Sample records for angayuqaq oscar kawagley

  1. Oscar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lied, Nils

    The true story of Oscar, an Arctic husky who had been a sledge dog in Antarctica, is told for readers aged 10 to 12 years. The author, Oscar's long-time master, visits Oscar at the Melbourne zoo as the story begins. He recounts some of his memories of Oscar, including a number of expeditions, and Oscar's fight to remain "king dog" of the…

  2. OSCAR a Matlab based optical FFT code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degallaix, Jérôme

    2010-05-01

    Optical simulation softwares are essential tools for designing and commissioning laser interferometers. This article aims to introduce OSCAR, a Matlab based FFT code, to the experimentalist community. OSCAR (Optical Simulation Containing Ansys Results) is used to simulate the steady state electric fields in optical cavities with realistic mirrors. The main advantage of OSCAR over other similar packages is the simplicity of its code requiring only a short time to master. As a result, even for a beginner, it is relatively easy to modify OSCAR to suit other specific purposes. OSCAR includes an extensive manual and numerous detailed examples such as simulating thermal aberration, calculating cavity eigen modes and diffraction loss, simulating flat beam cavities and three mirror ring cavities. An example is also provided about how to run OSCAR on the GPU of modern graphic cards instead of the CPU, making the simulation up to 20 times faster.

  3. Oscar Buneman, a personal remembrance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    Oscar Buneman, professor emeritus of electrical engineering at Stanford University and significant contributor to the fields of numerical analysis, plasma electrodynamics, and fundamental electromagnetic theory, died in his sleep on January 24, 1993. Numerous tributes to his memory have been published; however, I would like to concentrate on my own marvelous experiences with him. I knew Oscar Buneman through his interesting lectures at the International School for Space Simulation (ISSS) II, held in Kauai, Hawaii, in 1985. Later during ISSS III, held in France in 1987, Oscar was my instructor for the practical courses. I enjoyed his experienced guidance on the 1-D electrostatic code and developed a close relationship with him. After this course, I presented a poster on a 3-D magnetostatic simulation of whistler waves driven by an electron beam a a symposium in Beaulieu-sur-Mer, France. A friend told me that Oscar Buneman had attended my poster session and had said that he had also done a similar model. After the 1987 Fall AGU Meeting in San Francisco, I met Oscar Buneman at Stanford University. He was interested in my 3-D magnetostatic simulation of Whistler waves.

  4. OSCAR4: a flexible architecture for chemical text-mining.

    PubMed

    Jessop, David M; Adams, Sam E; Willighagen, Egon L; Hawizy, Lezan; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2011-10-14

    The Open-Source Chemistry Analysis Routines (OSCAR) software, a toolkit for the recognition of named entities and data in chemistry publications, has been developed since 2002. Recent work has resulted in the separation of the core OSCAR functionality and its release as the OSCAR4 library. This library features a modular API (based on reduction of surface coupling) that permits client programmers to easily incorporate it into external applications. OSCAR4 offers a domain-independent architecture upon which chemistry specific text-mining tools can be built, and its development and usage are discussed.

  5. OSCAR4: a flexible architecture for chemical text-mining

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Open-Source Chemistry Analysis Routines (OSCAR) software, a toolkit for the recognition of named entities and data in chemistry publications, has been developed since 2002. Recent work has resulted in the separation of the core OSCAR functionality and its release as the OSCAR4 library. This library features a modular API (based on reduction of surface coupling) that permits client programmers to easily incorporate it into external applications. OSCAR4 offers a domain-independent architecture upon which chemistry specific text-mining tools can be built, and its development and usage are discussed. PMID:21999457

  6. Oscar F. Smith Middle School: One Extra Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article features Oscar F. Smith Middle School, a challenging school in Chesapeake, Virginia. When Principal Linda Scott exclaims, "Oscar F. Smith Middle School is "hot"!" to visitors, she is not referring to the inside temperature of the bustling school of grades 6-8 located in the historic South Norfolk borough of…

  7. Ages of Oscar-Winning Best Actors and Actresses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard; Davis, Gretchen

    1990-01-01

    Presents an activity considering whether a difference exists in the age of Oscar winners. Describes how to draw a stem plot and a box plot as an example of implementing the recommendations of the NCTM Standards. Provides tables showing the name, movie titles, and ages of the Oscar winners since 1928. (YP)

  8. OSCAR API for Real-Time Low-Power Multicores and Its Performance on Multicores and SMP Servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Keiji; Mase, Masayoshi; Mikami, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Shirako, Jun; Kasahara, Hironori

    OSCAR (Optimally Scheduled Advanced Multiprocessor) API has been designed for real-time embedded low-power multicores to generate parallel programs for various multicores from different vendors by using the OSCAR parallelizing compiler. The OSCAR API has been developed by Waseda University in collaboration with Fujitsu Laboratory, Hitachi, NEC, Panasonic, Renesas Technology, and Toshiba in an METI/NEDO project entitled "Multicore Technology for Realtime Consumer Electronics." By using the OSCAR API as an interface between the OSCAR compiler and backend compilers, the OSCAR compiler enables hierarchical multigrain parallel processing with memory optimization under capacity restriction for cache memory, local memory, distributed shared memory, and on-chip/off-chip shared memory; data transfer using a DMA controller; and power reduction control using DVFS (Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling), clock gating, and power gating for various embedded multicores. In addition, a parallelized program automatically generated by the OSCAR compiler with OSCAR API can be compiled by the ordinary OpenMP compilers since the OSCAR API is designed on a subset of the OpenMP. This paper describes the OSCAR API and its compatibility with the OSCAR compiler by showing code examples. Performance evaluations of the OSCAR compiler and the OSCAR API are carried out using an IBM Power5+ workstation, an IBM Power6 high-end SMP server, and a newly developed consumer electronics multicore chip RP2 by Renesas, Hitachi and Waseda. From the results of scalability evaluation, it is found that on an average, the OSCAR compiler with the OSCAR API can exploit 5.8 times speedup over the sequential execution on the Power5+ workstation with eight cores and 2.9 times speedup on RP2 with four cores, respectively. In addition, the OSCAR compiler can accelerate an IBM XL Fortran compiler up to 3.3 times on the Power6 SMP server. Due to low-power optimization on RP2, the OSCAR compiler with the OSCAR API

  9. Structural basis for collagen recognition by the immune receptor OSCAR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long; Hinerman, Jennifer M; Blaszczyk, Michal; Miller, Jeanette L C; Conrady, Deborah G; Barrow, Alexander D; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Herr, Andrew B

    2016-02-04

    The osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is a collagen-binding immune receptor with important roles in dendritic cell maturation and activation of inflammatory monocytes as well as in osteoclastogenesis. The crystal structure of the OSCAR ectodomain is presented, both free and in complex with a consensus triple-helical peptide (THP). The structures revealed a collagen-binding site in each immunoglobulin-like domain (D1 and D2). The THP binds near a predicted collagen-binding groove in D1, but a more extensive interaction with D2 is facilitated by the unusually wide D1-D2 interdomain angle in OSCAR. Direct binding assays, combined with site-directed mutagenesis, confirm that the primary collagen-binding site in OSCAR resides in D2, in marked contrast to the related collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1). Monomeric OSCAR D1D2 binds to the consensus THP with a KD of 28 µM measured in solution, but shows a higher affinity (KD 1.5 μM) when binding to a solid-phase THP, most likely due to an avidity effect. These data suggest a 2-stage model for the interaction of OSCAR with a collagen fibril, with transient, low-affinity interactions initiated by the membrane-distal D1, followed by firm adhesion to the primary binding site in D2. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Telemetry Data Collection from Oscar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Paul C.; Horan, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the design, configuration, and operation of a satellite station built for the Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Laboratory in the Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Engineering at New Mexico State University (NMSU). This satellite station consists of a computer-controlled antenna tracking system, 2m/70cm transceiver, satellite tracking software, and a demodulator. The satellite station receives satellite,telemetry, allows for voice communications, and will be used in future classes. Currently this satellite station is receiving telemetry from an amateur radio satellite, UoSAT-OSCAR-11. Amateur radio satellites are referred to as Orbiting Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio (OSCAR) satellites as discussed in the next section.

  11. Evaluation of OSCAR ocean surface current product in the tropical Indian Ocean using in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikhakolli, Rajesh; Sharma, Rashmi; Basu, Sujit; Gohil, B. S.; Sarkar, Abhijit; Prasad, K. V. S. R.

    2013-02-01

    The OSCAR (ocean surface current analysis real-time), which is a product derived from various satellite observations, has been evaluated in the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) in two different ways. First, the OSCAR-derived monthly climatology has been compared with available drifter-derived climatology in the TIO. From the comparison of the two climatologies, one can infer that OSCAR product is able to capture the variabilities of the well-known surface current systems in the TIO reasonably well. Fourier analysis of the major current systems, as reproduced by OSCAR, shows that the dominant annual and semiannual periodicities, known to exist in these systems, have been faithfully picked up by OSCAR. Next, the evaluation has been carried out by comparing the OSCAR currents with currents measured by moored buoys. The zonal component of OSCAR-current is in good agreement with corresponding component of buoy-observed current with a correlation exceeding 0.7, while the match between the meridional components is poorer. The locations of the peaks of the mean and eddy kinetic energies are matching in both the climatologies, although the peak in the drifter climatology is stronger than the same in the OSCAR product. Finally, an important feature of Indian Ocean circulation, namely the reverse Wyrtki jet, occurring during anomalous dipole years, has been well-reproduced by OSCAR currents.

  12. Observable Social Cognition: A Rating Scale (OSCARS): An Interview-Based Assessment for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Kristin M.; Combs, Dennis R.; Gibson, Clare M.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Roberts, David L.; Penn, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with schizophrenia consistently show impairments in social cognition (SC). SC has become a potential treatment target due to its association with functional outcomes. An alternative method of assessment is to administer an observer-based scale incorporating an informant’s “first hand” impressions in ratings. Methods The present study used the Observable Social Cognition: A Rating Scale (OSCARS) in 62 outpatients and 50 non-psychiatric controls (NPCs) to assess performance in domains of SC (e.g. emotion perception, theory of mind). Results The OSCARS demonstrated sufficient internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Construct validity was assessed through an exploratory factor analysis. Patient OSCARS indices were not significantly correlated with measures of SC with the exception of aggressive attributional style. Individuals with less impairment in SC reacted more aggressively to ambiguous situations. NPC OSCARS were significantly correlated with measures of theory of mind and attributional style. In a combined sample of patients and controls, six of eight items were significantly correlated with the SC task assessing the same domain, providing modest evidence of convergent validity. In patients, the OSCARS was significantly correlated with measures of functional outcome and neurocognition. Lastly, the OSCARS was found to be significantly associated with functional outcome after the influence of objective measures of SC was statistically removed. Conclusions The present study provides preliminary evidence that the OSCARS may be useful for clinicians in collecting data about patients’ potential real-world SC deficits, in turn increasing the degree to which these impairments may be targeted in treatment. PMID:25675960

  13. The Feasibility of "oscar" as AN Information System for Sustainable Rehabilitation of Built Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, C.; Rouillard, C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper aims to examine the feasibility of the Online Sustainable Conservation Assistance Resource (OSCAR) as an information system and framework to help find appropriate ways to improve the sustainable performance of heritage buildings in North America. The paper reviews the need for holistic comprehensive authoritative information in the field of sustainable conservation, how OSCAR addresses this gap, the OSCAR workflow, and how it was used in two case studies. It was found that OSCAR has potential to become a practical educational tool and design aide to address the sustainable performance of heritage buildings. The paper contributes to the discourse on sustainable conservation by examining resources and tools which address the need for holistic retrofit approaches. The findings will be useful to educators and professionals in the fields of sustainable design and heritage conservation.

  14. Rapid deletion production in fungi via Agrobacterium mediated transformation of OSCAR deletion contructs.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Precise deletion of gene(s) of interest, while leaving the rest of the genome unchanged, provides the ideal product to determine that particular gene’s function in the living organism. In this protocol we describe the OSCAR method of precise and rapid deletion plasmid construction. OSCAR relies on t...

  15. The renovation of Madison's Oscar Mayer Theater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Joseph W. A.; Calamia, Paul T.

    2002-05-01

    Originally opened in 1928 as the Capitol Theatre, the Oscar Mayer Theatre in Madison, WI underwent substantial renovation in 1980 to support its current performance program. The theatre is now home to the Madison Symphony and the Madison Opera, and is used for ballet, touring shows, and popular concerts as well. As part of the ongoing Overture Project which will transform the theatre's home, the Madison Civic Center, into the Overture Center, the Oscar Mayer Theatre will be further improved to support its new role. In this paper we will discuss the reasoning behind the upcoming renovation within the context of the Overture Project, we will describe the pending architectural modifications to the theatre, and we will discuss the intended changes in acoustics. Computer modeling results will also be presented for the existing and renovated conditions.

  16. Oxidizing and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains - OSCAR data report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Benkovitz, C.M.; Evans, V.A.; Tichler, J.L.

    The organization of this report is as follows: Chapter 1 presents a description of the OSCAR experiment, including its objectives, design, and field deployment. Chapter 2 presents the OSCAR Central Data Coordination function and summarizes the tasks needed to compile each data set. Chapters 3 through 6 address each of the four OSCAR events. A synoptic description of each event is presented in these chapters, followed by a summary of the data captured during the event. Chapter 3 and Appendices C-G then present detailed tabular and graphical displays of the data captured during this event by the intermediate-density precipitation chemistrymore » network, the BNL aircraft and the surface air chemistry measurements conducted by BNL and by state/province agency networks. Data from the high-density precipitation chemistry network are being presented in a separate series of reports by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Detailed displays of the data for events 2 to 4 have not been included in this report; however, selected portions could be developed for interested parties.« less

  17. Neuropsychological Thoughts, Then and Now: A Tribute to Oscar Marin.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Karalyn E

    2015-09-01

    This brief paper, inspired by an invitation to acknowledge and celebrate Oscar Marin's great contributions to cognitive neurology and neuropsychology, reviews the case of a patient, T.P., who had significant deficits of naming, reading, and spelling. I first studied and reported this patient 35 years ago, in 1979, when I was significantly influenced by the work of Oscar Marin and his colleagues. I have recently had the unusual opportunity to do some brief reassessment of T.P.'s current (2015) cognitive abilities, and to reassess the interpretations that I had given to her pattern of impairment in the initial studies. I suggest that advances over the last decade or so-in theorizing about, and connectionist modeling of, reading and spelling disorders-enable a more coherent account of T.P.'s acquired anomia, dyslexia, and dysgraphia, and the relationships among them.

  18. Comparing Staffing Levels in the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System with the Medicaid Cost Report Data: Are Differences Systematic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kash, Bita A.; Hawes, Catherine; Phillips, Charles D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study had two goals: (a) to assess the validity of the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) staffing data by comparing them to staffing measures from audited Medicaid Cost Reports and (b) to identify systematic differences between facilities that over-report or underreport staffing in the OSCAR. Design and Methods: We…

  19. OSCAR: A new modular device for the identification and correlation of low energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Lombardo, I.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.; Ausanio, G.; Ordine, A.; Miranda, M.; De Luca, M.; Alba, R.; Augey, L.; Barlini, S.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Bruno, M.; Camaiani, A.; Casini, G.; Chbihi, A.; Cicerchia, M.; Cinausero, M.; Fabris, D.; Faible, Q.; Francalanza, L.; Frankland, J. D.; Grassi, L.; Gramegna, F.; Gruyer, D.; Kordyasz, A. J.; Kozik, T.; LaTorre, R.; Le Neindre, N.; Lopez, O.; Marchi, T.; Morelli, L.; Ottanelli, P.; Parlog, M.; Pastore, G.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Santonocito, D.; Stefanini, A. A.; Tortone, G.; Valdrè, S.; Vient, E.

    2018-01-01

    A new modular and high versatility hodoscope, OSCAR, has been developed and characterized. The aim of this hodoscope is to work as an ancillary detector of present large acceptance heavy ion detectors in specific angular regions where low thresholds and high granularities are needed. We discuss the capabilities of OSCAR in the ΔE-E identification of very low energy light particles, providing a precise map of the thickness uniformity of the ΔE (SSSSD, 20 μm) stage and showing how the thickness gradient affects the identification of particles. Energy spectra of light identified particles produced in Ca+Ca collisions at 35AMeV are used to investigate isospin transport phenomena involving the emission of low energy particles from the quasi-target (QT) source in semi-peripheral nuclear collisions. The possibility to explore particle-particle correlations are also discussed.

  20. Morality's ugly implications in Oscar Wilde's fairy tales.

    PubMed

    Jones, Justin T

    2011-01-01

    In Oscar Wilde's two volumes of fairy tales, "The Happy Prince" and Other Tales (1888) and A House of Pomegranates (1891), many central characters meet with premature death or physical disfigurement after learning a bourgeois moral lesson. In an attempt to explain this unconventional phenomenon in the fairy tale tradition, this essay examines Wilde's stories through the lens of his aesthetic ideology and demonstrates how the superficial morality of the Victorian bourgeoisie corrodes each tale's aesthetic integrity, causing the characters to either deny morality outright, assume the guise of Christian philanthropy, or die as the result of their moral reformation.

  1. OSCAR/Surface: Metadata for the WMO Integrated Observing System WIGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klausen, Jörg; Pröscholdt, Timo; Mannes, Jürg; Cappelletti, Lucia; Grüter, Estelle; Calpini, Bertrand; Zhang, Wenjian

    2016-04-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Integrated Global Observing System (WIGOS) is a key WMO priority underpinning all WMO Programs and new initiatives such as the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). It does this by better integrating WMO and co-sponsored observing systems, as well as partner networks. For this, an important aspect is the description of the observational capabilities by way of structured metadata. The 17th Congress of the Word Meteorological Organization (Cg-17) has endorsed the semantic WIGOS metadata standard (WMDS) developed by the Task Team on WIGOS Metadata (TT-WMD). The standard comprises of a set of metadata classes that are considered to be of critical importance for the interpretation of observations and the evolution of observing systems relevant to WIGOS. The WMDS serves all recognized WMO Application Areas, and its use for all internationally exchanged observational data generated by WMO Members is mandatory. The standard will be introduced in three phases between 2016 and 2020. The Observing Systems Capability Analysis and Review (OSCAR) platform operated by MeteoSwiss on behalf of WMO is the official repository of WIGOS metadata and an implementation of the WMDS. OSCAR/Surface deals with all surface-based observations from land, air and oceans, combining metadata managed by a number of complementary, more domain-specific systems (e.g., GAWSIS for the Global Atmosphere Watch, JCOMMOPS for the marine domain, the WMO Radar database). It is a modern, web-based client-server application with extended information search, filtering and mapping capabilities including a fully developed management console to add and edit observational metadata. In addition, a powerful application programming interface (API) is being developed to allow machine-to-machine metadata exchange. The API is based on an ISO/OGC-compliant XML schema for the WMDS using the Observations and Measurements (ISO19156) conceptual model. The purpose of the

  2. Reconstruction and downscaling of Eastern Mediterranean OSCAR satellite surface current data using DINEOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaidis, Andreas; Stylianou, Stavros; Georgiou, Georgios; Hajimitsis, Diofantos; Gravanis, Elias; Akylas, Evangelos

    2015-04-01

    During the last decade, Rixen (2005) and Alvera-Azkarate (2010) presented the DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions) method, a EOF-based technique to reconstruct missing data in satellite images. The application of DINEOF method, proved to provide relative success in various experimental trials (Wang and Liu, 2013; Nikolaidis et al., 2013;2014), and tends to be an effective and computationally affordable solution, on the problem of data reconstruction, for missing data from geophysical fields, such as chlorophyll-a, sea surface temperatures or salinity and geophysical fields derived from satellite data. Implementation of this method in a GIS system will provide with a more complete, integrated approach, permitting the expansion of the applicability over various aspects. This may be especially useful in studies where various data of different kind, have to be examined. For this purpose, in this study we have implemented and present a GIS toolbox that aims to automate the usage of the algorithm, incorporating the DINEOF codes provided by GHER (GeoHydrodynamics and Environment Research Group of University of Liege) into the ArcGIS®. ArcGIS® is a well known standard on Geographical Information Systems, used over the years for various remote sensing procedures, in sea and land environment alike. A case-study of filling the missing satellite derived current data in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea area, for a monthly period is analyzed, as an example for the effectiveness and simplicity of the usage of this toolbox. The specific study focuses to OSCAR satellite data (http://www.oscar.noaa.gov/) collected by NOAA/NESDIS Operational Surface Current Processing and Data Center, from the respective products of OSCAR Project Office Earth and Space Research organization, that provides free online access to unfiltered (1/3 degree) resolution. All the 5-day mean products data coverage were successfully reconstructed. KEY WORDS: Remote Sensing, Cyprus

  3. View looking down to the Oscar S. Straus Memorial Fountain. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking down to the Oscar S. Straus Memorial Fountain. The monument was authorized by Congress in 1927 and dedicated in 1947. It consists of the fountain and two groups of statues, Religious Freedom and Reason. It was disassembled in 1991 and reinstalled after the construction of the Ronald Reagan Building and the International Trade Center. The rededication took place in 1998 and the fountain is located near the west entrance of the building complex. - Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. Oscar Riddle's Science, a Special Bird, & the Founding of the NABT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandervoort, Frances S.

    2013-01-01

    Oscar Riddle, born in Indiana in 1877, was an ardent evolutionist and a key player in the founding of the National Association of Biology Teachers in 1938. He studied heredity and behavior in domestic pigeons and doves with Charles O. Whitman of the University of Chicago, received his Ph.D. in zoology in 1907, and in 1912 began a long career at…

  5. Awareness tool for safe and responsible driving (OSCAR): a potential educational intervention for increasing interest, openness and knowledge about the abilities required and compensatory strategies among older drivers.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Audet, Thérèse; Gélinas, Isabelle; Bédard, Michel; Langlais, Marie-Ève; Therrien, France-Hélène; Renaud, Judith; Coallier, Jean-Claude; D'Amours, Monia

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to verify the impact of the awareness tool for safe and responsible driving (OSCAR) on older adults' (1) interest, openness, and knowledge about the abilities and compensatory strategies required for safe driving; (2) awareness of changes that have occurred in their own driving abilities; and (3) actual utilization of compensatory strategies. A preexperimental design, including a pretest (T0) and posttest (T1) 8 to 10 weeks after exposure to the intervention, was used with 48 drivers aged between 67 and 84. The participants had a valid driving license and drove at least once a week. Overall, the results demonstrate that OSCAR increased interest, openness, and knowledge about the abilities and compensatory strategies of older drivers (P <.01). After exposure to OSCAR, the majority of the participants confirmed that changes had occurred in at least one of their abilities. Moreover, half of the older drivers reported having started using 6 or more compensatory strategies. In summary, in addition to increasing older adults' interest, openness, and knowledge to discussion about driving, OSCAR also improved awareness of the changes that could negatively impact safe driving and enhanced utilization of compensatory strategies. While promoting safe driving and the prevention of crashes and injuries, this intervention could ultimately help older adults maintain or increase their transportation mobility. More studies are needed to further evaluate OSCAR and identify ways to improve its effectiveness.

  6. The Lessons Oscar Taught Us: Data Science and Media & Entertainment.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael; McClarren, Ryan; Gaughan, Conor

    2013-06-01

    Farsite Group, a data science firm based in Columbus, Ohio, launched a highly visible campaign in early 2013 to use predictive analytics to forecast the winners of the 85th Annual Academy Awards. The initiative was fun and exciting for the millions of Oscar viewers, but it also illustrated how data science could be further deployed in the media and entertainment industries. This article explores the current and potential use cases for big data and predictive analytics in those industries. It further discusses how the Farsite Forecast was built, as well as how the model was iterated, how the projections performed, and what lessons were learned in the process.

  7. Occupational self-coding and automatic recording (OSCAR): a novel web-based tool to collect and code lifetime job histories in large population-based studies.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Sara; Jarvis, Deborah; Young, Heather; Young, Alan; Allen, Naomi; Potts, James; Darnton, Andrew; Rushton, Lesley; Cullinan, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Objectives The standard approach to the assessment of occupational exposures is through the manual collection and coding of job histories. This method is time-consuming and costly and makes it potentially unfeasible to perform high quality analyses on occupational exposures in large population-based studies. Our aim was to develop a novel, efficient web-based tool to collect and code lifetime job histories in the UK Biobank, a population-based cohort of over 500 000 participants. Methods We developed OSCAR (occupations self-coding automatic recording) based on the hierarchical structure of the UK Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) 2000, which allows individuals to collect and automatically code their lifetime job histories via a simple decision-tree model. Participants were asked to find each of their jobs by selecting appropriate job categories until they identified their job title, which was linked to a hidden 4-digit SOC code. For each occupation a job title in free text was also collected to estimate Cohen's kappa (κ) inter-rater agreement between SOC codes assigned by OSCAR and an expert manual coder. Results OSCAR was administered to 324 653 UK Biobank participants with an existing email address between June and September 2015. Complete 4-digit SOC-coded lifetime job histories were collected for 108 784 participants (response rate: 34%). Agreement between the 4-digit SOC codes assigned by OSCAR and the manual coder for a random sample of 400 job titles was moderately good [κ=0.45, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.42-0.49], and improved when broader job categories were considered (κ=0.64, 95% CI 0.61-0.69 at a 1-digit SOC-code level). Conclusions OSCAR is a novel, efficient, and reasonably reliable web-based tool for collecting and automatically coding lifetime job histories in large population-based studies. Further application in other research projects for external validation purposes is warranted.

  8. Parallel processing of real-time dynamic systems simulation on OSCAR (Optimally SCheduled Advanced multiprocessoR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, Hironori; Honda, Hiroki; Narita, Seinosuke

    1989-01-01

    Parallel processing of real-time dynamic systems simulation on a multiprocessor system named OSCAR is presented. In the simulation of dynamic systems, generally, the same calculation are repeated every time step. However, we cannot apply to Do-all or the Do-across techniques for parallel processing of the simulation since there exist data dependencies from the end of an iteration to the beginning of the next iteration and furthermore data-input and data-output are required every sampling time period. Therefore, parallelism inside the calculation required for a single time step, or a large basic block which consists of arithmetic assignment statements, must be used. In the proposed method, near fine grain tasks, each of which consists of one or more floating point operations, are generated to extract the parallelism from the calculation and assigned to processors by using optimal static scheduling at compile time in order to reduce large run time overhead caused by the use of near fine grain tasks. The practicality of the scheme is demonstrated on OSCAR (Optimally SCheduled Advanced multiprocessoR) which has been developed to extract advantageous features of static scheduling algorithms to the maximum extent.

  9. Oscar Marin and the Creation of a Cognitive Neuropsychology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Posner, Michael I

    2015-09-01

    During the 1980s, the Cognitive Neuropsychology Laboratory at Good Samaritan Hospital, Portland, Oregon, made important strides in the study of brain injury. Created and headed by Oscar Marin and the author, in affiliation with the University of Oregon, the lab brought together students, fellows, and visiting experts in neurology, psychology, psychiatry, neuropsychology, neurobiology, neurophysiology, and computation. Their patient-focused collaborations produced groundbreaking research in language and its disorders, bradyphrenia, neglect, cerebellar function and impairment, and the psychology of music. The lab hosted the meeting that they documented in the influential 1985 book Attention and Performance XI: Mechanisms of Attention. The lab's members have gone on to lead distinguished careers and continue making major contributions to cognitive neuroscience.

  10. Indigenous Knowledge in the Sciences and a Practical Application in the Super Saturday Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settee, Priscilla

    This paper reviews books and research papers concerned with Indigenous science knowledge and its integration into school curricula and describes current efforts to bridge Western and Native science. "A Yupiaq World View: Implications for Cultural, Educational and Technological Adaptation in a Contemporary World" (Angayuqaq Oscar…

  11. Induced reproduction and early development histology of Oscar Astronotus ocellatus (Agassiz, 1831).

    PubMed

    Paes, Maria do Carmo Faria; Makino, Lilian Cristina; Vasquez, Leonardo Avendaño; Fernandes, João Batista Kochenborger; Valentin, Fernanda Nogueira; Nakaghi, Laura Satiko Okada

    2015-04-01

    Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus) is an important fish from the Amazon Basin that has great potential for fish farming, human consumption, sport fishing and fish keeping. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of two hormonal treatments on the induction of artificial reproduction in broodstock and to describe the histological development of embryos and larvae. Broodstocks were selected and induced using two different hormones: (i) extract of carp pituitary (ECP); and (ii) synthetic human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Spawnings were transferred to hatcheries, collected at pre-established times, processed and analysed by histology. Astronotus ocellatus did not respond well to induced reproduction. From 16 couples of breeding fish, only five out of the eight females released oocytes after the hormonal action time, three with hCG and two with ECP; just one male responded positively to hCG. Oscar eggs were oval, and semi-adhesive, the yolk contained granules, and egg diameter was approximately 1.65 ± 0.057 to 1.98 ± 0.038 mm. Development from the initial collection (IC) point until the total absorption of the yolk lasted 315 h, at an average temperature of 27.45 ± 2.13°C. Several events marked embryonic and larval development, including the formation of the optic cup, forebrain, otic vesicle and cephalic divisions. The newly hatched larvae had non-pigmented eyes, and a closed mouth and anus, as well as the presence of adhesive glands on the head. Larval development was characterized by formation of the heart, liver, gaseous bladder, gills, pronephros, brain, fins and also the digestive tract. These results provide important information for the rearing and reproduction of A. ocellatus.

  12. Oscar Renda Contracting Inc. Navajo Nation Crushing/Screening Operation: Coverage Under General Air Quality Permit for Stone Quarrying, Crushing and Screening Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Documents related to approved request for coverage under the Stone Quarrying, Crushing and Screening Facilities General Permit for Oscar Renda Contracting Inc. Navajo Nation Crushing/Screening Operation located in McKinley and San Juan Counties, NM.

  13. OSCAR: A Compact, Powerful and Versatile On Board Computer Based on LEON3 Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupat, Jean-Luc; Lefevre, Aurelien; Koebel, Franck

    2011-08-01

    Satellites are controlled via a platform On Board Computer (OBC) that manages different parameters (attitude, orbit, modes, temperatures ...) with respect to its payload mission (telecommunication, earth observation, scientific mission). The platform OBC is connected to the satellite and the ground control via digital links, and executes on board software.The main functions of a platform OBC are to provide the satellite flight segment with the following features: o Processing resources for the flight mission software o TM/TC services and interfaces with the RF communication chaino General communication services with the Avionicsand payload equipments through an on-board communication bus based on the MIL-1553B standard or CANo Time synchronization and distributiono Failure tolerant architecture based on the use of redounded reconfiguration units and redundancyimplementationFrom a hardware point of view, it groups a lot of digital functions usually dispatched on numerous chips (processor, co-processor, digital links IP ...) together. In order to reach an ultimate level of integration, Astrium has designed an ASIC gathering on a single chip all the required digital functions: the SCOC3 ASIC.Astrium has developed an OBC based on this SCOC3 ASIC: the OSCAR (Optimized Spacecraft Computer Architecture with Reconfiguration). It is now available off-the-shelf as the new OBC product family of Astrium.This paper presents the major innovations introduced by Astrium for SCOC3 and OSCAR with the objective to save cost and mass through a solution compatible with any class quality project, using a unique software development environment for user.

  14. Goldfish and oscars have comparable responsiveness to dipole stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauroth, Ines Eva; Mogdans, Joachim

    2009-12-01

    The relative roles of the fish lateral line and inner ear for the perception of hydrodynamic stimuli are poorly investigated. Here, we studied responsiveness to a 100 Hz vibrating sphere (dipole stimulus) of goldfish and oscars, two species that differ in peripheral lateral line morphology, inner ear morphology, mechanical linkage between inner ear and swim bladder, and inner ear sensitivity. We measured unconditioned dipole-evoked changes in breathing activity in still water and in the presence of a 5-cm s-1 background flow. In still water, individuals from both species responded to sound pressure levels (SPLs) between 92 and 109 dB SPL re 1 μPaRMS. Responsiveness was not affected by background flow or by temporary inactivation of the lateral line. The data suggest that fish with different lateral line and inner ear morphologies have similar sensitivities to vibrating sphere stimuli and can detect and respond to dipole sources equally well in still water and in moderate background flows. Moreover, behavioral responses were not dependent on a functional lateral line, suggesting that in this type of experiment, the inner ear is the dominant sense organ for the perception of hydrodynamic stimuli.

  15. OSCAR - Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The interdisciplinary OSCAR project is examining the heat and mass fluxes in the solid Earth and overlying ocean at the Costa Rica mid-ocean Ridge (CRR) in the Panama Basin. The 3500 m deep Panama basin is isolated from the wider Pacific Ocean below 2000 m by the Cocos and Carnegie Ridges except for a deep water channel along the Ecuador trench. This channel supplies cold abyssal water into the Basin at a rate of 0.35 Sv (million cubic metres per second)) at a temperature of 1.75°C. Within the basin the water is heated to 2°C. The energy for this heating is dominated by geothermal effects with a smaller contribution from mainly tidal induced mixing over the ridges. The main geophysical transect for the OSCAR survey links the CRR with the ODP 504B borehole which is drilled 2111 m into 5.9 Ma oceanic crust. Changes in the solid Earth properties from the CRR to 504B are mapped using a combination of seismic 2D- and 3D-refraction and synthetic-aperture reflection, magnetics, gravity, magnetotelluric data, swath bathymetry and heat-flow. Results show that the properties of layer 2 are variable and are more likely a function of changes in magma supply at the ridge rather than the effects of ageing. Of particular note is the abrupt change at 5 Ma. Older crust has a higher velocity and lower topography when compared with younger crust. Also the heat-flow over the older crust is largely through conduction whereas in the younger crust it is largely by advection. The physical oceanography data include conductivity temperature depth (CTD) casts, micro-structure casts, helium and other isotope data, together with seabed and moored temperature, pressure and Doppler current measurements. The inflowing water along the Ecuador trench initially mix with with the warmer water as it enters the basin. Mixing and heating continues as the water circulates into the western part of the basin where it shows no vertical density gradient for over 1000 m and an overall temperature increase

  16. The Role of Higher Education Institutions in Rural Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryden, John

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this paper has emerged from the work of Shelton (2000, 2003), Bernhardt, Kawagley and Hill (2000), Boylan and McSwan (1998), Bryden and Boylan (2004) and others on "place-based" and "consequential" education in rural areas, prompting the question: if place-based and consequential education is "good" for…

  17. Eprosartan-based hypertension therapy, systolic arterial blood pressure and cognitive function: analysis of Middle East data from the OSCAR study.

    PubMed

    Radaideh, Ghazi Ahmad; Choueiry, Patrick; Ismail, Amr; Eid, Elie; Berrou, Jean-Pascal; Sedefdjian, Armand; Sévenier, Frank; Pathak, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Studies have indicated a relationship between hypertension and cognitive function. The possible effect of antihypertensive therapy on cognitive disorders is therefore a matter of interest. The Observational Study on Cognitive function And SBP Reduction (OSCAR) was an open-label, multinational trial designed to evaluate the impact of eprosartan-based antihypertensive therapy on cognitive function in patients with essential hypertension. Eprosartan 600 mg/day for 6 months (with provision for additional medication as needed) was initiated in hypertensive subjects aged ≥ 50 years. A total of 853 patients in an intention-to-treat cohort from seven countries of the Middle East was identified for subgroup analysis. Arterial blood pressure was reduced significantly (P < 0.001) during the study: At the end of 6 months of eprosartan-based therapy, the mean (±SD) reduction from baseline was 32.1 ± 14.3/14.6.3 ± 8.6 mmHg (P < 0.001). Mean pulse pressure was reduced by 18.3 ± 13.1 mmHg (P < 0.0001 vs baseline). Blood pressure was normalized (systolic <140 mmHg and diastolic <90 mmHg) in 68.2% of patients. The overall mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score after 6 months of eprosartan-based therapy was one-point higher than at baseline (P < 0.001). MMSE score on completion of 6 months' follow-up was either unchanged or increased from baseline in 793 (93%) individuals and decreased in 60 (7%). Factors associated with stability of or improvement in cognitive function included MMSE score at baseline, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at baseline, and treatment-induced change in DBP. Results from the Middle East subgroup of OSCAR are supportive of the hypothesis that antihypertensive therapy based on angiotensin-receptor blocker therapy with eprosartan may be associated with preservation or improvement of cognitive function.

  18. The OSCAR experiment: using full-waveform inversion in the analysis of young oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverton, Akela; Morgan, Joanna; Wilson, Dean; Hobbs, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The OSCAR experiment aims to derive an integrated model to better explain the effects of heat loss and alteration by hydrothermal fluids, associated with the cooling of young oceanic crust at an axial ridge. High-resolution seismic imaging of the sediments and basaltic basement can be used to map fluid flow pathways between the oceanic crust and the surrounding ocean. To obtain these high-resolution images, we undertake full-waveform inversion (FWI), an advanced seismic imaging technique capable of resolving velocity heterogeneities at a wide range of length scales, from background trends to fine-scale geological/crustal detail, in a fully data-driven automated manner. This technology is widely used within the petroleum sector due to its potential to obtain high-resolution P-wave velocity models that lead to improvements in migrated seismic images of the subsurface. Here, we use the P-wave velocity model obtained from travel-time tomography as the starting model in the application of acoustic, time-domain FWI to a multichannel streamer field dataset acquired in the east Pacific along a profile between the Costa Rica spreading centre and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) borehole 504B, where the crust is approximately six million years old. FWI iteratively improves the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the predicted data and the field data. It seeks to find a high-fidelity velocity model that is capable of matching individual seismic waveforms of the original raw field dataset, with an initial focus on matching the low-frequency components of the early arriving energy. Quality assurance methods adopted during the inversion ensure convergence in the direction of the global minimum. We demonstrate that FWI is able to recover fine-scale, high-resolution velocity heterogeneities within the young oceanic crust along the profile. The highly resolved FWI velocity model is useful in the identification of the layer 2A/2B interface and low-velocity layers that

  19. Osmoregulation and muscle water control in vitro facing salinity stress of the Amazon fish Oscar Astronotus ocellatus (Cichlidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutierre, Silvia M. M.; Schulte, Jessica M.; Schofield, Pam; Prodocimo, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    Specimens of Oscar Astronotus ocellatus from a fish farm were abruptly submitted to salt stress of 14 ppt and 20 ppt, for 3 and 8 h to determine their plasma osmolality. Muscle wet body mass change in vitro was analyzed from control freshwater animals. Fish in 14 ppt presented no osmolality distress even after 8 h. In 20 ppt, a slight increase (10%) in plasma osmolality was observed for both times of exposure when compared to control fish. Muscle slices submitted in vitro to hyper-osmotic saline displayed decreased body mass after 75 min, and slices submitted to hypo-osmotic saline displayed increased body mass after 45 min when compared to control (isosmotic saline). These results reinforce A. ocellatus’s euryhalinity. The fish were able to regulate its internal medium and tolerate 14 ppt, but presented an intense osmotic challenge and low muscle hydration control when facing salinities of 20 ppt.

  20. Oscar: a portable prototype system for the study of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, Fabio; Rosoldi, Marco; Amato, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The study of the techniques for the exploitation of solar energy implies the knowledge of nature, ecosystem, biological factors and local climate. Clouds, fog, water vapor, and the presence of large concentrations of dust can significantly affect the way to exploit the solar energy. Therefore, a quantitative characterization of the impact of climate variability at the regional scale is needed to increase the efficiency and sustainability of the energy system. OSCAR (Observation System for Climate Application at Regional scale) project, funded in the frame of the PO FESR 2007-2013, aims at the design of a portable prototype system for the study of correlations among the trends of several Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) and the change in the amount of solar irradiance at the ground level. The final goal of this project is to provide a user-friendly low cost solution for the quantification of the impact of regional climate variability on the efficiency of solar cell and concentrators to improve the exploitation of natural sources. The prototype has been designed on the basis of historical measurements performed at CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (CIAO). Measurements from satellite and data from models have been also considered as ancillary to the study, above all, to fill in the gaps of existing datasets. In this work, the results outcome from the project activities will be presented. The results include: the design and implementation of the prototype system; the development of a methodology for the estimation of the impact of climate variability, mainly due to aerosol, cloud and water vapor, on the solar irradiance using the integration of the observations potentially provided by prototype; the study of correlation between the surface radiation, precipitation and aerosols transport. In particular, a statistical study will be presented to assess the impact of the atmosphere on the solar irradiance at the ground, quantifying the contribution due to aerosol and

  1. Oscar — Using Byte Pairs to Find File Type and Camera Make of Data Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karresand, Martin; Shahmehri, Nahid

    Mapping out the contents of fragmented storage media is hard if the file system has been corrupted, especially as the current forensic tools rely on meta information to do their job. If it was possible to find all fragments belonging to a certain file type, it would also be possible to recover a lost file. Such a tool could for example be used in the hunt for child pornography. The Oscar method identifies the file type of data fragments based solely on statistics calculated from their structure. The method does not need any meta data to work. We have previously used the byte frequency distribution and the rate of change between consecutive bytes as basis for the statistics, as well as calculating the 2-gram frequency distribution to create a model of different file types. This paper present a variant of the 2-gram method, in that it uses a dynamic smoothing factor. In this way we take the amount of data used to create the centroid into consideration. A previous experiment on file type identification is extended with .mp3 files reaching a detection rate of 76% with a false positives rate of 0.4%. We also use the method to identify the camera make used to capture a .jpg picture from a fragment of the picture. The result shows that we can clearly separate a picture fragment coming from a Fuji or Olympus cameras from a fragment of a picture of the other camera makes used in our test.

  2. Learning to Attend and Observe: Parent-Child Meaning Making in the Natural World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Ananda Maria

    Observation is a traditional form of learning and a scientific practice, and as such it plays a significant role in teaching and learning both inside and outside of schools. Recently, educational researchers and philosophers have called attention to the role of observation in scientific knowledge building (Brayboy & Castagno, 2008; Cajete, 2000; Datson & Lunbeck, 2011; Eberbach, 2009; Eberbach & Crowley, 2009; Kawagley, 2006; Norris, 1985; Smith & Reiser, 2005). These scholars have foregrounded the complexity of observation, particularly as it applies to inquiry practices in those domains which are heavily reliant on observation (Eberbach & Crowley, 2009; Maltese, Balliet, & Riggs, 2013; Smith & Reiser, 2005). My dissertation research examines how families with young children engage in the coordinated activity of observation during forest walks. I focus on the ways in which attentional practices support observational inquiry among parents and children between the ages of 5 to 7. Specifically, I examine how families coordinate attention and highlight features of the environment in order to make them observable. I use a mixed methods approach to investigate the range of interactional resources parents and children use as they engage in observation and learning about the natural world. Building on Indigenous scholarship (Cajete, 2000; Deloria & Wildcat, 2010; Kawagley, 2006), sociocultural theories and ecological approaches to development (Cole, 1996; Goodwin, 1994; Ingold, 2000; Rogoff, 2003) and conversation analysis (Heritage, 2008; Pomerantz & Fehr, 1997), I develop a taxonomy of forms of coordination and discuss how spatial arrangements and language work together to link attention, observations and explanations. This work further contributes to our understanding of the situated and cultural nature of learning and serves as a resource for the design of place-based learning environments that are based on the intellectual strengths and resources of diverse families.

  3. Preliminary Results of the GPS Flight Experiment on the High Earth Orbit AMSAT-OSCAR 40 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Michael C.; Bauer, Frank H.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Davis, Edward P.; Davis, George W.; Jackson, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    The GPS flight experiment on the High Earth Orbit (HEO) AMSAT-OSCAR 40 (AO-40) spacecraft was activated for a period of approximately six weeks between 25 September and 2 November, 2001, and the initial results have exciting implications for using GPS as a low-cost orbit determination sensor for future HEO missions. AO-40, an amateur radio satellite launched November 16, 2000, is currently in a low inclination, 1000 by 58,800 km altitude orbit. Although the GPS receiver was not initialized in any way, it regularly returned GPS observations from points all around the orbit. Raw signal to noise levels as high as 9 AMUs (Trimble Amplitude Measurement Units) or approximately 48 dB-Hz have been recorded at apogee, when the spacecraft was close to 60,000 km in altitude. On several occasions when the receiver was below the GPS constellation (below 20,000 krn altitude), observations were reported for GPS satellites tracked through side lobe transmissions. Although the receiver has not returned any point solutions, there has been at least one occasion when four satellites were tracked simultaneously, and this short arc of data was used to compute point solutions after the fact. These results are encouraging, especially considering the spacecraft is currently in a spin-stabilized attitude mode that narrows the effective field of view of the receiving antennas and adversely affects GPS tracking. Already AO-40 has demonstrated the feasibility of recording GPS observations in HEO using an unaided receiver. Furthermore, it is providing important information about the characteristics of GPS signals received by a spacecraft in a HEO, which has long been of interest to many in the GPS community. Based on the data returned so far, the tracking performance is expected to improve when the spacecraft is transitioned to a three axis stabilized, nadir pointing attitude in Summer, 2002.

  4. Danngarrd-Oscar events recorded in a terrestrial sequence in central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. C.; Geertsema, M.; Telka, A.; Mathewes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Danngarrd-Oscar events recorded in the GISP2 Greenland Ice Core. The increasingly dry and cold conditions indicated by the macrofossil assemblage likely reflect the growth of ice in the Coast Mountains that would reduce the availability of moisture to the Interior Plateau from Pacific air masses. This is confirmed by reconstruction of the growth of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet during the Late Wisconsinan based on published radiocarbon dates.

  5. Indoor air quality of a museum in a subtropical climate: the Oscar Niemeyer museum in Curitiba, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Ricardo H M; Carneiro, Barbara H B; Paralovo, Sarah L; Campos, Vania P; Tavares, Tania M; Evangelista, Heitor; Van Grieken, Rene; Godoi, Ana F L

    2013-05-01

    The assessment of damage to indoor cultural heritage, in particular by pollutants, is nowadays a major and growing concern for curators and conservators. Nevertheless, although many museums have been widely investigated in Europe, the effects of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in museums under tropical and subtropical climates and with different economic realities are still unclear. An important portion of the world's cultural heritage is currently in tropical countries where both human and financial resources for preserving museum collections are limited. Hence, our aim is to assess the damage that can be caused to the artwork by pollution in hot and humid environments, where air quality and microclimatic condition differences can cause deterioration. As a case study, particulate matter as well as gases were collected at the Oscar Niemeyer Museum (MON) in Curitiba, Brazil, where large modern and contemporary works of art are displayed. NO2, SO2, O3, Acetic Acid, Formic Acids and BTEX, in the ambient air, were sampled by means of passive diffusive sampling and their concentrations were determined by IC or GC-MS. The particulate matter was collected in bulk form and analyzed with the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and aethalometer. The chemical compositions of individual particles were quantitatively elucidated, including low-Z components like C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements, using automated electron probe microanalysis. The gaseous and particulate matter levels were then compared with the concentrations obtained for the same pollutants in other museums, located in places with different climates, and with some reference values provided by international cultural heritage conservation centers. Results are interpreted separately and as a whole with the specific aim of identifying compounds that could contribute to the chemical reactions taking place on the surfaces of artifacts and which could potentially cause irreversible damage to the

  6. Impact of data assimilation on ocean current forecasts in the Angola Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillipson, Luke; Toumi, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    The ocean current predictability in the data limited Angola Basin was investigated using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) with four-dimensional variational data assimilation. Six experiments were undertaken comprising a baseline case of the assimilation of salinity/temperature profiles and satellite sea surface temperature, with the subsequent addition of altimetry, OSCAR (satellite-derived sea surface currents), drifters, altimetry and drifters combined, and OSCAR and drifters combined. The addition of drifters significantly improves Lagrangian predictability in comparison to the baseline case as well as the addition of either altimetry or OSCAR. OSCAR assimilation only improves Lagrangian predictability as much as altimetry assimilation. On average the assimilation of either altimetry or OSCAR with drifter velocities does not significantly improve Lagrangian predictability compared to the drifter assimilation alone, even degrading predictability in some cases. When the forecast current speed is large, it is more likely that the combination improves trajectory forecasts. Conversely, when the currents are weaker, it is more likely that the combination degrades the trajectory forecast.

  7. Usability of clinical decision support system as a facilitator for learning the assistive technology adaptation process.

    PubMed

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Kuflik, Tsvi; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of Ontology Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for the assistive technology adaptation process, its impact on learning the matching process, and to determine the relationship between its usability and learnability. Two groups of expert and novice clinicians (total, n = 26) took part in this study. Each group filled out system usability scale (SUS) to evaluate OSCAR's usability. The novice group completed a learning questionnaire to assess OSCAR's effect on their ability to learn the matching process. Both groups rated OSCAR's usability as "very good", (M [SUS] = 80.7, SD = 11.6, median = 83.7) by the novices, and (M [SUS] = 81.2, SD = 6.8, median = 81.2) by the experts. The Mann-Whitney results indicated that no significant differences were found between the expert and novice groups in terms of OSCAR's usability. A significant positive correlation existed between the usability of OSCAR and the ability to learn the adaptation process (rs = 0.46, p = 0.04). Usability is an important factor in the acceptance of a system. The successful application of user-centered design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically in developing other systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Creating a CDSS with a focus on its usability is an important factor for its acceptance by its users. Successful usability outcomes can impact the learning process of the subject matter in general, and the AT prescription process in particular. The successful application of User-Centered Design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically. The study emphasizes the importance of close collaboration between the developers and

  8. 77 FR 62236 - National and Governmental Advisory Committees to the U.S. Representative to the Commission for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... CEC's 2013 Draft Operational Plan and learn about Tribal issues in North America. The meeting will... services for individuals with disabilities, please contact Oscar Carrillo at 202- 564-0347 or [email protected] . To request accommodation of a disability, please contact Oscar Carrillo, preferably at...

  9. A Conversational Intelligent Tutoring System to Automatically Predict Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Annabel; Crockett, Keeley; McLean, David; Edmonds, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a generic methodology and architecture for developing a novel conversational intelligent tutoring system (CITS) called Oscar that leads a tutoring conversation and dynamically predicts and adapts to a student's learning style. Oscar aims to mimic a human tutor by implicitly modelling the learning style during tutoring, and…

  10. Damage and Recovery of Hair Cells in Fish Canal (But Not Superficial) Neuromasts after Gentamicin Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Jiakun; Yan, Hong Young; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrating the presence of two types of sensory hair cells in the ear of a telcost fish (Astronotus ocellatus, the oscar) indicates that hair cell heterogeneity may exist not only in amniotic vertebrates but also in anamniotes. Here we report that a similar heterogeneity between hair cell types may also occur in the other mechanosensory organ of the oscar, the lateral line. We exposed oscars to the aminoglycoside (ototoxic) antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and found damaged sensory hair cells in one class of the lateral line receptors, the canal neuromasts, but not in the other class, the superficial neuromasts. This effect was not due to the canal environment. Moreover, new ciliary bundles on hair cells of the canal neuromasts were found after, and during, gentamicin exposure. The pattern of hair cell destruction and recovery in canal neuromasts is similar to that of type 1-like hair cells found in the striolar region of the utricle and lagena of the oscar after gentamicin treatment. These results suggest that the hair cells in the canal and superficial neuromasts may be similar to type 1-like and type 2 hair cells, respectively, in the fish ear.

  11. Genius begins at home: Shared social identity enhances the recognition of creative performance.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Niklas K; Haslam, S Alexander; Ryan, Michelle K; Millard, Kathryn

    2017-11-01

    The present research examines the extent to which the recognition of creative performance is structured by social group membership. It does this by analysing the award of merit prizes for Best Actor and Actress in a Leading Role for the international award of US-based Oscars and British-based BAFTAs since BAFTA's inception of this category in 1968. For both awards, the exclusive assessment criterion is the quality of artists' performance in the international arena. Results show that US artists won a greater proportion of Oscars than BAFTAs (odds ratio: 2.10), whereas British artists won a greater proportion of BAFTAs than Oscars (OR: 2.26). Furthermore, results support the hypothesis that these patterns are more pronounced as the diagnostic value of a quality indicator increases - that is, in the conferring of actual awards rather than nominations. Specifically, US artists won a greater proportion of Oscar awards than nominations (OR: 1.77), while British artists won a greater proportion of BAFTA awards than nominations (OR: 1.62). Additional analyses show that the performances of in-group actors in movies portraying in-group culture (US culture in the case of Oscars, British culture in the case of BAFTAs) are more likely to be recognized than the performances of in-group actors in movies portraying the culture of other (out-)groups. These are the first data to provide clear evidence from the field that the recognition of exceptional creative performance is enhanced by shared social identity between perceivers and performers. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Performance of NACA Eight-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor Designed on the Basis of Airfoil Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1944-08-01

    TEE BASIS OF AIRFOIL THEORY By John T. Slnnette, Jr., Oscar W. Schey, and J. Austin King Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory Cleveland, Ohio FILE...efficiency can he designed by the proper application of airfoil theory. Aircraft Engine Research laboratory, Hational Advisory Committee for Aeronautlos...Basis of Airfoil Theory AUTHORS): Sinnette, John T.; Schey, Oscar W.; and others ORIGINATING AGENCY: Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory, Cleveland

  13. Male entertainment award winners are older than female winners.

    PubMed

    Gilberg, M; Hines, T

    2000-02-01

    It has been said that in the entertainment industry after a certain age women have a harder time being as successful as men. Four analyses of the ages of male and female Oscar winners, Oscar nominees, Emmy winners, and Grammy winners over the past 25 years showed that in all four groups women were, on the average, younger than the men. Two interpretations of these differences are delineated.

  14. Science and Technology for the Future Force. FY2006 Summer Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Panel Members Co-Chairs • Allen Adler • Gil Herrera • Charley Otstott Staff Assistant • Oscar Valent, ASA(ALT) Government Advisors • LTC(P) Keith Edwards...measures to cross- train/ educate personnel Transitioning Technology is a Contact Sport Technology transition from the S&T community to the acquisition...Members Co-Chairs • Allen Adler • Gil Herrera • Charley Otstott Staff Assistant • Oscar Valent, ASA(ALT) Government Advisors • LTC(P) Keith Edwards, ARCIC

  15. Methods of extending crop signatures from one area to another

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Efforts to develop a technology for signature extension during LACIE phases 1 and 2 are described. A number of haze and Sun angle correction procedures were developed and tested. These included the ROOSTER and OSCAR cluster-matching algorithms and their modifications, the MLEST and UHMLE maximum likelihood estimation procedures, and the ATCOR procedure. All these algorithms were tested on simulated data and consecutive-day LANDSAT imagery. The ATCOR, OSCAR, and MLEST algorithms were also tested for their capability to geographically extend signatures using LANDSAT imagery.

  16. Using Paleomagnetic, Geochemical and Structural Data to Recognize Post-metamorphic Tectonic Events in the Caledonide Terranes of Western Svalbard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, K.; Manby, G.; Nejbert, K.; Domańska Siuda, J.; Burzyński, M.

    2015-12-01

    A total of 170 oriented palaeomagnetic samples of Proterozoic-Lower Palaeozoic metacarbonates and metabasites from 28 sites in Hornsund and Oscar II Land, Western Spitsbergen (Fig. 1A) were investigated at the Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Geophysics . Petrographic and rock-magnetic analyses revealed that the ferromagnetic carriers are dominated by metamorphic pyrrhotite and Low-Ti magnetite. Simultaneous in situ laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar age determination of the samples indicate that a 426-380 Ma Caledonian sensu lato thermal overprint was followed by younger events in the 377-326 Ma and ca. 300 Ma intervals (Fig. 1B). The latter two ages appear to coincide with recently published seismic data indicating that Late Devonian - Carboniferous rifting was followed by similar crustal extension in the SW Barents shelf area in Late Carboniferous time. Published in situ palaeomagnetic directions from Hornsund area in SW Svalbard fit the Silurian sector of the Baltica reference path suggesting that the geometry of the sampled Caledonian Sofekammen Syncline was not modified during following Svalbardian or Eurekan deformation events (Fig. 1C). In contrast, palaeomagnetic directions obtained from Oscar II Land are distant from Caledonian sector of Baltica reference path (Fig. 1C). It is suggested here, that the most significant mechanism responsible for the rotation of the palaeomagnetic directions and modification of geometry of Caledonian tectonic structures of Oscar II Land was listric normal faulting related to the opening of the North Atlantic -Arctic Ocean Basins. Late Cretaceous- Early Tertiary Eurekan folding and thrust faulting appear to have had minor influence on the palaeomagnetic directions obtained. This study is part of the Polish National Science Centre - DEC 2011/03/D/ST10/05193 PALMAG 2012-2016 funded project . Fig. 1. A. Geological sketch map of Western Spitsbergen. B. Probability diagrams derived from insitu 40Ar/39Ar laser ablation age

  17. Optimal shortening of uniform covering arrays

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Valdez, Nelson; Avila-George, Himer; Carrizalez-Turrubiates, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Software test suites based on the concept of interaction testing are very useful for testing software components in an economical way. Test suites of this kind may be created using mathematical objects called covering arrays. A covering array, denoted by CA(N; t, k, v), is an N × k array over Zv={0,…,v-1} with the property that every N × t sub-array covers all t-tuples of Zvt at least once. Covering arrays can be used to test systems in which failures occur as a result of interactions among components or subsystems. They are often used in areas such as hardware Trojan detection, software testing, and network design. Because system testing is expensive, it is critical to reduce the amount of testing required. This paper addresses the Optimal Shortening of Covering ARrays (OSCAR) problem, an optimization problem whose objective is to construct, from an existing covering array matrix of uniform level, an array with dimensions of (N − δ) × (k − Δ) such that the number of missing t-tuples is minimized. Two applications of the OSCAR problem are (a) to produce smaller covering arrays from larger ones and (b) to obtain quasi-covering arrays (covering arrays in which the number of missing t-tuples is small) to be used as input to a meta-heuristic algorithm that produces covering arrays. In addition, it is proven that the OSCAR problem is NP-complete, and twelve different algorithms are proposed to solve it. An experiment was performed on 62 problem instances, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of solving the OSCAR problem to facilitate the construction of new covering arrays. PMID:29267343

  18. The Use of Satellites by Schools and Colleges, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Provides information about and suggestions for using orbital satellite-carrying amateur radio (OSCAR) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites for instructional purposes. (JN)

  19. Team performance in resuscitation teams: Comparison and critique of two recently developed scoring tools☆

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Anthony; Walker, Susanna T.; Brett, Stephen J.; Vincent, Charles; Sevdalis, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim Following high profile errors resulting in patient harm and attracting negative publicity, the healthcare sector has begun to focus on training non-technical teamworking skills as one way of reducing the rate of adverse events. Within the area of resuscitation, two tools have been developed recently aiming to assess these skills – TEAM and OSCAR. The aims of the study reported here were:1.To determine the inter-rater reliability of the tools in assessing performance within the context of resuscitation.2.To correlate scores of the same resuscitation teams episodes using both tools, thereby determining their concurrent validity within the context of resuscitation.3.To carry out a critique of both tools and establish how best each one may be utilised. Methods The study consisted of two phases – reliability assessment; and content comparison, and correlation. Assessments were made by two resuscitation experts, who watched 24 pre-recorded resuscitation simulations, and independently rated team behaviours using both tools. The tools were critically appraised, and correlation between overall score surrogates was assessed. Results Both OSCAR and TEAM achieved high levels of inter-rater reliability (in the form of adequate intra-class coefficients) and minor significant differences between Wilcoxon tests. Comparison of the scores from both tools demonstrated a high degree of correlation (and hence concurrent validity). Finally, critique of each tool highlighted differences in length and complexity. Conclusion Both OSCAR and TEAM can be used to assess resuscitation teams in a simulated environment, with the tools correlating well with one another. We envisage a role for both tools – with TEAM giving a quick, global assessment of the team, but OSCAR enabling more detailed breakdown of the assessment, facilitating feedback, and identifying areas of weakness for future training. PMID:22561464

  20. Nursing home staffing requirements and input substitution: effects on housekeeping, food service, and activities staff.

    PubMed

    Bowblis, John R; Hyer, Kathryn

    2013-08-01

    To study the effect of minimum nurse staffing requirements on the subsequent employment of nursing home support staff. Nursing home data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System merged with state nurse staffing requirements. Facility-level housekeeping, food service, and activities staff levels are regressed on nurse staffing requirements and other controls using fixed effect panel regression. OSCAR surveys from 1999 to 2004. Increases in state direct care and licensed nurse staffing requirements are associated with decreases in the staffing levels of all types of support staff. Increased nursing home nurse staffing requirements lead to input substitution in the form of reduced support staffing levels. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  1. Who is teaching what, when? An evolving online tool to manage dental curricula.

    PubMed

    Walton, Joanne N

    2014-03-01

    There are numerous issues in the documentation and ongoing development of health professions curricula. It seems that curriculum information falls quickly out of date between accreditation cycles, while students and faculty members struggle in the meantime with the "hidden curriculum" and unintended redundancies and gaps. Beyond knowing what is in the curriculum lies the frustration of timetabling learning in a transparent way while allowing for on-the-fly changes and improvements. The University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry set out to develop a curriculum database to answer the simple but challenging question "who is teaching what, when?" That tool, dubbed "OSCAR," has evolved to not only document the dental curriculum, but as a shared instrument that also holds the curricula and scheduling detail of the dental hygiene degree and clinical graduate programs. In addition to providing documentation ranging from reports for accreditation to daily information critical to faculty administrators and staff, OSCAR provides faculty and students with individual timetables and pushes updates via text, email, and calendar changes. It incorporates reminders and session resources for students and can be updated by both faculty members and staff. OSCAR has evolved into an essential tool for tracking, scheduling, and improving the school's curricula.

  2. Wilde Pomegranates: The Ghost of a Room and the Soul of a Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoban, Russell

    1997-01-01

    Reflects on the author's childhood reading experiences and explorations of his father's library. Examines one book in particular, Oscar Wilde's collection of stories entitled, "A House of Pomegranates." (TB)

  3. Nursing Home Staffing Requirements and Input Substitution: Effects on Housekeeping, Food Service, and Activities Staff

    PubMed Central

    Bowblis, John R; Hyer, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of minimum nurse staffing requirements on the subsequent employment of nursing home support staff. Data Sources Nursing home data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System merged with state nurse staffing requirements. Study Design Facility-level housekeeping, food service, and activities staff levels are regressed on nurse staffing requirements and other controls using fixed effect panel regression. Data Extraction Method OSCAR surveys from 1999 to 2004. Principal Findings Increases in state direct care and licensed nurse staffing requirements are associated with decreases in the staffing levels of all types of support staff. Conclusions Increased nursing home nurse staffing requirements lead to input substitution in the form of reduced support staffing levels. PMID:23445455

  4. 17. Missile mural, third flight of stairs. Lyon Whiteman ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Missile mural, third flight of stairs. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Minuteman Missile Launch Facility Trainer T-12, Northeast of Oscar-01 Missile Alert Facility, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  5. 12. Hard HF transmitter antenna, view toward west. Lyon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Hard HF transmitter antenna, view toward west. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  6. 11. Hard HF receiver antenna, view towards east. Lyon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Hard HF receiver antenna, view towards east. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  7. 78 FR 38336 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ..., President (QI), Stephen B. Schwark, Treasurer, Application Type: License Transfer to EFL Container Lines...., Suite K, Mobile, AL 36609, Officers: Thomas (Mac) H. McPhillips IV, Assistant Vice President (QI), Oscar...

  8. ALMA's long look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morata, Oscar; Huang, Ted

    2017-06-01

    ALMA's Band 1 receivers will open up the 7 mm window to the 66 antennas on Chajnantor Plateau. Oscar Morata and Ted Huang relate the expected delivery schedule and science goals for these instruments.

  9. 18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards west. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  10. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Buneman, R.; Barker, R.J.; Peratt, A.L.

    Highlights are presented from among the many contributions made by Oscar Buneman to the science, engineering, and mathematics communities. Emphasis is placed not only on ''what'' this pioneer of computational plasma physics contributed but, of equal importance, on ''how'' he made his contributions. Therein lies the difference between technical competence and scientific greatness. The picture which emerges illustrates the open-mindedness, enthusiasm, intellectual/physical stamina, imagination, intellectual integrity, interdisciplinary curiosity, and deep humanity that made this individual unique. As a gentleman and a scholar, he had mastered the art of making cold technical facts ''come to life.'' Oscar Buneman died peacefully atmore » his home near Stanford University on Sunday, January 24th, 1993. The profound influence he has had on many of his colleagues guarantees his immortality.« less

  11. Optoelectronic Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-07

    plasmon laser, superlens, hyperlens, plasmonic solitons, slot waveguide, “ Metasurface ” collimator etc "Oscar for Inventors," the Lemelson-MIT...Operating beyond the diffraction limit Nonlinear effects Metamaterials/TrOptics / Metasurfaces Nanofabrication gernot.pomrenke

  12. 10. 351st Missile Wing Maintenance insignia on wall opposite the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 351st Missile Wing Maintenance insignia on wall opposite the entrance. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Minuteman Missile Launch Facility Trainer T-12, Northeast of Oscar-01 Missile Alert Facility, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  13. The Rhetoric That Dare Not Speak Its Name.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Suggests how Oscar Wilde uses "linguistic armory" to force the question of the apparent "normal relationships" between "signifieds" and "signifiers" that have led to the folly of belief in the absoluteness of such "normal relationships." (RS)

  14. A Ghostly Symposium on the Value of the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    In mock interviews with Mark Twain, Oscar Wilde, Plato, and George Santayana, the value of the arts in education is discussed. The author suggests this mock interview technique as a method for teaching other topics. (KC)

  15. Using Workflows to Explore and Optimise Named Entity Recognition for Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, BalaKrishna; Hawizy, Lezan; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tsujii, Junichi; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry text mining tools should be interoperable and adaptable regardless of system-level implementation, installation or even programming issues. We aim to abstract the functionality of these tools from the underlying implementation via reconfigurable workflows for automatically identifying chemical names. To achieve this, we refactored an established named entity recogniser (in the chemistry domain), OSCAR and studied the impact of each component on the net performance. We developed two reconfigurable workflows from OSCAR using an interoperable text mining framework, U-Compare. These workflows can be altered using the drag-&-drop mechanism of the graphical user interface of U-Compare. These workflows also provide a platform to study the relationship between text mining components such as tokenisation and named entity recognition (using maximum entropy Markov model (MEMM) and pattern recognition based classifiers). Results indicate that, for chemistry in particular, eliminating noise generated by tokenisation techniques lead to a slightly better performance than others, in terms of named entity recognition (NER) accuracy. Poor tokenisation translates into poorer input to the classifier components which in turn leads to an increase in Type I or Type II errors, thus, lowering the overall performance. On the Sciborg corpus, the workflow based system, which uses a new tokeniser whilst retaining the same MEMM component, increases the F-score from 82.35% to 84.44%. On the PubMed corpus, it recorded an F-score of 84.84% as against 84.23% by OSCAR. PMID:21633495

  16. A Cataract Surgery Training Program: 2-Year Outcome After Launching.

    PubMed

    Yu, A-Yong; Wang, Qin-Mei; Li, Jin; Huang, Fang; Golnik, Karl

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether a short-term training program can produce competent cataract surgeons. This observational pilot study enrolled 12 trainees who could not perform phacoemulsification independently. The training consisted of 2 phases. During the first 3-month phase, trainees were taught phacoemulsification through wet laboratory exposure and deliberate practice in patients at the training center in the Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University in China. The second phase consisted of performing 50 cases at the trainees׳ home institution with supports from instructors of the first phase. Trainees׳ surgical results were followed-up. The surgical skill as measured by the Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric (OSCAR) and surgical outcomes were analyzed. During the first phase trainees performed 193.3 ± 95.4 wet laboratory cases and 557 eyes in patients. The complication rate was 0.54%. The OSCAR scores improved significantly (p < 0.01) in the first phase. At the second phase, all the trainees could carry out phacoemulsification at their home hospital and the complication rate was 1.87%. During the long-term follow-up, 4936 cases of phacoemulsification were performed and the complication rate was 0.87%. Trainees succeeded in performing phacoemulsification safely and skillfully through a limited short period of training by wet laboratory exposure, deliberate practice in patients, and frequent formative feedback provided by the OSCAR tool. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of state medicaid case-mix payment on nursing home resident acuity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhanlian; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2006-08-01

    To examine the relationship between Medicaid case-mix payment and nursing home resident acuity. Longitudinal Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessments from 1999 to 2002 and Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996 to 2002, for all freestanding nursing homes in the 48 contiguous U.S. states. We used a facility fixed-effects model to examine the effect of introducing state case-mix payment on changes in nursing home case-mix acuity. Facility acuity was measured by aggregating the nursing case-mix index (NCMI) from the MDS using the Resource Utilization Group (Version III) resident classification system, separately for new admits and long-stay residents, and by an OSCAR-derived index combining a range of activity of daily living dependencies and special treatment measures. We followed facilities over the study period to create a longitudinal data file based on the MDS and OSCAR, respectively, and linked facilities with longitudinal data on state case-mix payment policies for the same period. Across three acuity measures and two data sources, we found that states shifting to case-mix payment increased nursing home acuity levels over the study period. Specifically, we observed a 2.5 percent increase in the average acuity of new admits and a 1.3 to 1.4 percent increase in the acuity of long-stay residents, following the introduction of case-mix payment. The adoption of case-mix payment increased access to care for higher acuity Medicaid residents.

  18. Using workflows to explore and optimise named entity recognition for chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kolluru, Balakrishna; Hawizy, Lezan; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tsujii, Junichi; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry text mining tools should be interoperable and adaptable regardless of system-level implementation, installation or even programming issues. We aim to abstract the functionality of these tools from the underlying implementation via reconfigurable workflows for automatically identifying chemical names. To achieve this, we refactored an established named entity recogniser (in the chemistry domain), OSCAR and studied the impact of each component on the net performance. We developed two reconfigurable workflows from OSCAR using an interoperable text mining framework, U-Compare. These workflows can be altered using the drag-&-drop mechanism of the graphical user interface of U-Compare. These workflows also provide a platform to study the relationship between text mining components such as tokenisation and named entity recognition (using maximum entropy Markov model (MEMM) and pattern recognition based classifiers). Results indicate that, for chemistry in particular, eliminating noise generated by tokenisation techniques lead to a slightly better performance than others, in terms of named entity recognition (NER) accuracy. Poor tokenisation translates into poorer input to the classifier components which in turn leads to an increase in Type I or Type II errors, thus, lowering the overall performance. On the Sciborg corpus, the workflow based system, which uses a new tokeniser whilst retaining the same MEMM component, increases the F-score from 82.35% to 84.44%. On the PubMed corpus, it recorded an F-score of 84.84% as against 84.23% by OSCAR.

  19. 2. T12, exterior overall view, view from just outside the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. T-12, exterior overall view, view from just outside the security fence looking southeast. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Minuteman Missile Launch Facility Trainer T-12, Northeast of Oscar-01 Missile Alert Facility, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  20. Advanced Concepts and Methods of Approximate Reasoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    immeasurably by numerous conversations and discussions with Nadal Bat- tle, Hamid Berenji , Piero Bonissone, Bernadette Bouchon-Meunier, Miguel Delgado, Di...comments of Claudi Alsina, Hamid Berenji , Piero Bonissone, Didier Dubois, Francesc Esteva, Oscar Firschein, Marty Fischler, Pascal Fua, Maria Angeles

  1. We must speak of hope as well as catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2017-08-23

    Al Gore, the former US vice-president and now campaigner on climate change, has just released a follow-up to his groundbreaking 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth. Gore's first film won an Oscar and grossed $49 million - astonishing for a documentary.

  2. The Effect of State Medicaid Case-Mix Payment on Nursing Home Resident Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhanlian; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between Medicaid case-mix payment and nursing home resident acuity. Data Sources Longitudinal Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessments from 1999 to 2002 and Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996 to 2002, for all freestanding nursing homes in the 48 contiguous U.S. states. Study Design We used a facility fixed-effects model to examine the effect of introducing state case-mix payment on changes in nursing home case-mix acuity. Facility acuity was measured by aggregating the nursing case-mix index (NCMI) from the MDS using the Resource Utilization Group (Version III) resident classification system, separately for new admits and long-stay residents, and by an OSCAR-derived index combining a range of activity of daily living dependencies and special treatment measures. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We followed facilities over the study period to create a longitudinal data file based on the MDS and OSCAR, respectively, and linked facilities with longitudinal data on state case-mix payment policies for the same period. Principal Findings Across three acuity measures and two data sources, we found that states shifting to case-mix payment increased nursing home acuity levels over the study period. Specifically, we observed a 2.5 percent increase in the average acuity of new admits and a 1.3 to 1.4 percent increase in the acuity of long-stay residents, following the introduction of case-mix payment. Conclusions The adoption of case-mix payment increased access to care for higher acuity Medicaid residents. PMID:16899009

  3. Tanks Within The Marine Air Ground Task Force: A N/A Versatile Combat Multiplier Throughout the Full Spectrum of Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-26

    Estes, Marines Under Armor : The Marine Corps and the Armored Fighting Vehicle, 1916- 2000. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis MD, 2000. Prior to WWIT...Marines Under Armor : The Marine Corps and the Armored Fighting Vehicle, 1916-2000. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MA: 2000 Gilbert, Oscar E

  4. 77 FR 67657 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service (IHS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Practice, and Local Effort (BPPPLE) Form.'' Need and Use of Information Collection: The IHS goal is to.../Disease Prevention, Nursing, and Dental) have developed a centralized program database of best practices, promising Practices and local efforts and resources. This database was previously referred as OSCAR, but the...

  5. Development Communication Report, No. 41, March 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Communication Report, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This newsletter on development projects in developing nations include the following major articles: (1) "An Insider's Perspective: Dr. Henry Cassirer Talks to DCR about Development Communication and Unesco"; (2) "Comic Books Carry Health Messages to Rural Children in Honduras," by Oscar Vigano; (3) "Computers Come to the…

  6. 4. View of the launch closure. Transporter/erector mounts at center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of the launch closure. Transporter/erector mounts at center, security antenna at left, access building at right. View towards south. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Minuteman Missile Launch Facility Trainer T-12, Northeast of Oscar-01 Missile Alert Facility, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  7. Cutting Costs on Computer Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, Robert V., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Using the experience of Ford Motor Company, Oscar Meyer, and IBM, this article shows that companies are enjoying high quality product performance and substantially lower costs by converting from premium white bond computer stock forms to blended bond forms. School administrators are advised to do likewise. (MLH)

  8. Power-Aware Compiler Controllable Chip Multiprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikano, Hiroaki; Shirako, Jun; Wada, Yasutaka; Kimura, Keiji; Kasahara, Hironori

    A power-aware compiler controllable chip multiprocessor (CMP) is presented and its performance and power consumption are evaluated with the optimally scheduled advanced multiprocessor (OSCAR) parallelizing compiler. The CMP is equipped with power control registers that change clock frequency and power supply voltage to functional units including processor cores, memories, and an interconnection network. The OSCAR compiler carries out coarse-grain task parallelization of programs and reduces power consumption using architectural power control support and the compiler's power saving scheme. The performance evaluation shows that MPEG-2 encoding on the proposed CMP with four CPUs results in 82.6% power reduction in real-time execution mode with a deadline constraint on its sequential execution time. Furthermore, MP3 encoding on a heterogeneous CMP with four CPUs and four accelerators results in 53.9% power reduction at 21.1-fold speed-up in performance against its sequential execution in the fastest execution mode.

  9. Cost effectiveness, the economic considerations of prenatal screening strategies for trisomy 21 in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Dhaifalah, I; Májek, O

    2012-02-01

    To perform an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis for screening of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) in the Czech Republic through a decision tree model designed to evaluate the costs and potential risks involved in using different strategies of screening. METHODS AND DATA ANALYSIS: Using decision-analysis modelling, we compared the cost-effectiveness of nine possible screening strategies for trisomy 21: 1. maternal age > or = 35 in first trimester, 2. maternal age > or = 35 in second trimester, 3. second trimester triple test (AFP, hCG, mu E3), 4. nuchal translucency measurement, 5. first trimester serum test (PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG), 6. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) not in OSCAR manner, 7. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) in OSCAR manner, 8. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, nasal bone, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) not in OSCAR manner, 9. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, nasal bone, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) in OSCAR manner. The analysis is performed from a health care payer perspective using relevant cost and outcomes related to each screening strategy in a cohort of 118,135 pregnant women presenting around 12 weeks of pregnancy in the Czech Republic. Using a computer spreadsheet Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Wash) the following outcomes: overall cost-effectiveness, trisomy 21 cases detected, trisomy 21 live birth prevented and euploid losses from invasive procedures were obtained. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were also calculated by a comparison of strategy nine and strategy three (the current practice in the Czech Republic). Under the baseline assumptions, the model favors strategy nine as the most cost-effective trisomy 21 screening strategy. This strategy was the least expensive strategy per trisomy 21 cases averted. Although all the other strategies cost less, they all had lower trisomy 21 detection rates and higher numbers of procedure-related losses (except for

  10. Ocean Circulation and Dynamics on the West Antarctic Peninsula Continental Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Physical Oceanography, and Wolfgang Schneider, Renato Quifiones, Silvio Pantoja, Samuel Hormaz6bal and Oscar Pizarro all helped me learn more about how to be...Rohardt, G., Krause , G., 1992. The Antarctic coastal current in the southeastern Weddell Sea. Polar Biology 12 (2), 171-182. 178 Flagg, C. N

  11. Identification of Tasks Performed by United States Army Dietitians Which are Perceived as Delegable to Enlisted Personnel Having the 94F50 or the 94F40 Military Occupational Specialty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    diversification, and franchising 3. higher costs per employee and an increased need for higher productivity 4. increasiing numbers of formal in-service...Army’s New CAFe ," Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly 13 (May 1972):76-81. Snyder, Oscar P., "Computer-Managed Susbistence System: A

  12. New Research on Securing Educational Excellence & Equity for English Language Learners in Texas Secondary Schools. IDRA Jose A. Cardenas School Finance Fellows Program 2015 Symposium Proceedings (San Antonio, Texas, February 2, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2015

    2015-01-01

    English language learners make up the fastest growing segment of the student population, but they are one of the lowest academically performing groups of students and the achievement gap widens as students progress through school. Dr. Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos, the Intercultural Development Research Association's (IDRA's) inaugural Jose A.…

  13. Relationship between fluoride exposure and osteoclast markers during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Junrui, Pei; Bingyun, Li; Yanhui, Gao; Xu, Jiaxun; Darko, Gottfried M; Dianjun, Sun

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal fluorosis is a metabolic bone disease caused by excessive accumulation of fluoride. Although the cause of this disease is known, the mechanism by which fluoride accumulates on the bone has not been clearly defined, thus there are no markers that can be used for screening skeletal fluorosis in epidemiology. In this study, osteoclasts were formed from bone marrow cells of C57BL/6 mice-treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. The mRNA expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR), calcitonin receptor (CTR), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and cathepsin K (CK) were detected using real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Results showed that fluoride between 0.5 and 8mg/l had no effect on osteoclast formation. However fluoride at 0.5mg/l level significantly decreased the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Fluoride concentration was negatively correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. On day 5 of osteoclast differentiation maturity, MMP9 and CK mRNA expression were not only negatively correlated with fluoride concentration, but directly correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR mRNA expression were positively correlated with the number of osteoclast and they had no correlation with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Thus, it can be seen that MMP9 and CK may reflect the change of activity of bone resorption as well the degree of fluoride exposure. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR can represent the change of number of osteoclast formed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. NASA in the Park, 2018

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-06-20

    NASA in the Park on June 16 in Huntsville featured more than 60 exhibits and demonstrations by NASA experts, as well as performances by Marshall musicians, educational opportunities, games and hands-on activities for all ages. ”Oscar the Robot” gets and gives lots of hugs.

  15. Brecht: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demetz, Peter, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Sergey Tretiakov, Hearings of the House Committee on Un-American Activities, Hannah Arendt, Eric Bentley, Oscar Budel, Ernst Schumacher, I. Fradkin, Hans Egon Holthusen, Gunter Rohrmoser, Walter H. Sokol, Franz Norbert…

  16. 75 FR 68213 - Certifications and Exemptions Under the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... naval ship: Annex I, paragraph 3(c), pertaining to the placement of task lights not less than two meters... safety, Navigation (water), and Vessels. 0 For the reasons set forth in the preamble, amend part 706 of... vessel in the athwartship direction * * * * * * * USS OSCAR AUSTIN DDG 79 1.89 meters...

  17. Planting the Seeds: Frontiers of Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mischler-Philbin, Jim; Murphy, Katie (with an introduction by Eileen Emerson)

    2000-01-01

    Contains articles written by two former Frontiers of Justice participants about their experiences and reflections on the legacy message of the Church in El Salvador. Also includes a poem written by the Archbishop Oscar Romero, and an extensive bibliography of resources in English on the Church in El Salvador. (VWC)

  18. Bringing Climate Change into the Life Science Classroom: Essentials, Impacts on Life, and Addressing Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Amy J.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is at the forefront of our cultural conversation about science, influencing everything from presidential debates to Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech. The topic is becoming increasingly socially and scientifically relevant but is no closer to being resolved. Most high school students take a life science course but…

  19. Middle Level Learning Number 47

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapham, Steven S.; Hanes, Peter; Turner, Thomas N.; Clabough, Jeremiah C.; Cole, William

    2013-01-01

    This issue's "Middle Level Learning" section presents two articles. The first is "Harriet Tubman: Emancipate Yourself!" (by Steven S. Lapham and Peter Hanes). "Argo," which won the 2012 Oscar for best picture, was about a daring escape of six U.S. diplomats from Iran during the 1979 hostage crisis. Now imagine the…

  20. SIX DECADES OF SERVICE, 1903-1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milwaukee School of Engineering, WI.

    OSCAR WERWATH ARRIVED IN MILWAUKEE FROM GERMANY IN 1903 AND FOUNDED A SCHOOL TO MAKE SKILLED MECHANICS, TECHNICIANS, AND ENGINEERS OF THE UNSKILLED AND THE APPRENTICED. BY 1908, THE SCHOOL OFFERED TWO FULL-TIME TWO-SEMESTER COURSES IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL AREAS IN ADDITION TO EVENING PROGRAMS. COOPERATIVE ENGINEERING EDUCATION, INTRODUCED IN…

  1. Touched by Injury: Toward an Educational Theory of Anti-Racist Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgis, Dina; Kennedy, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Informed by the critical humanisms of Hannah Arendt, Frantz Fanon, and Paul Gilroy, the authors argue for an orientation to teaching and learning that troubles the continuing effects of dehumanizing race logic. Reflecting on Paul Haggis's Oscar award winning film "Crash" from 2004, they suggest that the metaphor of racial "crashing" captures what…

  2. Shaw's Comedy, Language Arts: 5113.90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This guide provides the teacher with strategies to aid students in examining five representative plays by Bernard Shaw and in comparing his comedy with the comic art of Oscar Wilde, Richard Sheridan, Ben Jonson, and William Shakespeare. Performance objectives include isolating elements which pertain to the life and times of Shaw, delineating…

  3. Inspired by the Slum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratapchandran, Sarat

    2009-01-01

    An innovative learning technique that originated in a slum in India's capital, New Delhi, sets the stage for "Q&A" that is now the Oscar winning movie, "Slumdog Millionaire". In an interview, Dr. Sugata Mitra, the creator of this new educational pedagogy termed Minimally Invasive Education (MIE), explains how it can help…

  4. Poor Americans: How the Poor White Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilisuk, Marc; Pilisuk, Phyllis

    Contents of this book include the following essays which originally appeared in "Transaction" magazine: (1) "Poor Americans: an introduction," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (2) "How the white poor live," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (3) "The culture of poverty," Oscar Lewis; (4) "Life in Appalachia--the case of Hugh McCaslin," Robert…

  5. COCHABAMBA READER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LASTRA, YOLANDA

    INTENDED AS FOLLOWUP MATERIAL AFTER THE COMPLETION OF THE TWO-VOLUME SPOKEN COCHABAMBA COURSE, THIS READER CONSISTS OF A SINGLE LONG STORY, "JUANITO," WRITTEN BY OSCAR TERAN. IT HAS BEEN USED AS A RADIO SCRIPT FOR A SERIES OF BROADCASTS FROM A COCHABAMBA STATION WHICH SERVES THE SURROUNDING INDIGENOUS POPULATION. THE MATERIAL IS…

  6. A Historical Perspective of the USAWC Class of 1940

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-15

    speci- fic source material so as to avoid becom- ing submerged in statistical and other data and finding little or no time for thought and reflection...Other Sign. WWII Asg: - Misc: - Rank Attained by 󈧲: BC CPT Oscar R Johnston INF Source Commision: USMA Age: 42 Assign After AWC: Mbr . Sup and Proj

  7. Populism in Latin America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-20

    Jorge Quiroga Ramírez (August 7, 2001 -- August 6, 2002), Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada (August 6, 2002 – October 17, 2003), Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert...Adolfo Rodriguez Saa (December 23 -- 30, 2001), Eduardo Oscar Camaño (December 31, 2001 – January 2, 2002), Eduardo Alberto Duhalde (January 2, 2002 – May

  8. Manos Hadjidakis: The Story of an Anarchic Youth and a "Magnus Eroticus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miralis, Yiannis

    2004-01-01

    The name of Manos Hadjidakis is probably unknown to contemporary musicians and music educators. After all, the Greek composer achieved his international fame back in 1961 when he won an Oscar for his soundtrack of the movie, "Never on Sunday." Numerous other awards followed from England, Krance, Germany, and of course, Greece. After his…

  9. Risk, Prophecy, Truth and Inspiration: A Picture of Archbishop Romero in the Education System of El Salvador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Born in El Salvador, at the heart of the Americas, Archbishop Oscar Romero came to have a profound impact, both nationally and internationally. Speaking out fearlessly against injustice and oppression, Archbishop Romero's poignant and powerful homilies were heard throughout the world and made him one of the greatest prophets. In the 30-year period…

  10. Lesbian Scholar/Gay Subject: Turn-of-the-Century Inversions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marra, Kim

    2003-01-01

    Outlines the author's research and interest in the life and sexuality of Clyde Fitch, a successful yet historically obscure American playwright and sometime lover of Oscar Wilde. Explains that Fitch whets the author's hunger for more knowledge because of what he revealed about the reigning feminine ideal that he helped codify and that the author…

  11. Personality Change Among Educationally Disadvantaged Veterans as a Function of Enrollment in a Junior College Developmental Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faubion, Joan H.; Rupiper, O. J.

    One of the first educational institutions funded for the establishment of a training program for Viet Nam veterans was Oscar Rose Junior College at Midwest City, Oklahoma. The developmental program began in September 1972, with 112 veterans in the original training phase. The present study was conducted during the spring semester of 1972-73, with…

  12. Doing better to do good: the impact of strategic adaptation on nursing home performance.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent; Feng, Zhanlian; Intrator, Orna

    2007-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that a greater commitment to strategic adaptation, as exhibited by more extensive implementation of a subacute/rehabilitation care strategy in nursing homes, will be associated with superior performance. Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1997 to 2004, and the area resource file (ARF). The extent of strategic adaptation was measured by an aggregate weighted implementation score. Nursing home performance was measured by occupancy rate and two measures of payer mix. We conducted multivariate regression analyses using a cross-sectional time series generalized estimating equation (GEE) model to examine the effect of nursing home strategic implementation on each of the three performance measures, controlling for market and organizational characteristics that could influence nursing home performance. DATA COLLECTION/ABSTRACTION METHODS: OSCAR data was merged with relevant ARF data. The results of our analysis provide strong support for the hypothesis. From a theoretical perspective, our findings confirm that organizations that adjust strategies and structures to better fit environmental demands achieve superior performance. From a managerial perspective, these results support the importance of proactive strategic leadership in the nursing home industry.

  13. West Europe Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-27

    more recently, the singular distancing of Jose Antonio Segurado and the Liberal Party. Next came an internal crisis, the sudden departure of Jorge...would have better electoral results:- AP,- CDS, Oscar Alzaga’s PDP, or Antonia- Segurado -’-S-PL?) Overall PSOE AP IU CDS AP 24.3 21.5 41.6 7.3 11.1

  14. With a Little Help from Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, John

    2009-01-01

    Over the last year, the author's students have become very interested in popular culture from Korea and Japan. In particular, the class liked the films of Hayao Miyazaki, an Oscar-winning director who is considered one of the foremost anime filmmakers. In this article, the author came to an idea while he and the first-grade class were discussing…

  15. (Self-)Portrait of Prof. R. C.: A Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Charles E., III

    2010-01-01

    This essay offers a retrospective on the four special issues of this journal (1957, 1980, 1990, 2001) dedicated to the "state of the art" of rhetorical criticism. Drawing on Oscar Wilde's "The Portrait of Mr. W. H." as allegory, the essay also functions to queer this retrospective in an ongoing effort to queer rhetorical studies. The essay closes…

  16. Two Thumbs Up, Five Stars, and an Oscar?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the themes of "Good Will Hunting" and "Titanic" and their messages to educators. The need for gifted children to have an array of people in their lives to nurture their abilities and the need for the development of a New Zealand national policy for gifted children is emphasized. (CR)

  17. Possible Diagenetic Connection Between the Dark Fe-rich Rocks at Gale Crater, Mars, and the Felsic JakeM Class Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellert, R.; Berger, J. A.; Boyd, N.; O'Connell-Cooper, C.; Desouza, E.; Schmidt, M. E.; Thompson, L. M.; VanBommel, S.; Yen, A. S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Edgett, K. S.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    During its >13 km traverse so far, the Mars rover Curiosity encountered several dark, fine-grained float rocks. The first example investigated with the APXS, Et_Then (Sol 91), was found near the landing site. It has an enigmatic composition with very high 27% FeO, elevated Na and K, and low Mg. A boulder with nearly identical chemistry, called Secure (Sol 560), was found near the Kimberley waypoint, some 5 km southwest. Both rocks have a unique enrichment in Ga of about 70 ppm, significantly greater than the typical 20 ppm or lower that represents approximately the detection limit for Ga with the APXS. While the origin of these loose float rocks is still under discussion, a recent measurement of a boulder another 7 km southwest on lower Mount Sharp might shed light on the formation process. Two targets, named Sonneblom and Zambezi (Sols 1407 and 1409), were measured on a dark gray boulder in a blocky deposit overlying Murray formation mudstones. They share many of the compositional characteristics of the felsic Jake_M class rocks, also found along Curiosity's traverse, which have elevated alkaline elements and very low Cr, Ni, and Zn. The key difference relative to the original Jake_M rock is the higher Fe and Si and lower Al. Sonneblom and Zambezi are similar to several isolated rocks encountered earlier during the traverse and nearly identical to Oscar (Sol 515). The three rock classes, Jake_M, Oscar and Et_Then, all occurring as isolated float rocks separated by >10 km, seem to form a mixing line between Jake_M proper and Et_Then as endmembers, adding increasing amounts of iron oxides and possibly SiO2 as cement to fragments of Jake_M-like material. Another curious piece of evidence is that the rocks Sonneblom, Zambezi and Oscar have uniquely elevated Ga of about 40 ppm as well, connecting them to Et_Then. Whereas in-depth textural comparison of all these chemically related rocks is pending, based on the compositional trends these erosion-resistant rocks might

  18. 76 FR 66123 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    .... Anaya Charles E. Castle James E. Fix Dean A. Gary James P. Greene Larry L. Harris Roger D. Kloss Mark D. Kraft Steven E. Letchenberg Oscar N. Lefferts Joseph L. Mast Jesse E. McClary, Sr. Steven S. O'Donnell Benjamin R. Sauder Mark L. Simmons Don W. Smith Robert E. Smith Jerry W. Stanfill Roger L. Unser Virgil E...

  19. "There Are Opportunities out There. My Job Is to Open Them up to People"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Nobody was more surprised than Geraldine Wriglesworth when she found herself nominated for a Star Award--the first-ever "Oscars" for the unsung heroes of the learning and skills sector. Wriglesworth started out as a part-time tutor, doing one session a week as a health and fitness instructor. Originally she had gone along to a class and the tutor…

  20. Study of a Novel Ionizer Configuration for the Ion Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited STUDY OF A NOVEL...IONIZER CONFIGURATION FOR THE ION THRUSTER by Jason Theodore Cooper December 2006 Thesis Advisor: Oscar Biblarz Co-Advisor: Jose...December 2006 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Study of a Novel Ionizer Configuration for the Ion Thruster

  1. Latin America Report: Tables of Contents, JPRS-LAM-85-OOl, 2 January 1985 - JPRS-LAM-85-O56, 28 June 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-13

    in Chimalhuacan, by Luis Arturo Ramirez NICARAGUA PERU Sociologist Analyzes Religious Issue in Sandinist Revolution (Luis Serra; EL NUEVO DIARIO...Exemptions Described Housing Subsidy Explained COLOMBIA CUBA Ramirez Announces Betancur Travel Itinerary (Oscar Dominguez; Cadena Radial Super, 4 Feb 85...Export Reforms (EL TIEMPO, 2 Mar 85) 66 New INCORA Head Advocates Agrarian Reform (Fabio Callejas Ramirez ; Cadena Radial Super, 7 Mar 85

  2. Control of Chaos: New Perspectives in Experimental and Theoretical Science. International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos in Applied Sciences and Engineering. Theme Issue. Part 1. Volume 8, Number 8, August 1998.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    de Matemdticas, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain RICARDO CHACON Departamento de Electr6nica e, Ingenieria Electromecdnica, Escuela, de... Ingenierias Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz, Spain MIGUEL ANGEL LOPEZ Departamento de Matemdticas, Aplicada, Escuela Universitaria de...World Scientific Publishing Company FUZZY CONTROL OF CHAOS OSCAR CALVO* CICpBA, L.E.L C.1, Departamento de Electrotecnia, Facultad de Ingenieria

  3. Software for Simulating a Complex Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. Michael

    2003-01-01

    RoboSim (Robot Simulation) is a computer program that simulates the poses and motions of the Robonaut a developmental anthropomorphic robot that has a complex system of joints with 43 degrees of freedom and multiple modes of operation and control. RoboSim performs a full kinematic simulation of all degrees of freedom. It also includes interface components that duplicate the functionality of the real Robonaut interface with control software and human operators. Basically, users see no difference between the real Robonaut and the simulation. Consequently, new control algorithms can be tested by computational simulation, without risk to the Robonaut hardware, and without using excessive Robonaut-hardware experimental time, which is always at a premium. Previously developed software incorporated into RoboSim includes Enigma (for graphical displays), OSCAR (for kinematical computations), and NDDS (for communication between the Robonaut and external software). In addition, RoboSim incorporates unique inverse-kinematical algorithms for chains of joints that have fewer than six degrees of freedom (e.g., finger joints). In comparison with the algorithms of OSCAR, these algorithms are more readily adaptable and provide better results when using equivalent sets of data.

  4. Do Medicaid Wage Pass-through Payments Increase Nursing Home Staffing?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhanlian; Lee, Yong Suk; Kuo, Sylvia; Intrator, Orna; Foster, Andrew; Mor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of state Medicaid wage pass-through policy on direct-care staffing levels in U.S. nursing homes. Data Sources Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data, and state Medicaid nursing home reimbursement policies over the period 1996–2004. Study Design A fixed-effects panel model with two-step feasible-generalized least squares estimates is used to examine the effect of pass-through adoption on direct-care staff hours per resident day (HPRD) in nursing homes. Data Collection/Extraction Methods A panel data file tracking annual OSCAR surveys per facility over the study period is linked with annual information on state Medicaid wage pass-through and related policies. Principal Findings Among the states introducing wage pass-through over the study period, the policy is associated with between 3.0 and 4.0 percent net increases in certified nurse aide (CNA) HPRD in the years following adoption. No discernable pass-through effect is observed on either registered nurse or licensed practical nurse HPRD. Conclusions State Medicaid wage pass-through programs offer a potentially effective policy tool to boost direct-care CNA staffing in nursing homes, at least in the short term. PMID:20403054

  5. The Design and Implementation of a Prototype Surf-Zone Robot for Waterborne Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    parents, Oscar and Ada Lucia, for allowing my mind to dream and pursue those dreams since I was a child. To Sean, Judith, Tatiana, David and...prolonged immersion periods. Grease or marine silicone was applied to prevent water intrusion into the mechanical components of the gearbox. The following... intrusion . The waterproof cylinder for electronics successfully served this purpose. Components external to the cylinder were potted for protection

  6. Costa Rica: Background and U.S. Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-10

    against Rolando Araya of the National Liberation Party (PLN). Pacheco ran on an anti-corruption, good governance platform, but he and his party have...scheduled for February 2006 . Economic Conditions With its stable democracy, relatively high level of economic development, and highly educated population...political leaders for this support. Former President Oscar Arias, who is running for the presidency in 2006 , was especially vocal in his criticism

  7. Southeast Asia Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-21

    PROCUREMENT OF PUBLICATIONS JPRS publications may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161. In order- ing, it...to matters other than procurement may be addressed to Joint Publications Research Service, 1000 North Glebe Road, Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS...Denies Graft Charges (Oscar M. Quiambao; PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER, 31 Mar 87) 36 Banks’ Reserve Deficiency Declines ( BUSINESS DAY, 1 Apr 87

  8. Early Exercise in the Burn Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health, and Physical Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0160 TITLE: Early Exercise in the Burn Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves... designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of... Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health, and Physical Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Oscar E

  9. The Ring of Gyges: Anonymity and Technological Advance’s Effect on the Deterrence of Non-State Actors in 2035

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-16

    year of 1944 (the year of highest Manhattan Project expenditures). Richard G. Hewlett and Oscar E. Anderson, Jr., The New World: A History of the...technological developments in the biological sciences may provide 39 A case in point is the Manhattan ... Project undertaken by the United States to produce the first atomic weapon. A huge national effort was required to create the first atomic weapon in

  10. Latin America Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-27

    MEXICO TEHUANTEPEC BISHOP LONA DISCUSSES CHURCH-STATE RELATION Mexico City PROCESO in Spanish No 511, 18 Aug 86 pp 6-11 [Article by Oscar Hinojosa...news agency transmissions and broadcasts. Materials from foreign- language sources are translated; those from English- language sources are...b - Army Training Planes Crash Over Santiago (Santiago Domestic Service, 30 Sep 86) 47 New Training Plane Built With Spanish Help (Santiago

  11. Final Environmental Assessment for Constructing and Operating Remoted Target Systems at Avon Park Air Force Range, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Combat Command,Environmental Flight,Avon Park Air Force Range...FL,33825 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11...Oscar Range are either Spodosols or Alfisols. Spodosols soils are characterized by a subsurface zone called a spodic ( organic ) horizon layer, whereas

  12. Early Exercise in the Burn Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health, and Physical Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health , and Physical Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Oscar E. Suman, PhD...Multicenter Study of the Effect of In-Patient Exercise Training on Length of Hospitalization, Mental Health , and Physical Performance in Burned...Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health , and Physical Performance,” Proposal Log Number 13214039, Award Number W81XWH-14

  13. El Salvador Psychological Operations Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-04

    General Adolfo Blandon, Colonel C. R. L6pez Nuila, Colonel Oscar Campos Anaya, Colonel Sigifredo Ochoa, and Colonel Orlando Zepeda . "North Americans...34 include: Ambassador Edwin G. Corr, Major General James R. Taylor, Colonel John C. Ellerson, Colonel James J. Steele, Colonel John D . Waghelstein...Concrete political tasks. d . The struggle for immediate justice and reforms. e. The development of the war. f. Propaganda against the enemy army This

  14. Latin America Report No. 2691.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-14

    Rua , for radicalism; Francisco Manrique, Nicanor Costa Mendez and Alvaro Alsogaray, for the center; and Oscar Alende, for the leftist coalition...another radical, De la Rua with 10 percent, after which the Peronists appear: Matera (8), Isabel Peron (8) and Luder (5). De la Rua gained a percentage...latter category, Alfonsin was dominant (32), followed by De la Rua with 13. Alsogaray received his biggest percentage here, 4, equaling Manrique

  15. Association between Traditional Nursing Home Quality Measures and Two Sources of Nursing Home Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer L; Sause, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test for an association between traditional nursing home quality measures and two sources of resident- and caregiver-derived nursing home complaints. Data Sources Nursing home complaints to the North Carolina Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program and state certification agency from October 2002 through September 2006 were matched with Online Survey Certification and Reporting data and Minimum Data Set Quality Indicators (MDS-QIs). Study Design We examine the association between the number of complaints filed against a facility and measures of inspection violations, staffing levels, and MDS-QIs. Data Extraction One observation per facility per quarter is constructed by matching quarterly data on complaints to OSCAR data from the same or most recent prior quarter and to MDS-QIs from the same quarter. One observation per inspection is obtained by matching OSCAR data to complaint totals from both the same and the immediate prior quarter. Principal Findings There is little relationship between MDS-QIs and complaints. Ombudsman complaints and inspection violations are generally unrelated, but there is a positive relationship between state certification agency complaints and inspection violations. Conclusions Ombudsman and state certification agency complaint data are resident- and caregiver-derived quality measures that are distinctive from and complement traditional quality measures. PMID:23216541

  16. Effects of State Minimum Staffing Standards on Nursing Home Staffing and Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongyoung; Stearns, Sally C

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of state minimum staffing standards on the level of staffing and quality of nursing home care. Data Sources Online Survey and Certification Reporting System (OSCAR) merged with the Area Resource File from 1998 through 2001. Study Design Between 1998 and 2001, 16 states implemented or expanded staffing standards in excess of federal requirements, creating a natural experiment in comparison with facilities in states without new standards. Difference-in-differences models using facility fixed effects were estimated to determine the effect of state standards. Data Collection/Extraction Methods OSCAR data were linked to the data on market conditions and state policies. A total of 55,248 facility-year observations from 15,217 freestanding facilities were analyzed. Principal Findings Increased standards resulted in small staffing increases for facilities with staffing initially below or close to new standards. Yet the standards were associated with reductions in restraint use and the number of total deficiencies at all types of facilities. Conclusions Mandated staffing standards affect only low-staff facilities facing potential for penalties, and effects are small. Selected facility-level outcomes may show improvement at all facilities due to a general response to increased standards or to other quality initiatives implemented at the same time as staffing standards. PMID:18823448

  17. Proceedings of the 7th Annual TARDEC Ground Vehicle Survivability Symposium, March 26-28, 1996, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Volume 1 - Unclassified Session Papers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    McClelland, Technical Director, U.S. Army Submitted TARDEC 9:25 A.M. Keynote None Dr. Kenneth J. Oscar, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army...Submitted for Procurement 9:50 A.M. Industry Perspective Vol. 1 .3 Dr. Kenneth M. Krall, Vice President - Advanced Programs & Technology, Loral Vought...Project Manager (PM), Light Tactical Vehicles 12:00 A.M. Defense Supply Center Business Processes - Meeting Vol. 1 57 Customer Needs COL Joseph M

  18. KSC-00pp0690

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-29

    Research scientist Oscar Monje records data associated with ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship

  19. KSC00pp0690

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-29

    Research scientist Oscar Monje records data associated with ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. The payload process testing is one of many studies being performed at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship

  20. Latin America Report, No. 2717.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-04

    advanced toward us. From the first moment, the recent-arrival created a pleasing impression by his simplicity. He was Sub-Cdr Oscar Lanuza Salgado...Commander Lanuza was given cultural and military advance training courses. He also served in G-2. The "Choir of Angels" has been in operation for...Mountains Sub-Lt Julio Cesar Briones is one of those command cadres to which Sub-Commander Lanuza referred. Everybody affectionately calls him "The

  1. Trauma Pod/Operating Room of the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    into C++ objects. OpenBinder software provided by ORNL was also used. This approach reduces the potential errors that might be introduced by...publications can be found here. OSCAR has been used by developers at the Univ. of Texas, ORNL , NASA/Ames, and NASA/JSC. RRGKinematix, a single...the last DH frame (at the wrist) is 70 mm. Position Travel Limits (degrees) - these are software limits as specified by ORNL Joint 1

  2. Optical Computing. Organization of the 1993 Photonics Science Topical Meetings Held in Palm Springs, California on March 16 - 19, 1993. Technical Digest Series, Volume 7

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-19

    network Implementation using 9:20 am asymmetric Fabry-Perot modulators, Andrew Jennings, Brian OWA3 Multiwavelength optical half adder, Pochi Yeh... multiwavelength optical half adder. (p. 68) nects. (p. 96) 9:40 am 2:50 pm OWA4 Wavelength multiplexed computer-generated volume OWC3 Content addramble...ATMOS and OSCAR are RACE projects, mentioned in the text shape this into new systems architectures, ("optical ether"). Broadly speaking, this has led to

  3. InAs Band-Edge Exciton Fine Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-29

    Chapter 1 InAs Band-Edge Exciton Fine Structure 1.1 Contributions This work was carried out in collaboration with Oscar Sandoval, a summer student at...diffusion,1,2 charg- ing,2,3 and excitonic fine structure.1,3–9 While spectral diffusion and charging are most likely photoinduced effects and thus can be...unavoidable. A complete understanding of the excitonic 1 Distribution A: Public Release energy landscape enables us to determine dephasing rates

  4. Evolution of Gravity Receptors in the Ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the origins and evolution of two hair cell types in the ears of a teleost fish, Astronotus ocellatus (the oscar), is presented. First, it was demonstrated that the cells in the rostral end of the saccule of the , Carassius auratus, are type 1-like, while those at the caudal end are type 2 cells. It was demonstrated that the dichotomy of hair cell types found in the utricle of the oscar is also found in the goldfish. Second, the lateral line system of the oscar was examined using gentamicin sulphate, an ototocix drug that destroys type 1- like hair cells but does not appear to damage type 2 hair cells. It was demonstrated that the hair cells found in neuromasts of lateral line canal organs were totally destroyed within 1 day of treatment, while the hair cells in free neuromasts were undamaged after 12 days of treatment. Third, it was demonstrated that the calyx, the specialized nerve ending, is not unique to amniotes and that it is present at least in the cristae of semicirular canals in goldfish. These results have demonstrated that: (1) there are multiple hair cell types in the vestibular endorgans of the ear of fishes, (2) these hair cell types are very similar to those found in the mammalian vestibular endorgans, (3) the nerve calyx is also present in fishes, and (4) multiple hair cell types and the calyx have evolved far earlier in the course of vertebrate evolution than heretofore thought. Understanding the structure of the vestibular endorgans has important implications for being able to understand how these organs respond to gravistatic, acceleration and acoustic input. The vestibular endorgans of fishes may provide an ideal system in which to analyze functional differences in hair cells. Not only are the two hair cell types similar to those found in mammals, they are located in very discrete regions in each endorgan. Thus, it is relatively easy to gain access to cells of one or the other type. The presence of two

  5. KSC-04pd0719

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla., listen to Center Director Jim Kennedy as he shares America’s new vision for space exploration. Kennedy is visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia, talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  6. KSC-04pd0718

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla., listen intently to Center Director Jim Kennedy as he shares America’s new vision for space exploration. Kennedy is visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia, talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  7. Papers Selected for Presentation at the International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment (16th) Held at Buenos Aires, Argentina on 2-9 June 1982. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    ARGENTINA Oscar Dominguez and Stella Carballo .............. 355 STUDIES ON SOME URBAN PROBLEMS USING AIRBORNE REMOTE SENSORS IN SANTIAGO, CHILE ...SAN JUAN ARGENTINA) (1) Silvia Lendaro de Gianni (2,3) Enrique Uliarte (I) Centro Regional de Agua Subterrgnea (2) Universidad Nacional de San Juan act...Hidrogeol6gico para refuerzo do la provisi6n de agua " a Puerto Deseado. In4dito. - Pezzuchi, Hugo Daniel (1978) "studio Geol6gico de la zona de Lstancia Dos

  8. One Hundred Years of Flight: USAF Chronology of Significant Air and Space Events, 1903-2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    the USS Ranger the first ship designed from scratch as an aircraft carrier. October 5: Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon, Jr., completed the first...aircraft car- rier USS Ranger . September 29: Maj. Gen. Henry H. Arnold became chief of the Army Air Corps, formally taking the place of Maj. Gen. Oscar...28: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its Ranger V/Ispacecraft from Cape Kennedy on a flight to the Moon. On July 31, Ranger V

  9. Information theory and robotics meet to study predator-prey interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Daniele; Ruberto, Tommaso; Cord-Cruz, Gabrielle; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-07-01

    Transfer entropy holds promise to advance our understanding of animal behavior, by affording the identification of causal relationships that underlie animal interactions. A critical step toward the reliable implementation of this powerful information-theoretic concept entails the design of experiments in which causal relationships could be systematically controlled. Here, we put forward a robotics-based experimental approach to test the validity of transfer entropy in the study of predator-prey interactions. We investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish to a fear-evoking robotic stimulus, designed after the morpho-physiology of the red tiger oscar and actuated along preprogrammed trajectories. From the time series of the positions of the zebrafish and the robotic stimulus, we demonstrate that transfer entropy correctly identifies the influence of the stimulus on the focal subject. Building on this evidence, we apply transfer entropy to study the interactions between zebrafish and a live red tiger oscar. The analysis of transfer entropy reveals a change in the direction of the information flow, suggesting a mutual influence between the predator and the prey, where the predator adapts its strategy as a function of the movement of the prey, which, in turn, adjusts its escape as a function of the predator motion. Through the integration of information theory and robotics, this study posits a new approach to study predator-prey interactions in freshwater fish.

  10. Smarter Earth Science Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The explosive growth in Earth observational data in the recent decade demands a better method of interoperability across heterogeneous systems. The Earth science data system community has mastered the art in storing large volume of observational data, but it is still unclear how this traditional method scale over time as we are entering the age of Big Data. Indexed search solutions such as Apache Solr (Smiley and Pugh, 2011) provides fast, scalable search via keyword or phases without any reasoning or inference. The modern search solutions such as Googles Knowledge Graph (Singhal, 2012) and Microsoft Bing, all utilize semantic reasoning to improve its accuracy in searches. The Earth science user community is demanding for an intelligent solution to help them finding the right data for their researches. The Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources (OSCAR) (Huang et al., 2012), was created in response to the DARPA Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) programs need for an intelligent context models management system to empower its terrain simulation subsystem. The core component of OSCAR is the Environmental Context Ontology (ECO) is built using the Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) (Raskin and Pan, 2005). This paper presents the current data archival methodology within a NASA Earth science data centers and discuss using semantic web to improve the way we capture and serve data to our users.

  11. Is It Oscar-Worthy? Children’s Metarepresentational Understanding of Acting

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Thalia R.; Bloom, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although it is an essential aspect of one of the most common forms of entertainment, psychologists know almost nothing about how children understand the act of portraying a character in a realistic manner—realistic acting. Do children possess the sort of meta-theory of acting that adults possess? In two studies we find that, unlike adults, children between the ages of 3–5 do not think that a realistic actor is better at portraying a characteristic than a nonrealistic actor, nor do they prefer one to the other. As they develop, they come to understand that realistic acting is different from nonrealistic acting, but unlike adults, children think that a nonrealistic, pretense-like portrayal is more difficult to achieve than a realistic representation of an emotional or physical state. These findings show that children’s metarepresentational understanding of acting is relatively immature at age 5, and that their understanding of this specific domain of pretense lags behind their understanding of pretense in general. PMID:25761111

  12. Evaluation of the Operational Stress Control and Readiness (OSCAR) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Responding to Combat Stress Reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 4.4. Team Leaders’ View of Stigma Associated with Combat Stress...leaders’ perceptions of OSCAR’s impact on attitudes toward stress response and recovery; unit cohesion and morale; stigma around mental health and...Continuum, a tool for identi- fying combat stress problems of varying severity, and Combat and Operational Stress First Aid (COSFA), a psychological

  13. Support Facility Determination... Oscar Mayer and Madison Gas and Electric

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  14. Twenty-Channel Voice Response System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    read back as "MIKE" "INDIA" "VICTOR" CHO will be read back as "CHARLIE" " HOTEL " "OSCAR". For some locations, the actual name of the airport will be...PROCESSOR (Cont’d.) C-24 is YES nMk>LENGTH? No a is nWA-nMA+l SKYA (nWA) NO is YES lajt-l? NO 7 is YES SMM (INDA) N UKMUC NO s 2 FIGIM C-3.- SA PR

  15. Superplastic Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V-0.1B Alloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Scott (UES, Inc.) for help with running the high temperature tension tests. The Ti-6Al-4V-0.1B sheets used in this study were fabricated in...collaboration with Scott Reed (Flowserve) and Oscar Yu (RTI) under EMTEC Project CT-86. 6 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. References...Sun, M. Bennett, and J.M. Scott , “Production of Plates and Sheets from As-Cast Ti-6Al-4V via Boron Modification”, in: Ti-2007 Science and Technology

  16. KSC-04pd0715

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Jim Kennedy talks to students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Kennedy is visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  17. KSC-04pd0745

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Jim Kennedy shakes hands with students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Kennedy is touring Florida and Georgia NASA Explorer Schools to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  18. KSC-04pd0716

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Jim Kennedy talks to students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Kennedy is visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  19. KSC-04pd0747

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Jim Kennedy stands with Dr. Linward Barnes, principal of Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Kennedy is touring Florida and Georgia NASA Explorer Schools to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  20. KSC-04pd0717

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Jim Kennedy talks to students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Kennedy is visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  1. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway inmore » osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative

  2. A Select Bibliography of the United States Navy and the Southeast Asian Conflict 1950 - 1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    34---]’. •-- June 1982U ~Avail and/or Mat Special T C ;7- "::2’oo-DTIC gLEECTEB. .. ... JI"D E C 3 0 DUMMITNo STATE"MT AIAppioved hm publi ndeas...Asia. New York: Crown Publishers, 1979. Hooper, Edwin B., Allard, Dean C ., and Fitzgerald, Oscar P. The Setting of the Stage to 1959. Vol. I in series...Enigineer- in- Ci~iuanT/PUYT Tulich, Eugene N. The United States Coast Guard in South East Asia During the Vietnam - c t ashington: Public Affairs Divlsi6

  3. Research experiments at Hangar L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Researchers work with wheat samples that are part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. From left are research scientist Oscar Monje and research technicians Lisa Ruffa and Ignacio Eraso. The payload process testing they are performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship.

  4. KSC-04pd0707

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two student “astronauts” welcome special NASA guests to Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Center Director Jim Kennedy made the trip with NASA astronaut Sam Durrance and other NASA-KSC representatives to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  5. KSC-04pd0713

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Sam Durrance and Center Director Jim Kennedy talk to students in a classroom at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Kennedy is visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  6. KSC-04pd0727

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Sam Durrance (right) talks to a student and teacher at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. He and Center Director Jim Kennedy, along with other NASA representatives, visited the school to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  7. KSC00pp0697

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-01

    Researchers work with wheat samples that are part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. From left are research scientist Oscar Monje and research technicians Lisa Ruffa and Ignacio Eraso. The payload process testing they are performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship

  8. KSC-00pp0697

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-01

    Researchers work with wheat samples that are part of ground testing for the first International Space Station plant experiment, scheduled to fly in October 2001. From left are research scientist Oscar Monje and research technicians Lisa Ruffa and Ignacio Eraso. The payload process testing they are performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship

  9. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, a research scientist, packs a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  10. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, a research scientist, pours a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  11. Operation HARDTACK. Volume 2. Radiological Safety. Extracted Version

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    slowly to the southwest. This cell van reported 60 z.les southwest. at nightfnll with an intensity of 350 mr/hr measured by the sampler aircraft. This...POJOA , C J~~’/𔄃(Vera)L (Levoy)e ((Oscar) * / (Re RIBAI(Tom)______ (I( Van ) (Fred)R iliS~~ ~ ~ OF S;3 IE/1 NYA Avn (I(Henry) DEEP ENTRANC Radiologica...P2V was dispatched on a track of 260 degrees from Alice and read 300 mr 35 miles out. It van then sent due north of Pearl and found unscectedly an

  12. "JCE" Classroom Activity #107. And the Oscar Goes to...A Chemist!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howder, Collin R.; Groen, Kyle D.; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    A hands-on activity and demonstration, both applicable to the 2010 National Chemistry Week theme of Behind the Scenes with Chemistry, are presented. In the activity, students compare and contrast the properties of heat conductors and heat insulators. During the demonstration, students learn that water absorbed by a superabsorbent polymer can…

  13. The Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric; Lyon, Richard G.; Sears, Edie; Lu, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Several space missions presently in the concept phase (e.g. Stellar Imager, Submillimeter Probe of Evolutionary Cosmic Structure, Terrestrial Planet Finder) plan to use multiple spacecraft flying in precise formation to synthesize unprecedently large aperture optical systems. These architectures present challenges to the attitude and position determination and control system; optical performance is directly coupled to spacecraft pointing with typical control requirements being on the scale of milliarcseconds and nanometers. To investigate control strategies, rejection of environmental disturbances, and sensor and actuator requirements, a capability is needed to model both the dynamical and optical behavior of such a distributed telescope system. This paper describes work ongoing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center toward the integration of a set of optical analysis tools (Optical System Characterization and Analysis Research software, or OSCAR) with the Formation Flying Test Bed (FFTB). The resulting system is called the Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT), and it provides the capability to simulate closed-loop control of optical systems composed of elements mounted on multiple spacecraft. The attitude and translation spacecraft dynamics are simulated in the FFTB, including effects of the space environment (e.g. solar radiation pressure, differential orbital motion). The resulting optical configuration is then processed by OSCAR to determine an optical image. From this image, wavefront sensing (e.g. phase retrieval) techniques are being developed to derive attitude and position errors. These error signals will be fed back to the spacecraft control systems, completing the control loop. A simple case study is presented to demonstrate the present capabilities of the tool.

  14. The Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric; Lyon, Richard G.; Sears, Edie; Lu, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Several space missions presently in the concept phase (e.g. Stellar Imager, Sub- millimeter Probe of Evolutionary Cosmic Structure, Terrestrial Planet Finder) plan to use multiple spacecraft flying in precise formation to synthesize unprecedently large aperture optical systems. These architectures present challenges to the attitude and position determination and control system; optical performance is directly coupled to spacecraft pointing with typical control requirements being on the scale of milliarcseconds and nanometers. To investigate control strategies, rejection of environmental disturbances, and sensor and actuator requirements, a capability is needed to model both the dynamical and optical behavior of such a distributed telescope system. This paper describes work ongoing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center toward the integration of a set of optical analysis tools (Optical System Characterization and Analysis Research software, or OSCAR) with the Formation J?lying Test Bed (FFTB). The resulting system is called the Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT), and it provides the capability to simulate closed-loop control of optical systems composed of elements mounted on multiple spacecraft. The attitude and translation spacecraft dynamics are simulated in the FFTB, including effects of the space environment (e.g. solar radiation pressure, differential orbital motion). The resulting optical configuration is then processed by OSCAR to determine an optical image. From this image, wavefront sensing (e.g. phase retrieval) techniques are being developed to derive attitude and position errors. These error signals will be fed back to the spacecraft control systems, completing the control loop. A simple case study is presented to demonstrate the present capabilities of the tool.

  15. PREFACE: Second School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda, Arnulfo

    2008-02-01

    The physics of cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos has become nowadays a subject of fast development. On the other hand present and planed experimental facilities installed in the American continent, attract and facilitate the involvement of local young researchers. For these reasons Professor Oscar Saavedra and his team of the high altitude cosmic ray Chacaltaya laboratory and the Universidad Mayor de San Andres in La Paz Bolivia, conceived the idea of organizing the First School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics in La Paz 9-20 August 2004. That school was possible, in spite of the scarcity of funds, thanks to the solidary participation of several distinguish lecturers who paid their travel and local expenses. Their lectures were made available on a CD by the local students. It was then decided that a second school be organized for 2006 in Mexico. It was held from 28 August to 15 September 15. Some of the lecturers in this Second School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics were too busy to write their lectures, but here we put at the disposal of the interested community the contributions of Roberto Battiston, Karen S Caballero, Edgar Casimiro, David Delepine, Giorgio Giacomelli, Gonzalo Rodríguez and Luis Villaseñor. This School was possible thanks to the financial assistance of CONACyT (Mexico), the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), the University of Torino and the Centro Latino Americano de Fisica. Arnulfo Zepeda The editors of these proceedings are: Rebeca López Rodrigo Pelayo Oscar Saavedra Arnulfo Zepeda

  16. Effects of Medicare payment changes on nursing home staffing and deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Yi, Deokhee; Norton, Edward C; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the effects of Medicare's Prospective Payment System (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and associated rate changes on quality of care as represented by staffing ratios and regulatory deficiencies. Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996-2000 were linked with Area Resource File (ARF) and Medicare Cost Report data to form a panel dataset. A difference-in-differences model was used to assess effects of the PPS and the BBRA (Balanced Budget Refinement Act) on staffing and deficiencies, a design that allows the separation of the effects of the policies from general trends. Ordinary least squares and negative binomial models were used. The OSCAR and Medicare Cost Report data are self-reported by nursing facilities; ARF data are publicly available. Data were linked by provider ID and county. We find that professional staffing decreased and regulatory deficiencies increased with PPS, and that both effects were mitigated with the BBRA rate increases. The effects appear to increase with the percent of Medicare residents in the facility except, in some cases, at the highest percentage of Medicare. The findings on staffing are statistically significant. The effects on deficiencies, though exhibiting consistent signs and magnitudes with the staffing results, are largely insignificant. Medicare's PPS system and associated rate cuts for SNFs have had a negative effect on staffing and regulatory compliance. Further research is necessary to determine whether these changes are associated with worse outcomes. Findings from this investigation could help guide policy modifications that support the provision of quality nursing home care.

  17. Naphthalene biodegradation in temperate and arctic marine microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bagi, Andrea; Pampanin, Daniela M; Lanzén, Anders; Bilstad, Torleiv; Kommedal, Roald

    2014-02-01

    Naphthalene, the smallest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is found in abundance in crude oil, its major source in marine environments. PAH removal occurs via biodegradation, a key process determining their fate in the sea. Adequate estimation of PAH biodegradation rates is essential for environmental risk assessment and response planning using numerical models such as the oil spill contingency and response (OSCAR) model. Using naphthalene as a model compound, biodegradation rate, temperature response and bacterial community composition of seawaters from two climatically different areas (North Sea and Arctic Ocean) were studied and compared. Naphthalene degradation was followed by measuring oxygen consumption in closed bottles using the OxiTop(®) system. Microbial communities of untreated and naphthalene exposed samples were analysed by polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and pyrosequencing. Three times higher naphthalene degradation rate coefficients were observed in arctic seawater samples compared to temperate, at all incubation temperatures. Rate coefficients at in situ temperatures were however, similar (0.048 day(-1) for temperate and 0.068 day(-1) for arctic). Naphthalene biodegradation rates decreased with similar Q10 ratios (3.3 and 3.5) in both seawaters. Using the temperature compensation method implemented in the OSCAR model, Q10 = 2, biodegradation in arctic seawater was underestimated when calculated from the measured temperate k1 value, showing that temperature difference alone could not predict biodegradation rates adequately. Temperate and arctic untreated seawater communities were different as revealed by pyrosequencing. Geographic origin of seawater affected the community composition of exposed samples.

  18. Do nursing home chain size and proprietary status affect experiences with care?

    PubMed Central

    You, Kai; Li, Yue; Intrator, Orna; Stevenson, David; Hirth, Richard; Grabowski, David; Banaszak-Holl, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2012, over half of nursing homes were operated by corporate chains. Facilities owned by the largest for-profit chains were reported to have lower quality of care. However, it is unknown how nursing home chain ownerships are related with experiences of care. Objectives To study the relationship between nursing home chain characteristics (chain size and profit status) with patients' family member reported ratings on experiences with care. Data Sources and Study Design Maryland nursing home care experience reports, the Online Survey, Certification, And Reporting (OSCAR) files, and Area Resource Files are used. Our sample consists of all non-governmental nursing homes in Maryland from 2007 to 2010. Consumer ratings were reported for: overall care; recommendation of the facility; staff performance; care provided; food and meals; physical environment; and autonomy and personal rights. We identified chain characteristics from OSCAR, and estimated multivariate random effect linear models to test the effects of chain ownership on care experience ratings. Results Independent nonprofit nursing homes have the highest overall rating score of 8.9, followed by 8.6 for facilities in small nonprofit chains, and 8.5 for independent for-profit facilities. Facilities in small, medium and large for-profit chains have even lower overall ratings of 8.2, 7.9, and 8.0, respectively. We find similar patterns of differences in terms of recommendation rate, and important areas such as staff communication and quality of care. Conclusions Evidence suggests that Maryland nursing homes affiliated with large- and medium- for-profit chains had lower ratings of family reported experience with care. PMID:26765147

  19. Do Nursing Home Chain Size and Proprietary Status Affect Experiences With Care?

    PubMed

    You, Kai; Li, Yue; Intrator, Orna; Stevenson, David; Hirth, Richard; Grabowski, David; Banaszak-Holl, Jane

    2016-03-01

    In 2012, over half of nursing homes were operated by corporate chains. Facilities owned by the largest for-profit chains were reported to have lower quality of care. However, it is unknown how nursing home chain ownerships are related with experiences of care. To study the relationship between nursing home chain characteristics (chain size and profit status) with patients' family member reported ratings on experiences with care. Maryland nursing home care experience reports, the Online Survey, Certification, And Reporting (OSCAR) files, and Area Resource Files are used. Our sample consists of all nongovernmental nursing homes in Maryland from 2007 to 2010. Consumer ratings were reported for: overall care; recommendation of the facility; staff performance; care provided; food and meals; physical environment; and autonomy and personal rights. We identified chain characteristics from OSCAR, and estimated multivariate random effect linear models to test the effects of chain ownership on care experience ratings. Independent nonprofit nursing homes have the highest overall rating score of 8.9, followed by 8.6 for facilities in small nonprofit chains, and 8.5 for independent for-profit facilities. Facilities in small, medium, and large for-profit chains have even lower overall ratings of 8.2, 7.9, and 8.0, respectively. We find similar patterns of differences in terms of recommendation rate, and important areas such as staff communication and quality of care. Evidence suggests that Maryland nursing homes affiliated with large-for-profit and medium-for-profit chains had lower ratings of family reported experience with care.

  20. [Experience feed back committee in radiotherapy (CREx): a compulsory tool for security management evaluation at two years].

    PubMed

    Lartigau, E; Coche-Dequeant, B; Dumortier, V; Giscard, S; Lacornerie, T; Lasue, A; Cheval, V; Martel, V; Malfait, B; Fuchs, A; Pestel, M; Damman, M; Forrest, M

    2008-11-01

    After working on treatment organisation in radiotherapy (bonne pratiques organisationnelles en radiothérapie - action pilote MEAH 2003), the development of a security policy has become crucial. With the help of Air France Consulting and the MEAH, three cancer centers in Angers, Lille and Villejuif worked together on the implantation of experience feed back committees (CREx) dedicated to the registration, analysis and correction of precursor events. After two years, we report the centre Oscar-Lambret experience in Lille and try to get the recommendations for generalisation of the process. This seems now to be compulsory for security management in oncology.

  1. HMO penetration, hospital competition, and growth of ambulatory surgery centers.

    PubMed

    Bian, John; Morrisey, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Using metropolitan statistical area (MSA) panel data from 1992-2001 constructed from the 2002 Medicare Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System, we estimate the market effects of health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration and hospital competition on the growth of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Our regression models with MSA and year fixed effects suggest that a 10-percentage-point increase in HMO penetration is associated with a decrease of 3 ASCs per 1 million population. A decrease from 5 to 4 equal-market-shared hospitals in a market is associated with an increase of 2.5 ASCs per 1 million population.

  2. KSC-04pd0742

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Sam Durrance takes time for a group photo with students from Panama City, Fla., Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School. The students are wearing mock space suit helmets. Durrance joined Center Director Jim Kennedy, who is visiting Florida and Georgia NASA Explorer Schools to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  3. KSC-04pd0731

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Jim Kennedy (center) is interviewed by a reporter from channel 7 ABC-TV after his visit to Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. He other NASA officials visited the school to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students at NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  4. KSC-04pd0735

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Sam Durrance (standing, in the background) shares stories of his experiences as an astronaut with the students in a classroom at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Durrance joined Center Director Jim Kennedy as he shares America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students at NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  5. KSC-04pd0736

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Sam Durrance shares stories of his experiences as an astronaut with enthralled students in a classroom at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Durrance joined Center Director Jim Kennedy, who is visiting Florida and Georgia NASA Explorer Schools to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  6. KSC-04pd0728

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Sam Durrance signs the costume helmet of one of the students who welcomed NASA representatives to Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. He and Center Director Jim Kennedy, along with others, visited the school to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  7. KSC-04pd0721

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Sam Durrance shares stories of his experiences in space with the students at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Durrance joined Center Director Jim Kennedy as he shares America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students in NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  8. Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program, Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Part 4. Analysis of Borehole Gravity Surveys and Other Geologic and Bathymetric Studies in Vicinity of OAK and KOA craters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    si(e(TILDA) rL ojwa (URSULA) 4-~ ~Alembel ( VERA ) 100 ± 4- U Billse (WILMA) 1~O0 iA .~~IJ~ , *(MACK) Runil (YVONNE) . (OSCAR) ~,M(ZONA) - 11൦’ BSken...Chapter, the totals for these species are given in row 41. Procythereis sp. B generally occurs in zones 1 Setae are small hairs that occur on the exterior...6.1 2. 15 5536. 5073. 0920. 330 533.0 .063239. 32008. 31960. alo A3.) o00 96 0*3. 060 72* 50320 2.00 313os. 30. 3196. 3360 340 3.0)3*02 302. 302 so

  9. Advanced Plant Habitat

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-17

    A test unit, or prototype, of NASA's Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) was delivered to the Space Station Processing Facility at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. Oscar Monje, a scientist on the Engineering Services Contract, prepares the base of the APH for engineering development tests to see how the science will integrate with the various systems of the plant habitat. The APH will have about 180 sensors and fourt times the light output of Veggie. The APH will be delivered to the International Space Station in March 2017.

  10. Oscar's Options: A Supplementary Environmental Education Curriculum. Books 1 and 2 (Combined).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Carole O.; Schwartz, Martha M.

    This two-volume supplementary curriculum is designed for teachers of children grades 4-8. There are eight units overall: (1) national resources; (2) litter; (3) household hazardous wastes; (4) landfills; (5) recycling; (6) incineration; (7) compost; and (8) source reduction. Each unit contains a list of objectives for students, a suggested time…

  11. Effects of Medicare Payment Changes on Nursing Home Staffing and Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Yi, Deokhee; Norton, Edward C; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Medicare's Prospective Payment System (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and associated rate changes on quality of care as represented by staffing ratios and regulatory deficiencies. Data Sources Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996–2000 were linked with Area Resource File (ARF) and Medicare Cost Report data to form a panel dataset. Study Design A difference-in-differences model was used to assess effects of the PPS and the BBRA (Balanced Budget Refinement Act) on staffing and deficiencies, a design that allows the separation of the effects of the policies from general trends. Ordinary least squares and negative binomial models were used. Data Collection Methods The OSCAR and Medicare Cost Report data are self-reported by nursing facilities; ARF data are publicly available. Data were linked by provider ID and county. Principal Findings We find that professional staffing decreased and regulatory deficiencies increased with PPS, and that both effects were mitigated with the BBRA rate increases. The effects appear to increase with the percent of Medicare residents in the facility except, in some cases, at the highest percentage of Medicare. The findings on staffing are statistically significant. The effects on deficiencies, though exhibiting consistent signs and magnitudes with the staffing results, are largely insignificant. Conclusions Medicare's PPS system and associated rate cuts for SNFs have had a negative effect on staffing and regulatory compliance. Further research is necessary to determine whether these changes are associated with worse outcomes. Findings from this investigation could help guide policy modifications that support the provision of quality nursing home care. PMID:15149474

  12. "Anything is good that stimulates thought" in the hippocampus. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Markus J.; Kuchinke, Lars

    2015-06-01

    While the emotional trias of brainstem, diencephalon, and orbitofrontal cortex is generally accepted to hold an affective function at its core, fewer researchers would agree that the least common denominator function of the hippocampus is affective [1]. There is a greater consensus on complementary learning systems theory proposing that in contrast to the outer cerebral cortex hosting more stable memories, synaptic associations in the hippocampus create novel knowledge in the context of episodic memories [2]. We chose Oscar Wilde's quote [3, p. 108] as title because we think that the novel hippocampal conjunction of for the most part familiar (long-term) knowledge patterns elicits the positive affect of appreciation [4,5].

  13. KSC-04PD-0726

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla., Center Director Jim Kennedy (far left) stands with (left to right) Bay County school board members Johnny Brock and Thelma Rohan, astronaut Sam Durrance and Panama City Commissioner Johnathon Wilson. Kennedy and Durrance and other NASA officials were at the school to share Americas new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  14. HMO Penetration, Hospital Competition, and Growth of Ambulatory Surgery Centers

    PubMed Central

    Bian, John; Morrisey, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Using metropolitan statistical area (MSA) panel data from 1992-2001 constructed from the 2002 Medicare Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System, we estimate the market effects of health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration and hospital competition on the growth of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Our regression models with MSA and year fixed effects suggest that a 10-percentage-point increase in HMO penetration is associated with a decrease of 3 ASCs per 1 million population. A decrease from 5 to 4 equal-market-shared hospitals in a market is associated with an increase of 2.5 ASCs per 1 million population. PMID:17290661

  15. KSC-04pd0739

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Sam Durrance points to a student with a question in a classroom at Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. Sharing stories of his experiences as an astronaut, Durrance joined Center Director Jim Kennedy, who is visiting Florida and Georgia NASA Explorer Schools to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  16. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, a research scientist, packs a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Seated at right is Susan Manning-Roach, a quality assurance specialist on the Engineering Services Contract. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  17. Underway Recovery Test 6 (URT-6) - Day 4 Afternoon Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-20

    Sailors from the USS Anchorage simulate “Oscar,” a dummy used for man overboard drills, to the medical unit. During Underway Recovery Test 6, the USS Anchorage’s man overboard drill gave Kennedy Space Center’s NASA Recovery Team a glimpse of one way an astronaut could be brought from a small boat onto the ship using a stretcher. Once the Orion capsule splashes down in the Pacific Ocean, astronauts can choose to stay in the capsule until it is pulled into the well deck of the Navy vessel, or have a diver retrieve them in the open water and then get the capsule later.

  18. Underway Recovery Test 6 (URT-6) - Day 4 Afternoon Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-20

    USS Anchorage’s Deck Department is heaving around the line as they bring up “Oscar,” a dummy used for man overboard drills. During Underway Recovery Test 6, the USS Anchorage’s man overboard drill gave Kennedy Space Center’s NASA Recovery Team a glimpse of one way an astronaut could be brought from a small boat onto the ship using a stretcher. Once the Orion capsule splashes down in the Pacific Ocean, astronauts can choose to stay in the capsule until it is pulled into the well deck of the Navy vessel, or have a diver retrieve them first and then get the capsule later.

  19. Underway Recovery Test 6 (URT-6) - Day 4 Afternoon Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-20

    Chief Warrant Officer Ferrari from the USS Anchorage inspects the Deck Department as they prepare to bring in “Oscar,” a dummy used for man overboard drills. During Underway Recovery Test 6, the USS Anchorage’s man overboard drill gave Kennedy Space Center’s NASA Recovery Team a glimpse of one way an astronaut could be brought from a small boat onto the ship using a stretcher. Once the Orion capsule splashes down in the Pacific Ocean, astronauts can choose to stay in the capsule until it is pulled into the well deck of the Navy vessel, or have a diver retrieve them first and then get the capsule later.

  20. Upgrade of DRAMA-ESA's Space Debris Mitigation Analysis Tool Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelhaus, Johannes; Sanchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Braun, Vitali; Kebschull, Christopher; de Oliveira, Joaquim Correia; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Raul; Wiedemann, Carsten; Krag, Holger; Vorsmann, Peter

    2013-08-01

    One decade ago ESA started the dev elopment of the first version of the software tool called DRAMA (Debris Risk Assessment and Mitigation Analysis) to enable ESA space programs to assess their compliance with the recommendations in the European Code of Conduct for Space Debris Mitigation. This tool was maintained, upgraded and extended during the last year and is now a combination of five individual tools, each addressing a different aspect of debris mitigation. This paper gives an overview of the new DRAMA software in general. Both, the main tools ARES, OSCAR, MIDAS, CROC and SARA will be discussed and the environment used by DRAMA will be explained shortly.

  1. KSC-04pd0726

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla., Center Director Jim Kennedy (far left) stands with (left to right) Bay County school board members Johnny Brock and Thelma Rohan, astronaut Sam Durrance and Panama City Commissioner Johnathon Wilson. Kennedy and Durrance and other NASA officials were at the school to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  2. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India Coastal Current on the continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amol, P.; Shankar, D.; Fernando, V.; Mukherjee, A.; Aparna, S. G.; Fernandes, R.; Michael, G. S.; Khalap, S. T.; Satelkar, N. P.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Gaonkar, M. G.; Tari, A. P.; Kankonkar, A.; Vernekar, S. P.

    2014-06-01

    We present current data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) moored on the continental slope off the west coast of India. The data were collected at four locations (roughly at Kanyakumari, Kollam, Goa, and Mumbai) extending from ˜ 7° to ˜ 20°N during 2008-2012. The observations show that a seasonal cycle, including an annual cycle, is present in the West India Coastal Current (WICC); this seasonal cycle, which strengthens northward, shows considerable interannual variability and is not as strongly correlated along the coast as in climatologies based on ship drifts or the altimeter. The alongshore decorrelation of the WICC is much stronger at intraseasonal periods, which are evident during the winter monsoon all along the coast. This intraseasonal variability is stronger in the south. A striking feature of the WICC is upward phase propagation, which implies an undercurrent whose depth becomes shallower as the season progresses. There are also instances when the phase propagates downward. At the two southern mooring locations off Kollam and Kanyakumari, the cross-shore current, which is usually associated with eddy-like circulations, is comparable to the alongshore current on occasions. A comparison with data from the OSCAR (Ocean Surface Currents Analyses Real-time) data product shows not only similarities, but also significant differences, particularly in the phase. One possible reason for this phase mismatch between the ADCP current at 48 m and the OSCAR current, which represents the current in the 0-30 m depth range, is the vertical phase propagation. Current products based on Ocean General Circulation Models like ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II) and GODAS (Global Ocean Data Assimilation System) show a weaker correlation with the ADCP current, and ECCO2 does capture some of the observed variability.

  3. KSC-04pd0709

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Pam Biegert (back to camera), chief of KSC’s Education Programs and University Research Office, praises the costumes of two students who welcomed NASA representatives to Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. At left is astronaut Sam Durrance, and at right is Center Director Jim Kennedy. NASA-KSC officials are visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share America’s new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASA’s stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  4. The Marin Lab at the Dawn of Cognitive Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Myrna F

    2015-09-01

    This essay discusses the intellectual developments in psychology, linguistics, and behavioral neurology that shaped Oscar Marin's approach to disorders of high cortical function. As Chief of Neurology at Baltimore City Hospitals in the 1970s, Dr Marin teamed with biopsychologist Eleanor Saffran and the author in seminal studies of acquired language disorders (aphasia) centering on core processes of syntax and semantics, and rejecting premature reductionism. The philosophical and methodological principles that motivated these studies are traced through the author's personal recollections and the published writings of the Marin lab. These principles came to be associated with the cognitive neuropsychology school of research and have important linkages to contemporary work in the neuroscience of aphasia and related cognitive disorders.

  5. MLM Builder: An Integrated Suite for Development and Maintenance of Arden Syntax Medical Logic Modules

    PubMed Central

    Sailors, R. Matthew

    1997-01-01

    The Arden Syntax specification for sharable computerized medical knowledge bases has not been widely utilized in the medical informatics community because of a lack of tools for developing Arden Syntax knowledge bases (Medical Logic Modules). The MLM Builder is a Microsoft Windows-hosted CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering) tool designed to aid in the development and maintenance of Arden Syntax Medical Logic Modules (MLMs). The MLM Builder consists of the MLM Writer (an MLM generation tool), OSCAR (an anagram of Object-oriented ARden Syntax Compiler), a test database, and the MLManager (an MLM management information system). Working together, these components form a self-contained, unified development environment for the creation, testing, and maintenance of Arden Syntax Medical Logic Modules.

  6. Two-hundred years of hydrogeology in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenshein, J. S.; Moore, J.E.; Lohman, S.W.; Chase, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    The Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America (GSA) sponsored a symposium entitled ' Hydrogeology in the United States, 1776- 1976 ' at the annual meeting of the GSA on November 9, 1976. The symposium was organized to provide a forum for discussion of major eras in the history of American hydrogeology and to contribute to the bicentennial celebration of the founding of the United States. Presentations were broken down into 3 sections: The Early Era (with a tribute to Oscar E. Meinzer), 1776-1920; Meinzer Era, 1910-1940; and the Modern Era (including scientific advantages; the quantification of hydrogeology; geochemistry; surface and borehole geophysics; and hydrogeology, policy, and politics) 1940-1976. (Lantz-PTT)

  7. [Ceroplastics and forensic medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, Universidade de São Paulo, 1934-1950].

    PubMed

    Carreta, Jorge Augusto

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the relationships between ceroplastics and the institutionalization of forensic medicine as a discipline at the Faculty of Medicine, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. The wax models, representing diseases or body parts that were the subject of medical forensic investigation, were produced by Augusto Esteves between 1936 and 1960. It is believed that the ceroplastic production represented the program devised by Flamínio Fávero, full professor of forensic medicine between 1923 and 1955. The comparison between the wax pieces at Museu Técnico-Científico (a science and technology museum) at Instituto Oscar Freire and the treatise on forensic medicine by Fávero, first published in 1938, indicates that such a supposition is plausible.

  8. Ancient and modern women in the "Woman's World".

    PubMed

    Hurst, Isobel

    2009-01-01

    Under the editorship of Oscar Wilde, the "Woman's World" exemplified the popular dissemination of Hellenism through periodical culture. Addressing topics such as marriage, politics, and education in relation to the lives of women in the ancient world, the magazine offered an unfamiliar version of the reception of ancient Greece and Rome in late-Victorian aestheticism, one that was accessible to a wide readership because it was often based on images rather than texts. The classical scholar Jane Ellen Harrison addressed herself to this audience of women readers, discussing the similarities between modern collegiate life and the "woman's world" that enabled Sappho to flourish in ancient Greece. The "Woman's World" thus questions gender stereotypes by juxtaposing ancient and modern women, implicitly endorsing varied models of womanhood.

  9. The Marin Lab at the Dawn of Cognitive Neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2015-01-01

    This essay discusses the intellectual developments in psychology, linguistics, and behavioral neurology that shaped Oscar Marin’s approach to disorders of high cortical function. As Chief of Neurology at Baltimore City Hospitals in the 1970s, Dr Marin teamed with biopsychologist Eleanor Saffran and the author in seminal studies of acquired language disorders (aphasia) centering on core processes of syntax and semantics, and rejecting premature reductionism. The philosophical and methodological principles that motivated these studies are traced through the author’s personal recollections and the published writings of the Marin lab. These principles came to be associated with the cognitive neuropsychology school of research and have important linkages to contemporary work in the neuroscience of aphasia and related cognitive disorders. PMID:26413736

  10. KSC-04PD-0710

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA-KSC representatives pose with two students in front of Oscar Patterson Elementary Magnet School in Panama City, Fla. From left are Pam Biegert (chief of KSCs Education Programs and University Research Office), astronaut Sam Durrance, Center Director Jim Kennedy, John Halsema (chief, Government Relations Office), Steve Lewis (assistant to Kennedy), and Mike Rein (division chief, Communications). NASA-KSC officials are visiting NASA Explorer Schools in Florida and Georgia to share Americas new vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Kennedy is talking with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  11. Improved LANDSAT to give better view of earth resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The launch data of LANDSAT 3 is announced. The improved capability of the spacecrafts' remote sensors (the return beam vidicon and the multispectral scanner) and application of LANDSAT data to the study of energy supplies, food production, and global large-scale environmental monitoring are discussed along with the piggyback amateur radio communication satellite-OSCAR-D, the plasma Interaction Experiment, and the data collection system onboard LANDSAT 3. An assessment of the utility of LANDSAT multispectral data is given based on the research results to data from studies of LANDSAT 1 and 2 data. Areas studied include agriculture, rangelands, forestry, water resources, environmental and marine resources, environmental and marine resources, cartography, land use, demography, and geological surveys and mineral/petroleum exploration.

  12. Inter comparison of Tropical Indian Ocean features in different ocean reanalysis products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Ananya; Parekh, Anant; Chowdary, J. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2017-09-01

    This study makes an inter comparison of ocean state of the Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) in different ocean reanalyses such as global ocean data assimilation system (GODAS), ensemble coupled data assimilation (ECDA), ocean reanalysis system 4 (ORAS4) and simple ocean data assimilation (SODA) with reference to the in-situ buoy observations, satellite observed sea surface temperature (SST), EN4 analysis and ocean surface current analysis real time (OSCAR). Analysis of mean state of SST and sea surface salinity (SSS) reveals that ORAS4 is better comparable with satellite observations as well as EN4 analysis, and is followed by SODA, ECDA and GODAS. The surface circulation in ORAS4 is closer to OSCAR compared to the other reanalyses. However mixed layer depth (MLD) is better simulated by SODA, followed by ECDA, ORAS4 and GODAS. Seasonal evolution of error indicates that the highest deviation in SST and MLD over the TIO exists during spring and summer in GODAS. Statistical analysis with concurrent data of EN4 for the period of 1980-2010 supports that the difference and standard deviation (variability strength) ratio for SSS and MLD is mostly greater than one. In general the strength of variability is overestimated by all the reanalyses. Further comparison with in-situ buoy observations supports that MLD errors over the equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO) and the Bay of Bengal are higher than with EN4 analysis. Overall ORAS4 displays higher correlation and lower error among all reanalyses with respect to both EN4 analysis and buoy observations. Major issues in the reanalyses are the underestimation of upper ocean stability in the TIO, underestimation of surface current in the EIO, overestimation of vertical shear of current and improper variability in different oceanic variables. To improve the skill of reanalyses over the TIO, salinity vertical structure and upper ocean circulation need to be better represented in reanalyses.

  13. Accuracy of Down syndrome risks produced in a first-trimester screening programme incorporating fetal nuchal translucency thickness and maternal serum biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Kevin

    2002-03-01

    Over the past three years approximately 12 000 women have been screened in the first trimester through our OSCAR programme, which utilizes fetal NT and maternal serum free beta-hCG and PAPP-A. During this time 30 cases of Down syndrome were identified either prenatally or postnatally. Using an established procedure the accuracy of predicted risk for Down syndrome was assessed in a population of 30 cases of Down syndrome and 11 758 unaffected pregnancies. The correlation between predicted risk and prevalence of Down syndrome was very high (r=0.9995). It is concluded that risks produced by the Fetal Medicine Foundation combined risk algorithm agree very closely with Down syndrome prevalence and can be used with confidence when counselling women of their risk. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. KSC-2011-6821

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-08

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, members of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) launch team monitor GRAIL's launch countdown from the Mission Directors Center in Hangar AE. From left are Joe Lackovich, NASA advisory manager, NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP); Amanda Mitskevich, manager, LSP; and Oscar Toledo, NASA Headquarters senior advisor, LSP. Launch is scheduled for 8:37:06 a.m. EDT Sept. 8 from Space Launch Complex 17B on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem around the moon to precisely measure and map variations in the moon's gravitational field. The mission will provide the most accurate global gravity field to date for any planet, including Earth. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/grail. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  15. Land, Life, and Security: An Interview with Edgardo Garcia, Secretary General of the Association of Farm Workers in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Madeleine K; Gonzalez, Marvin

    2016-08-01

    This is an interview with Edgardo Garcia, Secretary General of the Association of Farm Workers in Nicaragua and Oscar Berríos from the Nicaraguan National Engineering University. The interview was conducted in Nicaragua in October 2013. Garcia and Berríos address the importance of organizing among formal workers and informal workers, and the shared conditions of both in Nicaragua. They highlight the history and context of the agricultural workers who began organizing during the national armed revolutionary war, the role of government to create conditions for healthy and safe work, and the need for workers to organize and advocate for themselves. Finally, they highlight the importance of solidarity among workers and the need for alliances with unions and technical assistance providers around the world. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, (far right) a research scientist, packs a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Assisting him is Jeffrey Richards, project science coordinator with SGT on the Engineering Services Contract (ESC). Seated in the foreground is Susan Manning-Roach, a quality assurance specialist, also with ESC. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  17. The white marble used in Brasília, a World Heritage and the capital of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heloisa Barros de Oliveira Frascá, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Created as the Brazilian capital, in the central western part of Brazil, Brasilia is a definitive example of 20th century modernist urbanism. It was built in only four years, from 1956 to 1960, following the project of urban planner Lucio Costa and architect Oscar Niemeyer that intended that every element - from the layout of the residential and administrative districts (often compared to the shape of a bird in flight) to the symmetry of the buildings themselves - should be in harmony with the city's overall design. This description is from the World Heritage Centre, of Unesco, that nominated Brasilia as a Cultural Heritage Property in 1987. Most of the remarkable buildings designed Oscar Niemeyer, cited by Unesco, are around the Plaza of Three Powers, as the Planalto ("Plateau") Palace, the National Congress, the Supreme Court, the Cathedral, the National Theatre among others. Aside from the worldwide recognition of the architectonic value of these buildings, it is barely mentioned the expressive use of white marble as cladding. Very few are found in the literature about specification criteria, provenance, fixation method and conservation. According to Oscar Niemeyer Foundation, at this moment they know that the stone come from a supplier in the State of Rio de Janeiro. A preliminary research indicated that the marble used in most of Brasilia buildings are from the municipality of Italva, in the northwest of the State of Rio de Janeiro (DRM-RJ, 2012). In a study carried out by DRM-RJ, in 2003, it is mentioned two white marble commercialized as dimension stone in Italva: "Sparkling Marble" (SM) and "Italva White Marble" (IWM), respectively dolomite-calcite marble and dolomite marble. Their main characteristics are: bulk specific gravity: 2,792 kg/m3 (SM) and 2,852kg/m3 (IWM); water absorption: 0.08 % (SM) and 0.10 % (IWM); uniaxial compression strength: 84.3 MPa (SM) and 88.2 MPa (IWM); modulus of rupture: 9.92 MPa (SM) and 8.75 MPa (IWM); coefficient of linear

  18. Investigation of the Hoyle state in12C with a new hodoscope detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Lombardo, I.; Vigilante, M.; De Luca, M.; Acosta, L.; Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cherubini, S.; Cvetinovic, A.; D'Agata, G.; Francalanza, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Ordine, A.; Pizzone, R.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Santagati, G.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Verde, G.

    2017-07-01

    The {0}2+ state in12C (7.654MeV, the Hoyle state) is important for the understanding of clustering phenomena in nuclei. The pronounced cluster nature of this state allows the triple-α process in stars with a reaction rate regulated by its structure properties. To precisely estimate the direct component in the 3α decay mechanism of the Hoyle state, we developed a new experiment using the14N(d,α)12C reaction at 10.5MeV. An anti-coincidence telescope was used to identify the α ejectiles leading the residual12C in the Hoyle state, while its decays in 3α were studied by means of a new hodoscope of silicon detectors, superOSCAR, placed in kinematical coincidence to fully reconstruct the events. Details of the experiment and preliminary results are discussed in the text.

  19. Don't let your disease define you.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Vivian Stephenson directed information technology systems at numerous companies, including Target Corporation, as Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, and Williams-Sonoma, as Chief Operating Officer and Chief Information Officer. In 1994, Vivian was a recipient of the "Oscar" of information technology-the Smithsonian Institution and Computerworld Award-for developing the Planned Store Inventory System at Mervyn's Corporation. Vivian is a former chair of the Board of Trustees at Mills College, from which she received a Doctor of Humane Letters Honorary Degree in 2005 for her "ethical and compassionate leadership" and for serving as "an inspired, unwavering advocate for women and the power of education to transform women's lives and society as a whole." Vivian survived two different types of breast cancer, diagnosed in 1980 and 1996. In 2009, she was diagnosed with stage IV ovarian cancer.

  20. Final Report on DOE Project entitled Dynamic Optimized Advanced Scheduling of Bandwidth Demands for Large-Scale Science Applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ramamurthy, Byravamurthy

    2014-05-05

    In this project, developed scheduling frameworks for dynamic bandwidth demands for large-scale science applications. In particular, we developed scheduling algorithms for dynamic bandwidth demands in this project. Apart from theoretical approaches such as Integer Linear Programming, Tabu Search and Genetic Algorithm heuristics, we have utilized practical data from ESnet OSCARS project (from our DOE lab partners) to conduct realistic simulations of our approaches. We have disseminated our work through conference paper presentations and journal papers and a book chapter. In this project we addressed the problem of scheduling of lightpaths over optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks. We published severalmore » conference papers and journal papers on this topic. We also addressed the problems of joint allocation of computing, storage and networking resources in Grid/Cloud networks and proposed energy-efficient mechanisms for operatin optical WDM networks.« less

  1. Harnessing the power of the grassroots to conduct public health research in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study from western Kenya in the adaptation of community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches.

    PubMed

    Kamanda, Allan; Embleton, Lonnie; Ayuku, David; Atwoli, Lukoye; Gisore, Peter; Ayaya, Samuel; Vreeman, Rachel; Braitstein, Paula

    2013-01-31

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a collaborative approach to research that involves the equitable participation of those affected by an issue. As the field of global public health grows, the potential of CBPR to build capacity and to engage communities in identification of problems and development and implementation of solutions in sub-Saharan Africa has yet to be fully tapped. The Orphaned and Separated Children's Assessments Related to their Health and Well-Being (OSCAR) project is a longitudinal cohort of orphaned and non-orphaned children in Kenya. This paper will describe how CBPR approaches and principles can be incorporated and adapted into the study design and methods of a longitudinal epidemiological study in sub-Saharan Africa using this project as an example. The CBPR framework we used involves problem identification, feasibility and planning; implementation; and evaluation and dissemination. This case study will describe how we have engaged the community and adapted CBPR methods to OSCAR's Health and Well-being Project's corresponding to this framework in four phases: 1) community engagement, 2) sampling and recruitment, 3) retention, validation, and follow-up, and 4) analysis, interpretation and dissemination. To date the study has enrolled 3130 orphaned and separated children, including children living in institutional environments, those living in extended family or other households in the community, and street-involved children and youth. Community engagement and participation was integral in refining the study design and identifying research questions that were impacting the community. Through the participation of village Chiefs and elders we were able to successfully identify eligible households and randomize the selection of participants. The on-going contribution of the community in the research process has been vital to participant retention and data validation while ensuring cultural and community relevance and equity in the

  2. Seismic microzoning projects and their implementation in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Cano, V.; Olbrich, F.; Vallee, M.; Morales, C.; Arreaza, A.; Mendes, K.; Klarica, S.; Alvarez Gomez, J.; Aray, J.; Vielma, J.; Pombo, A.; Diaz, J.; Grupo de trabajo

    2013-05-01

    analysis. Further members of the "Grupo de trabajo: Investigaciones aplicadas a la gestion integral del riesgo en espacios urbanos" are: Oscar Andrés López, Milgreya Cerrada, Rafael Torres, Oscar Ramírez, Elieser Sanzonetti, José Heredia, Jaime Avendaño, Fernando Mazuera, Luis Molina, Alexi Suárez, Víctor Rocabado, Mónica Paolini, Luis Yegres, Leonardo Alvarado, Herbert Rendón, Luz Rodríguez, Jorge González.

  3. Thales Angenieux: 42 years of cine 35 mm zoom leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debize, Jacques

    2004-02-01

    Since the early years of zoom optics, Angenieux has been involved in cine 8 mm, 16 mm and 35 mm. Among more than twenty different zoom lenses, four of them have been milestones in this field, technical progresses being sanctified by two Oscars in 1964 and 1990. From 1960 to 2002 Angenieux has created first the 4 x 35 LA2, the first four times mechanically compensated zoom lens for cine 35 mm in the world, secondary the 10 x 25 T2, the first ten times mechanically compensated zoom lens for cine 35 mm in the world, then the 10 x 25 HR, the top level of quality for its category and finally the 12 x 24 Optimo with all characteristics and performances greatly increased. This leadership has been reached thanks to computers and in-house softwares but also thanks to new manufacturing processes.

  4. How did the fracking controversy emerge in the period 2010-2012?

    PubMed

    Mazur, Allan

    2016-02-01

    In 2010-2012, the controversy over fracking grew rapidly, first in the United States, and then internationally. An important step was the anti-fracking documentary film Gasland. With help from celebrity sources, the film was produced and won a prize at the Sundance Film Festival by early 2010 and had an Oscar nomination by early 2011, in the meantime popularizing potent images of hazard including tainted aquifers and ignitable water running from kitchen faucets. During this period, major US news organizations paid little attention to the issue. The offshore Deepwater Horizon disaster of April 2010 spurred The New York Times to prolific reporting on potential risks of the new onshore technique for extracting shale gas. With flagship news coverage, the controversy had by 2012 gained wide media attention that evoked public concern and opposition, spreading from the United States to other nations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Distance learning: empathy and culture in Junot Diaz's "Wildwood".

    PubMed

    Garden, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    This essay discusses critical approaches to culture, difference, and empathy in health care education through a reading of Junot Diaz's "Wildwood" chapter from the 2007 novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I begin with an analysis of the way that Diaz's narrative invites readers to imagine and explore the experiences of others with subtlety and complexity. My reading of "Wildwood" illuminates its double-edged injunction to try to imagine another's perspective while recognizing the limits to-or even the impossibility of-that exercise. I draw on post-colonial theory and feminist science studies to illuminate a text that is created and interpreted in a post-colonial context-the Dominican diaspora in the United States. The essay offers a model of historical and critical analysis that health care educators can use to frame the concept of empathy in the classroom and the clinic.

  6. X-ray fluorescence and imaging analyses of paintings by the Brazilian artist Oscar Pereira Da Silva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, P. H. O. V.; Kajiya, E. A. M.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Neiva, A. C.; Pinto, H. P. F.; Almeida, P. A. D.

    2014-02-01

    Non-destructive analyses, such as EDXRF (Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence) spectroscopy, and imaging were used to characterize easel paintings. The analyzed objects are from the collection of the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo. EDXRF results allowed us to identify the chemical elements present in the pigments, showing the use of many Fe-based pigments, modern pigments, such as cobalt blue and cadmium yellow, as well as white pigments containing lead and zinc used by the artist in different layers. Imaging analysis was useful to identify the state of conservation, the localization of old and new restorations and also to detect and unveil the underlying drawings revealing the artist's creative processes.

  7. The Value of an Independent Royal Air Force - Breaking the Oscar Wilde Paradigm in British Defence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    discussion. 11 Ian Drury , Defence Correspondent, "Could this be the end for the RAF? Military chief refuses to rule out merger with Navy as cuts loom...However, would it provide the flexibility to be effective if a different threat emerged in ten years time? In contrast to Smith‟s thesis, Colin ...1984), 88. 25 General Rupert Smith, The Utility of Force – The Art of War in the Modern World (New York, NY: Vintage Books, 2008), 5. 26 Colin

  8. Forensic seismology and the sinking of the Kursk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, Keith D.; Wallace, Terry C.; Taylor, Steven R.; Hartse, Hans E.

    On August 10, 2000, Russia's Northern Fleet began its largest naval exercise in more than a decade. Among the vessels taking part was the heavily-armed Kursk, an Oscar class submarine that was the most modern cruise-missile sub in the fleet.Beginning on August 14, a series of reports in the press indicated that the Kursk had been severely damaged during the exercise and that the crew were likely dead. By August 17, news agencies were reporting that seismic networks in the Baltic area had detected two seismic events which appeared to correspond to the Kursk disaster in time and space (Figure 1). Specifically the seismic events were consistent with reports from the British Broadcasting Corporation on the location of ongoing rescue efforts. The fact that this section of the Barents Sea is essentially aseismic added credence to the assertion that the seismic events were directly related to the sinking of the Kursk.

  9. Nursing home safety: does financial performance matter?

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Reid M; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Darren; Carretta, Henry J

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between financial performance and selected safety measures of nursing homes in the State of Florida. We used descriptive analysis on a total sample of 1,197. Safety information was from the Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data of 2003 to 2005, while the financial performance measures were from the Medicare cost reports of 2002 to 2004. Finally, we examined the most frequently cited deficiencies as well as the relationship between financial performance and quality indicators. Nursing homes in the bottom quartile of financial performance perform poorly on most resident-safety measures of care; however, nursing homes in the top two financial categories also experienced a higher number of deficiencies. Nursing homes in the next to lowest quartile of financial performance category best perform on most of these safety measures. The results reinforce the need to monitor nursing home quality and resident safety in US nursing homes, especially among facilities with poor overall financial performance.

  10. Nursing home consumer complaints and quality of care: a national view.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David G

    2006-06-01

    This study uses 5 years of national data on investigated nursing home complaints (1998-2002) to evaluate whether complaints might be used to assess nursing home quality of care. On-Line Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data are used to evaluate the association between consumer complaints, facility and resident characteristics, and other nursing home quality measures. The analyses are undertaken in the context of considerable cross-state variation in nursing home complaint processes and rates. Complaints varied across facility characteristics in ways consistent with the nursing home quality literature. Complaints were significantly positively associated with survey deficiencies and the presence of serious survey deficiencies, and significantly negatively associated with nurse and nurse aide staffing. Complaints performance was significantly predictive of survey deficiencies at subsequent inspections. This study presents the first national evidence for using consumer complaints to assess nursing home quality of care. Despite limitations, nursing home complaints appear to offer a real-time signal of quality concerns.

  11. Dynamic modeling of environmental risk associated with drilling discharges to marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Durgut, İsmail; Rye, Henrik; Reed, Mark; Smit, Mathijs G D; Ditlevsen, May Kristin

    2015-10-15

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of base-fluids, chemicals and particulates, and may, after discharge to the marine environment, result in adverse effects on benthic communities. A numerical model was developed to estimate the fate of drilling discharges in the marine environment, and associated environmental risks. Environmental risk from deposited drilling waste in marine sediments is generally caused by four types of stressors: oxygen depletion, toxicity, burial and change of grain size. In order to properly model these stressors, natural burial, biodegradation and bioturbation processes were also included. Diagenetic equations provide the basis for quantifying environmental risk. These equations are solved numerically by an implicit-central differencing scheme. The sediment model described here is, together with a fate and risk model focusing on the water column, implemented in the DREAM and OSCAR models, both available within the Marine Environmental Modeling Workbench (MEMW) at SINTEF in Trondheim, Norway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geothermal heating in the Panama Basin and its impact on water mass transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyte, D.; Morales Maqueda, M. A.; Hobbs, R. W.; Megann, A.; Smeed, D.

    2017-12-01

    Geothermal heating is a driving force of abyssal water transformation. To quantify its impact at the basin scale, a hydrographic survey of the Panama Basin was carried out in 2014-2015 as part of the international project OSCAR (Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge). The study shows that about half of the water entering the basin, which is connected to the Pacific Ocean only through the a narrow passage part of the Ecuador Trench, is converted to lighter water within just 200 km downstream of the passage. Of the resulting water, a staggering 90% is transformed by geothermal heating inside the basin, welling up into the ocean interior from a bottom boundary layer (BBL) that can be up to 1000 m thick. The geothermal forcing leaves an imprint in temperature-salinity properties hundreds of meters above the thick BBL. We present a conceptual model of the abyssal water transformation in the basin that incorporates these processes.

  13. Impact of climate change and seasonal trends on the fate of Arctic oil spills.

    PubMed

    Nordam, Tor; Dunnebier, Dorien A E; Beegle-Krause, C J; Reed, Mark; Slagstad, Dag

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effects of a warmer climate, and seasonal trends, on the fate of oil spilled in the Arctic. Three well blowout scenarios, two shipping accidents and a pipeline rupture were considered. We used ensembles of numerical simulations, using the OSCAR oil spill model, with environmental data for the periods 2009-2012 and 2050-2053 (representing a warmer future) as inputs to the model. Future atmospheric forcing was based on the IPCC's A1B scenario, with the ocean data generated by the hydrodynamic model SINMOD. We found differences in "typical" outcome of a spill in a warmer future compared to the present, mainly due to a longer season of open water. We have demonstrated that ice cover is extremely important for predicting the fate of an Arctic oil spill, and find that oil spills in a warming climate will in some cases result in greater areal coverage and shoreline exposure.

  14. Are nursing home survey deficiencies higher in facilities with greater staff turnover.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Nancy B; Johantgen, Meg; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Han, Kihye

    2014-02-01

    To examine CNA and licensed nurse (RN+LPN/LVN) turnover in relation to numbers of deficiencies in nursing homes. A secondary data analysis of information from the National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) and contemporaneous data from the Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Data were linked by facility as the unit of analysis to determine the relationship of CNA and licensed nurse turnover on nursing home deficiencies. The 2004 NNHS used a multistage sampling strategy to generate a final sample of 1174 nursing homes, which represent 16,100 NHs in the United States. This study focused on the 1151 NNHS facilities with complete deficiency data. Turnover was defined as the total CNAs/licensed nurse full-time equivalents (FTEs) who left during the preceding 3 months (full- and part-time) divided by the total FTE. NHs with high turnover were defined as those with rates above the 75th percentile (25.3% for CNA turnover and 17.9% for licensed nurse turnover) versus all other facilities. This study used selected OSCAR deficiencies from the Quality of Care, Quality of Life, and Resident Behavior categories, which are considered to be more closely related to nursing care. We defined NHs with high deficiencies as those with numbers of deficiencies above the 75th percentile versus all others. Using SUDAAN PROC RLOGIST, we included NNHS sampling design effects and examined associations of CNA/licensed nurse turnover with NH deficiencies, adjusting for staffing, skill mix, bed size, and ownership in binomial logistic regression models. High CNA turnover was associated with high numbers of Quality of Care (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.10-2.13), Resident Behavior (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.03-1.97) and total selected deficiencies (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.12). Licensed nurse turnover was significantly related to Quality of Care deficiencies (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.50-2.82) and total selected deficiencies (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.25-2.33). When both CNA turnover and licensed nurse turnover were

  15. Integrated organotypic slice cultures and RT-QuIC (OSCAR) assay: implications for translational discovery in protein misfolding diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protein misfolding is a key pathological event in neurodegenerative diseases like prion diseases, synucleinopathies, and tauopathies that are collectively termed protein misfolding disorders (PMD). Prions are a prototypic model to study protein aggregation biology and therapeutic development. Attemp...

  16. Collagen type I as a ligand for receptor-mediated signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boraschi-Diaz, Iris; Wang, Jennifer; Mort, John S.; Komarova, Svetlana V.

    2017-05-01

    Collagens form the fibrous component of the extracellular matrix in all multi-cellular animals. Collagen type I is the most abundant collagen present in skin, tendons, vasculature, as well as the organic portion of the calcified tissue of bone and teeth. This review focuses on numerous receptors for which collagen acts as a ligand, including integrins, discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and 2, OSCAR, GPVI, G6b-B and Lair-1 of the leukocyte receptor complex and mannose family receptor uPARAP/Endo 180. We explore the process of collagen production and self-assembly, as well as its degradation by collagenases and gelatinases in order to predict potential temporal and spatial sites of action of different collagen receptors. While the interactions of the mature collagen matrix with integrins and DDR are well-appreciated, potential signals from immature matrix as well as collagen degradation products are possible but not yet described. The role of multiple collagen receptors in physiological processes and their contribution to pathophysiology of diseases affecting collagen homeostasis require further studies.

  17. Caring for people with dementia and challenging behaviors in nursing homes: A needs assessment geriatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M; Bay, Camden P; Levy, Barcey T; Carnahan, Ryan M

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 50% of nursing home residents have a dementia diagnosis. The purpose of this research was to conduct a needs assessment of directors of nursing (DON) in Iowa nursing homes in relation to caring for patients with Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia. DON responses were linked to Online Survey Certification and Reporting/Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reporting (OSCAR/CASPER) data to examine how facility characteristics may be associated with use of and confidence in non-drug management strategies. From 431 questionnaires mailed to DONs, 160 (37%) were returned. Regression analysis showed that those who were more confident in managing challenging behavior were more likely to have satisfaction with current training on managing challenging behaviors and had a psychiatrist available to visit the facility. Facilities with a larger proportion of patients with challenging behaviors being treated with non-drug approaches instead of antipsychotics had DONs who were more likely to be confident in non-drug management strategies and have knowledge about the FDA antipsychotic medications risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Edward Burne-Jones' Heavenly Conception: A Biblical Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheney, L. D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Edward Burne-Jones was a Pre-Raphaelite artist and designer, who collaborated with William Morris on many decorative arts (stained glass windows, book illustrations, ceramic and tapestry designs). He was a founding partner in the firm Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company. Burne-Jones composed The Days of Creation between 1870 and 1876 for the Morris firm. These paintings were executed in gouache and gold paint, and cartoons were made for tile and in stained glass, for the Church of St. Editha at Tamworth in Staffordshire. Burne-Jones' creation was highly praised and elegantly described by Oscar Wilde: “The picture is divided into six compartments, each representing a day in the Creation of the World, under the symbol of an angel holding a crystal globe, within which is shown the work of a day.” This paper will examine how Burne-Jones visualized an unusual celestial creation where angels holding magical spheres unveil the divine manifestation for the creation of a terrestrial realm. He created a cosmic utopia of the natural world.

  19. A bone-resorption surface-targeting nanoparticle to deliver anti-miR214 for osteoporosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shufan; Liu, Jiafan; Sun, Yao; Wang, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    With increasing fracture risks due to fragility, osteoporosis is a global health problem threatening postmenopausal women. In these patients, osteoclasts play leading roles in bone loss and fracture. How to inhibit osteoclast activity is the key issue for osteoporosis treatment. In recent years, miRNA-based gene therapy through gene regulation has been considered a potential therapeutic method. However, in light of the side effects, the use of therapeutic miRNAs in osteoporosis treatment is still limited by the lack of tissue/cell-specific delivery systems. Here, we developed polyurethane (PU) nanomicelles modified by the acidic peptide Asp8. Our data showed that without overt toxicity or eliciting an immune response, this delivery system encapsulated and selectively deliver miRNAs to OSCAR+ osteoclasts at bone-resorption surface in vivo. With the Asp8-PU delivery system, anti-miR214 was delivered to osteoclasts, and bone microarchitecture and bone mass were improved in ovariectomized osteoporosis mice. Therefore, Asp8-PU could be a useful bone-resorption surface-targeting delivery system for treatment of osteoclast-induced bone diseases and aging-related osteoporosis. PMID:29075114

  20. Ground water in Pavant Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennis, P. E.; Maxey, G.B.; Thomas, H.E.

    1946-01-01

    The users of wells for irrigation in Pavant Valley, particularly in the Flowell district, have long been cognizant of their utter dependency upon ground water for livelihood, and were among the first in the State to make an organized effort to conserve supplies by prevention of waste. Since passage of the State ground-water law in 1935, the State Engineer has not approved applications for new wells in the areas of most concentrated development, and has deferred adjudication of existing water rights until adequate data concerning the ground-water resources become available. The investigation of ground-water resources in Pavant Valley was suggested by the State Engineer and constitutes one of a series that are being made in the important groundwater basins of Utah by the Federal Geological Survey in cooperation with the State Engineer. The investigation was under the general supervision of Oscar E. Meinzer, geologist in charge of the ground-water division of the Federal Geological Survey. H. E. Thomas, in charge of groundwater investigations in Utah, returned from military service overseas in time to assist in the completion of the manuscript, and edited the report.

  1. Laboratory spectroscopy of Mars Analogue materials and latest field results from Iceland and Eifel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    We have established a collection of samples, and measured them in the laboratory towards a spectrometric database that could be used as a reference for future orbital or in situ measurements. We are using systematically for all samples UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers, and sporadically a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and a Raman laser spectrometer on control samples. We also used a documented set of Moon-Mars relevant minerals curated at VU Amsterdam, as well as samples retrieved from Mars analogue campaigns in Utah (Foing et al., 2011, 2016), Iceland (Mid-Atlantic ridge spreading and magma-ice interaction), La Réunion hot spot volcano and Eifel volcanic region (mixed hotspot and melt-ascent through crust fractures) from recent campaigns in 2015 and 2016.. We discuss samples spectral diagnostics of volcanic processes and hydrous alterations that can inform recent or upcoming measurements from Mars orbit or in situ rovers. Acknowledgements: we thank Dominic Doyle for ESTEC optical lab support, Euan Monaghan (Leiden U) for FTIR measurement support, Wim van Westrenen for access to VU samples, Oscar Kamps (Utrecht U), Aidan Cowley (EAC) and Matthias Sperl (DLR) for support discussions

  2. Salinity and temperature tolerance of an emergent alien species, the Amazon fish Astronotus ocellatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutierrel, Silvia M M; Schofield, Pam; Prodocimo, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    Astronotus ocellatus (oscar), is native to the Amazon basin and, although it has been introduced to many countries, little is known regarding its tolerances for salinity and temperature. In this report, we provide data on the tolerance of A. ocellatus to abrupt and gradual changes in salinity, its high and low temperature tolerance, and information on how salinity, temperature, and fish size interact to affect survival. Fish were able to survive abrupt transfer to salinities as high as 16 ppt with no mortality. When salinity change was gradual (2 ppt/day), fish in the warm-temperature experiment (28°C) survived longer than fish in the cool-temperature experiment (18°C). Larger fish survived longer than smaller ones at the higher salinities when the temperature was warm, but when the temperature was cool fish size had little effect on survival. In the temperature-tolerance experiments, fish survived from 9 to 41°C for short periods of time. Overall, the species showed a wide range of temperature and salinity tolerance. Thus, in spite of the tropical freshwater origin of this species, physiological stress is not likely to hinder its dispersal to brackish waters, especially when temperatures are warm.

  3. Robin Williams' suicide: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-01-01

    The world renowned comedian and four-time Oscar nominated actor Robin Williams died on August 11, 2014. From the outset, the news indicated that his death was believed to be a suicide and this was later confirmed to be true by the autopsy reports. Williams had been suffering from severe depression, which is believed to be the leading contributor to his suicide. In this case study, I will highlight the event of the actor's suicide and the main risk factors along with depression leading to his tragic death. As of the end of 2015, no other case study seemed to have addressed or explored the links between the cause (or causes) and events leading to Robin Williams' suicide. Robin Williams was suffering from relationship problems, financial problems, drug addiction, and major depression. All of these factors led to his suicide. The chances of committing suicide drastically increase in the presence of any of the key risk factors. Unfortunately, the actor Robin Williams was dealing with four of the major risk factors all together, which put him at a high risk of committing suicide and eventually led to his tragic death.

  4. The inhibitory effect of vitamin K on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Jie; Kim, Min Seuk; Ahn, Byung-Yong

    2015-10-01

    To further understand the correlation between vitamin K and bone metabolism, the effects of vitamins K1, menaquinone-4 (MK-4), and menaquinone-7 (MK-7) on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption were comparatively investigated. Vitamin K2 groups (MK-4 and MK-7) were found to significantly inhibit RANKL-medicated osteoclast cell formation of bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) in a dose-dependent manner, without any evidence of cytotoxicity. The mRNA expression of specific osteoclast differentiation markers, such as c-Fos, NFATc1, OSCAR, and TRAP, as well as NFATc1 protein expression and TRAP activity in RANKL-treated BMMs were inhibited by vitamin K2, although MK-4 exhibited a significantly greater efficiency compared to MK-7. In contrast, the same dose of vitamin K1 had no inhibitory effect on RANKL-induced osteoclast cell formation, but increased the expression of major osteoclastogenic genes. Interestingly, vitamins K1, MK-4 and MK-7 all strongly inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption (p < 0.01) in a dose dependent manner. These results suggest that vitamins K1, MK-4 and MK-7 have anti-osteoporotic properties, while their regulation effects on osteoclastogenesis are somewhat different.

  5. Do Recipients of an Association-Sponsored Quality Award Program Experience Better Quality Outcomes Compared With Other Nursing Facilities Across the United States?

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas; Olson, Doug; Shah, Urvi; Hansen, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    This study explores the relationship between recipients of an association-sponsored Quality Award Program and select measures of quality in U.S. nursing facilities, examined both cross-sectionally and over time. Data used came from Quality Award Program recipients over 9 years (2003-2011) and a set of quality indicators from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. These data were analyzed using a variety of multivariate regression techniques. Cross-sectionally, the award recipients demonstrated higher performance on most of the quality indicators, compared with both the broader field of nursing facilities and also a more stringent comparison group of facilities. Comparing quality from the 4 years before the award was received to the 4 years after the award, the majority of quality indicators demonstrated improvement in those facilities receiving an award. These results indicate that, in general, the nursing facilities that participate in and receive the Silver or Gold American Health Care Association (AHCA) and National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL) National Quality Award perform at a higher level of quality for residents and sustain that heightened performance over a period of time.

  6. Bradykinin regulates osteoblast differentiation by Akt/ERK/NFκB signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Sharma, Kirti; Kumar, Narender; Roy, Partha

    2014-12-01

    Bradykinin (BK), a well known mediator of pain and inflammation, is also known to be involved in the process of bone resorption. The present study therefore evaluated the role of BK in osteoblast lineage commitment. Our data showed that BK inhibits the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, but does not affect their viability. Moreover, BK also inhibits osteoblastic differentiation by significantly downregulating the levels of mRNAs for osteopontin, runX2, col24, osterix, osteocalcin genes and bone mineralization (P < 0.05). Further, BK was found to elicit the BK receptors (BDKR1 and BDKR2) mediated activation of ERK1/2 and Akt pathways, which finally led to the activation of NFκB. BK also promoted the osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow derived preosteoclast cells by upregulating the expression of c-fos, NFATC1, TRAP, clcn7, cathK, and OSCAR genes and increasing TRAP activity through NFκB pathway. In conclusion, our data suggest that BK decreases the differentiation of osteoblasts with concomitant increase in osteoclast formation and thus provides new insight into the mechanism of action of BK in modulating bone resorption. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Preparing our Paralympians: research and development at Ossur, UK. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    PubMed

    Hirons, Richard

    2012-09-01

    In the last 25 years, the continuous evolution in the design of prostheses for individuals with transfemoral and transtibial amputations has been remarkable. Mirroring this development is the dependency and expectancy of the prosthesis technology by the athletes, coaches and other personnel involved in creating Paralympians of today and the future. Össur is recognised as a leader in designing innovative prosthetic products that have contributed worldwide to developing leading Paralympians. The opening section of this article presents an overview of the new Össur products for 2012. Discussion is also focussed on how Össur's high-function prosthetic products are integrated into an athlete's training regime. With involvement of the clinical team discussion is also expanded to recognise the important contribution coaching staff has on optimising performance of a Paralympian's training regime. The dialogue continues with a viewpoint on whether Oscar Pistorius, the face of Össur who wears Flex-Foot Cheetah blades, should participate in the Olympics and Paralympics. While the conclusion of this article may leave more questions than answers, the technology and products offered by Össur provide for a credible foundation and preparation for future challenges beyond the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

  8. Serious Mental Illness and Nursing Home Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Cai, Shubing; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of a nursing home's share of residents with a serious mental illness (SMI) on the quality of care. Data Sources Secondary nursing home level data over the period 2000 through 2008 obtained from the Minimum Data Set, OSCAR, and Medicare claims. Study Design We employ an instrumental variables approach to address the potential endogeneity of the share of SMI residents in nursing homes in a model including nursing home and year fixed effects. Principal Findings An increase in the share of SMI nursing home residents positively affected the hospitalization rate among non-SMI residents and negatively affected staffing skill mix and level. We did not observe a statistically significant effect on inspection-based health deficiencies or the hospitalization rate for SMI residents. Conclusions Across the majority of indicators, a greater SMI share resulted in lower nursing home quality. Given the increased prevalence of nursing home residents with SMI, policy makers and providers will need to adjust practices in the context of this new patient population. Reforms may include more stringent preadmission screening, new regulations, reimbursement changes, and increased reporting and oversight. PMID:23278400

  9. First results from the ionospheric tomography experiment using beacon TEC data obtained by means of a network along a longitude of 136°E over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    2010-03-01

    A chain of newly designed GNU (GNU is not UNIX) Radio Beacon Receivers (GRBR) has recently been established over Japan, primarily for tomographic imaging of the ionosphere over this region. Receivers installed at Shionomisaki (33.45°N, 135.8°E), Shigaraki (34.8°N, 136.1°E), and Fukui (36°N, 136°E) continuously track low earth orbiting satellites (LEOS), mainly OSCAR, Cosmos, and FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC, to obtain simultaneous total electron content (TEC) data from these three locations, which are then used for the tomographic reconstruction of ionospheric electron densities. This is the first GRBR network established for TEC observations, and the first beacon-based tomographic imaging in Japanese longitudes. The first tomographic images revealed the temporal evolution with all of the major features in the ionospheric electron density distribution over Japan. A comparison of the tomographically reconstructed electron densities with the ƒ o F 2 data from Kokubunji (35°N, 139°E) revealed that there was good agreement between the datasets. These first results show the potential of GRBR and its network for making continuous, unattended ionospheric TEC measurements and for tomographic imaging of the ionosphere.

  10. The impact of the prospective payment system for skilled nursing facilities on therapy service provision: a transaction cost approach.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent; Intrator, Orna; Feng, Zhanlian; Angelelli, Joseph; Davis, Jullet A

    2003-12-01

    To examine skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) "make-or-buy" decisions with respect to rehabilitation therapy service provision in the 1990s, both before and after implementation of Medicare's Prospective Payment System (PPS) for SNFs. Longitudinal On-line Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data (1992-2001) on a sample of 10,241 freestanding urban SNFs. We estimated a longitudinal multinomial logistic regression model derived from transaction cost economic theory to predict the probability of the outcome in each of four service provision categories (all employed staff, all contract, mixed, and no services provided). Transaction frequency, uncertainty, and complexity result in greater control over therapy services through employment as opposed to outside contracting. For-profit status and chain affiliation were associated with greater control over therapy services. Following PPS, nursing homes acted to limit transaction costs by either exiting the rehabilitation market or exerting greater control over therapy services by managing rehabilitation services in-house. The financial incentives associated with changes in reimbursement methodology have implications that extend beyond the boundaries of the health care industry segment directly affected. Unintended quality and access consequences need to be carefully monitored by the Medicare program.

  11. Community Discharge of Nursing Home Residents: The Role of Facility Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Holup, Amanda A; Gassoumis, Zachary D; Wilber, Kathleen H; Hyer, Kathryn

    2016-04-01

    Using a socio-ecological model, this study examines the influence of facility characteristics on the transition of nursing home residents to the community after a short stay (within 90 days of admission) or long stay (365 days of admission) across states with different long-term services and supports systems. Data were drawn from the Minimum Data Set, the federal Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) database, the Area Health Resource File, and the LTCFocUs.org database for all free-standing, certified nursing homes in California (n = 1,127) and Florida (n = 657) from July 2007 to June 2008. Hierarchical generalized linear models were used to examine the impact of facility characteristics on the probability of transitioning to the community. Facility characteristics, including size, occupancy, ownership, average length of stay, proportion of Medicare and Medicaid residents, and the proportion of residents admitted from acute care facilities are associated with discharge but differed by state and whether the discharge occurred after a short or long stay. Short- and long-stay nursing home discharge to the community is affected by resident, facility, and sometimes market characteristics, with Medicaid consistently influencing discharge in both states. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Changes in Consumer Demand Following Public Reporting of Summary Quality Ratings: An Evaluation in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Limited consumer use of health care report cards may be due to the large amount of information presented in report cards, which can be difficult to understand. These limitations may be overcome with summary measures. Our objective was to evaluate consumer response to summary measures in the setting of nursing homes. 2005-2010 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. In December 2008, Medicare converted its nursing home report card to summary or star ratings. We test whether there was a change in consumer demand for nursing homes related to the nursing home's star rating after the information was released. The star rating system was associated with a significant change in consumer demand for low- and high-scoring facilities. After the star-based rating system was released, 1-star facilities typically lost 8 percent of their market share and 5-star facilities gained over 6 percent of their market share. The nursing home star rating system significantly affected consumer demand for high- and low-rated nursing homes. These results support the use of summary measures in report cards. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Aberrant intermediate filament and synaptophysin expression is a frequent event in malignant melanoma: an immunohistochemical study of 73 cases.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ryan C; Carter, Jodi M; Folpe, Andrew L

    2015-08-01

    Malignant melanomas are known to express vimentin, among other intermediate filaments. Though anomalous keratin expression by malignant melanoma has been reported, its frequency is not well-established and this phenomenon is not well-known. We have seen in consultation a number of malignant melanomas with anomalous expression of keratin, other intermediate filaments, or synaptophysin, and therefore studied a large group of primary and metastatic melanomas to determine the frequency of these events. About 73 cases of malignant melanoma (22 primaries and 51 metastases) from 71 patients (51 male, 20 female; mean 59 years, range 17-87 years) were retrieved from our archives. Prior diagnoses were confirmed by re-review of hematoxylin and eosin sections and relevant (e.g., S100 protein, HMB45, Melan-A, and tyrosinase) immunohistochemical studies. Available sections were immunostained for keratin (OSCAR and AE1/AE3 antibodies), desmin, neurofilament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, synaptophysin, and chromogranin A. Not all cases could be tested for all markers. Cases were predominantly epithelioid (48/73, 66%) or spindle cell/desmoplastic (25/73, 34%). S100 protein, Melan-A, HMB45, and tyrosinase were positive in 60/65 (92%), 34/64 (53%), 30/60 (50%), 25/48 (52%) of cases, respectively. All five S100-protein-negative cases expressed at least one of the other melanocytic markers: Melan-A (two of four, 50%), HMB45 (two of three, 67%), and tyrosinase (one of two, 50%). All cases expressed at least one melanocytic marker. Cases were positive for keratin (OSCAR, 17/61, 28%; AE1/AE3, 16/40, 40%), desmin (11/47, 24%), neurofilament protein (5/31, 16%), glial fibrillary acidic protein (3/32, 9%), and synaptophysin (10/34, 29%), typically only in a minority of cells. Chromogranin was negative (0/32, 0%). Altogether 9/73 cases (12%) showed expression of >1 intermediate filament. All S100-protein-negative melanomas showed anomalous intermediate filament expression (keratin

  14. On the Character and Mitigation of Atmospheric Noise in InSAR Time Series Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Fielding, E. J.; Fishbein, E.

    2013-12-01

    that we outline. The multispectral near-infrared (NIR) sensors provide high spatial resolution (~1 km) estimates of total column tropospheric water vapor by measuring the absorption of reflected solar illumination and provide may excellent estimates of wet delay. The Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar (OSCAR) project currently provides water vapor products through web services (http://oscar.jpl.nasa.gov). Unfortunately, such sensors require daytime and cloudless observations. Global and regional numerical weather models can provide an additional estimate of both the dry and atmospheric delays with spatial resolution of (3-100 km) and time scales of 1-3 hours, though these models are of lower accuracy than imaging observations and are benefited by independent observations from independent observations of atmospheric water vapor. Despite these issues, the integration of these techniques for InSAR correction and uncertainty estimation may contribute substantially to the reduction and rigorous characterization of uncertainty in InSAR time series analysis - helping to expand the range of tectonic displacements imaged with InSAR, to robustly constrain geophysical models, and to generate a-priori assessments of satellite acquisitions goals.

  15. Parallelizing Compiler Framework and API for Power Reduction and Software Productivity of Real-Time Heterogeneous Multicores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Wada, Yasutaka; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Mase, Masayoshi; Shirako, Jun; Kimura, Keiji; Kasahara, Hironori

    Heterogeneous multicores have been attracting much attention to attain high performance keeping power consumption low in wide spread of areas. However, heterogeneous multicores force programmers very difficult programming. The long application program development period lowers product competitiveness. In order to overcome such a situation, this paper proposes a compilation framework which bridges a gap between programmers and heterogeneous multicores. In particular, this paper describes the compilation framework based on OSCAR compiler. It realizes coarse grain task parallel processing, data transfer using a DMA controller, power reduction control from user programs with DVFS and clock gating on various heterogeneous multicores from different vendors. This paper also evaluates processing performance and the power reduction by the proposed framework on a newly developed 15 core heterogeneous multicore chip named RP-X integrating 8 general purpose processor cores and 3 types of accelerator cores which was developed by Renesas Electronics, Hitachi, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Waseda University. The framework attains speedups up to 32x for an optical flow program with eight general purpose processor cores and four DRP(Dynamically Reconfigurable Processor) accelerator cores against sequential execution by a single processor core and 80% of power reduction for the real-time AAC encoding.

  16. An Evaluation of Performance Thresholds in Nursing Home Pay-for-Performance.

    PubMed

    Werner, Rachel M; Skira, Meghan; Konetzka, R Tamara

    2016-12-01

    Performance thresholds are commonly used in pay-for-performance (P4P) incentives, where providers receive a bonus payment for achieving a prespecified target threshold but may produce discontinuous incentives, with providers just below the threshold having the strongest incentive to improve and providers either far below or above the threshold having little incentive. We investigate the effect of performance thresholds on provider response in the setting of nursing home P4P. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. Difference-in-differences design to test for changes in nursing home performance in three states that implemented threshold-based P4P (Colorado, Georgia, and Oklahoma) versus three comparator states (Arizona, Tennessee, and Arkansas) between 2006 and 2009. We find that those farthest below the threshold (i.e., the worst-performing nursing homes) had the largest improvements under threshold-based P4P while those farthest above the threshold worsened. This effect did not vary with the percentage of Medicaid residents in a nursing home. Threshold-based P4P may provide perverse incentives for nursing homes above the performance threshold, but we do not find evidence to support concerns about the effects of performance thresholds on low-performing nursing homes. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. ChemicalTagger: A tool for semantic text-mining in chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The primary method for scientific communication is in the form of published scientific articles and theses which use natural language combined with domain-specific terminology. As such, they contain free owing unstructured text. Given the usefulness of data extraction from unstructured literature, we aim to show how this can be achieved for the discipline of chemistry. The highly formulaic style of writing most chemists adopt make their contributions well suited to high-throughput Natural Language Processing (NLP) approaches. Results We have developed the ChemicalTagger parser as a medium-depth, phrase-based semantic NLP tool for the language of chemical experiments. Tagging is based on a modular architecture and uses a combination of OSCAR, domain-specific regex and English taggers to identify parts-of-speech. The ANTLR grammar is used to structure this into tree-based phrases. Using a metric that allows for overlapping annotations, we achieved machine-annotator agreements of 88.9% for phrase recognition and 91.9% for phrase-type identification (Action names). Conclusions It is possible parse to chemical experimental text using rule-based techniques in conjunction with a formal grammar parser. ChemicalTagger has been deployed for over 10,000 patents and has identified solvents from their linguistic context with >99.5% precision. PMID:21575201

  18. Simulation of Top Quark Pair Production as a Background for Higgs Events at the Compact Muon Solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, Christopher

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we simulated top-antitop (tt-bar) quark events at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), an experiment presently being constructed at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. The tt-bar process is an important background for Higgs events. We used a chain of software to simulate and reconstruct processes that will occur inside the detector. CMKIN was used to generate and store Monte Carlo Events. OSCAR, a GEANT4 based CMS detector simulator, was used to simulate the CMS detector and how particles would interact with the detector. Next, we used ORCA to simulate the response of the readout electronics at CMS. Last, we used the Jet/MET Root maker to create root files of jets and missing energy. We are now using this software analysis chain to complete a systematic study of initial state radiation at hadron colliders. This study is essential because tt-bar is the main background for the Higgs boson and these processes are extremely sensitive to initial state radiation. Results of our initial state radiation study will be presented. We started this study at the new LHC Physics Center (LPC) located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and we are now completing the study at the University of Rochester.

  19. A brief history of choline

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    In 1850, Theodore Gobley, working in Paris, described a substance “lecithine”, which he named after the Greek “lekithos” for egg yolk. Adolph Strecker noted in 1862 that when lecithin from bile was heated, it generated a new nitrogenous chemical that he named “choline”. Three years later, Oscar Liebreich identified a new substance, “neurine”, in the brain. After a period of confusion, neurine and choline were found to be the same molecule, and the name choline was adapted. Lecithin was eventually characterized chemically as being phosphatidylcholine. In 1954, Eugene Kennedy described the cytidine 5-dihphosphocholine pathway by which choline is incorporated into phosphatidylcholine. A second route, the phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase pathway, was identified by Jon Bremer and David Greenberg in 1960. The role of choline as part of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine was established by Otto Loewi and Henry Dale. Working in the 1930s at the University of Toronto, Charles Best showed that choline prevented fatty liver in dogs and rats. The importance of choline as an essential nutrient for human health was determined in the 1990s through controlled feeding studies in humans. Recently, an understanding of the role of genetic variation in setting the dietary requirement for choline in people is being unraveled. PMID:23183298

  20. Enabling PBPK model development through the application of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The creation of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for a new chemical requires the selection of an appropriate model structure and the collection of a large amount of data for parameterization. Commonly, a large proportion of the needed information is collected from previously published PBPK models for compounds analogous to the chemical of interest. A key difficulty in quickly developing new models is therefore the identification of appropriate chemical analogs within PBPK model literature. To reduce the burden on researchers of finding the appropriate literature to inform new modeling efforts, we sought to collect a comprehensive listing of chemicals contained in the corpus of PBPK articles and embed them into a chemically searchable database for facile analog identification. To cull the list of chemicals from PBPK literature, we investigated the use of three easily accessible methods: collecting chemicals via MeSH controlled vocabulary processing abstracts using OSCAR4 text-mining software, and annotating abstracts using chemicalize.org. In total, just over 300 unique compounds spanning a variety of chemical classes were identified as having completed PBPK models from over 1700 articles. Additional annotations of PBPK model details including species, lifestage, number of compartments, gender, and exposure routes were tabulated. These data were then imbedded into the Toxicokinetic Knowledge Base (TKKB), an internal website for chemicall

  1. Systematic review of studies of staffing and quality in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Jane E; Rantz, Marilyn J; Flesner, Marcia K; Riggs, C Jo

    2006-07-01

    To evaluate a range of staffing measures and data sources for long-term use in public reporting of staffing as a quality measure in nursing homes. Eighty-seven research articles and government documents published from 1975 to 2003 were reviewed and summarized. Relevant content was extracted and organized around 3 themes: staffing measures, quality measures, and risk adjustment variables. Data sources for staffing information were also identified. There is a proven association between higher total staffing levels (especially licensed staff) and improved quality of care. Studies also indicate a significant relationship between high turnover and poor resident outcomes. Functional ability, pressure ulcers, and weight loss are the most sensitive quality indicators linked to staffing. The best national data sources for staffing and quality include the Minimum Data Set (MDS) and On-line Survey and Certification Automated Records (OSCAR). However, the accuracy of this self-reported information requires further reliability and validity testing. A nationwide instrument needs to be developed to accurately measure staff turnover. Large-scale studies using payroll data to measure staff retention and its impact on resident outcomes are recommended. Future research should use the most nurse-sensitive quality indicators such as pressure ulcers, functional status, and weight loss.

  2. Nurse staffing levels and Medicaid reimbursement rates in nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Charlene; Swan, James H; Carrillo, Helen

    2007-06-01

    To examine the relationship between nursing staffing levels in U.S. nursing homes and state Medicaid reimbursement rates. Facility staffing, characteristics, and case-mix data were from the federal On-Line Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) system and other data were from public sources. Ordinary least squares and two-stage least squares regression analyses were used to separately examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) and total nursing hours in all U.S. nursing homes in 2002, with two endogenous variables: Medicaid reimbursement rates and resident case mix. RN hours and total nursing hours were endogenous with Medicaid reimbursement rates and resident case mix. As expected, Medicaid nursing home reimbursement rates were positively related to both RN and total nursing hours. Resident case mix was a positive predictor of RN hours and a negative predictor of total nursing hours. Higher state minimum RN staffing standards was a positive predictor of RN and total nursing hours while for-profit facilities and the percent of Medicaid residents were negative predictors. To increase staffing levels, average Medicaid reimbursement rates would need to be substantially increased while higher state minimum RN staffing standards is a stronger positive predictor of RN and total nursing hours.

  3. Medical staff organization in nursing homes: scale development and validation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul R; Karuza, Jurgis; Intrator, Orna; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent; Caprio, Thomas; Caprio, Anthony; Dauenhauer, Jason; Lima, Julie

    2009-09-01

    To construct a multidimensional self-report scale to measure nursing home (NH) medical staff organization (NHMSO) dimensions and then pilot the scale using a national survey of medical directors to provide data on its psychometric properties. Instrument development process consisting of the proceedings from the Nursing Home Physician Workforce Conference and focus groups followed by cognitive interviews, which culminated in a survey of a random sample of American Medical Directors Association (AMDA) affiliated medical directors. Analyses were conducted on surveys matched to Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from freestanding nonpediatric nursing homes. A total of 202 surveys were available for analysis and comprised the final sample. Dimensions were identified that measured the extent of medical staff organization in nursing homes and included staff composition, appointment process, commitment (physiciancohesion; leadership turnover/capability), departmentalization (physician supervision, autonomy and interdisciplinary involvement), documentation, and informal dynamics. The items developed to measure each dimension were reliable (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.81 to 0.65).Intercorrelations among the scale dimensions provided preliminary evidence of the construct validity of the scale. This report, for the first time ever, defines and validates NH medical staff organization dimensions, a critical first step in determining the relationship between physician practice and the quality of care delivered in the NH.

  4. The Impact of the Prospective Payment System for Skilled Nursing Facilities on Therapy Service Provision: A Transaction Cost Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent; Intrator, Orna; Feng, Zhanlian; Angelelli, Joseph; Davis, Jullet A

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) “make-or-buy” decisions with respect to rehabilitation therapy service provision in the 1990s, both before and after implementation of Medicare's Prospective Payment System (PPS) for SNFs. Data Sources Longitudinal On-line Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data (1992–2001) on a sample of 10,241 freestanding urban SNFs. Study Design We estimated a longitudinal multinomial logistic regression model derived from transaction cost economic theory to predict the probability of the outcome in each of four service provision categories (all employed staff, all contract, mixed, and no services provided). Principal Findings Transaction frequency, uncertainty, and complexity result in greater control over therapy services through employment as opposed to outside contracting. For-profit status and chain affiliation were associated with greater control over therapy services. Following PPS, nursing homes acted to limit transaction costs by either exiting the rehabilitation market or exerting greater control over therapy services by managing rehabilitation services in-house. Conclusions The financial incentives associated with changes in reimbursement methodology have implications that extend beyond the boundaries of the health care industry segment directly affected. Unintended quality and access consequences need to be carefully monitored by the Medicare program. PMID:14727783

  5. Psoralidin suppresses osteoclastogenesis in BMMs and attenuates LPS-mediated osteolysis by inhibiting inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbo; Ma, Rui; Yang, Xiaobin; Zhu, Ziqi; Guo, Hua; He, Baorong; Wang, Biao; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-10-01

    Psoralidin is a metabolic product from the seed of psoraleacorylifolia, possessed anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. We speculated that psoralidin might impact osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. By using both in vitro and in vivo studies, we observed psoralidin strongly inhibited RANKL induced osteoclast formation during preosteoclast cultures, suggesting that it acts on osteoclast precursors to inhibit RANKL/RANK signaling. At the molecular level, by using MAPKs specific inhibitors (U-0126, SB-203580 and SP-600125) we demonstrated that psoralidin markedly abrogated the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, JNK. Moreover, the RANKL induced NF-κB/p65 phosphorylation and I-κB degradation were significantly inhibited by psoralidin. Further, psoralidin significantly suppressed osteoclastogenesis marker genes of TRAP, Cathepsin K and OSCAR. These were accompanied by the decreased expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. Consistent with in vitro results, our in vivo and serologic studies showed psoralidin inhibited lipopolysaccharide induced bone resorption by suppressing the inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α and IL-6 expression, as well as the ratio of RNAKL : OPG. These results collectively suggested that psoralidin could represent a novel therapeutic strategy for osteoclast-related disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Malpractice litigation and nursing home quality of care.

    PubMed

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Park, Jeongyoung; Ellis, Robert; Abbo, Elmer

    2013-12-01

    To assess the potential deterrent effect of nursing home litigation threat on nursing home quality. We use a panel dataset of litigation claims and Nursing Home Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1995 to 2005 in six states: Florida, Illinois, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Missouri, and Delaware, for a total of 2,245 facilities. Claims data are from Westlaw's Adverse Filings database, a proprietary legal database, on all malpractice, negligence, and personal injury/wrongful death claims filed against nursing facilities. A lagged 2-year moving average of the county-level number of malpractice claims is used to represent the threat of litigation. We use facility fixed-effects models to examine the relationship between the threat of litigation and nursing home quality. We find significant increases in registered nurse-to-total staffing ratios in response to rising malpractice threat, and a reduction in pressure sores among highly staffed facilities. However, the magnitude of the deterrence effect is small. Deterrence in response to the threat of malpractice litigation is unlikely to lead to widespread improvements in nursing home quality. This should be weighed against other benefits and costs of litigation to assess the net benefit of tort reform. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. Malpractice Litigation and Nursing Home Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Park, Jeongyoung; Ellis, Robert; Abbo, Elmer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the potential deterrent effect of nursing home litigation threat on nursing home quality. Data Sources/Study Setting. We use a panel dataset of litigation claims and Nursing Home Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1995 to 2005 in six states: Florida, Illinois, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Missouri, and Delaware, for a total of 2,245 facilities. Claims data are from Westlaw's Adverse Filings database, a proprietary legal database, on all malpractice, negligence, and personal injury/wrongful death claims filed against nursing facilities. Study Design. A lagged 2-year moving average of the county-level number of malpractice claims is used to represent the threat of litigation. We use facility fixed-effects models to examine the relationship between the threat of litigation and nursing home quality. Principal Findings. We find significant increases in registered nurse-to-total staffing ratios in response to rising malpractice threat, and a reduction in pressure sores among highly staffed facilities. However, the magnitude of the deterrence effect is small. Conclusions. Deterrence in response to the threat of malpractice litigation is unlikely to lead to widespread improvements in nursing home quality. This should be weighed against other benefits and costs of litigation to assess the net benefit of tort reform. PMID:23741985

  8. [Incidence and surgical wound infection risk factors in breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, D; Penel, N; Deberles, M F; Fournier, C

    2000-11-18

    In order to evaluate occurrence and risk factors for wound infection (WI) in breast cancer surgery, we carried out a prospective study. From September 1996 through April 1997, an infection control physician prospectively evaluated 542 wounds of all patients having breast cancer surgery at the Oscar Lambret Cancer Center. WI was defined as a wound with pus. Antibiotic prophylaxis was given in case of immediate breast reconstruction. Statistical evaluation was performed using the c < or = test for categorial data and non-parametric Mann-Whitney test for continuous data. In univariate analysis, differences were considered significant at p < 0.01. The overall WI rate was 3.51% (19/352). In univariate analysis, risk factors for WI were: total preoperative hospital stay (p = 0.01), previous chemotherapy (p = 0.01), previous oncologic surgery (p = 0.03) and immediate breast reconstruction (p = 0.002). In mutivariate analysis, we observed two independent predictive factors for WI: previous chemotherapy (p = 0.05) and immediate breast reconstruction (p = 0.02). Previous anticancer chemotherapy was a major risk factor. In these cases, a phase III trial could confirm efficacy of standard antibiotic prophylaxis. Breast reconstruction was the second major risk factor. Standard antibiotic prophylaxis (used in our study) was insufficient.

  9. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wu, Chase

    A number of Department of Energy (DOE) science applications, involving exascale computing systems and large experimental facilities, are expected to generate large volumes of data, in the range of petabytes to exabytes, which will be transported over wide-area networks for the purpose of storage, visualization, and analysis. The objectives of this proposal are to (1) develop and test the component technologies and their synthesis methods to achieve source-to-sink high-performance flows, and (2) develop tools that provide these capabilities through simple interfaces to users and applications. In terms of the former, we propose to develop (1) optimization methods that align andmore » transition multiple storage flows to multiple network flows on multicore, multibus hosts; and (2) edge and long-haul network path realization and maintenance using advanced provisioning methods including OSCARS and OpenFlow. We also propose synthesis methods that combine these individual technologies to compose high-performance flows using a collection of constituent storage-network flows, and realize them across the storage and local network connections as well as long-haul connections. We propose to develop automated user tools that profile the hosts, storage systems, and network connections; compose the source-to-sink complex flows; and set up and maintain the needed network connections.« less

  10. ChemicalTagger: A tool for semantic text-mining in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hawizy, Lezan; Jessop, David M; Adams, Nico; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2011-05-16

    The primary method for scientific communication is in the form of published scientific articles and theses which use natural language combined with domain-specific terminology. As such, they contain free owing unstructured text. Given the usefulness of data extraction from unstructured literature, we aim to show how this can be achieved for the discipline of chemistry. The highly formulaic style of writing most chemists adopt make their contributions well suited to high-throughput Natural Language Processing (NLP) approaches. We have developed the ChemicalTagger parser as a medium-depth, phrase-based semantic NLP tool for the language of chemical experiments. Tagging is based on a modular architecture and uses a combination of OSCAR, domain-specific regex and English taggers to identify parts-of-speech. The ANTLR grammar is used to structure this into tree-based phrases. Using a metric that allows for overlapping annotations, we achieved machine-annotator agreements of 88.9% for phrase recognition and 91.9% for phrase-type identification (Action names). It is possible parse to chemical experimental text using rule-based techniques in conjunction with a formal grammar parser. ChemicalTagger has been deployed for over 10,000 patents and has identified solvents from their linguistic context with >99.5% precision.

  11. A Workflow-based Intelligent Network Data Movement Advisor with End-to-end Performance Optimization

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhu, Michelle M.; Wu, Chase Q.

    2013-11-07

    Next-generation eScience applications often generate large amounts of simulation, experimental, or observational data that must be shared and managed by collaborative organizations. Advanced networking technologies and services have been rapidly developed and deployed to facilitate such massive data transfer. However, these technologies and services have not been fully utilized mainly because their use typically requires significant domain knowledge and in many cases application users are even not aware of their existence. By leveraging the functionalities of an existing Network-Aware Data Movement Advisor (NADMA) utility, we propose a new Workflow-based Intelligent Network Data Movement Advisor (WINDMA) with end-to-end performance optimization formore » this DOE funded project. This WINDMA system integrates three major components: resource discovery, data movement, and status monitoring, and supports the sharing of common data movement workflows through account and database management. This system provides a web interface and interacts with existing data/space management and discovery services such as Storage Resource Management, transport methods such as GridFTP and GlobusOnline, and network resource provisioning brokers such as ION and OSCARS. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed transport-support workflow system in several use cases based on its implementation and deployment in DOE wide-area networks.« less

  12. Indian Ocean Surface Circulations and Their Connection to Indian Ocean Dipole, Identified From Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Real Time (OSCAR) Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    31 1. Seasonal Development .......................................................................32 2. Winter Monsoon...summary of the monsoon system in the Indian Ocean. The top part indicates the wind cycle; the lower part shows the major currents that develop in...energy interests in the Indian Ocean’s waters. The rapid economic progress in developing nations, such as India and South Africa, also adds up their

  13. PREFACE: 50 years in science: Alejandro Szanto de Toledo (2045-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-07-01

    During the XXXVII RTFNB 2014, we had the pleasure to organize a tribute to Professor Alejandro Szanto de Toledo to commemorate his 50 years of dedication to nuclear physics. Named ''Alexfest'', it gathered friends and very prominent physicists from around the world that came to Brazil specially to render a tribute to Alex, as many friends and colleagues called him. During the whole afternoon, the invited speakers presented some of the physics topics and important contributions that Alex gave to the field of nuclear physics during his five decades of intense work. Alex is the responsible for several landmarks in the Brazilian nuclear science, especially in the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo (IFUSP), where he spent almost his entire career. He started his professional life in the IFUSP Van de Graaf Laboratory, under Oscar Sala's supervision as an undergraduate student. His talent allowed him to give significant contributions to the machine operation since the beginning of his internship in the laboratory. He soon became the responsible for the development, construction and implementation of an ion source for the new Pelletron accelerator, project coordinated by Oscar Sala as well. This was a huge responsibility for a young master degree student. His PhD thesis was about nuclear fusion, a topic that he mastered during his career. His international reputation allowed him to become a visiting researcher at several laboratories in the US, France, Japan, Russia and Germany. Not satisfied with the challenges that his career was imposing to him, Alex pioneered the creation of a high-energy nuclear physics group in Brazil, becoming member of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker At Rhic) collaboration in 1995, one of the two major experiments of the RHIC accelerator (Relativistic heavy Ion Collider), located in the Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA. Later on, in 2006, he also led his group to become part of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment ALICE (A

  14. Clinical utility and economic viability of a 3T MRI in an anti-cancer centre: The experience of the centre Oscar Lambret.

    PubMed

    Taïeb, S; Devise, V; Pouliquen, G; Rocourt, N; Faivre-Pierret, M; Brongniart, S; Peugny, P; Ceugnart, L

    2012-07-01

    This paper will try and describe the installation of a 3T MRI in an anti-cancer centre. Functional sequences become indispensable in the assessment of targeted treatments. It is only possible to carry out these treatments on a routine basis in acceptable examination times with 3T. The technical constraints are overcome with third generation MRI and the improvement of the spatial resolution in examination times reduced by 30 to 50% increases patient comfort. Nevertheless, the financial constraints represent a major handicap. It is not possible to obtain an economic balance with rates based on the cost and depreciation of 1.5T imagers that are half the price. Copyright © 2012 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Science as Performance: Communicating and Educating through Theater, Music, and Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Brian B.

    2010-01-01

    Theater, music, dance, the literary and the visual arts can convey the joys and controversies of science. We describe a program at the Graduate Center entitled Science & the Arts which is designed to communicate to the public the excitement and wonder of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Over the past few years there have been major successes in communicating science to the public through the arts. This is especially evident in theater, film and opera with such recent plays as Copenhagen, the Oscar winning film A Beautiful Mind and the opera Doctor Atomic at the Met. The performance series Science & the Arts has been developed and tested at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) in mid-Manhattan for more than nine years, see http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart/ . We have established working relationships with actors, playwrights, dancers, choreographers, musicians, composers, artists and scientists who work at the intersection of science and the arts. In this presentation we will illustrate many of our collaborations in theater, dance, music and art. Faculty members, professionals and students from the university, other educational institutions, museums, theaters and government laboratories as well as the public with an interest science and arts programs should find this presentation of particular interest. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation, NSF PHY-0431660.

  16. Experimental transmission of Enteromyxum leei to freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Diamant, A; Ram, S; Paperna, I

    2006-10-17

    The myxosporean Enteromyxum leei is known to infect a wide range of marine fish hosts. The objective of the present study was to determine whether freshwater fish species are also receptive hosts to this parasite. Seventeen species of freshwater fish were experimentally fed E. leei-infected gut tissue from donor gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata obtained from a commercial sea bream cage farm. Four of the tested species, tiger barb Puntius tetrazona, zebra danio Danio rerio, oscar Astronotus ocellatus and Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus, were found to be susceptible with prevalences ranging from 53 to 90%. The course of infection and pathology was limited to the gut mucosa epithelium and was similar to that observed in marine hosts. Little is known of the differences in physiological conditions encountered by a parasite in the alimentary tract of freshwater vs. marine teleost hosts, but we assume that a similar osmotic environment is maintained in both. Parasite infectivity may be influenced by differences in the presence or absence of a true stomach, acidic gastric pH and digestive enzyme activity both in the stomach and intestine. Variability in susceptibility among species may also stem from differences in innate immunity. Dimensions of spores produced in the donor sea bream and recipient freshwater species are variable in size, as previously observed in other captive marine host species.

  17. Carbon-isotope stratigraphy of the Lower Ordovician succession in Northeast Greenland: Implications for correlations with St. George Group in western Newfoundland (Canada) and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmy, Karem; Stouge, Svend; Christiansen, Jørgen L.; Harper, Dave A. T.; Knight, Ian; Boyce, Douglas

    2010-03-01

    The Lower Ordovician sequence on the Ella Ø Island in Northeast (N-E) Greenland is a thick shallow marine platform carbonate sequence (˜ 1415 m thick) and constitutes the major part of the Kong Oscar Fjord Group. It consists, from bottom to top, of the Antiklinalbugt, Septembersø, and Cape Weber formations, which are believed to be respectively coeval with the Watts Bight, Boat Harbour, and Catoche formations of the St. George Group in western Newfoundland, Canada. Samples were collected from outcrops at high-resolution intervals and micritic materials were extracted by microdrilling after screening their petrographic and geochemical criteria to evaluate the degree of preservation. The δ13C and δ18O values of well preserved micrite microsamples range from -5.2‰ to 0.5‰ (VPDB) and from -10.3‰ to-6.5‰ (VPDB), respectively. The δ13C carb profile of the sequence reveals few negative shifts, which vary between ˜ 2 and 4.7‰ and are associated with unconformities/disconformities, thus reflecting the effect of significant sea-level changes. The δ13C shifts can be correlated with counterparts on the St. George Group and also on the global Lower Ordovician δ13C profiles around the early Tremadoc (˜ 2.3‰) and late Tremadoc-early Arenig (˜ 4.7‰).

  18. Response of near-surface currents in the Indian Ocean to the anomalous atmospheric condition in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utari, P. A.; Nurkhakim, M. Y.; Setiabudidaya, D.; Iskandar, I.

    2018-05-01

    Anomalous ocean-atmosphere conditions were detected in the tropical Indian Ocean during boreal spring to boreal winter 2015. It was suggested that the anomalous conditions were characteristics of the positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) event. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the response of near-surface currents in the tropical Indian Ocean to the anomalous atmospheric condition in 2015. Near-surface current from OSCAR (Ocean Surface Current Analyses Real Time) reanalysis data combined with the sea surface temperature (SST) data from OISST – NOAA, sea surface height (SSH) and surface winds from the ECMWF were used in this investigation. The analysis showed that the evolution of 2015 pIOD started in June/July, peaked in the September and terminated in late November 2015. Correlated with the evolution of the pIOD, easterly winds anomalies were detected along the equator. As the oceanic response to these easterly wind anomalies, the surface currents anomalously westward during the peak of the pIOD. It was interesting to note that the evolution of 2015 pIOD event was closely related to the ocean wave dynamics as revealed by the SSH data. Downwelling westward propagating Rossby waves were detected in the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean. Once reached the western boundary of the Indian Ocean, they were redirected back into interior Indian Ocean and propagating eastward as the downwelling Kelvin waves.

  19. The impact of wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing on satellite-derived ocean surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhenli; Xu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Ocean surface currents estimated from the satellite data consist of two terms: Ekman currents from the wind stress and geostrophic currents from the sea surface height (SSH). But the classical Ekman model does not consider the wave effects. By taking the wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing into account, the impact of waves (primarily the Stokes drift) on ocean surface currents is investigated and the wave-modified currents are formed. The products are validated by comparing with OSCAR currents and Lagrangian drifter velocity. The result shows that our products with the Stokes drift are better adapted to the in situ Lagrangian drifter currents. Especially in the Southern Ocean region (40°S-65°S), 90% (91%) of the zonal (meridional) currents have been improved compared with currents that do not include Stokes drift. The correlation (RMSE) in the Southern Ocean has also increased (decreased) from 0.78 (13) to 0.81 (10.99) for the zonal component and 0.76 (10.87) to 0.79 (10.09) for the meridional component. This finding provides the evidence that waves indeed play an important role in the ocean circulation, and need to be represented in numerical simulations of the global ocean circulation. This article was corrected on 10 FEB 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  20. A dictionary to identify small molecules and drugs in free text.

    PubMed

    Hettne, Kristina M; Stierum, Rob H; Schuemie, Martijn J; Hendriksen, Peter J M; Schijvenaars, Bob J A; Mulligen, Erik M van; Kleinjans, Jos; Kors, Jan A

    2009-11-15

    From the scientific community, a lot of effort has been spent on the correct identification of gene and protein names in text, while less effort has been spent on the correct identification of chemical names. Dictionary-based term identification has the power to recognize the diverse representation of chemical information in the literature and map the chemicals to their database identifiers. We developed a dictionary for the identification of small molecules and drugs in text, combining information from UMLS, MeSH, ChEBI, DrugBank, KEGG, HMDB and ChemIDplus. Rule-based term filtering, manual check of highly frequent terms and disambiguation rules were applied. We tested the combined dictionary and the dictionaries derived from the individual resources on an annotated corpus, and conclude the following: (i) each of the different processing steps increase precision with a minor loss of recall; (ii) the overall performance of the combined dictionary is acceptable (precision 0.67, recall 0.40 (0.80 for trivial names); (iii) the combined dictionary performed better than the dictionary in the chemical recognizer OSCAR3; (iv) the performance of a dictionary based on ChemIDplus alone is comparable to the performance of the combined dictionary. The combined dictionary is freely available as an XML file in Simple Knowledge Organization System format on the web site http://www.biosemantics.org/chemlist.

  1. Have Nursing Home Compare quality measure scores changed over time in response to competition?

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G; Engberg, John; Liu, Darren

    2007-06-01

    Currently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services report on 15 Quality Measures (QMs) on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) website. It is assumed that nursing homes are able to make improvements on these QMs, and in doing so they will attract more residents. In this investigation, we examine changes in QM scores, and whether competition and/or excess demand have influenced these change scores over a period of 1 year. Data come from NHC and the On-line Survey Certification And Recording (OSCAR) system. QM change scores are calculated using values from January 2003 to January 2004. A series of regression analyses are used to examine the association of competition and excess demand on QM scores. Eight QMs show an average decrease in scores (ie, better quality) and six QMs show an average increase in scores (ie, worse quality). However, for 13 of the 14 QMs these average changes averaged less than 1%. The regression analyses show an association between higher competition and improving QM scores and an association between lower occupancy and improving QM scores. As would be predicted based on the market-driven mechanism underlying quality improvements using report cards, we show that it is in the most competitive markets and those with the lowest average occupancy rates that improvements in the QM scores are more likely.

  2. Acute effects of dietary fatty acids on osteclastogenesis via RANKL/RANK/OPG system.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, M Carmen; Garcia, Indara; Bermudez, Beatriz; Lopez, Sergio; Cardelo, Magdalena P; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G; Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    Postprandial state is directly linked with chronic diseases. We hypothesized that dietary fats may have acute effects on health status by modulating osteoclast differentiation and activation in a fatty acid-dependent manner. In healthy subjects, a fat-enriched meal increased plasma levels of the RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand)/OPG (osteoprotegerin) ratio (SFAs > MUFAs = PUFAs) in the postprandial state. Postprandial TRL-SFAs enhanced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and the expression of osteoclast marker genes (TRAP, OSCAR, RANK, and CATHK) while downregulated the expression of OPG gene in human monocyte-derived osteoclasts. These effects were not observed with monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-enriched postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs). Moreover, postprandial TRL-SFAs increased the release of osteoclastogenic cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) meanwhile TRL-MUFAs and TRL-PUFAs increased the release of anti-osteoclastogenic cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) in the medium of human monocyte-derived osteoclasts. For the first time, we show that postprandial TRLs are metabolic entities with osteoclastogenic activity and that this property is related to the type of dietary fatty acid in the meal. The osteoclastogenic potency was as follows: SFAs > MUFAs = PUFAs. These exciting findings open opportunities for developing nutritional strategies with olive oil as the principal dietary source of MUFAs, notably oleic acid, to prevent development and progression of osteoclast-related diseases. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The Effect of Rural Hospital Closures on Community Economic Health

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, George M; Slifkin, Rebecca T; Randolph, Randy K; Poley, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of rural hospital closures on the local economy. Data Sources U.S. Census Bureau, OSCAR, Medicare Cost Reports, and surveys of individuals knowledgeable about local hospital closures. Study Design Economic data at the county level for 1990–2000 were combined with information on hospital closures. The study sample was restricted to rural counties experiencing a closure during the sample period. Longitudinal regression methods were used to estimate the effect of hospital closure on per-capita income, unemployment rate, and other community economic measures. Models included both leading and lagged closure terms allowing a preclosure economic downturn as well as time for the closure to be fully realized by the community. Data Collection Information on closures was collected by contacting every state hospital association, reconciling information gathered with that contained in the American Hospital Association file and OIG reports. Principal Findings Results indicate that the closure of the sole hospital in the community reduces per-capita income by $703 (p<0.05) or 4 percent (p<0.05) and increases the unemployment rate by 1.6 percentage points (p<0.01). Closures in communities with alternative sources of hospital care had no long-term economic impact, although income decreased for 2 years following the closure. Conclusions The local economic effects of a hospital closure should be considered when regulations that affect hospitals' financial well-being are designed or changed. PMID:16584460

  4. Experiments in NMR Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanera, Isaac; Cardenas, Rosa; Paster, Jeremy; Turbyfill, Amanda; Markert, John

    2012-02-01

    We report details of the construction and use of three nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy (NMRFM) probes, as well as the development of control systems for three-dimensional nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy. Our variable temperature probe performed position-dependent ^1H NMR force measurements on a 25x15x7 μm^3 single crystal of ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4 at room temperature in a sample-on-oscillator geometry. Force signals were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 6, and 12 μm resolution, in a one-dimensional scan. Measurements of NMR relaxation times T2^*=1.5±0.2 μs, T2= 44±2 μs, and T1=5.6±0.7 s were obtained. We describe the upgrade of our ^3He NMRFM probe for measurements towards the base temperature of 0.3K for investigation of nanoscale structures and metal oxide interfaces using the iOSCAR technique and perpendicular-cantilever geometry. Force-detected ^11B NMR signals in a 30 μm crystal of superconductor MgB2 have also been achieved using this probe. Efforts in the development of our NMRFM probe for the study of biological samples in liquid media are reported. Magnetic field effects on micromagnet films on cantilevers are being studied for the characterization of the mechanical sensors to be used in these liquid experiments.

  5. Nursing home consumer complaints and their potential role in assessing quality of care.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David G

    2005-02-01

    State survey agencies collect and investigate consumer complaints for care in nursing homes and other health care settings. Complaint investigations play a key role in quality assurance, because they can respond to concerns of consumers and families. This study uses 5 years of nursing home complaints data from Massachusetts (1998-2002) to investigate whether complaints might be used to assess nursing home quality of care. The investigator matches facility-level complaints data with On-Line Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data and Minimum Data Set Quality Indicator (MDS QI) data to evaluate the association between consumer complaints, facility and resident characteristics, and other nursing home quality measures. Consumer complaints varied across facility characteristics in ways consistent with the nursing home quality literature. Complaints were consistently and significantly associated with survey deficiencies, the presence of a serious survey deficiency, and nurse aide staffing. Complaints were not significantly associated with nurse staffing, and associations with 6 MDS QIs were mixed. The number of complaints was significantly predictive of survey deficiencies identified at the subsequent inspection. Nursing home consumer complaints provide a supplemental tool with which to differentiate nursing homes on quality. Despite limitations, complaints data have potential strengths when used in combination with other quality measures. The potential of using consumer complaints to assess nursing home quality of care should be evaluated in states beyond Massachusetts. Evaluating consumer complaints also might be a productive area of inquiry for other health care settings such as hospitals and home health agencies.

  6. Global Characterization of Tropospheric Noise for InSAR Analysis Using MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Hensley, S.; Chaubell, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Pan, L.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Radio wave's differential phase delay variation through the troposphere is one of the largest error sources in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements, and water vapor variability in the troposphere is known to be the dominant factor. We use the precipitable water vapor products from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors mounted on Terra and Aqua satellites to produce tropospheric noise maps of InSAR. Then we extract a small set of characteristic parameters of its power spectral density curve and 1-D covariance function, and calculate the structure function to estimate the expected tropospheric noise level as a function of distance. The results serve two purposes: 1) to provide guidance on the expected covariance matrix for geophysical modeling, 2) to provide quantitative basis of the measurement requirements for the planned US L-band SAR mission. We build over a decade span (2000-2013) of a lookup table of the parameters derived from 2-by-2 degree tiles at 1-by-1 degree posting of global coverage, representing 10 days of each season in each year. The MODIS data were retrieved from OSCAR (Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar) server. MODIS images with 5 percent or more cloud cover were discarded. Cloud mask and sensor scanning artifacts were removed with interpolation and spectral filtering, respectively. We also mitigate topography dependent stratified tropospheric delay variation using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Models (SRTM DEMs).

  7. Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    Scientific Committee Silvia Arrese-Igor Irigoyen (CFM, CSIC - UPV/EHU, Donostia), Javier Campo (ICMA-CSIC, Zaragoza), Carlos Frontera (ICMAB-CSIC, Barcelona), Victoria García Sakai (ISIS, Chilton), Cristina Gómez-Polo (UPNa, Pamplona), Miguel Ángel González (ILL, Grenoble), Pedro Gorría (Universidad Oviedo), Jon Gutiérrez Echevarría (EHU/UPV, Bilbao), J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (UPNa, Pamplona), Vicente Recarte (UPNa, Pamplona), Jesús Ruíz Hervías (UPM, Madrid), Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos (UPNa, Pamplona), Antonio Urbina (UPC, Cartagena) Organizing Committee J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (Co-Chair), Vicente Recarte ( Co-Chair), Cristina Gómez-Polo, Silvia Larumbe Abuin, Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos Editors of the Proceedings J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal, Vicente Recarte Plenary speakers Charles Simon (Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France), Miguel Angel Alario Franco (Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain), Dieter Richter (Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Jülich, Germany), James Yeck (European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden) Invited speakers Manu Barandiarán (BCMaterials & EHU/UPV), Arantxa Arbe (MFC, CSIC- UPV/EHU), José Luis Martínez (Consorcio ESS-Bilbao), Marta Castellote, IETcc-CSIC), Josep Lluis Tamarit (UPC), Diego Alba-Venero (ISIS), Elizabeth Castillo (CIC Energigune), Josu M. Igartua (EHU/UPV), Antonio Dos Santos (UPM), Alex Masalles (Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya), José Abad (UPCT), Claudia Mondelli (ILL), Oscar Fabelo (ILL), Aurora Nogales (IEM-CSIC), Jesús Rodríguez (UC), Gerardo

  8. Understanding the Dynamics of the South Indian Ocean Sea Surface Salinity Maximum Pool From Argo, Rama, Aquarius, SMOS & Other Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, V. V.; Phillips, H. E.

    2016-02-01

    Subtropical salinity maximum regions are particularly important because the salty subtropical underwater (STW) is formed by subduction of surface waters in these areas. In all oceans, the STW is transported equatorward from the formation region and are tightly related to the Subtropical-Tropical Cell. In the South Indian Ocean (SIO), the salinity maximum pool is further poleward (25S-38S) and eastward (60E-120E). It significantly impacts the circulation of the eastern basin, because the STW forms a strong haline front with the fresh Indonesian Throughflow waters. This haline front overwhelms the temperature contribution establishing the eastward Eastern Gyral Current, an important upstream source for the Leeuwin Current. In the present work, we analyze the variability of the SSS maximum pool using Aquarius and SMOS satellites, an Argo gridded product and the RAMA mooring located at 25S-100E. OAFLUX, 3B42 TRMM, Ascat/Quikscat winds and OSCAR products complement this study. The salinity maximum pool has a strong seasonal cycle of contraction (min in Oct) and expansion (max in April), and most of this variation occurs in the pool poleward side. Advection and entrainment control the contraction, while expansion is due to atmospheric forcing (E-P). From 2004 to 2014, a clear reduction in the pool area is identified, which might be related to a decadal variability. In this case, the variation is in the equatorward side of the pool. Processes controlling this long-term variability are being investigated.

  9. Mixed Layer Temperature Budget for the Northward Propagating Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation (MISO) in the Central Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girishkumar, M. S.; Joseph, J.; Thangaprakash, V. P.; Pottapinjara, V.; McPhaden, M. J.

    2017-11-01

    Composite analyses of mixed layer temperature (MLT) budget terms from near-surface meteorological and oceanic observations in the central Bay of Bengal are utilized to evaluate the modulation of air-sea interactions and MLT processes in response to the summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO). For this purpose, we use moored buoy data at 15°N, 12°N, and 8°N along 90°E together with TropFlux meteorological parameters and the Ocean Surface Current Analyses Real-time (OSCAR) current product. Our analysis shows a strong cooling tendency in MLT with maximum amplitude in the central and northern BoB during the northward propagation of enhanced convective activity associated with the active phase of the MISO; conversely, warming occurs during the suppressed phase of the MISO. The surface mixed layer is generally heated during convectively inactive phases of the MISO primarily due to increased net surface heat flux into the ocean. During convectively active MISO phases, the surface mixed layer is cooled by the combined influence of net surface heat loss to the atmosphere and entrainment cooling at the base of mixed layer. The variability of net surface heat flux is primarily due to modulation of latent heat flux and shortwave radiation. Shortwave is mostly controlled by an enhancement or reduction of cloudiness during the active and inactive MISO phases and latent heat flux is mostly controlled by variations in air-sea humidity difference.

  10. The riddle of sex: biological theories of sexual difference in the early twentieth-century.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nathan Q

    2011-01-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, biologists such as Oscar Riddle, Thomas Hunt Morgan, Frank Lillie, and Richard Goldschmidt all puzzled over the question of sexual difference, the distinction between male and female. They all offered competing explanations for the biological cause of this difference, and engaged in a fierce debate over the primacy of their respective theories. Riddle propounded a metabolic theory of sex dating from the late-nineteenth century suggesting that metabolism lay at the heart of sexual difference. Thomas Hunt Morgan insisted on the priority of chromosomes, Frank Lillie emphasized the importance of hormones, while Richard Goldschmidt supported a mixed model involving both chromosomes and hormones. In this paper, I will illustrate how the older metabolic theory of sex was displaced when those who argued for the relatively newer theories of chromosomes and hormones gradually formed an alliance that accommodated each other and excluded the metabolic theory of sex. By doing so, proponents of chromosomes and hormones established their authority over the question of sexual difference as they laid the foundations for the new disciplines of genetics and endocrinology. Their debate raised urgent questions about what constituted sexual difference, and how scientists envisioned the plasticity and controllability of this difference. These theories also had immediate political and cultural consequences at the turn of the twentieth century, especially for the eugenic and feminist movements, both of which were heavily invested in knowledge of sex and its determination, ascertainment, and command.

  11. Modelling the transport of oil after a proposed oil spill accident in Barents Sea and its environmental impact on Alke species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Yuan, F.; Mikkelsen, J. D.; Ohm, C.; Stange, E.; Holand, M.

    2017-08-01

    Accidental oil spills can have significant effect on the coastal and marine environment. As the oil extraction and exploration activities increase in the Barents Sea, it is of increasingly importance to investigate the potential oil spill incidents associated with these activities. In this study, the transport and fate of oil after a proposed oil spill incident in Barents Sea was modelled by oil spill contingency and response model OSCAR. The possibility that the spilled oil reach the open sea and the strand area was calculated respectively. The influence area of the incident was calculated by combining the results from 200 simulations. The possibility that the spilled oil reach Alke species, a vulnerable species and on the National Red List of birds in Barents Sea, was analyzed by combining oil spill modelling results and the Alke species distribution data. The results showed that oil is dominated with a probability of 70-100% in the open sea to reach an area in a radius of 20km from the release location after 14 days of release. The probability reduces with the increasing distances from the release location. It is higher possibility that the spilled oil will reach the Alke species in the strand area than in the open sea in the summer. The total influence area of the release is 11 429 km2 for the surface water and 1528 km2 for the coastal area.

  12. Mesozoic Magmatism and Base-Metal Mineralization in the Fortymile Mining District, Eastern Alaska - Initial Results of Petrographic, Geochemical, and Isotopic Studies in the Mount Veta Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Slack, John F.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Mortensen, James K.

    2009-01-01

    -bearing Zn skarn. Cu-Zn-Pb-Ag-Au showings at the Oscar pros-pect occur in marble-hosted magnetite and pyrrhotite skarn that is spatially related to the stocks, dikes, and sills of the Early Jurassic syenite of Mount Veta. Mineralized rocks at the Eva Creek Ag-Zn-Pb-Cu prospect are within 1.5 km of the Mount Veta pluton, which is epidotized and locally altered along its contact with metamorphosed country rock east of the prospect. We report five new sulfide Pb-isotopic analyses from the LWM, Oscar, and Eva Creek prospects and compare these sulfide Pb-isotopic ratios with those for sulfides from nearby deposits and prospects in the Yukon-Tanana Upland and with feldspar Pb-isotopic ratios for Mesozoic plutons in the region. Disparities between the Pb-isotopic ratios for sulfides and igneous feldspars are consistent with a carbonate-replacement model for both the LWM and Eva Creek prospects. The presence in the Fortymile district of base-metal sulfides within both calc-silicate-rich skarns and the calc-silicate-free carbonate replacement deposits may reflect multistage mineralization by magmatic-hydrothermal systems during the emplacement of two or more magmatically unrelated igneous intrusions. Alternatively, all of the mineralized occurrences could be products of one regionally zoned system that formed during the intrusion of a single pluton. In addition to the likely origin of some of the base-metal occurrences by intrusion-related hydrothermal fluids, proximity of the LWM prospect to the northeast-striking, high-angle Kechumstuk Fault suggests that fluid flow along the fault also played an important role during carbonate-replacement mineralization.

  13. Dispersibility and biotransformation of oils with different properties in seawater.

    PubMed

    Brakstad, Odd G; Farooq, Umer; Ribicic, Deni; Netzer, Roman

    2018-01-01

    Dispersants are used to remove oils slicks from sea surfaces and to generate small oil-droplet dispersions, which may result in enhanced biodegradation of the oil. In this study, dispersibility and biodegradation of chemically dispersed oils with different physical-chemical properties (paraffinic, naphthenic and asphaltenic oils) were compared in natural temperate SW at 13 °C. All selected oils were chemically dispersible when well-known commercial dispersants were used. However, interfacial tension (IFT) studies of the dispersed oils showed different IFT properties of the oils at 13 °C, and also different leaching of the dispersants from oil droplet surfaces. Biodegradation studies of the chemically dispersed oils were performed in a carousel system, with initial median droplet sizes <30 μm and oil concentrations of 2.5-2.8 mg/L. During biodegradation, oil droplet concentrations were rapidly reduced, in association with the emergence of macroscopic 'flocs'. Biotransformation results showed that half-lives of semivolatile total extractable organic carbon (TEOC), single target 2- to 4-ring PAH, and 22 oil compound groups used as input data in the oil spill contingency model OSCAR, did not differ significantly between the oils (P > 0.05), while n-alkanes half-lives differed significantly (P < 0.05). Biotransformation was associated with rapid microbial growth in all oil dispersions, in association with n-alkane and PAH biotransformation. These results have implications for the predictions of biodegradation of oil slicks treated with dispersants in temperate SW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Georges Marinesco (1863-1938): neurologist, neurohistologist and neuropathologist.

    PubMed

    Catala, M; Poirier, J

    2012-01-01

    Gheorghe Marinescu (Georges Marinesco, in French) is a Romanian physician, founder of the School of Neurology in that country. He begins his medical studies in Bucharest, then has the opportunity to reach Paris and join the School of Neurology in La Salpêtrière Hospital, lead by Jean-Martin Charcot. This trip will forever imprint the mind of Marinescu, a great friend of France, a respectful student of Charcot and a friendly colleague of many Parisian neurologists. Marinescu's works are multiple and very important. He describes the succulent hand in syringomyelia and the palmar-jaw reflex. Marinescu is also one of the first to use the cinema for medical purposes. His work as an anatomo-clinician, a method developed by Charcot, is important. We denote the description of the locus niger affected by tuberculosis in a case of parkinsonism (this description paving Etienne Brissaud's way to highlight the anatomical origin of Parkinson's disease), the original clinical description of Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, and that of medullomyoblastoma. Marinescu is also a famous neurocytologist as evidenced by his work, La Cellule Nerveuse, published in 1909. The first volume of the book is devoted to the aspects of the normal nervous tissue: the neurofibrillar network, the chromatophilic elements, and the paranucleolar corpuscles (now known as Marinescu's bodies). The second volume of the book is almost related to features revealed by experimental lesions: chromatolysis and neuronophagia. Furthermore, Marinescu describes with Oscar Blocq, small nodules than are now regarded as the first description of senile plaques.

  15. Integrating economy, ecology and uncertainty in an oil-spill DSS: The Prestige accident in Spain, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Kai W.; Liu, Xin

    2006-12-01

    Major accidental oil spills still affect sensitive marine areas and shorelines around the world, constituting a challenge for operational as well as strategic contingency management. As a rationale basis for addressing both issues we here propose a Decision Support System (DSS) consisting of a combination of modelling and evaluation methods which in particular assesses various impacts on habitats and local economies. By integrating the state-of-the-art oil spill contingency simulation system OSCAR with wind and current forecasts, environmental GIS data and multi-criteria analysis techniques, the DSS is able to rank different response actions to a chemical or oil spill. In this study, the usefulness of the approach is tested by hindcasting the Prestige accident off the coast of Spain in 2002. In particular, the short- to mid-term economic and ecological consequences of different mitigation measures are estimated. We identified clearly one worst option matching the actual decision taken by the responsible parties and one or two almost equally well performing routes. Two procedures of including uncertainty at various stages of the DSS are tested. The first method averages ensembles of outcomes between each modelling/evaluation stage, while the second one preserves the entire degree of freedom till the final ranking procedure. Results in the Prestige case turned out to be rather insensitive against both ways to account for uncertainties. The robustness as well as clarity of the DSS has the potential to enhance the efficiency of decision making even in politically sensitive situations. Limitations as well as ongoing improvements of the system are highlighted, in particular emphasizing linkages to environmental economics.

  16. Automatic maintenance payload on board of a Mexican LEO microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Vivas, Esaú; García-Nocetti, Fabián; Mendieta-Jiménez, Francisco

    2006-02-01

    Few research institutions from Mexico work together to finalize the integration of a technological demonstration microsatellite called Satex, aiming the launching of the first ever fully designed and manufactured domestic space vehicle. The project is based on technical knowledge gained in previous space experiences, particularly in developing GASCAN automatic experiments for NASA's space shuttle, and in some support obtained from the local team which assembled the México-OSCAR-30 microsatellites. Satex includes three autonomous payloads and a power subsystem, each one with a local microcomputer to provide intelligent and dedicated control. It also contains a flight computer (FC) with a pair of full redundancies. This enables the remote maintenance of processing boards from the ground station. A fourth communications payload depends on the flight computer for control purposes. A fifth payload was decided to be developed for the satellite. It adds value to the available on-board computers and extends the opportunity for a developing country to learn and to generate domestic space technology. Its aim is to provide automatic maintenance capabilities for the most critical on-board computer in order to achieve continuous satellite operations. This paper presents the virtual computer architecture specially developed to provide maintenance capabilities to the flight computer. The architecture is periodically implemented by software with a small amount of physical processors (FC processors) and virtual redundancies (payload processors) to emulate a hybrid redundancy computer. Communications among processors are accomplished over a fault-tolerant LAN. This allows a versatile operating behavior in terms of data communication as well as in terms of distributed fault tolerance. Obtained results, payload validation and reliability results are also presented.

  17. How to pitch a brilliant idea.

    PubMed

    Elsbach, Kimberly D

    2003-09-01

    Coming up with creative ideas is easy; selling them to strangers is hard. Entrepreneurs, sales executives, and marketing managers often go to great lengths to demonstrate how their new concepts are practical and profitable--only to be rejected by corporate decision makers who don't seem to understand the value of the ideas. Why does this happen? Having studied Hollywood executives who assess screenplay pitches, the author says the person on the receiving end--the "catcher"--tends to gauge the pitcher's creativity as well as the proposal itself. An impression of the pitcher's ability to come up with workable ideas can quickly and permanently overshadow the catcher's feelings about an idea's worth. To determine whether these observations apply to business settings beyond Hollywood, the author attended product design, marketing, and venture-capital pitch sessions and conducted interviews with executives responsible for judging new ideas. The results in those environments were similar to her observations in Hollywood, she says. Catchers subconsciously categorize successful pitchers as showrunners (smooth and professional), artists (quirky and unpolished), or neophytes (inexperienced and naive). The research also reveals that catchers tend to respond well when they believe they are participating in an idea's development. As Oscar-winning writer, director, and producer Oliver Stone puts it, screen-writers pitching an idea should "pull back and project what he needs onto your idea in order to make the story whole for him." To become a successful pitcher, portray yourself as one of the three creative types and engage your catchers in the creative process. By finding ways to give your catchers a chance to shine, you sell yourself as a likable collaborator.

  18. The effect of Medicaid nursing home reimbursement policy on Medicare hospice use in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan C; Gozalo, Pedro; Lima, Julie C; Mor, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    To understand how changes in Medicaid nursing home (NH) reimbursement policy and rates affect a NH's approach to end-of-life care (ie, its use of hospice). This longitudinal study merged US NH decedents' (1999 to 2004) resident assessment data (MDS) with Part A claims data to determine the proportion of a NH's decedents using hospice. Freestanding NHs across the 48 contiguous US states were included. A NH-level analytic file was merged with NH survey (ie, OSCAR) and area resource file data, and with annual data on state Medicaid NH rates, case-mix reimbursement policies, and hospice certificate of need (CON). NH fixed-effect (within) regression analysis examined the effect of changing state policies, controlling for differing time trends in CON and case-mix states and for facility-level and county-level attributes. Models were stratified by urban/rural status. A $10 increase in the Medicaid rate resulted in a 0.41% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.275, 0.553] increase in hospice use in urban NHs and a 0.37% decrease (95% CI: -0.676, -0.063) in rural NHs not adjacent to urban areas. There was a nonstatistically significant increase in rural NHs adjacent to urban areas. Introduction of case-mix reimbursement resulted in a 2.14% (95% CI: 1.388, 2.896) increase in hospice use in urban NHs, with comparable increases in rural NHs. This study supports and extends previous research by showing changes in Medicaid NH reimbursement policies affect a NH's approach to end-of-life care. It also shows how policy changes can have differing effects depending on a NH's urban/rural status.

  19. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization: Correlates with Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul R.; Karuza, Jurgis; Lima, Julie; Intrator, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the relationship between how medical care is organized and delivered in nursing homes. Taking a lead from the acute care arena, we hypothesize that nursing home medical staff organization (NHMSO) is an important predictor of clinical outcomes in the nursing home. Methods A total of 202 usable surveys from a two-wave survey process using the Dillman Method were returned from medical directors who were randomly selected from the AMDA membership and were asked to fill out a survey on the structure of medical organization in their primary nursing home practice. Quality measures that are likely to be affected by physician practice patterns were culled from NH Compare and OSCAR data sets and matched to the physician surveys, i.e., long stay residents' prevalence of pain, restraint use, catheter use, pressure ulcers, pneumococcal vaccination, influenza vaccination, presence of advanced directives, prescription of antibiotics, and prevalence of depression. Results Using a series of hierarchical multiple regressions, significant R2 changes were found when the medical staff organization dimensions were added in the regressions after controlling for nursing home structural characteristics for the following outcomes: pneumococcal vaccination and restraint use. Near significant findings were noted for pain prevalence among long stay residents, catheter use and prevalence of pressure ulcers. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate a relationship between medical staff organizational dimensions and clinical outcomes in the nursing home setting and as such represents an initial “proof of concept.” NHMSO should be considered as a potentially important mediating or moderating variable in the quality of care equation for nursing homes. PMID:21450190

  20. The quest for a z-pinch based fusion energy source—a historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, John

    1997-05-01

    Ever since 1958, when Oscar Anderson observed copious neutrons emanating from a "magnetically self-constricted column of deuterium plasma," scientists have attempted to develop the simple linear pinch into a fusion power source. After all, simple calculations show that if one can pass a current of slightly less than 2 million amperes through a stable D-T plasma, then one could achieve not just thermonuclear break-even, but thermonuclear gain. Moreover, several reactor studies have shown that a simple linear pinch could be the basis for a very attractive fusion system. The problem is, of course, that the seemingly simple act of passing 2 MA through a stable pinch has proven to be quite difficult to accomplish. The pinch tends to disrupt due to instabilities, either by the m=0 (sausage) or m=1 (kink) modes. Curtailing the growth of these instabilities has been the primary thrust of z-pinch fusion research, and over the years a wide variety of formation techniques have been tried. The early pinches were driven by relatively slow capacitive discharges and were formed by imploding a plasma column. The advent of fast pulsed power technology brought on a whole new repertoire of formation techniques, including: fast implosions, laser or field-enhanced breakdown in a uniform volume of gas, a discharge inside a small capillary, a frozen deuterium fiber isolated by vacuum, and staged concepts in which one pinch implodes upon another. And although none of these have yet to be successful, some have come tantalizingly close. This paper will review the history of this four-decade long quest for fusion power.

  1. Factors influencing the output of rural cataract surgical facilities in China: the SHARP study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Jin, Ling; Zhou, Zhongqiang; Huang, Yiwen; Yan, Xixi; Liu, Tianyu; Ong, Ee Lin; Liu, Bin; Huang, Wenyong; Iezzi, Beatrice; He, Mingguang; Friedman, David S; Congdon, Nathan G

    2015-02-03

    To identify factors associated prospectively with increased cataract surgical rate (CSR) in rural Chinese hospitals. Annual cataract surgical output was obtained at baseline and 24 months later from operating room records at 42 rural, county-level hospitals. Total local CSR (cases/million population/y), and proportion of CSR from hospital and local competitors were calculated from government records. Hospital administrators completed questionnaires providing demographic and professional information, and annual clinic and outreach screening volume. Independent cataract surgeons provided clinical information and videotapes of cases for grading by two masked experts using the Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric (OSCAR). Uncorrected vision was recorded for 10 consecutive cataract cases at each facility, and 10 randomly-identified patients completed hospital satisfaction questionnaires. Total value of international nongovernmental development organization (INGDO) investment in the previous three years and demographic information on hospital catchment areas were obtained. Main outcome was 2-year percentage change in hospital CSR. Among the 42 hospitals (median catchment population 530,000, median hospital CSR 643), 78.6% (33/42) were receiving INGDO support. Median change in hospital CSR (interquartile range) was 33.3% (-6.25%, 72.3%). Predictors of greater increase in CSR included higher INGDO investment (P = 0.02, simple model), reducing patient dissatisfaction (P = 0.03, simple model), and more outreach patient screening (P = 0.002, simple and multiple model). Outreach cataract screening was the strongest predictor of increased surgical output. Government and INGDO investment in screening may be most likely to enhance output of county hospitals, a major goal of China's Blindness Prevention Plan. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  2. Global Tropospheric Noise Maps for InSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S. H.; Hensley, S.; Agram, P. S.; Chaubell, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Pan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Radio wave's differential phase delay variation through the troposphere is the largest error sources in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements, and water vapor variability in the troposphere is known to be the dominant factor. We use the precipitable water vapor (PWV) products from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors mounted on Terra and Aqua satellites to produce tropospheric noise maps of InSAR. We estimate the slope and y-intercept of power spectral density curve of MODIS PWV and calculate the structure function to estimate the expected tropospheric noise level as a function of distance. The results serve two purposes: 1) to provide guidance on the expected covariance matrix for geophysical modeling, 2) to provide quantitative basis for the science Level-1 requirements of the planned NASA-ISRO L-band SAR mission (NISAR mission). We populate lookup tables of such power spectrum parameters derived from each 1-by-1 degree tile of global coverage. The MODIS data were retrieved from OSCAR (Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar) server. Users will be able to use the lookup tables and calculate expected tropospheric noise level of any date of MODIS data at any distance scale. Such calculation results can be used for constructing covariance matrix for geophysical modeling, or building statistics to support InSAR missions' requirements. For example, about 74% of the world had InSAR tropospheric noise level (along a radar line-of-sight for an incidence angle of 40 degrees) of 2 cm or less at 50 km distance scale during the time period of 2010/01/01 - 2010/01/09.

  3. Self-assessment of social cognitive ability in schizophrenia: Association with social cognitive test performance, informant assessments of social cognitive ability, and everyday outcomes.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Juliet M; Pinkham, Amy E; Penn, David L; Harvey, Philip D

    2018-04-17

    Impairments in self-assessment are common in people with schizophrenia and impairments in self-assessment of cognitive ability have been found to predict impaired functional outcome. In this study, we examined self-assessment of social cognitive ability and related them to assessments of social cognition provided by informants, to performance on tests of social cognition, and to everyday outcomes. The difference between self-reported social cognition and informant ratings was used to predict everyday functioning. People with schizophrenia (n=135) performed 8 different tests of social cognition. They were asked to rate their social cognitive abilities on the Observable Social Cognition Rating Scale (OSCARs). High contact informants also rated social cognitive ability and everyday outcomes, while unaware of the patients' social cognitive performance and self-assessments. Social competence was measured with a performance-based assessment and clinical ratings of negative symptoms were also performed. Patient reports of their social cognitive abilities were uncorrelated with performance on social cognitive tests and with three of the four domains of functional outcomes. Differences between self-reported and informant rated social cognitive ability predicted impaired everyday functioning across all four functional domains. This difference score predicted disability even when the influences of social cognitive performance, social competence, and negative symptoms were considered. Mis-estimation of social cognitive ability was an important predictor of social and nonsocial outcomes in schizophrenia compared to performance on social cognitive tests. These results suggest that consideration of self-assessment is critical when attempting to evaluate the causes of disability and when trying to implement interventions targeting disability reduction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High-resolution modeling of antibody structures by a combination of bioinformatics, expert knowledge, and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Hiroki; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamashita, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Sarmiento, Jamica; Liang, Shide; Morokata, Tatsuaki; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Higo, Junichi; Standley, Daron M; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-08-01

    In the second antibody modeling assessment, we used a semiautomated template-based structure modeling approach for 11 blinded antibody variable region (Fv) targets. The structural modeling method involved several steps, including template selection for framework and canonical structures of complementary determining regions (CDRs), homology modeling, energy minimization, and expert inspection. The submitted models for Fv modeling in Stage 1 had the lowest average backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) (1.06 Å). Comparison to crystal structures showed the most accurate Fv models were generated for 4 out of 11 targets. We found that the successful modeling in Stage 1 mainly was due to expert-guided template selection for CDRs, especially for CDR-H3, based on our previously proposed empirical method (H3-rules) and the use of position specific scoring matrix-based scoring. Loop refinement using fragment assembly and multicanonical molecular dynamics (McMD) was applied to CDR-H3 loop modeling in Stage 2. Fragment assembly and McMD produced putative structural ensembles with low free energy values that were scored based on the OSCAR all-atom force field and conformation density in principal component analysis space, respectively, as well as the degree of consensus between the two sampling methods. The quality of 8 out of 10 targets improved as compared with Stage 1. For 4 out of 10 Stage-2 targets, our method generated top-scoring models with RMSD values of less than 1 Å. In this article, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of our approach as well as possible directions for improvement to generate better predictions in the future. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The “Resus:Station”: The use of clinical simulations in a randomised crossover study to evaluate a novel resuscitation trolley☆

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Susanna T.; Brett, Stephen J.; McKay, Anthony; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Vincent, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim Inadequately designed equipment has been implicated in poor efficiency and critical incidents associated with resuscitation. A novel resuscitation trolley (Resus:Station) was designed and evaluated for impact on team efficiency, user opinion, and teamwork, compared with the standard trolley, in simulated cardiac arrest scenarios. Methods Fifteen experienced cardiac arrest teams were recruited (45 participants). Teams performed recorded resuscitation simulations using new and conventional trolleys, with order of use randomised. After each simulation, efficiency (“time to drugs”, un-locatable equipment, unnecessary drawer opening) and team performance (OSCAR) were assessed from the video recordings and participants were asked to complete questionnaires scoring various aspects of the trolley on a Likert scale. Results Time to locate the drugs was significantly faster (p = 0.001) when using the Resus:Station (mean 5.19 s (SD 3.34)) than when using the standard trolley (26.81 s (SD16.05)). There were no reports of missing equipment when using the Resus:Station. However, during four of the fifteen study sessions using the standard trolley participants were unable to find equipment, with an average of 6.75 unnecessary drawer openings per simulation. User feedback results clearly indicated a highly significant preference for the newly designed Resus:Station for all aspects. Teams performed equally well for all dimensions of team performance using both trolleys, despite it being their first exposure to the Resus:Station. Conclusion We conclude that in this simulated environment, the new design of trolley is safe to use, and has the potential to improve efficiency at a resuscitation attempt. PMID:22796405

  6. Which organizational characteristics are associated with increased management of depression using antidepressants in US nursing homes?

    PubMed

    Lapane, Kate L; Hughes, Carmel M

    2004-10-01

    There is universal agreement that organizational characteristics of nursing facilities can and do influence the quality of care and resident outcomes. This study evaluated the relation between organizational characteristics and management of depression using antidepressants. This was a cross-sectional study of Medicare/Medicaid certified nursing homes in 6 states in 2000. We studied 87,907 residents with depression in 2,128 facilities. Minimum Data Set (MDS) provided information regarding use of antidepressants and resident factors. On-line Survey and Certification of Automated Records (OSCAR) provided facility characteristics information including structural, resource, and staffing levels. Adjusted estimates of organizational effects on antidepressant drug use were derived from generalized estimating equations. Increased treatment of depression with antidepressants was associated with facilities with a higher percentage of residents from payer sources other than Medicare/Medicaid (odds ratio [OR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.06) and more professional nursing staff (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.26). Decreased treatment tended to be related to larger homes (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.68-0.84) or if the home employed full-time physicians (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96). Once the decision to treat was made, treatment with tricyclics tended to be inversely related to larger homes, for-profit facilities, and homes with more Medicare residents. Facilities that are required to be more fiscally conservative, be it larger facilities with fewer private pay patients or for profit facilities, have lower rates of pharmacologic treatment. Resource and structural characteristics influence the type of antidepressant being prescribed; resident characteristics may not be the over-riding factor in prescribing.

  7. Mental Health Services in the Marine Corps: An Exploratory Study of Stigma and Potential Benefits of Destigmatization Training Within the Operational Stress Control and Readiness (OSCAR) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    table. This organization believes that the prevalence of misrepresented mental patients and/or actors / actresses with mental illness in shows and... vs . appropriate mental health care 40 utilization) produce high rates of absenteeism. These rates of absenteeism are compounded by a lack of

  8. Impact of virtual reality simulation on learning barriers of phacoemulsification perceived by residents.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny Siu-Chun; Sun, Zihan; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Ko, Simon Tak-Chuen; Lok, Jerry Ka-Hing; Lai, Timothy Yuk-Yau; Sikder, Shameema; Tham, Clement C

    2018-01-01

    To identify residents' perceived barriers to learning phacoemulsification surgical procedures and to evaluate whether virtual reality simulation training changed these perceptions. The ophthalmology residents undertook a simulation phacoemulsification course and proficiency assessment on the Eyesi system using the previously validated training modules of intracapsular navigation, anti-tremor, capsulorrhexis, and cracking/chopping. A cross-sectional, multicenter survey on the perceived difficulties in performing phacoemulsification tasks on patients, based on the validated International Council of Ophthalmology's Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric (ICO-OSCAR), using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = least and 5 = most difficulty), was conducted among residents with or without prior simulation training. Mann-Whitney U tests were carried out to compare the mean scores, and multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of lower scores with the following potential predictors: 1) higher level trainee, 2) can complete phacoemulsification most of the time (>90%) without supervisor's intervention, and 3) prior simulation training. The study was conducted in ophthalmology residency training programs in five regional hospitals in Hong Kong. Of the 22 residents, 19 responded (86.3%), of which 13 (68.4%) had completed simulation training. Nucleus cracking/chopping was ranked highest in difficulty by all respondents followed by capsulorrhexis completion and nucleus rotation/manipulation. Respondents with prior simulation training had significantly lower difficulty scores on these three tasks (nucleus cracking/chopping 3.85 vs 4.75, P = 0.03; capsulorrhexis completion 3.31 vs 4.40, P = 0.02; and nucleus rotation/manipulation 3.00 vs 4.75, P = 0.01). In multivariate analyses, simulation training was significantly associated with lower difficulty scores on these three tasks. Residents who had completed Eyesi simulation training had higher

  9. Time-dependent changes in magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the Costa Rica Rift recorded by variations in oceanic crustal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Peirce, C.; Hobbs, R. W.; Gregory, E. P. M.; Zhang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Geophysical studies of crustal structure at a diverse range of ridges have provided evidence that the balance between spreading rate and magma supply determines whether spreading predominantly occurs by magmatic accretion of new oceanic crust or through tectonic stretching of the whole lithosphere. Asymmetric spreading, patterns of on- and off-axis volcanism, the evolution of oceanic core complexes and the distribution of hydrothermal systems all indicate that the process of spreading is not constant over geologically short timescales. The structure of the resulting crust reflects this complexity in origin. Studies along flow-lines across ridges spreading at intermediate rates suggest variations in topographic style and crustal structure have periodically occurred, controlled by the interplay between magmatic accretion and tectonic stretching, and coupled to the degree of hydrothermal activity. Seismic reflection images and tomographic models derived from wide-angle seismic data have enabled a detailed examination of the oceanic crust that formed at the fast-to-intermediate-spreading (36 mm yr-1) Costa Rica Rift over the last 6 Ma, to look for any temporal variation in basement topography, upper crust (layer 2) P-wave velocity/density structure and crustal thickness. Coincident marine gravity and magnetic data not only allow us to test the validity of the final velocity-density model but also review variability in half-spreading rate, respectively. Collectively our analyses allow us to investigate the timescale and cyclicity of crustal structure variations and, having determined the spreading rate over time, consider how this may reflect changes in magma supply and/or hydrothermal activity at the Costa Rica Rift, using borehole 504B as the ground-truth. This research is part of a major, interdisciplinary NERC-funded collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  10. Understanding Fracturing and Alteration at ODP Borehole 504B: 3D Seismic Structure and Anisotropy of 5.9 Ma Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, E. P. M.; Hobbs, R. W.; Peirce, C.; Wilson, D. J.; Zhang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Faults and fracture networks within the oceanic crust influence the pattern of hydrothermal circulation. This circulation changes the primary composition and structure of the crust as it evolves, particularly the upper crust (layer 2), through the secondary alteration of minerals and the infilling and 'sealing' of cracks. Processes influencing the extent and the depth within the crust of these changes are currently not well known. Alteration can be quantified by observing changes in the seismic velocity structure of the crust, and analysis of seismic anisotropy within the upper crust reveals the nature of ridge-parallel aligned faults and fractures. Here we show a 3D P-wave velocity model and anisotropy maps for 5.9 Ma crust at ODP borehole 504B, situated 200 km south of the Costa Rica Rift, derived from an active-source wide-angle seismic survey in the Panama Basin conducted in 2015. The seismic structure reveals relatively homogeneous, 5 km thick oceanic crust with upper crustal velocity boundaries occurring coincident with alteration fronts observed in 504B. Correlations between basement topography, velocity anomaly and anisotropy indicate that a distinct relationship between hydrothermal alteration, basement ridges, fractures, and the velocity structure of layer 2 exists in this location. A significant difference is seen in the velocity and anisotropic structure between regions to the east and west of the borehole, that correlates with patterns in heat flow observations and indicates that: 1) these two regions of crust have inherited differences in crustal fabric during accretion; and/or 2) different regimes of hydrothermal circulation have been active in each part of the crust as they have aged. This research is part of a major, interdisciplinary NERC-funded research collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  11. Niclosamide suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and prevents LPS-induced bone loss

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Ju-Young; Baek, Jong Min

    Niclosamide (5-chloro-salicyl-(2-chloro-4-nitro) anilide) is an oral anthelmintic drug used for treating intestinal infection of most tapeworms. Recently, niclosamide was shown to have considerable efficacy against some tumor cell lines, including colorectal, prostate, and breast cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia. Specifically, the drug was identified as a potent inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is associated with osteoclast differentiation and function. In this study, we assessed the effect of niclosamide on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was inhibited by niclosamide, due to inhibitionmore » of serine–threonine protein kinase (Akt) phosphorylation, inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (IκB), and STAT3 serine{sup 727}. Niclosamide decreased the expression of the major transcription factors c-Fos and NFATc1, and thereafter abrogated the mRNA expression of osteoclast-specific genes, including TRAP, OSCAR, αv/β3 integrin (integrin αv, integrin β3), and cathepsin K (CtsK). In an in vivo model, niclosamide prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced bone loss by diminishing osteoclast activity. Taken together, our results show that niclosamide is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and may be considered as a new and safe therapeutic candidate for the clinical treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the anti-osteoclastogenic effects of niclosamide in vitro and in vivo. • Niclosamide impairs the activation of the Akt-IκB-STAT3 ser{sup 727} signaling axis. • Niclosamide acts a negative regulator of actin ring formation during osteoclast differentiation. • Niclosamide suppresses LPS-induced bone loss in vivo. • Niclosamide deserves new evaluation as a potential treatment target in various bone diseases.« less

  12. Factors predictive of increased influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in long-term care facilities: the CMS-CDC standing orders program Project.

    PubMed

    Bardenheier, Barbara H; Shefer, Abigail; McKibben, Linda; Roberts, Henry; Rhew, David; Bratzler, Dale

    2005-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2002, a multistate demonstration project was conducted in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) to encourage implementation of standing orders programs (SOP) as evidence-based vaccine delivery strategies to increase influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in LTCFs. Examine predictors of increase in influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in LTCFs. Intervention study. Self-administered surveys of LTCFs merged with data from OSCAR (On-line Survey Certification and Reporting System) and immunization coverage was abstracted from residents' medical charts in LTCFs. Twenty LTCFs were sampled from 9 intervention and 5 control states in the 2000 to 2001 influenza season for baseline and during the 2001 to 2002 influenza season for postintervention. Each state's quality improvement organization (QIO) promoted the use of standing orders for immunizations as well as other strategies to increase immunization coverage among LTCF residents. Multivariate analysis included Poisson regression to determine independent predictors of at least a 10 percentage-point increase in facility influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage. Forty-two (20%) and 59 (28%) of the facilities had at least a 10 percentage-point increase in influenza and pneumococcal immunizations, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, predictors associated with increase in influenza vaccination coverage included adoption of requirement in written immunization protocol to document refusals, less-demanding consent requirements, lower baseline influenza coverage, and small facility size. Factors associated with increase in pneumococcal vaccination coverage included adoption of recording pneumococcal immunizations in a consistent place, affiliation with a multifacility chain, and provision of resource materials. To improve the health of LTCF residents, strategies should be considered that increase immunization coverage, including written protocol for immunizations and documentation of

  13. The General History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taton, René; Wilson, Curtis; Hoskin, editor Michael, , General

    2009-09-01

    Part V. Early Phases in the Reception of Newton's Theory: 14. The vortex theory in competition with Newtonian celestial dynamics Eric J. Aiton; 15. The shape of the Earth Seymour L. Chapin; 16. Clairaut and the motion of the lunar apse: The inverse-square law undergoes a test Craig B. Waff; 17. The precession of the equinoxes from Newton to d'Alembert and Euler Curtis Wilson; 18. The solar tables of Lacaille and the lunar tables of Mayer Eric G. Forbes and Curtis Wilson; 19. Predicting the mid-eighteenth-century return of Halley's Comet Craig B. Waff; Part VI. Celestial Mechanics During the Eighteenth Century: 20. The problem of perturbation analytically treated: Euler, Clairaut, d'Alembert Curtis Wilson; 21. The work of Lagrange in celestial mechanics Curtis Wilson; 22. Laplace Bruno Morando; Part VII. Observational Astronomy and the Application of Theory in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Century: 23. Measuring solar parallax: The Venus transits of 1761 and 1769 and their nineteenth-century sequels Albert Van Helden; 24. The discovery of Uranus, the Titius-Bode and the asteroids Michael Hoskin; 25. Eighteenth-and nineteenth century developments in the theory and practice of orbit determination Brian G. Marsden; 26. The introduction of statistical reasoning into astronomy: from Newton to Poincaré Oscar Sheynin; 27. Astronomy and the theory of errors: from the method of averages to the method of least squares F. Schmeidler; Part VIII. The Development of Theory During the Nineteenth Century: 28. The golden age of celestial mechanics Bruno Morando; Part IX. The Application of Celestial Mechanics to the Solar System to the End of the Nineteenth Century: 29. Three centuries of lunar and planetary ephemerides and tables Bruno Morando; 30. Satellite ephemerides to 1900 Yoshihide Kozai; Illustrations; Combined index for Parts 2A and 2B.

  14. Pixel or Paper? Validation of a Mobile Technology for Collecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Epis, Oscar Massimiliano; Casu, Cinzia; Belloli, Laura; Schito, Emanuela; Filippini, Davide; Muscarà, Marina; Gentile, Maria Giovanna; Perez Cagnone, Paula Carina; Venerelli, Chiara; Sonnati, Massimo; Schiavetti, Irene; Bruschi, Eleonora

    2016-11-16

    In the management of chronic disease, new models for telemonitoring of patients combined with the choice of electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePRO) are being encouraged, with a clear improvement of both patients' and parents' quality of life. An Italian study demonstrated that ePRO were welcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with excellent matching data. The aim of this study is to evaluate the level of agreement between electronic and paper-and-pencil questionnaire responses. This is an observational prospective study. Patients were randomly assigned to first complete the questionnaire by paper and pencil and then by tablet or in the opposite order. The questionnaire consisted of 3 independent self-assessment visual rating scales (Visual Analog Scale, Global Health score, Patient Global Assessment of Disease Activity) commonly used in different adult patients, including those with rheumatic diseases. A total of 185 consecutive RA patients were admitted to hospital and were enrolled and completed the questionnaire both on paper and on electronic versions. For all the evaluated items, the intrarater degree of agreement between 2 approaches was found to be excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient>0.75, P<.001). An electronic questionnaire is uploaded in a dedicated Web-based tool that could implement a telemonitoring system aimed at improving the follow-up of RA patients. High intrarater reliability between paper and electronic methods of data collection encourage the use of a new digital app with consequent benefit for the overall health care system. ©Oscar Massimiliano Epis, Cinzia Casu, Laura Belloli, Emanuela Schito, Davide Filippini, Marina Muscarà, Maria Giovanna Gentile, Paula Carina Perez Cagnone, Chiara Venerelli, Massimo Sonnati, Irene Schiavetti, Eleonora Bruschi. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 16.11.2016.

  15. Science as Performance: A Proactive Strategy to Communicate and Educate Through Theater, Music and Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Brian

    2006-03-01

    Theater, music, dance, the literary and the visual arts can convey the joys and controversies of science. We describe a program at the Graduate Center entitled Science as Performance which is designed to communicate to the public the excitement and wonder of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Over the past few years there have been major successes in communicating science to the public through the arts. This is especially evident in theater and film with such recent plays as Copenhagen and the Oscar winning film A Beautiful Mind. The performance series Science and the Arts has been developed and tested at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) in mid-Manhattan for more than four years, see http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart/ . We have developed working relationships with actors, playwrights, dancers, choreographers, musicians, composers, artists and scientists who work at the intersection of science and the arts. In this presentation we will illustrate many of our collaborations in theater, dance, music and art. The response to the series has shown that the arts can make the sciences accessible, relevant, and exciting to diverse audiences in ways that provide both scientific content and significant artistic and entertainment values. The National Science Foundation has awarded a grant to the Graduate Center to help replicate similar Science and the Arts programs on other campuses by involving both their science departments and their performing arts departments. Some results of campus visits will be described. The author will also describe his involvement with producing two musical versions of a play, Einstein’s Dreams based on the novel by Alan Lightman. One production opened at the Teatro da Trindade in Lisbon, Portugal at on October 21, 2005 for a four month run and a second and different production opens at the Prince Music Theater in Philadelphia in March 2006.

  16. Impact of virtual reality simulation on learning barriers of phacoemulsification perceived by residents

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Danny Siu-Chun; Sun, Zihan; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Ko, Simon Tak-Chuen; Lok, Jerry Ka-Hing; Lai, Timothy Yuk-Yau; Sikder, Shameema; Tham, Clement C

    2018-01-01

    Objective To identify residents’ perceived barriers to learning phacoemulsification surgical procedures and to evaluate whether virtual reality simulation training changed these perceptions. Design The ophthalmology residents undertook a simulation phacoemulsification course and proficiency assessment on the Eyesi system using the previously validated training modules of intracapsular navigation, anti-tremor, capsulorrhexis, and cracking/chopping. A cross-sectional, multicenter survey on the perceived difficulties in performing phacoemulsification tasks on patients, based on the validated International Council of Ophthalmology’s Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric (ICO-OSCAR), using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = least and 5 = most difficulty), was conducted among residents with or without prior simulation training. Mann–Whitney U tests were carried out to compare the mean scores, and multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of lower scores with the following potential predictors: 1) higher level trainee, 2) can complete phacoemulsification most of the time (>90%) without supervisor’s intervention, and 3) prior simulation training. Setting The study was conducted in ophthalmology residency training programs in five regional hospitals in Hong Kong. Results Of the 22 residents, 19 responded (86.3%), of which 13 (68.4%) had completed simulation training. Nucleus cracking/chopping was ranked highest in difficulty by all respondents followed by capsulorrhexis completion and nucleus rotation/manipulation. Respondents with prior simulation training had significantly lower difficulty scores on these three tasks (nucleus cracking/chopping 3.85 vs 4.75, P = 0.03; capsulorrhexis completion 3.31 vs 4.40, P = 0.02; and nucleus rotation/manipulation 3.00 vs 4.75, P = 0.01). In multivariate analyses, simulation training was significantly associated with lower difficulty scores on these three tasks. Conclusion Residents who

  17. On the freshwater budget in the eastern tropical Atlantic during the development of the cold tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlundt, Michael; Krahmann, Gerd; Brandt, Peter; Karstensen, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    The most striking sea surface temperature (SST) phenomenon in the tropical Atlantic is the seasonal appearance of the Atlantic Cold Tongue (ACT). Onset, duration, spatial extent and strength of cooling are subject to significant interannual variability. The ACT onset is also associated with remarkable changes in upper ocean salinity. To examine the different contributions to these changes we here focus on and present a mixed layer freshwater budget in the eastern tropical Atlantic. Our investigation is based on an exceptionally large set of observations during the onset of the ACT in late boreal spring/ early boreal summer 2011: more than 5400 CTD-profiles acquired by seven gliders running simultaneously to two research cruises, 180 ship based CTD-profiles, time series data from the PIRATA buoy array as well as measurements from the Argo float program are used to derive mixed layer depth, lateral and vertical salinity gradients. To derive turbulent mixing and inferred diapycnal salt flux, microstructure observations are taken into account. Furthermore satellite measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) by the SMOS mission and of SST by the TMI radiometer as well as atmospheric reanalysis data and the OSCAR project products are implemented. Freshwater budget terms were calculated for different sub-regions. These sub-regions are chosen using pre-defined thresholds in SSS, SST or mixed layer depth. Overall the freshwater budget is dominated by the net surface freshwater flux and horizontal advection by strong zonal currents. Other terms, like entrainment and diapycnal mixing are found to be regionally important. In particular, the observed increase in salinity in the near-equatorial region during ACT onset is found to be the result of the northward migration of the ITCZ associated with reduced net surface freshwater flux at the equator as well as mixing of salty subsurface waters into the surface mixed layer.

  18. Application of Ontologies for Big Earth Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Chang, G.; Armstrong, E. M.; Boening, C.

    2014-12-01

    Connected data is smarter data! Earth Science research infrastructure must do more than just being able to support temporal, geospatial discovery of satellite data. As the Earth Science data archives continue to expand across NASA data centers, the research communities are demanding smarter data services. A successful research infrastructure must be able to present researchers the complete picture, that is, datasets with linked citations, related interdisciplinary data, imageries, current events, social media discussions, and scientific data tools that are relevant to the particular dataset. The popular Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies is a collection of ontologies and concepts designed to improve discovery and application of Earth Science data. The SWEET ontologies collection was initially developed to capture the relationships between keywords in the NASA Global Change Master Directory (GCMD). Over the years this popular ontologies collection has expanded to cover over 200 ontologies and 6000 concepts to enable scalable classification of Earth system science concepts and Space science. This presentation discusses the semantic web technologies as the enabling technology for data-intensive science. We will discuss the application of the SWEET ontologies as a critical component in knowledge-driven research infrastructure for some of the recent projects, which include the DARPA Ontological System for Context Artifact and Resources (OSCAR), 2013 NASA ACCESS Virtual Quality Screening Service (VQSS), and the 2013 NASA Sea Level Change Portal (SLCP) projects. The presentation will also discuss the benefits in using semantic web technologies in developing research infrastructure for Big Earth Science Data in an attempt to "accommodate all domains and provide the necessary glue for information to be cross-linked, correlated, and discovered in a semantically rich manner." [1] [1] Savas Parastatidis: A platform for all that we know

  19. Between pregnancy biological variability of first trimester markers of Down syndrome and the implications for screening in subsequent pregnancies: an issue revisited.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Kevin

    2002-10-01

    To assess the level of correlation of first trimester biochemical and biophysical markers of Down syndrome between different pregnancies in the same individual. To assess the impact that between pregnancy biological variability has on the likelihood that women who are at increased risk in a first pregnancy being also at increased risk in a subsequent pregnancy. During a three period women attending the OSCAR clinic at Harold Wood Hospital have had the opportunity to have first trimester screening for Down syndrome and other aneuploidies using the maternal serum biochemical markers free beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in conjunction with fetal nuchal translucency (NT) thickness and maternal age. Of the 111,105 women undergoing such screening, the computer records were examined for women who had more than one pregnancy. The results from 1002 women with two normal singleton pregnancies were available for analysis. Marker correlations (as MoM) were established between the pregnancies and the proportion of women likely to be at increased risk in each pregnancy estimated, as was the likelihood of women being at increased risk in both pregnancies. For fetal NT there was no correlation between NT MoM in the first and second pregnancy (r = 0.0959, p > 0.10). For maternal serum free beta-hCG MoM a significant correlation was found (r = 0.3976, p < 0.001), as was also found for PAPP-A MoM (r = 0.4371, p < 0.001). The implication for such between pregnancy marker association is that women who have an increased risk of Down syndrome in one pregnancy are two or three times more likely to repeat this event in their next pregnancy. This information may be useful in counselling women when undergoing first trimester screening in a subsequent pregnancy. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Screening for chromosomal anomalies in the first trimester: does repeat maternal serum screening improve detection rates?

    PubMed

    Spencer, Kevin; Cuckle, Howard S

    2002-10-01

    To assess the within person biological variability of first trimester maternal serum biochemical markers of trisomy 21 across the 10-14 week gestational period. To evaluate whether repeat sampling and testing of free beta-hCG and PAPP-A during this period would result in an improved detection rate. Women presenting at the first trimester OSCAR clinic have blood collected prior to ultrasound dating and nuchal translucency measurement. All samples are analysed for free beta-hCG and PAPP-A before an accurate estimate of gestation is available. In 10% of cases the gestation is prior to the minimum time for NT measurement (11 weeks) and these women are rebooked for a repeat visit to the clinic at the appropriate time. Our fetal database was interrogated to obtain cases in which two maternal blood samples had been collected and analysed in the 10-14 week period. Using data from the marker correlations and statistical modelling, the impact of repeat testing on detection rate for trisomy 21 at a fixed 5% false positive rate, was assessed. 261 pairs of data were available for analysis collected over a 3 year period. The correlation between free beta-hCG in sample 1 and sample 2 was 0.890 and that for PAPP-A was 0.827. The average within person biological variation for free beta-hCG was 21% and 32% for PAPP-A. The increase in detection rate when using both sets of marker data was 3.5% when using serum biochemistry and maternal age, and 1.3% when using nuchal translucency, serum biochemistry and maternal age. Repeat sampling and testing of maternal serum biochemical markers is unlikely to substantially improve first trimester screening performance. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The Effect of Pay-for-Performance in Nursing Homes: Evidence from State Medicaid Programs

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pay-for-performance (P4P) is commonly used to improve health care quality in the United States and is expected to be frequently implemented under the Affordable Care Act. However, evidence supporting its use is mixed with few large-scale, rigorous evaluations of P4P. This study tests the effect of P4P on quality of care in a large-scale setting—the implementation of P4P for nursing homes by state Medicaid agencies. Data Sources/Study Setting 2001–2009 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. Study Design Between 2001 and 2009, eight state Medicaid agencies adopted P4P programs in nursing homes. We use a difference-in-differences approach to test for changes in nursing home quality under P4P, taking advantage of the variation in timing of implementation across these eight states and using nursing homes in the 42 non-P4P states plus Washington, DC as contemporaneous controls. Principal Findings Quality improvement under P4P was inconsistent. While three clinical quality measures (the percent of residents being physically restrained, in moderate to severe pain, and developed pressure sores) improved with the implementation of P4P in states with P4P compared with states without P4P, other targeted quality measures either did not change or worsened. Of the two structural measures of quality that were tied to payment (total number of deficiencies and nurse staffing) deficiency rates worsened slightly under P4P while staffing levels did not change. Conclusions Medicaid-based P4P in nursing homes did not result in consistent improvements in nursing home quality. Expectations for improvement in nursing home care under P4P should be tempered. PMID:23398330

  2. Re-evaluating the 1940s CO2 plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, A.; Ciais, P.; Barichivitch, J.; Brovkin, V.; Gasser, T.; Pongratz, J.; Trudinger, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ice-core record reveals a stabilisation of atmospheric CO2 in the 1940s (the so called "plateau"), in spite of continued emissions from fossil fuel burning (FF) and land-use change (LUC). This stabilisation has been previously attributed to very strong oceanic CO2 uptake, perhaps in response to the El-Niño event in 1940. However, this explanation is questionable, since recent atmospheric CO2 data indicate that El Niño events generally lead to higher atmospheric CO2 growth-rates because of the terrestrial response, and oceanic CO2 measurements indicate the range of variability in the ocean sink has been rather modest in recent decades. We use up-to-date reconstructions of the CO2 sources (FF and LUC), ocean uptake from two different reconstructions and the terrestrial sink (from TRENDY models) over the 20th century to evaluate whether these allow capturing the CO2 plateau and provide further insight about its drivers. While these datasets provide a plausible explanation for most of the 20th century carbon budget, especially since 1970, they overestimate atmospheric CO2 growth rate during the plateau period by 0.9-2.0PgC.yr-1. We test the possible explanations for this mismatch, namely i) the role of natural variability in the ocean sink; ii) the representation of the terrestrial sink response to the climate anomalies during the 1940s by land-surface models; iii) the contribution of land-use processes possibly not represented in the current datasets. We conclude that a strong terrestrial sink concurrent with enhanced oceanic uptake is required to explain the CO2 stabilisation. Tests performed using the OSCAR carbon-cycle model suggest that changes in land-use coinciding with drastic socioeconomic changes during WW2 could plausibly contribute to the additional sink required.

  3. Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation by overexpression of NDRG2 in monocytes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kang, Kyeongah; Nam, Sorim; Kim, Bomi

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a member of the NDRG family of differentiation-related genes, has been characterized as a regulator of dendritic cell differentiation from monocytes, CD34{sup +} progenitor cells, and myelomonocytic leukemic cells. In this study, we show that NDRG2 overexpression inhibits the differentiation of U937 cells into osteoclasts in response to stimulation with a combination of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). U937 cells stably expressing NDRG2 are unable to differentiate into multinucleated osteoclast-like cells and display reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and resorption pit formation. Furthermore, NDRG2 expression significantly suppressesmore » the expression of genes that are crucial for the proliferation, survival, differentiation, and function of osteoclasts, including c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, RANK, and OSCAR. The activation of ERK1/2 and p38 is also inhibited by NDRG2 expression during osteoclastogenesis, and the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by NDRG2 correlates with the down-regulation of the expression of the transcription factor PU.1. Taken together, our results suggest that the expression of NDRG2 potentially inhibits osteoclast differentiation and plays a role in modulating the signal transduction pathway responsible for osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • The expression of NDRG2 significantly impairs osteoclast differentiation. • PU.1 and p38 MAPK inhibitions by NDRG2 are critical for the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. • Knockdown of NDRG2 rescues the ability of monocytes to differentiate into osteoclasts. • NDRG2 expression in BM and primary macrophages also impairs osteoclast differentiation. • This study implies the potential of NDRG2 expression in the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis.« less

  4. Esculetin attenuates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation through c-Fos/nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 signaling pathway

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Baek, Jong Min; Park, Sun-Hyang; Cheon, Yoon-Hee

    Esculetin exerts various biological effects on anti-oxidation, anti-tumors, and anti-inflammation. However, the involvement of esculetin in the bone metabolism process, particularly osteoclast differentiation has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we first confirmed the inhibitory effect of esculetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. We then revealed the relationship between esculetin and the expression of osteoclast-specific molecules to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. Esculetin interfered with the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) both at the mRNA and protein level with no involvement in osteoclast-associated early signaling pathways, suppressingmore » the expression of various transcription factors exclusively expressed in osteoclasts such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp), cathepsin K, αvβ3 integrin, and calcitonin receptor (Ctr). Additionally, esculetin inhibited the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring-positive osteoclasts during osteoclast differentiation. However, the development of F-actin structures and subsequent bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts, which are observed in osteoclast/osteoblast co-culture systems were not affected by esculetin. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that esculetin inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via direct suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1 expression and exerts an inhibitory effect on actin ring formation during osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the effects of esculetin on osteoclast differentiation and function. • Our data demonstrate for the first time that esculetin can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • Esculetin acts as an inhibitor of c-Fos and NFATc1 activation

  5. Silibinin inhibits prostate cancer cells- and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by targeting NFATc1, NF-κB, and AP-1 activation in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Chandagirikoppal V; Deep, Gagan; Gangar, Subhash C; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are limited therapeutic options against bone metastatic prostate cancer (PCA), which is primarily responsible for high mortality and morbidity in PCA patients. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis is an essential feature associated with metastatic PCA in the bone microenvironment. Silibinin, an effective chemopreventive agent, is in phase II clinical trials in PCA patients but its efficacy against PCA cells-induced osteoclastogenesis is largely unknown. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on PCA cells-induced osteoclastogenesis employing human PCA (PC3MM2, PC3, and C4-2B) and murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. We also assessed silibinin effect on receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced signaling associated with osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. Further, we analyzed silibinin effect on osteomimicry biomarkers in PCA cells. Results revealed that silibinin (30-90 μM) inhibits PCA cells-induced osteoclast activity and differentiation in RAW264.7 cells via modulating expression of several cytokines (IGF-1, TGF-β, TNF-α, I-TAC, M-CSF, G-CSF, GM-CSF, etc.) that are important in osteoclastogenesis. Additionally, in RAW264.7 cells, silibinin decreased the RANKL-induced expression and nuclear localization of NFATc1, which is considered the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, silibinin decreased the RANKL-induced DNA binding activity of NFATc1 and its regulators NF-κB and AP1, and the protein expression of osteoclast specific markers (TRAP, OSCAR, and cathepsin K). Importantly, silibinin also decreased the expression of osteomimicry biomarkers (RANKL, Runx2, osteocalcin, and PTHrP) in cell culture (PC3 and C4-2B cells) and/or in PC3 tumors. Together, our findings showing that silibinin inhibits PCA cells-induced osteoclastogenesis, suggest that silibinin could be useful clinically against bone metastatic PCA. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The effect of pay-for-performance in nursing homes: evidence from state Medicaid programs.

    PubMed

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) is commonly used to improve health care quality in the United States and is expected to be frequently implemented under the Affordable Care Act. However, evidence supporting its use is mixed with few large-scale, rigorous evaluations of P4P. This study tests the effect of P4P on quality of care in a large-scale setting-the implementation of P4P for nursing homes by state Medicaid agencies. 2001-2009 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. Between 2001 and 2009, eight state Medicaid agencies adopted P4P programs in nursing homes. We use a difference-in-differences approach to test for changes in nursing home quality under P4P, taking advantage of the variation in timing of implementation across these eight states and using nursing homes in the 42 non-P4P states plus Washington, DC as contemporaneous controls. Quality improvement under P4P was inconsistent. While three clinical quality measures (the percent of residents being physically restrained, in moderate to severe pain, and developed pressure sores) improved with the implementation of P4P in states with P4P compared with states without P4P, other targeted quality measures either did not change or worsened. Of the two structural measures of quality that were tied to payment (total number of deficiencies and nurse staffing) deficiency rates worsened slightly under P4P while staffing levels did not change. Medicaid-based P4P in nursing homes did not result in consistent improvements in nursing home quality. Expectations for improvement in nursing home care under P4P should be tempered. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. Lack of CD47 Impairs Bone Cell Differentiation and Results in an Osteopenic Phenotype in Vivo due to Impaired Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Cecilia; Persson, Emelie; Baldock, Paul; Stenberg, Åsa; Boström, Ingrid; Matozaki, Takashi; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Lundberg, Pernilla

    2013-01-01

    Here, we investigated whether the cell surface glycoprotein CD47 was required for normal formation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts and to maintain normal bone formation activity in vitro and in vivo. In parathyroid hormone or 1α,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 (D3)-stimulated bone marrow cultures (BMC) from CD47−/− mice, we found a strongly reduced formation of multinuclear tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)+ osteoclasts, associated with reduced expression of osteoclastogenic genes (nfatc1, Oscar, Trap/Acp, ctr, catK, and dc-stamp). The production of M-CSF and RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand) was reduced in CD47−/− BMC, as compared with CD47+/+ BMC. The stromal cell phenotype in CD47−/− BMC involved a blunted expression of the osteoblast-associated genes osterix, Alp/Akp1, and α-1-collagen, and reduced mineral deposition, as compared with that in CD47+/+ BMC. CD47 is a ligand for SIRPα (signal regulatory protein α), which showed strongly reduced tyrosine phosphorylation in CD47−/− bone marrow stromal cells. In addition, stromal cells lacking the signaling SIRPα cytoplasmic domain also had a defect in osteogenic differentiation, and both CD47−/− and non-signaling SIRPα mutant stromal cells showed a markedly reduced ability to support osteoclastogenesis in wild-type bone marrow macrophages, demonstrating that CD47-induced SIRPα signaling is critical for stromal cell support of osteoclast formation. In vivo, femoral bones of 18- or 28-week-old CD47−/− mice showed significantly reduced osteoclast and osteoblast numbers and exhibited an osteopenic bone phenotype. In conclusion, lack of CD47 strongly impairs SIRPα-dependent osteoblast differentiation, deteriorate bone formation, and cause reduced formation of osteoclasts. PMID:23990469

  8. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts hasmore » been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening.« less

  9. Comparison of laboratory and ambulatory measures of central blood pressure and pulse wave reflection: hitting the target or missing the mark?

    PubMed

    Burns, Matthew J; Seed, Jeremy D; Incognito, Anthony V; Doherty, Connor J; Notay, Karambir; Millar, Philip J

    2018-04-01

    Prior studies demonstrating clinical significance of noninvasive estimates of central blood pressure (BP) and pulse wave reflection have relied primarily on discrete resting measures. The aim of this study was to compare central BP and pulse wave reflection measures sampled during a single resting laboratory visit against those obtained under ambulatory conditions. The secondary aim was to investigate the reproducibility of ambulatory central BP and pulse wave reflection measurements. Forty healthy participants (21 males; 24 ± 3 years) completed three measurements of brachial artery pulse wave analysis (Oscar 2 with SphygmoCor Inside) in the laboratory followed by 24 hours of ambulatory monitoring. Seventeen participants repeated the 24-hour ambulatory monitoring visit after at least 1 week. Ambulatory measures were divided into daytime (9 AM-9 PM), nighttime (1 AM-6 AM), and 24-hour periods. Compared with laboratory measurements, central systolic BP, augmentation pressure, and augmentation index (with and without heart rate normalization) were higher (all P < .01) during daytime and 24-hour periods but lower during the nighttime period (all P < .001). The drop in nighttime brachial systolic BP was larger than central systolic pressure (Δ -20 ± 6 vs. -15 ± 6 mm Hg; P < .0001). Repeat ambulatory measurements of central BP and pulse wave reflection displayed good-to-excellent intraclass correlation coefficients (r = 0.58-0.86; all P < .01), although measures of pulse wave reflection had higher coefficients of variation (14%-41%). The results highlight absolute differences in central BP and pulse wave reflection between discrete laboratory and ambulatory conditions. The use of ambulatory measures of central BP and pulse wave reflection warrant further investigation for clinical prognostic value. Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regional and Local Glacial-Earthquake Patterns in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K.; Nettles, M.

    2016-12-01

    Icebergs calved from marine-terminating glaciers currently account for up to half of the 400 Gt of ice lost annually from the Greenland ice sheet (Enderlin et al., 2014). When large capsizing icebergs ( 1 Gt of ice) calve, they produce elastic waves that propagate through the solid earth and are observed as teleseismically detectable MSW 5 glacial earthquakes (e.g., Ekström et al., 2003; Nettles & Ekström, 2010 Tsai & Ekström, 2007; Veitch & Nettles, 2012). The annual number of these events has increased dramatically over the past two decades. We analyze glacial earthquakes from 2011-2013, which expands the glacial-earthquake catalog by 50%. The number of glacial-earthquake solutions now available allows us to investigate regional patterns across Greenland and link earthquake characteristics to changes in ice dynamics at individual glaciers. During the years of our study Greenland's west coast dominated glacial-earthquake production. Kong Oscar Glacier, Upernavik Isstrøm, and Jakobshavn Isbræ all produced more glacial earthquakes during this time than in preceding years. We link patterns in glacial-earthquake production and cessation to the presence or absence of floating ice tongues at glaciers on both coasts of Greenland. The calving model predicts glacial-earthquake force azimuths oriented perpendicular to the calving front, and comparisons between seismic data and satellite imagery confirm this in most instances. At two glaciers we document force azimuths that have recently changed orientation and confirm that similar changes have occurred in the calving-front geometry. We also document glacial earthquakes at one previously quiescent glacier. Consistent with previous work, we model the glacial-earthquake force-time function as a boxcar with horizontal and vertical force components that vary synchronously. We investigate limitations of this approach and explore improvements that could lead to a more accurate representation of the glacial earthquake source.

  11. Epilepsy and catalepsy in Anglo-American literature between romanticism and realism: Tennyson, Poe, Eliot and Collins.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P

    2000-12-01

    Epilepsy and catalepsy were not clearly separated in the minds of people in the early 19th century, and catalepsy may have been used as a diagnostic euphemism for epilepsy. Tennyson, in "The Princess" describes, under the diagnosis of catalepsy, probable temporal lobe epileptic dreamy states with derealization which serve as a metaphor of sexual and moral ambivalence, the poem's central theme. It seems that Tennyson knew such seizures from his own father who had been given a diagnosis of catalepsy. Poe gave his Berenice in the novella of the same title a diagnosis of epilepsy as a reason for a premature burial. However, there was a good deal of unlikelyhood in this, and when he came to this theme in "The Fall of the House of Usher" and in "The Premature Burial" he chose instead a diagnosis of catalepsy which fitted better with the plot. The fits of the title character in George Eliot's Silas Marner, diagnosed as catalepsy, would today rather be seen as epileptic twilight states. It would seem that this author drew from contemporary dictionary descriptions which described conditions similar to Marner's fits under the heading of catalepsy. In Eliot's "legend with a realistic treatment", the twilight states are a central factor in the plot and explain Marner's reclusion and passivity. In Poor Miss Finch by English realist Wilkie Collins, the post-traumatic seizures of Oscar, one of the main characters, their cause, their treatment with silver nitrate, and the subsequent discoloration of his skin are central supporting elements of a perfectly constructed plot. Collins gives an exact description of a right versive seizure with secondary generalisation, and how to deal with it. In none of these works seizures are seen in a negative light. They rather evoke reactions of sympathy and support.

  12. Comparison of time series of integrated water vapor measured using radiosonde, GPS and microwave radiometer at the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Franceso; Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Information about the amount and spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor is essential to improve our knowledge of weather forecasting and climate change. Water vapor is highly variable in space and time depending on the complex interplay of several phenomena like convection, precipitation, turbulence, etc. It remains one of the most poorly characterized meteorological parameters. Remarkable progress in using of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), in particular GPS, for the monitoring of atmospheric water vapor has been achieved during the last decades. Various studies have demonstrated that GPS could provide accurate water vapor estimates for the study of the atmosphere. Different GPS data processing provided within the scientific community made use of various tropospheric models that primarily differs for the assumptions on the vertical refractivity profiles and the mapping of the vertical delay with elevation angles. This works compares several models based on the use of surface meteorological data. In order to calculate the Integrated Water Vapour (IWV), an algorithm for calculating the zenith tropospheric delay was implemented. It is based upon different mapping functions (Niell, Saastamoinen, Chao and Herring Mapping Functions). Observations are performed at the Istituto di Metodologie per l'Analisi Ambientale (IMAA) GPS station located in Tito Scalo, Potenza (40.60N, 15.72E), from July to December 2014, in the framework of OSCAR project (Observation System for Climate Application at Regional scale). The retrieved values of the IWV using the GPS are systematically compared with the other estimation of IWV collected at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory) using the other available measurement techniques. In particular, in this work the compared IWV are retrieved from: 1. a Trimble GPS antenna (data processed by the GPS-Met network, see gpsmet.nooa.gov); 2. a Novatel GPS antenna (data locally processed using a software developed at CIAO); 3

  13. Seismic structure of oceanic crust at ODP borehole 504B: Investigating anisotropy and layer 2 characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, E. P. M.; Hobbs, R. W.; Peirce, C.; Wilson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Fracture and fault networks in the upper oceanic crust influence the circulation of hydrothermal fluids and heat transfer between crust and ocean. These fractures form by extensional stresses, with a predominant orientation parallel to the ridge axis, creating porosity- and permeability-derived anisotropy that can be measured in terms of seismic velocity. These properties change as the crust ages and evolves through cooling, alteration and sedimentation. The rate at which these changes occur and their effects on oceanic crustal structure and hydrothermal flow patterns are currently not well constrained. The NERC-funded OSCAR project aims to understand the development of upper oceanic crust, the extent and influence of hydrothermal circulation on the crust, and the behavior of fluids flowing in fractured rock. We show P-wave velocity models centered on DSDP/ODP Hole 504B, located ~200 km south of the Costa Rica Rift, derived from data acquired during a recent integrated geophysics and oceanography survey of the Panama Basin. The data were recorded by 25 four-component OBSs deployed in a grid, that recorded ~10,000 full azimuthal coverage shots fired by a combined high- and low-frequency seismic source. Both reflection and refraction data are integrated to reveal the seismic velocity structure of the crust within the 25 km by 25 km grid. The down-hole geological structure of 6 Ma crust at 504B comprises 571.5 m of extrusive basalts overlying a 209 m transition zone of mixed pillows and dikes containing a clear alteration boundary, which grades to >1050 m of sheeted dikes. Our model results are compared with this lithological structure and other previously published results to better understand the nature of velocity changes within seismic layer 2. The data provide a 3D framework, which together with analysis of the S-wave arrivals and particle motion studies, constrain estimates of the seismic anisotropy and permeability structure of the upper oceanic crust as it

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy - general considerations and experience in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević-Peleš, Alma; Bajs Janović, Maja; Stručić, Ana; Šagud, Marina; Skočić HanŽek, Milena; Živković, Maja; Janović, Špiro

    2018-06-01

    Despite controversy, ECT has been recognized as significantly effective for the treatment of mental disorders since 1938, when Cerletti and Bini introduced ECT in clinical psychiatric practice for treatment of schizophrenia. In the next period, indication for ECT switched more toward depression and catatonia. ECT was even banned from psychiatric training in 1960's, due to the anti-psychiatric movement, which were fortified by Oscar winning movie "One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest". Due to its robust effectiveness, ECT revived in the early 1980's and today holds its position in clinical psychiatric practices around the world. Mechanism of ECT on brain and psychopathology is still not fully understood. Main theories have been neurotransmitter, post-receptor, neurophysiological and neuroendocrine theory. Regarding best clinical practices and evidence reported in the literature, ECT today is considered a treatment option for, traditionally, depression, suicidality and catatonia, and also schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, malignant neuroleptic syndrome, postpartal depression and psychosis, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, dementia, etc. Recent evidence of ECT efficacy is growing stronger also in the treatment resistant cases, for depression and psychosis. Great advantage of ECT is lack of absolute contraindications. ECT in Croatia was introduced in clinical psychiatric practice in 1960's in four institutions. Mainly due to stigma, but also a tendency for shifting toward hypothesized action mechanism, ECT in Croatia has been re-named to electrostimulative therapy or electroneuromodulatory treatment. In recent decades, the Department of psychiatry in the University Hospital Centre Zagreb (KBC Zagreb), has continuously been practicing ECT. Our department is considered a regional leader, regarding number of patient cases and overall experience in homeland and neighbouring countries. In the 2016, Croatian expert group

  15. Laboratory and Field Spectroscopy of Moon analogue material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    Samples derived from terrestrial analogue sites are studied to gain insight into lunar processes in their geological context (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011). For this study samples from the volcanic region of the Eifel, Germany collected during our latest field campaigns in November 2015 and February 2016 (Foing et al., 2010), are analyzed with a variety of spectrometers. The aim is to obtain a database of analyzed samples that could be used as a reference for future in situ measurements. We also use a documented set of Moon-Mars relevant minerals curated at VU Amsterdam. We are using systematically for all samples UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers, and sporadically a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and a Raman laser spectrometer on control samples. Calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers is the main focus of this research in order to obtain the clearest spectra. The calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers requires the use of a good light source as well as suitable optical fibers to create a signal that covers the widest range in wavelengths available. To eliminate noise towards the edges of this range, multiple measurements are averaged and data is processed by dividing the signal by reference spectra. Obtained spectra can be tested for accuracy by comparing them with stationary laboratory spectrometers such as the FTIR spectrometer. The Raman, UV-VIS and NIR are also used in combination with the ExoGeoLab mock-up lander during field campaigns (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011) also brought again to Eifel in February 2016, to prove the applicability of the equipment in the field. Acknowledgements: we thank Dominic Doyle for ESTEC optical lab support, Euan Monaghan (Leiden U) for FTIR measurement support, Wim van Westrenen for access to VU samples, Oscar Kamps (Utrecht U./ESTEC), Aidan Cowley (EAC) and Matthias Sperl (DLR) for support discussions

  16. The Software Architecture of the Upgraded ESA DRAMA Software Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebschull, Christopher; Flegel, Sven; Gelhaus, Johannes; Mockel, Marek; Braun, Vitali; Radtke, Jonas; Wiedemann, Carsten; Vorsmann, Peter; Sanchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Krag, Holger

    2013-08-01

    In the beginnings of man's space flight activities there was the belief that space is so big that everybody could use it without any repercussions. However during the last six decades the increasing use of Earth's orbits has lead to a rapid growth in the space debris environment, which has a big influence on current and future space missions. For this reason ESA issued the "Requirements on Space Debris Mitigation for ESA Projects" [1] in 2008, which apply to all ESA missions henceforth. The DRAMA (Debris Risk Assessment and Mitigation Analysis) software suite had been developed to support the planning of space missions to comply with these requirements. During the last year the DRAMA software suite has been upgraded under ESA contract by TUBS and DEIMOS to include additional tools and increase the performance of existing ones. This paper describes the overall software architecture of the ESA DRAMA software suite. Specifically the new graphical user interface, which manages the five main tools ARES (Assessment of Risk Event Statistics), MIDAS (MASTER-based Impact Flux and Damage Assessment Software), OSCAR (Orbital Spacecraft Active Removal), CROC (Cross Section of Complex Bodies) and SARA (Re-entry Survival and Risk Analysis) is being discussed. The advancements are highlighted as well as the challenges that arise from the integration of the five tool interfaces. A framework had been developed at the ILR and was used for MASTER-2009 and PROOF-2009. The Java based GUI framework, enables the cross-platform deployment, and its underlying model-view-presenter (MVP) software pattern, meet strict design requirements necessary to ensure a robust and reliable method of operation in an environment where the GUI is separated from the processing back-end. While the GUI framework evolved with each project, allowing an increasing degree of integration of services like validators for input fields, it has also increased in complexity. The paper will conclude with an outlook on

  17. Exploring the Architectural Tradespace of Severe Weather Monitoring Nanosatellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, N.; Selva, D.; Blackwell, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    MicroMAS-1, a 3U nanosatellite developed by MIT/LL, MIT/SSL, and University of Massachusetts, was launched on July 13, 2014 and is scheduled for deployment from the International Space Station in September. The development of MicroMAS motivates an architectural analysis of a constellation of nanosatellites with the goal of drastically reducing the cost of observing severe storms compared with current monolithic missions such as the Precision and All-Weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission from the NASA Decadal Survey. Our goal is to evolve the instrument capability on weather monitoring nanosatellites to achieve higher performance and better satisfy stakeholder needs. Clear definitions of performance requirements are critical in the conceptual design phase when much of the project's lifecycle cost and performance will be fixed. Ability to perform trade studies and optimization of performance needs with instrument capability will enable design teams to focus on key technologies that will introduce high value and high return on investment. In this work, we approach the significant trades and trends of constellations for monitoring severe storms by applying our rule-based decision support tool. We examine a subset of stakeholder groups listed in the OSCAR online database (e.g., weather, climate) that would benefit from severe storm weather data and their respective observation requirements (e.g. spatial resolution, accuracy). We use ten parameters in our analysis, including atmospheric temperature, humidity, and precipitation. We compare the performance and cost of thousands of different possible constellations. The constellations support hyperspectral sounders that cover different portions of the millimeter-wave spectrum (50-60 GHz, 118GHz, 183GHz) in different orbits, and the performance results are compared against those of the monolithic PATH mission. Our preliminary results indicate that constellations using the hyperspectral millimeter wave sounders can

  18. SU-E-T-217: Intrinsic Respiratory Gating in Small Animal CT

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Liu, Y; Smith, M; Mistry, N

    Purpose: Preclinical animal models of lung cancer can provide a controlled test-bed for testing dose escalation or function-based-treatment-planning studies. However, to extract lung function, i.e. ventilation, one needs to be able to image the lung at different phases of ventilation (in-hale / ex-hale). Most respiratory-gated imaging using micro-CT involves using an external ventilator and surgical intervention limiting the utility in longitudinal studies. A new intrinsic respiratory retrospective gating method was developed and tested in mice. Methods: A fixed region of interest (ROI) that covers the diaphragm was selected on all projection images to estimate the mean intensity (M). The meanmore » intensity depends on the projection angle and diaphragm position. A 3-point moving average (A) of consecutive M values: Mpre, Mcurrent and Mpost, was calculated to be subtracted from Mcurrent. A fixed threshold was used to enable amplitude based sorting into 4 different phases of respiration. Images at full-inhale and end-exhale phases of respiration were reconstructed using the open source OSCaR. Lung volumes estimated at the 2 phases of respiration were validated against literature values. Results: Intrinsic retrospective gating was accomplished without the use of any external breathing waveform. While projection images were acquired at 360 different angles. Only 138 and 104 projections were used to reconstruct images at full-inhale and end-exhale. This often results in non-uniform under-sampled angular projections leading to some minor streaking artifacts. The calculated expiratory, inspiratory and tidal lung volumes correlated well with the values known from the literature. Conclusion: Our initial result demonstrates an intrinsic gating method that is suitable for flat panel cone beam small animal CT systems. Reduction in streaking artifacts can be accomplished by oversampling the data or using iterative reconstruction methods. This initial experience will enable

  19. PREFACE: International Symposium on Ultrasound in the Control of Industrial Processes (UCIP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Luis Elvira; Resa López, Pablo; Salazar, Jordi; Benedito Fort, José Javier; Martínez Graullera, Óscar

    2012-12-01

    Multiple Scattering of Generic Waves in Particulate Composites' by Félix Alba Consulting. A total of 93 delegates from 21 countries participated actively in this event, and more than ten companies were involved through oral communications, tutorials, exhibition or sponsorship. Conference photograph Conference photograph Organizers Organizers SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE Dr Luis Elvira, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Pablo Resa, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Oscar F Martinez-Graullera Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Jordi Salazar Department of Electronic Engineering Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain Dr Jose Benedito Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Dr Luis Elvira, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Prof Malcolm J W Povey, Procter Department of Food Science University of Leeds, United Kingdom Dr Jordi Salazar, Department of Electronic Engineering Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain Dr Jose Benedito, Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain Dr Oscar F Martinez-Graullera, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Carmen Duran, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Pablo Resa, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dra Cristina Aparicio, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Prof Francisco Montero de Espinosa, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Jaime Rodríguez-López, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Carlos Sierra, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Shiva Kant Shukla, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y

  20. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Leas, Eric C; Althouse, Benjamin M; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H; Noar, Seth M; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Ayers, John W

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this "organic advocacy" may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms "climate change" or "global warming" reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573-699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the "DiCaprio effect" surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for "climate change" or "global warming" increased 261% (95%CI, 186-335) and 210% (95%CI 149-272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP's daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio's speech (e.g., "hottest year"), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., "electric car"). Because these data are freely available in real time our analytical strategy provides substantial lead time

  1. Origin and Evolution of the Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliam, Andrew; Rauch, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Introduction; List of participants; 1. Mount Wilson Observatory contributions to the study of cosmic abundances of the chemical elements George W. Preston; 2. Synthesis of the elements in stars: B2FH and beyond E. Margaret Burbidge; 3. Stellar nucleosynthesis: a status report 2003 David Arnett; 4. Advances in r-process nucleosynthesis John J. Cowan and Christopher Sneden; 5. Element yields of intermediate-mass stars Richard B. C. Henry; 6. The impact of rotation on chemical abundances in red giant branch stars Corinne Charbonnel; 7. s-processing in AGB stars and the composition of carbon stars Maurizio Busso, Oscar Straniero, Roberto Gallino, and Carlos Abia; 8. Models of chemical evolution Francesca Matteucci; 9. Model atmospheres and stellar abundance analysis Bengt Gustafsson; 10. The light elements: lithium, beryllium, and boron Ann Merchant Boesgaard; 11. Extremely metal-poor stars John E. Norris; 12. Thin and thick galactic disks Poul E. Nissen; 13. Globular clusters and halo field stars Christopher Sneden, Inese I. Ivans and Jon P. Fulbright; 14. Chemical evolution in ω Centauri Verne V. Smith; 15. Chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds, from young to old stars Vanessa Hill; 16. Detailed composition of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies Matthew D. Shetrone; 17. The evolutionary history of Local Group irregular galaxies Eva K. Grebel; 18. Chemical evolution of the old stellar populations of M31 R. Michael Rich; 19. Stellar winds of hot massive stars nearby and beyond the Local Group Fabio Bresolin and Rolf P. Kudritzki; 20. Presolar stardust grains Donald D. Clayton and Larry R. Nittler; 21. Interstellar dust B. T. Draine; 22. Interstellar atomic abundances Edward B. Jenkins; 23. Molecules in the interstellar medium Tommy Wiklind; 24. Metal ejection by galactic winds Crystal L. Martin; 25. Abundances from the integrated light of globular clusters and galaxies Scott C. Trager; 26. Abundances in spiral and irregular galaxies Donald R. Garnett; 27

  2. Warthin-like papillary renal cell carcinoma: Clinicopathologic, morphologic, immunohistochemical and molecular genetic analysis of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Skenderi, Faruk; Ulamec, Monika; Vanecek, Tomas; Martinek, Petr; Alaghehbandan, Reza; Foix, Maria Pane; Babankova, Iva; Montiel, Delia Perez; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Svajdler, Marian; Dubinský, Pavol; Cempirkova, Dana; Pavlovsky, Michal; Vranic, Semir; Daum, Ondrej; Ondic, Ondrej; Pivovarcikova, Kristyna; Michalova, Kvetoslava; Hora, Milan; Rotterova, Pavla; Stehlikova, Adela; Dusek, Martin; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2017-04-01

    Oncocytic papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) is a distinct subtype of PRCC, listed as a possible new variant of PRCC in the 2016 WHO classification. It is composed of papillae aligned by large single-layered eosinophilic cells showing linearly arranged oncocytoma-like nuclei. We analyzed clinicopathologic, morphologic, immunohistochemical and molecular-genetic characteristics of 11 oncocytic PRCCs with prominent tumor lymphocytic infiltrate, morphologically resembling Warthin's tumor. The patients were predominantly males (8/11, 73%), with an average age of 59years (range 14-76), and a mean tumor size of 7cm (range 1-22cm). Tumors had the features of oncocytic PRCCs with focal pseudostratification in 8/11 cases and showed dense stromal inflammatory infiltration in all cases. Papillary growth pattern was predominant, comprising more than 60% of tumor volume. Tubular and solid components were present in 5 and 3 cases, respectively. Uniform immunohistochemical positivity was found for AMACR, PAX-8, MIA, vimentin, and OSCAR. Tumors were mostly negative for carboanhydrase 9, CD117, CK20, and TTF-1. Immunohistochemical stains for DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and PMS2 were retained in all cases, while MSH2 and MSH6 were negative in 1 case. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) consisted of both B and T cells. Chromosomal copy number variation analysis showed great variability in 5 cases, ranging from a loss of one single chromosome to complex genome rearrangements. Only one case showed gains of chromosomes 7 and 17, among other aberrations. In 4 cases no numerical imbalance was found. Follow up data was available for 9 patients (median 47.6months, range 1-132). In 6 patients no lethal progression was noted, while 3 died of disease. In conclusion, Warthin-like PRCC is morphologically very close to oncocytic PRCC, from which it differs by the presence of dense lymphoid stroma. Chromosomal numerical aberration pattern of these tumors is variable; only one case showed

  3. Porosity, Fracturing and Alteration of Young Oceanic Crust: New Seismic Analyses at Borehole 504B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, E. P. M.; Hobbs, R. W.; Peirce, C.; Wilson, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    conduits for mineralising fluids to flow. This research is part of a major, interdisciplinary NERC-funded research collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  4. New Marine Heat Flow measurements at the Costa Rica Rift, Panama Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. N.; Kolandaivelu, K. P.; Gregory, E. P. M.; Alshafai, R.; Lowell, R. P.; Hobbs, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    We report new heat flow measurements collected along the southern flank of the Costa Rica ridge. This ridge flank has been the site of numerous seismic, heat flow, and ocean drilling experiments and has become an important type location for investigations of off-axis hydrothermal processes. These data were collected as part of an interdisciplinary NERC and NSF-funded collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterization of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR), to better understand links between crustal evolution, hydrothermal heat loss and the impact of this heat loss and fluid mass discharge on deep ocean circulation. The heat flow measurements are collocated with a newly acquired high-resolution seismic profile collected using a GI-gun source to image the sedimentary and upper crustal section. The profile is tied to ODP Hole 504B and provides robust estimates of the sediment thickness as well as its internal structure. In total five heat flow stations consisting of 67 new heat flow measurements were made, spanning crustal ages between 1.3 and 5.4 Myr. The full spreading rate of 66 mm/yr gives rise to abyssal hill basement relief between 500 and 250 m. Sediment cover is relatively incomplete in this region and varies between 0 and 290 m. The majority of heat flow values fall below half-space cooling models indicating that significant amounts of heat are removed by hydrothermal circulation. Low heat flow values are observed in sediment ponds between abyssal hill relief and high values are generally associated with ridge-ward dipping faults bounding abyssal hills. These faults are likely high permeability pathways where heated fluids are discharging, providing an example where large-scale faulting and block rotation plays a major role in ventilated ridge flank fluid circulation. The heat flow fraction (qobs/qpred) varies between varies between 0.01 and 4.1 and has a mean of 0.3 indicating that on average 70

  5. Axial crustal structure of the Costa Rica Rift: Implications for along-axis hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Tong, V.; Hobbs, R. W.; Peirce, C.; Lowell, R. P.; Haughton, G.; Murton, B. J.; Morales Maqueda, M. A.; Harris, R. N.; Robinson, A. H.

    2017-12-01

    along-axis hydrothermal circulation transferring heat and impacting the properties of newly accreted oceanic crust. This research is part of a major, interdisciplinary NERC-funded collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  6. 3D crustal structure beneath the Costa Rica Rift from seismic tomography: insight into magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Tong, V.; Wilson, D. J.; Hobbs, R. W.; Haughton, G.; Murton, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  7. Determining the Extent of Hydrothermal Interaction on the Southern Costa Rica Rift Ridge Flank During the Past 8 Ma from Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Moorkamp, M.; Hobbs, R. W.; Peirce, C.; Harris, R. N.; Morgan, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    between P-wave velocity and density models from which we infer the likely hydrothermal regimes at the time of formation at the spreading ridge. This research is part of a major, interdisciplinary NERC-funded collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  8. SU-E-E-07: An Adaptable Approach for Education On Medical Physics at Undergraduate and Postgraduate Levels

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Miller-Clemente, R; Universidad de Oriente, Santiago De Cuba, Santiago de Cuba; Mendez-Perez, L

    regions without formal programs of MP, like most of developing countries. Starting with undergraduate students would allow to reach appropriate certification faster than most of traditional or alternative approaches for education on MP. The authors acknowledge Radiation Consulting Group, LLC, an Arizona Corporation which promotes the use of ionizing radiation in the healing arts, for the “Oscar Luis Caballero” travel grant. The authors thanks to professors Meisbel Daudinot, David Adame and Alexander Pascau for the practices through imagis, imageROC and ANGIODIN PD3000 respectively.« less

  9. An Assessment of Magma-Hydrothermal Heat Output at the Costa Rica Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, R. P.; Morales Maqueda, M. A.; Banyte, D.; Zhang, L.; Tong, V.; Hobbs, R. W.; Harris, R. N.

    2016-12-01

    A joint geophysical/physical oceanographic investigation of the Costa Rica Ridge as part of the OSCAR (Oceanographic and Seismic Characterization of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge) research program enables us to estimate hydrothermal heat output and its likely link to a sub-axial magma lens (AML). In December 2014, a number of tow-yo casts were made along and near the ridge axis where seismic reflection data collected in 1994 showed the presence of seismic reflector interpreted to be an AML at a depth of about 2800 m below the seafloor. A decline in beam transmission in a ≈ 200 m thick region located approximately 800 to 900 meters above the seafloor indicated the presence of a hydrothermal plume. CTD data collected above the ridge yielded a weighted average buoyancy frequency of approximately 19.3 x 10-8 s-2. Assuming a mean hydrothermal vent temperature of 350°C, buoyant plume theory yields a heat output between 400 and 600 MW. Application of the single-pass modeling approach to the hydrothermal system, yields an estimated mass flow between 210 and 337 kg/s, and the mean product of crustal permeability x discharge area ranges between 6 and 10 x 10-9 m4. A multichannel seismic profile collected in 2015 indicates the presence of a reflector 5 km along-axis and < 100 m wide, in approximately the same location as the 1994 survey, suggesting that magma-driven hydrothermal heat output may have exhibited stability on a decadal time scale. The relatively small size of the inferred AML, when coupled to the heat output estimate and the single-pass model, suggests that the conductive boundary layer at the top the AML is 2m thick and that the AML must be frequently replenished to maintain stable heat output. Assuming the hydrothermal system is driven by magmatic latent heat, a 100 m thick AML could have powered a 100 MW hydrothermal system for 20 years, while inputting 5 x 107 m3 of melt into the axis. These results indicate

  10. Morphological, immunohistochemical, and chromosomal analysis of multicystic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, an architecturally unusual challenging variant.

    PubMed

    Foix, Maria Pané; Dunatov, Ana; Martinek, Petr; Mundó, Enric Condom; Suster, Saul; Sperga, Maris; Lopez, Jose I; Ulamec, Monika; Bulimbasic, Stela; Montiel, Delia Perez; Alaghehbandan, Reza; Peckova, Kvetoslava; Pivovarcikova, Krystina; Ondrej, Daum; Rotterova, Pavla; Skenderi, Faruk; Prochazkova, Kristyna; Dusek, Martin; Hora, Milan; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) is typically composed of large leaf-like cells and smaller eosinophilic cells arranged in a solid-alveolar pattern. Eosinophilic, adenomatoid/pigmented, or neuroendocrine variants have also been described. We collected 10 cases of ChRCC with a distinct multicystic pattern out of 733 ChRCCs from our registry, and subsequently analyzed these by morphology, immunohistochemistry, and array comparative genomic hybridization. Of the 10 patients, 6 were males with an age range of 50-89 years (mean 68, median 69). Tumor size ranged between 1.2 and 20 cm (mean 5.32, median 3). Clinical follow-up was available for seven patients, ranging 1-19 years (mean 7.2, median 2.5). No aggressive behavior was documented. We observed two growth patterns, which were similar in all tumors: (1) variable-sized cysts, resembling multilocular cystic neoplasm of low malignant potential and (2) compressed cystic and tubular pattern with slit-like spaces. Raisinoid nuclei were consistently present while necrosis was absent in all cases. Half of the cases showed eosinophilic/oncocytic cytology, deposits of pigment (lipochrome) and microcalcifications. The other half was composed of pale or mixed cell populations. Immunostains for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), CK7, OSCAR, CD117, parvalbumin, MIA, and Pax 8 were positive in all tumors while negative for vimentin, TFE3, CANH 9, HMB45, cathepsin K, and AMACR. Ki67 immunostain was positive in up to 1 % of neoplastic cells. Molecular genetic examination revealed multiple chromosomal losses in two fifths analyzable tumors, while three cases showed no chromosomal numerical aberrations. ChRCC are rarely arranged in a prominent multicystic pattern, which is probably an extreme form of the microcystic adenomatoid pigmented variant of ChRCC. The spectrum of tumors entering the differential diagnosis of ChRCC is quite different from that of conventional ChRCC. The immunophenotype of ChRCC is identical with

  11. The inhibitory effect of beta-lapachone on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gu, Dong Ryun; Center for Metabolic Function Regulation; Lee, Joon No

    β-lapachone (β-L) is a substrate of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH): quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). NQO1 reduces quinones to hydroquinones using NADH as an electron donor and consequently increases the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio. The activation of NQO1 by β-L has beneficial effects on several metabolic syndromes, such as obesity, hypertension, and renal injury. However, the effect of β-L on bone metabolism remains unclear. Here, we show that β-L might be a potent inhibitor of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. β-L inhibited osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner and also reduced the expression of osteoclast differentiation marker genes,more » such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Acp5 or TRAP), cathepsin K (CtsK), the d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase V0 domain (Atp6v0d2), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dc-stamp). β-L treatment of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis significantly increased the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio and resulted in the activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a negative regulator of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, β-L treatment led to significant suppression of the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1β (PGC1β), which can stimulate osteoclastogenesis. β-L treatment downregulated c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 (NFATc1), which are master transcription factors for osteoclastogenesis. Taken together, the results demonstrated that β-L inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and could be considered a potent inhibitor of RANKL-mediated bone diseases, such as postmenopausal osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. - Highlights: • β-lapachone (β-L) inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. • β-L increases the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio

  12. Exploring the relationship between nursing home financial performance and management entrepreneurial attributes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jullet A; Marino, Louis D; Vecchiarini, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) (i.e., their innovativeness, proactiveness and risk-taking) and financial performance in nursing homes. We hypothesize that nursing homes that are more proactive will report better short-term financial performance, while when firms with higher propensities for innovativeness and risk-taking will experience poorer financial performance in the short period due to the high costs associated with the initial adoption of innovation and with pursuing high-risks ventures. In 2004, a survey was developed and mailed to a population of 670 nursing homes in the state of Florida who were listed in the Florida Nursing Home Guide of the Agency for Health Care Administration. The final sample for this study included 104 respondents. The data from these surveys were merged with additional variables gathered from the 2004 Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) system and the 2004/2005 Medicare Cost Reports (MCR). EO was operationalized using a nine-item scale adapted from Covin and Slevin (1989), and financial performance was assessed using total profit margin. The overall findings suggest partial support for the hypotheses. Support was found for the negative relationship between innovativeness and short-term financial performance, but only partial support was found for the relationship between performance and risk-taking. Our results demonstrated that the various aspects of entrepreneurial behaviors have a differential effect on firm performance. From a managerial perspective, nursing home administrators may continue to seek ways to be entrepreneurial while understanding that some activities may only lead to short-term profitability. These findings should not dissuade administrators from innovative behaviors. They do suggest, however, that innovative administrators should prepare for some initial decrease in profitability following new service implementation. Findings suggest that to varying

  13. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Althouse, Benjamin M.; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H.; Noar, Seth M.; Allem, Jon-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this “organic advocacy” may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio’s 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms “climate change” or “global warming” reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573–699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the “DiCaprio effect” surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for “climate change” or “global warming” increased 261% (95%CI, 186–335) and 210% (95%CI 149–272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP’s daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio’s speech (e.g., “hottest year”), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., “electric car”). Because these data are freely available in real time our

  14. Uncertainty in projected climate change arising from uncertain fossil-fuel emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilcaille, Y.; Gasser, T.; Ciais, P.; Lecocq, F.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Mohr, S.

    2018-04-01

    Emission inventories are widely used by the climate community, but their uncertainties are rarely accounted for. In this study, we evaluate the uncertainty in projected climate change induced by uncertainties in fossil-fuel emissions, accounting for non-CO2 species co-emitted with the combustion of fossil-fuels and their use in industrial processes. Using consistent historical reconstructions and three contrasted future projections of fossil-fuel extraction from Mohr et al we calculate CO2 emissions and their uncertainties stemming from estimates of fuel carbon content, net calorific value and oxidation fraction. Our historical reconstructions of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions are consistent with other inventories in terms of average and range. The uncertainties sum up to a ±15% relative uncertainty in cumulative CO2 emissions by 2300. Uncertainties in the emissions of non-CO2 species associated with the use of fossil fuels are estimated using co-emission ratios varying with time. Using these inputs, we use the compact Earth system model OSCAR v2.2 and a Monte Carlo setup, in order to attribute the uncertainty in projected global surface temperature change (ΔT) to three sources of uncertainty, namely on the Earth system’s response, on fossil-fuel CO2 emission and on non-CO2 co-emissions. Under the three future fuel extraction scenarios, we simulate the median ΔT to be 1.9, 2.7 or 4.0 °C in 2300, with an associated 90% confidence interval of about 65%, 52% and 42%. We show that virtually all of the total uncertainty is attributable to the uncertainty in the future Earth system’s response to the anthropogenic perturbation. We conclude that the uncertainty in emission estimates can be neglected for global temperature projections in the face of the large uncertainty in the Earth system response to the forcing of emissions. We show that this result does not hold for all variables of the climate system, such as the atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 and the

  15. Harnessing the power of the grassroots to conduct public health research in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study from western Kenya in the adaptation of community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a collaborative approach to research that involves the equitable participation of those affected by an issue. As the field of global public health grows, the potential of CBPR to build capacity and to engage communities in identification of problems and development and implementation of solutions in sub-Saharan Africa has yet to be fully tapped. The Orphaned and Separated Children’s Assessments Related to their Health and Well-Being (OSCAR) project is a longitudinal cohort of orphaned and non-orphaned children in Kenya. This paper will describe how CBPR approaches and principles can be incorporated and adapted into the study design and methods of a longitudinal epidemiological study in sub-Saharan Africa using this project as an example. Methods The CBPR framework we used involves problem identification, feasibility and planning; implementation; and evaluation and dissemination. This case study will describe how we have engaged the community and adapted CBPR methods to OSCAR’s Health and Well-being Project’s corresponding to this framework in four phases: 1) community engagement, 2) sampling and recruitment, 3) retention, validation, and follow-up, and 4) analysis, interpretation and dissemination. Results To date the study has enrolled 3130 orphaned and separated children, including children living in institutional environments, those living in extended family or other households in the community, and street-involved children and youth. Community engagement and participation was integral in refining the study design and identifying research questions that were impacting the community. Through the participation of village Chiefs and elders we were able to successfully identify eligible households and randomize the selection of participants. The on-going contribution of the community in the research process has been vital to participant retention and data validation while ensuring cultural and

  16. Palaeomagnetism of the Late Neoproterozoic of Ella O, North-East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilner, B.; Mac Niocaill, C.; Stouge, S.; Harper, D.

    2004-12-01

    Neoproterozoic to lower Ordovician sediments outcrop in a N-S trending band in the fjord region of North-East Greenland. The sequence comprises, in ascending order, the Eleonore Bay Group, the Tillite Group and the Canyon and Spiral Creek Formations. The Eleonore Bay Group is thought to be Upper Riphean in age and consists of cherty limestone and dolomite capped by red siltstone. The overlying Tillite Group contains two tillite packages separated by an intertillite which comprises marine siltstone and sandstone. The Canyon and Spiral Creek Formation consist of evaporitic red siltstone, with chert-rich horizons and some dolomite. The Spiral Creek Formation is overlain by a basal Cambrian quartzite. 500 samples were collected from the late Precambrian succession on the island of Ella O in Kong Oscars Fjord. Sampling was aimed in particular at red beds and other likely magnetic targets. The specimens were demagnetised using progressive alternating frequency and thermal techniques and typically revealed a multi-component remanence structure. A majority of the specimens carry a low stability (generally < 20mt, < 250° ) component, directed north and steeply down. This closely resembles present Earth's field. Demagnetisation of the Eleonore Bay Group reveals a high stability component directed south and shallow down, with an opposing component north and up. After tilt correction the mean direction yields a palaeolatitude of 4° . This component passes field tests, and is interpreted as primary. Magnetic characteristics in the Tillite Group are distinct from those of the Eleonore Bay Group. The Lower Tillite Formation carries an east directed shallow down component. The palaeolatitude derived from this direction indicates low latitude deposition for the glacial rocks above the Eleonore Bay Group. The Upper Tillite Formation carries a high stability component directed steeply upwards. Specimens from a limited pilot study pass reversal and fold tests, but further

  17. Impairment of motor skills in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in remote Australia: The Lililwan Project.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Barbara R; Doney, Robyn; Latimer, Jane; Watkins, Rochelle E; Tsang, Tracey W; Hawkes, Genevieve; Fitzpatrick, James P; Oscar, June; Carter, Maureen; Elliott, Elizabeth J

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to characterise motor performance in predominantly Aboriginal children living in very remote Australia, where rates of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) are high. Motor performance was assessed, and the relationship between motor skills, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and PAE was explored. Motor performance was assessed using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Second Edition Complete Form, in a population-based study of children born in 2002 or 2003 living in the Fitzroy Valley, Western Australia. Composite scores ≥2SD (2nd percentile) and ≥1SD (16th percentile) below the mean were used respectively for FASD diagnosis and referral for treatment. FASD diagnoses were assigned using modified Canadian Guidelines. A total of 108 children (Aboriginal: 98.1%; male: 53%) with a mean age of 8.7 years was assessed. The cohort's mean total motor composite score (mean ± SD 47.2 ± 7.6) approached the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Second Edition normative mean (50 ± 10). Motor performance was lower in children with FASD diagnosis than without (mean difference (MD) ± SD: -5.0 ± 1.8; confidence interval: -8.6 to -1.5). There was no difference between children with PAE than without (MD ± SE: -2.2 ± 1.5; confidence interval: -5.1 to 0.80). The prevalence of motor impairment (≥-2SD) was 1.9% in the entire cohort, 9.5% in children with FASD, 3.3% in children with PAE and 0.0% both in children without PAE or FASD. Almost of 10% of children with FASD has significant motor impairment. Evaluation of motor function should routinely be included in assessments for FASD, to document impairment and enable targeted early intervention.[Lucas BR, Doney R, Latimer J, Watkins RE, Tsang TW, Hawkes G, Fitzpatrick JP, Oscar J, Carter M, Elliott EJ. Impairment of motor skills in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in remote Australia: The Lililwan Project. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:719-727]. © 2016

  18. The use of Saildrones as Long Endurance, Ocean Research Platforms in Remote and Extreme Environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, R.; Peacock, D.; Jones, E.

    2016-02-01

    The world's oceans are experiencing significant change, which will have a profound impact on ecosystems, fish stocks and climate. Furthermore, the areas where some of the biggest changes are occurring are also some of the least measured and understood. This is largely due to their remote location and/or harsh environment, where the cost of deploying sensors is significant. New technologies are required to supplement ships and mooring data to meet the demand for longer, more economical deployments with the ability for real-time data and adaptive sampling. The Saildrone was designed to meet this need, providing the ability to reach almost any part of the world's oceans, without requiring a ship. Deployed from the dock, the unmanned Saildrone navigates autonomously to the area of interest, where it operates for extended periods before returning to shore for servicing and subsequent re-deployment. The Saildrone is propelled by wind power from a 4 m solid wing. Stability is provided by static weight in the keel and outrigger hulls. The 5.8 m hull includes several payload bays, with a payload capacity of 100 kg. Working with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), under a collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), the Saildrone platform was equipped with a suite of meteorological and oceanographic sensors that would enable a wide variety of ocean research missions to be undertaken. After field tests in San Francisco Bay, a 3 month mission was conducted in the eastern Bering Sea in spring 2015. The mission included rough sea-trials, sensor comparisons in coordination with the NOAAS Oscar Dyson, and a survey of the northern Bering Sea shortly after ice retreat. The mission was completed as planned, with the two Saildrones (SD-126 & SD-128) returning to the dock from which they were deployed after 97 days and each completing 4400 nautical miles. During the second half of 2015, two subsequent missions were conducted in the Gulf of Mexico. Two

  19. Architecture for the Next Generation System Management Tools

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gallard, Jerome; Lebre, I Adrien; Morin, Christine

    2011-01-01

    /VSE configurations without making assumptions about the hardware and the software re- sources. For each requirement, the system executes the corresponding operation with the appropriate management tool. As a proof of concept, we implemented a first prototype that currently interacts with several system management tools (e.g., OSCAR, the Grid 5000 toolkit, and XtreemOS) and that can be easily extended to integrate new resource brokers or cloud systems such as Nimbus, OpenNebula or Eucalyptus for instance.« less

  20. Angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in Japanese elderly, high-risk, hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2012-10-01

    It is unknown whether high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy or angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker combination therapy is better in elderly hypertensive patients with high cardiovascular risk. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of these treatments in elderly, high-risk Japanese hypertensive patients. The OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-end point study of 1164 hypertensive patients aged 65 to 84 years with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension during treatment with olmesartan 20 mg/d were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg/d olmesartan (high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker) or a calcium channel blocker + 20 mg/d olmesartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death. During a 3-year follow-up, blood pressure was significantly lower in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group than in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group. Mean blood pressure at 36 months was 135.0/74.3 mm Hg in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group and 132.6/72.6 mm Hg in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group. More primary end points occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group than in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group (58 vs 48 events, hazard ratio [HR], 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.92; P=.17). In patients with cardiovascular disease at baseline, more primary events occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group (HR, 1.63, P=.03); in contrast, fewer events were observed in the subgroup without cardiovascular disease (HR, 0.52, P=.14). This treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant (P=.02). The angiotensin II receptor blocker and

  1. Detecting the influence of ocean process on the moisture supply for India summer monsoon from Satellite Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Liu, W. T.; Fore, A.; Hayashi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A strong contrast in the onset of Indian summer monsoon was observed by independent satellites: average rain rate over India subcontinent (IS) in June was more than doubled in 2013 than 2012 (TRMM); also observed are larger area of wet soil (Aquarius) and high water storage (GRACE). The difference in IS rainfall was contributed to the moisture inputs through west coast of India, estimated from ocean wind (OSCAT2) and water vapor (TMI). This is an interesting testbed for studying the role of ocean on terrestrial water cycle, in particular the Indian monsoon, which has tremendous social-economical impact. What is the source of extra moisture in 2013 or deficit in 2012 for the monsoon onset? Is it possible to quantify the contribution of ocean process that maybe responsible for redistributing the freshwater in favor of the summer monsoon moisture supply? This study aims to identify the influence of ocean processes on the freshwater exchange between air-sea interfaces, using Aquarius sea surface salinity (SSS). We found two areas in Indian Ocean with high correlation between IS rain rate and Aquarius SSS: one area is in the Arabian Sea adjacent to IS, another area is a horizontal patch from 60°E to 100°E centered around 10°S. On the other hand, E-P (OAflux, TRMM) shows no similar correlation patterns with IS rain. Based on the governing equation of the salt budget in the upper ocean, we define the freshwater flux, F, from the oceanic branch of the water cycle, including contributions from salinity tendency, advection, and subsurface process. The tendency and advection terms are estimated using Aquarius SSS and OSCAR ocean current. We will present results of analyzing the spatial and temporal variability of F and evidence of and hypothesis on how the oceanic processes may enhance the moisture supply for summer Indian monsoon onset in 2013 comparing with 2012. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) has been producing the global soil moisture (SM) every 2-3 days

  2. Permafrost thaw strongly reduces allowable CO2 emissions for 1.5°C and 2°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechiar, M.; Gasser, T.; Kleinen, T.; Ciais, P.; Huang, Y.; Burke, E.; Obersteiner, M.

    2017-12-01

    We quantify how the inclusion of carbon emission from permafrost thaw impacts the budgets of allowable anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We use the compact Earth system model OSCAR v2.2 which we expand with a permafrost module calibrated to emulate the behavior of the complex models JSBACH, ORCHIDEE and JULES. When using the "exceedance" method and with permafrost thaw turned off, we find budgets very close to the CMIP5 models' estimates reported by IPCC. With permafrost thaw turned on, the total budgets are reduced by 3-4%. This corresponds to a 33-45% reduction of the remaining budget for 1.5°C, and a 9-13% reduction for 2°C. When using the "avoidance" method, however, permafrost thaw reduces the total budget by 3-7%, which corresponds to reductions by 33-56% and 56-79% of the remaining budget for 1.5°C and 2°C, respectively. The avoidance method relies on many scenarios that actually peak below the target whereas the exceedance method overlooks the carbon emitted by thawed permafrost after the temperature target is reached, which explains the difference. If we use only the subset of scenarios in which there is no net negative emissions, the permafrost-induced reduction in total budgets rises to 6-15%. Permafrost thaw therefore makes the emission budgets strongly path-dependent. We also estimate budgets of needed carbon capture in scenarios overshooting the temperature targets. Permafrost thaw strongly increases these capture budgets: in the case of a 1.5°C target overshot by 0.5°C, which is in line with the Paris agreement, about 30% more carbon must be captured. Our conclusions are threefold. First, inclusion of permafrost thaw systematically reduces the emission budgets, and very strongly so if the temperature target is overshot. Second, the exceedance method, that is the only one that complex models can follow, only partially accounts for the effect of slow non-linear processes such as permafrost thaw, leading to overestimated budgets. Third, the newfound

  3. Evolution of Heat Flow with Age on the Southern Flank of the Costa Rica Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolandaivelu, K. P.; Harris, R. N.; Lowell, R. P.; Wilson, D. J.; Hobbs, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    indicated by global data suggests that basement burial under a thick sediment cover inhibits advective heat loss through the crust. These data were collected as part of a major interdisciplinary NERC and NSF-funded collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterization of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  4. Effects of extracellular magnesium extract on the proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblasts and osteoclasts in coculture.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lili; Feyerabend, Frank; Schilling, Arndt F; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Luthringer, Bérengère J C

    2015-11-01

    Coculture of osteoblasts and osteoclasts is a subject of interest in the understanding of how magnesium (Mg)-based implants influence the bone metabolism and remodeling upon degradation. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) transduced mesenchymal stem cells (SCP-1) were first differentiated into osteoblasts with osteogenic supplements and then further cocultured with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) without the addition of osteoclastogenesis promoting factors. Concomitantly, the cultures were exposed to variable Mg extract dilutions (0, 30×, 10×, 5×, 3×, 2× and 1×). Phenotype characterization documented that while 2× dilution of Mg extract was extremely toxic to osteoclast monoculture, monocytes in coculture with osteoblasts exhibited a greater tolerance to higher Mg extract concentration. The dense growth of osteoblasts in cultures with 1× dilution of Mg extract suggested that high concentration of Mg extract promoted osteoblast proliferation/differentiation behavior. The results of intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activities as well as protein and gene expressions of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) revealed significantly enhanced formation of osteoblasts whereas decreased osteoclastogenesis in the cultures with high concentrations of Mg extract (2× and 1× dilutions). In conclusion, while an increased osteoinductivity has been demonstrated, the impact of potentially decreased osteoclastogenesis around the Mg-based implants should be also taken into account. Cocultures containing both bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts should be preferentially performed for in vitro cytocompatibility assessment of Mg-based implants as they more closely mimic the in vivo environment. An attractive human osteoblasts and osteoclasts cocultivation regime was

  5. Singularity free N-body simulations called 'Dynamic Universe Model' don't require dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    For finding trajectories of Pioneer satellite (Anomaly), New Horizons satellite going to Pluto, the Calculations of Dynamic Universe model can be successfully applied. No dark matter is assumed within solar system radius. The effect on the masses around SUN shows as though there is extra gravitation pull toward SUN. It solves the Dynamics of Extra-solar planets like Planet X, satellite like Pioneer and NH for 3-Position, 3-velocity 3-accelaration for their masses, considering the complex situation of Multiple planets, Stars, Galaxy parts and Galaxy centre and other Galaxies Using simple Newtonian Physics. It already solved problems Missing mass in Galaxies observed by galaxy circular velocity curves successfully. Singularity free Newtonian N-body simulations Historically, King Oscar II of Sweden an-nounced a prize to a solution of N-body problem with advice given by Güsta Mittag-Leffler in 1887. He announced `Given a system of arbitrarily many mass points that attract each according to Newton's law, under the assumption that no two points ever collide, try to find a representation of the coordinates of each point as a series in a variable that is some known function of time and for all of whose values the series converges uniformly.'[This is taken from Wikipedia]. The announced dead line that time was1st June 1888. And after that dead line, on 21st January 1889, Great mathematician Poincaré claimed that prize. Later he himself sent a telegram to journal Acta Mathematica to stop printing the special issue after finding the error in his solution. Yet for such a man of science reputation is important than money. [ Ref Book `Celestial mechanics: the waltz of the planets' By Alessandra Celletti, Ettore Perozzi, page 27]. He realized that he has been wrong in his general stability result! But till now nobody could solve that problem or claimed that prize. Later all solutions resulted in singularities and collisions of masses, given by many people

  6. First-trimester ADAM12 and PAPP-A as markers for intrauterine fetal growth restriction through their roles in the insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Cowans, Nicholas J; Spencer, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    PAPP-A is a marker used as part of the most effective method of screening for chromosomal anomalies in the first trimester. ADAM12 is a recently discovered pregnancy associated member of the ADAM (a multidomain glycoprotein metalloprotease) family. Recently, ADAM12 has been shown as a potential marker for early screening for chromosomal anomalies. Both PAPP-A and ADAM12 have been identified as proteases to insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. In this role, they may have a regulatory function in controlling the amount of free bioactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF). We therefore wish to examine if the levels of either of these proteases are related to various growth related adverse pregnancy outcomes. PAPP-A and ADAM12 were measured in a subset of samples collected at 11 to 14 weeks as part of an OSCAR clinic screening for chromosomal anomalies. Follow-up of pregnancies screened between September 1999 and August 2003 identified 1705 pregnancies with an outcome of intrauterine fetal demise on or after 24 weeks, preterm delivery at 24-34 weeks or 35-36 weeks, very low birthweight (<1.5 kg), low birthweight (<2.5 kg), large birthweight (>4.5 kg), and birth weight below the 3rd or 5th or 10th centile for gestation. A series of 414 normal outcome pregnancies constituted the control group. Marker levels were adjusted for gestation and maternal weight and the log MoM of the markers were compared using t-test of unequal variance between the control group and the various adverse outcome groups. ADAM12 and PAPP-A concentrations were reduced in low for gestational age birth weights and in all births with weights below 2.5 kg. There was a linear relationship between the severity of the IUGR and the decrease in PAPP-A and ADAM12. In the larger babies, only ADAM12 was found to be significantly increased in babies above the 90th centile of weight for gestation. The results of our study are compatible with the proposed role of ADAM12 and PAPP-A in promoting growth and

  7. Applying STOPP Guidelines in Primary Care Through Electronic Medical Record Decision Support: Randomized Control Trial Highlighting the Importance of Data Quality.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan; Davies, Iryna; Rusk, Raymond; Lesperance, Mary; Weber, Jens

    2017-06-15

    Potentially Inappropriate Prescriptions (PIPs) are a common cause of morbidity, particularly in the elderly. We sought to understand how the Screening Tool of Older People's Prescriptions (STOPP) prescribing criteria, implemented in a routinely used primary care Electronic Medical Record (EMR), could impact PIP rates in community (non-academic) primary care practices. We conducted a mixed-method, pragmatic, cluster, randomized control trial in research naïve primary care practices. Phase 1: In the randomized controlled trial, 40 fully automated STOPP rules were implemented as EMR alerts during a 16-week intervention period. The control group did not receive the 40 STOPP rules (but received other alerts). Participants were recruited through the OSCAR EMR user group mailing list and in person at user group meetings. Results were assessed by querying EMR data PIPs. EMR data quality probes were included. Phase 2: physicians were invited to participate in 1-hour semi-structured interviews to discuss the results. In the EMR, 40 STOPP rules were successfully implemented. Phase 1: A total of 28 physicians from 8 practices were recruited (16 in intervention and 12 in control groups). The calculated PIP rate was 2.6% (138/5308) (control) and 4.11% (768/18,668) (intervention) at baseline. No change in PIPs was observed through the intervention (P=.80). Data quality probes generally showed low use of problem list and medication list. Phase 2: A total of 5 physicians participated. All the participants felt that they were aware of the alerts but commented on workflow and presentation challenges. The calculated PIP rate was markedly less than the expected rate found in literature (2.6% and 4.0% vs 20% in literature). Data quality probes highlighted issues related to completeness of data in areas of the EMR used for PIP reporting and by the decision support such as problem and medication lists. Users also highlighted areas for better integration of STOPP guidelines with

  8. EDITORIAL: XIII Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Juan; Contreras, Guillermo; Delepine, David; Napsuciale, Mauro

    2012-08-01

    Juan Barranco Physics Department, Guanajuato University, Loma del Bosque 103, col. Loma del Campestre, 37150, Leon (Mexico) jbarranc@fisica.ugto.mx Guillermo Contreras Departamento de Fisica Aplicada Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Merida (Mexico) jgcn@mda.cinvestav.mx David Delepine Physics Department, Guanajuato University, Loma del Bosque 103, col. Loma del Campestre, 37150, Leon (Mexico) delepine@fisica.ugto.mx Mauro Napsuciale Physics Department, Guanajuato University, Loma del Bosque 103, col. Loma del Campestre, 37150, Leon (Mexico) mauro@fisica.ugto.mx The XIII Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields (MWPF) took place from 20-26 October 2011, in the city of León, Guanajuato, México. This is a biennial meeting organized by the Division of Particles and Fields of the Mexican Physical Society designed to gather specialists in different areas of high energy physics to discuss the latest developments in the field. The thirteenth edition of this meeting was hosted by the Department of Cultural Studies of Guanajuato University in a nice environment dedicated to the Arts and Culture. The XIII MWPF was organized by three working groups who organized the corresponding sessions around three topics. The first one was Strings, Cosmology, Astroparticles and Physics Beyond the Standard Model. In this category we included: Cosmic Rays, Gamma Ray Bursts, Physics Beyond the Standard Model (theory and experimental searches), Strings and Cosmology. The working group for this topic was formed by Arnulfo Zepeda, Oscar Loaiza, Axel de la Macorra and Myriam Mondragón. The second topic was Hadronic Matter which included Perturbative QCD, Jets and Diffractive Physics, Hadronic Structure, Soft QCD, Hadron Spectroscopy, Heavy Ion Collisions and Soft Physics at Hadron Colliders, Lattice Results and Instrumentation. The working group for this topic was integrated by Wolfgang Bietenholz and Mariana Kirchbach. The third topic was

  9. Triple seismic source, double research ship, single ambitious goal: integrated imaging of young oceanic crust in the Panama Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dean; Peirce, Christine; Hobbs, Richard; Gregory, Emma

    2016-04-01

    roughness. Increased basement roughness leads to a non-uniform distribution of sediments, which we hypothesise influences the pattern of hydrothermal circulation and ultimately the secondary alteration of the upper crust. A combination of the complimentary wide-angle and normal incidence datasets and their individual models act as a starting point for joint inversion of seismic, gravity and MT data. The joint inversion produces a fully integrated model, enabling us to better understand how the oceanic crust evolves as a result of hydrothermal fluid circulation and cooling, as it ages from zero-age at the ridge-axis to 6 Ma at borehole 504B. Ultimately, this model can be used to undertake full waveform inversion to produce a high-resolution velocity model of the oceanic crust in the Panama Basin. This research is part of a major, interdisciplinary NERC-funded research collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  10. Re-evaluating the 1940s CO2 plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Ana; Ciais, Philippe; Barichivich, Jonathan; Bopp, Laurent; Brovkin, Victor; Gasser, Thomas; Peng, Shushi; Pongratz, Julia; Viovy, Nicolas; Trudinger, Cathy M.

    2016-09-01

    observed stabilization of atmospheric CO2 cannot be confirmed nor discarded, as TRENDY models do not reproduce the expected concurrent strong decrease in terrestrial uptake. Nevertheless, this would further increase the mismatch between observed and modelled CO2 growth rate during the CO2 plateau epoch. Tests performed using the OSCAR (v2.2) model indicate that changes in land use not correctly accounted for during the period (coinciding with drastic socioeconomic changes during the Second World War) could contribute to the additional sink required. Thus, the previously proposed ocean hypothesis for the 1940s plateau cannot be confirmed by independent data. Further efforts are required to reduce uncertainty in the different terms of the carbon budget during the first half of the 20th century and to better understand the long-term variability of the ocean and terrestrial CO2 sinks.

  11. PASCOS 2012 - 18th International Symposium on Particles Strings and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    (Sociedad Mexicana de Física), ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics), BUAP (Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla), the Government of the State of Yucatán, the University of Hamburg, and Telmex. We also want to acknowledge the invaluable help of the staff of the Mexican Physical Society, in particular Lic. Santos Zúñniga Sánchez and Ms. Claudia Velasco Marín, and of the conference secretaries, Ms. Lizette Ramírez Bermúdez (UNAM) and Ms. Mariana del Castillo Sánchez (Cinvestav), for their support before, during and after the organization of PASCOS 2012. Last but not least, we would like to thank all the PASCOS 2012 participants for their attendance and for contributing to make the conference an engaging and stimulating event. The organizers, Myriam Mondragón, Adnan Bashir, David Delepine, Francisco Larios, Oscar Loaiza, Axel de la Macorra, Lukas Nellen, Sarira Sahu, Humberto Salazar and Liliana Velasco-Sevilla.

  12. [Speech by Oscar Julian Bardeci, director of the Centro Latinoamericano de Demografia (CELADE), at the Latinamerican Regional Meeting prior to the International Conference on Population in recognition of the Second Meeting on Population by the Committee of Upper-Level Government Experts (CEGAN), Havana, Cuba, November 16-19, 1983].

    PubMed

    Bardeci, O J

    1983-12-01

    This work examines the relationship between population growth and economic development in Latin America and assesses progress in the 10 years since the Bucharest World Population Conference. The Latin American population increased from about 159 million in 1950 to 275 million in 1970 and around 325 million in 1980. The rate of growth reached a maximum of 2.8%/year in the early 1970s and has now declined to about 2.3%/year. The regional growth rate is a product of population dynamics that differ greatly in individual countries. Crude birth rates declined in every country of Latin America between 1975-80, but still exceeded 40/1000 in 1980-85 in Bolivia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Current fertility is the result of the different trajectories of the demographic transition in different countries. While fertility in Argentina, Cuba, and Uruguay underwent a slow but sustained decline that began prior to 1960, other countries including Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, and Venezuela began an accelerated fertility decline in the 1960s that diffused rapidly through all age and social groups. Other countries have still not entered a definite phase of fertility decline. Mortality rates have declined appreciably in Latin America in the past few decades although they remain high in some countries. After the end of World War II and until the mid-1970s, most countries of the region experienced rapid economic growth coupled with profound changes in the productive structure. The industrial labor force grew in almost all countries along with urbanization, the decline of agricultural employment, and the increase of the tertiary sector. These and other important economic advances through the mid-1970s occurred despite rapid population growth, and the beginning of the fertility decline coincided with slowing economic growth that saw negative rates in 1981-82. Various studies have shown that not all population sectors were incorporated in the process of economic and social development. The proportion of the population in active age groups has increased dramatically, but no corresponding increase in employment opportunities has occurred. The informal sector has absorbed most of the excess growth, a trend reflected in the exclusion of a large segment of the population from the fruits of economic progress. Population growth and increased life expectancy have created demands for more retirement benefits, health and educational services, transportation, recreation, and housing. Nevertheless, it cannot be concluded that rapid population growth necessarily has negative consequences for economic development or social welfare. There are indications that the problem of poverty in Latin America could be solved if the political will to do so existed; obstacles to overcoming poverty are not primarily material or population-related. Urbanization, settlement of marginal areas, and relative decline of agricultural areas are 3 trends in spatial distribution of varying intensity and repercussions in different countries.

  13. Influence of Large Igneous Provinces on Svalbard tectonics and sedimentation from the Late Mesozoic through Cenozoic: Insight from (U-Th)/He zircon and apatite thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Christopher; Schneider, David; Majka, Jaroslaw

    2016-04-01

    Svalbard, the northwestern sub-aerial exposure of the Barents Shelf, offers significant insight into the geodynamics of the High Arctic. The tectonics and sedimentation on Svalbard from the Late Mesozoic through Cenozoic can be attributed to two Large Igneous Provinces: the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP; 130-90 Ma) and the North Atlantic Large Igneous Province (NAIP; 62-55 Ma). The relationship between the HALIP and the tectonics of the High Arctic remains somewhat unclear, whereas the NAIP is directly linked to opening of the North Atlantic Ocean. This study attempts to establish links between the HALIP and geodynamics of the High Arctic, and reveals the far-field tectonic consequences of the NAIP on Svalbard and the High Arctic. We focus on the Southwestern Caledonian Basement Terrane of Svalbard, characterized by the West Spitsbergen Fold and Thrust Belt, formed during the Eurekan Orogeny (c. 55-33 Ma). Crystalline basement was sampled from four regions (Prins Karls Forland, Oscar II Land, Wedel Jarlsberg Land, and Sørkapp Land) for the purpose of zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry which allows for resolution of thermal events below 200°C. We forward model our datasets using HeFTy software to produce temperature-time histories for each of these regions, and compare these thermal models with Svalbard stratigraphy to resolve the geodynamics of Svalbard from the Late Mesozoic through Cenozoic. The Cretaceous stratigraphy of Svalbard is characterized by a short-lived Mid-Cretaceous sub-aerial unconformity (c. 129 Ma) and a significant Late Cretaceous unconformity (c. 105-65 Ma). Our thermal models reveal a Mid-Cretaceous heating event, suggesting an increasing geothermal gradient coeval with development of the first unconformity. This may indicate that short-lived domal-uplift, related to the arrival of the HALIP plume, was a primary control on Svalbard tectonics and sedimentary deposition throughout the Mid-Cretaceous. Late Cretaceous

  14. Determination of the KQclinfclin,Qmsr fmsr correction factors for detectors used with an 800 MU/min CyberKnife(®) system equipped with fixed collimators and a study of detector response to small photon beams using a Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Moignier, C; Huet, C; Makovicka, L

    2014-07-01

    In a previous work, output ratio (ORdet) measurements were performed for the 800 MU/min CyberKnife(®) at the Oscar Lambret Center (COL, France) using several commercially available detectors as well as using two passive dosimeters (EBT2 radiochromic film and micro-LiF TLD-700). The primary aim of the present work was to determine by Monte Carlo calculations the output factor in water (OFMC,w) and the [Formula: see text] correction factors. The secondary aim was to study the detector response in small beams using Monte Carlo simulation. The LINAC head of the CyberKnife(®) was modeled using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code system. The primary electron beam was modeled using a monoenergetic source with a radial gaussian distribution. The model was adjusted by comparisons between calculated and measured lateral profiles and tissue-phantom ratios obtained with the largest field. In addition, the PTW 60016 and 60017 diodes, PTW 60003 diamond, and micro-LiF were modeled. Output ratios with modeled detectors (ORMC,det) and OFMC,w were calculated and compared to measurements, in order to validate the model for smallest fields and to calculate [Formula: see text] correction factors, respectively. For the study of the influence of detector characteristics on their response in small beams; first, the impact of the atomic composition and the mass density of silicon, LiF, and diamond materials were investigated; second, the material, the volume averaging, and the coating effects of detecting material on the detector responses were estimated. Finally, the influence of the size of silicon chip on diode response was investigated. Looking at measurement ratios (uncorrected output factors) compared to the OFMC,w, the PTW 60016, 60017 and Sun Nuclear EDGE diodes systematically over-responded (about +6% for the 5 mm field), whereas the PTW 31014 Pinpoint chamber systematically under-responded (about -12% for the 5 mm field). ORdet measured with the SFD diode and PTW 60003 diamond

  15. Mobilization and acquisition of sparingly soluble P-Sources by Brassica cultivars under P-starved environment II. Rhizospheric pH changes, redesigned root architecture and pi-uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Shahbaz; Oki, Yoko; Adachi, Tadashi

    2009-11-01

    Non-mycorrhizal Brassica does not produce specialized root structures such as cluster or dauciform roots but is an effective user of P compared with other crops. In addition to P-uptake, utilization and remobilization activity, acquisition of orthophosphate (Pi) from extracellular sparingly P-sources or unavailable bound P-forms can be enhanced by biochemical rescue mechanisms such copious H(+)-efflux and/or carboxylates exudation into rhizosphere by roots via plasmalemma H(+) ATPase and anion channels triggered by P-starvation. To visualize the dissolution of sparingly soluble Ca-phosphate (Ca-P), newly formed Ca-P was suspended in agar containing other essential nutrients. With NH(4)(+) applied as the N source, the precipitate dissolved in the root vicinity can be ascribed to rhizosphere acidification, whereas no dissolution occurred with nitrate nutrition. To observe in situ rhizospheric pH changes, images were recorded after embedding the roots in agar containing bromocresol purple as a pH indicator. P-tolerant cultivar showed a greater decrease in pH than the sensitive cultivar in the culture media (the appearance of typical patterns of various colors of pH indicator in the root vicinity), and at stress P-level this acidification was more prominent. In experiment 2, low P-tolerant class-I cultivars (Oscar and Con-II) showed a greater decrease in solution media pH than low P-sensitive class-II (Gold Rush and RL-18) cultivars, and P-contents of the cultivars was inversely related to decrease in culture media pH. To elucidate P-stress-induced remodeling and redesigning in a root architectural system, cultivars were grown in rhizoboxes in experiment 3. The elongation rates of primary roots increased as P-supply increased, but the elongation rates of the branched zones of primary roots decreased. The length of the lateral roots and topological index values increased when cultivars were exposed to a P-stress environment. To elucidate Pi-uptake kinetics, parameters

  16. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  17. Composition and Realization of Source-to-Sink High-Performance Flows: File Systems, Storage, Hosts, LAN and WAN

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wu, Chase Qishi

    methods to achieve source-to-sink high-performance flows, and (2) develop tools that provide these capabilities through simple interfaces to users and applications. In terms of the former, we propose to develop (1) optimization methods that align and transition multiple storage flows to multiple network flows on multicore, multibus hosts; and (2) edge and long-haul network path realization and maintenance using advanced provisioning methods including OSCARS and OpenFlow. We also propose synthesis methods that combine these individual technologies to compose high-performance flows using a collection of constituent storage-network flows, and realize them across the storage and local network connections as well as long-haul connections. We propose to develop automated user tools that profile the hosts, storage systems, and network connections; compose the source-to-sink complex flows; and set up and maintain the needed network connections. These solutions will be tested using (1) 100 Gbps connection(s) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with storage systems supported by Lustre and GPFS file systems with an asymmetric connection to University of Memphis (UM); (2) ORNL testbed with multicore and multibus hosts, switches with OpenFlow capabilities, and network emulators; and (3) 100 Gbps connections from ESnet and their Openflow testbed, and other experimental connections. This proposal brings together the expertise and facilities of the two national laboratories, ORNL and ANL, and UM. It also represents a collaboration between DOE and the Department of Defense (DOD) projects at ORNL by sharing technical expertise and personnel costs, and leveraging the existing DOD Extreme Scale Systems Center (ESSC) facilities at ORNL.« less

  18. Palaeomagnetic, rock-magnetic and mineralogical investigations of metadolerites from Western Svalbard : A preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Krzysztof; Nejbert, Krzysztof; Domańska-Siuda, Justyna; Manby, Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    A group of 42 independently oriented palaeomagnetic samples from 7 sites located in central part of the West Spitsbergen Thrust and Fault Belt has been investigated. The samples were collected from 5 distinct metadolerite sheets intruded into the Proterozoic - Lower Paleozoic metamorphic complex of Western Oscar II Land (Western Svalbard Caledonian Terrane - Harland, 1997 division). All analyzed metadolerite samples were metamorphosed under greenschist facies metamorphism. The metamorphic assemblage consist of hornblende, biotite, actinolite, chlorite, epidote, stilpnomelane, titanite, albite, and quartz. Calcite, associated with pyrrhotite, pyrite chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and covellite, that occurs as irregular intergrowths or thin veins, document high activity of H2O-CO2-rich fluids during metamorphism. Primary magmatic phases represented by clinopyroxene occur rarely, and only in thick metadolerite dykes. Accessory oxides change their mineralogical and chemical composition during metamorphism. In all examined samples primary Ti-magnetite and oxy-exsolved hematite break-down completely into titanite or have been dissolved. The ilmenite are also replaced by titanite, but in metadolerites at contact with host metapelites, slightly altered ilmenite grains with preserved hematite exsolution were documented. Basing on mineralogical observations it should be expected that metamorphic processes have almost completely reset the paleomagnetic data record from the time of dolerite crystallization. This stage can document only rare hematite oxy-exsolution preserved within ilmenite, and presumably small inclusion of magnetite still preserved within unaltered clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic record of metamorphic stage is probably recorded by pyrrhotite, hematite, goethite, and late Ti-free magnetite that can grow during breakdown of pyrrhotite to pyrite (Ramdohr. 1980). The NRM (Natural Remanent Magnetisation) intensities of the palaeomagnetic samples exceed the minimum 10

  19. PREFACE: International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics & 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas L. S.; deHarak, Bruno A.

    2010-01-01

    44 submitted posters covered recent advances in these topics. These proceedings present papers on 35 of the invited talks. The Local Organizers gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, and the University of Kentucky Department of Physics and Astronomy. We also thank Carol Cotrill, Eva Ellis, Diane Yates, Sarah Crowe, and John Nichols, of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky for their invaluable assistance in the smooth running of the conferences; Oleksandr Korneta for taking the group photograph; and Emily Martin for helping accompanying persons. Nicholas L S Martin University of Kentucky Bruno A deHarak Illinois Wesleyan University International Scientific Organizing Committee Co-Chairs Don Madison (USA)Klaus Bartschat (USA) Members Lorenzo Avaldi (Italy)Nils Andersen (Denmark) Jamal Berakdar (Germany)Uwe Becker (Germany) Michael Brunger (Australia)Igor Bray (Australia) Greg Childers (USA)Nikolay Cherepkov (Russia) JingKang Deng (China)Albert Crowe (UK) Alexander Dorn (Germany)Danielle Dowek (France) Jim Feagin (USA)Oscar Fojon (Argentina) Nikolay Kabachnik (Russia)Tim Gay (USA) Anatoli Kheifets (Australia)Alexei Grum-Grzhimailo (Russia) George King (UK)Friedrich Hanne (Germany) Tom Kirchner (Germany)Alan Huetz (France) Azzedine Lahmam-Bennani (France)Morty Khakoo (USA) Julian Lower (Australia)Birgit Lohmann (Australia) William McCurdy (USA)Bill McConkey (Canada) Andrew Murray (UK)Rajesh Srivastava (India) Bernard Piraux (Belgium)Al Stauffer (Canada) Tim Reddish (Canada)Jim Williams (Australia) Roberto Rivarola (Argentina)Akira Yagishita (Japan) Michael Schulz (USA)Peter Zetner (Canada) Anthony Starace (USA)Joachim Ullrich (Germany) Giovanni Stefani (Italy)Erich Weigold (Australia) Masahiko Takahashi (Japan) Conference photograph

  20. Evolutionary developmental biology: its concepts and history with a focus on Russian and German contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Lennart; Levit, Georgy S.; Hoßfeld, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    Evolutionary theory has been likened to a “universal acid” (Dennett 1995) that eats its way into more and more areas of science. Recently, developmental biology has been infused by evolutionary concepts and perspectives, and a new field of research—evolutionary developmental biology—has been created and is often called EvoDevo for short. However, this is not the first attempt to make a synthesis between these two areas of biology. In contrast, beginning right after the publication of Darwin’s Origin in 1859, Ernst Haeckel formulated his biogenetic law in 1872, famously stating that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny. Haeckel was in his turn influenced by pre-Darwinian thinkers such as Karl Ernst von Baer, who had noted that earlier developmental stages show similarities not seen in the adults. In this review, written for an audience of non-specialists, we first give an overview of the history of EvoDevo, especially the tradition emanating from Haeckel and other comparative embryologists and morphologists, which has often been neglected in discussions about the history of EvoDevo and evolutionary biology. Here we emphasize contributions from Russian and German scientists to compensate for the Anglo-American bias in the literature. In Germany, the direct influence of Ernst Haeckel was felt particularly in Jena, where he spent his entire career as a professor, and we give an overview of the “Jena school” of evolutionary morphology, with protagonists such as Oscar Hertwig, Ludwig Plate, and Victor Franz, who all developed ideas that we would nowadays think of as belonging to EvoDevo. Franz ideas about “biometabolic modi” are similar to those of a Russian comparative morphologist that visited Jena repeatedly, A. N. Sewertzoff, who made important contributions to what we now call heterochrony research—heterochrony meaning changes in the relative timing of developmental events. His student I. I. Schmalhausen became an important contributor to the

  1. Evolutionary developmental biology: its concepts and history with a focus on Russian and German contributions.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Lennart; Levit, Georgy S; Hossfeld, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    Evolutionary theory has been likened to a "universal acid" (Dennett 1995) that eats its way into more and more areas of science. Recently, developmental biology has been infused by evolutionary concepts and perspectives, and a new field of research--evolutionary developmental biology--has been created and is often called EvoDevo for short. However, this is not the first attempt to make a synthesis between these two areas of biology. In contrast, beginning right after the publication of Darwin's Origin in 1859, Ernst Haeckel formulated his biogenetic law in 1872, famously stating that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny. Haeckel was in his turn influenced by pre-Darwinian thinkers such as Karl Ernst von Baer, who had noted that earlier developmental stages show similarities not seen in the adults. In this review, written for an audience of non-specialists, we first give an overview of the history of EvoDevo, especially the tradition emanating from Haeckel and other comparative embryologists and morphologists, which has often been neglected in discussions about the history of EvoDevo and evolutionary biology. Here we emphasize contributions from Russian and German scientists to compensate for the Anglo-American bias in the literature. In Germany, the direct influence of Ernst Haeckel was felt particularly in Jena, where he spent his entire career as a professor, and we give an overview of the "Jena school" of evolutionary morphology, with protagonists such as Oscar Hertwig, Ludwig Plate, and Victor Franz, who all developed ideas that we would nowadays think of as belonging to EvoDevo. Franz ideas about "biometabolic modi" are similar to those of a Russian comparative morphologist that visited Jena repeatedly, A. N. Sewertzoff, who made important contributions to what we now call heterochrony research--heterochrony meaning changes in the relative timing of developmental events. His student I. I. Schmalhausen became an important contributor to the synthetic theory of

  2. The wounded male persona and the mysterious feminine in the poetry of James Wright: a study in the transformation of the self.

    PubMed

    Graves, M; Schermer, V L

    1998-12-01

    James Wright's work is multilayered. Taken as a whole, which Annie Wright's beautiful compilation, Above the River, allows one to do, Wright's poems (as well as his masterful "prose poems") have a pattern akin to a mythic cycle. "Mythemes" (Lévi-Strauss, 1979) recur as dialectic opposites from one poem to another, whether the abandoned male and mysterious woman, humankind and nature, blindness and seeing, secrets and revelation. Suggestive and symbolic forms such as birds, horses, earth, sky, the destitute, rivers, and adolescence weave themselves throughout in inner and outer "landscapes" of images and experiential moments. There is a frequent shift of "gestalts" between the inner world and external reality. Such a "blooming, buzzing confusion" of internal and external referents might appear to be psychotic and imply a loss of "reality testing." Chassaguet-Smirgel (1988), citing Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray as an example, contended that the artist narrowly averts psychosis by transforming it into a work of art. Surrealists, for whom the psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan was an important figure (cf. Sarup, 1992, pp. 17-27), elevated psychosis to the status of art, and Wright has been considered to be a surrealistic poet, although he himself denied such an affiliation. Hall (Wright, 1990, Introduction, pp. xxiii-xxxvii) suggests that Wright, in addition to an extensive history of alcoholism, from which he seemed to recover towards the end of his life, suffered from a major mental illness, which included episodes of severe depression, hospitalizations, and at least one suicide attempt. The severity of the asceticism and the extreme damage to the self in some Wright's work suggests their roots in early traumatic experiences. (A terribly damaged yet heroic personage, whose disfigurement perhaps symbolizes the poet's trauma, is "Hook" [ATR, pp. 315-316], about a man who gives his last few cents to the poet with a hook replacing his amputated hand.) Not enough is

  3. Determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for detectors used with an 800 MU/min CyberKnife{sup ®} system equipped with fixed collimators and a study of detector response to small photon beams using a Monte Carlo method

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Moignier, C., E-mail: cyril.moignier@free.fr; Huet, C.; Makovicka, L.

    Purpose: In a previous work, output ratio (OR{sub det}) measurements were performed for the 800 MU/min CyberKnife{sup ®} at the Oscar Lambret Center (COL, France) using several commercially available detectors as well as using two passive dosimeters (EBT2 radiochromic film and micro-LiF TLD-700). The primary aim of the present work was to determine by Monte Carlo calculations the output factor in water (OF{sub MC,w}) and the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors. The secondary aim was to study the detector response in small beams using Monte Carlomore » simulation. Methods: The LINAC head of the CyberKnife{sup ®} was modeled using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code system. The primary electron beam was modeled using a monoenergetic source with a radial gaussian distribution. The model was adjusted by comparisons between calculated and measured lateral profiles and tissue-phantom ratios obtained with the largest field. In addition, the PTW 60016 and 60017 diodes, PTW 60003 diamond, and micro-LiF were modeled. Output ratios with modeled detectors (OR{sub MC,det}) and OF{sub MC,w} were calculated and compared to measurements, in order to validate the model for smallest fields and to calculate k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors, respectively. For the study of the influence of detector characteristics on their response in small beams; first, the impact of the atomic composition and the mass density of silicon, LiF, and diamond materials were investigated; second, the material, the volume averaging, and the coating effects of detecting material on the detector responses were estimated. Finally, the influence of the size of silicon chip on diode response was investigated. Results: Looking at measurement ratios (uncorrected output factors) compared to the OF{sub MC,w}, the PTW

  4. PREFACE: The 5th International Symposium on Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, M.; Izquierdo, J. M.; Kuru, S.; Negro, J.; del Olmo, M. A.

    2008-08-01

    integrable systems 7. Symmetries in condensed matter and statistical physics 8. Symmetries in particle physics, nuclear, atomic and molecular physics 9. Nonlinear quantum mechanics 10. Time asymmetric quantum mechanics 11. SUSY quantum mechanics, PT symmetries and pseudo-Hamiltonians 12. Mathematical methods for symmetries and quantum theories 13. Symmetries in chemistry, biology and other sciences Papers accepted for publication in this issue aim to provide a survey of the state of the art in different fields and contain contributions from plenary speakers. In addition, the issue contains contributions from other participants and it has also been open to other authors whose work fits into the topics of the conference. In any case, all the contributions have been refereed according to the high standards of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. We are much indebted to several institutions; without their support the organization of the QTS5 symposium would not have been possible. In this respect we acknowledge the Ministerio de Educación of Spain and Junta de Castilla y León for general financial support; to Fundación Universidades de Castilla y León for a number of grants to young researchers who otherwise would not have attended the conference; also to the European Physical Society that provided a number of grants for eastern countries, and to the University of Valladolid where the event took place. We thank IOP Publishing and the staff of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical for the publication of this special issue. In addition, we want to express our gratitude to other members of the Local Organizing Committe of QTS5, who are not Editors of this special issue: Oscar Arratia, Juan A Calzada and Fernando Gómez. Finally, we would like to thank all the participants in the QTS5 conference for their presence, contributions, and for the good atmosphere achieved during their stay. We hope that the experience of spending these days in Valladolid

  5. Publishing high-quality climate data on the semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Andrew; Haller, Armin; Lefort, Laurent; Taylor, Kerry

    2013-04-01

    temperature dataset, Australian Climate Observations Reference Network - Surface Air Temperature (ACORN-SAT) [BoM, 2012b]. This dataset contains daily homogenised surface temperature observations for 112 locations around Australia, dating back to 1910. An ontology for the dataset was developed [Lefort et. al., 2012], based on the existing Semantic Sensor Network ontology [Compton et. al., 2012] and the W3C RDF Data Cube vocabulary [W3C, 2012]. Additional vocabularies were developed, e.g. for BoM weather stations and rainfall districts. The dataset was converted to RDF and loaded into an RDF triplestore. The Linked-Data API (http://code.google.com/p/linked-data-api) was used to configure specific URI query patterns (e.g. for observation timeseries slices by station), and a SPARQL endpoint was provided for direct querying. In addition, some demonstration 'mash-ups' were developed, providing an interactive browser-based interface to the temperature timeseries. References [Berners-Lee et. al., 2001] Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila (2001), "The Semantic Web", Scientific American, May 2001. [Berners-Lee, 2006] Tim Berners-Lee (2006), "Linked Data - Design Issues", W3C [http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html] [BoM, 2012a] Bureau of Meteorology (2012), "Environmental information" [http://www.bom.gov.au/environment/] [BoM, 2012b] Bureau of Meteorology (2012), "Australian Climate Observations Reference Network - Surface Air Temperature" [http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/change/acorn-sat/] [Compton et. al., 2012] Michael Compton, Payam Barnaghi, Luis Bermudez, Raul Garcia-Castro, Oscar Corcho, Simon Cox, John Graybeal, Manfred Hauswirth, Cory Henson, Arthur Herzog, Vincent Huang, Krzysztof Janowicz, W. David Kelsey, Danh Le Phuoc, Laurent Lefort, Myriam Leggieri, Holger Neuhaus, Andriy Nikolov, Kevin Page, Alexandre Passant, Amit Sheth, Kerry Taylor (2012), "The SSN Ontology of the W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group", J. Web Semantics, 17 (2012) [http

  6. Fresh Water River discharges as observed by SMOS in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Turiel, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) are two peculiar regions in the Indian Ocean exhibiting a wide range of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) values. In the BoB, the strong summer monsoon rainfall and the continental run-offs into these semi-enclosed basins result in an intense dilution of the surface seawater in the northern part of the Bay, thereby inducing some of the lowest SSS water masses found in the tropical belt. In the AS, because of the intense variability associated with the monsoon cycle, water mass structure in the upper layers of the AS shows enormous variability in the space and time. As such, the role of the salinity in these regions is crucial in the ocean dynamics of these regions. After more than 7 years in orbit, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission [1] continues to provide a series of salinity data that could be used to monitor the SSS variations in these climatically relevant regions, provided that systematic errors due to land contamination are reduced. Recently-developed algorithms for SSS retrieval [2] have improved the filtering criteria and the mitigation of the systematic bias, providing coherent SSS retrievals close to the land masses. In this work we have analyzed the SSS in 2-degree boxes located at the mouth of the main rivers in the BoB: Ganges-Brahmaputra, Irrawady, Mahanadi, Godovari; and in the AS: Indus. We have first tried to validate the SMOS salinity retrievals with in situ measurements. Since there is few available in situ data, we have also compared the climatological SSS behavior derived from SMOS with the ones provided by the World Ocean Atlas [3]. We have also compared the SMOS SSS data with historical data of discharges [4] and [5], ocean currents from the Ocean Surface Current Analyses Real-time (OSCAR) [6], Sea Surface Temperature from Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) [7],[8] and [9] and Chlorophyll data [10]. The conclusion of this work is that, when the proper

  7. PREFACE: The 5th International Symposium in Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, O.; Calzada, J. A.; Gómez-Cubillo, F.; Negro, J.; del Olmo, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    atmosphere achieved during their stay. We hope that the experience of spending these days in Valladolid has been most fruitful for all of them. O Arratia, J A Calzada, F Gómez-Cubillo, J Negro and M A del Olmo Universidad de Valladolid, Spain Editors of the QTS5 Proceedings Conference Board S T Ali (Montreal) L L Boyle (Canterbury) M A del Olmo (Valladolid) V K Dobrev (Sofia) H D Doebner (Clausthal), Chair E Kapuscik (Cracow) V I Man'ko (Moscow) G Marmo (Naples) G S Pogosyan (Yerevan and Dubna) T H Seligman (Cuernavaca) A I Solomon (Paris and Open University) P Suranyi (Cincinnati) L C R Wijewardhana (Cincinnati) International Advisory Committee L Accardi, (Roma) M Asorey, (Zaragoza) M T Batchelor, (Canberra) C M Bender, (Washington) A Bohm, (Texas) E Celeghini, (Firenze) I Cirac, (Garching) S Ferrara, (CERN) J P Gazeau, (Paris) G Goldin , (Rutgers) F Iachello, (Yale) T Janssen, (Nijmegen) J Klauder, (Gainesville) P Kulish, (St Petersburg) B Mielnik, (Mexico DF) W Miller, (Minneapolis) M Plyushchay, (Santiago de Chile) O Ragnisco, (Roma) S Randjbar-Daemi, (ICTP) M Santander, (Valladolid) G Sierra, (Madrid) P Townsend, (Cambridge) S Twarock, (York) F Wilczek, (Boston) P Winternitz, (Montreal) K B Wolf, (Cuernavaca) Local Organizing Committee (University of Valladolid) Oscar Arratia Juan A Calzada Manuel Gadella Fernando Gómez-Cubillo José Manuel Izquierdo Sengül Kuru Javier Negro Mariano A del Olmo (Chairman) Official photograph

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J. M.

    2006-02-01

    existence theorem for small perturbations of K = -1 vacuum Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes. The novelty here is the use of the Bel-Robinson energy and its generalizations. At a more specialized level, Michael Anderson has contributed a review of Cheeger-Gromov Theory and Applications to General Relativity, which is an update of the lectures he gave at the summer school. This reviewer is unfamiliar with the material presented here, but it looks to be potentially important. Luis Lehner and Oscar Reula have presented a rather useful but concise review of numerical relativity for mathematical relativists, entitled Status Quo and Open Problems in the Numerical Construction of Spacetimes, which is very different to the first author's school presentation. This should perhaps be worked up to a more encyclopaedic review. Gregory Galloway has contributed Null Geometry and the Einstein Equations, an extended version of his summer school lectures, which surveyed how techniques from global Lorentzian geometry and causality theory can be used to obtain results about the global behaviour of solutions of the Einstein equations, thus generalizing and extending the classic Hawking-Penrose results. The reader should recall that the articles have been ordered by objective length rather than subjective quality. Alan Rendall's is a masterly if terse review of The Einstein-Vlasov System, a laudable attempt to bring the mathematical status of results on the non-vacuum field equations up to that of their vacuum counterparts. This duplicates precisely his school presentation. Last but not least, John Friedman has given an excellent succinct review of what can go wrong if one abandons the requirement of time-orientability, The Cauchy problem on Spacetimes That Are Not Globally Hyperbolic, which seems to be identical to his school presentation. As always, this experienced author's presentation has exemplary clarity. This is an impressive volume presenting clearly the current state of the art. No

  9. Towards A Moon Village: Vision and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    or interest. Just let us know your views! Highlights and recommendations can be found on https://ildwg.wordpress.com/ *Moon Village Workshops Organisers Team: Bernard Foing (ESA/ESTEC & ILEWG), Aidan Cowley, Guillermo Ortega, Linda van Hilten (ESA), Vid Beldavs, David Dunlop, Jim Crisafulli (International Lunar Decade), ESTEC Moon Village workshop 2015 WGs co-conveners: Peter Batenburg, Andrea Jaime, Abigail Calzada, Angeliki Kapoglou, Chris Welch, Susanne Pieterse, Daniel Esser, Audrey Berquand, Daniel Winter, Dmitri Ivanov, Simone Paternostro, Matias Hazadi, Oscar Kamps, Marloes Offringa

  10. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    led him to introduce this subject area into the Toronto graduate research and teaching curriculum. In collaboration with the Department of Electrical Engineering, he established a radio astronomy observing site at the U of T's David Dunlap Observatory (DDO) in 1956. This was at a time when few astronomers took this subject seriously. The DDO work led to the precise determination of the absolute flux density of Cas A at 320 MHz, a radiometric standard as important today as it was when it was reported in 1963. On behalf of the University of Toronto, he subsequently participated in radio astronomy activity at the National Research Council's (NRC's) new Algonquin Radio Observatory in Algonquin Park. The radio astronomy program that Don established was an early stimulus for the first successful experiment in Very Long Baseline Interferometry in 1967, a collaboration among the University of Toronto, Queen's University, and NRC. As a teacher, Don was highly regarded by his students, whom he engaged with his characteristic wit and frequent anecdotes. His lectures always were well prepared and organized, and endowed with an underlying belief that the ideas and principles of physics were most easily understood by applying them first to the stars. As an innovative teacher, he was the first professor at Toronto to teach computer programming at the university, recognizing early that students would need such skills in their scientific careers. Similarly, he was a strong advocate for public outreach. He was featured in the Oscar-nominated short film "Universe" produced in 1960 by the National Film Board of Canada. He also was instrumental in the establishment of the McLaughlin Planetarium, which opened in Toronto in October 1968. In honor of his strong record in education, the U of T established an undergraduate scholarship in Don's name in 2003 to reward promising undergraduates in the astronomy program. In 1965, Don became Head of the Department and Director of the DDO, and

  11. Comet or Asteroid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-11-01

    . Thus such asteroids are known as the Trojans and the mentioned programme is referred to as the Uppsala-DLR Trojan Survey . In September and October/November 1996, the ESO Schmidt telescope was used to cover about 900 square degrees twice centered on the sky field in the direction of the Jovian L4 point. The observations were made by ESO night-assistants Guido and Oscar Pizarro . By inspection of those from September, Claes-Ingvar Lagerkvist found a total of about 400 Trojan asteroids, most of which were hitherto unknown. Their accurate positions were measured on a two-coordinate measuring machine at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany). During the same period, the 0.6-m Bochum telescope at La Silla was used for additional observations of positions and magnitudes. An asteroid with a tail? ESO Press Photo 31a/97 ESO Press Photo 31a/97 [JPG, 120k] Caption: Discovery image of P/1997 T3 , obtained on October 1, 1997, with the 1-metre ESO Schmidt telescope at the La Silla observatory in the Chilean Atacama desert. The object is seen as a small straight and sharp `asteroidal' trail (in 4 o'clock orientation) on the lower right side of the strong white line in the middle of the field, directly opposite the white dot (these marks were placed in order to mark the position of the new object on the film). A new object was found by Claes-Ingvar Lagerkvist on a film obtained with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt telescope on October 1, 1997. The appearance was that of a point light source, i.e. it was presumably of asteroidal nature , cf. ESO Press Photo 31a/97. ESO Press Photo 31b/97 ESO Press Photo 31b/97 [JPG, 45k] Caption: P/1997 T3 on October 6, 1997 at 05:13:54 UT. This image of the new object (slightly above and to the left of the centre of the field) was obtained with the 0.6-m Bochum telescope at La Silla; the observer was Andreas Nathues . The tail is faintly visible to the lower left of the point-like object (in the 7 o'clock direction). However, when Andreas Nathues (DLR

  12. Obituary: James Gilbert Baker, 1914-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Neal Kenton

    2005-12-01

    (1970), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1946), and the National Academy of Engineering (1979). He was a member of the American Astronomical Society, the International Astronomical Union, and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. He authored numerous professional papers and has over fifty US patents. He maintained his affiliation with the Harvard College Observatory and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory until he retired in 2003. Even after his retirement in 2003, he continued work at his home on a new telescope design that he told his family he should have discovered in 1940. Light was always his tool to the understanding of the Universe. An entry from his personal observation log, 7 January 1933, made after an evening of star gazing reveals the pure inspiration of his efforts: "After all, it is the satisfaction obtained which benefits humanity, more than any other thing. It is in the satisfaction of greater human knowledge about the cosmos that the scientist is spurred on to greater efforts." James Baker fulfilled the destiny he had foreseen in 1933, living to see professional and amateur astronomers use his instruments and designs to further the understanding of the cosmos. Whereas, he had not predicted that his cameras would protect this nation for over many years. He is survived by his wife, his four children and five grandchildren. 1Oscar Bryant, "Astronomical Designs," in "Accent", the University of Louisville College of Arts and Sciences Alumni Newsletter, Spring 1994. 2George W. Goddard,Brigadier General, "Overview", 273.

  13. Towards a Moon Village: Young Lunar Explorers Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamps, Oscar; Foing, Bernard; Batenburg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    : ESA delegations, media, national governments, citizens and taxpayers. References: [1] http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ and https://ildwg.wordpress.com/ [2] Foing B. Moon explora-tion highlights and Moon Village introduction. [3] Young Lunar Explorers Report ESTEC Moon village sessions with community and young professionals. *Organisation: Bernard Foing, ESA/ESTEC & ILEWG, ESTEC Moon Village workshop WGs co-conveners: Peter Batenburg, Andrea Jaime, Abigail Calzada, Angeliki Kapoglou, Chris Welch, Susanne Pieterse, Daniel Esser, Audrey Berquand, Daniel Winter, Hanna Läkk, Dmitri Ivanov, S Paternostro, Matias Hazadi, Oscar Kamps

  14. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    cole Polytechnique, Palaiseau and University of Crete Denis KleversPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Paul Koerber Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Simon Koers Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Karl KollerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Peter Koroteev Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow and Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Alexey KoshelevVrije Universiteit, Brussel Costas KounnasÉcole Normale Supérieure, Paris Daniel KreflCERN, Geneva Charlotte KristjansenNiels Bohr Institute, København Finn LarsenCERN, Geneva and University of Michigan Arnaud Le DiffonÉcole Normale Supérieure, Lyon Michael LennekCentre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Alberto Lerda Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Andreas LiberisUniversity of Patras Maria A Lledo Universidad de Valencia Oscar Loaiza-Brito CINVESTAV, Mexico Florian Loebbert Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Yolanda Lozano University of Oviedo Dieter Luest Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Tomasz Łukowski Jagiellonian University, Krakow Diego Mansi University of Crete Alberto Mariotti Università di Milano-Bicocca Raffaele Marotta Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli Alessio Marrani Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and LNF, Firenze Andrea Mauri University of Crete Liuba Mazzanti École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Sean McReynoldsUniversità di Milano-Bicocca AKM Moinul Haque Meaze Chittagong University Patrick Meessen Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Carlo MeneghelliUniversità di Parma and Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Lotta Mether University of Helsinki and CERN, Geneva René Meyer Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Georgios MichalogiorgakisCenter de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Giuseppe Milanesi Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Samuel Monnier Université de Genève Wolfgang Mueck

  15. Ashes from the Elder Brethren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    based is now in press in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. It is also available on the web as astro-ph/0012457. Notes [1]: 1 billion = 1,000 million. [2]: The team members in the ESO Large Program 165-L0263 devoted to the analysis of globular cluster dwarf stars, described in this Press Release, are: Raffaele Gratton (PI), Eugenio Carretta , Riccardo Claudi , Silvano Desidera , Sara Lucatello (Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Italy), Gisella Clementini , Angela Bragaglia (Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Italy), Paolo Molaro , Piercarlo Bonifacio , Miriam Centurion (Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Italy), Francesca D' Antona (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vittorio Castellani (Universita' di Pisa, Italy), Alessandro Chieffi (CNR-IAS, Italy), Oscar Straniero (Osservatorio di Teramo, Italy), Luca Pasquini , Patrick Francois (ESO), Francois Spite , Monique Spite (Observatoire de Meudon, France), Chris Sneden (University of Texas at Austin, USA), Frank Grundahl (University of Aarhus, Denmark). [3]: While it is apparent that some mass is transferred from the Planetary Nebulae to the stars, the details of this process are not clear. It may have happened before the stars here observed were formed, or later. In the latter case, the accretion may have occurred only during a particular evolutionary phase, some 100 million years after the cluster formed, i.e. about 11 to 15 billion years ago, and in very dense environments. Moreover, the accretion rate will depend on the relative velocities: only stars that move slowly with respect to the interstellar medium has a good chance of accreting matter. This may also be (part of) an explanation of the observed, large differences from star to star. [4]: A photo of a large planetary nebula is available as PR Photo 38a/98 and information about VLT observations of white dwarf stars in globular clusters are described in PR 20/99. Technical information about the photo PR Photo 06a/01 The image has been