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  1. Self-Reported Utilization of Eye Care among Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES)

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Leo S.; Varma, Rohit; Paz, Sylvia H.; Lai, Mei Ying; Mazhar, Kashif; Andersen, Ronald M.; Azen, Stanley P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To identify the prevalence and determinants of self-reported eye care utilization in Latinos. Design Population-based ocular epidemiological study in Latinos age 40+ living in La Puente, California. Participants 5,455 participants. Methods Univariate, multivariable and stepwise logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predisposing, enabling and need variables associated with self-reported eye care utilization. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence of self-reported utilization: eye care visit, having had a dilated examination in the past 12 months, ever having had a dilated examination, and odds ratios for factors associated with self-reported utilization. Results Overall, 36% of participants reported an eye care visit and 19% reported having a dilated examination in the past year. Fifty-seven percent reported ever having had a dilated eye examination. Greater eye care utilization was associated with older age, female gender, bilingual language proficiency (English and Spanish), more education, having health insurance, having a usual place for care, having a regular provider of care, greater number of co-morbidities, visual impairment, and lower vision-specific quality of life scores. Conclusions Increasing utilization and access to eye care for Latinos should be a priority because visual impairment has significant impacts on well-being and mortality. PMID:20018380

  2. Population and High-Risk Group Screening for Glaucoma: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Brian A.; Vigen, Cheryl; Lai, Mei-Ying; Winarko, Jonathan; Nguyen, Betsy; Azen, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the ability of various screening tests, both individually and in combination, to detect glaucoma in the general Latino population and high-risk subgroups. Methods. The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study is a population-based study of eye disease in Latinos 40 years of age and older. Participants (n = 6082) underwent Humphrey visual field testing (HVF), frequency doubling technology (FDT) perimetry, measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) and central corneal thickness (CCT), and independent assessment of optic nerve vertical cup disc (C/D) ratio. Screening parameters were evaluated for three definitions of glaucoma based on optic disc, visual field, and a combination of both. Analyses were also conducted for high-risk subgroups (family history of glaucoma, diabetes mellitus, and age ≥65 years). Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated for those continuous parameters independently associated with glaucoma. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to develop a multivariate algorithm for glaucoma screening. Results. Preset cutoffs for screening parameters yielded a generally poor balance of sensitivity and specificity (sensitivity/specificity for IOP ≥21 mm Hg and C/D ≥0.8 was 0.24/0.97 and 0.60/0.98, respectively). Assessment of high-risk subgroups did not improve the sensitivity/specificity of individual screening parameters. A CART analysis using multiple screening parameters—C/D, HVF, and IOP—substantially improved the balance of sensitivity and specificity (sensitivity/specificity 0.92/0.92). Conclusions. No single screening parameter is useful for glaucoma screening. However, a combination of vertical C/D ratio, HVF, and IOP provides the best balance of sensitivity/specificity and is likely to provide the highest yield in glaucoma screening programs. PMID:21245400

  3. Four-Year Incidence and Progression of Visual Impairment in Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES)

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Chung, Jessica; Foong, Althena W.P.; Torres, Mina; Choudhury, Farzana; Azen, Stanley P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the 4-year incidence of visual impairment (VI) and blindness and worsening of visual acuity in adult Latinos/Hispanics aged 40 years and older. Design Population-based, longitudinal study. Methods Participants underwent a detailed ophthalmologic examination including assessing both presenting binocular (PVA) and best-corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA) in both eyes using a standard ETDRS protocol. The main outcome measures are 4-year incidence of visual impairment and blindness based on PVA or BCVA in the better seeing eye and defined as 1) baseline visual acuity (PVA or BCVA)≥20/40 and a follow-up PVA or BCVA<20/40 but better than 20/200, and 2) baseline PVA>20/200 and a follow-up PVA≤20/200 respectively. Monocular worsening was defined as a decrease of ≥5, 10, and 15 letters in either eye. Results Four thousand six hundred and fifty eight participants were examined at baseline and the 4-year follow-up. The 4-year incidence of presenting binocular VI and blindness was 2.9% and 0.3%. The 4-year incidence of best corrected VI and blindness was 1.2% and 0.3%. The 4-year incidence of monocular worsening by ≥5, 10, and 15 letters was 24.8%, 8.5% and 3.1% respectively. The incidence of VI and blindness increased with age at baseline (P<0.01). The incidence of VI in the second eye (12.2%) was significantly higher than incidence of VI in the first eye (2.9%)(P<0.001). Conclusion Overall, the annual incidence of VI in Latinos/Hispanics was higher than that reported in non-Hispanic white persons and the highest reported in a population-based study in the U.S. Screening and intervention programs to reduce visual impairment and blindness should focus on the older Latino population. PMID:20399925

  4. FOUR-YEAR INCIDENCE AND PROGRESSION OF LENS OPACITIES: THE LOS ANGELES LATINO EYE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Richter, Grace M.; Torres, Mina; Foong, Athena W.P.; Choudhury, Farzana; Azen, Stanley P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the 4-year incidence and progression of lens opacities. Design Population-based longitudinal study. Methods 4,658 adult Latinos from Los Angeles County, were examined at baseline and 4-year follow-up. Examination included assessment of lens opacities using the Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II). Incidences of cortical, nuclear, and posterior subcapsular opacities (with LOCS II scores ≥2) were defined as opacity development in persons without that opacity at baseline. Single and mixed opacities were defined in persons without any opacity at baseline. Incidence of all lens changes included development of at least one opacity or cataract surgery among those without any opacity at baseline. 4-year progressions were defined as increase of ≥2 in LOCS II score. Results The 4-year incidence of all lens opacities was 14.2%. 4-year incidence of cataract surgery was 1.48%. The incidences were 4.1% for cortical-only, 5.8% for nuclear-only, 0.5% for PSC-only, and 2.5% for mixed. The incidences for any opacities were 7.5% for cortical, 10.2% for nuclear, and 2.5% for PSC. Incidence increased with age (P<0.0001 for all). The progressions were 8.5% for cortical, 3.7% for nuclear, and 2.9% for PSC opacities. Conclusions Our Latino population had a higher incidence of nuclear than cortical opacities, but a greater progression of cortical than nuclear opacities. Incidence and progression of PSC was low. Additional understanding of the natural history and progression of various lens opacities will give us a better understanding of how and when to screen for, monitor, and treat cataracts. PMID:20181327

  5. Ocular Risk Factors for Age-related Macular Degeneration: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES)

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Bell, Samantha; Choudhury, Farzana; Klein, Ronald; Azen, Stanley; Varma, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association of ocular factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Latinos. Design Population-based, cross-sectional study of 6357 self-identified Latinos aged 40 years and older. Methods Ophthalmic examination included subjective refraction, measurement of axial length, evaluation of iris color, Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II) grading of cataracts, and stereoscopic macular photographs for AMD lesions. Generalized estimating equation analysis incorporated data from both eyes to estimate odds ratios adjusted for covariates. Results After controlling for confounders (age, gender and smoking), prior cataract surgery was associated with advanced AMD (OR: 2.8, 95% CI 1.0, 7.8), increased retinal pigment (OR: 1.6, 95% CI 1.0, 1.5) and retinal pigment epithelial depigmentation (OR: 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.4). The presence of any lens opacity was associated with soft drusen (OR: 1.2; 95% CI 1.0, 1.5). Longer axial length (per mm) was associated with a decreased odds of soft drusen, increased retinal pigment, and geographic atrophy (GA) (ORs: 0.8 [95% CI 0.7, 0.9], 0.8 [95% CI 0.7, 0.9], 0.7 [95% CI 0.5, 0.9], respectively. Myopia was inversely associated with soft drusen (OR: 0.8; 95% CI 0.7, 1.0). Lighter colored irises were associated with GA (OR: 5.0; 95% CI 1.0, 25.3). Conclusions Cross-sectional associations of ocular factors such as cataract, cataract surgery, and refractive errors with early AMD lesions found in Latinos were consistent with those in whites. Additionally, prior cataract surgery was associated with advanced AMD. PMID:20138605

  6. Intraocular Pressure, Central Corneal Thickness, and Prevalence of Open-Angle Glaucoma: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Brian A.; Varma, Rohit; Chopra, Vikas; Lai, Mei-Ying; Shtir, Corina; Azen, Stanley P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and intraocular pressure (IOP) and the impact of central corneal thickness (CCT) on this relationship. Design Population based cross-sectional study. Methods The study cohort consisted of 5970 participants from the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES) with no history of glaucoma treatment and with complete ophthalmic examination data. The relationship between the prevalence of OAG and IOP was contrasted across persons with CCT designated as thin, normal or thick. Results Prevalence of OAG was exponentially related to IOP. When stratified by CCT, persons with thin CCT had a significantly higher prevalence of OAG than did those with normal or thick CCT’s at all levels of IOP. Adjusting each IOP individually for CCT did not impact significantly the relationship between the prevalence of OAG and IOP. Conclusions These findings suggest that adjusting for the impact of CCT on IOP by correction algorithms is not necessary in a population analysis of glaucoma prevalence; CCT and other associated corneal properties, however, are important independent risk factors for the prevalence of OAG. PMID:18672218

  7. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Age-related Macular Degeneration: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Bell, Samantha; Wu, Joanne; Klein, Ronald; Azen, Stanley P.; Hooper, Claire; Foong, Athena W. P.; Varma, Rohit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association of cardiovascular risk factors, ocular perfusion pressure with early and advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Latinos. Design Population-based, cross-sectional study. Methods Data were collected from a population-based sample of self-identified adult Latinos using standardized protocols for assessing blood pressure and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement and stereoscopic macular photography. Hypertension was defined as either a history of hypertension or systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140mmHg +/− diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥85mmHg. Ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was defined as the difference between mean arterial blood pressure and IOP. AMD was diagnosed from photographic grading by masked trained graders. Logistic regression was used to assess associations. Results Gradable retinal photographs were available in 5875 participants. After adjusting for age, sex, and cigarette smoking, higher DBP and uncontrolled diastolic hypertension were associated with exudative AMD (Odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1−2.8; and OR, 3.3; CI, 1.2−9.3, respectively). Higher OPP was associated with a decreased risk of GA (OR, 0.4 per 10mmHg; CI, 0.3−0.5). Low pulse pressure was associated with a lower risk of exudative AMD (OR, 0.2; CI, 0.1−0.6). Obesity was associated with increased retinal pigment (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.0−2.3). Conclusion These data suggest that in Latinos cardiovascular risk factors may play a role in advanced AMD. Given that Latinos have a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, an intervention aimed at reducing these risk factors may also have a beneficial impact on the risk of having early and advanced AMD. PMID:18222193

  8. FOUR-YEAR INCIDENCE AND PROGRESSION OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY AND MACULAR EDEMA: THE LOS ANGELES LATINO EYE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Choudhury, Farzana; Klein, Ronald; Chung, Jessica; Torres, Mina; Azen, Stanley P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the 4-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy macular edema (ME), and clinically significant macular edema (CSME) among adult Latinos with diabetes mellitus. Design A population-based, longitudinal study of 4658 self-identified Latinos (primarily Mexican-Americans), residing in Los Angeles, examined at baseline (2000-2003) and at 4 years (2004-2008). Methods Participants underwent a standardized ophthalmic examination. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and CSME were detected by grading of stereoscopic fundus photographs using the Modified Airlie House classification scheme. Chi-square and trend tests were used to assess differences in incidence when stratifying by age and duration of diabetes. Results The 4-year incidence of DR, ME and CSME was 34.0% (182/535) and 5.4% (38/699) and 7.2% (50/699) respectively. Younger persons and those with longer duration of diabetes mellitus had a higher incidence on DR compared to those who were older and had shorter duration of diabetes mellitus. A higher incidence of ME was associated with longer duration of diabetes mellitus (P=0.004). Worsening/Progression of any DR was found in 38.9% (126/324) and improvement occurred in 14.0% (37/265) of participants. Progression from non-proliferative (NPDR) to proliferative DR (PDR) and from NPDR to PDR with high-risk characteristics occurred in 5.3% and 1.9% of participants. Conclusions The 4-year incidence and progression of DR and the incidence of ME and CSME among Latinos are high compared to non-Hispanic Whites. These findings support the need to identify and modify risk factors associated with these long-term complications. PMID:20149342

  9. FOUR-YEAR INCIDENCE AND PROGRESSION OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: THE LOS ANGELES LATINO EYE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Foong, Athena W.P.; Lai, Mei-Ying; Choudhury, Farzana; Klein, Ronald; Azen, Stanley P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate 4-year incidence and progression of early and advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Population-based cohort study. Methods A comprehensive ophthalmologic examination including stereoscopic fundus photography was performed on adult Latinos at baseline and follow-up. Photographs were graded using a modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. For estimations of incidence and progression of AMD, the Age Related Eye Disease Study Scale was used. Main outcome measures are incidence and progression of early AMD (drusen type, drusen size, and retinal pigmentary abnormalities) and advanced AMD (exudative AMD and geographic atrophy). Results 4,658/6100 (76%) completed the follow-up examination. The 4-year incidence of early AMD was 7.5% (95%CI:6.6,8.4) and advanced AMD was 0.2% (95%CI:0.1,0.4). Progression of any AMD occurred in 9.3% (95%CI:8.4,10.3) of at-risk participants. Incidence and progression increased with age. Incidence of early AMD in the second eye (10.8%) was higher than incidence in the first eye (6.9%). Baseline presence of soft indistinct large drusen≥250μm in diameter was more likely to predict the 4-year incidence of pigmentary abnormalities, geographic atrophy, and exudative AMD than smaller or hard or soft distinct drusen. Conclusions Age-specific incidence and progression of AMD in Latinos are lower than in non-Hispanic whites. While incident early AMD is more often unilateral, the risk of its development in the second is higher than in the first eye. Older persons and those with soft indistinct large drusen had a higher risk of developing advanced AMD compared to those who were younger and did not have soft indistinct large drusen. PMID:20399926

  10. Risk Factors for Four-Year Incidence and Progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    CHOUDHURY, FARZANA; VARMA, ROHIT; MCKEAN-COWDIN, ROBERTA; KLEIN, RONALD; AZEN, STANLEY P.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify risk factors for 4-year incidence and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in adult Latinos. DESIGN Population-based prospective cohort study. METHODS Participants, aged 40 or older, from The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES) underwent standardized comprehensive ophthalmologic examinations at baseline and at 4 years of follow-up. Age-related macular degeneration was detected by grading 30-degree stereoscopic fundus photographs using the modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression was used to examine the independent association of incidence and progression of AMD and baseline sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical, and ocular characteristics. RESULTS Multivariate analyses revealed that older age (OR per decade of age: 1.52; 95% CI: 1.29, 1.85) and higher pulse pressure (OR per 10 mm Hg: 2.54; 95% CI: 1.36, 4.76) were independently associated with the incidence of any AMD. The same factors were associated with early AMD, soft indistinct drusen, and retinal pigmentary abnormalities. Additionally, presence of clinically diagnosed diabetes mellitus was independently associated with increased retinal pigment (OR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.01, 2.85), and male gender was associated with retinal pigment epithelial depigmentation (OR 2.50; 95% CI: 1.48, 4.23). Older age (OR per decade of age: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.82, 2.67) and current smoking (OR: 2.85; 95% CI: 1.66, 4.90) were independently associated with progression of AMD. CONCLUSIONS Several modifiable risk factors were associated with 4-year incidence and progression of AMD in Latinos. The results suggest that interventions aimed at reducing pulse pressure and promoting smoking cessation may reduce incidence and progression of AMD, respectively. PMID:21679916

  11. The South Central Los Angeles Eruption: A Latino Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Armando

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes the changing demographics of South Central Los Angeles (California); and considers the Latino role in the 1992 riots, the etiology of the riots, and the rift created among ethnic and racial groups. The Latino perspective on the riots and the future is developed. (SLD)

  12. Roberto Gutierrez and the Art of Mapping Latino Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orozco, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Chicano artist Roberto Gutierrez is one of the most important artists to come out of the East Los Angeles artistic boom of the early 1970s. Gutierrez's life and the significance of his work to the evolving Chicano artistic narrative about Latino life and aesthetics in Los Angeles are discussed.

  13. Hurdles or walls? Nativity, citizenship, legal status and Latino homeownership in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Eileen Díaz

    2015-09-01

    Homeownership is directly and indirectly linked with many positive child, adult, and community-level outcomes. Prior research offers strong evidence that nativity and immigrants' citizenship status shapes U.S. homeownership, but relatively little work has explored how immigrants' legal status is connected with homeownership. This study draws from locational attainment and classic assimilation theories to develop hypotheses about sources of intra-Latino heterogeneity in homeownership. Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey data are used to contrast four distinct groups of Latinos: U.S. born natives, naturalized citizens, authorized non-citizens, and unauthorized non-citizens. Logistic regression results indicate baseline and residual variation in Latino homeownership based on immigrant citizenship and legal status. Of these, unauthorized non-citizens are the least likely to own their home. The results provide support for all three theoretical models, particularly the place stratification perspective. The results also point to the need for more housing studies that jointly examine citizenship and legal status.

  14. The Association Between Nutrition Facts Label Utilization and Comprehension among Latinos in Two East Los Angeles Neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mienah Z.; Rizzo, Shemra; Prelip, Michael L; Glik, Deborah C; Belin, Thomas R; Langellier, Brent A; Kuo, Alice A.; Garza, Jeremiah R; Ortega, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    Background The Nutrition Facts label can facilitate healthy dietary practices. There is a dearth of research on Latinos’ utilization and comprehension of the Nutrition Facts label. Objective To measure Nutrition Facts label use and comprehension and to identify their correlates among Latinos in East Los Angeles. Design Cross-sectional interviewer-administered survey using a computer assisted personal interview (CAPI) software conducted in either English or Spanish in the participant’s home. Participants/Setting Eligibility criteria were: living in a household within the block clusters identified, being age 18 or over, speaking English or Spanish, identifying as Latino and as the household’s main food purchaser and preparer. Analyses were based on 269 eligible respondents. Statistical analyses performed Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis assessed the association between the main outcomes and demographics. Multiple imputation addressed missing data. Results Sixty percent reported using the label; only 13% showed adequate comprehension of the label. Utilization was associated with being female, speaking Spanish and being below the poverty line. Comprehension was associated with younger age, not being married, and higher education. Utilization was not associated with comprehension. Conclusions Latinos who are using the Nutrition Facts label are not correctly interpreting the available information. Targeted education is needed to improve Nutrition Facts label use and comprehension, to directly improve diet, particularly among males, older Latinos, and those with less than a high school education. PMID:24974172

  15. Integrated connection to neighborhood storytelling network, education, and chronic disease knowledge among African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Chan; Moran, Meghan B; Wilkin, Holley A; Ball-Rokeach, Sandra J

    2011-04-01

    Combining key ideas from the knowledge-gap hypothesis and communication infrastructure theory, the present study aimed to explain the relations among individuals' education, access to community-based communication resources, and knowledge of chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, breast cancer, and prostate cancer) among African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles. Rather than explore the effect of isolated communication resources, this study explored the effect of an integrated connection to community-based storytellers on chronic disease knowledge. The authors hypothesized that individuals' access to a community-based communication infrastructure for obtaining and sharing information functions as an intervening step in the process where social inequality factors such as education lead to chronic disease knowledge gaps in a local community context. With random samples of African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles, the authors found that access to community-based communication resources plays a mediating role in the case of breast cancer and diabetes knowledge, but not in hypertension and prostate cancer knowledge. The authors discussed these findings on the basis of communication infrastructure theory and knowledge-gap hypothesis. PMID:21302173

  16. Associations Between Ethnic Labels and Substance Use Among Hispanic/Latino Adolescents in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Jennifer B; Thing, James; Soto, Daniel Wood; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Self-identification with ethnic-specific labels may indicate successful ethnic identity formation, which could protect against substance use. Alternatively, it might indicate affiliation with oppositional subcultures, a potential risk factor. This study examined longitudinal associations between ethnic labels and substance use among 1,575 Hispanic adolescents in Los Angeles. Adolescents who identified as Cholo or La Raza in 9th grade were at increased risk of past-month substance use in 11th grade. Associations were similar across gender and were not confounded by socioeconomic status, ethnic identity development, acculturation, or language use. Targeted prevention interventions for adolescents who identify with these subcultures may be warranted. PMID:24779500

  17. A Qualitative Analysis of the Use of Financial Services and Saving Behavior Among Older African Americans and Latinos in the Los Angeles Area

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Luisa R.; Ponce, Maria; Gongora, Arturo; Duru, O. Kenrik

    2015-01-01

    For this study, we conducted seven focus groups in the Los Angeles area with a total of 70 participants (42 Latinos and 28 African Americans) recruited from three senior centers and a church. There was a wide variety of responses in relation to the usage of financial services among participants. We found that although some participants seem to participate more in the formal financial sector and show a higher level of sophistication when managing their finances, other participants’ use of formal financial institutions is minimal. Among African American participants, we found several instances in which individuals feel very comfortable using banks. Lower levels of participation in the formal financial sector were found among the lower income Latino participants. In relation to barriers to participate in the financial sector, supply was not an issue, but demand and behavioral factors seem more important. Overall, no participants saved very much on a regular basis. We also find that participants in general do not want to ask their children for money, and also do not want to save and accumulate wealth to leave to their children. PMID:26064788

  18. Conceptualisations of masculinity and self-reported medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men in Los Angeles, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Frank H; Bogart, Laura M; Wagner, Glenn J; Klein, David J; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2014-06-01

    HIV-positive Latino men have been found to have poorer medication adherence compared to Whites. This study sought to identify how cultural conceptualisations of masculinity are associated with self-reported medication adherence among Latino men. A total of 208 HIV-positive men reported the number of doses of antiretroviral medication missed in the previous seven days (dichotomised at 100% adherence versus less). Conceptualisations of masculinity consisted of traditional machismo (e.g., power and aggressive attitudes, which are normally associated with negative stereotypes of machismo) and caballerismo (e.g., fairness, respect for elders and the importance of family). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with adherence. The mean adherence was 97% (SD = 6.5%; range = 57-100%). In all, 77% of the participants reported 100% adherence in the previous seven days. Caballerismo was associated with a greater likelihood (OR = 1.77; 95% CI: 1.08-2.92; p = 0.03) and machismo with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38-0.95; p = 0.03) of medication adherence. In addition, higher medication side-effects were found to be associated with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43-0.81; p = 0.001) of medication adherence. These findings reinforce the importance of identifying cultural factors that may affect medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men resident in the USA.

  19. Using Grindr, a Smartphone Social-Networking Application, to Increase HIV Self-Testing Among Black and Latino Men Who Have Sex With Men in Los Angeles, 2014.

    PubMed

    Huang, Emily; Marlin, Robert W; Young, Sean D; Medline, Alex; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    In Los Angeles County, about 25% of men who have sex with men (MSM) are HIV-positive but unaware of their status. An advertisement publicizing free HIV self-tests was placed on Grindr, a smartphone social-networking application, from April 17 to May 29, 2014. Users were linked to http://freehivselftests.weebly.com/ to choose a self-test delivery method: U.S. mail, a Walgreens voucher, or from a vending machine. Black or Latino MSM ≥ 18 years old were invited to take a testing experiences survey. During the campaign, the website received 11,939 unique visitors (average: 284 per day) and 334 self-test requests. Among 57 survey respondents, 55 (97%) reported that using the self-test was easy; two persons reported testing HIV positive and both sought medical care. Social networking application self-testing promotion resulted in a large number of self-test requests and has high potential to reach untested high-risk populations who will link to care if they test positive. PMID:27427928

  20. Native American Ancestry Is Associated With Severe Diabetic Retinopathy in Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoyi; Gauderman, W. James; Marjoram, Paul; Torres, Mina; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Varma, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness in working age adults. Studies have observed that Latinos have a higher prevalence of DR than whites. The purpose of this study is to test the association between genetic admixture and severe DR in Latinos with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. We conducted a case–control study using 944 T2DM subjects from the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study. Cases (n = 135) were defined as proliferative or severe nonproliferative DR subjects. Controls (n = 809) were other diabetic subjects in the cohort. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina OmniExpress BeadChip. We estimated genetic ancestry in Latinos using STRUCTURE with the HapMap reference panels. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the relationship between the proportions of genetic ancestry and severe DR. Results. Native American ancestry (NAA) in Latino T2DM subjects is associated significantly with severe DR (P = 0.002). The association remained significant (P = 0.005) after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, education, and income. We also validated the NAA estimates in Latinos using ADMIXTURE with the 1000 Genomes Project reference panels and obtained consistent results. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that NAA is a significant risk factor for severe DR in Latinos. PMID:25146985

  1. Palace Revolt in Los Angeles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Antonio Villaraigosa, the mayor of Los Angeles, comes alive when recalling his start in local politics--as a labor organizer agitating for reform inside decrepit and overcrowded schools. In his quest to turn around the schools, the mayor has united working-class Latino parents, civil rights leaders, and big-money Democrats to challenge union…

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Child Welfare Services through the Eyes of African American, Caucasian, and Latino Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayon, Cecilia; Lee, Cheryl D.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to find if differences exist among 88 African American, Caucasian, and Latino families who received child welfare services. Method: A secondary data analysis of cross-sectional survey data employing standardized measures was used for this study. Family preservation (FP) services were received by 49…

  3. El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project: model program for Latino caregivers of Alzheimer's disease-affected people.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Maria P; Villa, Valentine M; Trejo, Laura; Ramírez, Rosa; Ranney, Martha

    2003-04-01

    The article describes the El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project--a dementia-specific outreach and services program targeting Latino caregivers in the Los Angeles County area. The project is an example of an interorganizational community-based collaborative developed to provide an array of coordinated, ethnic-sensitive services to Latino dementia-affected adults and their family caregivers, using culturally specific outreach and services delivery strategies. Results of an evaluation of service utilization indicate a reduction in barriers to care and an increase in services utilization. Los Angeles County provides a natural urban laboratory to study the special needs and circumstances of older Latinos dealing with chronic and debilitating illnesses. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  4. Blood lead levels in children in south central Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, S J; Williams, F A; Delrahim, S; Khan, F; Kraft, M; Lu, M; Manalo, M; Sanchez, M; Wooten, D J

    1996-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 3 679 pediatric records from King/Drew Medical Center, south central Los Angeles, between 1991 and 1994. Blood lead levels of children were followed to age 18 y. Patients were not referred specifically for lead poisoning. The sample was primarily Latino. Geometric mean blood lead peaked at 6.7 micrograms/dl (0.32 mumol/l) between 2 and 3 y of age. There was a downward secular trend and a seasonal trend. Males had higher lead levels than females. Children who lived in several zipcode areas, in which the lowest family incomes were reported, had higher lead levels. More Latino children had higher lead levels than African American children. Latino children (i.e., 20.2%) who were 1-5 y of age had blood lead levels that were > or = 10 micrograms/dl. Young Latino children in this zone of Los Angeles may be at increased risk for lead exposure.

  5. Latino Parents and Teachers: Key Players Building Neighborhood Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Elizabeth; Ulanoff, Sharon H.

    2013-01-01

    This narrative study examines how Latino parents and teachers in the Boyle Heights/East Los Angeles community create and appropriate social capital to increase student achievement. Specifically, the study explores how parents and teachers participate in two community organizations to extend resources that have the potential to positively impact…

  6. Residential hierarchy in Los Angeles: an examination of ethnic and documentation status differences.

    PubMed

    Cort, David A; Lin, Ken-Hou; Stevenson, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    Longitudinal event history data from two waves of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey are used to explore racial, ethnic, and documentation status differences in access to desirable neighborhoods. We first find that contrary to recent findings, undocumented Latinos do not replace blacks at the bottom of the locational attainment hierarchy. Whites continue to end up in neighborhoods that are less poor and whiter than minority groups, while all minorities, including undocumented Latinos, end up in neighborhoods that are of similar quality. Second, the effects of socioeconomic status for undocumented Latinos are either similar to or weaker than disadvantaged blacks. These findings suggest that living in less desirable neighborhoods is a fate disproportionately borne by non-white Los Angeles residents and that in some limited ways, the penalty attached to being undocumented Latino might actually be greater than the penalty attached to being black. PMID:24576634

  7. Latinos and School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastic, Billie; Coronado, Diana Salas

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe how Latino students are underrepresented in public schools of choice. They provide evidence to refute the claim that Latino students who choose to leave assigned public schools enroll in religious schools instead. Charter schools stand out as the type of public schools of choice where Latino students are well represented.…

  8. Latinos: Remaking America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Marcelo M., Ed.; Paez, Mariela M., Ed.

    This book brings together leading scholars in the study of the Latino population in the United States. The papers include: "Introduction: The Research Agenda" (Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco and Mariela M. Paez); (1) "`Y tu que?' (Y2K): Latino History in the New Millennium" (George J. Sanchez); (2) "Islands and Enclaves: Caribbean Latinos in Historical…

  9. Sexuality Information Needs of Latino and African American Ninth Graders: A Content Analysis of Anonymous Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angulo-Olaiz, Francisca; Goldfarb, Eva S.; Constantine, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    This study used qualitative content analysis to examine anonymous questions about sex and sexuality submitted by Latino and African American adolescents in Los Angeles, California, classrooms. The majority of questions asked about sexuality and sexual behavior, or anatomy and physiology, with fewer questions about pregnancy and pregnancy…

  10. Schools for Democracy: Labor Union Participation and Latino Immigrant Parents' School-Based Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terriquez, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have long argued that civic organizations play a vital role in developing members' civic capacity. Yet few empirical studies examine how and the extent to which civic skills transfer across distinct and separate civic contexts. Focusing on Latino immigrant members of a Los Angeles janitors' labor union, this article fills a void by…

  11. Understanding Latina and Latino College Choice: A Social Capital and Chain Migration Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Patricia A.; McDonough, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    Through interviews and focus groups with 106 high school juniors and seniors, this research examined the college choice process for Latina and Latino students in the greater Los Angeles basin. Using chain migration theory within a social capital framework, the results indicated that as primarily first-generation college students, the students in…

  12. The Use of Female Commercial Sex Workers' Services by Latino Day Laborers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvan, Frank H.; Ortiz, Daniel J.; Martinez, Victor; Bing, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the characteristics of Latino day laborers who have sex with female commercial sex workers (CSWs). A sample of 450 day laborers in Los Angeles was used. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association of independent variables with the likelihood of having sex with a CSW. Overall, 26% of the 450 day…

  13. Los Angeles, CA.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A general view of the greater Los Angeles region of California (34,0N, 118.5W) showing the coastline, Vandenberg AFB, the south end of the Central Valley and the dry lake beds at Edwards AFB, landing site of the space shuttle.

  14. Angels in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of the placement of action lines to show the direction of movement. The author shows some visuals of angels and discusses in details the texture of the wings, the hair and the clothing.

  15. [Latino Religious Leadership Project of the Latino Commission on AIDS].

    PubMed

    Chacon, G

    1996-01-01

    The Latino community has strong religious and spiritual traditions, and there is a need for spiritual leadership. To address these needs, the Latino Leadership Project of the Latino Commission on AIDS offers prevention and education activities. The Commission refers religious leaders to the Latino community. Churches offer food and clothing banks, and counseling services to persons living with HIV/AIDS.

  16. High frequency of acute promyelocytic leukemia among Latinos with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Douer, D; Preston-Martin, S; Chang, E; Nichols, P W; Watkins, K J; Levine, A M

    1996-01-01

    A high frequency (24%) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was noted among acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) cases at the Los Angeles County-University of Southern California (LAC-USC) Medical Center, in comparison with the expected frequency of 5% to 15%. Because of the high proportion of Latinos in this center, we questioned if APL is more common in this ethnic group. The proportion of APL among the 80 AML patients of Latino origin was significantly higher (30; 37.5%) when compared with the 62 non-Latinos (4; 6.5%) (P = .00001). In an attempt to verify this finding on a larger group of patients, we analyzed 276 pathologically verified cases of AML in patients aged 30 to 69 years from the entire County of Los Angeles, registered on an ongoing population-based epidemiologic study of AML. APL was more frequent among the 47 Latinos (24.3%) than in the 229 non-Latinos (8.3%) (P = .0075). APL is seen in younger patients with AML, but Latino AML patients also had a higher frequency of APL after accounting for their younger age (age-adjusted odds ratio for APL among Latinos in LAC-USC Medical Center, 9.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9, 30] P = .0002; among Latinos in the population-based study, 3.0 [95% CI 1.3 to 6.9] P = .01). The different ethnic distribution of AML was found to be due to a higher proportion of APL cases per se, and not to a lower proportion of any other French-American-British subtype (P = .0004). These results, from two different populations of AML patients, indicate that Latinos with AML have a higher likelihood of the APL subtype of disease, which may suggest a genetic predisposition to APL and/or exposure to distinct environmental factor(s).

  17. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. The Latino Vote

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Arlene M.

    2008-01-01

    Latinos are the largest ethnic minority group in the United States; they are taking resources and jobs from Americans; they are "browning" their racial makeup--among other scenarios of doom that have accompanied the immigration debate. But with the 2008 presidential campaign season, Latinos have suddenly become the belles of the ball. People are…

  2. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latinos and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz-Franco, Luis

    An historical perspective reveals that sophisticated mathematical activity has been going on in the Latino culture for thousands of years. This paper provides a general definition of the area of mathematics education that deals with issues of culture and mathematics (ethnomathematics) and defines what is meant by the term Latino in this essay.…

  5. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. House Poor in Los Angeles: Examining Patterns of Housing-Induced Poverty by Race, Nativity, and Legal Status*

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Eileen Diaz

    2013-01-01

    Housing affordability in the United States is generally operationalized using the ratio approach, with those allocating more than thirty percent of income to shelter costs considered to have housing affordability challenges. Alternative standards have been developed that focus on residual income, whether income remaining after housing expenditures is sufficient to meet non-housing needs. This study employs Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey data to consider racial/ethnic, nativity and legal status differences in one residual income standard. Logistic regression analyses of housing-induced poverty focus on whether there are differences among five distinct groups: U.S.born Latinos, Non-Hispanic Whites, and African Americans, authorized Latino immigrants, and unauthorized Latino immigrants. Results suggest that: 1) Latino natives are significantly more likely to be in housing-induced poverty than African Americans and Latino immigrants, and 2) unauthorized Latino immigrants are not more likely to experience the outcome than other groups. The present work extends previous research. First, the results provide additional evidence of the value of operationalizing housing affordability using a residual income standard. Alternatives to the ratio approach deserve more empirical attention from a wider range of scholars and policymakers interested in housing affordability. Second, housing scholarship to date generally differentiates among Latinos by ethnicity, nativity, and citizenship. The present study contributes to emerging research investigating heterogeneity among Latinos by nativity and legal status. PMID:23585711

  7. Los Angeles, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This rare cloud and smog free view of Los Angeles, CA (34.0N, 118.5W) is a result of strong Santa Ana winds blowing from the east. Both cultural and natural features are well displayed and all of the major streets, highways and freeways can be traced in their entirety throughout the city as well as the major business and commercial sections. On the eastern edge of the scene, the San Andreas fault cuts across from southeast to northwest.

  8. Adherence to the food guide pyramid recommendations among African Americans and Latinos: results from the Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sangita; Murphy, Suzanne P; Wilkens, Lynne R; Shen, Lucy; Hankin, Jean H; Monroe, Kristine R; Henderson, Brian; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the degree of adherence to the Food Guide Pyramid recommendations among African Americans, Latinos born in the United States, and Latinos born in Mexico. Subjects were from the Multiethnic Cohort Study in Hawaii and Los Angeles, and completed a self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1993-1996. Dairy recommendations were the least likely of all the food group recommendations to be followed, with 61% to 99% of individuals in the three ethnic groups not consuming the recommended number of servings. African Americans were less likely to adhere to all of the food group recommendations compared to the two Latino groups. A greater percentage of Latinos born in the United States did not adhere to the food group recommendations compared to Latinos born in Mexico. All three groups would benefit from interventions designed to promote healthy food choices. PMID:15565084

  9. Adherence to the food guide pyramid recommendations among African Americans and Latinos: results from the Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sangita; Murphy, Suzanne P; Wilkens, Lynne R; Shen, Lucy; Hankin, Jean H; Monroe, Kristine R; Henderson, Brian; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the degree of adherence to the Food Guide Pyramid recommendations among African Americans, Latinos born in the United States, and Latinos born in Mexico. Subjects were from the Multiethnic Cohort Study in Hawaii and Los Angeles, and completed a self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1993-1996. Dairy recommendations were the least likely of all the food group recommendations to be followed, with 61% to 99% of individuals in the three ethnic groups not consuming the recommended number of servings. African Americans were less likely to adhere to all of the food group recommendations compared to the two Latino groups. A greater percentage of Latinos born in the United States did not adhere to the food group recommendations compared to Latinos born in Mexico. All three groups would benefit from interventions designed to promote healthy food choices.

  10. NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES APS DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES APS DATA Project Title:  NARSTO Discipline:  ... Platform:  Ground Station Instrument:  APS - Aerodynamic Particle Sizer Location:  Los Angeles, ... Data Guide Documents:  Los Angeles APS Guide Los Angeles Project Plan  (PDF) Los Angeles ...

  11. Oral health status and the epidemiologic paradox within latino immigrant groups

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background According to the United States census, there are 28 categories that define “Hispanic/Latinos.” This paper compares differences in oral health status between Mexican immigrants and other Latino immigrant groups. Methods Derived from a community-based sample (N = 240) in Los Angeles, this cross-sectional study uses an interview covering demographic and behavioral measures, and an intraoral examination using NIDCR epidemiologic criteria. Descriptive, bivariate analysis, and multiple regression analysis were conducted to examine the determinants that are associated with the Oral Health Status Index (OHSI). Results Mexican immigrants had a significantly higher OHSI (p < .05) compared to other Latinos. The multilinear regression showed that both age and gender (p < .05), percentage of untreated decayed teeth (p < .001), number of replaced missing teeth (p < .001), and attachment loss (p < .001) were significant. Conclusions Compared with the other Latino immigrants in our sample, Mexican immigrants have significantly better oral health status. This confirms the epidemiologic paradox previously found in comparisons of Mexicans with whites and African Americans. In this case of oral health status the paradox also occurs between Mexicans and other Latinos. Therefore, when conducting oral health studies of Latinos, more consideration needs to be given to differences within Latino subgroups, such as their country of origin and their unique ethnic and cultural characteristics. PMID:22958726

  12. Using the Precaution Adoption Process Model to Describe a Disaster Preparedness Intervention among Low-Income Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glik, Deborah C.; Eisenman, David P.; Zhou, Qiong; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Asch, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Only 40-50% of households in the United States are currently disaster prepared. In this intervention study, respondent-driven sampling was used to select a sample (n = 187) of low income, Latino residents of Los Angeles County, randomly assigned into two treatment conditions: (i) household preparedness education received through…

  13. Sexual Solicitation of Latino Male Day Laborers by Other Men

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, Frank H.; Ortiz, Daniel J.; Martinez, Victor; Bing, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the likelihood of Latino day laborers being solicited for sex by other men. Material and Methods 450 Latino day laborers were recruited in Los Angeles, California, from July to September 2005. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which day laborers were more likely to be solicited and subsequently to have sex. Results Thirty-eight percent reported being solicited for sex by another man while seeking work. Those solicited were more likely to live longer in the U.S., be more educated and screen positive for drug dependence. Of those solicited, 9.4% had sex with their solicitors. Those screening positive for drug dependence were more likely to have sex. Most of the day laborers who had anal sex with their solicitors did not always use condoms. Conclusions HIV prevention efforts should target drug dependent day laborers, who may place themselves at risk for HIV through sex with male solicitors. PMID:19039432

  14. Latinos and Political Party Affiliation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutwin, David; Brodie, Mollyann; Herrmann, Melissa; Levin, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    The past few elections have witnessed an increased contestation of votes across racial and ethnic identities, especially with regard to Latinos. As such, this article explores and reports on the important relationship between Latino identity and political party identification. Using the 2002 National Survey of Latinos (with its representative…

  15. The Politics of Latino Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, David L., Ed.; Meier, Kenneth J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Education is one of the most important public policy issues facing Latinos in the United States today, but the political dynamics behind Latino school achievement and failure are often misunderstood--and at times, overlooked altogether. In twelve revealing essays, "The Politics of Latino Education" brings together 23 accomplished and influential…

  16. The Latino Workforce. Statistical Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Breitfeld, Sean

    This brief analyzes the employment patterns and socioeconomic characteristics of Latinos. Nationally, Hispanics constitute 11.1 percent of the U.S. workforce. The number of Latino workers is expected to grow by 36.3 percent this decade. Working Latinos have persistently had high poverty and unemployment rates due to such factors as insufficient…

  17. Caring for Latino patients.

    PubMed

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients. PMID:23317025

  18. Latinos en Extasis.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, T; Chavez, J D

    1998-05-01

    The Mission Neighborhood Health Center (MNHC) in San Francisco offers a Latino youth program, Latinos en Extasis, focusing on HIV, sexually transmitted disease (STD), and pregnancy prevention. The youth-focused, peer intervention program works to increase risk prevention, improve self-esteem among Latino youth ages 13 to 18, and improve communication skills for negotiating birth control and condom use. Based on Diffusion of Innovation Theory (DIT), the program builds on the social influence of community leaders and peer educators. Peer educators, chosen based on their presentation skills and desire to be community activists, are trained on HIV/STDs and reproductive anatomy. The peer educators, who come from a variety of socioeconomic levels and backgrounds, recruit participants at community events, health centers, and high schools. Participants enjoy the role-playing and games that peer leaders use to encourage participation and facilitate education.

  19. Leveraging family values to decrease unhealthy alcohol use in aging Latino day laborers.

    PubMed

    del Pino, Homero E; Méndez-Luck, Carolyn; Bostean, Georgiana; Ramírez, Karina; Portillo, Marlom; Moore, Alison A

    2013-10-01

    In one Los Angeles study, 20 % of day laborers reported excessive drinking. Older adults are more sensitive to alcohol's effects, yet heavy drinking persists among Latinos until they are in their 60s. No interventions to reduce heavy drinking exist for aging day laborers. We recruited 14 day laborers aged 50 and older in Los Angeles. We identified their unhealthy alcohol use behaviors and comorbidities and conducted semi-structured interviews to understand their perceptions of unhealthy alcohol use. We found social disadvantages and conditions exacerbated by alcohol use, like depression. Participants were concerned with dying and premature aging, and reported that family could influence behavior change. An intervention should consider (1) integrating family values and (2) increasing knowledge about alcohol use and comorbidities. Further studies are needed to explore family influence on aging Latino day laborers.

  20. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  1. The Latino Education Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandara, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Latinos now constitute the largest minority group in the United States and the fastest growing segment of its school-age population. Yet they are the least educated of all major ethnic groups. Poverty, lack of access to high-quality preschool, low levels of parental education attainment, and hypersegregated schools all play a crucial role. The…

  2. Latinos in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily Elliott, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue contains five articles about the growing Latino population in the South and its impact on communities, particularly in rural areas. "Social Capital of Mexican Communities in the South" (Ruben Hernandez-Leon, Victor Zuniga) argues that, to understand and advocate for Mexican newcomer communities in the South, scholars,…

  3. Latino College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivas, Michael A., Ed.

    The condition of higher education for Hispanic Americans and Latin Americans is addressed in 12 papers from the 1983 Conference on Latino College Students. Attention is directed to the transition from high school to college, Hispanic student achievement, and economics and stratification. In addition to forewords by Gregory R. Anrig and Arturo…

  4. Championing the Latino Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    When the author worked as a vice principal at a K-8 school in Watsonville, California, a school predominantly filled with migrant workers' children, he felt a lack of support as a Latino as he began moving up into school administration. He also continued to see what he had seen as a teacher--which was how underserved minority students were. These…

  5. Immigrant incorporation in the garment industry of Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Light, I; Bernard, R B; Kim, R

    1999-01-01

    This study expands immigrant social network theory and examined employment patterns in the garment industry in Los Angeles, California, among Latino workers employed by Asian immigrant entrepreneurs. The study determined that a large percentage of immigrant employees found their jobs through the immigrant economy. Entrepreneurship increased the supply of local jobs and expanded the economy at destination at no expense to natives. Immigrant entrepreneurs bought firms from nonimmigrant owners or started new ones with an immigrant labor supply. Massey's index is flawed due to its exclusion of the role of entrepreneurs. Migration networks facilitate entrepreneurship, but some ethnic groups have fewer entrepreneurs, such as Mexicans and Central Americans. A 1993 Los Angeles survey identified 3642 garment factories in its county. Mean employment was 27.1 persons. The garment industry was the 4th largest industry in the area in 1996, with 98,700 employees. It represented 6% of all wage and salary employees in the City and 5.5% of the immigrant labor force in the County in 1990. 93% of garment workers in 1990 were immigrants. It is estimated that 51% of garment factory owners were Asians; most employees were Latinos. Census figures on sewing machine operators indicated 47.3% of owners were Whites and 42.45 were Asians. 53.3% of employees were other ethnic groups, 14.5% were Asians, and 32.2% were Whites. It is estimated that 47.2% of total employment was due to the immigration economy. 71.5% of the total employment in the garment industry was in the immigrant sector.

  6. Eye cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Z K

    1991-01-01

    Eye cosmetics are useful to highlight and emphasize the eyes. Currently available eye cosmetics include eye shadows, eye shadow setting creams, under-eye concealers, eye-liners, mascaras, artificial eyelashes, and eyebrow pencils. Special care must be taken when patients with sensitive skin or contact lens wearers select eye cosmetics. Eye cosmetics may also be the cause of either irritant or allergic contact dermatitis, which are two causes of the upper-eyelid dermatitis syndrome.

  7. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TENTH FLOOR SOUTH WING CAFETERIA FOOD LINE, FACING NORTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TWENTY-FOURTH FLOOR EXISTING CONDITIONS SHOWING STRUCTURE AND BRACING, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TWENTY-SIXTH FLOOR EXISTING CONDITIONS SHOWING STRUCTURE AND BRACING, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TWENTY-SIXTH FLOOR EXISTING CONDITIONS SHOWING STRUCTURE AND BRACING, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TWENTY-FOURTH FLOOR EXISTING CONDITIONS SHOWING STRUCTURE AND BRACING, FACING SOUTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TWENTY-SIXTH FLOOR EXISTING CONDITIONS SHOWING STRUCTURE AND BRACING, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TWENTY-FOURTH FLOOR EXISTING CONDITIONS SHOWING STRUCTURE AND BRACING, FACING EAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TWENTY-SIXTH FLOOR EXISTING CONDITIONS SHOWING STRUCTURE AND BRACING, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TENTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING RADIATOR AND WINDOW, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. John Ash, ALA., Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, ALA., Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING PARTITIONS, WINDOWS AND RADIATOR, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING PARTITIONS, WINDOWS AND RADIATOR, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR BREAK ROOM OFF OF ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR BREAK ROOM OFF OF ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIRST FLOOR DOORS TO THE CITY CLERK AND TAX & PERMIT DIVISION OFFICES, FACING NORTH. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR SHOWING ROTUNDA COLUMN CAPITALS AND LIGHT FIXTURES, FACING SOUTHEAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TENTH FLOOR SOUTH WING CAFETERIA LIGHT FIXTURE, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR SHOWING ROTUNDA COLUMN CAPITALS AND LIGHT FIXTURES, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR SHOWING ROTUNDA STANDING LIGHT FIXTURE, FACING NORTHEAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SOUTH ENTRY SHOWING DOORS AND LIGHT FIXTURES, FACING NORTH. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL EAST ENTRANCE PORCH SHOWING VAULTS AND LIGHT FIXTURE, FACING UP. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ENTRANCE COURTYARD SHOWING BRONZE DOORS, LIGHT FIXTURES AND GRILLS, FACING EAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS SHOWING COLUMN, ARCADE AND SPECTATOR SEATING, FACING SOUTHWEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS SHOWING PODIUM AND SEATING, FACING SOUTH. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS SHOWING COLUMN, ARCADE AND SPECTATOR SEATING, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR CORRIDOR NEAR ELEVATOR LOBBY SHOWING FIRE HOSE CABINET, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FOURTEENTH FLOOR FIRE HOSE NEAR NORTHEAST STAIR, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING RADIATOR AND WINDOWS, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR WEST OFFICE AREA THAT WAS ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING BEAM AND COLUMN CONNECTION NEAR NORTHWEST CORNER, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING DEMOLITION OF SOUTH WALL, FACING SOUTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING BEAM AND COLUMN CONNECTION NEAR SOUTHEAST CORNER, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING WOOD AND GLASS PARTITIONS, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FOURTEENTH FLOOR, SERVICE AREA DOOR NEAR ELEVATOR LOBBY, FACING SOUTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING STRUCTURAL PIERS AND FLORESCENT LIGHTS, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING DEMOLITION OF WEST WALL, FACING WEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR WEST OFFICE AREA THAT WAS ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING NORTHWEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Los Angeles and Its Mistress Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Wesley

    1973-01-01

    Los Angeles city has acute air pollution problems because of lack of an adequate mass transit system and the type of local industries. Air pollution in Los Angeles has affected agricultural production, vegetation, and public health in nearby areas. (PS)

  8. "Sobresalir": Latino Parent Perspectives on New Latino Diaspora Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Sarah; Wortham, Stanton

    2012-01-01

    Although many have documented the high value Latino families place on education, prevalent discourses nonetheless characterize Latino immigrant parents as not caring about their children's education. This paper describes the practice-based components of a participatory action research project in which we created a collaborative film, intended for…

  9. ZIP code correlates of HIV-testing: a multi-level analysis in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephanie L; Leibowitz, Arleen; Simon, Paul A; Grusky, Oscar

    2006-09-01

    In this study we examine how individuals' residential areas relate to their HIV-testing, regardless of individuals' characteristics. Data from a 1999 random probability sample of Los Angeles (LA) County adults (n = 5475) was used to conduct a multi-level analysis of HIV-testing among respondents in (1) all 233 ZIP codes and (2) the subset of regions with higher rates of higher-risk sex. Results showed that HIV-testing rates varied across individuals' residential ZIP codes. Throughout LA and in higher-risk regions, residents of areas containing concentrations of African Americans were more likely to test for HIV than residents of White or Latino areas, regardless of individuals' own race/ethnicity or the number of AIDS cases or testing sites in ZIP codes. However, residents of Latino areas were no more likely to test than residents of White areas. This is a concern because of increasing rates of HIV-infection among Latinos. We conclude that opportunities exist to increase testing in Latino higher-risk areas.

  10. Culture or No Culture? A Latino Critical Research Analysis of Latino Persistence Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz; Morrison, Jeaná

    2016-01-01

    The recent literature on Latino persistence does not take into account these students' distinct cultural backgrounds. Most researchers of Latino persistence use the self-designation "Latino" as a proxy variable representing Latino culture. A Latino Critical Theory (LatCrit) lens is applied to the persistence literature to demonstrate the…

  11. Cyber-Cops: Angels on the Net.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educom Review, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Curtis Sliwa, founder of the Guardian Angels citizens' safety patrol, discusses the development of the Cyber Angels, an online citizens' patrol group that monitors Internet communication. Cyber Angels voluntarily look for and report any illegal activity conducted over the Internet, such as pyramid scams, transmission of stolen credit card and…

  12. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  13. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Eye Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Eye Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Eye Cancer Overview Statistics ...

  14. In Their Own Voices: Latino Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longerbeam, Susan D.; Sedlacek, William E.; Alatorre, Helen M.

    2004-01-01

    In a study of 2,991 college students, researchers found significant differences between Latino and non-Latino students using MANOVA and chi-square statistics. Latino students were more likely to embrace diversity than non-Latino students, and were more likely to be concerned about financing their college educations. In addition, they were more…

  15. Gender and Power: Reconstructing Latino Ethnography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavella, Patricia; Takash, Paule Cruz

    1993-01-01

    Introduces selected papers delivered at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Papers explore gender as experienced by Latinas and Latinos, examine gendered relationships between Latino men and women, and discern how Latino gender norms in Latin America are perpetrated and negotiated by Latinos within the U.S.…

  16. Health Issues in the Latino Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Molina, Marilyn, Ed.; Molina, Carlos W., Ed.; Zambrana, Ruth Enid, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes 6 parts. Part 1, "Latino Populations in the United States," includes: (1) "Latino Health Policy: Beyond Demographic Determinism" (Angelo Falcon, Marilyn Aguirre-Molina, and Carlos W. Molina); (2) "Latino Health Status" (Olivia Carter-Pokras and Ruth Enid Zambrana); and (3) "Latino Access To Health Care: The Role…

  17. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino Film and Video Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez, Blanca, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This theme issue of the "Centro Bulletin" examines media stereotypes of Latinos and presents examples of alternatives. "From Assimilation to Annihilation: Puerto Rican Images in U.S. Films" (R. Perez) traces the representation of Puerto Ricans from the early days of television to the films of the 1970s. "The Latino 'Boom' in Hollywood" (C. Fusco)…

  4. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Love's Labour's Lost: Latino Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueredo, Danilo H.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of publishing of Latino literature and journals in the U.S. Nineteenth-century Latino publishing in different geographical regions is examined and the impact of social changes on 20th-century writing is discussed. Bilingual publishing and the role of academic presses are highlighted. (MMU)

  6. Latino Immigration, Education, and Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    Immigration is often framed as a problem, yet it is also a time of remarkable opportunity. While immigrants come to the United States from all over the world, the author focuses on the unique and urgent issues related to Latino immigration. Immigrant Latinos have changed the face of America and U.S. schools. Approximately one in five K-12 students…

  7. Latino culture and sex education.

    PubMed

    Medina, C

    1987-01-01

    This article points out important facets of Latino culture to which family life educators must be sensitive. If a family life education program is to prove successful for any Latino community, it must be bilingual. Approximately 85% of all Latinos are Catholic. Latinos are not accustomed to extensive support from the world outside the family; the cultural pattern is to rely on support from the extended family. Latino parents are especially concerned that differing sexual mores, values, and customs will corrupt their children; they place high value on the ideal of cultural preservation. The macho concept of the exaggerated importance of being male is inculcated in a male child from a very early age. Girls are constantly reminded of their inferiority and weakness and usually praised for their docility, submissiveness, and attractiveness. Marianismo, the submissive and obedient female character, pervades the traditional role of wife bestowed upon the Latina. Male and female homosexuality is not looked on favorably in the Latino community. Latinos generally employ a certain degree of formality when dealing with outsiders, professionals, and community leaders. Fatalismo, or fatalism, is particularly to blame for Latinos' apparent deference to others and yielding to authorities. Once these basic cultural characteristics are understood, health care providers can pick up on the forces operating to modify this traditional outline, such as social class, education, socioeconomic status, country of orgin, religiosity, the changing role of women, and the impact of the media, as well as the potential benefical impact of family life education programs.

  8. The Wings for Angels Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Liberty; McMillan, Ellen; Ayers, Ann

    2012-01-01

    How can the spirits of critically ill children be raised? Alexis Weisel (co-president of the Monarch High School National Art Honor Society, 2010-2011) had this question in mind when she initiated and developed the Wings for Angels Project after hearing about the Believe in Tomorrow (BIT) organization through her art teacher, Ellen McMillan. The…

  9. Using vignettes to rethink Latino-white disparities in self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Bzostek, Sharon; Sastry, Narayan; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne; Duffy, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often rely on respondents' self-rated health (SRH) to measure social disparities in health, but recent studies suggest that systematically different reporting styles across groups can yield misleading conclusions about disparities in SRH. In this study, we test whether this finding extends to ethnic differences in self-assessments of health in particular domains. We document differences between US-born whites and four Latino subgroups in respondents' assessments of health in six health domains using data from the second wave of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (N = 1468). We use both conventional methods and an approach that uses vignettes to adjust for differential reporting styles. Our results suggest that despite consistent evidence from the literature that Latinos tend to rate their overall health more poorly than whites, and that Latino immigrants report worse SRH than US-born Latinos, this pattern is not true of self-reports in individual health domains. We find that at the bivariate level, US-born whites (and often US-born Mexicans) have significantly more pessimistic reporting styles than Latino immigrants. After adding controls, we find evidence of significantly different reporting styles for only one domain: US-born Mexicans and whites consistently interpret head pain more severely than the other Latino subgroups. Finally, we find that both before and after adjusting for differences in rating styles across groups, non-Mexican Latino immigrants report better social and physical functioning and less pain than other groups. Our findings underscore the advantages of domain-specific ratings when evaluating ethnic differences in self-assessments of health. We encourage researchers studying social disparities in health to consider respondents' self-assessments in a variety of domains, and to also investigate (when possible) potential biases in their findings due to different reporting styles. The anchoring vignettes approach we use is

  10. Using vignettes to rethink Latino-white disparities in self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Bzostek, Sharon; Sastry, Narayan; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne; Duffy, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often rely on respondents' self-rated health (SRH) to measure social disparities in health, but recent studies suggest that systematically different reporting styles across groups can yield misleading conclusions about disparities in SRH. In this study, we test whether this finding extends to ethnic differences in self-assessments of health in particular domains. We document differences between US-born whites and four Latino subgroups in respondents' assessments of health in six health domains using data from the second wave of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (N = 1468). We use both conventional methods and an approach that uses vignettes to adjust for differential reporting styles. Our results suggest that despite consistent evidence from the literature that Latinos tend to rate their overall health more poorly than whites, and that Latino immigrants report worse SRH than US-born Latinos, this pattern is not true of self-reports in individual health domains. We find that at the bivariate level, US-born whites (and often US-born Mexicans) have significantly more pessimistic reporting styles than Latino immigrants. After adding controls, we find evidence of significantly different reporting styles for only one domain: US-born Mexicans and whites consistently interpret head pain more severely than the other Latino subgroups. Finally, we find that both before and after adjusting for differences in rating styles across groups, non-Mexican Latino immigrants report better social and physical functioning and less pain than other groups. Our findings underscore the advantages of domain-specific ratings when evaluating ethnic differences in self-assessments of health. We encourage researchers studying social disparities in health to consider respondents' self-assessments in a variety of domains, and to also investigate (when possible) potential biases in their findings due to different reporting styles. The anchoring vignettes approach we use is

  11. Perinatal Grief in Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory-making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based upon research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture. PMID:20975393

  12. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  13. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  14. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  15. Latinos with Diabetes and Food Insecurity in an Agricultural Community

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Gerardo; Morales, Leo S.; Isiordia, Marilu; de Jaimes, Fatima Nunez; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Noguera, Christine; Mangione, Carol M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Latinos from agricultural communities have a high prevalence of food insecurity and are at increased risk of obesity and diabetes, yet little is known about the associations between food insecurity and diabetes outcomes. Objective To examine the associations between food insecurity and diabetes outcomes among rural Latinos. Methods Cross-sectional survey with medical chart abstraction of 250 Latinos with diabetes. Primary outcomes are the control of three intermediate diabetes outcomes (hemoglobin A1C ≤ 8.0%, LDL-cholesterol ≤ 100 mg/dl, and blood pressure ≤ 140/90 mmHg), a composite of control of the three, and receipt of 6 processes of care. Secondary outcomes are cost-related medication underuse and participation in self-care activities. Results Fifty-two percent of patients reported food insecurity and one-in-four reported cost-related medication underuse. Patients with food insecurity were more likely to report cost-related medication underuse (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.49; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.30, 4.98; p = 0.003); less likely to meet the composite measure for control of the 3 intermediate outcomes (AOR 0.24; 95% CI 0.07, 0.84; p < 0.05), and less likely to receive a dilated eye exam (AOR 0.37; 95% CI 0.18, 0.77; p < 0.05) and annual foot exams (AOR 0.42; 95% CI 0.20, 0.84; p < 0.05) compared to those who were food secure. Conclusion Among this rural Latino population, food insecurity was independently associated with not having control of the intermediate diabetes outcomes captured in the composite measure, not receiving dilated eye and foot exams, and with self-reporting cost-related medication underuse. PMID:25811632

  16. 3D View of Los Angeles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    California's topography poses challenges for road builders. Northwest of Los Angeles, deformation of Earth's crust along the Pacific-North American crustal plate boundary has made transportation difficult. Direct connection between metropolitan Los Angeles (image lower left) and California's Central Valley (image top center) through the rugged terrain seen on the left side of this image was long avoided in favor of longer but easier paths. However, over the last century, three generations of roads have traversed this terrain. The first was 'The Ridge Route', a two-lane road, built in 1915, which followed long winding ridge lines that included 697 curves. The second, built in 1933, was to become four-lane U.S. Highway 99. It generally followed widened canyon bottoms. The third is the current eight lane Interstate 5 freeway, built in the 1960s, which is generally notched into hillsides, but also includes a stretch of several miles where the two directions of travel are widely separated and driving is 'on the left', a rarity in the United States. Such an unusual highway configuration was necessary in order to optimize the road grades for uphill and downhill traffic in this topographically challenging setting. This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30 meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. The elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar

  17. The Voting Rights Act and Latino Voter Registration: Symbolic Assistance for English-Speaking Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Michael; Zlotnick, Frances

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how the language minority provisions in the Voting Rights Act (VRA) affect Latino voter registration. We are particularly interested in how these provisions affect Latino citizens with varying levels of English language proficiency. Using data from the 2006 National Latino Survey, we find that Latino citizens with limited…

  18. 82. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING NORTHEAST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 87. AQUEDUCT IN COVERED CONDUIT LOOKING NORTHWEST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. AQUEDUCT IN COVERED CONDUIT LOOKING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 40. PLEASANT VALLEY RESERVOIR DAM LOOKING NORTHWEST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. PLEASANT VALLEY RESERVOIR DAM LOOKING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Access to Care and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Cross-Sectional Study in 2 Latino Communities.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Héctor E; Albert, Stephanie L; Roby, Dylan H; Beckerman, Jacob; Champagne, Philippe; Brookmeyer, Ron; Prelip, Michael L; Glik, Deborah C; Inkelas, Moira; Garcia, Rosa-Elenna; Ortega, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of Americans. CVD is understudied among Latinos, who have high levels of CVD risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether access to health care (ie, insurance status and having a usual source of care) is associated with 4 CVD prevention factors (ie, health care utilization, CVD screening, information received from health care providers, and lifestyle factors) among Latino adults and to evaluate whether the associations depended on CVD clinical risk/disease.Data were collected as part of a community-engaged food environment intervention study in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, CA. Logistic regressions were fitted with insurance status and usual source of care as predictors of the 4 CVD prevention factors while controlling for demographics. Analyses were repeated with interactions between self-reported CVD clinical risk/disease and access to care measures.Access to health care significantly increased the odds of CVD prevention. Having a usual source of care was associated with all factors of prevention, whereas being insured was only associated with some factors of prevention. CVD clinical risk/disease did not moderate any associations.Although efforts to reduce CVD risk among Latinos through the Affordable Care Act could be impactful, they might have limited impact in curbing CVD among Latinos, via the law's expansion of insurance coverage. CVD prevention efforts must expand beyond the provision of insurance to effectively lower CVD rates.

  2. Immigrant Latino Neighborhoods and Mortality among Infants Born to Mexican-Origin Latina Women

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Lisa Ross; Choi, Hwajung; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Sastry, Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the association between neighborhood Latino immigrant concentration and infant mortality by maternal nativity among singleton births to Mexican-origin women in Los Angeles County. Methods Information about births, infant deaths, and infant and maternal characteristics were obtained from geocoded Los Angeles County vital statistics records (2002–2005). Linked data on neighborhood characteristics (census tracts) were obtained from the 2000 Census. Logistic regression models were used to predict infant mortality while accounting for spatial clustering by census tract. Results Two-thirds of births to Mexican-origin mothers were to foreign-born women. Foreign-born mothers were older, had less education, and were more likely to have delivery costs paid by Medicaid than US-born mothers. Infants born to foreign-born women had a lower infant mortality rates than infants born to US-born women (3.8/1000 live births vs. 4.6, p=.002)). Among infants of foreign-born mothers, the odds of infant mortality increased with increasing immigrant concentration (OR: 1.29; 95%CI: 1.01–1.66). There was a similar pattern of association between immigrant concentration and mortality for infants of US-born mothers (OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 0.99–1.67). Conclusions In Los Angeles County, the odds of infant mortality among foreign-born Mexican-origin Latina were higher in higher-density immigrant neighborhoods, with a similar trend among US-born mothers. Thus, living in immigrant enclaves likely does not help to explain the lower than expected infant mortality rate among infants born to Latina women. Instead, higher neighborhood Latino immigrant concentration may indicate a neighborhood with characteristics that negatively impact maternal and infant health for Latinos. PMID:25430802

  3. Immigrant Latino neighborhoods and mortality among infants born to Mexican-origin Latina women.

    PubMed

    DeCamp, Lisa Ross; Choi, Hwajung; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Sastry, Narayan

    2015-06-01

    To compare the association between neighborhood Latino immigrant concentration and infant mortality by maternal nativity among singleton births to Mexican-origin women in Los Angeles County. Information about births, infant deaths, and infant and maternal characteristics were obtained from geocoded Los Angeles County vital statistics records (2002-2005). Linked data on neighborhood characteristics (census tracts) were obtained from the 2000 census. Logistic regression models were used to predict infant mortality while accounting for spatial clustering by census tract. Two-thirds of births to Mexican-origin mothers were to foreign-born women. Foreign-born mothers were older, had less education, and were more likely to have delivery costs paid by Medicaid than US-born mothers. Infants born to foreign-born women had a lower infant mortality rates than infants born to US-born women (3.8/1,000 live births vs. 4.6, p = .002). Among infants of foreign-born mothers, the odds of infant mortality increased with increasing immigrant concentration (OR 1.29; 95 % CI 1.01-1.66). There was a similar pattern of association between immigrant concentration and mortality for infants of US-born mothers (OR 1.29; 95 % CI 0.99-1.67). In Los Angeles County, the odds of infant mortality among foreign-born Mexican-origin Latina were higher in higher-density immigrant neighborhoods, with a similar trend among US-born mothers. Thus, living in immigrant enclaves likely does not help to explain the lower than expected infant mortality rate among infants born to Latina women. Instead, higher neighborhood Latino immigrant concentration may indicate a neighborhood with characteristics that negatively impact maternal and infant health for Latinos.

  4. Capturing Latino Students in the Academic Pipeline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandara, Patricia, Ed.; Larson, Katherine; Mehan, Hugh; Rumberger, Russell

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on three projects in California that have attempted to stem the tide of Latino dropouts and increase the college-going rates of the Latino population. Each of these three programs has tested a set of strategies aimed at increasing the educational attainment of Latino students, who now make up the largest single ethnic group in…

  5. Latinos and Education in Ventura County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segura, Denise A.

    This paper provides an overview of demographic and educational attainment data on Latinos in Ventura County, California, and describes an ongoing initiative to increase Latino college attendance through improved K-12 preparation and family involvement. In both its urban and rural areas, Ventura County harbors large Latino populations who are…

  6. Portrayals of Latinos in Magazine Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Charles R.; Bang, Hae-Kyong

    1997-01-01

    Offers a content analysis of U.S. magazine advertisements aimed at general audiences, finding that Latinos are highly underrepresented in magazine advertising. Shows that, although Latinos represent 10.5% of the U.S. population, they were present in just 4.7% of ads, and only 2.2% contained a Latino model in major role. (SR)

  7. Latino Students in Catholic Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Catholic educational institutions play an important role in educating Latino high achieving students. Latino students attending Catholic high schools are more likely to graduate and transition to college immediately following high school. Few studies have examined the outcomes of Latino students who attend Catholic colleges and universities and…

  8. Correlates of adiposity among Latino preschool children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood obesity is at record high levels in the US and disproportionately affects Latino children; however, studies examining Latino preschool children's obesity-related risk factors are sparse. This study determined correlates of Latino preschoolers' (ages 3-5 years) adiposity to inform future ob...

  9. NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES SMPS DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES SMPS DATA Project Title:  NARSTO Discipline:  ... Particle Properties Particulate Matter Order Data:  ASDC Order Tool:   Order Data Guide Documents:  ... Earth Related Data:  Environmental Protection Agency Supersites Los Angeles, California SCAR-B ...

  10. NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES PARTISOL DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-07

    NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES PARTISOL DATA Project Title:  NARSTO Discipline:  ... Properties Trace Elements Trace Metals Order Data:  Reverb:  Order Data Guide Documents:  ... Earth Related Data:  Environmental Protection Agency Supersites Los Angeles, California SCAR-B ...

  11. Trouble Brewing in Los Angeles. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The city of Los Angeles will face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that Los Angeles faces a total $152.6 billion liability for pensions that are underfunded--including $49.1 billion for the city pension systems, $2.4 billion for…

  12. Who has housing affordability problems? Disparities in Housing Cost burden by Race, Nativity and Legal Status in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Eileen Diaz

    2013-01-01

    Housing costs are a substantial component of U.S. household expenditures. Those who allocate a large proportion of their income to housing often have to make difficult financial decisions with significant short-term and long-term implications for adults and children. This study employs cross-sectional data from the first wave of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A.FANS) collected between 2000 and 2002 to examine the most common U.S. standard of housing affordability, the likelihood of spending thirty percent or more of income on shelter costs. Multivariate analyses of a low-income sample of U.S. born Latinos, Whites, African Americans, authorized Latino immigrants and unauthorized Latino immigrants focus on baseline and persistent differences in the likelihood of being cost burdened by race, nativity and legal status. Nearly half or more of each group of low-income respondents experience housing affordability problems. The results suggest that immigrants’ legal status is the primary source of disparities among those examined, with the multivariate analyses revealing large and persistent disparities for unauthorized Latino immigrants relative to most other groups. Moreover, the higher odds of housing cost burden observed for unauthorized immigrants compared with their authorized immigrant counterparts remains substantial, accounting for traditional indicators of immigrant assimilation. These results are consistent with emerging scholarship regarding the role of legal status in shaping immigrant outcomes in the United States. PMID:24077641

  13. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Healthy Eyes Maintaining Your Vision Click for more information Taking good care of ... are qualified to perform eye exams. Aging and Vision Changes As you age, it is normal to ...

  14. Eye Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  15. Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye and keeps it healthy. previous continue Light, Lens, Action These next parts are really cool, ... the eye. previous continue Rods and Cones Process Light The retina uses special cells called rods and ...

  16. Latino Resources at the Smithsonian = Recursos Latinos en el Smithsonian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

    This bilingual directory (English and Spanish) describes Smithsonian museums and offices and focuses on the Hispanic, Latino, Latin American, Spanish, and Portuguese facets of their collections, exhibits, research, public programs, fellowship and internship opportunities, publications, and services. The Smithsonian Institution is composed of 16…

  17. Eye Protection

    PubMed Central

    Pashby, Tom

    1986-01-01

    Eye injuries frequently occur in the home, at work and at play. Many result in legally blind eyes, and most are preventable. Awareness of potential hazards is essential to preventing eye injuries, particularly in children. In addition, protective devices must be used appropriately. We have developed eye protectors that have proved effective in reducing both the overall incidence and the severity of sports eye injuries. ImagesFigures 2a, bFigure 3Figures 4a, b, c, dFigure 5 PMID:21267100

  18. First-Year Latino Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Clifford; Montero, Fidel; Cutri, Ramona Maile

    2004-01-01

    Much has been written over the last two decades on the difficulties that many Latino students continue to face in U.S. public schools. In this article, the authors look at some of the most pressing of these problems in a particular middle-school in a Rocky Mountain state (which the authors called "Madison Middle School"). The authors examine these…

  19. Suicidal Behavior among Latino Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canino, Glorisa; Roberts, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the scientific literature related to suicidal behavior among Latino youth. Discusses the conceptualizations of culture, and how culture may influence behavior and psychopathology, in particular, suicidal behavior. Reviews the literature that discusses rates of suicidal behavior, risk, and protective factors associated with this behavior…

  20. Latino Periodicals: A Selection Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerena, Salvador, Ed.; Pisano, Vivian M., Ed.

    This guide is a collection development tool of national scope for librarians who need in-depth coverage of Latino periodicals suitable for public, school, and academic libraries. Periodicals evaluated include general interest and popular magazines and newspapers that appeal to Spanish-speaking, bilingual, and English-speaking library patrons and…

  1. What Works for Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Deborah; Brown, Sarita E.

    2004-01-01

    By the year 2025, 25 percent of school-age children in the United States and 22 percent of the college-age population will be Hispanic. Yet even with the growth of the population there remain significant achievement gaps between Hispanic students and other racial and ethnic groups, leading to fewer Latino high school and college graduates.…

  2. Effective Programs for Latino Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E., Ed.; Calderon, Margarita, Ed.

    This collection of papers presents the current state of research on effective instructional programs for Hispanic American students. The 10 chapters are: (1) "Effective Programs for Latino Students in Elementary and Middle Schools" (Olatokunbo S. Fashola, Robert E. Slavin, Margarita Calderon, and Richard Duran); (2) "Effective Dropout Prevention…

  3. Shuttle Endeavour Flyover of Los Angeles Landmarks

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space shuttle Endeavour atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft flew over many Los Angeles area landmarks on its final ferry flight Sept. 21, 2012, including the Coliseum, the Hollywood Sign, Griffith...

  4. Creating Programs to Help Latino Youth Thrive at School: The Influence of Latino Parent Involvement Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; Kelly, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Parent involvement programs can play an essential role in the academic success of Latino youth. This article reports the effectiveness and evaluation of two new Extension programs that help Latino parents become more involved in their youths' academics. The Latino Parent and Family Advocacy and Support Training (LPFAST) targets parents of K- 8th…

  5. Advancing the Language Skills of Young Latino Children. New Journalism on Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Margaret; Anguiano, Rebecca; Fuller, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    More than 20% of U.S. children entering kindergarten today are of Latino heritage. And Latino children--growing-up in highly diverse communities--enter school with weaker math and English preliteracy skills than their non-Latino peers. The growing percentage of Spanish-speaking children in today's classrooms raises questions for educators,…

  6. Latino Adults’ Access to Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos’ service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos’ access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

  7. Eye development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E; Li, Ke; Quiquand, Manon; Ruggiero, Robert; Wang, Lan-Hsin

    2014-06-15

    The eye has been one of the most intensively studied organs in Drosophila. The wealth of knowledge about its development, as well as the reagents that have been developed, and the fact that the eye is dispensable for survival, also make the eye suitable for genetic interaction studies and genetic screens. This article provides a brief overview of the methods developed to image and probe eye development at multiple developmental stages, including live imaging, immunostaining of fixed tissues, in situ hybridizations, and scanning electron microscopy and color photography of adult eyes. Also summarized are genetic approaches that can be performed in the eye, including mosaic analysis and conditional mutation, gene misexpression and knockdown, and forward genetic and modifier screens.

  8. EYE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicholas E.; Li, Ke; Quiquand, Manon; Ruggiero, Robert; Wang, Lan-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The eye has been one of the most intensively studied organs in Drosophila. The wealth of knowledge about its development, as well as the reagents that have been developed, and the fact that the eye is dispensable for survival, also make the eye suitable for genetic interaction studies and genetic screens. This chapter provides a brief overview of the methods developed to image and probe eye development at multiple developmental stages, including live imaging, immunostaining of fixed tissues, in situ hybridizations, and scanning electron microscopy and color photography of adult eyes. Also summarized are genetic approaches that can be performed in the eye, including mosaic analysis and conditional mutation, gene misexpression and knockdown, and forward genetic and modifier screens. PMID:24784530

  9. Change in Cognitive Abilities in Older Latinos.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Capuano, Ana W; Marquez, David X; Amofa, Priscilla; Barnes, Lisa L; Bennett, David A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare patterns of cognitive decline in older Latinos and non-Latinos. At annual intervals for a mean of 5.7 years, older Latino (n=104) and non-Latino (n=104) persons of equivalent age, education, and race completed a battery of 17 cognitive tests from which previously established composite measures of episodic memory, semantic memory, working memory, perceptual speed, and visuospatial ability were derived. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, and education, performance declined over time in each cognitive domain, but there were no ethnic group differences in initial level of function or annual rate of decline. There was evidence of retest learning following the baseline evaluation, but neither the magnitude nor duration of the effect was related to Latino ethnicity, and eliminating the first two evaluations, during which much of retest learning occurred, did not affect ethnic group comparisons. Compared to the non-Latino group, the Latino group had more diabetes (38.5% vs. 25.0; χ2[1]=4.4; p=.037), fewer histories of smoking (24.0% vs. 39.4%, χ2[1]=5.7; p=.017), and lower childhood household socioeconomic level (-0.410 vs. -0.045, t[185.0]=3.1; p=.002), but controlling for these factors did not affect results. Trajectories of cognitive aging in different abilities are similar in Latino and non-Latino individuals of equivalent age, education, and race. (JINS, 2016, 22, 58-65).

  10. Spanish language proficiency among providers and Latino clients' engagement in substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Erick G; Khachikian, Tenie; Kim, Tina; Kong, Yinfei; Vega, William A

    2013-12-01

    Quality of care, such as provision of services in Spanish, is a common factor believed to improve treatment engagement among Spanish-speaking Latinos in health care. However, there is little evidence that Spanish language proficiency among providers increases treatment access and retention in publicly funded substance abuse treatment. We analyzed client and program data collected in 2010-2011 from publicly funded treatment programs in Los Angeles County, California. An analytic sample of 1903 Latino clients nested within 40 treatment programs located in minority communities was analyzed using multilevel negative binomial regressions on days to initiate and spent in treatment. As hypothesized, Spanish language proficiency was negatively associated with client wait time and positively associated with retention in treatment, after controlling for individual and program characteristics. The path analysis models showed that Spanish language proficiency played a mediating role between professional accreditation and client wait time and retention. These preliminary findings provide an evidentiary base for the role of providers' Spanish language proficiency and Latino engagement in treatment for a population at high risk of treatment dropout. Implications related to health care reform legislation, which seeks to enhance linguistically competent care, are discussed.

  11. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  12. Eye Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cornea, which focuses light while protecting the eye. After light passes through the cornea, it travels through a ... and have them progress faster. With cataracts, the eye's clear lens clouds, blocking light. To help deal with mild cataracts, you may ...

  13. Geographic variation in rates of selected surgical procedures within Los Angeles County.

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, D M; Valdez, R B; Shapiro, M F; Brook, R H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We explore the contribution of income and ethnicity to geographic variation in utilization of surgical procedures. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. We assessed the use of eight procedures from 1986 through 1988 among residents of Los Angeles County using data from the California Discharge Dataset, the 1980 census, and other secondary sources. Procedures chosen for evaluation were coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), coronary artery angioplasty, permanent pacemaker insertion, mastectomy, simple hysterectomy, transurethral prostate resection (TURP), carotid endarterectomy, and appendectomy. STUDY DESIGN. The amount of inter-zip code variation for each procedure was first measured using various estimates including the analysis of variance coefficient of variation (CVA). Population-weighted multivariate regression analysis was used to model variation in age- and gender-adjusted rates of procedure use among 236 residential zip codes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Highest-variation procedures were coronary artery angioplasty (CVA = .392) and carotid endarterectomy (CVA = .374). The procedures with the lowest degree of variation were cardiac pacemaker implantation (CVA = .194) and hysterectomy (CVA = .195). Variation was significantly related to income (carotid endarterectomy) and either African American or Latino zip code ethnicity for all procedures except pacemaker implantation. For all procedures except appendectomy, the direction of the effect was toward fewer procedures with lower income. However, the effect of African American or Latino population ethnicity varied. CONCLUSIONS. In this large urban area both population ethnicity and socioeconomic status are significantly associated with the geographic utilization of selected surgical procedures. PMID:7721583

  14. Black/immigrant competition re-assessed: new evidence from Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, R

    1997-01-01

    Findings are presented from a survey of employers conducted to assess the impact of immigration and employer practices upon the chances of Blacks finding employment in Los Angeles. The highest ranking person involved in the hiring process at each of 44 restaurants, 46 printers, 41 hotels, and 39 furniture manufacturers was interviewed. The hiring of new employees drawn from the network of current employees seems to have the dual function of bringing immigrant communities into the workplace, while detaching vacancies from the open market, thereby reducing the number of employment opportunities for Blacks. Employers also perceived immigrants to be far more desirable employees than Blacks, partly because they believe that immigrants will work more productively. Immigrants are also seen as the more tractable laborers. Any managerial propensity to favor immigrants over Blacks will probably be reinforced by the attitudes of the mainly Latino work force, for placing a Black worker in a mainly Latino work crew may frustrate productivity given the animosity between the two ethnic groups. Blacks also appear to opt out of the low-level labor market in response to rising expectations, on the one hand, and the anticipation of encountering employment difficulties on the other.

  15. Racial-Ethnic Variation in Park Use and Physical Activity in the City of Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Han, Bing; Williamson, Stephanie; Cohen, Deborah A

    2015-12-01

    Racial-ethnic disparities in physical activity present important challenges to population health. Public parks provide access to free or low-cost physical activity opportunities, but it is unclear to what extent parks are utilized by various race-ethnic groups in diverse urban settings. Here, we examine racial ethnic differences in park use and physical activity among adult residents (n = 7506) living within 1 mi of 50 parks in the city of Los Angeles. In multivariate analyses, we find few differences among race-ethnic groups in terms of their frequency of having visited the park in the past 7 days; however, we find numerous differences in how the groups used the park and in their levels of physical activity: Blacks and English-speaking Latinos were less likely than whites to report being physically active, exercising in the park, and exercising outside the park; Spanish-speaking Latinos were equally likely as whites to report exercising in park but less likely to report exercising outside the park and more likely to report using the parks for social interactions; Asians/Pacific Islanders (PI)/others were more likely than whites to report visiting the park in the past 7 days and using the parks for social interactions. Urban parks appear to be an important resource for physical activity and socialization, in particular among Spanish-speaking Latino and Asians/PI groups. Additional efforts may be needed for other racial-ethnic minorities to experience the same benefits.

  16. Acute Rheumatic Fever in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Propp, Richard P.

    1965-01-01

    There was a general downward trend in the reported incidence of acute rheumatic fever in Los Angeles County during the years 1954-1963. A survey of hospital records in five large hospitals in 1962 revealed 100 cases diagnosed, 39 of which were reported. Diagnoses in the charts reviewed conformed to the Modified Jones Criteria. Most of the patients were born in Los Angeles County. Mortality rates for acute rheumatic fever during the same period were greatly in excess of those expected from the reported morbidity. The mean crude mortality rate for the period concerned was higher than for New York City, although not as high as for Boston. Acute rheumatic fever appears to constitute a health problem in need of review in Los Angeles County. PMID:5834286

  17. Air pollution and morbidity: a further analysis of the Los Angeles student nurses data

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Hasselblad, V.; Pitcher, H.

    1988-02-01

    Hammer et al. analyzed daily diary reports of headache, eye irritation, cough, and chest discomfort in a study of Los Angeles student nurses, and found a statistically significant association between these symptoms and daily maximum one-hour oxidant concentrations at a nearby air quality monitor. Our analysis examines the student nurse data for the possible significance of other pollutants. We used new model specifications designed to account for the probabilistic nature of the outcome variables, and to allow for complications arising from the time series aspects of the data. We replicated the finding of a significant relationship between oxidants and coughing and eye irritation, and also found that; carbon monoxide was significantly related to headache symptoms; nitrogen dioxide was significantly related to eye irritation; and sulfur dioxide was significantly related to chest discomfort.

  18. "Quebrando Fronteras": Trends among Latino and Latina Undergraduate Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Michelle Madsen; Lord, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Engineering, a field that has shaped the world's industrial and technological base, is ripe for an influx of Latino undergraduate students. Given U.S. Latino population increases, what is the trajectory of Latino participation in engineering education? Using an interdisciplinary lens, we critically examine Latino trends in undergraduate…

  19. Latinos In the Work Force: Diversity and Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Carole

    This booklet is written to provide managers, supervisors, and workers with general information about Latino diversity, Latino language differences, and Latino culture as an influence in the work force. The text emphasizes two themes in particular: (1) the great diversity within the Latino group due to many racial and historical differences; and…

  20. Latino Students in American Schools: Historical and Contemporary Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloosterman, Valentina I., Ed.

    This collection of papers presents a historical account of how Latino students experience the U.S. school system from a Latino perspective. The 11 papers are: (1) "Contested Learning: Latino Education in the United States from the 1500s to the Present" (Guadalupe San Miguel, Jr.); (2) "Faces of the Future: Latino Children in Early Childhood…

  1. "La Influencia De La Familia": Latino Retention in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort Daniels, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Although the Latino population is currently the largest minority ethnicity in the U.S. (U.S. Census, 2008), Latino students enroll in college and graduate in proportionately the smallest numbers (Latino, 2002). This dissertation examined the effect of Latino students' families on their decision to remain in school and finish a bachelor's…

  2. The Latino/a Condition. A Critical Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Richard, Ed.; Stefancic, Jean, Ed.

    This collection explores the struggles of the varied Latino peoples for identity, recognition, and legitimacy in the United States. Issues such as what it means to be Latino/a, what a just immigration policy should be, relations between Latinos and other cultural groups, and whether being Latino is a race or an ethnicity are explored. The 94…

  3. State of College Readiness for Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine college readiness among Latino students using results from EXPLORE[R] (for students in grade 8 or 9), PLAN[R] (for students in grade 10), and the ACT[R] test (for students in grade 11 or 12). Latino students include Mexican American/Chicano students, Puerto Rican students, Cuban students, and other students…

  4. What Latino Students Want from School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Jason G.

    2015-01-01

    If you asked Latino students how to improve schools for young people like themselves, what might they say? What recommendations might they have for educators committed to improving their education? The author invited a group of Latino high school students to join him as part of a research project. Their goal was to examine schooling experiences…

  5. Culturally Competent Qualitative Research with Latino Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojeda, Lizette; Flores, Lisa Y.; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Morales, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for conducting culturally competent qualitative research with Latino immigrants, a historically exploited group that represents more than half of all U.S. immigrants and is continuously growing. Limited research exists on Latino immigrants despite their large presence in the United States. The authors draw…

  6. Condom Use among Latino College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurman, Tilly; Borzekowski, Dina L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that Latinos, the largest racial/ethnic minority group in the United States, are disproportionately affected by HIV and AIDS. College health professionals, therefore, should understand current sexual behaviors and risk factors among Latino youth. The authors assessed students' condom use at their most recent sexual…

  7. What Works for Latino Youth. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, Washington, DC.

    The White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans works with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Latino community-based organizations, educators, and youth advisors to identify programs that work for Latino youth. This directory compiles the programs recommended to date and is a work in…

  8. An Examination of Latino Students' Homework Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Homework appears to be positively associated with better student outcomes. Although some researchers have explored the connection between time spent on homework and minority student achievement, few have examined the homework routines of Latino youth. Interviews with Latino high school students show that they have some difficulty completing daily…

  9. Latino Students' Perceptions of the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Dallas

    2011-01-01

    Library use is strongly linked with student persistence in higher education, and Latino students have lower rates of academic library use and proficiency than other racial/ethnic groups of students. This study explores Latino undergraduate students' perceptions of the academic library and library staff and identifies the conditions which impede or…

  10. Understanding Latino Families: Scholarship, Policy, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrana, Ruth E., Ed.

    This anthology examines the contemporary status of Latino families, especially their great racial and ethnic diversity. The book focuses on the strengths of Latino/Hispanic groups, structural processes that impede their progress, and cultural and familial processes that enhance their intergenerational adaptation and resiliency. Chapter 1, "The…

  11. Spontaneous Biliteracy: Examining Latino Students' Untapped Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Luz Reyes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cultural deficit theories have long been debunked, yet Spanish continues to be treated as an impediment to Latinos' school success. With over 5 million emerging bilinguals, of which approximately 75% are Spanish speakers, Latinos' biliteracy potential should be examined as a means to support their learning. This article focuses on the spontaneous…

  12. Latinos Improve Food Habits through Nutrition Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Lucia L.; Sutherlin, Jeanette M.; Yoshida, Sallie C.; Murphy, Suzanne P.; Bresnick, Stuart D.

    1998-01-01

    The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, a federally funded nutrition education program in California, is undertaking to assess the needs of Latino clients and develop culturally appropriate tools to evaluate changes in food-related behaviors. Latino participants in Fresno County reported improvements in reducing fat intake, using fruits…

  13. Latino Veterans with PTSD: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, James O. E.

    2014-01-01

    Latinos have a long history of military service with recent service including combat conditions and multiple deployments, which are highly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Clinical acumen underscores the importance of culture in assessment and treatment, but there has been little scientific literature that investigates the unique needs of veteran Latinos with PTSD. The primary goal of this systematic review was to analyze the existing literature on Latino veterans with PTSD and to critically evaluate attention to cultural issues. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses were used to guide this review. Peer-reviewed, research reports written in English on Latino Veterans with PTSD since 1980 were included; 20 were assessment related, and nine were treatment related. All studies were quantitative. Only 13 studies mentioned culture as part of the context for Latino veterans, and only seven included cultural factors as part of the study design. Present findings highlight a lack of research focused on understanding cultural factors related to the assessment and treatment of Latino veterans with PTSD. Culturally-informed research on Latino veterans from current wars, Latina veterans and Latino veteran treatment outcomes are necessary to provide culturally-appropriate care to this growing veteran subgroup. PMID:25379284

  14. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Spirituality and Cultural Identification Among Latino and Non-Latino College Students

    PubMed Central

    Campesino, Maureen; Belyea, Michael; Schwartz, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine (a) differences in spiritual perspectives and practices of Latino and non-Latino young adults and (b) the cultural relevance of the Latino Spiritual Perspective Scale (LSPS). Studies indicate that spiritual perspectives are embedded within cultural group norms and vary significantly across ethnic groups. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a convenience sample of 223 Latino and non-Latino university students in the Southwestern United States. The Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), the LSPS, the Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were used. Latinos scored significantly higher than non-Latinos in both measures of spiritual perspectives. Self-reported behavioral measures, such as frequency of personal prayer, were also higher among the Latino group. Latino cultural identification was the only significant predictor of LSPS scores. Findings from this study indicate that spirituality among Latinos has meanings specific to the cultural group context. These findings have implications for nursing research involving the conceptualization and measurement of spirituality among multiethnic groups. Los propósitos de este estudio eran examinar: (a) diferencias en perspectivas espirituales y prácticas de jóvenes Latinos y no Latinos; y (b) la relevancia cultural de la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina. Estudios indican que perspectivas espirituales están incrustadas entre normas culturales del grupo y varían considerablemente entre grupos étnicos. Un diseño transversal y de encuesta fue utilizado con una muestra de conveniencia de 233 estudiantes universitarios Latinos y no Latinos en el Suroeste de los Estados Unidos. La Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual (EPE), la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina (EPEL), la Escala Ortogonal de Identificación Cultural, y un cuestionario demográfico fueron utilizados. Los Latinos calificaron considerablemente más alto que los

  17. Spirituality and Cultural Identification Among Latino and Non-Latino College Students.

    PubMed

    Campesino, Maureen; Belyea, Michael; Schwartz, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine (a) differences in spiritual perspectives and practices of Latino and non-Latino young adults and (b) the cultural relevance of the Latino Spiritual Perspective Scale (LSPS). Studies indicate that spiritual perspectives are embedded within cultural group norms and vary significantly across ethnic groups. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a convenience sample of 223 Latino and non-Latino university students in the Southwestern United States. The Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), the LSPS, the Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were used. Latinos scored significantly higher than non-Latinos in both measures of spiritual perspectives. Self-reported behavioral measures, such as frequency of personal prayer, were also higher among the Latino group. Latino cultural identification was the only significant predictor of LSPS scores. Findings from this study indicate that spirituality among Latinos has meanings specific to the cultural group context. These findings have implications for nursing research involving the conceptualization and measurement of spirituality among multiethnic groups.Los propósitos de este estudio eran examinar: (a) diferencias en perspectivas espirituales y prácticas de jóvenes Latinos y no Latinos; y (b) la relevancia cultural de la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina. Estudios indican que perspectivas espirituales están incrustadas entre normas culturales del grupo y varían considerablemente entre grupos étnicos. Un diseño transversal y de encuesta fue utilizado con una muestra de conveniencia de 233 estudiantes universitarios Latinos y no Latinos en el Suroeste de los Estados Unidos. La Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual (EPE), la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina (EPEL), la Escala Ortogonal de Identificación Cultural, y un cuestionario demográfico fueron utilizados. Los Latinos calificaron considerablemente más alto que los no

  18. Spirituality and Cultural Identification Among Latino and Non-Latino College Students.

    PubMed

    Campesino, Maureen; Belyea, Michael; Schwartz, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine (a) differences in spiritual perspectives and practices of Latino and non-Latino young adults and (b) the cultural relevance of the Latino Spiritual Perspective Scale (LSPS). Studies indicate that spiritual perspectives are embedded within cultural group norms and vary significantly across ethnic groups. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a convenience sample of 223 Latino and non-Latino university students in the Southwestern United States. The Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), the LSPS, the Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were used. Latinos scored significantly higher than non-Latinos in both measures of spiritual perspectives. Self-reported behavioral measures, such as frequency of personal prayer, were also higher among the Latino group. Latino cultural identification was the only significant predictor of LSPS scores. Findings from this study indicate that spirituality among Latinos has meanings specific to the cultural group context. These findings have implications for nursing research involving the conceptualization and measurement of spirituality among multiethnic groups.Los propósitos de este estudio eran examinar: (a) diferencias en perspectivas espirituales y prácticas de jóvenes Latinos y no Latinos; y (b) la relevancia cultural de la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina. Estudios indican que perspectivas espirituales están incrustadas entre normas culturales del grupo y varían considerablemente entre grupos étnicos. Un diseño transversal y de encuesta fue utilizado con una muestra de conveniencia de 233 estudiantes universitarios Latinos y no Latinos en el Suroeste de los Estados Unidos. La Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual (EPE), la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina (EPEL), la Escala Ortogonal de Identificación Cultural, y un cuestionario demográfico fueron utilizados. Los Latinos calificaron considerablemente más alto que los no

  19. Evaluation of a Community Health Worker Intervention to Reduce HIV/AIDS Stigma and Increase HIV Testing Among Underserved Latinos in the Southwestern U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Davida; Espinoza, Lilia; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena; Diaz, Gaby; Carricchi, Ana; Galvez, Gino; Garcia, Melawhy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Latinos are at an elevated risk for HIV infection. Continued HIV/AIDS stigma presents barriers to HIV testing and affects the quality of life of HIV-positive individuals, yet few interventions addressing HIV/AIDS stigma have been developed for Latinos. Methods An intervention led by community health workers (promotores de salud, or promotores) targeting underserved Latinos in three southwestern U.S. communities was developed to decrease HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV knowledge and perception of risk. The intervention was led by HIV-positive and HIV-affected (i.e., those who have, or have had, a close family member or friend with HIV/AIDS) promotores, who delivered interactive group-based educational sessions to groups of Latinos in Spanish and English. To decrease stigma and motivate behavioral and attitudinal change, the educational sessions emphasized positive Latino cultural values and community assets. The participant pool comprised 579 Latino adults recruited in El Paso, Texas (n=204); San Ysidro, California (n=175); and Los Angeles, California (n=200). Results From pretest to posttest, HIV/AIDS stigma scores decreased significantly (p<0.001). Significant increases were observed in HIV/AIDS knowledge (p<0.001), willingness to discuss HIV/AIDS with one's sexual partner (p<0.001), and HIV risk perception (p=0.006). Willingness to test for HIV in the three months following the intervention did not increase. Women demonstrated a greater reduction in HIV/AIDS stigma scores when compared with their male counterparts, which may have been related to a greater increase in HIV/AIDS knowledge scores (p=0.016 and p=0.007, respectively). Conclusion Promotores interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV-related knowledge, perception of risk, and willingness to discuss sexual risk with partners show promise in reaching underserved Latino communities. PMID:26327724

  20. Eyes - bulging

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting worse? What other symptoms do you have? A slit-lamp examination may be done. Blood testing for thyroid disease may be done. Treatments depend on the cause. Artificial tears may be given to lubricate the eye.

  1. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  2. Eye emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    Supervise children carefully. Teach them how to be safe. Always wear protective eye gear when: Using power tools, hammers, or other striking tools Working with toxic chemicals Cycling or when in windy and dusty ...

  3. Eye Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD Mar. 01, 2015 Eye allergies, called allergic conjunctivitis , are a common condition that occurs when the ... with tearing and burning. Unlike bacterial or viral conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis is not spread from person to ...

  4. Black Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aug 30, 2016 Toddlers Most at Risk of Chemical Burns to Eyes Aug 26, 2016 Firework Blinds Teenager, Severs Hand Jun 29, ... at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  5. Engaging Latino audiences in informal science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfield, Susan B.

    Environment for the Americas (EFTA), a non-profit organization, developed a four-year research project to establish a baseline for Latino participation and to identify practical tools that would enable educators to overcome barriers to Latino participation in informal science education (ISE). Its national scope and broad suite of governmental and non-governmental, Latino and non-Latino partners ensured that surveys and interviews conducted in Latino communities reflected the cosmopolitan nature of the factors that influence participation in ISE programs. Information about economic and education levels, country of origin, language, length of residence in the US, and perceptions of natural areas combined with existing demographic information at six study sites and one control site provided a broader understanding of Latino communities. The project team's ability to work effectively in these communities was strengthened by the involvement of native, Spanish-speaking Latino interns in the National Park Service's Park Flight Migratory Bird Program. The project also went beyond data gathering by identifying key measures to improve participation in ISE and implementing these measures at established informal science education programs, such as International Migratory Bird Day, to determine effectiveness. The goals of Engaging Latino Audiences in Informal Science Education (ISE) were to 1) identify and reduce the barriers to Latino participation in informal science education; 2) provide effective tools to assist educators in connecting Latino families with science education, and 3) broadly disseminate these tools to agencies and organizations challenged to engage this audience in informal science education (ISE). The results answer questions and provide solutions to a challenge experienced by parks, refuges, nature centers, and other informal science education sites across the US. Key findings from this research documented low participation rates in ISE by Latinos, and that

  6. Los Angeles County Parks and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by the Los Angeles County Parks and Recreation Rehabilitation Unit (California) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer,…

  7. African American Art: A Los Angeles Legacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Harriet

    This curriculum unit focuses on the importance of Los Angeles (California) as a center for African American art and shows how African American artists have developed their own styles and how critics and collectors have encouraged them. The unit consists of four lessons, each of which can stand alone or be used in conjunction with the others. It…

  8. Los Angeles Settles ACLU Suit on Layoffs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A settlement crafted last week seeking to curb the use of seniority as a factor in teacher layoffs in the Los Angeles school system could become one of the nation's most far-reaching overhauls of the "last hired, first fired" policies common in school districts. If approved by a judge, the settlement would shield up to 45 low-performing schools in…

  9. Small Business Among Koreans in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonacich, Edna; And Others

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the character of small business among Koreans in Los Angeles, to examine the means by which Koreans are able to enter small business in an economy which clearly is moving in the opposite direction, and to consider why it is that immigrant small business should flourish within monopoly capitalism. Korean…

  10. Determining Prevalence and Correlates of Elder Abuse Using Promotores: Low Income Immigrant Latinos Report High Rates of Abuse and Neglect

    PubMed Central

    DeLiema, Marguerite; Gassoumis, Zachary D.; Homeier, Diana C.; Wilber, Kathleen H.

    2012-01-01

    Low-income Latino immigrants are understudied in elder abuse research. Limited English proficiency, economic insecurity, neighborhood seclusion, a tradition of resolving conflicts within the family, and mistrust of authorities may impede survey research and suppress abuse reporting. To overcome these barriers, we recruited and trained promotores, local Spanish-speaking Latinos, to interview a sample of Latino adults age 66 and older residing in low-income communities. The promotores conducted door-to-door interviews in randomly selected census tracts in Los Angeles to assess the frequency of psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, financial exploitation, and caregiver neglect. Overall, 40.4% of Latino elders experienced some form of abuse and/or neglect within the previous year. Nearly 25% reported psychological abuse, 10.7% indicated physical assault, 9% reported sexual abuse, 16.7% indicated financial exploitation, and 11.7% were neglected by their caregivers. Younger age, higher education, and experiencing sexual or physical abuse before age 65 were significant risk factors for psychological, physical, and/or sexual abuse. Years lived in the United States, younger age, and prior abuse were associated with increased risk of financial exploitation. Years spent living in the U.S. was a significant risk factor for caregiver neglect. Abuse prevalence was much higher in all mistreatment domains than findings from previous research on community-dwelling elders, suggesting that low-income Latino immigrants are highly vulnerable to elder mistreatment, or that respondents are more willing to disclose abuse to promotores who represent their culture and community. PMID:22697790

  11. Building market share in the Latino Community.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul B; Elzey, Thomas J; Romagoza, Juan

    2002-05-01

    Within the next few years, the Latino community will become the largest cultural segment in the United States. Hospitals face many barriers in addressing the needs of the Latino community, including language, cultural influences, and perception of health care. Economics, demographics, and regulations dictate the need to take action, but concerns over costs, lack of skills, and negative attitudes create barriers to success. A unique partnership in Washington, D.C., between La Clinica de Pueblo, a grassroots clinic serving the Latino community, and Howard University Hospital offers insight into an effective strategy that hospitals can adopt to meet the needs of this community appropriately.

  12. The Environmental Health of Latino Children

    PubMed Central

    Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Zambrana, Ruth E.; Poppell, Carolyn F.; Logie, Laura A.; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Representing 1 in 6 children in the United States, Latino children incur disproportionate exposures to air pollutants, pesticides, and toxic industrial chemicals, as well as lead and mercury from candy, traditional folk remedies, religious practices, and other sources. Latino children also have higher rates of asthma, lead and mercury poisoning, behavioral and developmental disorders, and certain cancers. Concurrent exposure to multiple pollutants, pre-existing disease, poor nutrition, substandard housing, limited access to health care, and other factors related to their lower socioeconomic status increase Latino children's susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Targeted research, education, prevention and intervention efforts, and economic development initiatives are needed. PMID:17825728

  13. Homophobia and racism experienced by Latino men who have sex with men in the United States: correlates of exposure and associations with HIV risk behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuko; Borkowf, Craig; Millett, Gregorio A; Bingham, Trista; Ayala, George; Stueve, Ann

    2012-04-01

    Using cross-sectional data collected from 1081 Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited with respondent-driven sampling (RDS) techniques from Los Angeles and New York, we examined the extent to which Latino MSM reported exposure to social discrimination (i.e., experienced both homophobia and racism, homophobia only, racism only, or neither homophobia nor racism). More than 40% of respondents experienced both homophobia and racism in the past 12 months. Los Angeles participants, those with lower income, and those who reported being HIV-positive were more likely to report experiencing both types of social discrimination. Adjusting for potential confounders, men exposed to both homophobia and racism were more likely than men exposed to neither form of discrimination to report unprotected receptive anal intercourse with a casual sex partner (AOR = 1.92, 95% CI, 1.18-3.24) and binge drinking (AOR = 1.42, 95% CI, 1.02-1.98). Our findings suggest the presence of a syndemic of adverse social experiences and call for more intervention research to address both homophobia and racism experienced among Latino MSM in the United States.

  14. Eye tracker.

    PubMed

    Pruehsner, W; Enderle, J D

    1999-01-01

    A device that records saccadic eye movements, the Eye Tracker, is presented in this paper. The Eye Tracker utilizes infra-red technology mounted on fully adjustable goggles to follow eye movements targeted by either a goggles mounted HUD type display or a wall mounted light bank. Output from the goggles is remotely sent to a PC type computer, which leads to device portability. The goggles can also maintain output data in an internal memory for latter download. The user interface is Windows based with the output from the goggles represented as a trace map or plotted points. This output can also be saved or printed for future reference. The user interface can be used on any PC type computer. The device is designed with reference to standard ISO design methodology. Safety in design and final product usage has also been addressed with reference to standard ISO type procedures. Device accuracy is maintained by precise construction of the IR units in the goggles and tight control of cross talk between each IR device plus filtering of ambient light signals. Also, a reset feature is included to maintain equal baseline control. An automatic switching device is included in the goggles to allow the Eye Tracker to "warm up," assuring that equal IR power is delivered for each subject tested. The IR units in the goggles are also modular in case replacement is required. PMID:11143354

  15. Delicious Heart-Healthy Latino Recipes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chicken mixture is cooling, place the corn flour in a large mixing bowl and gradually stir ... cup egg substitute • 2 egg whites • 1 tablespoon flour 62 Delicious and Heart Healthy Latino Recipes Substitutos ...

  16. Engaging Latino audiences in informal science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfield, Susan B.

    Environment for the Americas (EFTA), a non-profit organization, developed a four-year research project to establish a baseline for Latino participation and to identify practical tools that would enable educators to overcome barriers to Latino participation in informal science education (ISE). Its national scope and broad suite of governmental and non-governmental, Latino and non-Latino partners ensured that surveys and interviews conducted in Latino communities reflected the cosmopolitan nature of the factors that influence participation in ISE programs. Information about economic and education levels, country of origin, language, length of residence in the US, and perceptions of natural areas combined with existing demographic information at six study sites and one control site provided a broader understanding of Latino communities. The project team's ability to work effectively in these communities was strengthened by the involvement of native, Spanish-speaking Latino interns in the National Park Service's Park Flight Migratory Bird Program. The project also went beyond data gathering by identifying key measures to improve participation in ISE and implementing these measures at established informal science education programs, such as International Migratory Bird Day, to determine effectiveness. The goals of Engaging Latino Audiences in Informal Science Education (ISE) were to 1) identify and reduce the barriers to Latino participation in informal science education; 2) provide effective tools to assist educators in connecting Latino families with science education, and 3) broadly disseminate these tools to agencies and organizations challenged to engage this audience in informal science education (ISE). The results answer questions and provide solutions to a challenge experienced by parks, refuges, nature centers, and other informal science education sites across the US. Key findings from this research documented low participation rates in ISE by Latinos, and that

  17. Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit: a community health worker program to prevent vision loss and blindness among people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ammary-Risch, Neyal J; Aguilar, Marcela; Goodman, Laura Saunders; Quiroz, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic eye disease is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States and disproportionately affects Hispanics/Latinos. This article provides an overview of the Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit, a culturally and linguistically appropriate resource designed for community health workers to educate people with diabetes about eye health complications. The toolkit provides science-based, easy-to-understand information that can be used to conduct interactive, educational sessions about diabetes and eye health, the importance of comprehensive dilated eye examinations at least once a year for people with diabetes, and other ways to prevent vision loss and blindness.

  18. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound wand (transducer) is placed against the front surface ...

  19. Googly Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Beverage take-out trays are funky in their form and function. In this article, the author describes how to make googly eye masks out of discarded take-out trays and other common recycled or discarded materials. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  20. Wolf Fire West of Los Angeles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph taken from the International Space Station on June 7, 2002, shows the Copper Fire burning in the hills outside Los Angeles. Astronauts use a variety of lenses and look angles as their orbits pass over wildfires to document the long-distance movements of smoke from the fires as well as details of the burning areas. This image clearly illustrates the difficult, rugged terrain that firefighters must face when fighting these wildland fires.

  1. Latino terminology: conceptual bases for standardized terminology.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes-Bautista, D E; Chapa, J

    1987-01-01

    Conceptually, the only element that all Latin American countries share is not language, race, or culture, but political: the presence of United States foreign policy as pronounced in the Monroe Doctrine in 1823. The political relation between the US and Latin America has colored US domestic policy toward its populations of Latin American origin. From the beginning of US-Latin American relations, there has been a constant confusion of race for national origin, compounded by the adoption of euphemistic terms such as "Spanish surname." The term "Latino", derived from "Latin American," is offered as the term that best reflects both the diverse national origins and the nearly unitary treatment of Latinos in the US. The term Latino is operationalized to include all persons of Latin American origin or descent, irrespective of language, race, or culture. Specifically excluded are individuals of Spanish national origin outside the Western Hemisphere. When a synthetic sample has been derived, the term should be modified to reflect the basis upon which the sample was derived, e.g., "Latino (Spanish surname)." When working with Latinos from a specific national origin, that should be noted, e.g., "Mexican origin Latinos." PMID:3789240

  2. The Visiting Nurse Association of Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    1987-10-01

    In short, the VNA of Los Angeles has a proud tradition. For almost 50 years, it has been providing needed health care and supportive services to the chronically ill and disabled in their own homes. Thanks to the efforts of all who made these traditions, the VNA also has a bright future. The VNA is a source of pride in California not only because of what it has accomplished but also because of what the good people of the VNA will be able to accomplish in the future. The VNA of Los Angeles is a valuable community resource whose services will be needed now more than ever before. The combination of demographics, consequences of the greying of America, the effects of the expected AIDS epidemic, and the evolution of new technology all point in the direction of home care. The VNA is already in the vanguard of what surely will become a national trend. Because of these contributions--past, present, and future--CARING is proud to salute the Visiting Nurse Association of Los Angeles.

  3. Tohoku Women's Hurdling Project: Science Angels (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuki, Kotoe; Watanabe, Mayuko

    2009-04-01

    Tohoku University was the first National University to admit three women students in Japan in 1913. To support the university's traditional ``open-door'' policy, various projects have been promoted throughout the university since its foundation. A government plan, the Third-Stage Basic Plan for Science and Technology, aims to increase the women scientist ratio up to 25% nationwide. In order to achieve this goal, the Tohoku Women's Hurdling Project, funded by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), was adopted in 2006. This project is threefold: support for child/family, improvement of facilities, and support for the next generation, which includes our Science Angels program. ``Science Angels'' are women PhD students appointed by the university president, with the mission to form a strong support system among each other and to become role-models to inspire younger students who want to become researchers. Currently, 50 women graduate students of the natural sciences are Science Angels and are encouraged to design and deliver lectures in their areas of specialty at their alma maters. Up to now, 12 lectures have been delivered and science events for children in our community have been held-all with great success.

  4. The SAFER Latinos Project: Addressing a Community Ecology Underlying Latino Youth Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D.; Collins, Elizabeth; Klevens, Joanne; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Ivonne; del Cid, Alex Taylor; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the intervention model, early implementation experience, and challenges for the "Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos" (SAFER) Latinos project. The SAFER Latinos project is an attempt to build the evidence for a multilevel participatory youth violence prevention model tailored to the specific circumstances of…

  5. Improving Diabetes Care in the Latino Population: The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotberg, Britt; Greene, Rachel; Ferez-Pinzon, Anyul M.; Mejia, Robert; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of diabetes in Latinos is 12.8% compared to 9.3% of the general population. Latinos suffer from a higher prevalence of diabetic complications and mortality than whites yet receive less monitoring tests and education. Purpose: (1) Identify changes in clinical indicators among subjects with type 2 diabetes participating in…

  6. Ocular screening adherence across Hispanic/Latino heritage groups with diabetes: results from the Ocular SOL ancillary to the Miami site of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, Stacey L; McClure, Laura A; Zheng, D Diane; Lam, Byron L; Arheart, Kristopher L; Joslin, Charlotte E; Talavera, Gregory A; Lee, David J

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of ocular screening adherence among select Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes. Research design and methods Data were obtained through an ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (Miami site). Participants included Hispanics/Latinos aged 40+ years who underwent a baseline examination/risk factor assessment (2008–2011) and then completed a survey on vision health/knowledge (conducted October 2011–September 2013; sample n=1235; diabetic subsample=264). The dependent variable was having a dilated eye examination within the past 12 months. Covariate candidate selection for entry into sequential multivariable logistic regression models was guided by Anderson's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations. Results Participants aged 65+ were more likely to have dilated eye examinations (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.22 to 5.60) compared with those aged 40–54 years. Participants less likely to have dilated examinations had a high school degree or general educational development (GED) (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.96, compared to no degree) and those currently uninsured or never insured ((OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.83) and (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.51)) compared to those currently insured. Participants who heard or saw something about eye health from two or more sources (eg, media outlets, doctor's office, relatives/friends) compared to those who reported no sources in the past 12 months were more likely to have a dilated eye examination (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.26 to 6.28). Conclusions Lack of health insurance is strongly associated with low screening uptake in Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes. Health promotion strategies stressing the importance of annual dilated eye examinations and increasing sources of information on eye health are other potential strategies to increase screening uptake in Hispanics/Latinos

  7. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  8. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  9. Why Do Eyes Water?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? Print ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  10. The Occupational Status of the Latino in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Jorge A.

    1978-01-01

    Latinos of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Spanish origin are described. Antecedents that may account for differences found in levels of educational attainment, occupational and employment status, and income among the subgroups of Latinos are also discussed. (Author)

  11. Business Angels - A Subspecies of the homo oeconomicus ludens.

    PubMed

    Hüsler, Laurenz; Platzer, Erich M

    2014-12-01

    Business Angels invest in start-up companies in their early stage. This type of investor usually has a good knowledge of the start-up's industry sector, and in addition to the funds he invests, his management experience and his network can be useful for start-ups. Business Angel involvement has shown to improve the success rate and the profitability of start-ups. The article depicts the relationship between entrepreneurs and Business Angels in four case examples. PMID:26508599

  12. Self-Reported HIV Antibody Testing among Latino Urban Day Laborers

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Maria Rosa; Galvan, Frank H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify the characteristics of male Latino urban day laborers who self-report having tested for HIV. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 356 Latino day laborers, aged 18 to 40 years, who had been sexually active in the previous 12 months, from six day labor sites in the City of Los Angeles. Results Most of the men were single, mainly from Mexico and Guatemala, and had been employed as a day laborer less than 3 years; 38% had an annual income of $4,000 or less. Ninety-two percent of the men reported having sex with women only and 8% reported a history of having sex with men and women. Forty-six percent had received an HIV test in the previous 12 months and one person tested positive. In univariate logistic regression analyses, day laborers who were 26 years of age or older, had more than 3 years in the United States, had more than 1 year but less than 5 years employed as a day laborer and had annual incomes greater than $4,000 were significantly more likely to self-report HIV testing in the previous 12 months. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, only higher annual income was found to be significantly associated with self-reported HIV testing. Discussion Interventions that target lower income Latino day laborers are needed to promote early HIV detection. HIV detection offers individual benefits through treatment, with decreased morbidity and mortality, as well as public health benefits through decreased rates of HIV transmission in the community. PMID:20070009

  13. Eye contricks

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Pictorial images are icons as well as eye-cons: they provide distillations of objects or ideas into simpler shapes. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimensions of depth and motion are missing from icons, and these alone introduce all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as exploring the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons can also be illusions—tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is physically presented. Pictorial images can be spatialised or stylised; spatialised images generally share some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons, but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional. Icons as stylised words and spatialised images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte in a series of pipe paintings, and this theme is here alluded to. Most of visual science is now concerned with icons—two-dimensional displays on computer monitors. Is vision now the science of eye-cons? PMID:23145240

  14. Anaglyph, Metro Los Angeles, Calif.: Malibu to Mount Baldy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount San Antonio (more commonly known as Mount Baldy) crowns the San Gabriel Mountains northeast of Los Angeles in this computer-generated east-northeast anaglyph perspective viewed from above the Malibu coastline. On the right, the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica are in the foreground. Further away are downtown Los Angeles and then the San Gabriel Valley, which lies adjacent to the mountain front. The San Fernando Valley appears in the left foreground, separated from the ocean by the Santa Monica Mountains. At 3,068 meters (10,064 feet) Mount Baldy rises above the tree line, exposing bright white rocks that are not snow capped in this early autumn scene.

    This anaglyph perspective (stereoscopic 3-D) view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and a Landsat 7 satellite image. Topographic expression is exaggerated one and one-half times. Two perspectives (from slightly differing geographic positions) were created, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a near horizontal view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, S.D.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour

  15. English-Speaking Latino Parents' Literacy Practices in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saenz, Terry Irvine; Felix, Denise M.

    2007-01-01

    This study surveyed the literacy practices of 45 English-speaking parents of Latino kindergarten through second graders using English questionnaires. The results of the survey were similar in many respects to other studies of English-speaking Latinos and unlike studies of Spanish-speaking Latinos. Respondents reported numbers of children's books…

  16. U.S. Latino Children: A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Sonia M.

    This report presents status and trend data in several areas relevant to Latino children in the United States. The Latino population under age 18 years is growing faster than that of any other racial and ethnic group, and the challenges confronting these children have implications for cities and states where they live. While Latino children are…

  17. Resilience in Vulnerable and At-Risk Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogro-Wilson, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information about the strengths of Latino families to provide a knowledge base for providers in order to utilize the natural resiliency of Latinos in their practice and interventions. This article will review the literature and the most prominent theoretical models on the resiliency of Latino families and…

  18. Latinos and Anglos: Cultural Experiences of Grief Intensity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Jo-Anne; Frantz, Thomas T.

    1993-01-01

    Examined grief intensity among 50 Latino and 50 Anglo Americans. Latinos grieving sudden death had significantly greater grief intensity than Latinos grieving expected death and Anglos grieving either sudden or expected death. Funeral attendance, time since death, closeness of relationships had no significant effect on grief intensity, nor did…

  19. "Not Blending In": Latino Students in a Predominantly White School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Sherry

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study on the experiences of a small but growing population of Latino students in a small-town secondary school. All teachers and administrators were surveyed regarding their impressions of Latino students. All students in the school (95% White, 5% Latino) were surveyed regarding their impressions of…

  20. Latino Familial Childhood Health Socialization: Theoretical and Applied Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilchez, Katherine A.; Tinsley, Barbara J.

    In an effort to compare the socialization of Latino and White children with regard to health, a study was undertaken of 94 Latino and White mothers, 75 Latino and White fathers, and their fourth-grade children attending Catholic schools in a mid-sized west coast city. A questionnaire was administered to the children, assessing their locus of…

  1. Assessing Diversity among Latinos: Results from the NLAAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarnaccia, Peter J.; Pincay, Igda Martinez; Alegria, Margarita; Shrout, Patrick E.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Canino, Glorisa

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a profile of a range of important variables for assessing diversity among different Latino groups from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS). The NLAAS is a nationally representative study of the mental health needs and mental health services use of the Latino population of the United States. The NLAAS employs…

  2. Rural Latino Resources: A National Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochin, Refugio I.; Marroquin, Emily

    This guide provides background information on rural Latinos and includes brief profiles of 98 social scientists, researchers, and educators that focus their work on the rural Latino population. The first section addresses the need to study the rural Latino population and discusses census data, distinctions between rural and urban Mexican…

  3. Changing the Faces of Mathematics: Perspectives on Latinos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secada, Walter G., Ed.; Ortiz-Franco, Luis, Ed.; Hernandez, Norma G., Ed.; De La Cruz, Yolanda, Ed.

    This book focuses on a number of salient research and practice issues in the teaching and learning of mathematics among the second largest minority group in the United States, Latinos. Chapters include: (1) "Understanding the Needs of Latino Students in Reform-Oriented Mathematics Classrooms" (Judit N. Moschkovich); (2) "Latinos, Income, and…

  4. Latino/a Student Misbehavior and School Punishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peguero, Anthony A.; Shekarkhar, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Although Latino/as are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. student population, Latino/a youth face a number of educational hurdles, such as disproportionate school punishment. This topic is particularly relevant today in the midst of the current social, political, and economic debate over the influence of Latino/a immigration in the US school…

  5. The Hazards of Changing Schools for California Latino Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumberger, Russell W.; Larson, Katherine A.; Palardy, Gregory J.; Ream, Robert K.; Schleicher, Nina C.

    1998-01-01

    This report examines student mobility among California Latino adolescents. Latinos are now the largest ethnic group in the California schools; if student mobility is indeed a problem for both students and schools, it is important to understand the consequences of changing schools for Latino adolescents. Longitudinal data were studied for two…

  6. Availability of commonly consumed and culturally specific fruits and vegetables in African-american and Latino neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S; Zenk, Shannon N; Odoms-Young, Angela; Ruggiero, Laurie; Moise, Imelda

    2010-05-01

    Although the importance of culture in shaping individual dietary behaviors is well-documented, cultural food preferences have received limited attention in research on the neighborhood food environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the availability of commonly consumed and culturally specific fruits and vegetables in retail food stores located in majority African-American and Latino neighborhoods in southwest Chicago, IL. A cross-sectional survey of 115 stores (15% grocery stores, 85% convenience/corner stores) in African-American neighborhoods and 110 stores (45% grocery stores, 55% convenience/corner stores) in Latino neighborhoods was conducted between May and August of 2006. chi(2) tests were used to assess differences in the availability (presence/absence) of commonly consumed (n=25) and culturally specific fruits and vegetables for African Americans (n=16 varieties) and Latinos (n=18 varieties). Stores located in neighborhoods in which the majority of residents were African American or Latino were more likely to carry fresh fruits and vegetables that were culturally relevant to the dominant group. For example, grocery stores located in Latino neighborhoods were more likely to carry chayote (82.0% vs 17.6%, P<0.05), whereas grocery stores located in African-American neighborhoods were more likely to carry black-eyed peas (52.9% vs 20%, P<0.05). Most stores, however, carried fewer than 50% of commonly consumed or culturally specific fruits and vegetables. Findings from this study highlight that limited availability of culturally specific as well as commonly consumed fruits and vegetables in the neighborhood may be a barrier to fruit and vegetable consumption among African Americans and Latinos.

  7. Space Radar Image of Los Angeles, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of Los Angeles, California, taken on October 2, 1994. Visible in the image are Long Beach Harbor at the bottom right (south corner of the image), Los Angeles International Airport at the bottom center, with Santa Monica just to the left of it and the Hollywood Hills to the left of Santa Monica. Also visible in the image are the freeway systems of Los Angeles, which appear as dark lines. The San Gabriel Mountains (center top) and the communities of San Fernando Valley, Simi Valley and Palmdale can be seen on the left-hand side. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit. The image is centered at 34 degrees north latitude, 118 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers by 52 kilometers (62 miles by 32 miles). This single-frequency SIR-C image was obtained by the L-band (24 cm) radar channel, horizontally transmitted and received. Portions of the Pacific Ocean visible in this image appear very dark as do freeways and other flat surfaces such as the airport runways. Mountains in the image are dark grey, with brighter patches on the mountain slopes, which face in the direction of the radar illumination (from the top of the image). Suburban areas, with the low-density housing and tree-lined streets that are typical of Los Angeles, appear as lighter grey. Areas with high-rise buildings, such as downtown Los Angeles, appear in very bright white, showing a higher density of housing and streets which run parallel to the radar flight track. Scientists hope to use radar image data from SIR-C/X-SAR to map fire scars in areas prone to brush fires, such as Los Angeles. In this image, the Altadena fire area is visible in the top center of the image as a patch of mountainous terrain which is slightly darker than the nearby mountains. Using all the radar frequency and polarization images provided by SIR

  8. 83. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING EAST/NORTHEAST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING EAST/NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 91. FAIRMONT RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST/NORTHWEST Los Angeles Aqueduct, From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. FAIRMONT RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST/NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Health Disparities in the Latino Population

    PubMed Central

    Vega, William A.; Rodriguez, Michael A.; Gruskin, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    In this review, the authors provide an approach to the study of health disparities in the US Latino population and evaluate the evidence, using mortality rates for discrete medical conditions and the total US population as a standard for comparison. They examine the demographic structure of the Latino population and how nativity, age, income, and education are related to observed patterns of health and mortality. A key issue discussed is how to interpret the superior mortality indices of Latino immigrants and the subsequent declining health status of later generations. Explanations for differences in mortality include selection, reverse selection, death record inconsistencies, inequalities in health status, transnational migration, social marginality, and adaptation to environmental conditions in the United States. The utility of the public health social inequality framework and the status syndrome for explaining Latino disparities is discussed. The authors examine excess mortality from 8 causes: diabetes, stomach cancer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, liver disease, homicide, and work-related injuries. The impact of intergenerational changes in health behavior within the Latino population and the contributory role of suboptimal health care are interpreted in the context of implications for future research, public health programs, and policies. PMID:19713270

  11. Health disparities in the Latino population.

    PubMed

    Vega, William A; Rodriguez, Michael A; Gruskin, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this review, the authors provide an approach to the study of health disparities in the US Latino population and evaluate the evidence, using mortality rates for discrete medical conditions and the total US population as a standard for comparison. They examine the demographic structure of the Latino population and how nativity, age, income, and education are related to observed patterns of health and mortality. A key issue discussed is how to interpret the superior mortality indices of Latino immigrants and the subsequent declining health status of later generations. Explanations for differences in mortality include selection, reverse selection, death record inconsistencies, inequalities in health status, transnational migration, social marginality, and adaptation to environmental conditions in the United States. The utility of the public health social inequality framework and the status syndrome for explaining Latino disparities is discussed. The authors examine excess mortality from 8 causes: diabetes, stomach cancer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, liver disease, homicide, and work-related injuries. The impact of intergenerational changes in health behavior within the Latino population and the contributory role of suboptimal health care are interpreted in the context of implications for future research, public health programs, and policies.

  12. A Genomewide Admixture Map for Latino Populations

    PubMed Central

    Price, Alkes L. ; Patterson, Nick ; Yu, Fuli ; Cox, David R. ; Waliszewska, Alicja ; McDonald, Gavin J. ; Tandon, Arti ; Schirmer, Christine ; Neubauer, Julie ; Bedoya, Gabriel ; Duque, Constanza ; Villegas, Alberto ; Bortolini, Maria Catira ; Salzano, Francisco M. ; Gallo, Carla ; Mazzotti, Guido ; Tello-Ruiz, Marcela ; Riba, Laura ; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A. ; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel ; Menjivar, Marta ; Klitz, William ; Henderson, Brian ; Haiman, Christopher A. ; Winkler, Cheryl ; Tusie-Luna, Teresa ; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés ; Reich, David 

    2007-01-01

    Admixture mapping is an economical and powerful approach for localizing disease genes in populations of recently mixed ancestry and has proven successful in African Americans. The method holds equal promise for Latinos, who typically inherit a mix of European, Native American, and African ancestry. However, admixture mapping in Latinos has not been practical because of the lack of a map of ancestry-informative markers validated in Native American and other populations. To address this, we screened multiple databases, containing millions of markers, to identify 4,186 markers that were putatively informative for determining the ancestry of chromosomal segments in Latino populations. We experimentally validated each of these markers in at least 232 new Latino, European, Native American, and African samples, and we selected a subset of 1,649 markers to form an admixture map. An advantage of our strategy is that we focused our map on markers distinguishing Native American from other ancestries and restricted it to markers with very similar frequencies in Europeans and Africans, which decreased the number of markers needed and minimized the possibility of false disease associations. We evaluated the effectiveness of our map for localizing disease genes in four Latino populations from both North and South America. PMID:17503322

  13. The Cultural Strengths of Latino Families: Firm Scaffolds for Children and Youth. New Journalism on Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Human Development (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Daily news reports portray Latinos--especially immigrant families--as suffering from a variety of problems. Latino men increasingly fill the prisons. Teenagers dropping from high schools. Young children entering kindergarten already behind. But newborns of Latino immigrants are remarkably healthy, and children display robust levels of social…

  14. Improving Achievement for the Growing Latino Population Is Critical to the Nation's Future. Student Achievement Policy Brief #3: Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kober, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    More than one-fifth of the nation's public school students are Latino. By 2025, the share of Latino children is projected to increase to nearly 3 in 10 school-age children (Fry & Passel, 2009). The fast-growing Latino student population will shape the nation's future, so it is critical that these students are well-prepared for college, careers,…

  15. Analytical description of lobster eye and similar multi-foil optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Vladimír.; Hudec, René; Barbera, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Analytical equations describing lobster eye optical parameters on dependence on its geometric parameters are presented. The paper partially gives review of main previously known results. At next, the paper gives new results discussing parameters, that were not included to previously published models but may be significant. The results are applicable for a Schmidt as well as for an Angel lobster eye and for some related multi-foil systems.

  16. Latino Immigrants’ Intentions to Seek Depression Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role that illness perceptions, attitudes toward depression treatments, and subjective norms played in Latino immigrants’ intentions to seek depression care. Ninety-five Latino immigrant patients were presented a vignette depicting an individual with major depression and interviewed about their intentions to seek care if confronted with a similar situation. Patients’ preferences were to rely on informal sources of care first, and then turn to formal sources to cope with depression. Findings showed Latinos immigrants’ help-seeking intentions for depression were a function of their views of depression, attitudes toward their doctors’ interpersonal skills, and social norms related to seeking professional care after controlling for demographics, health insurance status, acculturation, clinical characteristics, perceived barriers to care, and past service use. PMID:17535121

  17. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…

  18. Envisioning a Public Research Agenda in Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogelgesang, Lori J.; Gilliam, Franklin D., Jr.; O'Byrne, Kathy; Leal-Sotelo, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles is an institution founded on a public mission and positioned as a world-renowned research university. This article describes the successes, challenges and future directions of a concerted institutional effort to engage with the broader Los Angeles community to address pressing social issues and needs. The…

  19. Battle in Los Angeles: Conflict Escalates as Charter Schools Thrive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmire, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the 1990s and well into the new millennium, the massive Los Angeles Unified School District barely noticed the many charter schools that were springing up around the metropolis. But Los Angeles parents certainly took notice, and started enrolling their children. In 2008, five charter-management organizations announced plans to…

  20. NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES AETHALOMETER EC DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES AETHALOMETER EC DATA Project Title:  NARSTO Discipline:  ... Carbonaceous Aerosols Particulate Matter Order Data:  ASDC Order Tool:   Order Data Guide Documents:  ... Earth Related Data:  Environmental Protection Agency Supersites Los Angeles, California SCAR-B ...

  1. NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES TEOM PM25 DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS LOS ANGELES TEOM PM25 DATA Project Title:  NARSTO Discipline:  ... Particulate Matter Mass Concentration Order Data:  ASDC Order Tool:   Order Data Guide Documents:  ... Earth Related Data:  Environmental Protection Agency Supersites Los Angeles, California SCAR-B ...

  2. Los Angeles Tries Luring Back Dropouts via Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports that education leaders in Los Angeles, faced with unrelenting pressure to raise anemic high school graduation rates, are turning to YouTube, MySpace, text messaging, and the radio waves to reach students at risk of dropping out of school and lure back thousands who have already left. The Los Angeles Unified School…

  3. Korean Language Maintenance in Los Angeles. Professional Papers K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kenneth Kong-On; And Others

    Characteristics of the Korean population in Los Angeles, intergenerational cultural problems, and efforts to promote language maintenance are described. The majority of Koreans in Los Angeles have been in the United States less than 10 years. A high percentage are from middle class and professional backgrounds. The traditional hierarchical family…

  4. Los Angeles Trade-Technical College Assessment Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Trade-Technical Coll., CA.

    This assessment report concerns the Los Angeles Trade-Technical College and the information, which is reported to the Los Angeles Community College District. The data was gathered through interviews conducted by an outside company. The report summarizes what interviewers learned about Trade-Tech's past and present and offers recommendations to…

  5. The Politics of School Desegregation in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart-Nibbrig, Nand E.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the influences that city and State politics have on school desegregation in Los Angeles. Asserts that the Los Angeles desegregation plan reflects the influence and power of the city's westside by providing an escape from its provisions of mandatory busing while meeting the school district's desegregation guidelines. (Author/GC)

  6. Glitches in Los Angeles Payroll System Spark Furor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Thousands of Los Angeles teachers have not been paid properly for months because of errors in a corporate-style payroll system that was introduced in January as part of a sweeping, $95 million computer modernization. The Los Angeles Unified School District acknowledges that the payroll system's rollout was rushed and tainted by numerous…

  7. A Study of Unincorporated East Los Angeles. Monograph No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macias, Reynaldo F.; And Others

    The aim of this study was to collect data and printed materials on and from unincorporated East Los Angeles and contiguous, predominantly Chicano neighborhoods to help determine the feasibility and/or desirability of incorporation of any or all of East Los Angeles. Information is given on: (1) incorporation procedures; (2) the past incorporation…

  8. Church, place, and crime: Latinos and homicide in new destinations.

    PubMed

    Shihadeh, Edward S; Winters, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Latinos are moving beyond traditional areas and settling in new, potentially disorganized destinations. Without an established immigrant community, new destinations appear to rely more on the local religious ecology to regulate community life and to keep crime low. We examine the link between religious ecology and Latino homicide victimization for traditional and new destination counties. We observe four findings. (1) A Catholic presence has no effect on Latino violence in the old and well-organized traditional settlement areas. But in new Latino settlement areas, a Catholic presence substantially lowers violence against Latinos. In contrast, mainline Protestantism is linked to high levels of violence against Latinos in new destinations. (2) Previous claims that Latino communities are safe do not apply to new destinations, where Latinos are murdered at a high rate. (3) Previous claims that areas with high Latino immigration are safe for Latinos are not true for new destinations. (4) New Latino destinations offer little insulation from the effects of economic deprivation on violence. We discuss the implications of the findings.

  9. Ecological simulation model of Los Angeles Harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, James N.; Kremer, Patricia

    1983-05-01

    A quasi-steady state numerical ecosystem model was designed to help evaluate the potential impact of various scenarios of effluent treatment and of a landfill on the distribution of phytoplankton and inorganic nutrients in Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors Formulations included (a) tidal circulation, (b) phytoplankton growth and oxygen production as a function of temperature, light, and nutrients, (c) grazing by zooplankton, (d) respiration and nutrient regeneration by the benthos, (e) biochemical oxidation of organics, and (f) nitrification Phytoplankton nitrogen, ammonium, nitrate, and oxygen were the state variables, which were simulated with diel and spatial variability for a range of seasonal conditions. Physical circulation was indicated to be a primary factor governing the distribution of state variables, and the landfill resulted in significant alterations. Simulated phytoplankton stocks approximated the upper range of reported concentrations, indicating a satisfactory prediction of bloom conditions. The model indicated that while light may usually regulate maximum phytoplankton levels, under bloom conditions nutrient limitation may also be important Most of the outer Los Angeles Harbor was affected by the effluent, as shown by comparison to the case with zero input Simulations for secondary versus primary treatment converged a short distance from the outfall in response to high BOD oxidation rates. In general, total phytoplankton crop was not greatly affected by the change from primary to secondary treatment, and predation on phytoplankton was small

  10. Same and Different: Latino College Students' Perceptions of Themselves and Others on Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, most Latino college students preferred the term "Hispanic" over "Latino" as a panethnic term. These Latino students also detailed their differences based on how they perceive other specific Latino ethnic groups, non-Latino groups, their political identity, and their immigration and citizenship status. (Contains 1 table and 1 note.)

  11. Depressive Symptoms Among Immigrant Latino Sexual Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Martinez, Omar; Song, Eun-Young; Daniel, Jason; Alonzo, Jorge; Eng, Eugenia; Duck, Stacy; Downs, Mario; Bloom, Fred R.; Allen, Alex Boeving; Miller, Cindy; Reboussin, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of depressive symptoms among immigrant Latino sexual minorities. Methods Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms, and univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify correlates of depressive symptoms. Results Unweighted and RDS-weighted prevalence estimates of depressive symptoms were 69.2% and 74.8%, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, low social support, sexual compulsivity, and high self-esteem were significantly associated with increased depressive symptoms. Conclusions A need exists for culturally congruent mental health services for immigrant Latino sexual minorities in the southern United States. PMID:23985187

  12. Believing... Achieving: Hispanic Latino & Deaf = Creer... Conseguir: Hispano Latino y Sordo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cate, Tammy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This booklet tells the success stories of a group of diverse individuals who are Hispanic/Latino and deaf or hard of hearing. Parallel translation is provided in English and Spanish. [This paper was translated by Coral Getino.

  13. The Los Angeles Riots Revisited: The Changing Face of the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Challenge for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Donna M.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), including an analysis of the demographic shifts and the tensions between the African American and Korean American communities at the time of the Los Angeles riots in 1992. The article includes my own experiences teaching high school English during the…

  14. Too Latino and Not Latino Enough: The Role of Ethnicity-Related Stressors on Latino College Students' Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojeda, Lizette; Navarro, Rachel L.; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Arbona, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between demographics (generation status, age, gender, education level) and ethnicity-related stressors, namely, perceived discrimination, stereotype confirmation concern, and own-group conformity pressure, and the life satisfaction of 115 Latino college students was examined. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated…

  15. Billie's eyes.

    PubMed

    Dunning, S E

    1993-03-01

    The author, a nurse, is personally opposed to abortion; however, her earlier encounter with a victim of an illegal abortion has prevented her from joining campaigns to reinstate bans on abortion rights. The woman, "Billie," presented to an inner-city Chicago hospital in 1970 with hemorrhaging. She had delayed going for treatment because she feared being imprisoned for having obtained an abortion. She rapidly entered septic shock, with hypotension, confusion, and hallucinations. Physicians removed her infected uterus and ovaries. Subsequent kidney failure necessitated the transfer of this young woman to another hospital where she could receive dialysis. The author was unable to obtain follow-up information on whether Billie survived. She remains haunted by the memory of Billie's wide, frightened eyes as she was placed in the ambulance. It is this memory, and the knowledge that desperate women like Billie will find someone, somewhere to perform an illegal abortion, that is behind the author's reluctant support for the right to choose.

  16. Finding an Eye Care Professional

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information > Finding an Eye Care Professional Finding an Eye Care Professional Finding an Eye Care Professional PDF* The National Eye Institute does not provide referrals or recommend specific ...

  17. Correlates of 1-year incidence of urinary incontinence in older Latino adults enrolled in a community-based physical activity trial.

    PubMed

    Morrisroe, Shelby N; Rodriguez, Larissa V; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Smith, Ariana L; Trejo, Laura; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) among older urban Latinos is high. Insight into etiologies of and contributing factors to the development of this condition is needed. This longitudinal cohort study identified correlates of 1-year incidence of UI in older community-dwelling Latino adults participating in a senior center-based physical activity trial in Los Angeles, California. Three hundred twenty-eight Latinos aged 60 to 93 participating in Caminemos, a randomized trial to increase walking, were studied. Participants completed an in-person survey and physical performance measures at baseline and 1 year. UI was measured using the International Consultation on Incontinence item: "How often do you leak urine?" Potential correlates of 1-year incidence of UI included sociodemographic, behavioral, medical, physical, and psychosocial characteristics. The overall incidence of UI at 1 year was 17.4%. Incident UI was associated with age, baseline activity of daily living impairment, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), mean steps per day, and depressive symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that improvement in physical performance score (odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.50-0.95) and high baseline physical (OR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.40-0.89) and mental (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.43-0.91) HRQoL were independently associated with lower rates of 1-year incident UI. An increase in depressive symptoms at 1 year (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.02-19.68) was independently associated with a higher rate of incident UI. One-year UI incidence in this population of older urban Latino adults participating in a walking trial was high but was lower in those who improved their physical performance. Interventions aimed at improving physical performance may help prevent UI in older Latino adults.

  18. National Eye Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... vision science and eye health fun with videos, optical illusions, and more. View the site Request for ... español NEI FAQs Eye Health Resources Studies, print materials and more. National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) ...

  19. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  20. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  1. Fluorescent eye test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fluorescent eye test is useful in determining if there is a scratch or other problem with the surface ... has thoroughly covered the eye a cobalt blue light is then directed on the eye. The light ...

  2. Training Materials Developed for Latino Entrepreneurs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreo, Christina; Miller, Wayne; Farmer, Frank; Moon, Zola; McCullough, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the materials and training program that Extension created to assist current and potential Latino immigrant entrepreneurs in starting businesses in Arkansas. The content-based educational materials describe the process for starting a new business, government regulatory requirements, start-up costs and considerations, and how…

  3. Celebratory Socialization: Welcoming Latino Students to College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laden, Berta Vigil

    This paper describes the Puente Project, a program developed to provide support services to Latino students attending California community colleges. A discussion of the organizational response to students of color and of organizational socialization practices is followed by a description of the development of the Puente Project. The project's…

  4. The Latino Student's Guide to College Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valverde, Leonard A., Ed.

    This book aims to assist Latinos who are thinking about going to college. The book is divided into four parts and is organized by steps. Part 1 discusses preparing for college. Steps identify 10 new ways of thinking to get ready psychologically for the SAT or ACT exams and college itself; provide forms, tips, and a sample letter to assist in…

  5. The Latino Experience in Central Falls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Central Falls is, by far, the poorest community in Rhode Island. More than 40 percent of the children under 18 live in poverty, and 40 percent of that group live in severe poverty. At Central Falls High School, low-income Latino students have fallen behind their white counterparts, with shockingly low graduation, poor literacy, and low…

  6. Computer Use, Parental Expectations, & Latino Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taningco, Maria Teresa V.; Pachon, Harry P.

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, traditionally underrepresented minority children have lower levels of academic achievement than their white counterparts. In the broadest perspective, this quantitative study seeks to help stakeholders and policymakers understand the factors responsible for Hispanic or Latino student achievement relative to that of comparison…

  7. Counseling Latinos with Substance Abuse Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Rivera, Edil; Wilbur, Michael P.; Phan, Loan T.; Maddux, Cleborne D.; Roberts-Wilbur, Janice

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a combination of approaches based on multicultural interventions and sociopolitical themes that provide interventions for working with Latinos with substance abuse problems. The purpose of the article is to view multimodal interventions, multicultural approaches, and humanistic counseling from a genetic perspective. It is…

  8. Brief Articles for Latino Parents, 1999 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, Charleston, WV.

    This packet contains six briefs developed specifically for Spanish-speaking Latino parents, and English translations of the briefs. These briefs state what researchers and practitioners have learned about various ways parents can help their children do well in school. Earlier editions of brief articles for parents have been used in various ways by…

  9. Latinos and Education: A Critical Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darder, Antonia, Ed.; And Others

    Latinos are among the nation's most educationally disadvantaged and economically disenfranchised groups. Addressing this reality within the context of a rapidly changing economy and society, this book links educational practice and the structural dimensions that shape institutional life. Sections focus on the political economy of schooling,…

  10. Latino Movement: A Target for Harassment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Members of the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MEChA), which translates to Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, report that their movement is being targeted by school administrators across the country due to its demands for Chicano/Latino studies programs and protests against anti-immigration and anti-affirmative action movements.…

  11. Changing Political Landscapes for Latinos in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casellas, Jason P.; Ibarra, Joanne D.

    2012-01-01

    The increased demographic presence of Latino individuals has gradually resulted in growing political influence and representation. This growing presence and influence has altered the American political landscape, drawing sudden attention among scholars, the media, and political pundits. This article investigates four aspects of the growing…

  12. Bringing Together Latino Children and Their Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachter, Jaqueline

    In order to acquaint teachers with the range of children's literature about Latino culture, this paper describes works of writers from both the United States and Latin America. The materials described, written in English or Spanish, range from fiction and nonfiction to filmstrips and magazines. A list of 50 books, magazines, and nonprint materials…

  13. Basta Ya! Latino Parents Fighting Entrenched Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Zulmara; Necochea, Juan

    2001-01-01

    In response to their children being turned away from the bilingual school, a group of Latino parents organized to pressure the Lompoc (California) Unified School District to guarantee educational equity. A systemic analysis of components leading to parental activism focuses on leadership, knowledge as power, cultural conflicts, anti-immigrant…

  14. How Elite Universities Fail Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavans, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    The US Census Bureau reveals that although there are more than 41.3 million Latinos in the US as on 2004--about 14 percent of the population, only a very small percentage of them attend the country's elite colleges. A large part of the problem is that, like most of the nation, elite colleges and universities have little awareness of the…

  15. Acculturation Tendencies in a Border Latino Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Robert; Vincent, Vern; Wang, Lin; Villas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify variables distinguishing more acculturated versus less acculturated Latinos residing near the United States-Mexico border. The study sample consisted of 438 participants ranging in age from 20 to 68 years. Data were gathered through a self-report survey instrument composed of items assessing acculturation,…

  16. Social Disorganization in New Latino Destinations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Martha; Lichter, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    Rural industrial restructuring, including growth in meat processing and other nondurable manufacturing, has generated employment opportunities that have attracted Latino in migrants to new nonmetropolitan destinations. Long-time residents, however, are not always receptive. While some observers point to economic and social benefits of a Latino…

  17. U.S. Latino Audiences of "Telenovelas."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Diana I.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with Latinos in the Northeast and the Southwest found that they watched Spanish-language soap operas (telenovelas) as a way of maintaining family ties and Hispanic culture, while watching American soap operas provided information about U.S. society and behavioral norms as well as opportunities to learn English. (Contains 21 references.)…

  18. An Annotated Bibliography of Latino Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Paul; Cabrera, Alberto; Swail, Watson Scott

    2007-01-01

    This bibliography lists and provides annotations for 59 recent research studies on a variety of Latino educational issues. Descriptions of the focus of each item, as well as implications for policy and practice are provided. Items range in publication date from 1993 to 2007. [This document was compiled by the Educational Policy Institute in…

  19. Smog chamber simulation of Los Angeles pollutant transport

    SciTech Connect

    Glasson, W.A.

    1981-06-01

    A smog chamber study simulated pollutant transport from Los Angeles to downwind areas by irradiating a typical Los Angeles hydrocarbon/nitrogen oxides mixture for extended periods of time. Smog chamber experiments were extended to 22 hr to obtain an integrated light intensity equal to that which occurs in this city. Results show that downwind oxidant levels are only slightly affected by large changes in emissions of nitrogen oxides. However, it is clear that reduced emissions will lead to an increase in oxidant in downtown Los Angeles. (6 graphs, 9 references, 1 table)

  20. A comparative analysis of homosexual behaviors, sex role preferences, and anal sex proclivities in Latino and non-Latino men.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, William L

    2009-10-01

    Machismo prescribes that homosexual encounters among Latino men are conducted along highly gendered lines: men tend to be anally insertive or receptive over the lifecourse, but not both. Some have argued that Latino men have more lifecourse homosexual behaviors in comparison to other racial/ethnic groups. This is often due to the perception that Latin America has quasi-institutionalized homosexuality, which sharply contrasts it with the United States. Although scholars suggest that sex role preferences and greater likelihoods for homosexual behaviors exist among Latino men in the United States, limited empirical data validate these claims. Latino/non-Latino differences in male homosexual behaviors and sex role preferences were analyzed by using the 2002 cycle of the National Survey of Family Growth, a nationally representative, probability sample of 4,928 men. Findings revealed that non-Mexican Latino, but not Mexican, men had increased likelihoods of ever having anal sex than non-Latino Whites and oral sex than non-Latino Blacks. These relationships remained after controlling for age, education, and foreign birth. Latino men preferred insertive or receptive sex in comparison to non-Latino Blacks and Whites, but this difference disappeared after education was controlled. In full and reduced models, Mexican men tended to be orifice-specific (oral or anal), while non-Mexican Latinos were more oriented to both oral and anal sex. Controlling for other factors, all Latinos were more likely than non-Latino Blacks and Whites to refuse to answer male homosexual behavior questions. The implications of race/ethnicity are discussed for homosexual behavior patterns among U.S. men.

  1. Latino Male Ethnic Subgroups: Patterns in College Enrollment and Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponjuan, Luis; Palomin, Leticia; Calise, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Latino male ethnic subgroups and their college enrollment and degree completion patterns. The chapter also offers recommendations to improve Latino male ethnic subgroups' educational achievement.

  2. Sexual health knowledge of male and female Latino immigrants.

    PubMed

    Seal, Paula S; Garcés-Palacio, Isabel C; Halanych, Jewell H; Scarinci, Isabel C

    2012-08-01

    To explore sexual health knowledge among Latino immigrants in a Southern U.S. city, we conducted 20 qualitative interviews, (10 Women and 10 Men). We explored knowledge and factors associated with sexual health among male and female Latino immigrants in a Southern U.S. city experiencing a major growth of Latino immigrants in the past 10 years. Both genders demonstrated limited knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and risks of sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition. Neither gender perceived that they could have an asymptomatic STI, including HPV. Gender differences exist in sexual behaviors and perceptions of STI risk. Females indicated that female Latinas tend to have older sexual initiation age, fewer lifetime sexual partners and more pro-active sexual health than did Latinos when referring to Latino males. Consequently, male and female Latino immigrants could benefit from culturally relevant programs to alleviate STI disparities.

  3. Overcoming Barriers: Tailoring Climate Education for Latino and non-Latino Citizen to Impact Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, M.; Boudrias, M. A.; Silva-Send, N. J.; Gershunov, A.; Anders, S.

    2013-12-01

    Culture has been shown to be an important determinant of Latino/Hispanic American environmental attitudes (Schultz, Unipan, & Gamba, 2000), which might help to explain the underrepresentation of Latinos in the U.S. 'environmental' movement. With shifting U.S. demographics, however, there is increased urgency to understand how Latinos integrate into the community that is concerned and literate about climate change. As part of the Climate Education Partners (CEP) work in San Diego, we investigated how to address this ethnic group disparity. In this paper, we describe a study of how climate change science knowledge relates to Latino and Non-Latino citizen (a) engagement in conservation behaviors and (b) more informed decision-making. Drawing upon previous work on the Tripartite Integration Model of Social Influence (TIMSI) (Estrada et al., 2011), we hypothesized that climate change knowledge that promotes efficacy (i.e., a sense that one can do something) would relate to greater engagement in conservation behaviors and more informed decision-making (both common of community members concerned about climate change). To test this model, 1001 San Diego residence participated in a telephone survey in which the attitudes towards climate change were assessed using '6 Americas' segmentation (Leiserowitz et al., 2011), in addition to climate change science knowledge, efficacy, values, and engagement in weekly and yearly climate change friendly behaviors (e.g., conservation, transportation, community engagement behaviors). Results showed that there were significant differences in the 6 America segmentation distributions, knowledge, efficacy and behavioral engagement with Latinos significantly more concerned than Non-Latinos, and reporting greater knowledge, efficacy and engagement in behaviors. However, data from both groups showed support for the TIMSI theoretical framework, such that efficacy mediated the relationship between climate change knowledge and behavior. Thus, for

  4. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  5. Hangar no. 2 detail view of SW corner. Note angel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 detail view of SW corner. Note angel of roof. Note door stops. Looking E. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  6. 78 FR 68135 - Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... Podesta, California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), 100 S. Main Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, telephone (213) 897-0309 and tami_podesta@dot.ca.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Effective July 1,...

  7. Yellow steam and electrical pipes across from Bright Angel Lodge. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Yellow steam and electrical pipes across from Bright Angel Lodge. Note control valve to right of control box, view E. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  8. Perspective of Bright Angel stone vault, view south, with HAER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective of Bright Angel stone vault, view south, with HAER field team measuring (Michael Lee and Dominic Duran foreground, Christopher Marston rear). - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  9. Bright Angel stone vault, with HAER field team members Dominic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bright Angel stone vault, with HAER field team members Dominic Duran, Christopher Marston, and Michael Lee (l to r). - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  10. South and west elevations of Bright Angel boiler house. Red ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South and west elevations of Bright Angel boiler house. Red Horse log cabin visible in background. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  11. 27. VIEW OF CAPE ROYAL ROAD FROM ANGEL'S WINDOW, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF CAPE ROYAL ROAD FROM ANGEL'S WINDOW, FACING NNW. TURNOUT PICTURED IN PHOTO AZ-40-22 IS VISIBLE IN GAP OF CLIFF. - Cape Royal Road, Between North Entrance Road & Cape Royal, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  12. 22. ANGEL'S WINDOW TURNOUT ON CAPE ROYAL ROAD, FACING NNE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. ANGEL'S WINDOW TURNOUT ON CAPE ROYAL ROAD, FACING NNE. WHITE VAN IS APPROXIMATE CAMERA POSITION FOR PHOTO AZ-40-21. - Cape Royal Road, Between North Entrance Road & Cape Royal, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  13. Final Ferry Takes SCA-Endeavour Over Los Angeles

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space shuttle Endeavour atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft overflew many landmarks in Los Angeles to conclude its final ferry flight into history on Sept. 21, 2012. Among highlights in this video...

  14. Eating for Your Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stastny, Sherri Nordstrom; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    An educational program targeting older adults was developed to increase knowledge regarding nutrition and eye health. With age, the chance for eye disease increases, so prevention is critical. The Eating for Your Eyes program has promoted behavior changes regarding eye health among the participants. This program is easily replicated and use is…

  15. Latino populations: a unique opportunity for epidemiological research of asthma.

    PubMed

    Salari, Keyan; Burchard, Esteban González

    2007-11-01

    Asthma is a significant health problem among Latinos, the largest minority population in the US. Asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality are highest in Puerto Ricans, intermediate in Dominicans and Cubans, and lowest in Mexicans and Central Americans. From a cultural and social perspective, Latinos represent a wide variety of national origins and ethnic and cultural groups, with a full spectrum of social class. From a genetic perspective, Latinos have descended from Native American, European and African populations. Here, we review results from recent genetic and clinical studies to illustrate the unique opportunity Latino groups offer for studying the interaction between racial, genetic and environmental contributions to asthma and drug responsiveness. PMID:17935571

  16. Is there a legacy of the U.S. Public Health Syphilis Study at Tuskegee in HIV/AIDS-related beliefs among heterosexual African-Americans and Latinos?

    PubMed

    Mays, Vickie M; Coles, Courtney N; Cochran, Susan D

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the US Public Health Syphilis Study at Tuskegee is sometime cited as a principal reason for the relatively low participation rates seen among racial/ethnic minorities, particularly African Americans, in biomedical research. However, only a few studies have actually explored this possibility. We use data from a random digit dial telephone survey of 510 African-Americans and 253 Latinos, age 18 to 45 years, to investigate associations between knowledge of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee and endorsement of HIV/AIDS conspiracy theories. All respondents were drawn from an area of low-income, predominantly race-segregated inner city households in Los Angeles. Results indicate that African Americans were significantly more likely than Latinos to endorse HIV/AIDS conspiracy theories. Further, African Americans were more aware of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee (SST). Nevertheless, 72% of African Americans and 94% of Latinos reported that they have never heard of the Syphilis Study at Tuskegee. Further, while awareness of the Syphilis Study at Tuskegee was a significant predictor of endorsing HIV/AIDS conspiracy theories, results suggest that other factors may be more important in accounting for low biomedical and behavioral study participation rates. PMID:23308036

  17. Effects of a Pilot Church-Based Intervention to Reduce HIV Stigma and Promote HIV Testing Among African Americans and Latinos.

    PubMed

    Derose, Kathryn P; Griffin, Beth Ann; Kanouse, David E; Bogart, Laura M; Williams, Malcolm V; Haas, Ann C; Flórez, Karen R; Collins, Deborah Owens; Hawes-Dawson, Jennifer; Mata, Michael A; Oden, Clyde W; Stucky, Brian D

    2016-08-01

    HIV-related stigma and mistrust contribute to HIV disparities. Addressing stigma with faith partners may be effective, but few church-based stigma reduction interventions have been tested. We implemented a pilot intervention with 3 Latino and 2 African American churches (4 in matched pairs) in high HIV prevalence areas of Los Angeles County to reduce HIV stigma and mistrust and increase HIV testing. The intervention included HIV education and peer leader workshops, pastor-delivered sermons on HIV with imagined contact scenarios, and HIV testing events. We surveyed congregants at baseline and 6 month follow-up (n = 1235) and found statistically significant (p < 0.05) reductions in HIV stigma and mistrust in the Latino intervention churches but not in the African American intervention church nor overall across matched African American and Latino pairs. However, within matched pairs, intervention churches had much higher rates of HIV testing (p < 0.001). Stigma reduction and HIV testing may have synergistic effects in community settings.

  18. Anticipatory effects of intonation: Eye movements during instructed visual search.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiwako; Speer, Shari R

    2008-02-01

    Three eye-tracking experiments investigated the role of pitch accents during online discourse comprehension. Participants faced a grid with ornaments, and followed pre-recorded instructions such as "Next, hang the blue ball" to decorate holiday trees. Experiment 1 demonstrated a processing advantage for felicitous as compared to infelicitous uses of L+H* on the adjective noun pair (e.g. blue ball followed by GREEN ball vs. green BALL). Experiment 2 confirmed that L+H* on a contrastive adjective led to 'anticipatory' fixations, and demonstrated a "garden path" effect for infelicitous L+H* in sequences with no discourse contrast (e.g. blue angel followed by GREEN ball resulted in erroneous fixations to the cell of angels). Experiment 3 examined listeners' sensitivity to coherence between pitch accents assigned to discourse markers such as 'And then,' and those assigned to the target object noun phrase.

  19. Anticipatory effects of intonation: Eye movements during instructed visual search.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiwako; Speer, Shari R

    2008-02-01

    Three eye-tracking experiments investigated the role of pitch accents during online discourse comprehension. Participants faced a grid with ornaments, and followed pre-recorded instructions such as "Next, hang the blue ball" to decorate holiday trees. Experiment 1 demonstrated a processing advantage for felicitous as compared to infelicitous uses of L+H* on the adjective noun pair (e.g. blue ball followed by GREEN ball vs. green BALL). Experiment 2 confirmed that L+H* on a contrastive adjective led to 'anticipatory' fixations, and demonstrated a "garden path" effect for infelicitous L+H* in sequences with no discourse contrast (e.g. blue angel followed by GREEN ball resulted in erroneous fixations to the cell of angels). Experiment 3 examined listeners' sensitivity to coherence between pitch accents assigned to discourse markers such as 'And then,' and those assigned to the target object noun phrase. PMID:19190719

  20. Anticipatory effects of intonation: Eye movements during instructed visual search

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kiwako; Speer, Shari R

    2007-01-01

    Three eye-tracking experiments investigated the role of pitch accents during online discourse comprehension. Participants faced a grid with ornaments, and followed pre-recorded instructions such as “Next, hang the blue ball” to decorate holiday trees. Experiment 1 demonstrated a processing advantage for felicitous as compared to infelicitous uses of L+H* on the adjective noun pair (e.g. blue ball followed by GREEN ball vs. green BALL). Experiment 2 confirmed that L+H* on a contrastive adjective led to ‘anticipatory’ fixations, and demonstrated a “garden path” effect for infelicitous L+H* in sequences with no discourse contrast (e.g. blue angel followed by GREEN ball resulted in erroneous fixations to the cell of angels). Experiment 3 examined listeners’ sensitivity to coherence between pitch accents assigned to discourse markers such as ‘And then,’ and those assigned to the target object noun phrase. PMID:19190719

  1. Latino residential segregation and self-rated health among Latinos: Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Plascak, Jesse J; Molina, Yamile; Wu-Georges, Samantha; Idris, Ayah; Thompson, Beti

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between Latino residential segregation and self-rated health (SRH) is unclear, but might be partially affected by social capital. We investigated the association between Latino residential segregation and SRH while also examining the roles of various social capital measures. Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2012-2014) and U.S. Census data were linked by zip code and zip code tabulation area. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate odds of good or better SRH by Latino residential segregation, measured by the Gini coefficient, and controlling for sociodemographic, acculturation and social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control. The Latino residential segregation - SRH relationship was convex, or 'U'-shaped, such that increases in segregation among Latinos residing in lower segregation areas was associated with lower SRH while increases in segregation among Latinos residing in higher segregation areas was associated with higher SRH. The social capital measures were independently associated with SRH but had little effect on the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. A convex relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH could explain mixed findings of previous studies. Although important for SRH, social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control might not account for the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. PMID:27173739

  2. Differences in Environmental Control and Asthma Outcomes Among Urban Latino, African American, and Non–Latino White Families

    PubMed Central

    Kopel, Sheryl; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Salcedo, Leslie; York, Daniel; Potter, Christina; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    Latino and African American children with asthma are at increased risk for asthma morbidity compared with non–Latino White children. Environmental control (ie, environmental exposures and family strategies to control them) may contribute to greater asthma morbidity for ethnic minority children living in urban environments. This study examined ethnic differences in a semi-structured assessment of environmental control, associations between environmental control and asthma outcomes (asthma control, functional limitation, and emergency department [ED] use), and ethnic differences in environmental triggers in a sample of urban Latino, African American, and non–Latino White families. One hundred thirty-three children (6–13 years of age) and their caregivers completed demographic questionnaires, measures of asthma control and morbidity, and a semi-structured interview assessing environmental control. Reported environmental control differed significantly by ethnicity (P<0.05), with Latino families reporting higher levels of environmental control. Reported environmental control was significantly associated with asthma control (P<0.017) and functional limitation (P<0.017). Reported environmental control and ED use were significantly associated in Latino families (P<0.05). Non–Latino White and African American families reported more secondhand smoke exposure than Latino families (P<0.001). Latino families reported more optimal home environmental control than other ethnic groups. Substantial ethnic differences in asthma triggers suggest that observed ethnic disparities in asthma may be due, at least in part, to differences in the home environment. PMID:22276226

  3. Epidemiology of pancreas cancer in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, T.M.; Paganini-Hill, A.

    1981-03-15

    The characteristics of the 3614 Los Angeles County residents in whom cancer of the exocrine pancreas was diagnosed during the period 1972-1977 were compared with those of all county residents and patients in whom any cancer was diagnosed during the same period. Seventy-nine percent of the diagnoses had been pathologically verified. This disease still preferentially afflicts the old, the black, and men, although the differences in risk with factors other than age are modest. The disease is not evenly distributed by social class, or over time, although it is not clear that the observed differences reflect etiology. The distributions with respect to important categories of occupation and industry, religion, marital status, geography of residence, and birthplace were rather uniform. Although there is no obvious explanation for any of several unexpected minor inequities in the pattern of incidence, there is no compelling evidence to support any specific environmental cause. There is substantial evidence which is inconsistent with those environmental hypotheses that have been proposed previously.

  4. Health outcomes research on Hispanics/Latinos.

    PubMed

    Giachello, A L

    1996-10-01

    Outcomes research studies the impact of the health and medical interventions on the health status and quality of life of the population. This paper discusses some of the issues and challenges involved in conducting health and medical outcomes research on the Latino population in the U. S., and also provides some solutions or strategies to overcome some of the most common problems in studying this population.

  5. Origins of the New Latino Underclass

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Douglas S.; Pren, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the Latino population of the United States was transformed from a small, ethnically segmented population of Mexicans in the southwest, Puerto Ricans in New York, and Cubans in Miami into a large national population dominated by Mexicans, Central Americans, and South Americans. This transformation occurred through mass immigration, much of it undocumented, to the point where large fractions of non-Caribbean Hispanics lack legal protections and rights in the United States. Rising illegality is critical to understanding the disadvantaged status of Latinos today. The unauthorized population began to grow after avenues for legal entry were curtailed in 1965. The consequent rise in undocumented migration enabled political and bureaucratic entrepreneurs to frame Latino migration as a grave threat to the nation, leading to a rising frequency of negative framings in the media, a growing conservative reaction, and increasingly restrictive immigration and border policies that generated more apprehensions. Rising apprehensions, in turn, further enflamed the conservative reaction to produce even harsher enforcement and more still more apprehensions, yielding a self-feeding cycle in which apprehensions kept rising even though undocumented inflows had stabilized. The consequent militarization of the border had the perverse effect of reducing rates of out-migration rather than inhibiting in-migration, leading to a sharp rise in net undocumented population and rapid growth of the undocumented population. As a result, a majority of Mexican, Central American, and South American immigrants are presently undocumented at a time when unauthorized migrants are subject to increasing sanctions from authorities and the public, yielding down-ward pressure on the status and well-being of Latinos in the United States. PMID:22829862

  6. Origins of the New Latino Underclass.

    PubMed

    Massey, Douglas S; Pren, Karen A

    2012-04-01

    Over the past four decades, the Latino population of the United States was transformed from a small, ethnically segmented population of Mexicans in the southwest, Puerto Ricans in New York, and Cubans in Miami into a large national population dominated by Mexicans, Central Americans, and South Americans. This transformation occurred through mass immigration, much of it undocumented, to the point where large fractions of non-Caribbean Hispanics lack legal protections and rights in the United States. Rising illegality is critical to understanding the disadvantaged status of Latinos today. The unauthorized population began to grow after avenues for legal entry were curtailed in 1965. The consequent rise in undocumented migration enabled political and bureaucratic entrepreneurs to frame Latino migration as a grave threat to the nation, leading to a rising frequency of negative framings in the media, a growing conservative reaction, and increasingly restrictive immigration and border policies that generated more apprehensions. Rising apprehensions, in turn, further enflamed the conservative reaction to produce even harsher enforcement and more still more apprehensions, yielding a self-feeding cycle in which apprehensions kept rising even though undocumented inflows had stabilized. The consequent militarization of the border had the perverse effect of reducing rates of out-migration rather than inhibiting in-migration, leading to a sharp rise in net undocumented population and rapid growth of the undocumented population. As a result, a majority of Mexican, Central American, and South American immigrants are presently undocumented at a time when unauthorized migrants are subject to increasing sanctions from authorities and the public, yielding down-ward pressure on the status and well-being of Latinos in the United States. PMID:22829862

  7. Latino Soldiering: The Red, White, and Brown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conde, Carlos D.

    2006-01-01

    U.S. Latinos--particularly Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans--are known as exemplary soldiers. The record shows they have always answered the call to duty proudly and willingly no matter the cause or the burden. That is why they have won so many Congressional Medals of Honor. There are currently about 85,000 Hispanics on active military duty.…

  8. Do You See What I See?: Latino Adolescents' Perceptions of the Images on Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivadeneyra, Rocio

    2006-01-01

    The pervasiveness of harmful stereotypes about Latinos has led to concern over the effects of these on individuals. The mass media play a central role in perpetuating these stereotypes, yet we know very little about how Latinos perceive them. The purpose of this study was to examine how Latino adolescents view portrayals of Latino characters on…

  9. Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavala, Maria R.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research document underperformance of Latino/a youth in mathematics, yet little is known about the day-to-day mathematics socialization of Latino/a youth. This research used qualitative case studies of two Algebra 1 classrooms and seven Latino/a focal students to document and describe two major influences on Latino/a youths'…

  10. Academic Achievement and Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zychinski, Kristen E.; Polo, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    The Latino population in the United States is increasing rapidly, and Latino youth comprise a significant proportion of the overall school-age population. Latino youth, however, demonstrate lower levels of academic achievement. Research also indicates Latino youth consistently report higher levels of depressive symptoms. We examined the relation…

  11. "It Turned My World Upside Down": Latino Youths' Perspectives on Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Linda K.; Perreira, Krista M.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined the migration and acculturation experiences of Latino youth in a newly emerging Latino community, communities that historically have had low numbers of Latino residents. This study uses in-depth interview data from the Latino Adolescent, Migration, Health, and Adaptation (LAMHA) project, a mixed-methods study, to document…

  12. Latino Employment and Black Violence: The Unintended Consequence of U.S. Immigration Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shihadeh, Edward S.; Barranco, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. immigration policies after 1965 fueled a rise in the Latino population and, thus, increased the competition for low-skill jobs. We examine whether Latino immigration and Latino dominance of low-skill industries increases black urban violence. Using city-level data for the year 2000, we find that (1. Latino immigration is positively linked to…

  13. ICE Raids, Children, Media, and Making Sense of Latino Newcomers in Flyover Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamann, Edmund T.; Reeves, Jenelle

    2012-01-01

    Extant cultural models articulated in "Flyover Country" print media responses to ICE workplace raids showed a welcome of sorts of Latino newcomers. These models suggest a place for Latino students at school and more broadly for Latino children and parents in these communities. Thus, they index an unwillingness to see Latino newcomers in…

  14. Applying Common Latino Magazine Cover Line Themes to Health Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Colleen L.; Barrios, Pamela; Lozada, Carolina; Soto-Balbuena, Kenlly; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe strategies used in magazine cover lines to capture the attention of Latino consumers. A content analysis of cover lines (n = 581) from six top-selling Latino women's and parenting magazines (n = 217 issues) sold in the United States identified 12 common themes: great/inspiring, beauty/health, bad/negative,…

  15. Latinos' Economic Recovery: Postsecondary Participation and Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastic, Billie; Nieto, David Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    The majority of Latinos currently enrolled in colleges and universities attend Hispanic-serving Institutions (HSIs), or those institutions where Latino undergraduate full-time equivalent enrollment equals or exceeds 25% of the student population. While HSIs only make up 7% of colleges and universities in the U.S., they enroll more than half of all…

  16. School Stratification in New and Established Latino Destinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dondero, Molly; Muller, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    The growth and geographic diversification of the school-age Latino population suggest that schools in areas that previously had very few Latinos now serve many of these students. This study uses the 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey and the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 to compare public high schools in new and established Latino…

  17. Latino Immigration: Preparing School Psychologists to Meet Students' Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Joslin, Jacqueline J.; Carrillo, Gerardo L.; Guzman, Veronica; Vega, Desireé; Plotts, Cynthia A.; Lasser, Jon

    2016-01-01

    As the population of immigrant Latino students continues to rise, school psychologists serving Latino children and families must develop the knowledge and skills necessary to provide high-quality psychological services to culturally and linguistically diverse students from immigrant families. Following a review of the relevant literature on the…

  18. Supporting the Development of Latino Bilingual Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michelle L.; Sawyer, Cheryl B.; Guzmán, Michele R.; Graziani, Cate

    2014-01-01

    Latino individuals who prefer to communicate in Spanish lack linguistically and culturally proficient mental health professionals with whom they can communicate effectively. This study illustrates the components necessary to facilitate the overall success of Latino, Spanish-speaking students in attaining advanced degrees in mental health services…

  19. What Would They Do? Latino Church Leaders and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; Ames, Natalie; Hancock, Tina U.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding what Latino church leaders believe about domestic violence, and what they do when they confront it, is a key step in developing programs to help them engage in domestic violence prevention and intervention activities in their congregations. This article presents the findings from an exploratory study of 28 Latino church leaders. The…

  20. Distributed Scaffolding: Wiki Collaboration among Latino High School Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Edwin Duncan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate if wiki collaboration among Latino high school chemistry students can help reduce the science achievement gap between Latino and White students. The study was a quasi-experimental pre/post control group mixed-methods design. It used three intact sections of a high school chemistry course. The first…

  1. Adult Latino College Students: Experiencias y la Educacion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Ana Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed to gain a better understanding of the learning experiences of adult Latino college students, as described directly in their own voices. The study was guided by two research questions: RQ1: "How do adult Latinos describe their undergraduate college learning experiences?" and RQ2: "How do culture, gender, and ethnic identity affect…

  2. Latinos, Education, and the Church: Toward a Culturally Democratic Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darder, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    The article provides a comprehensive critical analysis of key issues that are deeply salient to an examination of the relationship of Latinos, education, and the Church. The status of Latinos and their educational participation in the US is systematically presented through a critical theoretical lens that brings questions of historical, political,…

  3. National Survey of Latinos, 2002 : Summary of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Mollyann; Steffenson, Annie; Valdez, Jaime; Levin, Rebecca

    This paper presents data from a 2002 survey of Hispanic American adults. Overall, the Hispanic population held an array of attitudes, values, and beliefs that were distinct from those of non-Hispanic whites and blacks. However, there was no single, homogeneous Latino opinion. A diversity of views existed among Latinos, with differences between…

  4. "Salud America!" Developing a National Latino Childhood Obesity Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J.; Green, Lawrence W.; Ottoson, Judith

    2011-01-01

    U.S. childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, with one third of children overweight or obese. Latino children have some of the highest obesity rates, a concern because they are part of the youngest and fastest-growing U.S. minority group. Unfortunately, scarce research data on Latinos hinders the development and implementation of…

  5. Dismay and Disappointment: Parental Involvement of Latino Immigrant Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, A. Y. Fred

    2003-01-01

    Interviewed Latino immigrant parents within a predominantly Latino California community regarding involvement in their children's schools. Parents desired to be a part of their children's education but felt the schools did not listen to their needs. Forces within the schools prevented them from becoming involved. There was no language support for…

  6. Reaching Out to Latino Families of English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, David; Huerta, Mary Esther; Delgado, Rocio

    2011-01-01

    It's troubling that while schools are getting more Latino students, including English learners, these students are more likely to perform below grade level and eventually drop out. So this book proposes that educators everywhere do a better job of developing home-to-school partnerships based on meaningful relationships with Latino parents. Relying…

  7. Immigration and Ethnic Communities: A Focus on Latinos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochin, Refugio I., Ed.

    For over a decade, Latino immigrants, especially those of Mexican origin, have been at the heart of the immigration debate and have borne the brunt of conservative populism. Contributing factors to the public reaction to immigrants in general and Latinos specifically include the sheer size of recent immigration, the increasing prevalence of…

  8. Latino Parent Involvement: Seeing What Has Always Been There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Patricia L.; Nelson, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    This study reviews 20 years (1990-2010) of scholarly literature on parent involvement related to Latino parents. Parent involvement behaviors of Latino parents were identified and analyzed according to the dimensions of culture theoretical framework--specifically, the dimension of individualism-collectivism (Hofstede, 1984, 1997; Triandis, 1995;…

  9. Perceived Discrimination and Substance Use among Latino Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamoto, Janet; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine perceived discrimination and substance use among Latino high school students. Methods: Latino 9th graders (N=1332) completed self-report measures of perceived discrimination and substance use behavior. Results: Perceived discrimination was associated with lifetime use measures of smoking (OR=1.73, P less than 0.01), alcohol…

  10. Acculturation and Leadership Styles of Elected Latino Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased demographic change of Latinos in our society, the need for understanding who they are, how they live, and more importantly how they lead has never been more urgent. Answers regarding how Latinos lead warrant further empirical research and investigation. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine how a group of elected…

  11. Food and Beverage Marketing to Latinos: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeigbe, Rebecca T.; Baldwin, Shannon; Gallion, Kip; Grier, Sonya; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity rates among U.S. adults and children have increased over the past two decades and, although signs of stabilization and decline among certain age groups and geographies are being reported, the prevalence of obesity among Latino adults and children remain high. The Latino population is growing in parallel to these obesity rates and marketers…

  12. Bureaucratic Dysfunctions in the Education of Latino Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harklau, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Scholarship on Latinos' lagging US high school graduation and college enrollment rates has focused on systematic biases and inequities in schooling. This article argues for an additional complementary explanation for underachievement and school failure. Namely, it suggests that high school underachievement in Latino children of immigrants can be…

  13. Fostering Social-Emotional Resilience among Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Jazmin A.; Elias, Maurice J.

    2011-01-01

    National statistics reveal that Latino youth face significant challenges and engage in many risky behaviors that can hinder positive development and well-being, such as attempted suicide, lifetime cocaine use, unprotected sex, and dropping out of school. However, these statistics obscure the fact that many Latino youth are developing well despite…

  14. Perceptions of Financial Aid among California Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of a 15-minute survey that was administered to four hundred 18-24 year-old Latino youth in California to determine their perceptions of financial aid. Among the key findings were that (1) three out of four Latino young adults who did not attend college cited lack of financial aid as a factor in their decision…

  15. The Guide for Choosing Hispanic/Latino American Parenting Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingo, Robin R.; Mertensmeyer, Carol

    This guide is designed to help professionals working with Hispanic/Latino American parents to be better prepared to select culturally sensitive materials, to program more effectively, and to draw from the richness within the Hispanic/Latino American culture. The guide is one in a series of culturally specific guides produced as part of…

  16. The Latino/a Health Professions Pipeline: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivares-Urueta, Mayra

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 Census summary data and demographic projections for the country accentuate the astronomical growth of the Latino/a population. Mirroring these demographic trends, there is a critical shortage of Latino/as in the healthcare industry which negatively impacts the ability of the field to provide quality and culturally congruent healthcare to…

  17. High-Achieving Middle Schools for Latino Students in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jesse, Dan; Davis, Alan; Pokorny, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the characteristics of middle schools in which Latino students from low-income families made substantial achievement gains. Nine schools in Texas were selected where Latino students had shown strong gains in the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills. Data from onsite interviews, focus groups, and documents were…

  18. Latino Definitions of Success: A Cultural Model of Intercultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to examine Latino intercultural competence via two separate methodologies. Phase 1 entailed discovering and generating themes regarding the features of intercultural competence based on semistructured interviews of 15 Latino adults. Phase 2 included conducting a cultural consensus analysis from the quantitative responses…

  19. Hispanics, Latinos, or Americanos: the evolution of identity.

    PubMed

    Comas-Díaz, L

    2001-05-01

    This essay identifies and categorizes terms used to designate the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States. It provides an analysis framing the process of ethnic self-designation within an ethnopolitical and psychosocial context. The analysis concludes by presenting mestizaje and transculturation as processes involved in the evolution of Latino identity.

  20. Learning from Latinos: Contexts, Families, and Child Development in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce; Garcia Coll, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Two generations ago, Latino children and families were often defined as disadvantaged, even "culturally deprived," by psychologists, social scientists, and pediatric researchers. Since then, empirical work from several disciplines has yielded remarkable discoveries regarding the strengths of Latino families and resulting benefits for children.…

  1. Family Therapy with Latino Families: An Interview with Patricia Arredondo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardona, Betty; Softas-Nall, Lia

    2010-01-01

    In this interview, Patricia Arredondo shares with us her scholarship and expertise working with Latino families. Patricia talks about multicultural competencies, multicultural development as well as diversity assessment when working with Latino families. Dr. Arredondo has published widely on these topics and is the coauthor of "Counseling Latinos…

  2. Educational Inequality and the Latino Population of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L.

    2008-01-01

    This research report examines the comparative educational condition of Latinos in the United States. The report discusses the dramatic shortfalls that plague the educational outcomes of Latinos relative to other racial and ethnic groups. The outcomes studied include educational attainment, school and university enrollment, basic cognitive skills,…

  3. Predictors of Resilience in Maltreated and Nonmaltreated Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Elisa; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2005-01-01

    To date, few studies have sought to investigate the effects of child maltreatment and processes influencing maladaptation and resilience in Latino children. In the current investigation, multiple aspects of functioning, personal resources, and relationship features were examined in school-age maltreated and nonmaltreated Latino children.…

  4. Latino Parent Perspectives on Parental Involvement in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niven, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide insight into immigrant Latino parents' perspectives on parental involvement in elementary school settings as influenced by the Title I Family Literacy Program (TFLP). A comparison is made of Latino parents who have been participating in the TFLP for more than one year, participants new to the program…

  5. Factors Influencing Latino Participation in Community-Based Diabetes Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Sarah L.; Noterman, Amber; Litchfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    An Extension diabetes program (DP) was revised for Latinos; however, participation was limited. Factors influencing low participation rates were examined. Five Latinos interested in the DP participated in a focus group discussion. Transcripts were analyzed for themes. Preferred education programs were multi-session, local, group classes led by an…

  6. The Role of Collectivism among Latino American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arevalo, Irving; So, Dominicus; McNaughton-Cassill, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to explain the lower Latino college graduation rate, the current study focuses on collectivism in kin and nonkin helping situations. The sample comprised 60 students at a 4-year college in the southwestern United States. Results revealed significance between ethnicity and nonkin collectivism: Latino American college students were…

  7. A Comparison of Acculturation Measures among Hispanic/Latino Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Jennifer B.; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Wagner, Karla; Soto, Daniel; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Acculturation has been associated with numerous health and social outcomes among Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Various self-report scales have been used to measure acculturation, making comparisons of results across studies difficult. This study administered several commonly-used acculturation scales to 221 Hispanic/Latino 9th grade students in Los…

  8. Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Juan

    This book presents an integrated historical look at Latin America and Latinos in the United States, offering portraits of real-life Latino pioneers and sketches of the political events and social conditions that compelled them to leave their homeland and examining how they have transformed the nation's cultural landscape. Part 1, "Roots," includes…

  9. Predictive Variables of Success for Latino Enrollment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jafeth E.; Usinger, Janet; Thornton, Bill W.

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to better understand the unique variables that serve as predictors of Latino students' postsecondary enrollment and success. Impacts of various variables were examined among 850 Latino and Caucasian students (76% and 24% of the sample, respectively). Gender, ethnicity, perceived affordability, high school grade point average, and…

  10. Professional School Aspirations of First Generation Latino Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipiz Gonzalez, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    The low rate of Latino graduate and professional degree attainment is a problem for the Latinos who are not attaining high levels of education, for their families, for the institutions of higher education that suffer from a lack of diversity, and for the local, state, and federal governments that lose tax revenue from the potentially higher income…

  11. Retaining Latino Students: Culturally Responsive Instruction in Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Moreno, Marcio

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors define and describe culturally responsive teaching (CRT) in college and university courses. Whereas, the Latino population in our K-12 schools has grown rapidly, we have not seen such growth in the population of Latino students in our postsecondary schools. It is the authors' position that CRT can be a tool in helping…

  12. Roadmap for Ensuring America's Future by Increasing Latino College Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    The nation cannot reach its degree attainment goals without substantially increasing Latino college completion. While all groups will have to increase college degree attainment to meet the goals, increasing Latino educational attainment is crucial for the U.S. to meet its future societal and workforce needs for three main reasons: (1) the Latino…

  13. Occupational Linguistic Niches and the Wage Growth of Latino Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouw, Ted; Chavez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Does the concentration of recent Latino immigrants into "occupational linguistic niches"--occupations with large numbers of other Spanish speakers--restrict their wage growth? On the one hand, it is possible that Latino immigrants who are concentrated in jobs with large numbers of Spanish speakers may have less on-the-job exposure to English,…

  14. Development of an Acculturation Measure for Latino Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillen, Michelle B.; Hoewing-Roberson, Renee C.

    As part of a substance abuse prevention project, a measure was developed in both English and Spanish to measure levels of acculturation among members of a Latino youth population for later comparison of acculturation with high-risk behaviors. The Latino Youth Acculturation Scale (LYAS) consists of 23 items. Eleven items deal with language use of…

  15. Dietary and Built Environment Assessment in a Latino Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Sarah; Calloway, Stephanie A.; Maida, I. Tatiana; Rakel, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Assessment of basic dietary intake and community nutrition environment is lacking and needed to improve health outcomes for the growing U.S. Latino community. Purpose: The dietary intake and community nutrition environment of a Latino population in the Midwest was evaluated. Methods: In a community clinic, Block Food Frequency…

  16. "Salmonella arizona" Infections in Latinos Associated with Rattlesnake Folk Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, Stephen H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Conducted a case-control study to determine the magnitude of the problem of Latino patients who ingested rattlesnake capsules and then developed serious "Salmonella arizona" infections. Eighty-two percent of infected Latinos in 1986-87 who were questioned reported ingesting snake capsules. Discusses the association of ingesting snake capsules with…

  17. A Cardiovascular Health Program for Latinos Supplemented with Pedometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudnak, Tara; Lloyd, Angela; Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is an important modifiable risk factor for many chronic diseases which disproportionately affect Latinos in the U.S. Targeting at-risk Latinos for prevention and intervention programs to increase physical activity can help decrease their risk for developing these diseases. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to…

  18. In the Barrios: Latinos and the Underclass Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Joan, Ed.; Pinderhughes, Raquel, Ed.

    This book includes nine articles that broaden current debates on the American urban "underclass" by assessing the circumstances of inner-city Latino communities. An introduction provides background information on the U.S. Latino population and addresses factors related to urban poverty and to the "underclass" debate, including economic…

  19. College Knowledge: How Immigrant Latino Parents Access Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Ana F.

    2013-01-01

    Among ethnic groups in California, Latinos continue to have the lowest high school graduation rates and the lowest college completion rates. This study focused on understanding the role parents can play and ways schools and educators can support immigrant Latino parents to improve these rates. Framed with a "funds of knowledge" approach…

  20. Gardening, Tutoring, and Service by and for Latinos: La Esperanza

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussert-Webb, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a community service learning (CSL) project that helped sixteen Latino/a teacher trainees in the areas of caring, social justice, bias reduction, teaching experience, personal growth, joy, and collaboration. The project was significant because the participants and the children they tutored were all Latinos who had shared…

  1. Social Security: Strengthening a Vital Safety Net for Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Since 1935, Social Security has provided a vital safety net for millions of Americans who cannot work because of age or disability. This safety net has been especially critical for Americans of Latino decent, who number more than 50 million or nearly one out of every six Americans. Social Security is critical to Latinos because it is much more…

  2. Predicting Reading Ability for Bilingual Latino Children Using Dynamic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Douglas B.; Gillam, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the predictive validity of a dynamic assessment designed to evaluate later risk for reading difficulty in bilingual Latino children at risk for language impairment. During kindergarten, 63 bilingual Latino children completed a dynamic assessment nonsense-word recoding task that yielded pretest to posttest gain scores,…

  3. Inhabiting Latino Politics: How Colleges Shape Students' Political Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Daisy Verduzco

    2015-01-01

    To comply with ideals of multiculturalism and diversity, postsecondary institutions incorporate Latino students into distinct campus cultures. These cultures influence how students interact with one another, the university community at large, and communities outside of campus, ultimately shaping how students inhabit Latino politics. Drawing on…

  4. Career Support Group for Latino/a College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrios-Allison, Ana C.

    2011-01-01

    Culturally derived career counseling groups constitute a potentially promising way of providing supportive experiences for Latino/a college students. These groups can facilitate Latino/a students' help-seeking behavior, address general college transition needs, add new coping skills, resolve developmental issues, and respond to career concerns.…

  5. Degrees of Separation: Latino Students' Transitions to a Texas HBCU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Taryn Ozuna; Stone, Ashley N.

    2016-01-01

    A successful transition to college is the foundation for future academic success, and this process is particularly important for a quickly growing Latino population. This qualitative study explored the transitional experiences of eight Latino students who enrolled in a historically Black university in Texas. Focusing specifically on their…

  6. Latino Hillbilly: An Interview with Marcos McPeek Villatoro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minick, Jim; McPeek Villatoro, Marcos

    2001-01-01

    Novelist and faculty member McPeek Villatoro, son of a Salvadoran mother and an Appalachian father, discusses his childhood in Tennessee and San Francisco, racism encountered for being Latino or Appalachian, embracing his Latino roots, similarities between Appalachian and rural Central American cultures, the importance of teachers raising…

  7. Educating Latino Students: A Guide to Successful Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Maria Luisa, Ed.; Huerta-Macias, Ana, Ed.; Tinajero, Josefina Villamil, Ed.

    This book attempts to assist readers in expanding their knowledge base in the area of quality practices for Latino students. The chapters contain many practices that can be implemented in educational settings from preschool to secondary school. The following chapters are included: (1) "Successfully Educating Latinos: The Pivotal Role of the…

  8. Predictors of Condom Use in Latino Migrant Day Laborers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organista, Kurt C.; Ehrlich, Samantha F.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on predictors of condom use with casual female sex partners on the part of Latino migrant day laborers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Results come from a secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional survey using convenience sampling to interview 290 sexually active adult, male, migrant Latino day laborers. Regression…

  9. Barriers to Participation for Latino People at Dodge Nature Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Angie; Anderson, Dorothy H.

    2006-01-01

    The authors sought to identify barriers to participation for Latino people at Dodge Nature Center (DNC) in West St. Paul, MN. The authors used a multi-method approach, which included collecting demographic information, surveying the DNC staff, and interviewing Latino community leaders and parents. Results showed that unfamiliarity with DNC,…

  10. Community Cultural Wealth and Chicano/Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Trina M.; Lugg, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a vision of how educators can better foster the various forms of knowledge and wealth that Chicano/Latino students bring to their public schools. By using LatCrit (i.e., Latino/a critical race theory) to conceptualize community cultural wealth, we hope to give educational leaders greater insights into culturally appropriate…

  11. Concrete Roses: Examining the Resilience of Academically Successful Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfaro, Daisy Denise

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the academic resilience exhibited by urban, low-income, first college generation Latino students, as they navigated numerous risk factors and persisted from early education to law school. In order to uncover the protective factors that allowed resilient Latino students to overcome adversity within the K-20 educational…

  12. Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Structured interview data were obtained…

  13. Crowding out Latinos: Mexican Americans in the Public Consciousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portales, Marco

    Despite efforts to improve perceptions about Mexican Americans and other Spanish-speaking people in the United States, Chicanos and other Latinos are not yet seen as typical American citizens. Latinos continue to receive poor educations, and the media continue to represent them in ways unaffected by the emergence of Chicano literature. This book…

  14. Measles Vaccination Coverage among Latino Children Aged 12 to 59 Months in Los Angeles County: A Household Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Donnell P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the results of a household survey of measles vaccination coverage among Hispanic American children aged 12 to 59 months. Between 81 percent and 91 percent of the children have been vaccinated, a percentage insufficient to stop the high rate of measles transmission within this population. Recommends that public health efforts be focused on…

  15. Correlates of health literacy among latinos in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Boyas, Javier F

    2013-01-01

    Although research on acculturation and its effects on Latino health continue to grow, there is a dearth of knowledge on how acculturation levels shape health literacy. Health literacy is an important aspect of health to consider with the Latino population because a number of studies have found that this group has the lowest levels of health literacy in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine how acculturation and sociodemographic characteristics contribute to the health literacy of Latinos adults. Cross-sectional data was collected from a nonprobability sample of 123 Latinos living in various Arkansas communities. Multiple regression results suggest that Latinos who were more acculturated and were educated beyond high school were significantly more likely to have increased levels of health literacy. Findings also show that age, gender, income, and citizenship status were not significant predictors of health literacy. Implications and future research are discussed.

  16. Latino Definitions of Success: A Cultural Model of Intercultural Competence.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to examine Latino intercultural competence via two separate methodologies. Phase 1 entailed discovering and generating themes regarding the features of intercultural competence based on semistructured interviews of 15 Latino adults. Phase 2 included conducting a cultural consensus analysis from the quantitative responses of 46 Latino adults to determine the cultural model of intercultural competence. The major results indicated that the participants, despite variations in socioeconomic and generational statuses, shared a common knowledge base regarding the competencies needed for Latinos to successfully navigate different cultures. Overall, the cultural model of Latino intercultural competence includes a set of skills that integrates traditional cultural values along with attributes of self-efficacy. The findings are discussed within a competence-based conceptualization of cultural adaptation and potential advancements in acculturation research. PMID:20333325

  17. Trends in recreational computer use among Latino children in California.

    PubMed

    van Meijgaard, Jeroen; Shi, Lu; Simon, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In this study we examine differential trends in recreational computer use among Latino and white children in California. We analyzed data from the children's sample (age 4-11) of the 2001 and 2009 California Health Interview Survey. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate the impact of language spoken at home, income and parental education, on recreational computer use. Latino children had substantially lower recreational computer use in 2001, compared to whites, but by 2009 the gap had almost disappeared. Among Latinos, compared to families where English is spoken exclusively, recreational computer use was substantially lower in families where Spanish is spoken exclusively. Parental education and income were significantly associated with recreational computer use, but only among Latinos, and the association with parental education changed from 2001 to 2009, explaining some of the difference in trend between Latino and white children.

  18. Exploring Culturally Based Intrafamilial Stressors Among Latino Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, David; Ciofu, Amanda; Cervantes, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Despite the profound impact that intrafamilial stressors, including parent – adolescent acculturation discrepancies, may have on Latino adolescent behavioral and mental health, this line of research remains underdeveloped. The purpose of this study is to obtain rich descriptions from Latino adolescents of the most salient intrafamilial stressors. The authors employ focus group methodology with a grounded theory approach. A total of 25 focus groups were conducted with 170 Latino adolescents in the Northeast and Southwest United States. Findings indicate that Latino adolescents experience significant stressors related to parent – adolescent acculturation discrepancies. From this qualitative study the authors derive a series of testable hypotheses aimed at fully understanding the role of parent – adolescent acculturation discrepancies on Latino adolescent behavioral and mental health and informing the development of culturally responsive preventive interventions for this population. PMID:25530653

  19. HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of primarily African-American and Latino men who have sex with men social media users.

    PubMed

    Garett, Renee; Smith, Justin; Chiu, Jason; Young, Sean D

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in social media use allows these technologies to rapidly reach communities with higher HIV prevalence, such as African-American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). However, no studies have looked at HIV/AIDS stigma among social media users from African-American and Latino MSM communities, or the association between stigma and social media use among these groups. This study sought to assess the level of HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of social media-using African-American and Latino MSM from Los Angeles. A total of 112 (primarily African-American and Latino, n = 98, 88%) MSM Facebook users completed a survey on demographics, online social network use, and HIV/AIDS stigma. A composite stigma score was created by taking the cumulative score from a 15-item stigma questionnaire. Cumulative logistic models were used to assess the association between HIV/AIDS stigma and online social network use. In general, participants reported a low level of HIV/AIDS stigma (mean = 22.2/75, SD = 5.74). HIV/AIDS stigma composite score was significantly associated with increased time spent on online social networks each day (Adjusted odds ratios (AOR): 1.07, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.15). Among this diverse sample of MSM online social network users, findings suggest that HIV/AIDS stigma is associated with usage of social media. We discuss the implications of this work for future HIV prevention. PMID:26873022

  20. HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of primarily African-American and Latino men who have sex with men social media users.

    PubMed

    Garett, Renee; Smith, Justin; Chiu, Jason; Young, Sean D

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in social media use allows these technologies to rapidly reach communities with higher HIV prevalence, such as African-American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). However, no studies have looked at HIV/AIDS stigma among social media users from African-American and Latino MSM communities, or the association between stigma and social media use among these groups. This study sought to assess the level of HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of social media-using African-American and Latino MSM from Los Angeles. A total of 112 (primarily African-American and Latino, n = 98, 88%) MSM Facebook users completed a survey on demographics, online social network use, and HIV/AIDS stigma. A composite stigma score was created by taking the cumulative score from a 15-item stigma questionnaire. Cumulative logistic models were used to assess the association between HIV/AIDS stigma and online social network use. In general, participants reported a low level of HIV/AIDS stigma (mean = 22.2/75, SD = 5.74). HIV/AIDS stigma composite score was significantly associated with increased time spent on online social networks each day (Adjusted odds ratios (AOR): 1.07, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.15). Among this diverse sample of MSM online social network users, findings suggest that HIV/AIDS stigma is associated with usage of social media. We discuss the implications of this work for future HIV prevention.

  1. First-Generation Latino Males in Latino Fraternities at a Predominately White Institution: Psychological, Social, and Cultural College Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Sheila Marie

    2011-01-01

    This research study explores the first-generation undergraduate Latino male student experience at a Predominantly White Institution (PWI) affiliated within Latino Greek fraternities. The Psychosociocultural (PSC) model (Gloria & Rodriguez, 2000; Pope & Reynolds, 2000) that is used highlights the psychological, social and cultural contributing…

  2. Development of a Course in Chicano/Latino Psychology: An Academic Odyssey. JSRI Occasional Paper No. 49. Latino Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Brian W.

    This paper describes the development of a course in Chicano/Latino psychology by a professor of a mixed Chicano and Anglo ethnic background at Washington State University. The course objectives include: examination of the current psychosocial literature related to Chicano/Latino populations; issues of acculturation and ethnic identity; the…

  3. The Features and Roles of Rural Latinos: Cross-National Perspectives. JSRI Occasional Paper No. 26. Latino Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochin, Refugio I.

    In rural America, Latinos are the fastest growing population, increasing by 30 percent between 1980 and 1990. Rural Latinos are a large and growing share of the labor hired on farms, but earn only 60 cents for each dollar earned by nonfarm hired workers. This trend is largely due to the restructuring of agriculture in general, and the meatpacking…

  4. Latino Educational Leadership across the Pipeline: For Latino Communities and Latina/o Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Cristóbal; Martinez, Melissa A.; Valle, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Educational leaders have challenges providing rich and equitable education for the Latino community, the fastest growing underserved demographic in the United States. Although the field of educational leadership draws connections to serve diverse populations, this work uses existing research and theory to establish the concept of Latino…

  5. Developing a Latino Mentoring Program: Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sáenz, Victor B.; Ponjuan, Luis; Segovia, Jorge, Jr.; Del Real Viramontes, José

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights the development of Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success). At the center of Project MALES is a mentoring program that aims to cultivate an engaged support network for males of color at the University of Texas at Austin and across surrounding communities. Specifically, there is a discussion of the…

  6. Cultural sensitivity and work with Latino teen fathers.

    PubMed

    Mena, M

    1989-01-01

    An understanding of basic historical and cultural concepts is a prerequisite to effective work with Latino teen fathers. The fundamental structure of the Latino family is especially important to consider in working toward solutions that are consistent with the young Latino father's cultural context. The Latino client's understanding of his personal needs is strongly linked to family concerns and pressures. Unlike the Anglo-American family, where linear movement toward increased individuation and independence is stressed, the Latino family model places a higher value on continued involvement in an extended family network. The Latino culture's familial orientation can be a strength, in that there are so many functionally connected people to form a supportive network, yet it can also present problems for service delivery because of the importance of loyalty and privacy in the family. Other important cultural values in the Latino community include the centrality of the father as a power figure and respect for the rights of others. Also essential is sensitivity to the Latino's personalized way of relating. Social workers have found that rapport can be established more readily with Latino males if self-disclosure is used to foster a personal connection. Given the power that young fathers have over the young mother's future plans, it is essential that they be included in family planning program design and outreach. Cultural sensitivity--a willingness to learn about, understand, and accept the social context of human behavior--must be a cornerstone of agency programs seeking to enlist the participation of young Latino males. PMID:12315501

  7. A national agenda for Latino cancer prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Gallion, Kipling J; Suarez, Lucina; Giachello, Aida L; Marti, Jose R; Medrano, Martha A; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Talavera, Gregory A; Trapido, Edward J

    2005-06-01

    Although cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and premature death among Latinos, there is limited knowledge of cancer-related issues and priorities of greatest significance to the Latino population, the largest minority group in the nation. This information is vital in helping to guide Latino cancer research, training, and awareness efforts at national, regional, and local levels. To help identify cancer issues of greatest relevance to Latinos, Redes En Accion, The National Hispanic/Latino Cancer Network, a major network among the National Cancer Institute's Special Populations Networks, conducted a survey of 624 key opinion leaders from around the country. Respondents were asked to rank the three cancer sites most important to Latinos in their region and the five issues of greatest significance for this population's cancer prevention and control. Recommendations were prioritized for three specific areas: 1) research, 2) training and/or professional education, and 3) awareness and/or public education. Among cancers, breast carcinoma was ranked number one, followed in order by cervical and lung carcinomas. The issues of greatest significance to Latinos were 1) access to cancer screening and care, 2) tobacco use, 3) patient-doctor communication, 4) nutrition, and 5) risk communication. This survey solicited information from scientists, health care professionals, leaders of government agencies, professional and community-based organizations, and other stakeholders in Latino health. The results laid the foundation for a national Redes En Accion Latino cancer agenda, thus providing a useful tool for individuals and organizations engaged in cancer prevention and control efforts among the Hispanic-Latino population. PMID:15822119

  8. A national agenda for Latino cancer prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Gallion, Kipling J; Suarez, Lucina; Giachello, Aida L; Marti, Jose R; Medrano, Martha A; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Talavera, Gregory A; Trapido, Edward J

    2005-06-01

    Although cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and premature death among Latinos, there is limited knowledge of cancer-related issues and priorities of greatest significance to the Latino population, the largest minority group in the nation. This information is vital in helping to guide Latino cancer research, training, and awareness efforts at national, regional, and local levels. To help identify cancer issues of greatest relevance to Latinos, Redes En Accion, The National Hispanic/Latino Cancer Network, a major network among the National Cancer Institute's Special Populations Networks, conducted a survey of 624 key opinion leaders from around the country. Respondents were asked to rank the three cancer sites most important to Latinos in their region and the five issues of greatest significance for this population's cancer prevention and control. Recommendations were prioritized for three specific areas: 1) research, 2) training and/or professional education, and 3) awareness and/or public education. Among cancers, breast carcinoma was ranked number one, followed in order by cervical and lung carcinomas. The issues of greatest significance to Latinos were 1) access to cancer screening and care, 2) tobacco use, 3) patient-doctor communication, 4) nutrition, and 5) risk communication. This survey solicited information from scientists, health care professionals, leaders of government agencies, professional and community-based organizations, and other stakeholders in Latino health. The results laid the foundation for a national Redes En Accion Latino cancer agenda, thus providing a useful tool for individuals and organizations engaged in cancer prevention and control efforts among the Hispanic-Latino population.

  9. Diabetic Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It ... light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye. You need a healthy retina to see clearly. ...

  10. Diabetes - eye care

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic retinopathy - care ... until the problem is very bad. Your health care provider can catch problems early if you get ... doctor (ophthalmologist). Choose an eye doctor who takes care of people with diabetes. Your eye exam may ...

  11. Diabetes and eye disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye that can lead to blindness Macular edema: blurry vision due to fluid leaking into the ... in your retina (neovascularization) or you develop macular edema, treatment is usually needed. Eye surgery is the ...

  12. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and comfortable as possible until help arrives. continue Chemical Exposure Many chemicals, even those found around the house, can damage an eye. If your child gets a chemical in the eye and you know what it ...

  13. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  14. What Is Dry Eye?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery Museum of Vision Subspecialties Cataract/Anterior Segment Comprehensive Ophthalmology ... Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery Museum of Vision Subspecialties Cataract/Anterior Segment Comprehensive Ophthalmology ...

  15. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  16. Eye - foreign object in

    MedlinePlus

    ... to gently flush it out with water or eye drops. If that does not work, try touching a second cotton-tipped swab to the object to remove it. If the object is on the white of the eye, try gently rinsing the eye with water or ...

  17. Schizopolis: Border Cinema and the Global City (of Angels)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fojas, Camilla

    2006-01-01

    The films "Star Maps" and "El Norte" reveal the real political, socioeconomic, and psychic costs of divided cities by bringing the simulated realities of mass media to their logical end, thereby sacrificing each character to the disorder of the city. In "Star Maps", Carlos dreams of becoming the next major Latino star, but this dream is rendered…

  18. 77 FR 25739 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    .... ADDRESSES: Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles... contact Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles,...

  19. 77 FR 25743 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    .... Teeter, Ph.D., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549...., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549, telephone (310)...

  20. Mobile farm clinic outreach to address health conditions among Latino migrant farmworkers in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Luque, John S; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos; Marella, Prasen; Bowers, Angelica; Panchal, Viral; Anderson, Lisa; Charles, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural labor involves exposure to many occupational hazards, some of which can lead to chronic health conditions. The purpose of this study was to conduct an occupational health needs assessment of illnesses and work-related injuries among a Latino migrant farmworker population (recruited to harvest Vidalia onions) in South Georgia. Study data included survey responses from 100 farmworkers attending mobile farm clinics in 2010 at their worker housing residences, supplemented by medical diagnoses data from the same clinics collected over 3 years (2009-2011) for 1161 farmworkers at six different farms. From the survey, the main health problems reported were hypertension (25%), eye problems (12%), musculoskeletal problems (11%), diabetes (10%), and depression (7%). In multivariate analyses, depression scores were associated with having a history of musculoskeletal problems (p = .002). According to the mobile farm clinic data, the most common medical diagnoses included back pain (11.8%), hypertension (11.4%), musculoskeletal problems (11.3%), gastrointestinal disorders (8.6%), eye problems (7.2%), dermatitis or rash (7.0%), and tinea or fungal skin infections (5.6%). The study identified eye and musculoskeletal problems as the major occupational health conditions for this population of farmworkers.

  1. Food and Beverage Marketing to Latinos: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Adeigbe, Rebecca T; Baldwin, Shannon; Gallion, Kip; Grier, Sonya; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2015-10-01

    Obesity rates among U.S. adults and children have increased over the past two decades and, although signs of stabilization and decline among certain age groups and geographies are being reported, the prevalence of obesity among Latino adults and children remain high. The Latino population is growing in parallel to these obesity rates and marketers realize they cannot ignore this growing, high-spending, media-consuming segment. Studies examining food and beverage marketing strategies tend to discuss minority groups in general but do not account for racial and ethnic differences, reducing our ability to explain existing inequities. This article aimed to identify the food and beverage marketing strategies used to influence food environments for Latinos versus non-Latinos. A systematic literature review and analysis, guided by an established marketing conceptual framework, determined that the food and beverage marketing environment for Latinos is less likely to promote healthy eating and more likely to encourage consumption of low-nutrient, calorie-dense foods and beverages. This analysis also determined that Latinos' food environment and the placement of food retail stores appears to influence their body mass index; however, placement of these stores cannot be generalized, as geographical differences exist. While food and beverage marketing is only one of many sources of influence on food and beverage consumption, these findings reinforce the notion that Latinos are at a disadvantage when it comes to exposure of healthy lifestyle messaging and health-promoting food environments.

  2. Suicidal behavior in Latinos: focus on the youth.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Alvaro; Koons, Ann; Postolache, Teodor T

    2009-01-01

    The multicultural nature of American society presents clinicians and mental health providers with the unique challenge of working with mentally ill patients from many different cultural backgrounds. Although research investigating suicidal behavior among Latinos is limited, the literature suggests the presence of two distinct phenomena: (a) the prevalence of completed suicide among Latinos as a group is lower than the national rate and (b) the prevalence of suicidal behavior among Latino youth between the ages of 10-24 years is greater than in other ethnic groups, especially among females. Acculturation, family conflicts, physical abuse and sexual abuse, among other factors, have been suggested to increase the risk of depression and suicide among young Latinos. To ameliorate suicidal behavior among Latino youth, more research is needed about specific risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately, suicide prevention. Research focused on identifying risk and mediating factors for suicidal behavior in young Latinos is particularly relevant, given the size and rapid growth of the Latino population in the United States of America. PMID:20306758

  3. Food and Beverage Marketing to Latinos: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Adeigbe, Rebecca T; Baldwin, Shannon; Gallion, Kip; Grier, Sonya; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2015-10-01

    Obesity rates among U.S. adults and children have increased over the past two decades and, although signs of stabilization and decline among certain age groups and geographies are being reported, the prevalence of obesity among Latino adults and children remain high. The Latino population is growing in parallel to these obesity rates and marketers realize they cannot ignore this growing, high-spending, media-consuming segment. Studies examining food and beverage marketing strategies tend to discuss minority groups in general but do not account for racial and ethnic differences, reducing our ability to explain existing inequities. This article aimed to identify the food and beverage marketing strategies used to influence food environments for Latinos versus non-Latinos. A systematic literature review and analysis, guided by an established marketing conceptual framework, determined that the food and beverage marketing environment for Latinos is less likely to promote healthy eating and more likely to encourage consumption of low-nutrient, calorie-dense foods and beverages. This analysis also determined that Latinos' food environment and the placement of food retail stores appears to influence their body mass index; however, placement of these stores cannot be generalized, as geographical differences exist. While food and beverage marketing is only one of many sources of influence on food and beverage consumption, these findings reinforce the notion that Latinos are at a disadvantage when it comes to exposure of healthy lifestyle messaging and health-promoting food environments. PMID:25504570

  4. East Los Angeles College Community Demographics: A Look in 1980. Research Report 80-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Kenneth; Sachs, Steven Mark

    A study was conducted by East Los Angeles College (ELAC) to determine the economic, demographic, and ethnic composition of ELAC's service district. The study involved the examination of community data collected from a variety of sources, including the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Department, the Los Angeles Times Marketing Research…

  5. Latino immigrants, discrimination and reception in Columbus, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J H; Chavez, N M

    2013-04-01

    Columbus, Ohio has witnessed rapid growth in its Latino population as immigrants settle in the city to access jobs and a generally low cost of living. Immigrants also face discrimination as they settle in Columbus and interact with the city's citizens. In this paper, we note how discrimination plays out in social and economic isolation; a lack of programs to support the incorporation of Latinos in the city; and state laws that target immigrants. We present results of ongoing ethnographic work with the Latino community in Columbus.

  6. Latino immigrants, discrimination and reception in Columbus, Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J. H.; Chavez, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Columbus, Ohio has witnessed rapid growth in its Latino population as immigrants settle in the city to access jobs and a generally low cost of living. Immigrants also face discrimination as they settle in Columbus and interact with the city’s citizens. In this paper, we note how discrimination plays out in social and economic isolation; a lack of programs to support the incorporation of Latinos in the city; and state laws that target immigrants. We present results of ongoing ethnographic work with the Latino community in Columbus. PMID:25097268

  7. Latino parents' plans to communicate about sexuality with their children.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Maureen C; Wurtele, Sandy K

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated 86 Latino parents' intentions to communicate about sexuality issues with their children. They reported on their history of sexuality education, when they would first discuss sexuality-related topics, and their perceived effectiveness of each topic. Compared with a sample of Caucasian parents, Latino parents intended to discuss sexual abuse/molestation at an earlier age, but planned to discuss human reproduction, intercourse, and AIDS at significantly later ages. Suggestions for assisting Latino parents with communications regarding sexuality topics are provided.

  8. Assessing physical activity preferences in Latino and white preadolescents.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Norma; McCarley, Kendall E; Leung, Patrick; McLeod, Jessica; Rodriguez, Augusto X

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess physical activity preferences (PAP) in preadolescent children. 191 Latino and White children (M = 11.9, SD = +/- 0.7) participated. Demographic, anthropometric, and PAP measures were employed. Both Latino and White children reported water play, basketball, and bicycling as their most preferred activities while indoor chores were least preferred. Compared with Latino, White children reported a higher preference for baseball/softball. Exploratory factor analysis of PAP measure indicated a three-factor solution: free play, sports, and exercise. Multiple linear regression models revealed that PAP varied as a function of ethnicity, gender, age, and body mass index.

  9. Perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino and non-Latino male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Semple, Shirley J; Wagner, Karla D; Chavarin, Claudia V; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Patterson, Thomas L

    2015-02-01

    HIV prevention efforts must be comprehensive in their understanding of the factors involved in HIV risk. Male clients, who have received less research attention than female sex workers (FSWs), may experience stigma as a function of purchasing sex. Perceived stigma may be related to poor psychological outcomes, risky psychosexual characteristics, and higher drug and sexual risk behavior among male clients of FSWs. However, perceived stigma of purchasing sex may differ between clients of different ethnic groups. In the present study, we examine the correlates of perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino versus non-Latino male clients of FSWs in Tijuana, Mexico. Using time-location sampling, we recruited 375 male clients (323 Latino, 52 non-Latino) in Tijuana who completed a computerized survey on various measures. We measured perceived stigma of purchasing sex using three items we developed for this study. Using linear regression analyses we found that perceived stigma was associated with greater guilt, a greater feeling of escape from everyday life, and more negative condom attitudes among Latino clients. This was not found among non-Latino clients. Features of Latino culture, like machismo, and how they may relate to stigma of purchasing sex are discussed.

  10. Perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino and non-Latino male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pitpitan, Eileen V.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Semple, Shirley J.; Wagner, Karla D.; Chavarin, Claudia V.; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    HIV prevention efforts must be comprehensive in their understanding of the factors involved in HIV risk. Male clients, who have received less research attention than female sex workers (FSWs), may experience stigma as a function of purchasing sex. Perceived stigma may be related to poor psychological outcomes, risky psychosexual characteristics, and higher drug and sexual risk behavior among male clients of FSWs. However, perceived stigma of purchasing sex may differ between clients of different ethnic groups. In the present study, we examine the correlates of perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino vs. non-Latino male clients of FSWs in Tijuana, Mexico. Using time-location sampling, we recruited 375 male clients (323 Latino, 52 non-Latino) in Tijuana who completed a computerized survey on various measures. We measured perceived stigma of purchasing sex using three items we developed for this study. Using linear regression analyses we found that perceived stigma was associated with greater guilt, a greater feeling of escape from everyday life, and more negative condom attitudes among Latino clients. This was not found among non-Latino clients. Features of Latino culture, like machismo, and how they may relate to stigma of purchasing sex are discussed. PMID:23979714

  11. Latino Critical Perspective in Social Work.

    PubMed

    Kiehne, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Although a Latino critical perspective (LatCrit) is consistent with social work's professional mission and values, it is largely absent from its literature. With a focus on the Latino population in the United States, LatCrit elucidates an oppressive structure of social inequality and discrimination and promotes systemic change through self-advocacy. Thus, LatCrit supports the call for the revival of mezzo- and macro-level practice in social work. This article discusses the utility of LatCrit for social work practice through a discussion of its origins, main tenets, and primary aims. A critique of the theoretical perspective is also offered; its insights for social work practice, philosophical assumptions, and challenges for use in the field are highlighted. Social workers are offered an analysis of LatCrit enabling them to apply the theoretical perspective discretionarily rather than universally to meet diverse challenges and client needs. Specific ways in which social workers can facilitate the LatCrit praxis are discussed, such as community organizing and grassroots advocacy campaigns.

  12. Latino men's sexual behavior with transgender persons.

    PubMed

    Bockting, Walter; Miner, Michael; Rosser, B R Simon

    2007-12-01

    Male-to-female transgender persons are thought to be "vectors" for HIV/STI transmission, yet little quantitative information exists about the risk behavior of their male sexual partners who may serve as a "bridge" for HIV transmission into the general population. As part of an online survey examining the sexual risk behavior of Latino men who have sex with men (N = 1,026), we identified 44 (4%) participants who reported having had sex with a transgender partner. Compared with a randomly selected sub-sample of 200 men who did not report sex with a transgender person, sexual partners of transgender persons were almost three times more likely to have had unprotected sexual intercourse in the last three months. In addition, men who had sex with transgender persons were more likely to be HIV-positive; married, separated, or divorced; identify as bisexual or straight; have sex with women; and live in rural or small town communities. Regression analysis revealed that community size, sexual compulsivity, and having had a transgender partner were independent predictors of unprotected sex. Among Latino men who have sex with men, men with a history of sex with a transgender person appear more likely to be sexually compulsive and at greater risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. These men may, therefore, also serve as a "bridge" for HIV transmission to (as opposed to from) the transgender population.

  13. Making Invisible Latino Adolescents Visible: A Critical Approach to Latino Diversity. Michigan State University Series on Children, Youth, and Families, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montero-Sieburth, Martha, Ed.; Villarruel, Francisco A., Ed.

    The papers in this collection explore a variety of economic and social issues facing Latino adolescents, including those of Latino diversity or unity, sexuality, and family values. The authors discuss ways to respond to these issues, suggesting approaches that can contribute to the healthy development of Latino adolescents. The chapters are: (1)…

  14. Barriers and benefits of protective eyewear use by Latino farm workers.

    PubMed

    Forst, Linda; Noth, Isabel Martinez; Lacey, Steven; Bauer, Susan; Skinner, Sara; Petrea, Robert; Zanoni, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural work is one of the riskiest occupations for the eyes. Protective eyewear can prevent eye injuries in upward of 90% of cases. Latino migrant and seasonal farm workers (LFWs) are at particular risk of eye injury because of economic, social, and cultural barriers to safe employment. The goal of this project was to determine the perceived benefits and barriers to use of protective eyewear during agricultural work among LFWs. In the year 2000, 55 workers who spent at least part of their time working in Illinois and Michigan as seasonal, hired farm workers were interviewed either individually (9) or in six focus groups (46) regarding their perceptions of eye hazards and the factors that encourage or discourage the use of protective eyewear. Subsequently, safety glasses and training on eye safety were delivered by promotores de salud to LFWs from the same cohort over two summer seasons. During the second season, the promotores observed the use of safety eyewear by farm workers at least once per week on 17 farms over a three-month period. At each point of observation, the promotores asked those wearing the glasses why they chose to wear them and those who were not wearing them, why not. At both points of the study (pre-intervention interviews and post-intervention observations), the reasons for use fell into the following categories: protection from hazards, appearance, whether it was mandated/provided by the employer, and whether others used it. The reasons for non-use include perceived lack of protection, discomfort, undesirable appearance, interference with visual acuity, slowing down the work pace, and no mandate from employers. Since eliminating the eye injury hazard is not possible in most agricultural settings, administrative strategies and use of personal protective equipment are critical. Perceptions of the target audience, LFWs, should be used to develop a comprehensive eye safety program; this should include allowing LFWs to select a style from

  15. Perspective View, SRTM / Landsat, Los Angeles, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Los Angeles, Calif., is one of the world's largest metropolitan areas with a population of about 15 million people. The urban areas mostly cover the coastal plains and lie within the inland valleys. The intervening and adjacent mountains are generally too rugged for much urban development. This in large part because the mountains are 'young', meaning they are still building (and eroding) in this seismically active (earthquake prone) region.

    Earthquake faults commonly lie between the mountains and the lowlands. The San Andreas fault, the largest fault in California, likewise divides the very rugged San Gabriel Mountains from the low-relief Mojave Desert, thus forming a straight topographic boundary between the top center and lower right corner of the image. We present two versions of this perspective image from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM): one with and one without a graphic overlay that maps faults that have been active in Late Quaternary times (white lines). The fault database was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    For the annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Large image: 2 mB jpeg)

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on May 4, 2001, about seven weeks before the summer solstice, so natural terrain shading is not particularly strong. It is also not especially apparent given a view direction (northwest) nearly parallel to the sun illumination (shadows generally fall on the backsides of mountains). Consequently, topographic shading derived from the SRTM elevation model was added to the Landsat image, with a false sun illumination from the left (southwest). This synthetic shading enhances the appearance of the topography.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and substantially helps in analyzing the large and

  16. The rise and fall of the Latino dentist supply in California: implications for dental education.

    PubMed

    Hayes-Bautista, David E; Kahramanian, Mariam Iya; Richardson, Erin G; Hsu, Paul; Sosa, Lucette; Gamboa, Cristina; Stein, Robert M

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the number of Latino dentists in California, identify the schools and countries where they were educated, and compare Latino dentist demographics with that of the state's new demographics. From the 2000 California Department of Consumer Affairs list of 25,273 dentists, we identified Latino U.S. dental graduates (USDGs) by "heavily Hispanic" surnames and Latino international dental graduates (IDGs) by country and school of graduation. From the 2000 U.S. census Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS), we described Latino dentist characteristics such as Spanish language capacity and practice location. The number of Latino dentists acquiring licenses to practice in California has fallen dramatically, by nearly 80 percent, between 1983 and 2000. This decline is not merely an affirmative action issue; it results in an issue of access. Latino dentists are far more likely to speak Spanish and be located in a heavily Latino area than non-Latino dentists. Currently, although the supply of Latino dentists is dwindling, the Latino population is growing rapidly. In California and out-of-state schools, first-year matriculation of Latino USDG must increase. Further, non-Latino dentists should be prepared and given incentives to learn Spanish and locate practices in areas of need. The reintroduction of IDG Latino dentists needs to be seriously considered. PMID:17314384

  17. Turning Neighbors into Friends: The Los Angeles Camp Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenya, Judith

    2002-01-01

    A camp for Los Angeles (California) children traumatized by war, community violence, and hatred gives them time to heal and feel safe. The camp's theme of reconciliation and nonviolence is expressed by an all-volunteer staff through community, teamwork, and cooperation. Nature's diversity is used to show how diverse groups can interact, thrive,…

  18. Americas Unidas; Pilot Broadcasting Program Los Angeles, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Samuel W.

    A proposed Spanish-speaking pilot broadcasting program in the Los Angeles area is described in this prospectus. The purpose of Americas Unidas, a proposed non-profit California corporation, will be to do research and development, production, distribution, and broadcasting of educational films and other audiovisual materials for the…

  19. 40. Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, Los Angeles, California, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, Los Angeles, California, dated July 1937. (Microfiched drawings located at the Denver Service Center, #113/41906-set of 2) IMPROVEMENTS IN SEWAGE TREATMENT AND FILTER CHAMBER. - Water Reclamation Plant, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  20. 75 FR 13236 - FM Table of Allotments, Port Angeles, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... applications. See 73 FR 75631, published December 12, 2008. In the first application (File No. BPH-20080710AJA... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM Table of Allotments, Port Angeles, Washington AGENCY: Federal Communications... KSWW(FM), Montesano, Washington, to substitute FM Channel 271A for vacant Channel 229A at Port...

  1. Los Angeles Community Colleges Fall 2000 Student Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather, George; Kelly, Dexter

    This report gives a historical overview of the Los Angeles Community Colleges District Student Survey and provides details about the current survey results. The student survey was started in fall 1976 in order to provide a picture of students by identifying their goals, levels of college preparation, extra curricular interests, transportation…

  2. Case Study Number Four: Los Angeles County, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Marvin R.

    For any administrator evaluation system to work, reasonableness, integrity, and trust must be present, according to the author of these descriptions of two California evaluation programs in the Los Angeles County School District. These two programs are intended to comply with California's Stull Act, which mandates personnel evaluation in the…

  3. Annual Information Digest, Los Angeles Community Colleges, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, May K. C.

    Providing historical data up to 1992-1994 on the nine colleges in the Los Angeles community college District (LACCD), this statistical digest presents tables and graphs on student characteristics, enrollment trends, instructional programs, student performance and articulation, special services, and fiscal and personnel resources. Highlighted…

  4. Urban America: Policy Choices for Los Angeles and the Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, James B., Ed.; And Others

    This volume presents 13 essays on urban problems in the United States, particularly in Los Angeles (California) following the 1992 riots, and policy options for the future. Part 1 addresses policies of the past three decades; Part 2 looks at children, youth, and families; Part 3 discusses crime and criminal justice; and Part 4 examines public…

  5. Working Smart: The Los Angeles Workplace Literacy Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Adult and Occupational Education.

    The Working Smart workplace literacy project was sponsored by a public school district and several profit and nonprofit companies and conducted for the hotel and food industry in the Los Angeles area. Literacy instruction was merged with job requirements of the customer service job classifications. Videodisc courseware was developed, as were…

  6. Drop Out Patterns in the East Los Angeles Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waktola, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    This study attempted to analyze the drop out problem from spatial perspectives within the context of East Los Angeles Community College, California. Selected urban land-use types, which positively and negatively influence the propensity to drop out or persist-in colleges, were selected and captured during a global positioning system (GPS)-based…

  7. 75 FR 3981 - National Angel Island Day, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Island Day, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation One hundred years ago, the Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco Bay opened for the first time, and an...

  8. Los Angeles School Board Race Shatters Spending Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2013-01-01

    The price tag to win a seat in this week's primary election for the Los Angeles school board climbed to unprecedented levels, as a massive influx of outside cash has turned a local campaign into a national showdown pitting the long-standing influence of teachers' unions against the expanding imprint of deep-pocketed education activists. The high…

  9. FINE PORE DIFFUSER FOULING: THE LOS ANGELES STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes five fine pore diffuser evaluations conducted at three different wastewater treatment plants located in the greater Los Angeles area. The overall goal of the study was to evaluate the performance of fine pore diffusers using selected cleaning methods for ex...

  10. Spring 1987 Student Survey: Summary. Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrath, Nancy; Fong Lai, Kit

    Since 1974, student surveys have been conducted in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) to gather information on student goals, plans, academic preparation, characteristics, financial aid, and evaluations of college services. In spring 1987, a random sample of 15% of the current enrollment at each college in the LACCD were surveyed…

  11. The Community College General Academic Assessment: Los Angeles District, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Michelle

    Information is provided on the characteristics of Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) students and their general education and liberal arts knowledge. The first sections of the report provide information on the development and administration of the General Academic Assessment (GAA), an instrument containing representative items in the…

  12. Los Angeles Community College District Annual Report, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    This 1993 annual report provides information on student demographics, college programs, and educational finances in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD), which, with more than 117,000 students, is the largest community college district in the nation. The report begins with a statement from Donald Phelps, the outgoing chancellor of…

  13. Housing in Los Angeles: Affordable Housing for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Blue Ribbon Committee for Affordable Housing, CA.

    A 1988 mayoral committee assessed the seriousness of Los Angeles (California) housing problems and found that the city's housing efforts were sufficient in the 1960s, when the Federal Government took primary responsibility for housing and the average wage was adequate to support the cost of the average house or apartment. However, the following…

  14. Los Angeles City College Credit Manual. Revision, Spring 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Coll., CA.

    This manual lists regulations and practices governing credit procedures at Los Angeles City College (California). Grading practices and record updating procedures are covered, including credit by examination, credit/no credit grading, credit on early military withdrawal, course repetition, course duplication, incompletes, and credit transfer. The…

  15. The Science Curriculum in the Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Jack; Sillman, Donna

    The 1979-1980 class schedules for the nine institutions within the Los Angeles Community College District were examined to document the number and variety of courses offered by the colleges in six areas of science: agriculture, biological sciences, engineering sciences and technology, mathematics and computer science, physical sciences, and social…

  16. Los Angeles City College, Presidential Inauguration, October 22, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Mary

    On October 22, 1998, Los Angeles City College's 70th anniversary, Dr. Mary Spangler was inaugurated as the 12th president of the college. In this, her message to faculty, staff, and family attending the event, Spangler revisits the college's past, citing historical highlights from each decade. She also focuses on the present state of the college,…

  17. "Angels Voices": Libretto by Gary Race. Cue Sheet for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Dawn Eddy

    This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a performance of "Angels Voices," with libretto by Gary Race and music by Noa Ain. The guide, called a "Cuesheet," is in the form of a Director's Notebook (a scrapbook/journal of clippings, quotations, illustrations, notes, and other items) to show how a director…

  18. SOFT FLOOR COVERING IN THE LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CUNLIFF, DONALD D.

    A STUDY REGARDING THE INSTALLATION OF CARPET IN SCHOOLS IS DISCUSSED. THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO HAVE A CONSULTANT REVIEW UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE DISTRICT BUILDING AND GROUNDS SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR OF THE LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICTS, THE SOFT FLOOR COVERING INSTALLATIONS AT ARAGON AVENUE AND TWENTY-FOURTH STREET SCHOOLS. SECTIONS…

  19. Student Volunteer Service Programs: Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Roger

    This study investigated the extent and diversity of student volunteer programs in the Los Angeles Community College District (California) to determine the amount of college support and acceptance accorded them. The junior colleges should take advantage of the great student potential for positive social action and realize that, in the area of…

  20. Food Buying Practices of Mexican Americans in East Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jane S.; And Others

    As part of a pilot study of the nutritional status of Mexican American preschool children attending Head Start in East Los Angeles in the spring of 1969, questions were asked concerning their families' buying and food practices. This paper reports on the information obtained from the 21 questionnaires which were returned. Answers to the following…

  1. Arts in Focus: Los Angeles Countywide Arts Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This report baseline study information about the state of arts education in Los Angeles County, California, the most populous county in the United States. Students in the districts covered in this survey represent 27% of all students enrolled in California public schools (K-12) and 3.4% of all students enrolled in U.S. public schools. The survey's…

  2. Latino Teen Theater: A Theater Intervention to Promote Latino Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication.

    PubMed

    Noone, Joanne; Castillo, Nancy; Allen, Tiffany L; Esqueda, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Latina teen pregnancy rates continue to be a health disparity in the United States. This study evaluated a parenting intervention using interactive theater to facilitate Latino parent-adolescent communication about sexuality and pregnancy prevention. The intervention, conducted in Spanish and with teen actors, consisted of scenes involving the audience. Fifty-nine parents participated in this 3-month prospective study. Spanish measures of comfort with communication, general communication, and parent-child sexual communication were employed comparing paired t tests for each scale. Acceptability of the intervention was assessed and demonstrated. Eighty-six percent of parents used information from the performance to talk to their child. Improvements in general communication (p < .02), sexual communication (p < .001), and comfort (p < .001) occurred. Interactive theater is an innovative approach to facilitate Latino parent communication about sexuality and pregnancy prevention.

  3. The SAFER Latinos project: Addressing a community ecology underlying Latino youth violence.

    PubMed

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D; Collins, Elizabeth; Klevens, Joanne; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Ivonne; del Cid, Alex Taylor; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the intervention model, early implementation experience, and challenges for the Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos (SAFER) Latinos project. The SAFER Latinos project is an attempt to build the evidence for a multilevel participatory youth violence prevention model tailored to the specific circumstances of Central American immigrants. Specific circumstances targeted in this intervention are decreased family cohesion as a result of sequential immigration (i.e., parents arriving first and bringing their children years later or youth arriving without parents); multiple school barriers; community disorganization and low community efficacy; limited access to services; and a social context (including gang presence) that is linked to youth norms supporting violence. In its implementation, the initial intervention model was adapted to address barriers and challenges. These are described, along with lessons learned and the ongoing evaluation.

  4. Was all that Los Angeles River flood control concrete necessary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzert, W. C.; Regalado, S. S.; LaDochy, S.; Ramirez, P. C.; Willis, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    In 1938, heavy rains over the Los Angeles Basin resulted in widespread and costly flooding of the Los Angeles River floodplain. In response to the resultant damage, 51 miles of the River was concreted from the San Fernando Valley to the Pacific Ocean. Today proposals to modify the river to capture more water and to restore it to a more natural state have been approved. Through comparison of rainfall data, we test whether channelization can adequately handle the extreme flooding events occurring since 1938. Between February 27th to March 3rd 1938, two major storms resulted in 14.1 inches of rain in Pasadena, CA leading to the flooding of the Los Angeles River, 115 fatalities, the destruction of 5,601 buildings, and to $627 million (2011 dollars) in damages. Downtown Los Angeles averages 15 inches of precipitation a year, while the San Gabriel Mountains, where most of the Los Angeles River watershed rainfall is collected, typically receive more than 40 inches of rain annually. Eight record storms, each with rainfall totals over 11 inches, since the 1938 flood could have created devastating deluges were it not for channelization. Presently, at full stage the channelized Los Angeles River can accommodate a discharge of 129,000 cfs. During the 1938 flood event the discharge peaked at 68,000 cfs above Arroyo Seco and 79,000 cfs below Firestone Blvd. A similar storm event today would have led to increased discharge due to urbanization. Since 1938, the greatest discharge recorded at the same stations was 52,200 and 74,400 cfs during the February 16th 1980 storm. Although damage was substantial during this storm, river channelization prevented fatalities and much damage. To date, the channelization of the Los Angeles River has been successful in flood control. However, our research shows that southern California precipitation is becoming more intense which may result in increased flooding. Any future modifications to the river must be prepared to handle the extreme flooding

  5. Effectiveness of the Engagement and Counseling for Latinos (ECLA) Intervention in Low-Income Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Ludman, Evette; Kafali, Nilay; Lapatin, Sheri; Vila, Doriliz; Shrout, Patrick E.; Keefe, Kristen; Cook, Benjamin; Ault, Andrea; Li, Xinliang; Bauer, Amy; Epelbaum, Claudia; Alcantara, Carmela; Pineda, Tulia Inés Guerra; Tejera, Gloria Gonzalez; Suarez, Gloria; Leon, Karla; Lessios, Anna S.; Ramirez, Rafael R; Canino, Glorisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Persistent disparities in access and quality of mental health care for Latinos indicate a need for evidence-based, culturally adapted and outside-the-clinic-walls treatments. Objective Evaluate treatment effectiveness of telephone (ECLA –T) or face-to-face (ECLA-F) delivery of a 6–8 session cognitive behavioral therapy and care-management intervention for low-income Latinos, as compared to usual care for depression. Design Multi-site randomized controlled trial. Setting Eight community health clinics in Boston, Massachusetts and San Juan, Puerto Rico. Participants 257 Latino patients recruited from primary care between May 2011 and September 2012. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was severity of depression, assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-20 (HSCL-20). The secondary outcome was functioning over the previous 30 days, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO-DAS 2.0). Results Both telephone and face-to-face versions of the ECLA were more effective than usual care. The effect sizes of both intervention conditions on PHQ-9 were moderate when combined data from both sites are analyzed (.56 and .64 for face-to-face and telephone, respectively). Similarly, effect sizes of ECLA-F and ECLA-T on the HSCL were quite large in the Boston site (.64 and .73. respectively) but not in Puerto Rico (.10 and .03). Conclusions and Relevance The intervention appears to help Latino patients reduce depressive symptoms and improve functioning. Of particular importance is the higher treatment initiation for the telephone vs. face-to-face intervention (89.7% vs. 78.8%), which suggests that telephone-based care may improve access and quality of care. PMID:25310525

  6. Stereotypes of Latinos and Whites: do they guide evaluations in diverse work groups?

    PubMed

    Jimeno-Ingrum, Diana; Berdahl, Jennifer L; Lucero-Wagoner, Brennis

    2009-04-01

    We examined whether stereotypes of Latinos as less warm and less competent than Whites guided perceptions of individuals in interacting work groups. Both Whites and Latinos rated Latino group members as lower in competence and warmth than White group members. This occurred in work groups with a majority of White members as well as in work groups with a majority of Latino members. The most favorable ratings were received by solo Whites in majority Latino groups, whereas the least favorable ratings were received by solo Latinos in majority White groups. Implications and future directions for research are discussed. PMID:19364202

  7. Stereotypes of Latinos and Whites: do they guide evaluations in diverse work groups?

    PubMed

    Jimeno-Ingrum, Diana; Berdahl, Jennifer L; Lucero-Wagoner, Brennis

    2009-04-01

    We examined whether stereotypes of Latinos as less warm and less competent than Whites guided perceptions of individuals in interacting work groups. Both Whites and Latinos rated Latino group members as lower in competence and warmth than White group members. This occurred in work groups with a majority of White members as well as in work groups with a majority of Latino members. The most favorable ratings were received by solo Whites in majority Latino groups, whereas the least favorable ratings were received by solo Latinos in majority White groups. Implications and future directions for research are discussed.

  8. Occupational Injuries on Thoroughbred Horse Farms: A Description of Latino and Non-Latino Workers’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Swanberg, Jennifer E.; Clouser, Jessica M.; Westneat, Susan C.; Marsh, Mary W.; Reed, Deborah B.

    2013-01-01

    Animal production is a dangerous industry and increasingly reliant on a Latino workforce. Within animal production, little is known about the risks or the occupational hazards of working on farms involved in various aspects of thoroughbred horse breeding. Extant research suggests that horse workers are at risk of musculoskeletal and respiratory symptoms, kicks, and other injuries. However, limited known research has examined the experiences of the industry’s workers, including immigrant workers, despite their prominence and increased vulnerability. Using data collected from thoroughbred farm representatives via a phone-administered survey, a 2-hour face-to-face semi-structured interview, and farm injury logs, this article identifies and describes types of injuries experienced by workers (N = 284) and their surrounding circumstances. Results indicate that general injuries and musculoskeletal strains, sprains, and tears account for a majority of injuries among workers on thoroughbred farms. Upper limbs and extremities are most frequently injured, while direct contact with the horse accounted for over half of all injuries. No differences in the diagnoses or distribution of injury were found by ethnicity; however, Latinos were more often struck by or trampled by a horse while non-Latinos were more often injured by an insect or plant. Implications and opportunities for future research are discussed. PMID:24351785

  9. Occupational injuries on thoroughbred horse farms: a description of Latino and non-Latino workers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Clouser, Jessica M; Westneat, Susan C; Marsh, Mary W; Reed, Deborah B

    2013-12-01

    Animal production is a dangerous industry and increasingly reliant on a Latino workforce. Within animal production, little is known about the risks or the occupational hazards of working on farms involved in various aspects of thoroughbred horse breeding. Extant research suggests that horse workers are at risk of musculoskeletal and respiratory symptoms, kicks, and other injuries. However, limited known research has examined the experiences of the industry's workers, including immigrant workers, despite their prominence and increased vulnerability. Using data collected from thoroughbred farm representatives via a phone-administered survey, a 2-hour face-to-face semi-structured interview, and farm injury logs, this article identifies and describes types of injuries experienced by workers (N = 284) and their surrounding circumstances. Results indicate that general injuries and musculoskeletal strains, sprains, and tears account for a majority of injuries among workers on thoroughbred farms. Upper limbs and extremities are most frequently injured, while direct contact with the horse accounted for over half of all injuries. No differences in the diagnoses or distribution of injury were found by ethnicity; however, Latinos were more often struck by or trampled by a horse while non-Latinos were more often injured by an insect or plant. Implications and opportunities for future research are discussed. PMID:24351785

  10. Health communication in the Latino community: issues and approaches.

    PubMed

    Elder, John P; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Talavera, Gregory A

    2009-01-01

    With reference to the Communication-Persuasion model, we describe various research issues and challenges when considering the health of Latinos, and implications for designing and evaluating health communication and behavior change efforts in this population. Latinos, collectively the nation's largest minority group, vary substantially in terms of socioeconomic and legal status, their country of origin and the extent of ongoing contact with that country, their region of residence within the United States, their generation status and levels of acculturation, and psychosocial factors. Health communication efforts with Latinos need to focus on family, cultural traditions, and collectivism while attending to acculturation, language, generation and national origin. The most extensive intervention topic in Latino health promotion has been the application of the lay health advisor model. This and other fundamental communication approaches, as well as audience and population characteristics, need to be considered within the context of dynamic and complex societal changes.

  11. Latino elders reframing familismo: implications for health and caregiving support.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Maria Elena; Ransford, H Edward

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This study explores Latino elders' perceptions of familismo and the extent to which a familistic orientation translates into health support. Latinos have traditionally been portrayed as adhering to a familistic orientation with the presumption of duty and obligation to care or aging parents. Latino elders participated in focus groups that became the basis of this study. These elders shared ways they are reframing the familismo construct. Despite a greater need for support, elders reported infrequent contact with family. In the absence of family, family boundaries have been extended, so that others become "like family to me. The findings call into question the present state of familismo and the presumption that the Latino family is able to care for its own. PMID:22924203

  12. Ten Ways Hispanics and Latinos Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Native Asian American / Pacific Islander Hispanic / Latino American Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... compartir esta información libremente. [ Volver arriba ] Marzo 2015 ​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  13. Discontinuation of Antidepressant Medication Among Latinos in the US

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Alegría, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent growth in the variety of antidepressant medications available, many patients discontinue medication prematurely, for reasons such as nonresponse, side effects, stigma and miscommunication. Some analysts have suggested that Latinos may have higher antidepressant discontinuation rates than other US residents. This paper examines Latino antidepressant discontinuation, using data from a national probability survey of Latinos in the US. In this sample, 8% of Latinos had taken an antidepressant in the preceding 12 months. Among those users, 33.3% had discontinued taking antidepressants at the time of interview, and 18.9% had done so without prior input from their physician. Even controlling for clinical and other variables, patients who reported good or excellent English proficiency were less likely to stop at all. Patients were also less likely to stop if they were older, married, had public or private insurance, or had made eight or more visits to a nonmedical therapist. PMID:17570068

  14. Recent Noteworthy Young Adult Books about Latinos/as.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Isabel

    1999-01-01

    Offers brief descriptions of 16 books in English (published in 1997 and 1998) about Latino people and cultures. Arranges these noteworthy books into five broad areas: fiction, history, literature, poetry, and sociology. (SR)

  15. HIV Prevention Messages Targeting Young Latino Immigrant MSM.

    PubMed

    Solorio, Rosa; Norton-Shelpuk, Pamela; Forehand, Mark; Martinez, Marcos; Aguirre, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Young Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and for delayed diagnosis. A need exists to raise awareness about HIV prevention in this population, including the benefits of timely HIV testing. This project was developed through collaboration between University of WA researchers and Entre Hermanos, a community-based organization serving Latinos. Building from a community-based participatory research approach, the researchers developed a campaign that was executed by Activate Brands, based in Denver, Colorado. The authors (a) describe the development of HIV prevention messages through the integration of previously collected formative data; (b) describe the process of translating these messages into PSAs, including the application of a marketing strategy; (c) describe testing the PSAs within the Latino MSM community; and (c) determine a set of important factors to consider when developing HIV prevention messages for young Latino MSM who do not identify as gay.

  16. HIV Prevention Messages Targeting Young Latino Immigrant MSM

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Rosa; Forehand, Mark; Aguirre, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Young Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and for delayed diagnosis. A need exists to raise awareness about HIV prevention in this population, including the benefits of timely HIV testing. This project was developed through collaboration between University of WA researchers and Entre Hermanos, a community-based organization serving Latinos. Building from a community-based participatory research approach, the researchers developed a campaign that was executed by Activate Brands, based in Denver, Colorado. The authors (a) describe the development of HIV prevention messages through the integration of previously collected formative data; (b) describe the process of translating these messages into PSAs, including the application of a marketing strategy; (c) describe testing the PSAs within the Latino MSM community; and (c) determine a set of important factors to consider when developing HIV prevention messages for young Latino MSM who do not identify as gay. PMID:24864201

  17. Recommended Books about Latinos for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Isabel

    2001-01-01

    Reviews children's and adolescents' literature on the influence of Latinos in the United States, focusing on books in the following categories: the arts, fiction, literature, simple and interesting, and reference materials (encyclopedias and reference guides). (SM)

  18. HIV Prevention Messages Targeting Young Latino Immigrant MSM.

    PubMed

    Solorio, Rosa; Norton-Shelpuk, Pamela; Forehand, Mark; Martinez, Marcos; Aguirre, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Young Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and for delayed diagnosis. A need exists to raise awareness about HIV prevention in this population, including the benefits of timely HIV testing. This project was developed through collaboration between University of WA researchers and Entre Hermanos, a community-based organization serving Latinos. Building from a community-based participatory research approach, the researchers developed a campaign that was executed by Activate Brands, based in Denver, Colorado. The authors (a) describe the development of HIV prevention messages through the integration of previously collected formative data; (b) describe the process of translating these messages into PSAs, including the application of a marketing strategy; (c) describe testing the PSAs within the Latino MSM community; and (c) determine a set of important factors to consider when developing HIV prevention messages for young Latino MSM who do not identify as gay. PMID:24864201

  19. Eye injuries in childhood.

    PubMed

    Grin, T R; Nelson, L B; Jeffers, J B

    1987-07-01

    A 3-year survey was conducted of all children with eye injuries admitted to Wills Eye Hospital to determine demographic, etiologic, and prophylactic factors. There were 278 cases, representing 22% of all ocular injuries in children requiring admission. The frequency of childhood ocular injuries is high, often resulting in serious visual impairment. Many of these injuries are preventable. The causes of pediatric eye injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  20. Hate Crime in Los Angeles County 1990. A Report to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Bunny Nightwalker

    A report on 1990 hate crimes in Los Angeles County (California) found 275 racially motivated hate crimes, 150 religiously motivated hate crimes, and 125 sexual orientation hate crimes. The data were collected primarily from law enforcement and community agencies. Of the racially motivated crimes, most were aimed at Blacks, followed by Asians. Jews…

  1. LASIK and dry eye.

    PubMed

    Toda, Ikuko

    2007-01-01

    Dry eye is one of the most common complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). The clinical signs of post-LASIK dry eye include positive vital staining of ocular surface, decreased tear film breakup time and Schirmer test, reduced corneal sensitivity, and decreased functional visual acuity. The symptoms and signs last at least 1 month after LASIK. Although the mechanisms for developing post-LASIK dry eye are not completely understood, loss of corneal innervation by flap-making may affect the reflex loops of the corneal-lacrimal gland, corneal-blinking, and blinking-meibomian gland, and blinking-meibomian gland, resulting in decreased aqueous and lipid tear secretion and mucin expression. As LASIK enhancement by flap-lifting induces less dry eye symptoms and signs than first surgery, it is suggested that other factors rather than loss of neurotrophic effect may be involved in the mechanisms of post-LASIK dry eye. The treatments of dry eye include artificial tears, topical cyclosporine, hot compress, punctal plugs, and autologous serum eye drops. For patients with severe preoperative dry eye, a combination of punctal plugs and serum eye drops is required to be used before surgery.

  2. Impact of Motivational Pharmacotherapy on Treatment Retention among Depressed Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Balán, Iván C.; Patel, Sapana R.; Sánchez-Lacay, J. Arturo; Alfonso, César; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Blanco, Carlos; Schmidt, Andrew; Jiang, Huiping; Schneier, Franklin; Moyers, Theresa B.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to non-Latino Whites, US racial/ethnic minority groups show higher non-adherence with outpatient antidepressant therapy, including lower retention, despite adjusting for sociodemographic and insurance covariates. Culturally salient concerns about antidepressants leading to ambivalence about treatment engagement may contribute to this discrepancy. To improve treatment adherence among depressed Latinos, we developed Motivational Pharmacotherapy, a novel approach that combines Motivational Interviewing, standard pharmacotherapy, and attention to Latino cultural concerns about antidepressants. This 12-week, open-trial, pre-post pilot study assessed the impact of Motivational Pharmacotherapy on antidepressant therapy retention, response (symptoms, functioning, and quality of life), and visit duration among N=50 first-generation Latino outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder. At study endpoint, 20% of patients discontinued treatment, with a mean therapy duration of 74.2 out of 84 days. Patients’ symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life improved significantly. Mean visit length was 36.7 minutes for visit 1 and 24.3 minutes for subsequent visits, compatible with use in community clinics. Responder and remitter rates were 82% and 68%. Compared to published Latino proportions of non-retention (32-53%) and previous studies at our clinic with similar samples and medications (36-46%), Motivational Pharmacotherapy appears to improve Latino retention in antidepressant therapy, and should be investigated further in controlled designs. PMID:23965261

  3. Dissecting complex diseases in complex populations: asthma in latino americans.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Shweta; Seibold, Max A; Borrell, Luisa N; Tang, Hua; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Rodriguez-Santana, José R; Avila, Pedro C; Ziv, Elad; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Risch, Neil J; Burchard, Esteban González

    2007-07-01

    Asthma is a common but complex respiratory ailment; current data indicate that interaction of genetic and environmental factors lead to its clinical expression. In the United States, asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality vary widely among different Latino ethnic groups. The prevalence of asthma is highest in Puerto Ricans, intermediate in Dominicans and Cubans, and lowest in Mexicans and Central Americans. Independently, known socioeconomic, environmental, and genetic differences do not fully account for this observation. One potential explanation is that there may be unique and ethnic-specific gene-environment interactions that can differentially modify risk for asthma in Latino ethnic groups. These gene-environment interactions can be tested using genetic ancestry as a surrogate for genetic risk factors. Latinos are admixed and share varying proportions of African, Native American, and European ancestry. Most Latinos are unaware of their precise ancestry and report their ancestry based on the national origin of their family and their physical appearance. The unavailability of precise ancestry and the genetic complexity among Latinos may complicate asthma research studies in this population. On the other hand, precisely because of this rich mixture of ancestry, Latinos present a unique opportunity to disentangle the clinical, social, environmental, and genetic underpinnings of population differences in asthma prevalence, severity, and bronchodilator drug responsiveness. PMID:17607004

  4. Multiple sclerosis in Caucasians and Latino Americans.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Flores-Rivera, José; De La Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Rangel-López, Edgar; Corona, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that the prevalence, median age of onset, and specific phenotypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) are different in Caucasians and Latino Americans. Recent epidemiological studies indicate an increase in MS prevalence in Latin America (LA), where the south-north gradient of latitude described for Nordic countries does not exist. Analysis of MS epidemiological and specific aspects in LA suggests that susceptibility and clinical behavior of the disease are related to mixtures and admixtures of genes in the population. MS is not present in Amerindians with Mongoloid genes, such as occurs in other pure ethnic groups. Surely, future studies will be carried out to obtain more reliable information. In this review, we contrast and analyze the available data of MS in LA and endemic countries.

  5. One-year Incidence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Latino Poultry Processing Workers and Other Latino Manual Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Walker, Francis O.; Newman, Jill C.; Schulz, Mark R.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Eaton, Bethany; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) over one year in Latino poultry processing workers. Methods Symptoms and nerve conduction studies were used to identify Latino poultry processing workers (106 wrists) and Latinos in other manual labor occupations (257 wrists) that did not have CTS at baseline, and these individuals were then evaluated in the same manner one year later. Results Based on wrists, the one-year incidence of CTS was higher in poultry processing workers than non-poultry manual workers (19.8% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.022). Poultry workers had a higher odds (1.89; p = 0.089) of developing CTS over one year compared to non-poultry manual workers. Discussion Latino poultry processing workers have an incidence of CTS that is possibly higher than Latinos in other manual labor positions. Latino poultry workers’ high absolute and relative risk of CTS likely results from the repetitive and strenuous nature of poultry processing work. PMID:23996875

  6. An Eye for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostwald, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity as an excellent starting point for investigations related to the eye. Involves making a simple model of the vertebrate eye to illustrate the formation of an upside-down image on the retina by the lens. Links to investigations in numerous science disciplines including astronomy, genetics, biology, earth science, and…

  7. Photorefraction of the Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Photorefraction is a method to easily estimate the refractive state of the eye. The principle of photorefraction involves projecting light into the eye during flash photography and then examining the paths of light that emerge from the pupil after scattering on the back portion of the interior of the eyeball (fundus). We will explain the optical…

  8. Eye tissues study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Genina, Elina A.; Lakodina, Nina A.

    2001-08-01

    Theoretical and in vitro and in vivo experimental study of spectral and polarization characteristics of the human and rabbit eye tissues are presented. The possibility of control of optical properties of eye cornea, lens and sclera is discussed and realized experimentally for glucose solution as the refractive index matching factor.

  9. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. 01, 2016 Protecting your eyes from injury is one of the most basic things you can do to keep your vision healthy throughout your life. You may be somewhat aware of the possible ...

  10. Smoking and Eye Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health Apr. 14, 2014 Avoiding smoking and second hand smoke — or quitting if you are a smoker — are ... influence your eyes’ health. And tobacco smoke, including second-hand smoke, is an irritant that worsens dry eye , a ...

  11. Understanding pink eye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pink eye (PE) is a physiological tuber disorder that can result in serious processing complications and storage losses. The earliest external symptoms consist of an ephemeral pinkish discoloration around tuber eyes, predominately at the bud end of the tuber. These pinkish areas can then develop into...

  12. The (In)Significance of Race and Discrimination among Latino Youth: The Case of Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Giovani; Rivera, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing population of Latinos in the United States, there is little research that explores how discrimination affects the mental health of Latino youth along racial lines. In this paper we ask two closely related questions. First, do black Latino youth have higher or lower symptoms of depression than nonblack Latinos? Second, is the relationship between race and depression among Latino youth buffered by discrimination stress? Results from the Transitions Study show that black Latino youth have significantly higher symptoms of depression than nonblack Latinos. The relationship between race and depression depends on daily—but not on lifetime—experiences of discrimination. The combined effect of race and discrimination holds in the face of a wide range of measures of stress, including major lifetime events, recent life events, and chronic stressors. These findings encourage future research that considers the mental health effects of racial variation among Latinos. PMID:23559683

  13. Preventing HIV among Latino and African American Gay and Bisexual Men in a Context of HIV-Related Stigma, Discrimination, and Homophobia: Perspectives of Providers

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Ronald A.; Etzel, Mark A.; Hinojos, Ernesto; Henry, Charles L.; Perez, Mario

    2005-01-01

    HIV-related stigma, discrimination, and homophobia impede community based efforts to combat HIV disease among Latino and African American gay and bisexual men. This commentary highlights ways to address these social biases in communities of color in Los Angeles from the perspectives of staff from HIV prevention programs. Information was collected from HIV prevention program staff participating in a two-day symposium. The outcomes from the symposium offer strategies for developing and implementing HIV prevention services for Latino and African American gay and bisexual men, which include: 1) addressing social biases present in a community that can hinder, and even prohibit, utilization of effective HIV prevention programs; 2) recasting HIV prevention messages in a broader social or health context; 3) developing culturally appropriate HIV prevention messages; 4) exploring new modalities and venues for delivering HIV prevention messages that are appropriate for gay and bisexual men of color and the communities in which they live; and 5) broadening the target of HIV prevention services to include service providers, local institutions and agencies, and the community at-large. These strategies underscore the need to consider the social and contextual factors of a community when designing and implementing HIV prevention programs. PMID:16283834

  14. SRTM Stereo Pair with Landsat Overlay: Los Angeles to San Joaquin Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's topography poses challenges for road builders. Northwest of Los Angeles, deformation of Earth's crust along the Pacific-North American crustal plate boundary has made transportation difficult. Direct connection between metropolitan Los Angeles (image lower left) and California's Central Valley (image top center) through the rugged terrain seen on the left side of this image was long avoided in favor of longer, but easier paths. However, over the last century, three generations of roads have traversed this terrain. The first was 'The Ridge Route', a two-lane road, built in 1915, which followed long winding ridge lines that included 697curves. The second, built in 1933, was to become four-lane U.S. Highway 99. It generally followed widened canyon bottoms. The third is the current eight lane Interstate 5 freeway, built in the 1960s, which is generally notched into hillsides, but also includes a stretch of several miles where the two directions of travel are widely separated and driving is 'on the left', a rarity in the United States. Such an unusual highway configuration was necessary in order to optimize the road grades for uphill and downhill traffic in this topographically challenging setting.

    This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary SRTM elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30 meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive

  15. Eye burning - itching and discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergies or hay fever Infections, bacterial or viral ( conjunctivitis or pink eye) Chemical irritants (such as chlorine ... to help with allergies. Pink eye or viral conjunctivitis causes a red or bloodshot eye and excessive ...

  16. Early Landsat View of Los Angeles and Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Landsat 1 (originally named the Earth Resources Technology Satellite, or ERTS) was the first of what was to become a series of satellites designed to map and monitor the Earth's land surfaces. This view of Los Angeles and vicinity is a scene acquired by a single pass of Landsat 1 on 25 June 1974. The image is derived from visible and reflected infrared light and is displayed with the visible green, the visible red, and an infrared channel coded as blue, green, and red, respectively. Healthy vegetation is highly reflective in the infrared and therefore appears red in this standard display. Chaparral and forested areas form bold red patterns in the Sierra, Santa Monica, San Gabriel, and other mountain ranges. Agricultural fields form a textured red pattern in the San Joaquin Valley in the upper left. Downtown Los Angeles appears as a light blue patch in the lower right.

  17. (Re)visioning U.S. Latino Literatures in High School English Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas, Mary Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    The term "Latino" in this paper adopts a U.S. definition to refer to those persons born/living in the United States who are of Latin American ancestry. U.S. Latino literature is defined as literature that is originally composed mostly in English, but not exclusively, by authors of U.S. Latino background. Selections of Latino literature in the U.S.…

  18. 13. CENTER CROSS GIRDERS, B. TO B. ANGELES, AND LATERAL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. CENTER CROSS GIRDERS, B. TO B. ANGELES, AND LATERAL. (Also includes a schedule of parts.) American Bridge Company, Ambridge Plant No. 5, sheet no. 3, dated April 5, 1928, order no. F5073. For U.S. Steel Products Company, Pacific Coast Depot, order no. SF578. For Southern Pacific Company, order no. 8873-P28746. Various scales. - Napa River Railroad Bridge, Spanning Napa River, east of Soscol Avenue, Napa, Napa County, CA

  19. Lidar observation of elevated pollution layers over Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, R.M.; McElroy, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    Elevated pollution layers are observed over Los Angeles with an aircraft equipped with a downward-looking lidar. For the first time, detailed ancillary upper-air kinematic and thermodynamic data were collected simultaneously to aid in the interpretation of these elevated layers. It is concluded that upper-level winds within the inversion, orographic effects, and thermally induced changes in the depth of the mixed layer control the evolution of these layers.

  20. Sustainable Hydrogen Fueling Station, California State University, Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Blekhman, David

    2013-01-25

    The College of Engineering, Computer Science, & Technology at California State University, Los Angeles as part of its alternative and renewable energy leadership efforts has built a sustainable hydrogen station to teach and demonstrate the production and application of hydrogen as the next generation of fully renewable fuel for transportation. The requested funding was applied toward the acquisition of the core hydrogen station equipment: electrolyzer, compressors and hydrogen storage.