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Sample records for angiogenesis imaging agent

  1. PET Imaging of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Angiogenesis is a highly-controlled process that is dependent on the intricate balance of both promoting and inhibiting factors, involved in various physiological and pathological processes. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis has resulted in the design of new and more effective therapeutic strategies. Due to insufficient sensitivity to detect therapeutic effects by using standard clinical endpoints or by looking for physiological improvement, a multitude of imaging techniques have been developed to assess tissue vasculature on the structural, functional and molecular level. Imaging is expected to provide a novel approach to noninvasively monitor angiogenesis, to optimize the dose of new antiangiogenic agents and to assess the efficacy of therapies directed at modulation of the angiogenic process. All these methods have been successfully used preclinically and will hopefully aid in antiangiogenic drug development in animal studies. In this review article, the application of PET in angiogenesis imaging at both functional and molecular level will be discussed. For PET imaging of angiogenesis related molecular markers, we emphasize integrin αvβ3, VEGF/VEGFR, and MMPs. PMID:20046926

  2. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with an Integrin Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher R.; Hu, Xiaowen; Tlaxca, Jose; Decleves, Anne-Emilie; Houghtaling, Robert; Sharma, Kumar; Lawrence, Michael; Ferrara, Katherine; Rychak, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Ultrasound molecular imaging is an emerging technique for sensitive detection of intravascular targets. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis has strong potential for both clinical use and as a research tool in tumor biology and the development of anti-angiogenic therapies. Our objective is to develop a robust microbubble (MB) ultrasound contrast agent platform to which targeting ligands can be conjugated by biocompatible, covalent conjugation chemistry, and to develop a pure low mechanical index imaging processing method and corresponding quantifying method. The microbubbles and the imaging methods were evaluated in a mouse model of breast cancer in vivo. Materials and Methods We utilized a cyclic RGD (cRGD) pentapeptide containing a terminal cysteine group conjugated to the surface of MB bearing pyridyldithio-propionate (PDP) for targeting αvβ3 integrins. As negative controls, MB without a ligand or MB bearing a scrambled sequence (cRAD) were prepared. To enable characterization of peptides bound to MB surfaces, the cRGD peptide was labeled with FITC and detected by plate fluorometry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Targeted adhesion of cRGD-MB was demonstrated in an in vitro flow adhesion assay against recombinant murine αvβ3 integrin protein and αvβ3 integrin-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The specificity of cRGD-MB for αvβ3 integrin was demonstrated by treating bEnd.3 EC with a blocking antibody. A murine model of mammary carcinoma was used to assess targeted adhesion and ultrasound molecular imaging in vivo. The targeted microbubbles were visualized using a low mechanical index contrast imaging pulse sequence, and quantified by intensity normalization and two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis, Results The cRGD ligand concentration on the MB surface was ~8.2 × 106 molecules/MB. At a wall shear stress of 1.0 dynes/cm2, cRGD-MB exhibited 5-fold higher adhesion to immobilized recombinant αvβ3 integrin

  3. Radionuclide imaging of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Boerman, Otto C

    2009-12-01

    Angiogenesis is a multistep process regulated by pro- and antiangiogenic factors. In order to grow and metastasize, tumors need a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients. For growth beyond 1-2 mm in size, tumors are dependent on angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis is a new cancer treatment strategy that is now widely investigated clinically. Researchers have begun to search for objective measures that indicate pharmacologic responses to antiangiogenic drugs. Therefore, there is a great interest in techniques to visualize angiogenesis in growing tumors noninvasively. Several markers have been described that are preferentially expressed on newly formed blood vessels in tumors (alpha(v)beta(3) integrin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and its receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen) and in the extracellular matrix surrounding newly formed blood vessels (extra domain B of fibronectin, Tenascin-C, matrix metalloproteinases, and Robo-4). Several ligands targeting these markers have been tested as a radiotracer for imaging angiogenesis in tumors. The potential of some of these tracers, such as radiolabeled cyclic RGD peptides and radiolabeled anti-PSMA antibodies, has already been tested in cancer patients, while for markers such as Robo-4, the ligand has not yet been identified. In this review, an overview on the currently used nuclear imaging probes for noninvasive visualization of tumor angiogenesis is given.

  4. A Lipopeptide-Based αvβ₃ Integrin-Targeted Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Xu, Xiuxia; Chen, Yihan; Deng, Zhiting; Liu, Hongmei; Xu, Jianrong; Zhou, Jie; Tan, Guanghong; Wu, Junru; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-10-01

    The design and fabrication of targeted ultrasound contrast agents are key factors in the success of ultrasound molecular imaging applications. Here, we introduce a transformable αvβ3 integrin-targeted microbubble (MB) by incorporation of iRGD-lipopeptides into the MB membrane for non-invasive ultrasound imaging of tumor angiogenesis. First, the iRGD-lipopeptides were synthesized by conjugating iRGD peptides to distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine-polyethylene glycol 2000-maleimide. The resulting iRGD-lipopeptides were used for fabrication of the iRGD-carrying αvβ3 integrin-targeted MBs (iRGD-MBs). The binding specificity of iRGD-MBs for endothelial cells was found to be significantly stronger than that of control MBs (p < 0.01) under in vitro static and dynamic conditions. The binding of iRGD-MBs on the endothelial cells was competed off by pre-incubation with the anti-αv or anti-β3 antibody (p < 0.01). Ultrasound images taken of mice bearing 4T1 breast tumors after intravenous injections of iRGD-MBs or control MBs revealed strong contrast enhancement within the tumors from iRGD-MBs but not from the control MBs; the mean acoustic signal intensity was 10.71 ± 2.75 intensity units for iRGD-MBs versus 1.13 ± 0.18 intensity units for the control MBs (p < 0.01). The presence of αvβ3 integrin was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. These data indicate that iRGD-MBs can be used as an ultrasound imaging probe for the non-invasive molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis, and may have further implications for ultrasound image-guided tumor targeting drug delivery.

  5. A novel Tc-99 m and fluorescence labeled peptide as a multimodal imaging agent for targeting angiogenesis in a murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2016-11-01

    The serine-aspartic acid-valine (SDV) peptide binds specifically to integrin αV β3 . In the present study, we successfully developed a TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV peptide labeled with both Tc-99 m and TAMRA to target the integrin αV β3 of tumor cells; furthermore, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor of the murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV with Tc-99 m was done using ligand exchange methods. Labeling stability and cytotoxicity studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with HT-1080 and HT-29 tumors. A tumor tissue slide was prepared and analyzed using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99 m, the Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV complexes were prepared in high yield (>99%). In the gamma camera imaging study, a substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-1080 tumor (integrin αV β3 positive) and low uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-29 tumor (integrin αV β3 negative) were demonstrated. A competition study revealed that HT-1080 tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the co-injection of an excess concentration of SDV. Specific uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging and confocal microscopy studies. Our in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV in the integrin αV β3 -positive tumor. Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV could be a good candidate for a dual-modality imaging agent targeting tumor angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-05: Radiation Dosimetry of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, a SPECT Agent for Angiogenesis Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tc-99m labeled IDA-D-[c(RGDfK){sub 2} ( {sup 99m}Tc-RGD) is a recently developed radiotracer for gamma camera or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and promising agent for the visualization of angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the internal radiation dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD in humans. Methods: Six normal controls (F:M=4:2; 68.3±3.2 years; 56.5±10.7 kg) were participated in this study. Simultaneous anterior and posterior scans of whole-body were performed using dual head gamma camera system. Before the emission scan, transmission scan was performed just before injection of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD using Co-57 flood source. After an intravenous injection of 388.7±29.3 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD, six serial emission scans were performed at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 hours post-injection. The anterior and posterior images were geometrically averaged and attenuation correction was applied using transmission scan image. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on liver, gallbladder, kidneys, urinary bladder, spleen, brain, and large intestine. Time activity curves were obtained from serial emission scan and ROIs. The number of disintegrations per unit activity administered (residence time) were calculated from the area under the curve of time activity curves and injected dose of each patient. Finally, the radiation dose for each organ and effective doses were obtained using OLINDA/EXM 1.1 software and residence time. Results: High radiation doses were reported on renal and biliary excretion tracks such as urinary bladder wall, upper large intestine, kidneys, liver and gallbladder wall and their doses were 19.15±6.84, 19.28±4.78, 15.67±0.90, 9.13±1.71 and 9.09±2.03 µGy/MBq, respectively. The effective dose and effective dose equivalent were 5.08±0.53 and 7.11±0.58 µSv/MBq, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated the radiation dose of 99mTc-RGD, which has an acceptable effective radiation dose compare to the other Tc-99m labeled radio-tracers.

  7. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  8. Assessment of tumor angiogenesis using fluorescence contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Qian; Huang, Ping; Hyman, Shay; Intes, Xavier; Lee, William; Chance, Britton

    2003-12-01

    Angiogenesis is an important factor for further tumor growth and thus could be an attractive therapeutic target. Optical imaging can provide a non-invasive way to measure the permeability of tumor blood vessels and assess the tumor vasculature. We have developed a dual-channel near-infrared fluorescence system for simultaneous measurement of the pharmacokinetics of tumorous and normal tissues with exogenous contrast agents. This frequency-domain system consists of the light source (780 nm laser diode), fiber optics, interference filter (830 nm) and the detector (PMT). The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG), and the normal dosage is 100 μl at a concentration of 5 μM. In vivo animal study is performed on the K1735 melanoma-bearing mouse. The fluorescence signals both tumorous and normal tissues after the bolus injection of ICG through the tail vein are continuously recorded as a function of time. The data is fitted by a double-exponential model to reveal the wash-in and wash-out parameters of different tissues. We observed an elongated wash-out from the tumor compared with normal tissue (leg). The effect of radiation therapy on the tumor vasculature is also discussed.

  9. Pyrazoles as potential anti-angiogenesis agents: a contemporary overview

    PubMed Central

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos M.; Tzanetou, Evangelia N.; Haroutounian, Serkos A.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a mulit-step process by which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting vasculature. It is a key rate limiting factor in tumor growth since new blood vessels are necessary to increase tumor size. In this context it has been shown that anti-angiogenic factors can be used in cancer therapy. Among the plethora of heterocyclic compounds administered as anti-angiogenesis agents, pyrazoles constitute one of the bottlenecks of this category. Currently, several pyrazole based compounds are administered or are in Phase II and III trials and new targets emerge. It is highly possible that the advent of the next two decades will lead to the discovery and use of additional pyrazoles whose anti-angiogenic profile will position them in the forefront of the battle of various malignancies. The present review is an attempt to focus on those pyrazoles that arise as anti-angiogenesis agents commenting both on the chemistry and bioactivity that these exhibit aiming to contribute to the perspectives that they hold for future research. PMID:25250310

  10. Pyrazoles as potential anti-angiogenesis agents: A contemporary overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos; Tzanetou, Evangelia; Haroutounian, Serkos

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a mulit-step process by which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting vasculature. It is a key rate limiting factor in tumor growth since new blood vessels are necessary to increase tumor size. In this context it has been shown that anti-angiogenic factors can be used in cancer therapy. Among the plethora of heterocyclic compounds administered as anti-angiogenesis agents, pyrazoles constitute one of the bottlenecks of this category. Currently several pyrazole based compounds are administered or are in Phase II and III trials and new targets emerge. It is highly possible that the advent of the next two decades will lead to the discovery and use of additional pyrazoles whose anti-angiogenic profile will position them in the forefront of the battle of various malignancies. The present review is an attempt to focus on those pyrazoles that arise as anti-angiogenesis agents commenting both on the chemistry and bioactivity that these exhibit aiming to contribute to the perspectives that they hold for future research.

  11. Angiogenesis in prostate cancer: onset, progression and imaging.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giovanna; Mischi, Massimo; Scheepens, Wout; De la Rosette, Jean J; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Today, angiogenesis is known to play a key role in cancer growth and development. Emerging cancer treatments are based on the suppression of angiogenesis, and modern imaging techniques investigate changes in the microvasculature that are caused by angiogenesis. As for other forms of cancers, angiogenesis is well recognised as a fundamental process in the development of prostate cancer. The novelty of this extensive report on angiogenesis in cancer, with particular attention on prostate cancer and the imaging techniques able to detect it, is the new prospective to the subject. In contrast with the other available reviews, this report goes from 'theory' to 'practice', establishing a clear link between angiogenesis development and imaged angiogenesis features. Once the key role of angiogenesis in the development of cancer and in particular prostate cancer has been fully described, attention is turned to the current imaging methods with the potential to assess the angiogenesis process and, as a consequence, to detect and localise prostate cancer. • As confirmed by all available statistics, cancer represents a major clinical and societal problem in the developed world. The form of cancer with the highest incidence in men is prostate cancer. For prostate cancer, as well as for most forms of cancer, detection of the disease at an early stage is critical to reduce mortality and morbidity. • Today, it is well known that pathological angiogenesis represents a crucial step in cancer development and progression. Comparable with most forms of cancer, angiogenesis also plays a fundamental role for prostate cancer growth. • As a consequence, angiogenesis is an ideal target not only for novel anti-angiogenic therapies, but also for modern imaging techniques that aim at cancer localisation by detection of angiogenic microvascular changes. • These techniques are mainly based on magnetic resonance, ultrasound, and

  12. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling in Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are involved in a wide array of cardiovascular diseases, from myocardial ischemia and peripheral arterial disease, to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm. Molecular imaging techniques to detect and quantify key molecular and cellular players in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors, αvβ3 integrin, and matrix metalloproteinases) can advance vascular biology research and serve as clinical tools for early diagnosis, risk stratification, and selection of patients who would benefit most from therapeutic interventions. To target these key mediators, a number of molecular imaging techniques have been developed and evaluated in animal models of angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. This review of the state of the art molecular imaging of angiogenesis and vascular (and valvular) remodeling, will focus mostly on nuclear imaging techniques (positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography) that offer high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27275836

  13. Discovery of multi-target receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenesis agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bingling; Sun, Ying; Li, Chuansheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we have identified a biphenyl-aryl urea incorporated with salicylaldoxime (BPS-7) as an anti-angiogenesis agent. Herein, we disclosed a series of novel anti-angiogenesis agents with BPS-7 as lead compound through combining diarylureas with N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide. Several title compounds exhibited simultaneous inhibition effects against three pro-angiogenic RTKs (VEGFR-2, TIE-2 and EphB4). Some of them displayed potent anti-proliferative activity against human vascular endothelial cell (EA.hy926). In particular, two potent compounds (CDAU-1 and CDAU-2) could be considered as promising anti-angiogenesis agents with triplet inhibition profile. The biological evaluation and molecular docking results indicate that N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide could serve as a hinge-binding group (HBG) for the discovery of multi-target anti-angiogenesis agents. CDAU-2 also exhibited promising anti-angiogenic potency in a tissue model for angiogenesis. PMID:28332573

  14. Discovery of multi-target receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenesis agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bingling; Sun, Ying; Li, Chuansheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Recently, we have identified a biphenyl-aryl urea incorporated with salicylaldoxime (BPS-7) as an anti-angiogenesis agent. Herein, we disclosed a series of novel anti-angiogenesis agents with BPS-7 as lead compound through combining diarylureas with N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide. Several title compounds exhibited simultaneous inhibition effects against three pro-angiogenic RTKs (VEGFR-2, TIE-2 and EphB4). Some of them displayed potent anti-proliferative activity against human vascular endothelial cell (EA.hy926). In particular, two potent compounds (CDAU-1 and CDAU-2) could be considered as promising anti-angiogenesis agents with triplet inhibition profile. The biological evaluation and molecular docking results indicate that N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide could serve as a hinge-binding group (HBG) for the discovery of multi-target anti-angiogenesis agents. CDAU-2 also exhibited promising anti-angiogenic potency in a tissue model for angiogenesis.

  15. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  17. Micro-CT molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis using a magnetite nano-cluster probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-06-01

    Due to its high resolution, micro-CT is desirable for molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the sensitivity of micro-CT to contrast agents is relatively low. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop high micro-CT sensitive molecular imaging probes for direct visualization and dynamic monitoring of tumor angiogenesis. To this end, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides conjugated magnetite nano clusters (RGD-MNCs) were developed by assembling individual magnetite nano particles into clusters with amphiphilic (maleimide) methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) ((Mal)mPEG-PLA) copolymer and subsequently encoding RGD peptides onto the clusters for specific targeting alpha(v)beta3 integrin. The hydrodynamic size of RGD-MNCs was about 85 nm. To test its specificity, alpha(v)beta3 positive cells (H1299) were incubated with magnetite nano clusters (MNCs), RGD-MNCs or RGD-MNCs competition with free RGD peptides. Prussian Blue staining and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) measurements indicated that the cell uptake of RGD-MNCs was significantly more than that of MNCs, which could be inhibited by free RGD peptides. For detection of tumor angiogenesis, mice bearing H1299 tumors were injected intravenously with RGD-MNCs at the dose of 400 micro mol Fe/kg. Tumor angiogenic hot spots as well as individual angiogenic vessels could be clearly manifested by micro-CT imaging 12 h post injection, which was dynamically monitored with the extension of probe circulation time. Subsequent histological studies of tumor tissues verified that RGD-MNCs registered tumor angiogenic vessels. Our study demonstrated that RGD-MNC probes fabricated in this study could be used to effectively target alpha(v)beta3 integrin. Using high resolution micro-CT in combination with the probes, tumor angiogenesis could be studied dynamically.

  18. Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer by Molecular Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Together with Serum Markers of Tumor-Associated Nuclear Change and Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    ultrasound molecular imaging agents enhances signal intensity and detection of OVCA’ was examined in specific aim 1 described in Year-1 report...improved the detection of OVCA at early stage. This improvement in OVCA detectability was due to the enhanced ultrasound imaging signal intensity ...Molecular Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Together with Serum Markers of Tumor-Associated Nuclear Change and Angiogenesis PRINCIPAL

  19. Ultrasound molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis with a neuropilin-1-targeted microbubble.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Tam, Sarah; Ingham, Elizabeth S; Mahakian, Lisa M; Lai, Chun-Yen; Tumbale, Spencer K; Teesalu, Tambet; Hubbard, Neil E; Borowsky, Alexander D; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging has great potential to impact early disease diagnosis, evaluation of disease progression and the development of target-specific therapy. In this paper, two neuropilin-1 (NRP) targeted peptides, CRPPR and ATWLPPR, were conjugated onto the surface of lipid microbubbles (MBs) to evaluate molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis in a breast cancer model. Development of a molecular imaging agent using CRPPR has particular importance due to the previously demonstrated internalizing capability of this and similar ligands. In vitro, CRPPR MBs bound to an NRP-expressing cell line 2.6 and 15.6 times more than ATWLPPR MBs and non-targeted (NT) MBs, respectively, and the binding was inhibited by pretreating the cells with an NRP antibody. In vivo, the backscattered intensity within the tumor, relative to nearby vasculature, increased over time during the ∼6 min circulation of the CRPPR-targeted contrast agents providing high contrast images of angiogenic tumors. Approximately 67% of the initial signal from CRPPR MBs remained bound after the majority of circulating MBs had cleared (8 min), 8 and 4.5 times greater than ATWLPPR and NT MBs, respectively. Finally, at 7-21 days after the first injection, we found that CRPPR MBs cleared faster from circulation and tumor accumulation was reduced likely due to a complement-mediated recognition of the targeted microbubble and a decrease in angiogenic vasculature, respectively. In summary, we find that CRPPR MBs specifically bind to NRP-expressing cells and provide an effective new agent for molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

  20. A concise review of magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis by targeting integrin αvβ3 with magnetic probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajie; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Chunfu

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential step for the growth and spread of malignant tumors. Accurate detection and quantification of tumor angiogenesis is important for early diagnosis of cancers as well as post therapy assessment of antiangiogenic drugs. The cell adhesion molecule integrin αvβ3 is a specific marker of angiogenesis, which is highly expressed on activated and proliferating endothelial cells, but generally not on quiescent endothelial cells. Therefore, in recent years, many different approaches have been developed for imaging αvβ3 expression, for the detection and characterization of tumor angiogenesis. The present review provides an overview of the current status of magnetic resonance molecular imaging of integrin αvβ3, including the new development of high sensitive contrast agents and strategies for improving the specificity of targeting probes and the biological effects of imaging probes on αvβ3 positive cells.

  1. Agent-based model of angiogenesis simulates capillary sprout initiation in multicellular networks.

    PubMed

    Walpole, J; Chappell, J C; Cluceru, J G; Mac Gabhann, F; Bautch, V L; Peirce, S M

    2015-09-01

    Many biological processes are controlled by both deterministic and stochastic influences. However, efforts to model these systems often rely on either purely stochastic or purely rule-based methods. To better understand the balance between stochasticity and determinism in biological processes a computational approach that incorporates both influences may afford additional insight into underlying biological mechanisms that give rise to emergent system properties. We apply a combined approach to the simulation and study of angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from existing networks. This complex multicellular process begins with selection of an initiating endothelial cell, or tip cell, which sprouts from the parent vessels in response to stimulation by exogenous cues. We have constructed an agent-based model of sprouting angiogenesis to evaluate endothelial cell sprout initiation frequency and location, and we have experimentally validated it using high-resolution time-lapse confocal microscopy. ABM simulations were then compared to a Monte Carlo model, revealing that purely stochastic simulations could not generate sprout locations as accurately as the rule-informed agent-based model. These findings support the use of rule-based approaches for modeling the complex mechanisms underlying sprouting angiogenesis over purely stochastic methods.

  2. Endothelial cell targeted molecular imaging in tumor angiogenesis: strategies and current status.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Zeng, Yun; Liu, Yanhong; Liu, Gang; Ai, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays crucial roles in tumor growth, progression and metastasis. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of tumor neovasculature is a fundamental prerequisite for effective therapeutic intervention, particularly anti-angiogenic treatment regimens. Emerging molecular imaging techniques now allow recognition of cellular/molecular processes before gross pathological changes, leading to better understanding of fundamental biological processes of tumor angiogenesis. In this review, we will summarize recent progresses on molecular imaging of attractive biochemical epitopes in tumor angiogenesis, especially the endothelial cell targets-based imaging probes.

  3. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  4. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A.; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Forsberg, Anya I.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×106 breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180µl/kg) and low frequency pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by high frequency imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11–13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=−0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of

  5. Imaging Cancer Angiogenesis and Metastasis in a Zebrafish Embryo Model.

    PubMed

    Tulotta, C; He, S; van der Ent, W; Chen, L; Groenewoud, A; Spaink, H P; Snaar-Jagalska, B E

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and metastasis are key steps of cancer progression. In vitro and animal model studies have contributed to partially elucidating the mechanisms involved in these processes and in developing therapies. Besides the improvements in fundamental research and the optimization of therapeutic regimes, cancer still remains a major health threatening condition and therefore the development of new models is needed. The zebrafish is a powerful tool to study tumor angiogenesis and metastasis, because it allows the visualization of fluorescently labelled tumor cells inducing vessel remodeling, disseminating and invading surrounding tissues in a whole transparent embryo. The embryo model has also been used to address the contribution of the tumor stroma in sustaining tumor angiogenesis and spreading. Simultaneously, new anti-angiogenic drugs and compounds affecting malignant cell survival and migration can be tested by simply adding the compound into the water of living embryos. Therefore the zebrafish model offers the opportunity to gain more knowledge on cancer angiogenesis and metastasis in vivo with the final aim of providing new translational insights into therapeutic approaches to help patients.

  6. In vivo imaging of tumor angiogenesis using fluorescence confocal videomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, Victor; Faye, Nathalie; Chamming's, Foucauld; Clement, Olivier; Cuenod, Charles-Andre; Fournier, Laure S

    2013-09-11

    Fibered confocal fluorescence in vivo imaging with a fiber optic bundle uses the same principle as fluorescent confocal microscopy. It can excite fluorescent in situ elements through the optical fibers, and then record some of the emitted photons, via the same optical fibers. The light source is a laser that sends the exciting light through an element within the fiber bundle and as it scans over the sample, recreates an image pixel by pixel. As this scan is very fast, by combining it with dedicated image processing software, images in real time with a frequency of 12 frames/sec can be obtained. We developed a technique to quantitatively characterize capillary morphology and function, using a confocal fluorescence videomicroscopy device. The first step in our experiment was to record 5 sec movies in the four quadrants of the tumor to visualize the capillary network. All movies were processed using software (ImageCell, Mauna Kea Technology, Paris France) that performs an automated segmentation of vessels around a chosen diameter (10 μm in our case). Thus, we could quantify the 'functional capillary density', which is the ratio between the total vessel area and the total area of the image. This parameter was a surrogate marker for microvascular density, usually measured using pathology tools. The second step was to record movies of the tumor over 20 min to quantify leakage of the macromolecular contrast agent through the capillary wall into the interstitium. By measuring the ratio of signal intensity in the interstitium over that in the vessels, an 'index leakage' was obtained, acting as a surrogate marker for capillary permeability.

  7. In Vivo Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging Using Peptide-Based Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Conti, Peter S; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an emerging imaging technique for studying diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with a near-infrared emitting fluorophore for targeting tumor angiogenesis offers a noninvasive method for early tumor detection and efficient monitoring of tumor response to anti-angiogenesis therapy. CD13 receptor, a zinc-dependent membrane-bound ectopeptidase, plays important roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis and the growth of new blood vessels. In this chapter, we use CD13 receptor as an example to demonstrate how to construct CD13-specific NGR-containing peptides via bioorthogonal click chemistry for visualizing and quantifying the CD13 receptor expression in vivo by means of NIRF optical imaging.

  8. Clinical biomarkers of angiogenesis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aaron P.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Camphausen, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction An expanding understanding of the importance of angiogenesis in oncology and the development of numerous angiogenesis inhibitors are driving the search for biomarkers of angiogenesis. We review currently available candidate biomarkers and surrogate markers of anti-angiogenic agent effect. Discussion A number of invasive, minimally invasive, and non-invasive tools are described with their potential benefits and limitations. Diverse markers can evaluate tumor tissue or biological fluids, or specialized imaging modalities. Conclusions The inclusion of these markers into clinical trials may provide insight into appropriate dosing for desired biological effects, appropriate timing of additional therapy, prediction of individual response to an agent, insight into the interaction of chemotherapy and radiation following exposure to these agents, and perhaps most importantly, a better understanding of the complex nature of angiogenesis in human tumors. While many markers have potential for clinical use, it is not yet clear which marker or combination of markers will prove most useful. PMID:18414993

  9. Bioluminescence Imaging of Angiogenesis in a Murine Orthotopic Pancreatic Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Monica; Mojadidi, Michelle; Hines, O. Joe; Reber, Howard A.; Eibl, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Angiogenesis is essential for physiological processes as well as for carcinogenesis. New approaches to cancer therapy include targeting angiogenesis. One target is VEGF-A and its receptor VEGFR2. In this study, we sought to investigate pancreatic cancer angiogenesis in a genetically modified VEGFR2-luc-KI mouse. Procedures Live in vivo bioluminescence imaging of angiogenesis was performed continuously until sacrifice in subcutaneous tumors as well as in orthotopically transplanted tumors. Tumor tissue was immunostained for CD-31 and VEGFR2. Results Peritumoral angiogenesis measured by light emission was detected beginning at week 3 following subcutaneous injection. In the orthotopic model, light emission began at day 4, which likely corresponds to wound healing, and continued throughout the experimental period during tumor growth. Peritumoral CD-31 vessel- and VEGFR2-staining were positive. Conclusions The VEGFR2-luc-KI mouse is a valuable tool to demonstrate tumor angiogenesis and seems to be suitable to evaluate anti-angiogenic approaches in pancreatic cancer. PMID:20376570

  10. Spatiotemporal Analyses of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis via Intravital Imaging in Cranial Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunlan; Ness, Vincent P.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Chen, Hongli; Luo, Jiebo; Brown, Edward B; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are two integrated components in bone repair and regeneration. A deeper understanding of osteogenesis and angiogenesis has been hampered by technical difficulties of analyzing bone and neovasculature simultaneously in spatiotemporal scales and in three-dimensional formats. To overcome these barriers, a cranial defect window chamber model was established that enabled high-resolution, longitudinal, and real-time tracking of angiogenesis and bone defect healing via Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM). By simultaneously probing new bone matrix via second harmonic generation (SHG), neovascular networks via intravenous perfusion of fluorophore, and osteoblast differentiation via 2.3kb collagen type I promoter driven GFP (Col2.3GFP), we examined the morphogenetic sequence of cranial bone defect healing and further established the spatiotemporal analyses of osteogenesis and angiogenesis coupling in repair and regeneration. We demonstrated that bone defect closure was initiated in the residual bone around the edge of the defect. The expansion and migration of osteoprogenitors into the bone defect occurred during the first 3 weeks of healing, coupled with vigorous microvessel angiogenesis at the leading edge of the defect. Subsequent bone repair was marked by matrix deposition and active vascular network remodeling within new bone. Implantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from Col2.3GFP mice further showed that donor-dependent bone formation occurred rapidly within the first 3 weeks of implantation, in concert with early angiogenesis. The subsequent bone wound closure was largely host-dependent, associated with localized modest induction of angiogenesis. The establishment of a live imaging platform via cranial window provides a unique tool to understand osteogenesis and angiogenesis in repair and regeneration, enabling further elucidation of the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms of osteoprogenitor cell interactions

  11. RGD-Targeted Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Longitudinal Assessment of Hep-2 Tumor Angiogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiao; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Kang, Li-Ke; Wei, Hai-Ming; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Tao; Wen, Zong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective To prepare arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-targeted ultrasound contrast microbubbles (MBs) and explore the feasibility of their use in assessing dynamic changes in αvβ3 integrin expression in a murine model of tumor angiogenesis. Methods RGD peptides were conjugated to the surfaces of microbubbles via biotin-avidin linkage. Microbubbles bearing RADfK peptides were prepared as controls. The RGD-MBs were characterized using an Accusizer 780 and optical microscopy. The binding specificity of the RGD-MBs for ανβ3-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3) was demonstrated in vitro by a competitive inhibition experiment. In an in vivo study, mice bearing tumors of three different stages were intravenously injected with RGD-MBs and subjected to targeted, contrast-enhanced, high-frequency ultrasound. Subsequently, tumors were harvested and sectioned for immunofluorescence analysis of ανβ3 expression. Results The mean size of the RGD-MBs was 2.36 ± 1.7 μm. The RGD-MBs showed significantly higher adhesion levels to bEnd.3 cells compared to control MBs (P < 0.01). There was rarely binding of RGD-MBs to αvβ3-negative MCF-7 cells. Adhesion of the RGD-MBs to the bEnd.3 cells was significantly inhibited following treatment with anti-alpha(v) antibodies. The quantitative acoustic video intensity for high-frequency, contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of subcutaneous human laryngeal carcinoma (Hep-2) tumor xenografts was significantly higher in small tumors (19.89 ± 2.49) than in medium tumors (11.25 ± 2.23) and large tumors (3.38 ± 0.67) (P < 0.01). Conclusions RGD-MBs enable noninvasive in vivo visualization of changes in tumor angiogenesis during tumor growth in subcutaneous cancer xenografts. PMID:26862757

  12. Fluorescence imaging agents in cancerology

    PubMed Central

    Paganin-Gioanni, Aurélie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Paquereau, Laurent; Ecochard, Vincent; Golzio, Muriel; Teissié, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in cancer therapy is to improve early detection and prevention using novel targeted cancer diagnostics. Detection requests specific recognition. Tumor markers have to be ideally present on the surface of cancer cells. Their targeting with ligands coupled to imaging agents make them visible/detectable. Conclusions Fluorescence imaging is a newly emerging technology which is becoming a complementary medical method for cancer diagnosis. It allows detection with a high spatio-temporal resolution of tumor markers in small animals and in clinical studies. In this review, we focus on the recent outcome of basic studies in the design of new approaches (probes and devices) used to detect tumor cells by fluorescence imaging. PMID:22933906

  13. In-vivo three-dimensional Doppler variance imaging for tumor angiogenesis on chorioallantoic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenjuan; Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive tumor microvasculature visualization and characterization play significant roles in the detection of tumors and importantly, for aiding in the development of therapeutic strategies. The feasibility and effectiveness of a Doppler variance standard deviation imaging method for tumor angiogenesis on chorioallantoic membrane were tested in vivo on a rat glioma F98 tumor spheroid. Utilizing a high resolution Doppler Variance Optical Coherence Tomography (DVOCT) system with A-line rate of 20 kHz, three-dimensional mapping of a tumor with a total area of 3×2.5mm2 was completed within 15 seconds. The top-view image clearly visualized the complex vascular perfusion with the detection of capillaries as small as approximately 10μm. The results of the current study demonstrate the capability of the Doppler variance standard deviation imaging method as a non-invasive assessment of tumor angiogenesis, with the potential for its use in clinical settings.

  14. New Radiotracers for Imaging of Vascular Targets in Angiogenesis-related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous advances over the last several decades in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allow for targeted imaging of molecular and cellular events in the living systems. Angiogenesis, a multistep process regulated by the network of different angiogenic factors, has attracted world-wide interests, due to its pivotal role in the formation and progression of different diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and inflammation. In this review article, we will summarize the recent progress in PET or SPECT imaging of a wide variety of vascular targets in three major angiogenesis-related diseases: cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation. Faster drug development and patient stratification for a specific therapy will become possible with the facilitation of PET or SPECT imaging and it will be critical for the maximum benefit of patients. PMID:25086372

  15. FKBPL and Peptide Derivatives: Novel Biological Agents That Inhibit Angiogenesis by a CD44-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Andrea; O’Rourke, Martin; Yakkundi, Anita; Worthington, Jenny; Hookham, Michelle; Bicknell, Roy; McCarthy, Helen O.; McClelland, Keeva; McCallum, Lynn; Dyer, Hayder; McKeen, Hayley; Waugh, David; Roberts, Jennifer; McGregor, Joanne; Cotton, Graham; James, Iain; Harrison, Timothy; Hirst, David G.; Robson, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anti-angiogenic therapies can be an important adjunct to the management of many malignancies. Here we investigated a novel protein, FKBPL, and peptide derivative for their anti-angiogenic activity and mechanism of action. Experimental Design Recombinant FKBPL (rFKBPL) and its peptide derivative were assessed in a range of human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1) assays in vitro. Their ability to inhibit proliferation, migration and Matrigel dependent tubule formation was determined. They were further evaluated in an ex-vivo rat model of neo-vascularisation and in two in vivo mouse models of angiogenesis; the sponge implantation and the intra-vital microscopy models. Anti-tumor efficacy was determined in two human tumor xenograft models grown in SCID mice. Finally, the dependence of peptide on CD44 was determined using a CD44 targeted siRNA approach or in cell lines of differing CD44 status. Results rFKBPL inhibited endothelial cell migration, tubule formation and microvessel formation in vitro and in vivo. The region responsible for FKBPL’s anti-angiogenic activity was identified and a 24 amino acid peptide (AD-01) spanning this sequence was synthesised. It was potently anti-angiogenic and inhibited growth in two human tumor xenograft models (DU145 and MDA-231) when administered systemically, either on its own, or in combination with docetaxel. The anti-angiogenic activity of FKBPL and AD-01 was dependent on the cell surface receptor CD44 and signalling downstream of this receptor promoted an anti-migratory phenotype. Conclusion FKBPL and its peptide derivative AD-01 have potent anti-angiogenic activity. Thus, these agents offer the potential of an attractive new approach to anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:21364036

  16. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis Using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Conjugated Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Qin, Bin; Chen, Xucai; Wagner, William R; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2017-03-06

    Imaging of angiogenesis receptors could provide a sensitive and clinically useful method for detecting neovascularization such as occurs in malignant tumors, and responses to antiangiogenic therapies for such tumors. We tested the hypothesis that microbubbles (MB) tagged with human VEGF121 (MBVEGF) bind to the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) in vitro and angiogenic endothelium in vivo, and that this specific binding can be imaged on a clinical ultrasound system. In this work, targeted adhesion of MBVEGF was evaluated in vitro using a parallel plate flow system containing adsorbed recombinant human KDR. There was more adhesion of MBVEGF to KDR-coated plates when the amount of VEGF121 on each MB or KDR density on the plate was increased. MBVEGF adhesion to KDR-coated plates decreased with increasing wall shear rate. On intravital microscopic imaging of bFGF-stimulated rat cremaster muscle, there was greater microvascular adhesion of MBVEGF compared to that of isotype IgG-conjugated control MB (MBCTL). To determine if MBVEGF could be used to ultrasonically image angiogenesis, ultrasound imaging was performed in mice bearing squamous cell carcinoma after intravenous injection of MBVEGF. Ultrasound videointensity enhancement in tumor was significantly higher for MBVEGF (17.3 ± 9.7 dB) compared to MBCTL (3.8 ± 4.4 dB, n = 6, p < 0.05). This work demonstrates the feasibility of targeted ultrasound imaging of an angiogenic marker using MBVEGF. This approach offers a noninvasive bedside method for detecting tumor angiogenesis and could be extended to other applications such as molecular monitoring of therapeutic angiogenesis or antiangiogenic therapies in cardiovascular disease or cancer.

  17. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis Using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Conjugated Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Qin, Bin; Chen, Xucai; Wagner, William R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging of angiogenesis receptors could provide a sensitive and clinically useful method for detecting neovascularization such as occurs in malignant tumors, and responses to anti-angiogenic therapies for such tumors. We tested the hypothesis that microbubbles (MB) tagged with human VEGF121 (MBVEGF) bind to the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) in vitro and angiogenic endothelium in vivo, and that this specific binding can be imaged on a clinical ultrasound system. In this work, targeted adhesion of MBVEGF was evaluated in vitro using a parallel plate flow system containing adsorbed recombinant human KDR. There was more adhesion of MBVEGF to KDR-coated plates when the amount of VEGF121 on each MB or KDR density on the plate was increased. MBVEGF adhesion to KDR-coated plates decreased with increasing wall shear rate. On intravital microscopic imaging of bFGF-stimulated rat cremaster muscle, there was greater microvascular adhesion of MBVEGF compared to that of isotype IgG-conjugated control MB (MBCTL). To determine if MBVEGF could be used to ultrasonically image angiogenesis, ultrasound imaging was performed in mice bearing squamous cell carcinoma after intravenous injection of MBVEGF. Ultrasound videointensity enhancement in tumor was significantly higher for MBVEGF (17.3±9.7 dB) compared to MBCTL (3.8±4.4 dB, n=6, p<0.05). This work demonstrates the feasibility of targeted ultrasound imaging of an angiogenic marker using MBVEGF. This approach offers a non-invasive bedside method for detecting tumor angiogenesis and could be extended to other applications such as molecular monitoring of therapeutic angiogenesis or anti-angiogenic therapies in cardiovascular disease or cancer. PMID:28165246

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in a subcutaneous islet transplant site in a murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-06-01

    Islet transplantation (IT) is an established clinical therapy for select patients with type-1 diabetes. Clinically, the hepatic portal vein serves as the site for IT. Despite numerous advances in clinical IT, limitations remain, including early islet cell loss posttransplant, procedural complications, and the inability to effectively monitor islet grafts. Hence, alternative sites for IT are currently being explored, with the subcutaneous space as one potential option. When left unmodified, the subcutaneous space routinely fails to promote successful islet engraftment. However, when employing the previously developed subcutaneous "deviceless" technique, a favorable microenvironment for islet survival and function is established. In this technique, an angiocatheter was temporarily implanted subcutaneously, which facilitated angiogenesis to promote subsequent islet engraftment. This technique has been employed in preclinical animal models, providing a sufficient means to develop techniques to monitor functional aspects of the graft such as angiogenesis. Here, we utilize photoacoustic imaging to track angiogenesis during the priming of the subcutaneous site by the implanted catheter at 1 to 4 weeks postcatheter. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities shows gradual growth of vasculature in the implant position. These results demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis, thus facilitating a means to optimize and assess the pretransplant microenvironment.

  19. In Vitro Imaging of Angiogenesis Using Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stuhlmann, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important event during developmental processes, and it plays a key role in neovascularization. The development of an in vitro model that can be used for live imaging of vessel growth will facilitate the study of molecular and cellular mechanisms for the growth of blood vessels. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are considered to be a novel renewable source for the derivation of genetically manipulable endothelial cells (ECs). To derive green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing ECs, we used a transgenic ESC line in which a GFP reporter was driven by the endothelial-specific promoter fetal liver kinase 1. ESC-ECs were isolated from 11-day embryoid bodies by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Embedding the aggregated ESC-ECs in a 3-dimensional collagen gel matrix resulted in ESC-EC migration out of the aggregates and coalescence into a capillary network. Time-lapse microscopy revealed EC migration, proliferation, lumen formation, and anastomosis to other capillary vessels during this process, which were reminiscent of angiogenic processes. Vascular endothelial growth factor plays major roles in the induction of ESC-EC angiogenesis in vitro. Blockage of the β1 integrin subunit severely impaired ESC-EC survival and migration. We demonstrate that our in vitro ESC-EC angiogenesis model represents a high-resolution dynamic video-image system for observing the cellular events underlying angiogenic cascades. We also consider this model as an image screening tool for the identification of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic molecules. PMID:21385073

  20. Three-dimensional Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis in Colon Cancer using a Clinical Matrix Array Ultrasound Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaijun; Kaneko, Osamu F.; Tian, Lu; Hristov, Dimitre; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) expression in tumor angiogenesis using a clinical matrix array transducer and a clinical grade VEGFR2-targeted contrast agent in a murine model of human colon cancer. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care. Mice with human colon cancer xenografts (n=33) were imaged with a clinical ultrasound system and transducer (Philips iU22; X6-1) following intravenous injection of either clinical grade VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles (MBVEGFR2) or non-targeted control microbubbles (MBControl). Nineteen mice were scanned twice to assess imaging reproducibility. Fourteen mice were scanned both before and 24h after treatment with either bevacizumab (n=7) or saline only (n=7). 3D USMI datasets were retrospectively reconstructed into multiple consecutive 1-mm thick USMI data sets to simulate 2D imaging. Vascular VEGFR2 expression was assessed ex vivo using immunofluorescence. Results 3D USMI was highly reproducible using both MBVEGFR2 and MBControl (ICC=0.83). VEGFR2-targeted USMI signal significantly (P=0.02) decreased by 57% following anti-angiogenic treatment compared to the control group, which correlated well with ex vivo VEGFR2 expression on immunofluorescence (rho=0.93, P=0.003). If only central 1-mm tumor planes were analyzed to assess anti-angiogenic treatment response, the USMI signal change was significantly (P=0.006) overestimated by an average of 27% (range, 2–73%) compared to 3D USMI. Conclusions 3D USMI is feasible and highly reproducible and allows accurate assessment and monitoring of VEGFR2 expression in tumor angiogenesis in a murine model of human colon cancer. PMID:25575176

  1. Multi-modal Imaging of Angiogenesis in a Nude Rat Model of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Volumetric Computed Tomography and Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Bäuerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Berger, Martin R.; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential feature of cancer growth and metastasis formation. In bone metastasis, angiogenic factors are pivotal for tumor cell proliferation in the bone marrow cavity as well as for interaction of tumor and bone cells resulting in local bone destruction. Our aim was to develop a model of experimental bone metastasis that allows in vivo assessment of angiogenesis in skeletal lesions using non-invasive imaging techniques. For this purpose, we injected 105 MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells into the superficial epigastric artery, which precludes the growth of metastases in body areas other than the respective hind leg1. Following 25-30 days after tumor cell inoculation, site-specific bone metastases develop, restricted to the distal femur, proximal tibia and proximal fibula1. Morphological and functional aspects of angiogenesis can be investigated longitudinally in bone metastases using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), volumetric computed tomography (VCT) and ultrasound (US). MRI displays morphologic information on the soft tissue part of bone metastases that is initially confined to the bone marrow cavity and subsequently exceeds cortical bone while progressing. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) functional data including regional blood volume, perfusion and vessel permeability can be obtained and quantified2-4. Bone destruction is captured in high resolution using morphological VCT imaging. Complementary to MRI findings, osteolytic lesions can be located adjacent to sites of intramedullary tumor growth. After contrast agent application, VCT angiography reveals the macrovessel architecture in bone metastases in high resolution, and DCE-VCT enables insight in the microcirculation of these lesions5,6. US is applicable to assess morphological and functional features from skeletal lesions due to local osteolysis of cortical bone. Using B-mode and Doppler techniques, structure and perfusion of the soft tissue metastases can be evaluated

  2. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Perfusion Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment is the leading factor in angiogenesis. Angiogenesis can be identified by dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI (DCE MRI). Here we investigate the relationship between perfusion parameters on DCE MRI and angiogenic and prognostic factors in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Perfusion parameters (Ktrans, kep and ve) of 81 IDC were obtained using histogram analysis. Twenty-fifth, 50th and 75th percentile values were calculated and were analyzed for association with microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and conventional prognostic factors. Correlation between MVD and ve50 was positive (r = 0.33). Ktrans50 was higher in tumors larger than 2 cm than in tumors smaller than 2 cm. In multivariate analysis, Ktrans50 was affected by tumor size and MVD with 12.8% explanation. There was significant association between Ktrans50 and tumor size and MVD. Therefore we conclude that DCE MRI perfusion parameters are potential imaging biomarkers for prediction of tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. PMID:28036342

  4. Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Prem C.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

  5. Biodegradable dendritic positron-emitting nanoprobes for the noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Adah; Rossin, Raffaella; Shokeen, Monica; Hagooly, Aviv; Ananth, Ashwin; Capoccia, Benjamin; Guillaudeu, Steve; Abendschein, Dana; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Welch, Michael J.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2009-01-01

    A biodegradable positron-emitting dendritic nanoprobe targeted at αvβ3 integrin, a biological marker known to modulate angiogenesis, was developed for the noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis. The nanoprobe has a modular multivalent core-shell architecture consisting of a biodegradable heterobifunctional dendritic core chemoselectively functionalized with heterobifunctional polyethylene oxide (PEO) chains that form a protective shell, which imparts biological stealth and dictates the pharmacokinetics. Each of the 8 branches of the dendritic core was functionalized for labeling with radiohalogens. Placement of radioactive moieties at the core was designed to prevent in vivo dehalogenation, a potential problem for radiohalogens in imaging and therapy. Targeting peptides of cyclic arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) motifs were installed at the terminal ends of the PEO chains to enhance their accessibility to αvβ3 integrin receptors. This nanoscale design enabled a 50-fold enhancement of the binding affinity to αvβ3 integrin receptors with respect to the monovalent RGD peptide alone, from 10.40 nM to 0.18 nM IC50. Cell-based assays of the 125I-labeled dendritic nanoprobes using αvβ3-positive cells showed a 6-fold increase in αvβ3 receptor-mediated endocytosis of the targeted nanoprobe compared with the nontargeted nanoprobe, whereas αvβ3-negative cells showed no enhancement of cell uptake over time. In vivo biodistribution studies of 76Br-labeled dendritic nanoprobes showed excellent bioavailability for the targeted and nontargeted nanoprobes. In vivo studies in a murine hindlimb ischemia model for angiogenesis revealed high specific accumulation of 76Br-labeled dendritic nanoprobes targeted at αvβ3 integrins in angiogenic muscles, allowing highly selective imaging of this critically important process. PMID:19129498

  6. Neurovascular abnormalities in brain disorders: highlights with angiogenesis and magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The coupling between neuronal activity and vascular responses is controlled by the neurovascular unit (NVU), which comprises multiple cell types. Many different types of dysfunction in these cells may impair the proper control of vascular responses by the NVU. Magnetic resonance imaging, which is the most powerful tool available to investigate neurovascular structures or functions, will be discussed in the present article in relation to its applications and discoveries. Because aberrant angiogenesis and vascular remodeling have been increasingly reported as being implicated in brain pathogenesis, this review article will refer to this hallmark event when suitable. PMID:23829868

  7. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long; Bao, Jin-ku

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  8. Functional CT imaging of angiogenesis in rabbit VX2 soft-tissue tumour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Henderson, Elizabeth; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2001-12-01

    Functional parameters such as blood flow (BF), microvessel permeability surface area product (PS), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) are physiological markers related to the changes associated with angiogenesis. In the current study we present a functional CT technique for the simultaneous measurement of these four functional parameters and the display of each parameter as a functional image over an entire tissue slice. New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX2 thigh tumours were scanned using CT with contrast media injection. The ex vivo method of radioactive microspheres was used to evaluate the accuracy of BF measurements with the functional CT technique. There was a significant linear correlation (R = 0.96) between regional CT and microsphere-measured BF values, with a slope not significantly different from unity (0.98 +/- 0.02, P < 0.0001). The precision of our CT technique was determined by the repeated scanning under steady-state conditions. The precision of CT-measured BF, PS, BV and MTT was 14%, 18%, 20% and 24%, respectively. In conclusion, BF can be measured accurately and BF, PS, BV and MTT reproducibly using our functional CT technique. Functional CT can be readily incorporated into existing imaging protocols to assess tumour angiogenesis.

  9. In vivo imaging study of angiogenesis in a channelized porous scaffold.

    PubMed

    Tamplenizza, Margherita; Tocchio, Alessandro; Gerges, Irini; Martello, Federico; Martelli, Cristina; Ottobrini, Luisa; Lucignani, Giovanni; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The main scientific issue hindering the development of tissue engineering technologies is the lack of proper vascularization. Among the various approaches developed for boosting vascularization, scaffold design has attracted increasing interest over the last few years. The aim of this article is to illustrate a scaffold design strategy for enhancing vascularization based on sacrificial microfabrication of embedded microchannels. This approach was combined with an innovative poly(ether urethane urea) (PEUtU) porous scaffold to provide an alternative graft substitute material for the treatment of tissue defects. Fluorescent and chemiluminescent imaging combined with computed tomography were used to study the behavior of the scaffold composition within living subjects by analyzing angiogenesis and inflammation processes and observing the variation in x-ray absorption, respectively. For this purpose, an IntegriSense 680 probe was used in vivo for the localization and quantification of integrin αvβ3, due to its critical involvement in angiogenesis, and a XenoLight RediJect Inflammation Probe for the study of the decline in inflammation progression during healing. Overall, the collected data suggest the advantages of embedding a synthetic vascular network into a PEUtU porous matrix to enhance in vivo tissue integration, maturation, and regeneration. Moreover, our imaging approach proved to be an efficient and versatile tool for scaffold in vivo testing.

  10. In vivo imaging of the molecular distribution of the VEGF receptor during angiogenesis in a mouse model of ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoh; Gonda, Kohsuke; Takeda, Motohiro; Sato, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Satomi, Susumu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2011-09-29

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a critical role in angiogenesis and has been applied to medical therapy. However, because vascular imaging at the molecular level is impossible, the detailed in vivo dynamics of VEGF and its receptor (VEGFR) remain unknown. In this study, to understand the molecular distribution of VEGF and the VEGFR, we prepared ischemic mice with a new surgical method and induced angiogenesis in the gastrocnemius muscle. Then, we made a VEGF-conjugated fluorescence nanoparticle and performed staining of VEGFR-expressing cells with the fluorescent probe, demonstrating the high affinity of the probe for VEGFR. To observe the physiologic molecular distribution of VEGFR, we performed in vivo single-particle imaging of gastrocnemius in the ischemic leg with the fluorescent probe. The results suggested that only a 3-fold difference of VEGFR distribution is involved in the formation of branched vasculature in angiogenesis, although previous ex vivo data showed a 13-fold difference in its distribution, indicating that a method inducing a several-fold local increase of VEGFR concentration may be effective in generating site-specific angiogenesis in ischemic disease. This new in vivo imaging of ischemic mice could make useful contributions to understanding the mechanisms of angiogenesis and to developing a VEGFR-related drug.

  11. Imaging biomarkers of angiogenesis and the microvascular environment in cerebral tumours

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, G; Mills, S J; Coope, D J; O’connor, J P B; Jackson, A

    2011-01-01

    Conventional contrast-enhanced CT and MRI are now in routine clinical use for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of diseases in the brain. The presence of contrast enhancement is a proxy for the pathological changes that occur in the normally highly regulated brain vasculature and blood-brain barrier. With recognition of the limitations of these techniques, and a greater appreciation for the nuanced mechanisms of microvascular change in a variety of pathological processes, novel techniques are under investigation for their utility in further interrogating the microvasculature of the brain. This is particularly important in tumours, where the reliance on angiogenesis (new vessel formation) is crucial for tumour growth, and the resulting microvascular configuration and derangement has profound implications for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring. In addition, novel therapeutic approaches that seek to directly modify the microvasculature require more sensitive and specific biological markers of baseline tumour behaviour and response. The currently used imaging biomarkers of angiogenesis and brain tumour microvascular environment are reviewed. PMID:22433824

  12. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  13. Hypoxia imaging agents labeled with positron emitters.

    PubMed

    Hoigebazar, Lathika; Jeong, Jae Min

    2013-01-01

    Imaging hypoxia using positron emission tomography (PET) is of great importance for therapy of cancer. [(18)F]Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) was the first PET agent for hypoxia imaging, and various radiolabeled nitroimidazole derivatives such as [(18)F]fluoroerythronitroimidazole (FETNIM), [(18)F]1-α-D: -(2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA), [(18)F]2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl) acetamide (EF-5), and [(18)F]fluoroetanidazole (FETA) have been developed successively. To overcome the high cost of cyclotron installation, (68)Ga-labeled nitroimidazole derivatives also have been developed. Another important hypoxia imaging agent is (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM), which can distribute in cancer tissue rapidly due to high lipophilicity. However, its application is limited due to high cost of radionuclide production. Although various hypoxia imaging agents have been reported and tested, hypoxia PET images still have to be improved, because of the low blood flow in hypoxic tissues and resulting low uptake of the agents.

  14. Imaging agent and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Wieland, Donald M.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Beierwaltes, William H.; Wu, Jiann-long

    1986-04-22

    A new radiopharmaceutical composition for use in nuclear medicine comprises a radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The composition is used as an imaging agent for the heart, adrenal medulla, and tumors of the adrenal medulla and can be used for treatment of tumors of the adrenal medulla.

  15. Imaging agent and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Wieland, D.M.; Brown, L.E.; Beierwaltes, W.H.; Wu, J.L.

    1986-04-22

    A new radiopharmaceutical composition for use in nuclear medicine comprises a radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The composition is used as an imaging agent for the heart, adrenal medulla, and tumors of the adrenal medulla and can be used for treatment of tumors of the adrenal medulla. No Drawings

  16. Modular Strategies for PET Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging. PMID:19880343

  17. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30-40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [64Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for analysing

  18. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  19. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  20. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  1. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of angiogenesis using theranostic ανβ3-targeted copper nanoparticles incorporating a sn-2 lipase-labile fumagillin prodrug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiying; Cai, Xin; Yang, Xiaoxia; Senpan, Angana; Allen, John S.; Pan, Dipanjan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) tomography imaging is an emerging, versatile, and noninvasive imaging modality, which combines the advantages of both optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. It opens up opportunities for noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis, a feature of skin pathologies including cancers and psoriasis. In this study, high-density copper oleate encapsulated within a phospholipid surfactant (CuNPs) generated a soft nanoparticle with PA contrast comparable to gold. Within the near-infrared window, the copper nanoparticles can provide a signal more than 7 times higher that of blood. ανβ3-targeted of CuNPs in a Matrigel mouse model demonstrated prominent PA contrast enhancement of the neovasculature compared to mice given nontargeted or competitively inhibited CuNPs. Incorporation of a sn-2 lipase-labile fumagillin prodrug into the CuNPs produced marked antiangiogenesis in the same model, demonstrating the theranostic potential of a PA agent for the first time in vivo. With a PA signal comparable to gold-based nanoparticles yet a lower cost and demonstrated drug delivery potential, ανβ3-targeted CuNPs hold great promise for the management of skin pathologies with neovascular features.

  2. Family of enhanced photoacoustic imaging agents for high-sensitivity and multiplexing studies in living mice.

    PubMed

    de la Zerda, Adam; Bodapati, Sunil; Teed, Robert; May, Salomón Y; Tabakman, Scott M; Liu, Zhuang; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Dai, Hongjie; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-06-26

    Photoacoustic imaging is a unique modality that overcomes to a great extent the resolution and depth limitations of optical imaging while maintaining relatively high contrast. However, since many diseases will not manifest an endogenous photoacoustic contrast, it is essential to develop exogenous photoacoustic contrast agents that can target diseased tissue(s). Here we present a family of novel photoacoustic contrast agents that are based on the binding of small optical dyes to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-dye). We synthesized five different SWNT-dye contrast agents using different optical dyes, creating five "flavors" of SWNT-dye nanoparticles. In particular, SWNTs that were coated with either QSY(21) (SWNT-QSY) or indocyanine green (SWNT-ICG) exhibited over 100-times higher photoacoustic contrast in living animals compared to plain SWNTs, leading to subnanomolar sensitivities. We then conjugated the SWNT-dye conjugates with cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp peptides to molecularly target the α(v)β(3) integrin, which is associated with tumor angiogenesis. Intravenous administration of these tumor-targeted imaging agents to tumor-bearing mice showed significantly higher photoacoustic signal in the tumor than in mice injected with the untargeted contrast agent. Finally, we were able to spectrally separate the photoacoustic signals of SWNT-QSY and SWNT-ICG in living animals injected subcutaneously with both particles in the same location, opening the possibility for multiplexing in vivo studies.

  3. VEGF-loaded graphene oxide as theranostics for multi-modality imaging-monitored targeting therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhongchan; Huang, Peng; Tong, Guang; Lin, Jing; Jin, Albert; Rong, Pengfei; Zhu, Lei; Nie, Liming; Niu, Gang; Cao, Feng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-07-01

    Herein we report the design and synthesis of multifunctional VEGF-loaded IR800-conjugated graphene oxide (GO-IR800-VEGF) for multi-modality imaging-monitored therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. The as-prepared GO-IR800-VEGF positively targets VEGF receptors, maintains an elevated level of VEGF in ischemic tissues for a prolonged time, and finally leads to remarkable therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. Although more efforts are required to further understand the in vivo behaviors and the long-term toxicology of GO, our work demonstrates the success of using GO for efficient VEGF delivery in vivo by intravenous administration and suggests the great promise of using graphene oxide in theranostic applications for treating ischemic disease.Herein we report the design and synthesis of multifunctional VEGF-loaded IR800-conjugated graphene oxide (GO-IR800-VEGF) for multi-modality imaging-monitored therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. The as-prepared GO-IR800-VEGF positively targets VEGF receptors, maintains an elevated level of VEGF in ischemic tissues for a prolonged time, and finally leads to remarkable therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. Although more efforts are required to further understand the in vivo behaviors and the long-term toxicology of GO, our work demonstrates the success of using GO for efficient VEGF delivery in vivo by intravenous administration and suggests the great promise of using graphene oxide in theranostic applications for treating ischemic disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01573d

  4. Angiogenesis: a curse or cure?

    PubMed

    Gupta, K; Zhang, J

    2005-04-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels is essential during fetal development, female reproductive cycle, and tissue repair. In contrast, uncontrolled angiogenesis promotes the neoplastic disease and retinopathies, while inadequate angiogenesis can lead to coronary artery disease. A balance between pro-angiogenic and antiangiogenic growth factors and cytokines tightly controls angiogenesis. Considerable progress has been made in identifying these molecular components to develop angiogenesis based treatments. One of the most specific and critical regulators of angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which regulates endothelial proliferation, permeability, and survival. Several VEGF based treatments including anti-VEGF and anti-VEGF receptor antibodies/agents are in clinical trials along with several other antiangiogenic treatments. While bevacizumab (anti-VEGF antibody) has been approved for clinical use in colorectal cancer, the side effects of antiangiogenic treatment still remain a challenge. The pros and cons of angiogenesis based treatment are discussed.

  5. Quantitative positron emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis in rats with forelimb ischemia using (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK).

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Hyun; Kim, Young-Hwa; Kim, Young Joo; Yang, Bo Yeun; Jeong, Jae Min; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2013-10-01

    Gallium-68-labeled 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA)-cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys (c(RGDyK)) was developed for αvβ3 targeting, and is a promising agent for imaging of cancer and disorders related to angiogenesis. In this study, we performed kinetic analysis of (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK) in rats with surgically induced forelimb ischemia, and immunohistochemical analysis was also performed to assess αvβ3 immuno-staining level. Animal models were created by excision of the left brachial vessels, and a sham operation was performed on the right brachial region under 2 % isoflurane anesthesia. Using an animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner, a list mode PET scan (120 min) was started with the injection of (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK) via the tail vein at 3, 5 and 7 days after ischemic surgery. Volumes of interest were drawn on the left ventricle, sham operation, control, and ischemic regions. Compartmental and two graphical analyses (Logan and RE plots) were performed for kinetic parameter estimation. The immunohistochemical analysis was also performed after the last PET scan, and cell components were scored on a six point scale for quantification of immuno-staining level (0-negative to 5-very high). A 3-compartment model with reversible binding best described the tissue time-activity curves. The distribution volume of the ischemic region was significantly higher than that of the sham operation (P < 10(-6)) and control region (P < 10(-9)). Both the Logan and RE plots showed high correlation with compartmental analysis (R(2) = 0.96 and 0.95 for Logan and RE, respectively). The temporal changes in distribution volume and binding potential were not significant. The immuno-staining level of the ischemic region was significantly higher than that of sham operation (P < 10(-4)) and control region (P < 10(-8)). Kinetic modeling studies with dynamic (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK) PET scan are feasible based on an image-derived input function in a

  6. Tumor vascular-targeted co-delivery of anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapeutic agents by mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for synergetic therapy of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Meiying; Pan, Limin; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of drug non-selectivity in traditional chemotherapy, the construction of multifunctional targeting drug delivery systems is one of the most effective and prevailing approaches. The intratumoral anti-angiogenesis and the tumor cell-killing are two basic approaches in fighting tumors. Herein we report a novel tumor vascular-targeting multidrug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier to co-load an antiangiogenic agent (combretastatin A4) and a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin) and conjugate with targeting molecules (iRGD peptide) for combined anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapy. Such a dual-loaded drug delivery system is capable of delivering the two agents at tumor vasculature and then within tumors through a differentiated drug release strategy, which consequently results in greatly improved antitumor efficacy at a very low doxorubicin dose of 1.5 mg/kg. The fast release of the antiangiogenic agent at tumor vasculatures led to the disruption of vascular structure and had a synergetic effect with the chemotherapeutic drug slowly released in the following delivery of chemotherapeutic drug into tumors. PMID:26766908

  7. Quantitative assessment of tumor angiogenesis using real-time motion-compensated contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Guracar, Ismayil; Foygel, Kira; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test a real-time motion compensation algorithm for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of tumor angiogenesis on a clinical ultrasound system. Materials and methods The Administrative Institutional Panel on Laboratory Animal Care approved all experiments. A new motion correction algorithm measuring the sum of absolute differences in pixel displacements within a designated tracking box was implemented in a clinical ultrasound machine. In vivo angiogenesis measurements (expressed as percent contrast area) with and without motion compensated maximum intensity persistence (MIP) ultrasound imaging were analyzed in human colon cancer xenografts (n = 64) in mice. Differences in MIP ultrasound imaging signal with and without motion compensation were compared and correlated with displacements in x- and y-directions. The algorithm was tested in an additional twelve colon cancer xenograft-bearing mice with (n = 6) and without (n = 6) anti-vascular therapy (ASA-404). In vivo MIP percent contrast area measurements were quantitatively correlated with ex vivo microvessel density (MVD) analysis. Results MIP percent contrast area was significantly different (P < 0.001) with and without motion compensation. Differences in percent contrast area correlated significantly (P < 0.001) with x- and y-displacements. MIP percent contrast area measurements were more reproducible with motion compensation (ICC = 0.69) than without (ICC = 0.51) on two consecutive ultrasound scans. Following anti-vascular therapy, motion-compensated MIP percent contrast area significantly (P = 0.03) decreased by 39.4 ± 14.6 % compared to non-treated mice and correlated well with ex vivo MVD analysis (Rho = 0.70; P = 0.05). Conclusion Real-time motion-compensated MIP ultrasound imaging allows reliable and accurate quantification and monitoring of angiogenesis in tumors exposed to breathing-induced motion artifacts. PMID:22535383

  8. Aggretin Venom Polypeptide as a Novel Anti-angiogenesis Agent by Targeting Integrin alpha2beta1

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ching Hu; Chang, Chien Hsin; Hsu, Chun Chieh; Lin, Kung Tin; Peng, Hui Chin; Huang, Tur Fu

    2017-01-01

    VEGF and VEGFR antibodies have been used as a therapeutic strategy to inhibit angiogenesis in many diseases; however, frequent and repeated administration of these antibodies to patients induces immunogenicity. In previous studies, we demonstrated that aggretin, a heterodimeric snake venom C-type lectin, exhibits pro-angiogenic activities via integrin α2β1 ligation. We hypothesised that small-mass aggretin fragments may bind integrin α2β1 and act as antagonists of angiogenesis. In this study, the anti-angiogenic efficacy of a synthesised aggretin α-chain C-terminus (AACT, residue 106–136) was evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis models. The AACT demonstrated inhibitory effects on collagen-induced platelet aggregation and HUVEC adhesion to immobilised collagen. These results indicated that AACT may block integrin α2β1−collagen interaction. AACT also inhibited HUVEC migration and tube formation. Aortic ring sprouting and Matrigel implant models demonstrated that AACT markedly inhibited VEGF-induced neovascularisation. In addition, induction of FAK/PI3K/ERK1/2 tyrosine phosphorylation and talin 1/2 associated with integrin β1 which are induced by VEGF were blocked by AACT. Similarly, tyrosine phosphorylation of VEFGR2 and ERK1/2 induced by VEGF was diminished in integrin α2-silenced endothelial cells. Our results demonstrate that AACT is a potential therapeutic candidate for angiogenesis related-diseases via integrin α2β1 blockade. PMID:28252668

  9. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  10. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a "double-agent" approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as "secret agents" in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging.

  11. The cost of developing imaging agents for routine clinical use.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Adrian D

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the financial cost of developing new imaging agents for clinical use and to discuss the effects of these costs on the future clinical imaging agent environment. Publicly available financial data from the annual reports of major companies developing and selling imaging agents were examined and the data used to develop cost estimates. These estimates were compared with the in-depth data and analyses available for the development costs of therapeutic drugs. The cost of developing a drug for diagnostic imaging to commercialization is in the 100 dollars to 200 million dollars range, whereas a blockbuster imaging drug has current sales of 200 dollars to 400 million dollars. Most of these blockbuster imaging agents have been on the market for some time. The majority provide morphologic images with general indications in a slowly changing section of the market. Future agents will most likely address smaller markets and be in the rapidly developing molecular imaging field. The costs are high and are a significant brake on the development of imaging agents for commercialization. If new imaging agents are to realize their commercial potential, ways must be found to make the financials more attractive. The prices per dose are currently low so they must either be greatly increased for new imaging agents, with a corresponding increase in the value of the information they provide, or the use of imaging agents must be widened and/or their development made less costly in time and money. Without addressing these issues, the commercialization of new imaging agents will continue to be slow and may get slower. This will impact the progress of imaging agents toward use as validated biomarkers.

  12. Correlated magnetic resonance imaging and ultramicroscopy (MR-UM) is a tool kit to assess the dynamics of glioma angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Michael O; Bode, Julia; Kurz, Felix T; Hoffmann, Angelika; Ochs, Katharina; Ott, Martina; Deumelandt, Katrin; Krüwel, Thomas; Schwarz, Daniel; Fischer, Manuel; Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Kirschbaum, Klara; Solecki, Gergely; Chiblak, Sara; Abdollahi, Amir; Winkler, Frank; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Tews, Björn

    2016-02-02

    Neoangiogenesis is a pivotal therapeutic target in glioblastoma. Tumor monitoring requires imaging methods to assess treatment effects and disease progression. Until now mapping of the tumor vasculature has been difficult. We have developed a combined magnetic resonance and optical toolkit to study neoangiogenesis in glioma models. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and correlative ultramicroscopy (UM) of ex vivo cleared whole brains to track neovascularization. T2* imaging allows the identification of single vessels in glioma development and the quantification of neovessels over time. Pharmacological VEGF inhibition leads to partial vascular normalization with decreased vessel caliber, density, and permeability. To further resolve the tumor microvasculature, we performed correlated UM of fluorescently labeled microvessels in cleared brains. UM resolved typical features of neoangiogenesis and tumor cell invasion with a spatial resolution of ~5 µm. MR-UM can be used as a platform for three-dimensional mapping and high-resolution quantification of tumor angiogenesis.

  13. A Novel 99mTc-Labeled Molecular Probe for Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging in Hepatoma Xenografts Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Yan, Ping; Wang, Rong Fu; Zhang, Chun Li; Li, Ling; Yin, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Visualization of tumor angiogenesis using radionuclide targeting provides important diagnostic information. In previous study, we proved that an arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) peptide should be a tumor endothelial cell specific binding sequence. The overall aim of this study was to evaluate whether 99mTc-radiolabeled RRL could be noninvasively used for imaging of malignant tumors in vivo, and act as a new molecular probe targeting tumor angiogenesis. Methods The RRL peptide was designed and radiosynthesized with 99mTc by a one-step method. The radiolabeling efficiency and radiochemical purity were then characterized in vitro. 99mTc-RRL was injected intravenously in HepG2 xenograft-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Biodistribution and in vivo imaging were performed periodically. The relationship between tumor size and %ID uptake of 99mTc-RRL was also explored. Results The labeling efficiencies of 99mTc-RRL reached 76.9%±4.5% (n = 6) within 30–60 min at room temperature, and the radiochemical purity exceeded 96% after purification. In vitro stability experiment revealed the radiolabeled peptide was stable. Biodistribution data showed that 99mTc-RRL rapidly cleared from the blood and predominantly accumulated in the kidneys and tumor. The specific uptake of 99mTc-RRL in tumor was significantly higher than that of unlabeled RRL blocking and free pertechnetate control test after injection (p<0.05). The ratio of the tumor-to-muscle exceeded 6.5, tumor-to-liver reached 1.98 and tumor-to-blood reached 1.95. In planar gamma imaging study, the tumors were imaged clearly at 2–6 h after injection of 99mTc-RRL, whereas the tumor was not imaged clearly in blocking group. The tumor-to-muscle ratio of images with 99mTc-RRL was comparable with that of 18F-FDG PET images. Immunohistochemical analysis verified the excessive vasculature of tumor. There was a linear relationship between the tumor size and uptake of 99mTc-RRL with R2 = 0.821. Conclusion 99mTc-RRL can

  14. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a “double-agent” approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as “secret agents” in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging. PMID:27747191

  15. Gold nanorods: contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Gopal, R. Raja; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.

    2007-07-01

    Gold nanorods are seen as possible contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging since they have strong absorption peaks at near-infrared wavelengths. Also they are easy to conjugate with various proteins. If these particles can be conjugated with cancer affinity proteins then these particles can accumulate specifically at a tumor site. By detecting the presence of accumulation of gold nanorods inside the tissue the indirect detection of tumor can be realized. When these particles are irradiated with light pulses of appropriate temporal properties and energy the temperature around these particles can be high enough to induce apoptosis or necrosis in the surrounding cells. In order to use these particles at their full potential we must determine precisely their optical properties. We simulated the optical properties of gold nanorods synthesized by us using the DDSCAT code. The simulated spectra agree qualitatively with the spectra determined using spectrometry and also determined using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Further the values of molar extinction coefficient derived from the simulations were similar to the data measured experimentally by other groups. These results validated qualitatively the model used in the simulations. During simulations we found that the choice of the dielectric function used in simulations plays an important role in the results.

  16. PET imaging of tumor angiogenesis in mice with VEGF-A-targeted (86)Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Garmestani, Kayhan; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Milenic, Diane E; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2011-02-15

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to tumor-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and inhibits tumor angiogenesis. In 2004, the antibody was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma in combination with chemotherapy. This report describes the preclinical evaluation of a radioimmunoconjugate, (86)Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab, for potential use in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of VEGF-A tumor angiogenesis and as a surrogate marker for (90)Y-based radioimmunotherapy. Bevacizumab was conjugated to CHX-A″-DTPA and radiolabeled with (86)Y. In vivo biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed on mice bearing VEGF-A-secreting human colorectal (LS-174T), human ovarian (SKOV-3) and VEGF-A-negative human mesothelioma (MSTO-211H) xenografts. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies demonstrated highly specific tumor uptake of the radioimmunoconjugate. In mice bearing VEGF-A-secreting LS-174T, SKOV-3 and VEGF-A-negative MSTO-211H tumors, the tumor uptake at 3 days postinjection was 13.6 ± 1.5, 17.4 ± 1.7 and 6.8 ± 0.7 % ID/g, respectively. The corresponding tumor uptake in mice coinjected with 0.05 mg cold bevacizumab were 5.8 ± 1.3, 8.9 ± 1.9 and 7.4 ± 1.0 % ID/g, respectively at the same time point, demonstrating specific blockage of the target in VEGF-A-secreting tumors. The LS-174T and SKOV3 tumors were clearly visualized by PET imaging after injecting 1.8-2.0 MBq (86)Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab. Organ uptake quantified by PET closely correlated (r(2) = 0.87, p = 0.64, n = 18) to values determined by biodistribution studies. This preclinical study demonstrates the potential of the radioimmunoconjugate, (86)Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab, for noninvasive assessment of the VEGF-A tumor angiogenesis status and as a surrogate marker for (90)Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab radioimmunotherapy.

  17. PET imaging of tumor angiogenesis in mice with VEGF-A targeted 86Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Garmestani, Kayhan; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Milenic, Diane E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2010-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to tumor-secreted VEGF-A and inhibits tumor angiogenesis. In 2004, the antibody was approved by the United States FDA for the treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma in combination with chemotherapy. This report describes the preclinical evaluation of a radioimmunoconjugate, 86Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab, for potential use in PET imaging of VEGF-A tumor angiogenesis and as a surrogate marker for 90Y based radioimmunotherapy. Bevacizumab was conjugated to CHX-A″-DTPA and radiolabeled with 86Y. In vivo biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed on mice bearing VEGF-A secreting human colorectal (LS-174T), human ovarian (SKOV-3) and VEGF-A negative human mesothelioma (MSTO-211H) xenografts. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies demonstrated high specific tumor uptake of the radioimmunoconjugate. In mice bearing VEGF-A secreting LS-174T, SKOV-3 and VEGF-A negative MSTO-211H tumors, the tumor uptake at 3 d post-injection (p.i) was 13.6 ± 1.5, 17.4 ± 1.7 and 6.8 ± 0.7 % ID/g, respectively. The corresponding tumor uptake in mice co-injected with 0.05 mg cold bevacizumab were 5.8 ± 1.3, 8.9 ± 1.9 and 7.4 ± 1.0 % ID/g, respectively at the same time point, demonstrating specific blockage of the target in VEGF-A secreting tumors. The LS-174T and SKOV3 tumors were clearly visualized by PET imaging after injecting 1.8–2.0 MBq 86Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab. Organ uptake quantified by PET closely correlated (r2=0.87, p=0.64, n=18) to values determined by biodistribution studies. This preclinical study demonstrates the potential of the radioimmunoconjugate, 86Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab, for non-invasive assessment of the VEGF-A tumor angiogenesis status and as a surrogate marker for 90Y-CHX-A″-DTPA-bevacizumab radioimmunotherapy. PMID:20473899

  18. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-01-01

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents. PMID:23235326

  19. Radiolabelled spiroperidol: Possible pituitary adenoma imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.; Marshall, J.C.; Lloyd, R.V.; Sherman, P.S.; Wieland, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas are the most common type of pituitary tumors. Detection currently depends on physical symptoms, elevated serum prolactin levels and CT scans. An imaging agent which specifically localized in prolactinomas based on some functional characteristic of the tumor would be of considerable clinical value not only for early detection but also for monitoring of therapy. Tritiated spiroperidol (/sup 3/H-Sp) was selected for evaluation based on 1) the presence of D-2 receptors in normal anterior pituitary and adenoma tissue and 2) the high affinity of spiroperidol for D-2 receptors. Recent data have established that implantation of diethylstilbestrol (DES) in Fischer F344 rats induced prolactin-secreting tumors in the pituitary. /sup 3/HSp was evaluated in pituitary tissue of both control and DES-treated rats. /sup 3/HSp concentration in normal female anterior pituitary tissue was found to be about 0.27% kg dose/g from 5 min to 4hrs. This value was about 10 times levels in cortex, cerebellum and striatum. In DES-treated rats the % kg dose/g values remained approximately the same. A 5-fold increase in serum prolactin was associated with a 6-fold increase in both pituitary weight and % dose/organ. The data suggests that although total pituitary weight has increased due to tumor growth (reflected in increased values for % dose/organ), the relative number of receptors per g of tissue has remained constant. This result is in agreement with observations of others on D-2 receptor concentration in prolactinomas.

  20. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis in nascent Vx-2 rabbit tumors using a novel alpha(nu)beta3-targeted nanoparticle and 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Winter, Patrick M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Kassner, Andrea; Harris, Thomas D; Chinen, Lori K; Allen, John S; Lacy, Elizabeth K; Zhang, Huiying; Robertson, J David; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2003-09-15

    leaky tumor neovasculature but did not appreciably migrate into the interstitium, leading to a 56% increase in MR signal at 2 h. Pretargeting of the alpha(nu)beta(3)-integrin with nonparamagnetic nanoparticles competitively blocked the specific binding of alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted paramagnetic nanoparticles, decreasing the MR signal enhancement (50%) to a level attributable to local extravasation. The MR signal of adjacent hindlimb muscle or contralateral control tissues was unchanged by either the alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted or control paramagnetic agents. Immunohistochemistry of alpha(nu)beta(3)-integrin corroborated the extent and asymmetric distribution of neovascularity observed by MRI. These studies demonstrate the potential of this targeted molecular imaging agent to detect and characterize (both biochemically and morphologically) early angiogenesis induced by minute solid tumors with a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner, facilitating the localization of nascent cancers or metastases, as well as providing tools to phenotypically categorize and segment patient populations for therapy and to longitudinally follow the effectiveness of antitumor treatment regimens.

  1. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Dual-Modality Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Rats Using GEBP11 Peptide Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Su, Tao; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Jiinda; Han, Dong; Ma, Sai; Cao, Jianbo; Li, Xiujuan; Zhang, Ran; Qiao, Hongyu; Liang, Jimin; Liu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Liang, Shuhui; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Li, Jiayi; Cao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor progression. Tumor vasculature-targeting peptides have shown great potential for use in cancer imaging and therapy. Our previous studies have shown that GEBP11, a novel vasculature-specific binding peptide that exhibits high affinity and specificity to tumor angiogenesis, is a promising candidate for the diagnosis and targeted radiotherapy of gastric cancer. In the present study, we developed a novel magnetic resonance and fluorescence (MR/Fluo) dual-modality imaging probe by covalently coupling 2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid-coated paramagnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-MNPs) and Cy5.5 to the GEBP11 peptide. The probe Cy5.5-GEBP11-DMSA-MNPs (CGD-MNPs), with a hydrodynamic diameter of 82.8 ± 6.5 nm, exhibited good imaging properties, high stability and little cytotoxicity. In vivo MR/Fluo imaging revealed that CGD-MNPs were successfully applied to visualize tumor angiogenesis in SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models. Prussian blue and CD31 immunohistochemical staining confirmed that CGD-MNPs co-localized with tumor blood vessels. In conclusion, CGD-MNPs are promising candidates for use as MR and fluorescence imaging probes for visualizing gastric cancer angiogenesis in vivo.

  2. Utility of a prototype liposomal contrast agent for x-ray imaging of breast cancer: a proof of concept using micro-CT in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Samei, E.; Ghaghada, K.; Saunders, R.; Yuan, H.; Qi, Y.; Hedlund, L. W.; Mukundan, S.

    2008-03-01

    Imaging tumor angiogenesis in small animals is extremely challenging due to the size of the tumor vessels. Consequently, both dedicated small animal imaging systems and specialized intravascular contrast agents are required. The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a liposomal contrast agent for high-resolution micro-CT imaging of breast tumors in small animals. A liposomal blood pool agent encapsulating iodine with a concentration of 65.5 mg/ml was used with a Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy (CIVM) prototype micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system to image the R3230AC mammary carcinoma implanted in rats. The animals were injected with equivalent volume doses (0.02 ml/kg) of contrast agent. Micro-CT with the liposomal blood pool contrast agent ensured a signal difference between the blood and the muscle higher than 450 HU allowing the visualization of the tumors 3D vascular architecture in exquisite detail at 100-micron resolution. The micro-CT data correlated well with the histological examination of tumor tissue. We also studied the ability to detect vascular enhancement with limited angle based reconstruction, i.e. tomosynthesis. Tumor volumes and their regional vascular percentage were estimated. This imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and be the basis for evaluating anti-angiogenic therapies.

  3. A Perspective on Vascular Disrupting Agents that Interact with Tubulin: Preclinical Tumor Imaging and Biological Assessment#

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Ralph P.; Zhao, Dawen; Liu, Li; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment provides a rich source of potential targets for selective therapeutic intervention with properly designed anticancer agents. Significant physiological differences exist between the microvessels that nourish tumors and those that supply healthy tissue. Selective drug-mediated damage of these tortuous and chaotic microvessels starves a tumor of necessary nutrients and oxygen and eventually leads to massive tumor necrosis. Vascular targeting strategies in oncology are divided into two separate groups: angiogenesis inhibiting agents (AIAs) and vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). The mechanisms of action between these two classes of compounds are profoundly distinct. The AIAs inhibit the actual formation of new vessels, while the VDAs damage and/or destroy existing tumor vasculature. One subset of small-molecule VDAs functions by inhibiting the assembly of tubulin into microtubules, thus causing morphology changes to the endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature, triggered by a cascade of cell signaling events. Ultimately this results in catastrophic damage to the vessels feeding the tumor. The rapid emergence and subsequent development of the VDA field over the past decade has led to the establishment of a synergistic combination of preclinical state-of-the-art tumor imaging and biological evaluation strategies that are often indicative of future clinical efficacy for a given VDA. This review focuses on an integration of the appropriate biochemical and biological tools necessary to assess (preclinically) new small-molecule, tubulin active VDAs for their potential to be clinically effective anticancer agents. PMID:21321746

  4. MMP-2/9-Specific Activatable Lifetime Imaging Agent.

    PubMed

    Rood, Marcus T M; Raspe, Marcel; ten Hove, Jan Bart; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2015-05-12

    Optical (molecular) imaging can benefit from a combination of the high signal-to-background ratio of activatable fluorescence imaging with the high specificity of luminescence lifetime imaging. To allow for this combination, both imaging techniques were integrated in a single imaging agent, a so-called activatable lifetime imaging agent. Important in the design of this imaging agent is the use of two luminophores that are tethered by a specific peptide with a hairpin-motive that ensured close proximity of the two while also having a specific amino acid sequence available for enzymatic cleavage by tumor-related MMP-2/9. Ir(ppy)3 and Cy5 were used because in close proximity the emission intensities of both luminophores were quenched and the influence of Cy5 shortens the Ir(ppy)3 luminescence lifetime from 98 ns to 30 ns. Upon cleavage in vitro, both effects are undone, yielding an increase in Ir(ppy)3 and Cy5 luminescence and a restoration of Ir(ppy)3 luminescence lifetime to 94 ns. As a reference for the luminescence activation, a similar imaging agent with the more common Cy3-Cy5 fluorophore pair was used. Our findings underline that the combination of enzymatic signal activation with lifetime imaging is possible and that it provides a promising method in the design of future disease specific imaging agents.

  5. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as dual imaging agent in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenlong; Bony, Badrul Alam; Kim, Cho Rong; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-11-01

    There is no doubt that the molecular imaging is an extremely important technique in diagnosing diseases. Dual imaging is emerging as a step forward in molecular imaging technique because it can provide us with more information useful for diagnosing diseases than single imaging. Therefore, diverse dual imaging modalities should be developed. Molecular imaging generally relies on imaging agents. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles could be valuable materials for dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-fluorescent imaging (FI) because they have both excellent and diverse magnetic and fluorescent properties useful for dual MRI-FI, depending on lanthanide ions used. Since they are mixed nanoparticles, they are compact, robust, and stable, which is extremely useful for biomedical applications. They can be also easily synthesized with facile composition control. In this study, we explored three systems of ultrasmall mixed lanthanide (Dy/Eu, Ho/Eu, and Ho/Tb) oxide nanoparticles to demonstrate their usefulness as dual T2 MRI-FI agents.

  6. Neo-angiogenesis metabolic biomarker of tumor-genesis tracking by infrared joystick contact imaging in personalized homecare system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Hoekstra, Philip; Landa, Joseph; Vydelingum, Nadarajen A.

    2014-05-01

    We describe an affordable, harmless, and administrative (AHA) metabolic biomarker (MBM) for homecare cancer screening. It may save hundreds of thousands of women's and thousands of men's lives every year from breast cancer and melanoma. The goal is to increase the specificity of infrared (IR) imagery to reduce the false alarm rate (FAR). The patient's hands are immersed in icy cold water, about 11oC, for 30 seconds. We then compare two IR images, taken before and after the cold stimulus, and the difference reveals an enhanced signal and noise ratio (SNR) at tumorigenesis sites since the contraction of capillaries under cold challenge is natural to healthy capillaries, except those newly built capillaries during angiogenesis (Folkman, Nature 1995). Concomitant with the genome and the phenome (molecular signaling by phosphor-mediate protein causing inflammation by platelet activating factor (PAF) that transform cells from benign to malignant is the amplification of nitric oxide (NO) syntheses, a short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) that dilates regional blood vessels; superseding normal autonomic nervous system regulation. A rapidly growing tumor site might implicate accumulation of ROS, for which NO can rapidly stretch the capillary bed system usually having thinning muscular lining known as Neo-Angiogenesis (NA) that could behave like Leaky In-situ Faucet Effect (LIFE) in response to cold challenge. To emphasize the state of art knowledge of NA, we mentioned in passing the first generation of an anticapillary growth drug, Avastin by Genetech; it is an antibody protein that is injected for metastasis, while the second generation drug; Sorafenib by Bayers (2001) and Sutent by Pfizer (2000) both target molecular signaling loci to block receptor

  7. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): evolution and progress.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W C; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H; Menkens, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov ) to students, researchers, and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1,000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4,250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as well as a comma separated values file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, pre-clinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities, and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments, or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at micad@nlm.nih.gov.

  8. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  9. In vivo spectral and fluorescence imaging microscopy of tumor microvessel blood supply and oxygenation changes following vascular targeting agent treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jennifer; Kozikowski, Raymond; Molnar, Nikolett; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2012-03-01

    The formation of new microvasculature is essential for a tumor mass to grow. Vascular targeting agents (VTAs), including anti-angiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents, aim to either inhibit new vasculature growth or destroy existing vasculature, respectively. Because the mechanisms for anti-angiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents are complementary, analysis of these drugs used together is under investigation for the enhanced treatment of tumors in comparison to each treatment alone. The preclinical evaluation of the effects of VTAs on tumor growth in small animal models is vital for the development of effective drugs for clinical use. In vivo hyperspectral imaging microscopy of hemoglobin saturation has been used previously to investigate the efficacy of VTAs through analysis of tumor microvessel oxygenation after drug administration. Combining this imaging modality with first-pass fluorescence angiographic imaging can give additional important information about the vessel morphology and blood flow changes that occur after VTA treatment, thus elucidating the relationship between microvessel structure changes and oxygenation. In this study, we report the combined use of hyperspectral and first pass fluorescence angiographic imaging to examine the relationship between vessel morphology and oxygenation of human prostate cancer tumors in mice following treatment with vascular disrupting agents, OXi4503, and anti-VEGF angiogenesis inhibitor, cediranib. Imaging of the tumors is completed before treatment as well as in the days following treatment.

  10. Contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-12-18

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  11. Correlated magnetic resonance imaging and ultramicroscopy (MR-UM) is a tool kit to assess the dynamics of glioma angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Breckwoldt, Michael O; Bode, Julia; Kurz, Felix T; Hoffmann, Angelika; Ochs, Katharina; Ott, Martina; Deumelandt, Katrin; Krüwel, Thomas; Schwarz, Daniel; Fischer, Manuel; Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Kirschbaum, Klara; Solecki, Gergely; Chiblak, Sara; Abdollahi, Amir; Winkler, Frank; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Tews, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis is a pivotal therapeutic target in glioblastoma. Tumor monitoring requires imaging methods to assess treatment effects and disease progression. Until now mapping of the tumor vasculature has been difficult. We have developed a combined magnetic resonance and optical toolkit to study neoangiogenesis in glioma models. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and correlative ultramicroscopy (UM) of ex vivo cleared whole brains to track neovascularization. T2* imaging allows the identification of single vessels in glioma development and the quantification of neovessels over time. Pharmacological VEGF inhibition leads to partial vascular normalization with decreased vessel caliber, density, and permeability. To further resolve the tumor microvasculature, we performed correlated UM of fluorescently labeled microvessels in cleared brains. UM resolved typical features of neoangiogenesis and tumor cell invasion with a spatial resolution of ~5 µm. MR-UM can be used as a platform for three-dimensional mapping and high-resolution quantification of tumor angiogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11712.001 PMID:26830460

  12. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  13. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  14. PET/SPECT imaging agents for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission computed tomography (PET) imaging agents for neurodegenerative disease have a significant impact on clinical diagnosis and patient care. The examples of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) imaging agents described in this paper provide a general view on how imaging agents, ie radioactive drugs, are selected, chemically prepared and applied in humans. Imaging the living human brain can provide unique information on the pathology and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD and PD. The imaging method will also facilitate preclinical and clinical trials of new drugs offering specific information related to drug binding sites in the brain. In the future, chemists will continue to play important roles in identifying specific targets, synthesizing target-specific probes for screening and ultimately testing them by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:24676152

  15. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  16. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  17. [Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging: development and problems].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-kai

    2002-09-01

    In spite of the inherent versatility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers and clinicians from both home and aboard have made great achievements in developing safe and effective contrast agents. Many new agents are expected to be available for clinical use in the near future. It is of clinical importance that the agents should expand the diagnostic utility of MRI, improve the detection of tiny lesions and help evaluate specific tissue or organ functions. This article aims to examine current status of contrast agents for MRI and the problems waiting for solutions.

  18. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Minnie

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents. PMID:27398218

  19. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Chan, Minnie; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-01-21

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents.

  20. Ideal flushing agents for integrated optical acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    An increased number of integrated optical acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been researched and hold great hope for accurate diagnosing of vulnerable plaques and for guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, vascular lumen is filled with blood, which is a high-scattering source for optical and high frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to make images clear. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent that works for both optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions, mannitol, dextran and iohexol, as flushing agents because of their image-enhancing effects and low toxicities. Quantitative testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits.

  1. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  2. Tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, F.

    1985-01-01

    Tumours induce the growth of host blood vessels to support their proliferation. This process of angiogenesis is evoked by specific chemical signals. Recognition of these angiogenic factors has led to experimental methods for cancer diagnosis and for inhibiting malignant growth by specifically blocking neovascularisation. The clinical potential of these techniques is discussed. PMID:2413796

  3. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  4. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  5. Silicon Nanoparticles as Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Jacob W.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Johnson, Alexander C.; Barton, Robert A.; Lee, Menyoung; Ogier, Alexander C.; Vo, Chinh; Anahtar, Melis N.; Ren, Yin; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar; Cory, David G.; Hill, Alison L.; Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized nuclei provides high image contrast with little or no background signal. To date, in-vivo applications of pre-hyperpolarized materials have been limited by relatively short nuclear spin relaxation times. Here, we investigate silicon nanoparticles as a new type of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent. Nuclear spin relaxation times for a variety of Si nanoparticles are found to be remarkably long, ranging from many minutes to hours at room temperature, allowing hyperpolarized nanoparticles to be transported, administered, and imaged on practical time scales. Additionally, we demonstrate that Si nanoparticles can be surface functionalized using techniques common to other biologically targeted nanoparticle systems. These results suggest that Si nanoparticles can be used as a targetable, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent with a large range of potential applications. PMID:19950973

  6. VEGF-Iron Oxide Conjugate for Dual MR and PET Imaging of Breast Cancer Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with macrocyclic chelating agent DOTA for 64Cu-labeling and cyclic RGD peptide for integrin alpha (v)beta(3...Nanoparticles We have developed two types of novel superparamagentic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO), namely, PVP -IO and PASP-IO...Polyvinylpyrrolidone ( PVP )-coated iron oxide ( PVP -IO) nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step thermal decomposition method (Fig. 3). The overall size of the

  7. Recent Advances in Higher-Order, Multimodal, Biomedical Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, James; Chitgupi, Upendra; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2015-09-16

    Advances in biomedical imaging have spurred the development of integrated multimodal scanners, usually capable of two simultaneous imaging modes. The long-term vision of higher-order multimodality is to improve diagnostics or guidance through the analysis of complementary, data-rich, co-registered images. Synergies achieved through combined modalities could enable researchers to better track diverse physiological and structural events, analyze biodistribution and treatment efficacy, and compare established and emerging modalities. Higher-order multimodal approaches stand to benefit from molecular imaging probes and, in recent years, contrast agents that have hypermodal characteristics have increasingly been reported in preclinical studies. Given the chemical requirements for contrast agents representing various modalities to be integrated into a single entity, the higher-order multimodal agents reported so far tend to be of nanoparticulate form. To date, the majority of reported nanoparticles have included components that are active for magnetic resonance. Herein, recent progress in higher-order multimodal imaging agents is reviewed, spanning a range of material and structural classes, and demonstrating utility in three (or more) imaging modalities.

  8. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  9. Blood pool contrast agents for venous magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Irai S.; Li, Weier; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the venous system plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of clinically significant disorders. There have been great advances in venous imaging techniques, culminating in the use of magnetic resonance venography (MRV). Although MRV has distinct advantages in anatomic and quantitative cross sectional imaging without ionizing radiation, there are well-known challenges in acquisition timing and contrast administration in patients with renal impairment. The latest advancement involves the addition of new contrast media agents, which have emerged as valuable alternatives in these difficult scenarios. In this review, we will focus on a group of specific contrast agents called blood pool agents and discuss their salient features and clinical applications. PMID:28123972

  10. IDH mutation status is associated with a distinct hypoxia/angiogenesis transcriptome signature which is non-invasively predictable with rCBV imaging in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Kickingereder, Philipp; Sahm, Felix; Radbruch, Alexander; Wick, Wolfgang; Heiland, Sabine; Deimling, Andreas von; Bendszus, Martin; Wiestler, Benedikt

    2015-11-05

    The recent identification of IDH mutations in gliomas and several other cancers suggests that this pathway is involved in oncogenesis; however effector functions are complex and yet incompletely understood. To study the regulatory effects of IDH on hypoxia-inducible-factor 1-alpha (HIF1A), a driving force in hypoxia-initiated angiogenesis, we analyzed mRNA expression profiles of 288 glioma patients and show decreased expression of HIF1A targets on a single-gene and pathway level, strong inhibition of upstream regulators such as HIF1A and downstream biological functions such as angio- and vasculogenesis in IDH mutant tumors. Genotype/imaging phenotype correlation analysis with relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) MRI - a robust and non-invasive estimate of tumor angiogenesis - in 73 treatment-naive patients with low-grade and anaplastic gliomas showed that a one-unit increase in rCBV corresponded to a two-third decrease in the odds for an IDH mutation and correctly predicted IDH mutation status in 88% of patients. Together, these findings (1) show that IDH mutation status is associated with a distinct angiogenesis transcriptome signature which is non-invasively predictable with rCBV imaging and (2) highlight the potential future of radiogenomics (i.e. the correlation between cancer imaging and genomic features) towards a more accurate diagnostic workup of brain tumors.

  11. Chemical agent detection and quantification with imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifarraguerri, Augustin I.

    1999-10-01

    Passive standoff detection of chemical warfare (CW) agents is currently achieved by remote sensing infrared spectrometry in the 8 - 12 micrometer atmospheric window with the aid of automatic spectral analysis algorithms. Introducing an imaging capability would allow for rapid wide-area reconnaissance and mapping of vapor clouds, as well as reduce false alarms by exploiting the added spatial information. This paper contains an overview of the CW agent standoff detection problem and the challenges associated with developing imaging LWIR hyperspectral sensors for the detection and quantification of vapor clouds, as well as a discussion of spectral processing techniques which can be used to exploit the added data dimensionality.

  12. 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane:serotonin transporter imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Martarello, Laurent

    2005-01-18

    A series of compounds in the 4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes and 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane families are described as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for diseases associated with serotonin transporter dysfunction. These compounds bind to serotonin transporter protein with high affinity and selectivity. The invention provides methods of synthesis which incorporate radioisotopic halogens at a last step which permit high radiochemical yield and maximum usable product life. The radiolabeled compounds of the invention are useful as imaging agents for visualizing the location and density of serotonin transporter by PET and SPECT imaging.

  13. Imaging considerations for a technetium-99m myocardial perfusion agent

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Lister-James, J.; Campbell, S.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with /sup 201/Tl chloride suffers from a number of physical, geometric, and dosimetric constraints that could be diminished if an agent labeled with /sup 99m/Tc were available. The cationic complex /sup 99m/Tc hexakis-(t-butylisonitrile)technetium(I) ((/sup 99m/Tc)TBI) has been shown to concentrate in the myocardial tissue of both animals and humans, with preliminary clinical studies demonstrating a number of technical attributes not possible with /sup 201/Tl. Technetium-99m-TBI is a promising myocardial imaging agent that may permit high quality planar, gated, and tomographic imaging of both myocardial ischemia and infarction with reduced imaging times and improved resolution.

  14. Advances in the Development of Multimodal Imaging Agents for Nuclear/Near-infrared Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S C; Azhdarinia, A

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal imaging agents were first introduced a decade ago and consist of a targeting moiety that is dual-labeled with radioactive and fluorescent contrast. These compounds allow whole-body and intraoperative imaging to be performed through administration of a single agent and provide complementary diagnostic information that can be used to guide tumor resection. Since their initial evaluation, interest in dual-labeled agents has continued to grow and their design has subsequently evolved alongside the development of novel chelating agents, improved fluorophores, and highly selective coupling techniques for bioconjugate formation. In this review, will discuss how changes in the labeling components and schemes for multimodal agent development have impacted imaging performance and will focus on antibody- and peptide-based agents as models for dual labeling. We will also describe the growing role of modular dual labeling strategies as well as direct labeling methods using radiohalogens.

  15. Theranostic agents for intracellular gene delivery with spatiotemporal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peters, Jonathan T.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the modification of gene expression to treat a disease. However, efficient intracellular delivery and monitoring of gene therapeutic agents is an ongoing challenge. Use of theranostic agents with suitable targeted, controlled delivery and imaging modalities has the potential to greatly advance gene therapy. Inorganic nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been shown to be effective theranostic agents for the delivery and spatiotemporal tracking of oligonucleotides in vitro and even a few cases in vivo. Major concerns remain to be addressed including cytotoxicity, particularly of quantum dots; effective dosage of nanoparticles for optimal theranostic effect; development of real-time in vivo imaging; and further improvement of gene therapy efficacy. PMID:23606894

  16. A Brief Account of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  17. [Gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Muñoz, S; Calles Blanco, C; Marcin, Javier; Fernández Álvarez, C; Lafuente Martínez, J

    2014-06-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are increasingly being used in magnetic resonance imaging. These agents can improve the contrast in images and provide information about function and metabolism, increasing both sensitivity and specificity. We describe the gadolinium-based contrast agents that have been approved for clinical use, detailing their main characteristics based on their chemical structure, stability, and safety. In general terms, these compounds are safe. Nevertheless, adverse reactions, the possibility of nephrotoxicity from these compounds, and the possibility of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis will be covered in this article. Lastly, the article will discuss the current guidelines, recommendations, and contraindications for their clinical use, including the management of pregnant and breast-feeding patients.

  18. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V; Lanza, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds.

  19. Developments Toward Diagnostic Breast Cancer Imaging Using Near-Infrared Optical Measurements and Fluorescent Contrast Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Hawrysz, Daniel J; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The use of near-infrared (NIR) light to interrogate deep tissues has enormous potential for molecular-based imaging when coupled with NIR excitable dyes. More than a decade has now passed since the initial proposals for NIR optical tomography for breast cancer screening using time-dependent measurements of light propagation in the breast. Much accomplishment in the development of optical mammography has been demonstrated, most recently in the application of time-domain, frequency-domain, and continuous-wave measurements that depend on endogenous contrast owing to angiogenesis and increased hemoglobin absorbance for contrast. Although exciting and promising, the necessity of angiogenesis-mediated absorption contrast for diagnostic optical mammography minimizes the potential for using NIR techniques to assess sentinel lymph node staging, metastatic spread, and multifocality of breast disease, among other applications. In this review, we summarize the progress made in the development of optical mammography, and focus on the emerging work underway in the use of diagnostic contrast agents for the molecular-based, diagnostic imaging of breast. PMID:11191107

  20. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer.

  1. Spectral imaging of microvascular function in a renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; deDeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-02-01

    Tumors are highly metabolically active and thus require ample oxygen and nutrients to proliferate. Neovasculature generated by angiogenesis is required for tumors to grow beyond a size of about 1-2mm. Functional tumor vasculature also provides an access point for development of distant metastases. Due to the importance of the microvasculature for tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis, the microvasculature has emerged as a therapeutic target for treatment of solid tumors. We employed spectral imaging in a rodent window chamber model to observe and measure the oxygen transport function of tumor microvasculature in a human renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a fast acting vascular disrupting agent. Human Caki-1 cells were grown in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber in athymic nude mice. Spectral imaging was used to measure hemoglobin saturation immediately before, immediately after and also at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 hours after administration of the tubulin binding agent OXi4503. Up to 4 hours after treatment, tumor microvasculature was disrupted from the tumor core towards the periphery as seen in deoxygenation as well as structural changes of the vasculature. Reoxygenation and neovascularization commenced from the periphery towards the core from 6 - 48 hours after treatment. The timing of the effects of vascular disrupting agents can influence scheduling of repeat treatments and combinatorial treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Spectral imaging can potentially provide this information in certain laboratory models from endogenous signals with microvessel resolution.

  2. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  3. Cellular image segmentation using n-agent cooperative game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimock, Ian B.; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2016-03-01

    Image segmentation is an important problem in computer vision and has significant applications in the segmentation of cellular images. Many different imaging techniques exist and produce a variety of image properties which pose difficulties to image segmentation routines. Bright-field images are particularly challenging because of the non-uniform shape of the cells, the low contrast between cells and background, and imaging artifacts such as halos and broken edges. Classical segmentation techniques often produce poor results on these challenging images. Previous attempts at bright-field imaging are often limited in scope to the images that they segment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm for automatically segmenting cellular images. The algorithm incorporates two game theoretic models which allow each pixel to act as an independent agent with the goal of selecting their best labelling strategy. In the non-cooperative model, the pixels choose strategies greedily based only on local information. In the cooperative model, the pixels can form coalitions, which select labelling strategies that benefit the entire group. Combining these two models produces a method which allows the pixels to balance both local and global information when selecting their label. With the addition of k-means and active contour techniques for initialization and post-processing purposes, we achieve a robust segmentation routine. The algorithm is applied to several cell image datasets including bright-field images, fluorescent images and simulated images. Experiments show that the algorithm produces good segmentation results across the variety of datasets which differ in cell density, cell shape, contrast, and noise levels.

  4. Nanoengineered multimodal contrast agent for medical image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Gregory J.; Zheng, Jinzi; Brock, Kristy; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-04-01

    Multimodality imaging has gained momentum in radiation therapy planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Specifically, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are two complementary imaging modalities often utilized in radiation therapy for visualization of anatomical structures for tumour delineation and accurate registration of image data sets for volumetric dose calculation. The development of a multimodal contrast agent for CT and MR with prolonged in vivo residence time would provide long-lasting spatial and temporal correspondence of the anatomical features of interest, and therefore facilitate multimodal image registration, treatment planning and delivery. The multimodal contrast agent investigated consists of nano-sized stealth liposomes encapsulating conventional iodine and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The average loading achieved was 33.5 +/- 7.1 mg/mL of iodine for iohexol and 9.8 +/- 2.0 mg/mL of gadolinium for gadoteridol. The average liposome diameter was 46.2 +/- 13.5 nm. The system was found to be stable in physiological buffer over a 15-day period, releasing 11.9 +/- 1.1% and 11.2 +/- 0.9% of the total amounts of iohexol and gadoteridol loaded, respectively. 200 minutes following in vivo administration, the contrast agent maintained a relative contrast enhancement of 81.4 +/- 13.05 differential Hounsfield units (ΔHU) in CT (40% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 731.9 +/- 144.2 differential signal intensity (ΔSI) in MR (46% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the blood (aorta), a relative contrast enhancement of 38.0 +/- 5.1 ΔHU (42% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 178.6 +/- 41.4 ΔSI (62% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the liver (parenchyma), a relative contrast enhancement of 9.1 +/- 1.7 ΔHU (94% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes

  5. Functional imaging of the lungs with gas agents.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stanley J; Nagle, Scott K; Couch, Marcus J; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas--and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multidetector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multispectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultrashort echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis in both adults and children.

  6. Role of angiogenesis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Letilovic, Tomislav; Vrhovac, Radovan; Verstovsek, Srdan; Jaksic, Branimir; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a physiologic process of new blood vessels formation mediated by various cytokines called angiogenic and angiostatic factors. Although its potential pathophysiologic role in solid tumors has been extensively studied for more than 3 decades, enhancement of angiogenesis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other malignant hematological disorders has been recognized more recently. An increased level of angiogenesis has been documented by various experimental methods both in bone marrow and lymph nodes of patients with CLL. Although the role of angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of this disease remains to be fully elucidated, experimental data suggest that several angiogenic factors play a role in the disease progression. Biologic markers of angiogenesis were also shown to be of prognostic relevance in CLL. The current findings provide the rationale for investigating antiangiogenic agents in CLL. In the current review angiogenesis in CLL is discussed and its potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  7. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  8. Cell-cycle-dependent drug-resistant quiescent cancer cells induce tumor angiogenesis after chemotherapy as visualized by real-time FUCCI imaging.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-04

    We previously demonstrated that quiescent cancer cells in a tumor are resistant to conventional chemotherapy as visualized with a fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). We also showed that proliferating cancer cells exist in a tumor only near nascent vessels or on the tumor surface as visualized with FUCCI and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing tumor vessels. In the present study, we show the relationship between cell-cycle phase and chemotherapy-induced tumor angiogenesis using in vivo FUCCI real-time imaging of the cell cycle and nestin-driven GFP to detect nascent blood vessels. We observed that chemotherapy-treated tumors, consisting of mostly of quiescent cancer cells after treatment, had much more and deeper tumor vessels than untreated tumors. These newly-vascularized cancer cells regrew rapidly after chemotherapy. In contrast, formerly quiescent cancer cells decoyed to S/G2 phase by a telomerase-dependent adenovirus did not induce tumor angiogenesis. The present results further demonstrate the importance of the cancer-cell position in the cell cycle in order that chemotherapy be effective and not have the opposite effect of stimulating tumor angiogenesis and progression.

  9. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  10. Silver Nanoplate Contrast Agents for In Vivo Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Kimberly A.; Souza, Michael; Truby, Ryan; Luke, Geoffrey P.; Green, Christopher; Vreeland, Erika; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoplates are introduced as a new photoacoustic contrast agent that can be easily functionalized for molecular photoacoustic imaging in vivo. Methods are described for synthesis, functionalization, and stabilization of silver nanoplates using biocompatible (“green”) reagents. Directional antibody conjugation to the nanoplate surface is presented along with proof of molecular sensitivity in vitro with pancreatic cancer cells. Cell viability tests show the antibody-conjugated silver nanoplates to be nontoxic at concentrations up to 1 mg/ml. Furthermore, the silver nanoplates' potential for in vivo application as a molecularly sensitive photoacoustic contrast agent is demonstrated using an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Results of these studies suggest that the synthesized silver nanoplates are well suited for a host of biomedical imaging and sensing applications. PMID:22188516

  11. Proflavine derivatives as fluorescent imaging agents of amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Garin, Dominique; Oukhatar, Fatima; Mahon, Andrew B; Try, Andrew C; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Laferla, Frank M; Demeunynck, Martine; Sallanon, Marcelle Moulin; Chierici, Sabine

    2011-04-15

    A series of proflavine derivatives for use to further image Aβ amyloid deposits were synthesized and characterized. Aged 3xTg-AD (23 months old) mice hippocampus sections incubated with these derivatives revealed preferential labeling of amyloid plaques. Furthermore an in vitro binding study showed an inhibitory effect, although moderate, of these compounds on Aβ(40) fibril formation. This study highlights the potential of proflavine as a molecular scaffold for designing new Aβ imaging agents, its native fluorescence allowing in vitro neuropathological staining in AD damaged brain sections.

  12. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance mechanism...Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. 15

  13. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    goal is to develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance...mechanism. Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...the labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in

  14. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  15. Development of a Multifaceted Ovarian Cancer Imaging Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    method for a recombinant disintegrin vicrostatin (VN), whose structure is based on the snake venom disintegrin contortrostatin (CN), and the use of the...an innovative imaging and diagnostic agent for ovarian cancer (OC). Vicrostatin (VN) is a recombinant protein based on the venom disintegrin...form of the venom derived disintegrin contortrostatin, was compared to a cyclic peptide, cyclo(-RGDfV-), similar to Cilengitide, which is currently in

  16. Contrast agent stability: a continuous B-mode imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Sboros, V; Moran, C M; Pye, S D; McDicken, W N

    2001-10-01

    The stability of contrast agents in suspensions with various dissolved gas levels has not been reported in the literature. An in vitro investigation has been carried out that studied the combined effect of varying the acoustic pressure along with degassing the suspension environment. In this study, the contrast agents were introduced into suspensions with different oxygen concentration levels, and their relative performance was assessed in terms of decay rate of their backscatter echoes. The partial pressures of oxygen in those solutions ranged between 1.5 and 26 kPa. Two IV and one arterial contrast agents were used: Definity, Quantison, and Myomap. It was found that Quantison and Myomap released free bubbles at high acoustic pressure that also dissolved faster in degassed suspensions. The backscatter decay for Definity did not depend on the air content of the suspensions. The destruction of bubbles was dependent on acoustic pressure. Different backscatter performance was observed by different populations of bubbles of the last two agents. The physical quantity of "overall backscatter" (OB) was defined as the integral of the decay rate over time of the backscatter of the contrast suspensions, and improved significantly the understanding of the behaviour of the agents. A quantitative analysis of the backscatter properties of contrast agents using a continuous imaging approach was difficult to achieve. This is due to the fact that the backscatter in the field of view is representative of a bubble population affected by the ultrasound (US) field, but this bubble population is not representative of the contrast suspension in the whole tank. Single frame insonation is suggested to avoid the effects of decay due to the ultrasonic field, and to measure a tank-representative backscatter. The definition of OB was useful, however, in understanding the behaviour of the agents.

  17. [Anti-angiogenesis and molecular targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akihiko; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    Tumor angiogenesis contributes to the development of tumor progression. Several vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF)-targeted agents, administered either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy, have been shown to benefit patients with advanced-stage malignancies. In particular, bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that specifically targets VEGF, inhibiting angiogenesis, thereby impeding tumor growth and survival. It is also possible that combined VEGF and the epidermal growth factor (EGFR) pathway blockade could further enhance antitumor efficacy and help prevent resistance to therapy. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown new various molecular targets and the functional characteristics of tumor angiogenesis, which may provide strategies for improving the therapeutic benefit.

  18. Construction of specific magnetic resonance imaging/optical dual-modality molecular probe used for imaging angiogenesis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuejie; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhenbo

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to construct specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/optical dual-modality molecular probe. Tumor-bearing animal models were established. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe was construed by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified nano-Fe3O4 with specific targeted cyclopeptide GX1 and near-infrared fluorescent dyes Cy5.5. MRI/optical imaging effects of the probe were observed and the feasibility of in vivo double-modality imaging was discussed. It was found that, the double-modality probe was of high stability; tumor signal of the experimental group tended to be weak after injection of the probe, but rose to a level which was close to the previous level after 18 h (p > 0.05). We successively completed the construction of an ideal MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe which can selectively gather in gastric cancer is expected to be a novel probe used for diagnosing gastric cancer in the early stage.

  19. The Use of Novel PET Tracers to Image Breast Cancer Biologic Processes Such as Proliferation, DNA Damage and Repair, and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Laura

    2016-02-01

    The balance between proliferation and cell death is pivotal to breast tumor growth. Because of a combination of environmental and genetic factors leading to activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, these processes become deregulated in cancer. PET imaging of proliferation, angiogenesis, and DNA damage and repair offers the opportunity to monitor therapeutic efficacy to detect changes in tumor biology that may precede physical size reduction and simultaneously allows the study of intratumoral and intertumoral heterogeneity.This review examines recent developments in breast cancer imaging using novel probes. The probes discussed here are not licensed for routine use and are at various stages of development ranging from preclinical development (e.g., the DNA repair marker γH2AX) to clinical validation in larger studies (such as the proliferation probe 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine [(18)F-FLT]). In breast cancer, most studies have focused on proliferation imaging mainly based on (18)F-labeled thymidine analogs. Initial studies have been promising; however, the results of larger validation studies are necessary before being incorporated into routine clinical use. Although there are distinct advantages in using process-specific probes, properties such as metabolism need careful consideration, because high background uptake in the liver due to glucuronidation in the case of (18)F-FLT may limit utility for imaging of liver metastases.Targeting angiogenesis has had some success in tumors such as renal cell carcinoma; however, angiogenesis inhibitors have not been particularly successful in the clinical treatment of breast cancer. This could be potentially attributed to patient selection due to the lack of validated predictive and responsive biomarkers; the quest for a successful noninvasive biomarker for angiogenesis could solve this challenge. Finally, we look at cell death including apoptosis and DNA damage and repair probes, the most well

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized agents: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Erin; Ludwig, Kai; Mummy, David; Fain, Sean B

    2017-04-06

    In the past decade, hyperpolarized (HP) contrast agents have been under active development for MRI applications to address the twin challenges of functional and quantitative imaging. Both HP helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) gases have reached the stage where they are under study in clinical research. HP 129Xe, in particular, is poised for larger scale clinical research to investigate asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and fibrotic lung diseases. With advances in polarizer technology and unique capabilities for imaging of 129Xe gas exchange into lung tissue and blood, HP 129Xe MRI is attracting new attention. In parallel, HP 13C and 15N MRI methods have steadily advanced in a wide range of pre-clinical research applications for imaging metabolism in various cancers and cardiac disease. The HP [1-13C] pyruvate MRI technique, in particular, has undergone phase I trials in prostate cancer and is poised for investigational new drug trials at multiple institutions in cancer and cardiac applications. This review treats the methodology behind both HP gases and HP 13C and 15N liquid state agents. Gas and liquid phase HP agents share similar technologies for achieving non-equilibrium polarization outside the field of the MRI scanner, strategies for image data acquisition, and translational challenges in moving from pre-clinical to clinical research. To cover the wide array of methods and applications, this review is organized by numerical section into 1) a brief introduction, 2) the physical and biological properties of the most common polarized agents with a brief summary of applications and methods of polarization, 3) methods for image acquisition and reconstruction specific to improving data acquisition efficiency for HP MRI, 4) the main physical properties that enable unique measures of physiology or metabolic pathways, followed by a more detailed

  1. A paramagnetic CEST agent for imaging glucose by MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanrong; Trokowski, Robert; Sherry, A Dean

    2003-12-17

    The europium(III) complex of a DOTA-tetraamide ligand (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N' ',N' ''-tetraacetic acids) containing two phenyl boronate pendent arms binds glucose reversibly with an association constant of 383 M-1 at pH 7. Glucose binding results in slowing of water exchange between a single Eu(III)-bound water molecule and bulk water, and this can be imaged by MRI using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging sequence. This metabolite-responsive paramagnetic CEST agent responds to changes in glucose over the physiologically important range (0-20 mM), and thus it offers the possibility of high-sensitivity MR imaging glucose in tissues using bulk water protons as antenna.

  2. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  3. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  4. Angiogenesis and Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Ana Luiza L.; Reis, Fernando M.; Taylor, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive review was performed to survey the role of angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. This is a multifactorial disease in which the development and maintenance of endometriotic implants depend on their invasive capacity and angiogenic potential. The peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis is a complex suspension carrying inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, steroid hormones, proangiogenic factors, macrophages, and endometrial and red blood cells. These cells and their signaling products concur to promote the spreading of new blood vessels at the endometriotic lesions and surroundings, which contributes to the endometriotic implant survival. Experimental studies of several antiangiogenic agents demonstrated the regression of endometriotic lesions by reducing their blood supply. Further studies are necessary before these novel agents can be introduced into clinical practice, in particular the establishment of the safety of anti-angiogenic medications in women who are seeking to become pregnant. PMID:23766765

  5. 99mTc-Labeled Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Dual-Contrast (T1/T2) Magnetic Resonance and Dual-Modality Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Sihan; Zhang, Chunfu; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Dengfeng; Zhang, Jianping; Shi, Hongcheng; Zhang, Yingjian

    2015-06-01

    Multi functional probes possessing magnetic resonance imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography properties are favorable for the molecular imaging of cancers. In this study, ultra small super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, about 3.5 nm in size, were synthesized by the polyol method. The particles were functionalized using c(RGDyC) peptides and labeled with 99mTc to prepare molecular imaging probes for detecting tumor angiogenesis. The probes demonstrated good T1 (r1 = 8.2 s(-1) mM(-1)) and reasonable T2 contrast effects (r2 = 20.1 s(-1) mM(-1)) and could specifically target avβ3-positive cells, inducing more cell ingestion, unlike that in case of the control probes [functionalized with scrambled c(RADyC) peptides]. After the probes were injected into the mice bearing H1299 lung tumors, T1/T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography revealed that they addressed tumor angiogenic vessels, which were distributed mainly in the peripheral region of tumors. Biodistribution studies indicated that tumor accumulation of the probes was significant [13.8 ± 9.6%ID/g (p < 0.01), which is more than that of the control probes, 4.5 ± 1.9%ID/g], and could be inhibited by free RGD peptides (6.0 ± 2.8%ID/g, p < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that the dual-contrast (T1/T2) magnetic resonance and dual-modal imaging probe based on ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles is very promising for the molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis.

  6. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Jakubek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1μm, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  7. In Vivo Imaging of GLP-1R with a Targeted Bimodal PET/Fluorescence Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate visualization and quantification of β-cell mass is critical for the improved understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and insulinoma. Here, we describe the synthesis of a bimodal imaging probe (PET/fluorescence) for imaging GLP-1R expression in the pancreas and in pancreatic islet cell tumors. The conjugation of a bimodal imaging tag containing a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and the copper chelator sarcophagine to the GLP-1R targeting peptide exendin-4 provided the basis for the bimodal imaging probe. Conjugation was performed via a novel sequential one-pot synthetic procedure including 64Cu radiolabeling and copper-catalyzed click-conjugation. The bimodal imaging agent 64Cu-E4-Fl was synthesized in good radiochemical yield and specific activity (RCY = 36%, specific activity: 141 μCi/μg, >98% radiochemical purity). The agent showed good performance in vivo and ex vivo, visualizing small xenografts (<2 mm) with PET and pancreatic β-cell mass by phosphor autoradiography. Using the fluorescent properties of the probe, we were able to detect individual pancreatic islets, confirming specific binding to GLP-1R and surpassing the sensitivity of the radioactive label. The use of bimodal PET/fluorescent imaging probes is promising for preoperative imaging and fluorescence-assisted analysis of patient tissues. We believe that our procedure could become relevant as a protocol for the development of bimodal imaging agents. PMID:24856928

  8. Molecular imaging agents: impact on diagnosis and therapeutics in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Marc E.; Contino, Gianmarco; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging has become a crucial tool in oncology throughout the course of disease detection and management and is an integral part of clinical trials. Anatomic and functional imaging led the way, providing valuable information used in the diagnosis of disease, including data regarding the size and location of the tumor and on physiologic processes such as blood flow and perfusion. As understanding of cancer pathogenesis has advanced through the identification of genetic, biochemical, and cellular alterations in evolving tumors, emphasis has been made on developing methods to detect and serially monitor such alterations. This class of approaches is referred to as molecular imaging. Molecular imaging offers the potential for increasingly sensitive and specific visualization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. These approaches have become established as essential tools for cancer research, early cancer detection and staging and monitoring and predicting response to targeted therapies. Here, we will discuss recent advances in the development of molecular imaging agents and their implementation in basic cancer research as well as in more rationalized approaches to cancer care. PMID:20633310

  9. Multi-agent system for line detection on images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpatov, Boris A.; Babayan, Pavel V.; Shubin, Nikita Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Lines are one of the most informative structure elements on any images. For this reason, objects detection and recognition problems are often reduced to edge detection task. One of the most popular approaches to detect lines is based on the Hough transform or Radon transform. However, using both of transforms allows estimating the infinite lines parameters only. It is necessary to use additional approaches to estimate the ends of the detected lines. Moreover, Radon transform does not allow detecting non-straight curve shapes at all. This work is oriented to solve line detection problem using Radon transform and multi-agent approach. The results of the experimental researches that confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach are given. The real full HD image sequences are used. The direction of further improvements is proposed.

  10. DNA as sensors and imaging agents for metal ions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2014-02-17

    Increasing interest in detecting metal ions in many chemical and biomedical fields has created demands for developing sensors and imaging agents for metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. This review covers recent progress in DNA-based sensors and imaging agents for metal ions. Through both combinatorial selection and rational design, a number of metal-ion-dependent DNAzymes and metal-ion-binding DNA structures that can selectively recognize specific metal ions have been obtained. By attachment of these DNA molecules with signal reporters such as fluorophores, chromophores, electrochemical tags, and Raman tags, a number of DNA-based sensors for both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions have been developed for fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical, and surface Raman detection. These sensors are highly sensitive (with a detection limit down to 11 ppt) and selective (with selectivity up to millions-fold) toward specific metal ions. In addition, through further development to simplify the operation, such as the use of "dipstick tests", portable fluorometers, computer-readable disks, and widely available glucose meters, these sensors have been applied for on-site and real-time environmental monitoring and point-of-care medical diagnostics. The use of these sensors for in situ cellular imaging has also been reported. The generality of the combinatorial selection to obtain DNAzymes for almost any metal ion in any oxidation state and the ease of modification of the DNA with different signal reporters make DNA an emerging and promising class of molecules for metal-ion sensing and imaging in many fields of applications.

  11. Vascular flow and perfusion imaging with ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Matthew; Averkiou, Mike; Tiemann, Klaus; Lohmaier, Stefan; Powers, Jeff; Beach, Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Current techniques for imaging ultrasound (US) contrast agents (UCA) make no distinction between low-velocity microbubbles in the microcirculation and higher-velocity microbubbles in the larger vasculature. A combination of radiofrequency (RF) and Doppler filtering on a low mechanical index (MI) pulse inversion acquisition is presented that differentiates low-velocity microbubbles (on the order of mm/s) associated with perfusion, from the higher-velocity microbubbles (on the order of cm/s) in larger vessels. In vitro experiments demonstrate the ability to separate vascular flow using both harmonic and fundamental Doppler signals. Fundamental and harmonic Doppler signals from microbubbles using a low-MI pulse-inversion acquisition are compared with conventional color Doppler signals in vivo. Due to the lower transmit amplitude and enhanced backscatter from microbubbles, the in vivo signal to clutter ratios for both the fundamental (-11 dB) and harmonic (-4 dB) vascular flow signals were greater than with conventional power Doppler (-51 dB) without contrast agent. The processing investigated here, in parallel with conventional pulse-inversion processing, enables the simultaneous display of both perfusion and vascular flow. In vivo results demonstrating the feasibility and potential utility of the real-time display of both perfusion and vascular flow using US contrast agents are presented and discussed.

  12. Molecular photoacoustic imaging using gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Cho, Eun Chul; Chen, Jingyi; Song, Kwang Hyun; Au, Leslie; Favazza, Christopher P.; Zhang, Qiang; Cobley, Claire M.; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles have received much attention due to their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gold nanoparticles are attractive in many biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility, easily modifiable surfaces for targeting, lack of heavy metal toxicity, wide range of sizes (35-100 nm), tunable plasmonic resonance peak, encapsulated site-specific drug delivery, and strong optical absorption in the near-infrared regime. Specifically, due to their strong optical absorption, gold nanoparticles have been used as a contrast agent for molecular photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor. The plasmonic resonance peak of the gold nanocages (AuNCs) was tuned to the near-infrared region, and the ratio of the absorption cross-section to the extinction cross-section was approximately ~70%, as measured by PA sensing. We used PEGylated gold nanocages (PEG-AuNCs) as a passive targeting contrast agent on melanomas. After 6-h intravenous injection of PEG-AuNCs, PA amplitude was increased by ~14 %. These results strongly suggest PA imaging paired with AuNCs is a promising diagnostic tool for early cancer detection.

  13. Fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates as cellular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Langdon-Jones, Emily E; Symonds, Nadine O; Yates, Sara E; Hayes, Anthony J; Lloyd, David; Williams, Rebecca; Coles, Simon J; Horton, Peter N; Pope, Simon J A

    2014-04-07

    A range of biologically compatible, fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates, based upon the rhenium fac-tricarbonyl core, has been synthesized. The fluorescent ligands are based upon a N-functionalized, 4-amino-derived 1,8-naphthalimide core and incorporate a dipicolyl amine binding unit to chelate Re(I); the structural variations accord to the nature of the alkylated imide with ethyl ester glycine (L(1)), 3-propanol (L(2)), diethylene glycol (L(3)), and benzyl alcohol (L(4)) variants. The species are fluorescent in the visible region between 505 and 537 nm through a naphthalimide-localized intramolecular charge transfer, with corresponding fluorescent lifetimes of up to 9.8 ns. The ligands and complexes were investigated for their potential as imaging agents for human osteoarthritic cells and protistan fish parasite Spironucleus vortens using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results show that the specific nature of the naphthalimide structure serves to control the uptake and intracellular localization of these imaging agents. Significant differences were noted between the free ligands and complexes, with the Re(I) complex of L(2) showing hydrogenosomal localization in S. vortens.

  14. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  15. Dietary proteins and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2014-01-17

    Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  16. Angiogenesis Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhibitors: current strategies and future prospects. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2010; 60(4):222–243. [PubMed Abstract] Chen HX, Cleck JN. Adverse effects of anticancer agents that target the VEGF pathway. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 2009; 6(8):465– ...

  17. Gold nanoparticles as high-resolution X-ray imaging contrast agents for the analysis of tumor-related micro-vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Chien C.; Yong C.; Hsiang-Hsin, C.; Sheng-Feng, L.; Kang-Chao W.; Xiaoqing C.; Yeukuang, H.; Petibois, C.; Margaritondo, G.

    2012-03-12

    Angiogenesis is widely investigated in conjunction with cancer development, in particular because of the possibility of early stage detection and of new therapeutic strategies. However, such studies are negatively affected by the limitations of imaging techniques in the detection of microscopic blood vessels (diameter 3-5 {micro}m) grown under angiogenic stress. We report that synchrotron-based X-ray imaging techniques with very high spatial resolution can overcome this obstacle, provided that suitable contrast agents are used. We tested different contrast agents based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the detection of cancer-related angiogenesis by synchrotron microradiology, microtomography and high resolution X-ray microscopy. Among them only bare-AuNPs in conjunction with heparin injection provided sufficient contrast to allow in vivo detection of small capillary species (the smallest measured lumen diameters were 3-5 {micro}m). The detected vessel density was 3-7 times higher than with other nanoparticles. We also found that bare-AuNPs with heparin allows detecting symptoms of local extravascular nanoparticle diffusion in tumor areas where capillary leakage appeared. Although high-Z AuNPs are natural candidates as radiology contrast agents, their success is not guaranteed, in particular when targeting very small blood vessels in tumor-related angiography. We found that AuNPs injected with heparin produced the contrast level needed to reveal--for the first time by X-ray imaging--tumor microvessels with 3-5 {micro}m diameter as well as extravascular diffusion due to basal membrane defenestration. These results open the interesting possibility of functional imaging of the tumor microvasculature, of its development and organization, as well as of the effects of anti-angiogenic drugs.

  18. Simultaneous Dual-Nuclei Imaging for Motion Corrected Detection and Quantification of 19F Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Grässlin, Ingmar; Mazurkewitz, Peter C.; Schaeffter, Tobias; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine MRI offers broad potential for specific detection and quantification of molecularly targeted agents in diagnosis and therapy planning or monitoring. Because non-proton MRI applications lack morphological information, accompanying proton images are needed to elucidate the spatial tissue context. Furthermore, low concentrations typical of targeted molecular imaging agents require long examinations for signal averaging during which physiological motion may lead to blurring, underestimation in signal quantification, and erroneous localization of the agent distribution. Novel methods for truly-simultaneous acquisition of dual-nuclei MR data are presented that offer efficient and precise anatomical localization of fluorine signals using accurate motion correction based on contemporaneous proton signals. The feasibility of simultaneous dual-nuclei MRI motion correction and corresponding dual-resolution reconstruction, providing nuclei-specific spatial resolution to retrospectively optimize the balance between signal-to-noise ratio and resolution, is shown on a clinical 3T MR system. PMID:21394779

  19. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  20. Uptake of myocardial imaging agents by rejected hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A.; Carroll, M.; Wright, J.W.; Feldman, M.J.; Massucci, J.; Bhayana, J.N.; Gona, J.M.

    1985-09-01

    Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, Gallium 67 and Thallium 201 uptakes were measured in heterotopically transplanted rat hearts. Five days after transplantation, Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, and Gallium 67 uptakes were significantly higher in allogeneic grafts than in syngeneic grafts. At an early stage of rejection (three days after transplantation), only Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate uptake in the left ventricle of allogeneic grafts showed a significant difference (p less than 0.04). At five days, Thallium 201 uptake was significantly lower in allo- than syngeneic grafts. There was a positive correlation between radionuclide uptake and histologic degree of rejection for Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate and Gallium 67 while Thallium 201 uptake correlated negatively. Analysis of variance revealed that hearts with no or minimal rejection had statistically different uptakes than hearts with mild to moderate rejection. These results suggest that uptake of imaging agents might be useful in the diagnosis of rejection of the transplanted heart.

  1. Tailored Near-Infrared Contrast Agents for Image Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Njiojob, Costyl N.; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge. PMID:25711712

  2. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    McCarney, Evan R.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Lingwood, Mark D.; Han, Songi

    2007-01-01

    Pure water in a highly 1H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a 1H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the 1H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A 1H signal enhancement of water by a factor of −10 and −100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T1 relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate. PMID:17264210

  3. Harmonic chirp imaging method for ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Borsboom, Jerome M G; Chin, Chien Ting; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2005-02-01

    Coded excitation is currently used in medical ultrasound to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and penetration depth. We propose a chirp excitation method for contrast agents using the second harmonic component of the response. This method is based on a compression filter that selectively compresses and extracts the second harmonic component from the received echo signal. Simulations have shown a clear increase in response for chirp excitation over pulse excitation with the same peak amplitude. This was confirmed by two-dimensional (2-D) optical observations of bubble response with a fast framing camera. To evaluate the harmonic compression method, we applied it to simulated bubble echoes, to measured propagation harmonics, and to B-mode scans of a flow phantom and compared it to regular pulse excitation imaging. An increase of approximately 10 dB in SNR was found for chirp excitation. The compression method was found to perform well in terms of resolution. Axial resolution was in all cases within 10% of the axial resolution from pulse excitation. Range side-lobe levels were 30 dB below the main lobe for the simulated bubble echoes and measured propagation harmonics. However, side-lobes were visible in the B-mode contrast images.

  4. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  5. Design Principles of Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin; Wang, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that introduces molecular agents into traditional imaging techniques, enabling visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The promise of molecular imaging lies in its potential for selective potency by targeting biomarkers or molecular targets and the imaging agents serve as reporters for the selectivity of targeting. Development of an efficient molecular imaging agent depends on well-controlled high-quality experiment design involving target selection, agent synthesis, in vitro characterization, and in vivo animal characterization before it is applied in humans. According to the analysis from the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD, ), more than 6000 molecular imaging agents with sufficient preclinical evaluation have been reported to date in the literature and this number increases by 250-300 novel agents each year. The majority of these agents are radionuclides, which are developed for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) account for only a small part. This is largely due to the fact that MRI is currently not a fully quantitative imaging technique and is less sensitive than PET and SPECT. However, because of the superior ability to simultaneously extract molecular and anatomic information, molecular MRI is attracting significant interest and various targeted nanoparticle contrast agents have been synthesized for MRI. The first and one of the most critical steps in developing a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent is target selection, which plays the central role and forms the basis for success of molecular imaging. This chapter discusses the design principles of targeted contrast agents in the emerging frontiers of molecular MRI.

  6. Angiogenesis and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Elpek, Gülsüm Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that hepatic angiogenesis, regardless of the etiology, takes place in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) that are characterized by inflammation and progressive fibrosis. Because anti-angiogenic therapy has been found to be efficient in the prevention of fibrosis in experimental models of CLDs, it is suggested that blocking angiogenesis could be a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced fibrosis. Consequently, efforts are being directed to revealing the mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during the progression of liver fibrosis. Literature evidences indicate that hepatic angiogenesis and fibrosis are closely related in both clinical and experimental conditions. Hypoxia is a major inducer of angiogenesis together with inflammation and hepatic stellate cells. These profibrogenic cells stand at the intersection between inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis and play also a pivotal role in angiogenesis. This review mainly focuses to give a clear view on the relevant features that communicate angiogenesis with progression of fibrosis in CLDs towards the-end point of cirrhosis that may be translated into future therapies. The pathogenesis of hepatic angiogenesis associated with portal hypertension, viral hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease are also discussed to emphasize the various mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during liver fibrogenesis. PMID:25848465

  7. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  8. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium.

  9. Liver-specific agents for contrast-enhanced MRI: role in oncological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thian, Yee Liang; Riddell, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver-specific magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents are increasingly used in evaluation of the liver. They are effective in detection and morphological characterization of lesions, and can be useful for evaluation of biliary tree anatomy and liver function. The typical appearances and imaging pitfalls of various tumours at MR imaging performed with these agents can be understood by the interplay of pharmacokinetics of these contrast agents and transporter expression of the tumour. This review focuses on the applications of these agents in oncological imaging. PMID:24434892

  10. Angiogenesis: a prognostic determinant in pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Jill A; van Eijck, Casper H J; Hop, Wim C J; van Dekken, Herman; Dicheva, Bilyana M; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Koning, Gerben A; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2011-11-01

    Angiogenesis has been associated with disease progression in many solid tumours, however the statement that tumours need angiogenesis to grow, invade and metastasise seems no longer applicable to all tumours or to all tumour subtypes. Prognostic studies in pancreatic cancer are conflicting. In fact, pancreatic cancer has been suggested an example of a tumour in which angiogenesis is less essential for tumour progression. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure angiogenesis in two anatomically closely related however prognostically different types of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic head and periampullary cancer, and investigate its relation with outcome. Vessels were stained by CD31 on original paraffin embedded tissue from 206 patients with microscopic radical resection (R0) of pancreatic head (n=98) or periampullary cancer (n=108). Angiogenesis was quantified by microvessel density (MVD) and measured by computerised image analysis of three randomly selected fields and investigated for associations with recurrence free survival (RFS), cancer specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS) and conventional prognostic factors. MVD was heterogeneous both between and within tumours. A higher MVD was observed in periampullary cancers compared with pancreatic head cancers (p<.01). Furthermore, MVD was associated with lymph node involvement in pancreatic head (p=.014), but not in periampullary cancer (p=.55). Interestingly, MVD was not associated with RFS, CSS or with OS. In conclusion, angiogenesis is higher in periampullary cancer and although associated with nodal involvement in pancreatic head cancer, pancreatic cancer prognosis seems indeed angiogenesis independent.

  11. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  12. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH.

  13. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D’Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena—such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis—may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging. PMID:27829050

  14. Cannabidiol inhibits angiogenesis by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Solinas, M; Massi, P; Cantelmo, AR; Cattaneo, MG; Cammarota, R; Bartolini, D; Cinquina, V; Valenti, M; Vicentini, LM; Noonan, DM; Albini, A; Parolaro, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Several studies have demonstrated anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic actions of cannabinoids on various tumours, together with their anti-angiogenic properties. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) effectively inhibits the growth of different types of tumours in vitro and in vivo and down-regulates some pro-angiogenic signals produced by glioma cells. As its anti-angiogenic properties have not been thoroughly investigated to date, and given its very favourable pharmacological and toxicological profile, here, we evaluated the ability of CBD to modulate tumour angiogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Firstly, we evaluated the effect of CBD on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and viability – through [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and FACS analysis – and in vitro motility – both in a classical Boyden chamber test and in a wound-healing assay. We next investigated CBD effects on different angiogenesis-related proteins released by HUVECs, using an angiogenesis array kit and an ELISA directed at MMP2. Then we evaluated its effects on in vitro angiogenesis in treated HUVECs invading a Matrigel layer and in HUVEC spheroids embedded into collagen gels, and further characterized its effects in vivo using a Matrigel sponge model of angiogenesis in C57/BL6 mice. KEY RESULTS CBD induced HUVEC cytostasis without inducing apoptosis, inhibited HUVEC migration, invasion and sprouting in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo in Matrigel sponges. These effects were associated with the down-modulation of several angiogenesis-related molecules. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study reveals that CBD inhibits angiogenesis by multiple mechanisms. Its dual effect on both tumour and endothelial cells supports the hypothesis that CBD has potential as an effective agent in cancer therapy. PMID:22624859

  15. Platelets and angiogenesis in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sierko, Ewa; Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z

    2004-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that platelets play an important role in the process of tumor angiogenesis. Thrombocytosis is a frequent finding in cancer patients (10-57%). Although the mechanisms underlying thrombocytosis are not yet fully elucidated, tumor-derived factors with thrombopoietin-like activity and growth factors, platelet-derived microparticles, and factors secreted from bone marrow endothelial cells, as well as growth factors released by megakaryocytes (acting via an autocrine loop), are postulated to influence this process. The progression of cancer is associated with hypercoagulability, which results from direct influences of tumor cells and diverse indirect mechanisms. Activated platelets serve as procoagulant surfaces amplifying the coagulation reactions. It is well known that hemostatic proteins are involved in different steps of the angiogenic process. Furthermore, platelets adhering to endothelium facilitate adhesion of mononuclear cells (which exert various proangiogenic activities) to endothelial cells and their transmigration to the extravascular space. It was also documented that platelets induce angiogenesis in vivo. Platelets are a rich source of proangiogenic factors. They also store and release angiogenesis inhibitors. In addition, platelets express surface growth factor receptors, which may regulate the process of angiogenesis. Platelets also contribute directly to the process of basement membrane and extracellular matrix proteolysis by releasing proteinases, or indirectly via inducing endothelial cells and tumor cells to release proteolytic enzymes, as well as through the proteolytic activities of platelet-derived growth factors. The multidirectional activities of platelets in the process of new blood vessel formation during tumor development and metastasis formation may create the possibility of introducing antiplatelet agents for antiangiogenic therapy in cancer patients. Thus far experimental studies employing inhibitors of

  16. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process.

  17. Multimeric Near IR–MR Contrast Agent for Multimodal In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiple imaging modalities are often required for in vivo imaging applications that require both high probe sensitivity and excellent spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, MR and optical imaging are an attractive combination that can be used to determine both molecular and anatomical information. Herein, we describe the synthesis and in vivo testing of two multimeric NIR–MR contrast agents that contain three Gd(III) chelates and an IR-783 dye moiety. One agent contains a PEG linker and the other a short alkyl linker. These agents label cells with extraordinary efficacy and can be detected in vivo using both imaging modalities. Biodistribution of the PEGylated agent shows observable fluorescence in xenograft MCF7 tumors and renal clearance by MR imaging. PMID:26083313

  18. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  19. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  20. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-09-22

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based "nanobubble" contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size.

  1. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Stress-Induced Angiogenesis in MCF7 Human Breast Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman-Haran, Edna; Margalit, Raanan; Grobgeld, Dov; Degani, Hadassa

    1996-06-01

    The mechanism of contrast enhancement of tumors using magnetic resonance imaging was investigated in MCF7 human breast cancer implanted in nude mice. Dynamic contrast-enhanced images recorded at high spatial resolution were analyzed by an image analysis method based on a physiological model, which included the blood circulation, the tumor, the remaining tissues, and clearance via the kidneys. This analysis enabled us to map in rapidly enhancing regions within the tumor, the capillary permeability factor (capillary permeability times surface area per voxel volume) and the fraction of leakage space. Correlation of these maps with T2-weighted spin echo images, with histopathology, and with immunohistochemical staining of endothelial cells demonstrated the presence of dense permeable microcapillaries in the tumor periphery and in intratumoral regions that surrounded necrotic loci. The high leakage from the intratumoral permeable capillaries indicated an induction of a specific angiogenic process associated with stress conditions that cause necrosis. This induction was augmented in tumors responding to tamoxifen treatment. Determination of the distribution and extent of this stress-induced angiogenic activity by contrast-enhanced MRI might be of diagnostic and of prognostic value.

  2. Targeting Angiogenesis for Treatment of Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Somani, R. R.; Bhanushali, U. V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer research highlighted the importance of target-specific drug discovery. In view of these advances, the most important mechanism in tumour growth is its ability to stimulate the formation of blood capillaries around itself called tumour-driven angiogenesis. Hence targeting the angiogenesis, inhibits the growth of blood vessels around it and responsible for death of the tumour due to starvation and accumulation of toxic waste. The therapy, thus, indirectly cytotoxic to the tumour cells by targeting newly developing blood vessels. In this review, we summarised the various antiangiogenic agents with their clinical uses and current status. PMID:23901154

  3. Microscopic validation of whole mouse micro-metastatic tumor imaging agents using cryo-imaging and sliding organ image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiqiao; Zhou, Bo; Qutaish, Mohammed; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We created a metastasis imaging, analysis platform consisting of software and multi-spectral cryo-imaging system suitable for evaluating emerging imaging agents targeting micro-metastatic tumor. We analyzed CREKA-Gd in MRI, followed by cryo-imaging which repeatedly sectioned and tiled microscope images of the tissue block face, providing anatomical bright field and molecular fluorescence, enabling 3D microscopic imaging of the entire mouse with single metastatic cell sensitivity. To register MRI volumes to the cryo bright field reference, we used our standard mutual information, non-rigid registration which proceeded: preprocess --> affine --> B-spline non-rigid 3D registration. In this report, we created two modified approaches: mask where we registered locally over a smaller rectangular solid, and sliding organ. Briefly, in sliding organ, we segmented the organ, registered the organ and body volumes separately and combined results. Though sliding organ required manual annotation, it provided the best result as a standard to measure other registration methods. Regularization parameters for standard and mask methods were optimized in a grid search. Evaluations consisted of DICE, and visual scoring of a checkerboard display. Standard had accuracy of 2 voxels in all regions except near the kidney, where there were 5 voxels sliding. After mask and sliding organ correction, kidneys sliding were within 2 voxels, and Dice overlap increased 4%-10% in mask compared to standard. Mask generated comparable results with sliding organ and allowed a semi-automatic process.

  4. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Padmakar V.; Vasdev, Neil; Hao, Guiyang; Arora, Veera; Long, Michael; Slavine, Nikolai; Chiguru, Srinivas; Qu, Bao Xi; Sun, Xiankai; Bennett, Michael; Antich, Peter P.; Bonte, Frederick J.

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  5. Object oriented image analysis based on multi-agent recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib Mahmoudi, Fatemeh; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Reinartz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the capabilities of multi-agent systems are used in order to solve object recognition difficulties in complex urban areas based on the characteristics of WorldView-2 satellite imagery and digital surface model (DSM). The proposed methodology has three main steps: pre-processing of dataset, object based image analysis and multi-agent object recognition. Classified regions obtained from object based image analysis are used as input datasets in the proposed multi-agent system in order to modify/improve results. In the first operational level of the proposed multi-agent system, various kinds of object recognition agents modify initial classified regions based on their spectral, textural and 3D structural knowledge. Then, in the second operational level, 2D structural knowledge and contextual relations are used by agents for reasoning and modification. Evaluation of the capabilities of the proposed object recognition methodology is performed on WorldView-2 imagery over Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) which has been collected in January 2010. According to the obtained results of the object based image analysis process, contextual relations and structural descriptors have high potential to modify general difficulties of object recognition. Using knowledge based reasoning and cooperative capabilities of agents in the proposed multi-agent system in this paper, most of the remaining difficulties are decreased and the accuracy of object based image analysis results is improved for about three percent.

  6. MULTIFUNCTIONAL SYNTHETIC POLY(L-GLUTAMIC ACID)-BASED CANCER THERAPEUTIC AND IMAGING AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern polymer chemistry has led to the generation of a number of biocompatible synthetic polymers have been increasingly studied as efficient carriers for drugs and imaging agents. Synthetic biocompatible polymers have been used to improve the efficacy of both small-molecular-weight therapeutics and imaging agents. Furthermore, multiple targeted anticancer agents and/or imaging reporters can be attached to a single polymer chain, allowing multifunctional and/or multimodality therapy and molecular imaging. Having both an anticancer drug and an imaging reporter in a single polymer chain allows noninvasive real-time visualization of the pharmacokinetics of polymeric drug delivery systems, which can uncover and explain the complicated mechanisms of in vivo drug delivery and their correlation to pharmacodynamics. This review examines use of the synthetic biocompatible polymer poly(L-glutamic acid) (PG) as an efficient carrier of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents. This review will summarize and update our recent research on use of PG as a platform for drug delivery and molecular imaging, including recent clinical findings with respect to PG-paclitaxel (PG-TXL); the combination of PG-TXL with radiotherapy; mechanisms of action of PG-TXL; and noninvasive visualization of in vivo delivery of polymeric conjugates with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and multimodality imaging. PMID:21303613

  7. Content-based image retrieval in the World Wide Web: a web agent for fetching portraits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenkelt, Olaf; Kaufmann, Oliver; Eckstein, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    This article propose a way to automatically retrieve images from the world-wide-web using a semantic description for images and an agent concept for the retrieval of images. The system represents image in a textual way, e.g. look for a portrait of the a specific person, or fetch an image showing a countryside in Southern California. This textual descriptions are fed in search machines, e.g. yahoo, alta- vista. The resulting html documents are seeked for links. The next step subsequently processes each link by fetching the document other the net, converting it to an ascii representation, and performing a full text search by using the image description. This leads to starting points of images which are retrieved via a web-agent. The image descriptions are decomposed in a set of parts containing image operations which are further processed, e.g. a set for representing the background of a portrait tries to find a homogeneous region in the image because this is likely to find in a portrait. Additional operations are performed on the foreground, i.e. the image region which contains e.g. the face of a person. The system is realized using two C++ libraries: one for building up web-agents, LIWA++, and one for processing images, HORUS.

  8. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  9. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  10. Galectins in tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of solid tumors depends on the continuous ingrowth of new blood vessels out of pre-existing capillaries. Consequently, tumor neovascularization or tumor angiogenesis is considered a hallmark of cancer and an attractive target for cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis is mainly carried out by endothelial cells (EC), i.e., the cells lining the luminal vessel wall. These cells have to take on different functional activities in order to successfully make new tumor blood vessels. In the last decade it has become apparent that galectins are important regulators of tumor angiogenesis. In the present review we summarize the current knowledge regarding the role galectins in tumor angiogenesis focussing on the endothelial galectins, i.e., gal-1/-3/-8/-9. PMID:25405165

  11. Small animal imaging platform for quantitative assessment of short-wave infrared-emitting contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Philip; Mingozzi, Marco; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Zevon, Margot; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    We report the design, calibration, and testing of a pre-clinical small animal imaging platform for use with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emitting contrast agents. Unlike materials emitting at visible or near-infrared wavelengths, SWIR-emitting agents require detection systems with sensitivity in the 1-2 μm wavelength region, beyond the range of commercially available small animal imagers. We used a collimated 980 nm laser beam to excite rare-earth-doped NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites, as an example of a SWIR emitting material under development for biomedical imaging applications. This beam was raster scanned across the animal, with fluorescence in the 1550 nm wavelength region detected by an InGaAs area camera. Background adjustment and intensity non-uniformity corrections were applied in software. The final SWIR fluorescence image was overlaid onto a standard white-light image for registration of contrast agent uptake with respect to anatomical features.

  12. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  13. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  14. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  15. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  16. Magnetic resonance contrast media sensing in vivo molecular imaging agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Amanlou, Massoud; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Norouzian, Dariush; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbani, Masoud; Alavidjeh, Mohammad Shafiee; Inanlou, Davoud Nouri; Arabzadeh, Ali Jabbari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic imaging is commonly performed by nuclear medicine facilities such as PET or SPECT, etc. The production and biomedical applications of bio-molecular sensing in vivo MRI metabolic contrast agents has recently become of great universal research interest, which follows its great success as a potential cost effective, less radioactive, nuclear medicine alternative. Temperature, redox potential, enzyme activity, free radial/metal ion responsive and/or pH sensitive molecular metabolic MR contrast agents are among the famous instances exemplified, which basically promote MR image contrast enhancement ability to distinguish molecular metabolic/gene expression features. Overall, these MRI contrast agents provide a framework to achieve a greater degree of accuracy from MRI as a low cost, more available facility, non radioactive radiation producing and highly sensitive biomedical tool to propound as a new suggesting opponent for PET nuclear medicine imaging. In the present review, the design, development, examination and future of the above agents will be discussed in detail.

  17. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  18. PSMA-targeted contrast agents for intraoperative imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Lee, Jeong Heon; Kang, Homan; Park, G Kate; El Fakhri, Georges; Choi, Hak Soo

    2017-02-04

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) can serve as a molecular cell surface target for the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging enables highly sensitive, rapid, and non-radioactive imaging of PSMA, though specific targeting still remains a challenge because no optimized contrast agents exist.

  19. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    PubMed

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  20. Modifying the size distribution of microbubble contrast agents for high-frequency subharmonic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Rychak, Joshua J.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Subharmonic imaging is of interest for high frequency (>10 MHz) nonlinear imaging, because it can specifically detect the response of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). However, conventional UCA produce a weak subharmonic response at high frequencies, which limits the sensitivity of subharmonic imaging. We hypothesized that modifying the size distribution of the agent can enhance its high-frequency subharmonic response. The overall goal of this study was to investigate size-manipulated populations of the agent to determine the range of sizes that produce the strongest subharmonic response at high frequencies (in this case, 20 MHz). A secondary goal was to assess whether the number or the volume-weighted size distribution better represents the efficacy of the agent for high-frequency subharmonic imaging. Methods: The authors created six distinct agent size distributions from the native distribution of a commercially available UCA (Targestar-P®). The median (number-weighted) diameter of the native agent was 1.63 μm, while the median diameters of the size-manipulated populations ranged from 1.35 to 2.99 μm. The authors conducted acoustic measurements with native and size-manipulated agent populations to assess their subharmonic response to 20 MHz excitation (pulse duration 1.5 μs, pressure amplitudes 100–398 kPa). Results: The results showed a considerable difference between the subharmonic response of the agent populations that were investigated. The subharmonic response peaked for the agent population with a median diameter of 2.15 μm, which demonstrated a subharmonic signal that was 8 dB higher than the native agent. Comparing the subharmonic response of different UCA populations indicated that microbubbles with diameters between 1.3 and 3 μm are the dominant contributors to the subharmonic response at 20 MHz. Additionally, a better correlation was observed between the subharmonic response of the agent and the number-weighted size-distribution (R2

  1. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  2. Research into europium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HAN, GUOCAN; DENG, YANGWEI; SUN, JIHONG; LING, JUN; SHEN, ZHIQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Europium (Eu) is a paramagnetic lanthanide element that possesses an outstanding luminescent property. Eu complexes are ideal fluorescence imaging (FI) agents. Eu2+ has satisfactory relaxivity and optical properties, and can realize magnetic resonance (MRI)-FI dual imaging applications when used with appropriate cryptands that render it oxidatively stable. By contrast, based on the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) mechanism, Eu3+ complexes can provide enhanced MRI sensitivity when used with optimal cryptands, incorporated into polymeric CEST agents or blended with Gd3+. Eu complexes are promising in MRI-FI dual imaging applications and have a bright future. PMID:26136858

  3. Adaptive angiogenesis in placentas of heavy smokers.

    PubMed

    Pfarrer, C; Macara, L; Leiser, R; Kingdom, J

    1999-07-24

    Smoking in pregnancy increases perinatal morbidity and mortality, suggesting impaired placental function, though placental weight is increased. We used scanning electron microscopy to show adaptive angiogenesis in term placental villi from smokers (n=4) and non-smokers (n=4). These images may aid communication of the dangers of smoking in pregnancy.

  4. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Development of contrast enhancing agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lex, L

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful new diagnostic tool in medicine. In MRI there is a great need to improve the specific identification of different tissues i.e. to enhance the contrast between them. This review tries to cover most of the approaches known for solving this problem.

  6. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  7. Bisphosphonate-Based Contrast Agents for Radiological Imaging of Microcalcifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    treatment of patients with bone metastases [5]. Two such commercially available compounds are pamidronate disodium, available as Aredia® from...reaction has superior yield (>70%) to the 18-21% yield for pamidronate - IRDye-78 (LI-COR) conjugation reported previously [6]. Representative images are

  8. Gold nanoclusters as contrast agents for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; Tu, Yu; Qin, Songbing; Li, Yan; Zhou, Juying; Chen, Na; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Bingbo

    2012-04-15

    Multimodal imaging technique is an alternative approach to improve sensitivity of early cancer diagnosis. In this study, highly fluorescent and strong X-ray absorption coefficient gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are synthesized as dual-modality imaging contrast agents (CAs) for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Au NCs are well constructed with ultrasmall sizes, reliable fluorescent emission, high computed tomography (CT) value and fine biocompatibility. In vivo imaging results indicate that the obtained Au NCs are capable of fluorescent and X-ray enhanced imaging.

  9. Towards a framework for agent-based image analysis of remote-sensing data.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Peter; Lettmayer, Paul; Blaschke, Thomas; Belgiu, Mariana; Wegenkittl, Stefan; Graf, Roland; Lampoltshammer, Thomas Josef; Andrejchenko, Vera

    2015-04-03

    Object-based image analysis (OBIA) as a paradigm for analysing remotely sensed image data has in many cases led to spatially and thematically improved classification results in comparison to pixel-based approaches. Nevertheless, robust and transferable object-based solutions for automated image analysis capable of analysing sets of images or even large image archives without any human interaction are still rare. A major reason for this lack of robustness and transferability is the high complexity of image contents: Especially in very high resolution (VHR) remote-sensing data with varying imaging conditions or sensor characteristics, the variability of the objects' properties in these varying images is hardly predictable. The work described in this article builds on so-called rule sets. While earlier work has demonstrated that OBIA rule sets bear a high potential of transferability, they need to be adapted manually, or classification results need to be adjusted manually in a post-processing step. In order to automate these adaptation and adjustment procedures, we investigate the coupling, extension and integration of OBIA with the agent-based paradigm, which is exhaustively investigated in software engineering. The aims of such integration are (a) autonomously adapting rule sets and (b) image objects that can adopt and adjust themselves according to different imaging conditions and sensor characteristics. This article focuses on self-adapting image objects and therefore introduces a framework for agent-based image analysis (ABIA).

  10. Towards a framework for agent-based image analysis of remote-sensing data

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Peter; Lettmayer, Paul; Blaschke, Thomas; Belgiu, Mariana; Wegenkittl, Stefan; Graf, Roland; Lampoltshammer, Thomas Josef; Andrejchenko, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Object-based image analysis (OBIA) as a paradigm for analysing remotely sensed image data has in many cases led to spatially and thematically improved classification results in comparison to pixel-based approaches. Nevertheless, robust and transferable object-based solutions for automated image analysis capable of analysing sets of images or even large image archives without any human interaction are still rare. A major reason for this lack of robustness and transferability is the high complexity of image contents: Especially in very high resolution (VHR) remote-sensing data with varying imaging conditions or sensor characteristics, the variability of the objects’ properties in these varying images is hardly predictable. The work described in this article builds on so-called rule sets. While earlier work has demonstrated that OBIA rule sets bear a high potential of transferability, they need to be adapted manually, or classification results need to be adjusted manually in a post-processing step. In order to automate these adaptation and adjustment procedures, we investigate the coupling, extension and integration of OBIA with the agent-based paradigm, which is exhaustively investigated in software engineering. The aims of such integration are (a) autonomously adapting rule sets and (b) image objects that can adopt and adjust themselves according to different imaging conditions and sensor characteristics. This article focuses on self-adapting image objects and therefore introduces a framework for agent-based image analysis (ABIA). PMID:27721916

  11. Functional imaging using the retinal function imager: direct imaging of blood velocity, achieving fluorescein angiography-like images without any contrast agent, qualitative oximetry, and functional metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Izhaky, David; Nelson, Darin A; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Grinvald, Amiram

    2009-07-01

    The Retinal Function Imager (RFI; Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel) is a unique, noninvasive multiparameter functional imaging instrument that directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, and metabolic responses to photic activation. In addition, it allows capillary perfusion mapping without any contrast agent. These parameters of retinal function are degraded by retinal abnormalities. This review delineates the development of these parameters and demonstrates their clinical applicability for noninvasive detection of retinal function in several modalities. The results suggest multiple clinical applications for early diagnosis of retinal diseases and possible critical guidance of their treatment.

  12. HER2 Targeted Molecular MR Imaging Using a De Novo Designed Protein Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jingjuan; Li, Shunyi; Wei, Lixia; Jiang, Jie; Long, Robert; Mao, Hui; Wei, Ling; Wang, Liya; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively assess disease biomarkers has been hampered by the lack of desired contrast agents with high relaxivity, targeting capability, and optimized pharmacokinetics. We have developed a novel MR imaging probe targeting to HER2, a biomarker for various cancer types and a drug target for anti-cancer therapies. This multimodal HER20targeted MR imaging probe integrates a de novo designed protein contrast agent with a high affinity HER2 affibody and a near IR fluorescent dye. Our probe can differentially monitor tumors with different expression levels of HER2 in both human cell lines and xenograft mice models. In addition to its 100-fold higher dose efficiency compared to clinically approved non-targeting contrast agent DTPA, our developed agent also exhibits advantages in crossing the endothelial boundary, tissue distribution, and tumor tissue retention over reported contrast agents as demonstrated by even distribution of the imaging probe across the entire tumor mass. This contrast agent will provide a powerful tool for quantitative assessment of molecular markers, and improved resolution for diagnosis, prognosis and drug discovery. PMID:21455310

  13. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Zehri, Aqib H.; Ramey, Wyatt; Georges, Joseph F.; Mooney, Michael A.; Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Preul, Mark C.; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid) with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM), two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery. PMID:24872922

  14. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  15. Amphetamines and pH-shift agents for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Biersack, H.J.; Winkler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a review of the results of experimental and clinical research on both I-amphetamine derivatives and pH-shift agents. Virtually all relevant working groups from the USA and Europe have contributed to this volume. The pharmacology of amphetamine and the corresponding receptor theories are described in detail, whereas other chapters deal with the labeling as well as the metabolic process of this drug. In addition to this, new amphetamine derivatives are presented together with other essential products which play a significant role in scintigraphy of the brain function. Finally, there are two chapters on instrumentation problems followed by eight contributions on the clinical results of amphetamine scintigraphy in cerebral vascular diseases, epilepsy, migraine and brain tumors.

  16. Magnetic conjugated polymer nanoparticles as bimodal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Howes, Philip; Green, Mark; Bowers, Alex; Parker, David; Varma, Gopal; Kallumadil, Mathew; Hughes, Mary; Warley, Alice; Brain, Anthony; Botnar, Rene

    2010-07-21

    Hybrid nanoparticles which incorporate multiple functionalities, such as fluorescence and magnetism, can exhibit enhanced efficiency and versatility by performing several tasks in parallel. In this study, magnetic-fluorescent semiconductor polymer nanospheres (MF-SPNs) have been synthesized by encapsulation of hydrophobic conjugated polymers and iron oxide nanoparticles in phospholipid micelles. Four fluorescent conjugated polymers were used, yielding aqueous dispersions of nanoparticles which emit across the visible spectrum. The MF-SPNs were shown to be magnetically responsive and simultaneously fluorescent. In MRI studies, they were seen to have a shortening effect on the transverse T(2)* relaxation time, which demonstrates their potential as an MR contrast agent. Finally, successful uptake of the MF-SPNs by SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells was demonstrated, and they were seen to behave as bright and stable fluorescent markers. There was no evidence of toxicity or adverse affect on cell growth.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  18. Correlating Molecular Character of NIR Imaging Agents with Tissue-Specific Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Eric A.; Hyun, Hoon; Tawney, Joseph G.; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents are emerging in optical imaging as sensitive, cost-effective, and nonharmful alternatives to current agents that emit harmful ionizing radiation. Developing spectrally distinct NIR fluorophores to visualize sensitive vital tissues to selectively avoid them during surgical resection of diseased tissue is of great significance. Herein, we report the synthetic variation of pentamethine cyanine fluorophores with modifications of physicochemical properties toward prompting tissue-specific uptake into sensitive tissues (i.e., endocrine glands). Tissue-specific targeting and biodistribution studies revealed localization of contrast agents in the adrenal and pituitary glands, pancreas, and lymph nodes with dependence on molecular characteristics. Incorporation of hydrophobic heterocyclic rings, alkyl groups, and halogens allowed a fine-tuning capability to the hydrophobic character and dipole moment for observing perturbation in biological activity in response to minor structural alterations. These NIR contrast agents have potential for clinical translation for intraoperative imaging in the delineation of delicate glands. PMID:25923454

  19. SRF in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Claudio A

    2009-01-01

    Cell cytoskeleton proteins are fundamental to cell shape, cell adhesion and cell motility, and therefore play an important role during angiogenesis. One of the major regulators of cytoskeletal protein expression is serum response factor (SRF), a MADS-box transcription factor that regulates multiple genes implicated in cell growth, migration, cytoskeletal organization, energy metabolism and myogenesis. Recent data have demonstrated a crucial role of SRF downstream of VEGF and FGF signalling during sprouting angiogenesis, regulating endothelial cell (EC) migration, actin polymerisation, tip cell morphology, EC junction assembly and vascular integrity. Here, we review the role of SRF in the regulation of angiogenesis and EC function, integrate SRF function into a broader mechanism regulating branching morphogenesis, and discuss future directions and perspectives of SRF in EC biology. PMID:19287204

  20. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Beitzke, Dietrich Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-02-15

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  1. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents. PMID:26137374

  2. Cobalt Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles as a Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Zeinab; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Manouchehri, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) have been used for contrast enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In recent years, research on the use of ferrite nanoparticles in T2 contrast agents has shown a great potential application in MR imaging. In this work, Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-DMSA magnetic nanoparticles, CZF-MNPs and CZF-MNPs-DMSA, were investigated as MR imaging contrast agents. Methods: Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles and their suitable coating, DMSA, were investigated under in vitro condition. Human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3) with bare (uncoated) and coated magnetic nanoparticles were investigated as nano-contrast MR imaging agents. Results: Using T2-weighted MR images identified that signal intensity of bare and coated MNPs was enhanced with increasing concentration of MNPs in water. The values of 1/T2 relaxivity (r2) for bare and coated MNPs were found to be 88.46 and 28.80 (mM−1 s−1), respectively. Conclusion: The results show that bare and coated MNPs are suitable as T2-weighted MR imaging contrast agents. Also, the obtained r2/r1 values (59.3 and 50) for bare and coated MNPs were in agreement with the results of other previous relevant works. PMID:26140183

  3. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid as a Carrier for Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Amber L.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose With the broadening field of nanomedicine poised for future molecular level therapeutics, nano-and microparticles intended for the augmentation of either single- or multimodal imaging are created with PLGA as the chief constituent and carrier. Methods Emulsion techniques were used to encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic imaging contrast agents in PLGA particles. The imaging contrast properties of these PLGA particles were further enhanced by reducing silver onto the PLGA surface, creating a silver cage around the polymeric core. Results The MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA and the exogenous dye rhodamine 6G were both encapsulated in PLGA and shown to enhance MR and fluorescence contrast, respectively. The silver nanocage built around PLGA nanoparticles exhibited strong near infrared light absorbance properties, making it a suitable contrast agent for optical imaging strategies such as photoacoustic imaging. Conclusions The biodegradable polymer PLGA is an extremely versatile nano- and micro-carrier for several imaging contrast agents with the possibility of targeting diseased states at a molecular level. PMID:19034628

  4. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-05-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents.

  5. Utilization of nanoparticles as X-ray contrast agents for diagnostic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    De La Vega, José Carlos; Häfeli, Urs O

    2015-01-01

    Among all the diagnostic imaging modalities, X-ray imaging techniques are the most commonly used owing to their high resolution and low cost. The improvement of these techniques relies heavily on the development of novel X-ray contrast agents, which are molecules that enhance the visibility of internal structures within the body in X-ray imaging. To date, clinically used X-ray contrast agents consist mainly of small iodinated molecules that might cause severe adverse effects (e.g. allergies, cardiovascular diseases and nephrotoxicity) in some patients owing to the large and repeated doses that are required to achieve good contrast. For this reason, there is an increasing interest in the development of alternative X-ray contrast agents utilizing elements with high atomic numbers (e.g. gold, bismuth, ytterbium and tantalum), which are well known for exhibiting high absorption of X-rays. Nanoparticles (NPs) made from these elements have been reported to have better imaging properties, longer blood circulation times and lower toxicity than conventional iodinated X-ray contrast agents. Additionally, the combination of two or more of these elements into a single carrier allows for the development of multimodal and hybrid contrast agents. Herein, the limitations of iodinated X-ray contrast agents are discussed and the parameters that influence the efficacy of X-ray contrast agents are summarized. Several examples of the design and production of both iodinated and iodine-free NP-based X-ray contrast agents are then provided, emphasizing the studies performed to evaluate their X-ray attenuation capabilities and their toxicity in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Development of new brain imaging agents based upon nocaine-modafinil hybrid monoamine transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Musachio, John L; Hong, Jinsoo; Ichise, Masanori; Seneca, Nicholas; Brown, Amira K; Liow, Jeih-San; Halldin, Christer; Innis, Robert B; Pike, Victor W; He, Rong; Zhou, Jia; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2006-06-15

    11C-labeled (+)-trans-2-[[(3R,4S)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methylpiperidin-3-yl]methylsulfanyl]ethanol ([11C]5) and (+)-trans-2-[[(3R,4S)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methylpiperidin-3-yl]methylsulfanyl]-1-(piperidin-1-yl)ethanone ([11C]6) were synthesized and evaluated as new imaging agents for the norepinephrine transporter (NET). [11C]5 and [11C]6 display high affinity for the NET in vitro (Ki = 0.94 and 0.68 nM, respectively) and significant selectivity over the dopamine (DAT) and serotonin transporters (SERT). Because of their high affinity and favorable transporter selectivities we speculated that these ligands might serve as useful PET agents for imaging NET in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, both of these ligands provided brain images that were more typical of those shown by agents binding to the DAT.

  7. Subharmonic Imaging and Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is currently the standard of care for locally advanced breast cancer ...improve the monitoring of breast cancer treatment response to neoadjuvant therapies in women diagnosed with LABC by imaging tumor angiogenesis with...changed their mind prior to starting the study). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer , Ultrasound Imaging, Ultrasound Contrast Agent, Pressure Estimation

  8. From angiogenesis to neuropathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2005-12-01

    Angiogenesis - the growth of new blood vessels - is a crucial force for shaping the nervous system and protecting it from disease. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the brain and other tissues grow new blood vessels under normal and pathological conditions. Angiogenesis factors, especially vascular endothelial growth factor, are now known to have roles in the birth of new neurons (neurogenesis), the prevention or mitigation of neuronal injury (neuroprotection), and the pathogenesis of stroke, Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease. As our understanding of pathophysiology grows, these developments may point the way towards new molecular and cell-based therapies.

  9. ER Stress and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2015-10-06

    Proper tissue vascularization is vital for cellular function as it delivers oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and immune cells and helps to clear cellular debris and metabolic waste products. Tissue angiogenesis occurs to satisfy energy requirements and cellular sensors of metabolic imbalance coordinate vessel growth. In this regard, the classical pathways of the unfolded protein response activated under conditions of ER stress have recently been described to generate angiomodulatory or angiostatic signals. This review elaborates on the link between angiogenesis and ER stress and discusses the implications for diseases characterized by altered vascular homeostasis, such as cancer, retinopathies, and atherosclerosis.

  10. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.
    B.D. Abbott
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  11. Notch in Pathological Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    agent known as Notch1 decoy (hN1DFc). Activation or inactivation of Notch changes the gene profile of LEC and changes their in vitro behavior. An...induced transcripts for direct targets such as Hey1 and Hey2 (data not shown), as well as the LEC gene VEGFR-3 (Figure 2a). Interestingly, Notch...activity may interfere with tumor (lymph)angiogenesis by disrupting expression and activity of EC genes . To that end, we have created a treatment

  12. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  13. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  14. Poly(iohexol) nanoparticles as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Yap, Felix Y; Yin, Lichen; Ma, Liang; Zhou, Qin; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Fan, Timothy M; Gaba, Ron C; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-09-18

    Biocompatible poly(iohexol) nanoparticles, prepared through cross-linking of iohexol and hexamethylene diisocyanate followed by coprecipitation of the resulting cross-linked polymer with mPEG-polylactide, were utilized as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Compared to conventional small-molecule contrast agents, poly(iohexol) nanoparticles exhibited substantially protracted retention within the tumor bed and a 36-fold increase in CT contrast 4 h post injection, which makes it possible to acquire CT images with improved diagnosis accuracy over a broad time frame without multiple administrations.

  15. Effects of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA on Plant Growth and Root Imaging in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binmei; Wang, Qi; Ni, Xiaoyu; Dong, Yaling; Zhong, Kai; Wu, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have a wide range of applications in medical studies involving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), these agents are seldom used to enhance MRI images of plant root systems. To extend the application of MRI contrast agents to plant research and to develop related techniques to study root systems, we examined the applicability of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA to the imaging of rice roots. Specifically, we examined the biological effects of various concentrations of Gd-DTPA on rice growth and MRI images. Analysis of electrical conductivity and plant height demonstrated that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA had little impact on rice in the short-term. The results of signal intensity and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analysis suggested that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA was the appropriate concentration for enhancing MRI signals. In addition, examination of the long-term effects of Gd-DTPA on plant height showed that levels of this compound up to 5 mmol had little impact on rice growth and (to some extent) increased the biomass of rice. PMID:24945975

  16. Effects of the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent Gd-DTPA on plant growth and root imaging in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zan; Qian, Junchao; Liu, Binmei; Wang, Qi; Ni, Xiaoyu; Dong, Yaling; Zhong, Kai; Wu, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have a wide range of applications in medical studies involving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), these agents are seldom used to enhance MRI images of plant root systems. To extend the application of MRI contrast agents to plant research and to develop related techniques to study root systems, we examined the applicability of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA to the imaging of rice roots. Specifically, we examined the biological effects of various concentrations of Gd-DTPA on rice growth and MRI images. Analysis of electrical conductivity and plant height demonstrated that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA had little impact on rice in the short-term. The results of signal intensity and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analysis suggested that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA was the appropriate concentration for enhancing MRI signals. In addition, examination of the long-term effects of Gd-DTPA on plant height showed that levels of this compound up to 5 mmol had little impact on rice growth and (to some extent) increased the biomass of rice.

  17. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  18. The Harvard angiogenesis story.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joan W

    2014-01-01

    I shall discuss the work of researchers at Harvard Medical School who came together in the early 1990s. Scattered across various Harvard-affiliated hospitals and research centers, these individuals were unified by their interest in ocular neovascularization. Together and separately, they investigated models of ocular neovascularization, exploring tumor angiogenesis in eye development and disease.

  19. How phototherapy affects angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Mary

    2007-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for normal growth, tissue repair and regeneration. Its stimulation accelerates repair and regeneration including wound healing where these processes are delayed. Its inhibition can reduce the rate of growth of solid tumors. Phototherapy can accelerate the resolution of acute inflammation with the result that the proliferative phase of tissue repair, when angiogenesis occurs, begins earlier than in sham-irradiated controls. Evidence that angiogenesis is enhanced in dermal repair, tendon repair and bone regeneration in rodents is presented. The cellular mechanisms that control angiogenesis involve the interaction of endothelial cells, macrophages, pericytes and other cells in response, for example, to changes in the availability of oxygen in the local environment. Pericytes and macrophages modulate endothelial cell proliferation; pericytes guide endothelial cell migration. The stimulation of endothelial cell proliferation in vitro following exposure to red (660 nm) and infrared (820 nm) radiation, 15 mW, at 2-8 J/cm2 is presented. 1J/cm2 was ineffective. 820 nm irradiation, 15 mW, at 8 J/cm2 was observed to inhibit pericyte proliferation in vitro. Indirect effects on endothelial cell and pericyte proliferation followed stimulation of soluble mediator production by macrophages following exposure to red and infrared radiation. The potential clinical significance of the results obtained is discussed and the necessity of clinical trials emphasized.

  20. Optimization of oral contrast agents for MR imaging of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Lauenstein, Thomas C; Schneemann, Herbert; Vogt, Florian M; Herborn, Christoph U; Ruhm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jorg F

    2003-07-01

    Effect on small-bowel distention of additives to water as contrast agents for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was assessed. Oral contrast agents included water and water in combination with mannitol, a bulk fiber laxative, locust bean gum, and a combination of mannitol and locust bean gum. Filling of the small bowel was quantified on coronal images obtained with two-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence; bowel diameters were measured. Ingestion of water with locust bean gum and mannitol provided the best distention of the small bowel. MR imaging of the small bowel with oral administration of water can be improved with addition of osmotic and nonosmotic substances that lead to decreased water resorption.

  1. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T 1, spin-lattice relaxation and T 2, spin-spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T 1 and T 2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T 1 and 1/T 2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T 2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T 1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents.

  2. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  3. Cyanine dyes as contrast agents for near-infrared imaging in vivo: acute tolerance, pharmacokinetics, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Riefke, Björn; Sukowski, Uwe; Licha, Kai

    2011-06-01

    We compare pharmacokinetic, tolerance, and imaging properties of two near-IR contrast agents, indocyanine green (ICG) and 1,1'-bis-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid diglucamide monosodium salt (SIDAG). ICG is a clinically approved imaging agent, and its derivative SIDAG is a more hydrophilic counterpart that has recently shown promising imaging properties in preclinical studies. The rather lipophilic ICG has a very short plasma half-life, thus limiting the time available to image body regions during its vascular circulation (e.g., the breast in optical mammography where scanning over several minutes is required). In order to change the physicochemical properties of the indotricarbocyanine dye backbone, several derivatives were synthesized with increasing hydrophilicity. The most hydrophilic dye SIDAG is selected for further biological characterization. The acute tolerance of SIDAG in mice is increased up to 60-fold compared to ICG. Contrary to ICG, the pharmacokinetic properties of SIDAG are shifted toward renal elimination, caused by the high hydrophilicity of the molecule. N-Nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced rat breast carcinomas are clearly demarcated, both immediately and 24 h after intravenous administration of SIDAG, whereas ICG shows a weak tumor contrast under the same conditions. Our findings demonstrate that SIDAG is a high potential contrast agent for optical imaging, which could increase the sensitivity for detection of inflamed regions and tumors.

  4. Carbon Dots as Nontoxic and High-Performance Fluorescence Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haifang; Lu, Fushen; Luo, Pengju G.; Cao, Li; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Liu, Jia-Hui; Liu, Yuanfang; Chen, Min; Huang, Yipu; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (small carbon nanoparticles with the surface passivated by oligomeric PEG molecules) were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity and also for their optical imaging performance in reference to that of the commercially supplied CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The results suggested that the carbon dots were biocompatible, and their performance as fluorescence imaging agents was competitive. The implication to the use of carbon dots for in vitro and in vivo applications is discussed. PMID:20357893

  5. Palladium nanosheets as highly stable and effective contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Liming; Chen, Mei; Sun, Xiaolian; Rong, Pengfei; Zheng, Nanfeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A stable and efficient contrast agent is highly desirable for photoacoustic (PA) imaging applications. Recently gold nanostructures have been widely reported and studied for PA imaging and photothermal therapy. However, the structures of the nonspherical gold nanoparticles are easily destroyed after laser irradiation and thus may fail to complete the intended tasks. In this study, we propose to apply palladium nanosheets (PNSs), with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region, as a new class of exogenous PA contrast agents. PA and ultrasound (US) images were acquired sequentially by a portable and fast photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with a hand-held transducer. Significant and long-lasting imaging enhancement in SCC7 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma was successfully observed in mice by PAT over time after tail vein administration of PNSs. The morphology and functional perfusion of the tumors were delineated in PA images due to the nanoparticle accumulation. PAT of the main organs was also conducted ex vivo to trace the fate of PNSs, which was further validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). No obvious toxic effect was observed by in vitro MTT assay and ex vivo histological examination 7 days after PNS administration. With the combination of a portable imaging instrument and signal specificity, PNSs might be applied as stable and effective agents for photoacoustic cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance.

  6. Microbubbles as x-ray scattering contrast agents using analyzer-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Arfelli, F; Rigon, L; Menk, R H

    2010-03-21

    Conventional contrast agents utilized in diagnostic radiology are based on x-ray absorption properties; alternative physical principles capable of providing a contrast enhancement in radiographs have never been applied. This study exploits the possibility of using a novel type of contrast media based on x-ray scattering. The contrast agents consist of microbubble echo-enhancing agents, usually applied in ultrasound examinations, which are invisible with conventional x-ray absorption techniques. The experiment was carried out at the medical beamline of the synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste, Italy. A flat silicon analyzer crystal typically used for diffraction-enhanced imaging was utilized as a tool for detecting the scattering properties of the contrast agents. In analyzer-based imaging, it is possible to detect the scattering properties of the sample by shifting the analyzer crystal to selected positions of its reflectivity curve. In particular, when the sample consists of a large number of micro-particles an overall effect can be observed. Phantoms containing contrast agents based on microbubbles were imaged at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. High visibility of the details was demonstrated, and a strong contrast enhancement was measured compared to normal x-ray absorption techniques.

  7. Notch in Pathological Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    have created a treatment agent known as Notch1 decoy (hN1DFc). Activation of Notch changes the gene profile of LEC and changes their in vitro...and lymphangiogenesis by disrupting expression and activity of EC genes . To that end, we have created a treatment agent known as Notch1 decoy (hN1DFc...We hypothesized that inhibiting Notch activity may disrupt tumor (lymph)angiogenesis by changing expression and activity of EC genes . To that end, we

  8. Fluorine-19 MRI Contrast Agents for Cell Tracking and Lung Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew S.; Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 (19F)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging stand to revolutionize imaging-based research and clinical trials in several fields of medical intervention. First, their use in characterizing in vivo cell behavior may help bring cellular therapy closer to clinical acceptance. Second, their use in lung imaging provides novel noninvasive interrogation of the ventilated airspaces without the need for complicated, hard-to-distribute hardware. This article reviews the current state of 19F-based cell tracking and lung imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and describes the link between the methods across these fields and how they may mutually benefit from solutions to mutual problems encountered when imaging 19F-containing compounds, as well as hardware and software advancements. PMID:27042089

  9. Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b...prostate cancer by targeting simultaneously PSMA and hepsin, which are highly expressed in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In Year 3, we

  10. Synthesis of PSA Inhibitors as SPECT- and PET-Based Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    for their ability to inhibit PSA and chymotrypsin. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer , PSA inhibitors, boronic acids, peptidomimetics, serine protease...prostate cancer . First, all men undergoing androgen ablation, eventually relapse and no longer respond to hormone treatment . Therefore, there is an...Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maya Kostova, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University

  11. The influence of bonding agents in improving interactions in composite propellants determined using image analysis.

    PubMed

    Dostanić, J; Husović, T V; Usćumlić, G; Heinemann, R J; Mijin, D

    2008-12-01

    Binder-oxidizer interactions in rocket composite propellants can be improved using adequate bonding agents. In the present work, the effectiveness of different 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates was determined by stereo and metallographic microscopy and using the software package Image-Pro Plus. The chemical analysis of samples was performed by a scanning electron microscope equipped for energy dispersive spectrometry.

  12. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  13. Phthalocyanine photosensitizers as contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Bte Ebrahim; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2015-02-01

    There is a need for contrast agents for non-invasive diagnostic imaging of tumors. Herein, Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) was employed to evaluate phthalocyanines commonly used in photodynamic therapy as photoacoustic contrast agents. We studied the photoacoustic activity of three water-soluble phthalocyanine photosensitizers: phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (PcS4), Zn(II) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (ZnPcS4) and Al(III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulfonic acid (AlPcS4) in phantom and in tumor-bearing mice to investigate the biodistribution and fate of the phthalocyanines in the biological tissues. PcS4 was observed to grant good contrast between the different reticuloendothelial organs and accumulate in the tumor within an hour of post-administration. ZnPcS4 and AlPcS4 offered little contrast in photoacoustic signals between the organs. PcS4 is a promising photoacoustic contrast agent and can be exploited as a photodiagnostic agent.

  14. Oxidation-Responsive, EuII/III-Based, Multimodal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance and Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multimodal, oxidation-responsive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging that uses the differences in the properties between Eu in the +2 and +3 oxidation states. The enhancement of contrast in T1-weighted magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging was observed in the +2 but not in the +3 oxidation state, and the complex is a known chemical exchange saturation transfer agent for magnetic resonance imaging in the +3 oxidation state. PMID:28393130

  15. Perylene-diimide-based nanoparticles as highly efficient photoacoustic agents for deep brain tumor imaging in living mice

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Quli; Cheng, Kai; Yang, Zhen; ...

    2014-11-06

    In order to promote preclinical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, novel photoacoustic contrast agents are highly desired for molecular imaging of diseases, especially for deep tumor imaging. In this paper, perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diiimide-based near-infrared-absorptive organic nanoparticles are reported as an efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging of deep brain tumors in living mice with enhanced permeability and retention effect

  16. Perylene-diimide-based nanoparticles as highly efficient photoacoustic agents for deep brain tumor imaging in living mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quli; Cheng, Kai; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Ruiping; Yang, Min; Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaowei; Bu, Lihong; Lu, Xiaomei; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Huang, Wei; Zhao, Heng; Cheng, Zhen

    2015-02-04

    In order to promote preclinical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, novel photoacoustic contrast agents are highly desired for molecular imaging of diseases, especially for deep tumor imaging. Here, perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diiimide-based near-infrared-absorptive organic nanoparticles are reported as an efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging of deep brain tumors in living mice with enhanced permeability and retention effect.

  17. Erratum to: Ungersma SE, Pacheco G, Ho C, Yee SF, Ross J, van Bruggen N, Peale FV Jr, Ross S, Carano RA. Vessel imaging with viable tumor analysis for quantification of tumor angiogenesis. Magn Reson Med 2010;63:1637–1647.

    PubMed

    Ungersma, Sharon E; Pacheco, Glenn; Ho, Calvin; Yee, Sharon Fong; Ross, Jed; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Peale, Franklin V; Ross, Sarajane; Carano, Richard A D

    2011-03-01

    Imaging of tumor microvasculature has become an important tool for studying angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic therapies. Ultrasmall paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for indirect imaging of vasculature offer a method for quantitative measurements of vascular biomarkers such as vessel size index, blood volume, and vessel density (Q). Here, this technique is validated with direct comparisons to ex vivo micro-computed tomography angiography and histologic vessel measurements, showing significant correlations between in vivo vascular MRI measurements and ex vivo structural vessel measurements. The sensitivity of the MRI vascular parameters is also demonstrated, in combination with a multispectral analysis technique for segmenting tumor tissue to restrict the analysis to viable tumor tissue and exclude regions of necrosis. It is shown that this viable tumor segmentation increases sensitivity for detection of significant effects on blood volume and Q by two antiangiogenic therapeutics [anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) and anti-neuropilin-1] on an HM7 colorectal tumor model. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor reduced blood volume by 36±3% (p<0.0001) and Q by 52±3% (p<0.0001) at 48 h post-treatment; the effects of anti-neuropilin-1 were roughly half as strong with a reduction in blood volume of 18±6% (p<0.05) and a reduction in Q of 33±5% (p<0.05) at 48 h post-treatment.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using dual modal contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjo; Lee, Seunghyun; Cha, Myeonggeun; Jeong, Cheolhwan; Kang, Homan; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Yoon-sik; Jeong, Daehong; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a remarkable non-invasive imaging modality that provides a strong optical absorption contrast, high ultrasonic resolution, and great penetration depth. Thus, PAT has been widely used as an in vivo preclinical imaging tool. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is another attractive sensing technology in biological research because it offers highly sensitive chemical analyses and multiplexed detection. By performing dual-modal imaging of SERS and PAT, high-resolution structural PAT imaging and high-sensitivity SERS sensing can be achieved. At the same time, it is equally important to develop a dual modal contrast agent for this purpose. To perform both PAT and SERS, we synthesized PEGylated silver bumpy nanoshells (AgBSs). The AgBSs generate strong PA signals owing to their strong optical absorption properties as well as sensitive SERS signals because of the surface plasmon resonance effect. Then, multiplexed Raman chemicals were synthesized to enhance the sensitivity of Raman. We have photoacoustically imaged the sentinel lymph nodes of small animals after intradermal injection of multiplexed agents. Furthermore, the chemical composition of each agent has been distinguished through SERS.

  19. Fe-based nanoparticulate metallic alloys as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bomatí-Miguel, Oscar; Morales, María P; Tartaj, Pedro; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Bonville, Pierre; Santos, Martín; Zhao, Xinqing; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2005-10-01

    Pharmaceutical grade magnetic colloidal dispersions have been prepared from iron alloys synthesized by laser pyrolysis. The colloids were obtained by simultaneous dispersion and coating of the particles with dextran in a strong alkaline solution. Both powders and dispersions have been analyzed in terms of microstructural characteristics, chemical composition and magnetic properties. The powders consist of uniform spherical nanoparticles (12 nm of diameter) showing a metallic core encapsulated into an iron-oxide shell. On the other hand, the colloidal dispersions consist of magnetic particles-aggregates with hydrodynamic sizes of approximately 75 nm. Magnetic resonance images of rats were taken after the intravenously administration of the Fe colloidal dispersions, and compared with those obtained using a commercial iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent. The results showed a contrast improvement of 60% in the liver with respect to the commercial sample, which suggests that this product could be a suitable contrast agent for NMR imaging of liver and spleen.

  20. 3D multi-object segmentation of cardiac MSCT imaging by using a multi-agent approach.

    PubMed

    Fleureau, Julien; Garreau, Mireille; Boulmier, Dominique; Hernández, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new technique for general purpose, semi-interactive and multi-object segmentation in N-dimensional images, applied to the extraction of cardiac structures in MultiSlice Computed Tomography (MSCT) imaging. The proposed approach makes use of a multi-agent scheme combined with a supervised classification methodology allowing the introduction of a priori information and presenting fast computing times. The multi-agent system is organised around a communicating agent which manages a population of situated agents which segment the image through cooperative and competitive interactions. The proposed technique has been tested on several patient data sets. Some typical results are finally presented and discussed.

  1. 3D Multi-Object Segmentation of Cardiac MSCT Imaging by using a Multi-Agent Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fleureau, Julien; Garreau, Mireille; Boulmier, Dominique; Hernandez, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new technique for general purpose, semi-interactive and multi-object segmentation in N-dimensional images, applied to the extraction of cardiac structures in MultiSlice Computed Tomography (MSCT) imaging. The proposed approach makes use of a multi-agent scheme combined with a supervised classification methodology allowing the introduction of a priori information and presenting fast computing times. The multi-agent system is organised around a communicating agent which manages a population of situated agents which segment the image through cooperative and competitive interactions. The proposed technique has been tested on several patient data sets. Some typical results are finally presented and discussed. PMID:18003382

  2. Semimetal Nanomaterials of Antimony as Highly Efficient Agent for Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Rong, Pengfei; Yang, Kai; Huang, Peng; Sun, Kang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    In this study we report semimetal naonmaterials of antimony (Sb) as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and photothermal therapy (PTT). The Sb nanorod bundles have been synthesized through a facile route by mixing 1-octadecane (ODE) and oleyl amine (OAm) as the solvent. The aqueous dispersion of PEGylated Sb NPs, due to its broad and strong photoabsorption ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, is applicable as a photothermal agent driven by 808 nm laser with photothermal conversion efficiency up to 41%, noticeably higher than most of the PTT agents reported before. Our in vitro experiments also showed that cancer cell ablation effect of PEGylated Sb NPs was dependent on laser power. By intratumoral administration of PEGylated Sb NPs, 100% tumor ablation can be realized by using NIR laser irradiation with a lower power of 1 W/cm2 for 5 min (or 0.5 W/cm2 for 10 min) and no obvious toxic side effect is identified after photothermal treatment. Moreover, intense PA signal was also observed after intratumoral injection of PEGylated Sb NPs and NIR laser irradiation due to their strong NIR photoabsorption, suggesting PEGylated Sb NPs as a potential NIR PA agent. Based on the findings of this work, futher development of using other smimetal nanocrystals as highly efficient NIR agents can be achieved for vivo tumor imaging and PTT. PMID:25662491

  3. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic microendoscopy has shown promise for visualization of molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. However, fiber optic microendoscopes have limited optical sectioning capability, and image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques have been used in microendoscopes to remove out-of-focus light but reduce imaging speed or rely on bulky optical elements that prevent in vivo imaging. Here, we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe), a fiber optic system that can perform structured illumination in real time for optical sectioning without any opto-mechanical components attached to the distal tip of the fiber bundle. We demonstrate the use of DSIMe during in vivo fluorescence imaging in patients undergoing surgery for cervical adenocarcinoma in situ. Images acquired using DSIMe show greater contrast than standard microendoscopy, improving the ability to detect cellular atypia associated with neoplasia. PMID:27621464

  4. Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents for Enhancing Tissue Engineering Characterization and Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Santiesteban, Daniela Y.; Kubelick, Kelsey; Dhada, Kabir S.; Dumani, Diego; Suggs, Laura; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    The past three decades have seen numerous advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) therapies. However, despite the successes there is still much to be done before TERM therapies become commonplace in clinic. One of the main obstacles is the lack of knowledge regarding complex tissue engineering processes. Imaging strategies, in conjunction with exogenous contrast agents, can aid in this endeavor by assessing in vivo therapeutic progress. The ability to uncover real-time treatment progress will help shed light on the complex tissue engineering processes and lead to development of improved, adaptive treatments. More importantly, the utilized exogenous contrast agents can double as therapeutic agents. Proper use of these Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents (MIRAs) can help increase TERM therapy successes and allow for clinical translation. While other fields have exploited similar particles for combining diagnostics and therapy, MIRA research is still in its beginning stages with much of the current research being focused on imaging or therapeutic applications, separately. Advancing MIRA research will have numerous impacts on achieving clinical translations of TERM therapies. Therefore, it is our goal to highlight current MIRA progress and suggest future research that can lead to effective TERM treatments. PMID:26692081

  5. Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Palma, B. A.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.; Brandan, M. E.

    2007-11-26

    Angiogenesis could be a means for pouring contrast media around tumors. In this work, optimization of radiological parameters for contrast-enhanced subtraction techniques in mammography has been performed. A modification of Lemacks' analytical formalism was implemented to model the X-ray absorption in the breast with contrast medium and detection by a digital image receptor. Preliminary results of signal-to-noise ratio analysis show the advantage of subtracting two images taken at different energies, one prior and one posterior to the injection of contrast medium. Preliminary experimental results using a custom-made phantom have shown good agreement with calculations. A proposal is presented for the clinical application of the optimized technique, which aims at finding correlations between angiogenesis indicators and dynamic variables of contrast medium uptake.

  6. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  7. Spectral and fluorescence imaging of immune system and tissue response to an immunogenic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-05-01

    Imaging of immune system and tissue response to immunogenic agents can be important to the development of new biomaterials. Additionally, quantitative functional imaging can be useful for testing and evaluation of methods to alter or control the immune system response to implanted materials. In this preliminary study, we employ spectral imaging and fluorescence imaging to measure immune system and tissue response to implanted immunogenic agents. Poly (D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with a 50:50 composition was used to create immunogenic microparticles (MPs). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) encapsulated in the MPs was used to provoke a tissue immune response in mice and encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to fluorescently label the MPs for imaging. Control MPs did not contain LPS. The MPs were delivered at 50 particles/μL in a total volume of 20μL by subcutaneous injection in the skin of a nude mouse in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber preparation. Cultured immune cells from a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line were exogenously labeled with the fluorescent dye DiD in solution at a concentration of 8000cells/μL. Immediately after window chamber surgery and implantation of the MPs, 100μL of the fluorescent macrophage solution was administered via the tail vein. Fluorescence imaging was used to track MPs and macrophages while spectral imaging was used for imaging and measurement of hemoglobin saturation in the tissue microvasculature. Imaging was performed periodically over about three days. The spectral and fluorescence imaging combination enabled detailed observations of the macrophage response and functional effects on the tissue.

  8. New treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Kevin; Fang, Chunhui; Wu, Shenhong

    2017-02-02

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in the progression of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Agents targeting angiogenesis have played a primary role in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapy almost always occurs, and major progress has been made in understanding its underlying molecular mechanism. Axitinib and everolimus have been used extensively in patients whom have had disease progression after prior anti-angiogenesis therapy. Recently, several new agents have been shown to improve overall survival in comparison with everolimus. This review provides an in-depth summary of drugs employable in the clinical setting, the rationale to their use, and the studies conducted leading to their approval for use and provides perspective on the paradigm shift in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Highlighted are the newly approved agents cabozantinib, nivolumab, and lenvatinib for advanced renal cell carcinoma patients treated with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

  9. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J; Yin, Xiezhen; Xu, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy.

  10. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  11. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (<0.2 mm) and (ii) a new low noise amplifier incorporated into the ultrasonic probe and providing the noise equivalent pressure around 2 Pa resulting in increased signal-to-noise ratio and the optical absorption sensitivity of about 0.15 cm-1. We also improved scan time and the image reconstruction times. This prototype has been commercialized for a number of biomedical research applications, such as imaging vascularization and measuring hemoglobin / oxyhemoglobin distribution in the organs as well as imaging exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  12. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. The enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  13. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    DOE PAGES

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; ...

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form anmore » image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.« less

  14. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  15. A naturally occurring contrast agent for OCT imaging of smokers' lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Whiteman, Suzanne C.; Gey van Pittius, Daniel; El Haj, Alicia J.; Spiteri, Monica A.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers great potential for clinical applications in terms of its cost, safety and real-time imaging capability. Improvement of its resolution for revealing sub-layers or sub-cellular components within a tissue will further widen its application. In this study we report that carbon pigment, which is frequently present in the lungs of smokers, could be used as a contrast agent to improve the OCT imaging of lung tissue. Carbon produced an intense bright OCT image at a relatively deep location. The parallel histopathological section analysis confirmed the presence of carbon pigment in such tissues. The underlying mechanism of the OCT image formation has been discussed based on a model system in which carbon particles were dispersed in agar gel. Calculations and in-depth intensity profiles of OCT revealed that higher refractive index particles with a size close to or smaller than the wavelength would greatly increase backscattering and generate a sharp contrast, while a particle size several times larger than the wavelength would absorb or obstruct the light path. The naturally occurring contrast agent could provide a diagnostic biomarker of lung tissue in smokers. Furthermore, carbon under such circumstances, can be used as an effective exogenous contrast agent, with which specific components or tissues exhibiting early tumour formation can be optically labelled to delineate the location and boundary, providing potential for early cancer detection and its treatment.

  16. Uptake of perfusion imaging agents by transplanted hearts: an experimental study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A. Jr.; Carroll, M.; Feldman, M.J.; Kung, H.; Wright, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    There is a need for a reliable noninvasive marker of rejection in transplanted hearts. Endomyocardial biopsy is now the universally accepted diagnostic method of choice, but the invasiveness of the procedure and the limited size of the sample obtained makes this method far from ideal. As coronary blood flow may be expected to decrease during acute rejection, there has been interest in thallium-201 chloride (T1), a perfusion marker, as an imaging agent for diagnosing cardiac rejection. Hexakis(t-butylisonitrile)-technetium (Tc-TBI) is a representative of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals proposed as perfusion markers. We have compared the uptake of these imaging agents in a rat model of cardiac transplantation. Uptake of Tc-TBI as well as of T1 was significantly lower in rejecting than in nonrejecting hearts. This change was found in both left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles. Allografts in animals treated with cyclosporine (CyA) showed less severe rejection and higher uptakes of both imaging agents as compared to unmodified rejection. Our results suggest that perfusion imaging with these radionuclides is a potentially useful approach to the problem of detecting allograft rejection.

  17. Injectable microbubbles as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound imaging: the key role of perfluorochemicals.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Ernest G; Klein, David H; Mattrey, Robert M; Riess, Jean G

    2003-07-21

    Ultrasonography has, until recently, lacked effective contrast-enhancing agents. Micrometer-sized gas bubbles that resonate at a diagnostic frequency are ideal reflectors for ultrasound. However, simple air bubbles, when injected into the blood stream, disappear within seconds through the combined effects of Laplace pressure, blood pressure, and exposure to ultrasound energy. Use of fluorocarbon vapor, by extending the persistence of microbubbles in vivo from seconds to minutes, propelled contrast ultrasonography into clinical practice. Imaging techniques that selectively suppress tissue, but not microbubble signal, further increase image contrast. Approved products consist of C3F8 or SF6 microbubbles, and N2 microbubbles osmotically stabilized with C6F14. These agents allow the detection and characterization of cardiovascular abnormalities and solid organ lesions, such as tumors. By providing higher quality images, they improve the accuracy and confidence of disease diagnosis, and can play a decisive role in clinical decision making. New objectives include agents that target specific cells for the molecular imaging of disease, and drug and gene delivery, including ultrasound-triggered delivery.

  18. Review of Long-Wavelength Optical and NIR Imaging Materials: Contrast Agents, Fluorophores and Multifunctional Nano Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Pansare, Vikram; Hejazi, Shahram; Faenza, William; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of long wavelength and near infra-red (NIR) imaging has dramatically increased due to the desire to perform whole animal and deep tissue imaging. The adoption of NIR imaging is also growing rapidly due to the availability of targeted biological agents for diagnosis and basic medical research that can be imaged in vivo. The wavelength range of 650–1450 nm falls in the region of the spectrum with the lowest absorption in tissue and therefore enables the deepest tissue penetration. This is the wavelength range we focus on with this review. To operate effectively the imaging agents must both be excited and must emit in this long-wavelength window. We review the agents used both for imaging by absorption, scattering, and excitation (such as fluorescence). Imaging agents comprise both aqueous soluble and insoluble species, both organic and inorganic, and unimolecular and supramolecular constructs. The interest in multi-modal imaging, which involves delivery of actives, targeting, and imaging, requires nanocarriers or supramolecular assemblies. Nanoparticles for diagnostics also have advantages in increasing circulation time and increased imaging brightness relative to single molecule imaging agents. This has led to rapid advances in nanocarriers for long-wavelength, NIR imaging. PMID:22919122

  19. Targeting Angiogenesis in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sangeetha; Raffin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis has become an important target in the treatment of several solid tumors, including breast cancer. As monotherapy, antiangiogenic agents have demonstrated limited activity in metastatic breast cancer (MBC); therefore, they have generally been developed for use in combination with chemotherapies. Thus far, the experience with antiangiogenic agents for MBC has been mixed. The results from one study assessing addition of the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab to paclitaxel led to approval of bevacizumab for MBC. However, the modest improvement of progression-free survival rates in subsequent MBC studies has led to reappraisal of bevacizumab. Phase III studies have not produced evidence supporting use of the multikinase inhibitor sunitinib alone or in combination with MBC chemotherapy. Experience with sorafenib in a phase IIb program indicates potential when used in select combinations, particularly with capecitabine; however, phase III confirmatory data are needed. Although antiangiogenic therapies combined with chemotherapy have increased progression-free survival rates for patients with MBC, increases in overall survival times have not been observed. Some studies have tried to combine antiangiogenic agents such as bevacizumab and sunitinib or sorafenib, but that approach has been limited because of toxicity concerns. Sequential use of antiangiogenic agents with differing mechanisms of action may be an effective approach. Despite setbacks, angiogenesis will likely remain an important target of treatment for selected patients with MBC. PMID:22843553

  20. Novel angiogenesis inhibitory activity in cinnamon extract blocks VEGFR2 kinase and downstream signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VEGF is one of the most critical factors that induce angiogenesis, and has thus become an attractive target for anti-angiogenesis treatment. However, most of the current anti-VEGF agents that often cause side effects cannot be recommended for long term use. Identification of natural VEGF inhibitors...

  1. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging

    PubMed Central

    D’Hollander, Antoine; Mathieu, Evelien; Jans, Hilde; Vande Velde, Greetje; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lagae, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3). Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. PMID:27536107

  2. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS.

  3. Silica-coated gold nanoplates as stable photoacoustic contrast agents for sentinel lymph node imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Geoffrey P.; Bashyam, Ashvin; Homan, Kimberly A.; Makhija, Suraj; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-11-01

    A biopsy of the first lymph node to which a tumor drains—the sentinel lymph node (SLN)—is commonly performed to identify micrometastases. Image guidance of the SLN biopsy procedure has the potential to improve its accuracy and decrease its morbidity. We have developed a new stable contrast agent for photoacoustic image-guided SLN biopsy: silica-coated gold nanoplates (Si-AuNPs). The Si-AuNPs exhibit high photothermal stability when exposed to pulsed and continuous wave laser irradiation. This makes them well suited for in vivo photoacoustic imaging. Furthermore, Si-AuNPs are shown to have low cytotoxicity. We tested the Si-AuNPs for SLN mapping in a mouse model where they exhibited a strong, sustained photoacoustic signal. Real-time ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging revealed that the Si-AuNPs quickly drain to the SLN, gradually spreading throughout a large portion of the node.

  4. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Torres, A.; Williams, D. R.; Schallek, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina. PMID:26114032

  5. Gd-Si Oxide Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-García, Alejandro; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Bernabeu, Ángela; Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; Checa-Chavarria, Elisa; Fernández, Eduardo; Botella, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, characterization and application as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging of a novel type of magnetic nanoparticle based on Gd-Si oxide, which presents high Gd3+ atom density. For this purpose, we have used a Prussian Blue analogue as the sacrificial template by reacting with soluble silicate, obtaining particles with nanorod morphology and of small size (75 nm). These nanoparticles present good biocompatibility and higher longitudinal and transversal relaxivity values than commercial Gd3+ solutions, which significantly improves the sensitivity of in vivo magnetic resonance images. PMID:28335240

  6. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Torres, A; Williams, D R; Schallek, J B

    2015-06-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina.

  7. An in vitro study of a microbubble contrast agent using a clinical ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboros, V.; Moran, C. M.; Pye, S. D.; McDicken, W. N.

    2004-01-01

    Optimal insonation settings for contrast imaging are yet to be specified, mainly due to the lack of good understanding of the behaviour of the microbubbles. A satisfactory model that explains the behaviour of individual contrast agent scatterers has not yet been reported in the literature. An in vitro system based on a commercial scanner (ATL HDI3000) has been developed to investigate the backscatter of such agents. Suspensions of Definity® were introduced in an anechoic tank. The frequency of transmitted ultrasound varied from 1 to 5 MHz, pulse period from 2 to 10 periods and peak negative acoustic pressure from 0.08 to 1.7 MPa. The backscatter at the fundamental and second harmonic frequency windows from the agent was normalized in terms of the corresponding components of backscatter from a blood mimicking fluid suspension. The agent provided a dominant resonance effect at 1.6 MHz transmit frequency. Second harmonic normalized backscatter averaged around 9 dB higher than the fundamental. The normalized fundamental backscatter intensity was linear with peak negative pressure. The second harmonic at resonance peaked at 0.5 MPa suggestive of bubble disruption above such pressure. The system proved capable of illustrating the ultrasonic behaviour of Definity® in vitro, and the investigation suggested particular insonation conditions for optimal image enhancement using Definity®.

  8. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging. PMID:27775014

  9. Tracking contrast agents using real-time 2D photoacoustic imaging system for cardiac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo; Ingram, Pier; Witte, Russell S.

    2009-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly developing imaging modality that can detect optical contrast agents with high sensitivity. While detectors in PA imaging have traditionally been single element ultrasound transducers, use of array systems is desirable because they potentially provide high frame rates to capture dynamic events, such as injection and distribution of contrast in clinical applications. We present preliminary data consisting of 40 second sequences of coregistered pulse-echo (PE) and PA images acquired simultaneously in real time using a clinical ultrasonic machine. Using a 7 MHz linear array, the scanner allowed simultaneous acquisition of inphase-quadrature (IQ) data on 64 elements at a rate limited by the illumination source (Q-switched laser at 20 Hz) with spatial resolution determined to be 0.6 mm (axial) and 0.4 mm (lateral). PA images had a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 35 dB without averaging. The sequences captured the injection and distribution of an infrared-absorbing contrast agent into a cadaver rat heart. From these data, a perfusion time constant of 0.23 s-1 was estimated. After further refinement, the system will be tested in live animals. Ultimately, an integrated system in the clinic could facilitate inexpensive molecular screening for coronary artery disease.

  10. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging.

  11. Glycans in magnetic resonance imaging: determinants of relaxivity to smart agents, and potential applications in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Laura; Gregori, Maria; So, Po-Wah

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate chemistry and glycobiology have become a "hot" subject. These extensive, complex structures serve essential roles in cell surface phenomena, but we are only beginning to understand what some of these functions are; any advances in the development of synthetic and/or analytical tools for glycobiology are extremely useful for our understanding of the roles of carbohydrates in biology, and as biomarkers of physiological/pathological states. This review provides an outlook of the potential of carbohydrate chemistry/biology in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a major important and prominent technique in diagnostic clinical medicine and biomedical research. During the last 30 years, MRI has developed from an intriguing research project to an essential diagnostic method in the clinic. Although MRI contrast in endogenous tissues provides excellent sensitivity for detecting subtle changes in anatomy and function, MRI still has poor specificity for attributing image contrast to specific biological processes. To overcome this limitation, MRI methods are being developed that induce changes in MR image contrast in response to molecular compositions and functions that serve as early biomarkers of pathologies. Carbohydrates with their intriguing chemistry, not only can provide structures for novel MRI probes for imaging specific biological processes, but can themselves provide novel targets/biomarkers. For example, the glycan structure can simply provide a molecular scaffold for modulating the physicochemical properties of the imaging contrast agent, or can be used for the design of novel MR agents with the ability to disclose relevant physiological or pathological cellular events.

  12. Evaluation of chirp reversal power modulation sequence for contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Novell, A; Sennoga, C A; Escoffre, J M; Chaline, J; Bouakaz, A

    2014-09-07

    Over the last decade, significant research effort has been focused on the use of chirp for contrast agent imaging because chirps are known to significantly increase imaging contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). New imaging schemes, such as chirp reversal (CR), have been developed to improve contrast detection by increasing non-linear microbubble responses. In this study we evaluated the contrast enhancement efficiency of various chirped imaging sequences in combination with well-established imaging schemes such as power modulation (PM) and pulse inversion (PI). The imaging schemes tested were implemented on a fully programmable open scanner and evaluated by ultrasonically scanning (excitation frequency of 2.5 MHz; amplitude of 350 kPa) a tissue-mimicking flow phantom comprising a 4 mm diameter tube through which aqueous dispersions (dilution fraction of 1/2000) of the commercial ultrasound contrast agent, SonoVue(®) were continuously circulated. The recovery of non-linear microbubble responses after chirp compression requires the development and the optimization of a specific filter. A compression filter was therefore designed and used to compress and extract several non-linear components from the received microbubble responses. The results showed that using chirps increased the image CNR by approximately 10 dB, as compared to conventional Gaussian apodized sine burst excitation but degraded the axial resolution by a factor of 1.4, at -3 dB. We demonstrated that the highest CNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CTR) were achievable when CR was combined with PM as compared to other imaging schemes such as PI.

  13. Non-invasive detection of apoptosis using magnetic resonance imaging and a targeted contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, M; Beauregard, D A; Loizou, L; Davletov, B; Brindle, K M

    2001-11-01

    The C2 domain of synaptotagmin I, which binds to anionic phospholipids in cell membranes, was shown to bind to the plasma membrane of apoptotic cells by both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Conjugation of the protein to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles allowed detection of this binding using magnetic resonance imaging. Detection of apoptotic cells, using this novel contrast agent, was demonstrated both in vitro, with isolated apoptotic tumor cells, and in vivo, in a tumor treated with chemotherapeutic drugs.

  14. Novel Molecular Imaging Agents to Detect Biomarkers of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    chemistry with HBTU and HOBt as coupling agents. The coupling efficiency of each amino acid residues were checked by Kaiser’s ninhydrin test . The...of each amino acid residues were checked by Kaiser’s ninhydrin test . The starting resin had 1.0mmol/g of OH groups and the scale of peptide synthesis...assess biomarkers of metastatic breast cancer (Months 4-6). This task has been successfully accomplished by testing our peptide-DOTA imaging

  15. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  16. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-09

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  17. Innovative magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic agents based on paramagnetic Gd(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Aime, Silvio; Dastrù, Walter; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Gianolio, Eliana; Mainero, Valentina

    2002-01-01

    Gd(III) complexes are under intense scrutiny as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They act by enhancing tissutal proton relaxation rates. Much has already been done in order to get an in-depth understanding of the relationships between structure, dynamics, and contrastographic ability of these paramagnetic complexes. Their potential in the assessment of flow, perfusion, and capillary permeability has already been established. The next challenges are in the field of molecular imaging applications, which would allow the attainment of early diagnosis based on the recognition of specific reporters of the onset of the pathological state. To this end, Gd(III) complexes have to be endowed with improved targeting capabilities by conjugating suitable recognition synthons on their surfaces. Small peptides are candidates of choice for the attainment of this goal. Moreover, the intrinsic low sensitivity of the NMR techniques implies the need to deliver large amounts of contrast agents to the target in order to get its visualization in the resulting images. Highly efficient delivery systems have been identified, which bring a great promise for the development of innovative diagnostic agents based on Gd(III) complexes.

  18. Development of novel epidermal growth receptor-basedradiopharmaceuticals: Imaging agents for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Brocklin, Henry F.

    2001-09-25

    The goal of this research was to develop epidermal growthfactor receptor (EGFR) nuclear medicine breast cancer imaging agents. Ourapproach was to synthesize small molecule inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosinekinase (tk) suitable for labeling with single photon or positron-emittingradioisotopes and evaluate the imaging potential of these new molecules.We have synthesized and fully characterized 22 quinazoline compounds. Allcompounds inhibit EGFR tk phosphorylation activity in the nanomolarrange. All compounds tested exhibited specificity for the EGFR tk versusthe ErbB2 and ErbB4 tyrosine kinases. A radiometric binding assay usingan iodine-125 labeled quinazoline was developed to determine the affinityof the quinazolines for the EGFR tk ATP binding site. The affinitiesranged from 0.4-51 nM. The octanol/water partition coefficients (Log P;lipophilicity) of the new compounds ranged from 2.2-5.5. Six compoundshave been labeled with fluorine-18. Biodistribution in EGFRoverexpressing tumor bearing mice demonstrated tumor uptake buthighlighted delivery and metabolism issues. The 2-fluoro quinazoline wasnot metabolized in an in vitro hepatocyte study. From this work a breadthof agent characteristics was created establishing the foundation forfuture research toward the optimal EGFR imaging agent.

  19. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  20. Synthesis and characterization of iodobenzamide analogues: Potential D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.A.; Kung, H.F.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J. )

    1990-01-01

    (S)-N-((1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6- methoxybenzamide (({sup 123}I)IBZM) is a central nervous system (CNS) D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agent. In order to investigate the versatility of this parent structure in specific dopamine receptor localization and the potential for developing new dopamine receptor imaging agents, a series of new iodinated benzamides with fused ring systems, naphthalene (INAP) and benzofuran (IBF), was synthesized and radiolabeled, and the in vivo and in vitro biological properties were characterized. The best analogue of IBZM is IBF (21). The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) with rat striatal tissue preparation was found to be saturable and displayed a Kd of 0.106 {plus minus} 0.015 nM. Competition data of various receptor ligands for ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) binding show the following rank order of potency: spiperone greater than IBF (21) greater than IBZM greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than ({plus minus})-ADTN,6,7 greater than ketanserin greater than SCH-23390 much greater than propranolol. The in vivo biodistribution results confirm that ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) concentrated in the striatal area after iv injection into rats. The study demonstrates that ({sup 123}I)IBF (21) is a potential agent for imaging CNS D-2 dopamine receptors.

  1. [Molecular basics of angiogenesis].

    PubMed

    Skóra, Jan; Biegus, Jan; Pupka, Artur; Barć, Piotr; Sikora, Julita; Szyber, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    In the article we present the latest knowledge about angiogenesis. We have divided the paper into three main parts, in which the involvement of the extracellular matrix, cells, and cytokines/growth factors in the growth of new blood vessels is described. In brief, the extracellular compartment plays a crucial role in the formation of new vasculature. Degradation of matrix is a very important and precisely controlled process performed mostly by a family of proteins called matrix metallproteinases (MMPs). The extracellular compartment, through the special transmembrane proteins integrins, transmit a wide variety of signals into the cells and thus influence such cell behavior as proliferation, invasion, shape, migration, and maturation. Many products of matrix degradation are potent (mostly negative) regulators of angiogenesis; this self-limiting system prevents excessive proteolysis of the matrix components. The cells involved in the process are endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which are derived from bone marrow. The major surface antigens of the cells are CD34+, CD133+, and VEGFR2+. It has been demonstrated that EPCs are responsible for maintaining the functional integrity of endothelium. The number of EPCs in peripheral blood samples inversely correlates with cardiovascular risk factors. In the last section of the article the role of cytokines/growth factors is described. VEGF, as a key regulator of the initial steps of angiogenesis, controls the mobilization and incorporation of EPCs into the site of ischemia. The most important cytokine that facilitates the mobilization of EPCs from bone marrow is SDF-1, which is the strongest chemoattractant for EPCs. Ang-1, on the other hand, controls new blood vessel maturation and stabilization.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of cells overexpressing MagA, an endogenous contrast agent for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Goldhawk, Donna E; Lemaire, Claude; McCreary, Cheryl R; McGirr, Rebecca; Dhanvantari, Savita; Thompson, R Terry; Figueredo, Rene; Koropatnick, Jim; Foster, Paula; Prato, Frank S

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may benefit from the ferrimagnetic properties of magnetosomes, membrane-enclosed iron biominerals whose formation in magnetotactic bacteria is encoded by multiple genes. One such gene is MagA, a putative iron transporter. We have examined expression of MagA in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells and characterized their response to iron loading and cellular imaging by MRI. MagA expression augmented both Prussian blue staining and the elemental iron content of N2A cells, without altering cell proliferation, in cultures grown in the presence of iron supplements. Despite evidence for iron incorporation in both MagA and a variant, MagAE137V, only MagA expression produced intracellular contrast detectable by MRI at 11 Tesla. We used this stable expression system to model a new sequence for cellular imaging with MRI, using the difference between gradient and spin echo images to distinguish cells from artifacts in the field of view. Our results show that MagA activity in mammalian cells responds to iron supplementation and functions as a contrast agent that can be deactivated by a single point mutation. We conclude that MagA is a candidate MRI reporter gene that can exploit more fully the superior resolution of MRI in noninvasive medical imaging.

  3. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  4. Experimental evaluation of a hyperspectral imager for near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthman, A. S.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems have the potential to combine morphological and spectral information to provide detailed and high sensitivity readouts in biological and medical applications. As HSI enables simultaneous detection in several spectral bands, the technology has significant potential for use in real-time multiplexed contrast agent studies. Examples include tumor detection in intraoperative and endoscopic imaging as well as histopathology. A multiplexed readout from multiple disease targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. Here, we evaluate a commercial, compact, near-infrared HSI sensor that has the potential to enable low cost, video rate HSI for multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent studies in biomedical applications. The hyperspectral imager, based on a monolithically integrated Fabry-Perot etalon, has 70 spectral bands between 600-900 nm, making it ideal for this application. Initial calibration of the imager was performed to determine wavelength band response, quantum efficiency and the effect of F-number on the spectral response. A platform for wide-field fluorescence imaging in reflectance using fluorophore specific LED excitation was then developed. The applicability of the imaging platform for simultaneous readout of multiple fluorophore signals was demonstrated using a dilution series of Alexa Fluor 594 and Alexa Fluor 647, showing that nanomolar fluorophore concentrations can be detected. Our results show that the HSI system can clearly resolve the emission spectra of the two fluorophores in mixtures of concentrations across several orders of magnitude, indicating a high dynamic range performance. We therefore conclude that the HSI sensor tested here is suitable for detecting fluorescence in biomedical imaging applications.

  5. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  6. Inhibition of angiogenesis by S-adenosylmethionine

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, Mehmet; Sahin, Emel; Guemueslue, Saadet; Erdogan, Abdullah; Gueltekin, Meral

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Effects of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) were investigated in endothelial cells. {yields} Our results showed that SAM decreased proliferation of endothelial cells. {yields} SAM influentially inhibited the percentage of cell migration. {yields} SAM probably stopped migration as independent from its effects on proliferation. {yields} SAM was shown to suppress in vitro angiogenesis. -- Abstract: Metastasis is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer. One of the steps in metastasis process is the formation of new blood vessels. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns are common in cancer cells. In recent studies, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is a DNA methylating agent, has been found to have inhibitory effects on some carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we have used SAM to investigate whether it is effective against angiogenesis in vitro. Our results have shown that SAM can reduce the formation and organization of capillary-like structures of endothelial cells in tumoral environment. Besides, we have found SAM can block endothelial cell proliferation and the migration of cells towards growth factors-rich media. In conclusion, our study suggests that SAM may be used against angiogenesis as a natural bio-product.

  7. Preclinical evaluation of biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yi

    Macromolecular contrast agents have been shown to be superior to small molecular weight contrast agents for MRI in blood pool imaging, tumor diagnosis and grading. However, none has been approved by the FDA because they circulate in the bloodstream much longer than small molecular weight contrast agents and result in high tissue accumulation of toxic Gd(III) ions. Biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents (BMCA) were invented to alleviate the toxic accumulation. They have a cleavable disulfide bond based backbone that can be degraded in vivo and excreted out of the body via renal filtration. Furthermore, the side chain of the backbone can be modified to achieve various degradation rates. Three BMCA, (Gd-DTPA)-cystamine copolymers (GDCC), Gd-DTPA cystine copolymers (GDCP), and Gd-DTPA cystine diethyl ester copolymers (GDCEP), were evaluated as blood pool contrast agents in a rat model. They have excellent blood pool enhancement, preferred pharmacokinetics, and only minimal long-term tissue retention of toxic Gd(III) ions. GDCC and GDCP, the lead agents with desired degradation rates, with molecular weights of 20 KDa and 70 KDa, were chosen for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to differentiate human prostate tumor models of different malignancy and growth rates. GDCC and GDCP could differentiate these tumor models, providing more accurate estimations of plasma volume, flow leakage rate, and permeability surface area product than a small molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA-BMA when compared to the prototype macromolecular contrast agent albumin-Gd-DTPA. GDCC was favored for its neutral charge side chain and reasonable uptake rate by the tumors. GDCC with a molecular weight of 40 KDa (GDCC-40, above the renal filtration cutoff size) was used to assess the efficacy of two photothermal therapies (interstitial and indocyanine green enhanced). GDCC-40 provided excellent tumor enhancement shortly after its injection. Acute tumor response (4 hr) after therapies

  8. The benefits of paired-agent imaging in molecular-guided surgery: an update on methods and applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the major complications with conventional imaging-agent-based molecular imaging, particularly for cancer imaging, is variability in agent delivery and nonspecific retention in biological tissue. Such factors can account to "swamp" the signal arising from specifically bound imaging agent, which is presumably indicative of the concentration of targeted biomolecule. In the 1950s, Pressman et al. proposed a method of accounting for these delivery and retention effects by normalizing targeted antibody retention to the retention of a co-administered "untargeted"/control imaging agent [1]. Our group resurrected the approach within the last 5 years, finding ways to utilize this so-called "paired-agent" imaging approach to directly quantify biomolecule concentration in tissue (in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo) [2]. These novel paired-agent imaging approaches capable of quantifying biomolecule concentration provide enormous potential for being adapted to and optimizing molecular-guided surgery, which has a principle goal of identifying distinct biological tissues (tumor, nerves, etc…) based on their distinct molecular environment. This presentation will cover the principles and nuances of paired-agent imaging, as well as the current status of the field and future applications. [1] D. Pressman, E. D. Day, and M. Blau, "The use of paired labeling in the determination of tumor-localizing antibodies," Cancer Res, 17(9), 845-50 (1957). [2] K. M. Tichauer, Y. Wang, B. W. Pogue et al., "Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging," Phys Med Biol, 60(14), R239-69 (2015).

  9. Porphyrin Nanodroplets: Sub-micrometer Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Contrast Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Forbrich, Alexander; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chen, Juan; Lewis, John D; Zheng, Gang; Zemp, Roger J

    2016-01-20

    A novel class of all-organic nanoscale porphyrin nanodroplet agents is presented which is suitable for multimodality ultrasound and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Previous multimodality photoacoustic-ultrasound agents are either not organic, or not yet demonstrated to exhibit enhanced accumulation in leaky tumor vasculature, perhaps because of large diameters. In the current study, porphyrin nanodroplets are created with a mean diameter of 185 nm which is small enough to exhibit the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Porphyrin within the nanodroplet shell has strong optical absorption at 705 nm with an estimated molar extinction coefficient >5 × 10(9) m(-1) cm(-1) , allowing both ultrasound and photoacoustic contrast in the same nanoparticle using all organic materials. The potential of nanodroplets is that they may be phase-changed into microbubbles using high pressure ultrasound, providing ultrasound contrast with single-bubble sensitivity. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging allows visualization of nanodroplets when injected intratumorally in an HT1080 tumor in the chorioallantoic membrane of a chicken embryo. Intravital microscopy imaging of Hep3-GFP and HT1080-GFP tumors in chicken embryos determines that nanodroplets accumulated throughout or at the periphery of tumors, suggesting that porphyrin nanodroplets may be useful for enhancing the visualization of tumors with ultrasound and/or photoacoustic imaging.

  10. Method and application for imaging breast cancer using a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping; Intes, Xavier; Nioka, Shoko; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Chance, Britton

    2002-04-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) in the Near Infrared Spectral window (NIR) offers new possibilities for medical imaging. And using DOT, Indocyanine green (ICG) is found to be a useful blood pooling contrast agent for optical tumor detection. Here we introduce our efforts on study of breast cancer image reconstruction using ICG as a contrast agent. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we developed an effective method to analyze and process the raw data acquired from a CWS (Continuous Wave Spectroscopy) system. Differential absorption images of breast cancers are reconstructed by using ART (Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) which uses the diffusion equation within the Rytov approximation. The experiment device is a combination of sixteen light sources (tungsten bulb) and sixteen light detectors (silicon photodiodes). These sources and detectors are located on a circular holder where the human breasts are placed, each other at equal distance (11 angle apart). It takes a few seconds to acquire data since one source is on, while all the detectors simultaneously detect the photons. So an image includes 16*16 data points. Results from clinical trial in Japan and China show that there is a high concentration of ICG in the location of a cancer, suggesting high blood volume pooling and the usefulness of ICG detecting optically breast cancers.

  11. Biocompatible polypyrrole nanoparticles as a novel organic photoacoustic contrast agent for deep tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Zhengbao; Deng, Zijian; Li, Yanyan; Li, Changhui; Wang, Jinrui; Wang, Shumin; Qu, Enze; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-05-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a hybrid, nonionizing imaging modality because of its satisfactory spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast. Here, we demonstrate the application of a novel organic PAT contrast agent based on polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPy NPs). Monodisperse PPy NPs are ~46 nm in diameter with strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) range, which allowed visualization of PPy NP-containing agar gel embedded in chicken breast muscle at a depth of ~4.3 cm. Compared with PAT images based on the intrinsic optical contrast in mice, the PAT images acquired within 1 h after intravenous administration of PPy NPs showed the brain vasculature with greater clarity than hemoglobin in blood. Preliminary results showed no acute toxicity to the vital organs (heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys) in mice following a single imaging dose of PPy NPs. Our results indicate that PPy NPs are promising contrast agents for PAT with good biocompatibility, high spatial resolution and enhanced sensitivity.

  12. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future.

  13. Interleukin-6 Stimulates Defective Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Ganga; Milagre, Carla; Pearce, Oliver M T; Reynolds, Louise E; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan; Leinster, David A; Zhong, Haihong; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Thompson, Richard; Whiteford, James R; Balkwill, Frances

    2015-08-01

    The cytokine IL6 has a number of tumor-promoting activities in human and experimental cancers, but its potential as an angiogenic agent has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that IL6 can directly induce vessel sprouting in the ex vivo aortic ring model, as well as endothelial cell proliferation and migration, with similar potency to VEGF. However, IL6-stimulated aortic ring vessel sprouts had defective pericyte coverage compared with VEGF-stimulated vessels. The mechanism of IL6 action on pericytes involved stimulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 as well as angiopoietin2 (Ang2). When peritoneal xenografts of ovarian cancer were treated with an anti-IL6 antibody, pericyte coverage of vessels was restored. In addition, in human ovarian cancer biopsies, there was an association between levels of IL6 mRNA, Jagged1, and Ang2. Our findings have implications for the use of cancer therapies that target VEGF or IL6 and for understanding abnormal angiogenesis in cancers, chronic inflammatory disease, and stroke.

  14. Nucleic Acid-directed Self-assembly of Multifunctional Gold Nanoparticle Imaging Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyan; Liu, Yongjian; Jarreau, Chad; Welch, Michael J.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted much interest as a platform for development of multifunctional imaging and therapeutic agents. Multifunctionalized gold nanoparticles are generally constructed by covalent assembly of a gold core with thiolated ligands. In this study, we have assembled multifunctionalized gold nanoparticles in one step by nucleic acid hybridization of ODN (oligodeoxynucleotide)-derivatized gold nanoparticles with a library of pre-functionalized complementary PNAs (peptide nucleic acids). The PNAs were functionalized by conjugation with DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) for chelating 64Cu for PET imaging, PEG (polyethylene glycol) for conferring stealth properties, and Cy5 for fluorescent imaging. The resulting nanoparticles showed good stability both in vitro and in vivo showing biodistribution behavior in a mouse that would be expected for a PEGylated gold nanoparticle rather than that for the radiolabelled PNA used in its assembly. PMID:24058728

  15. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI.

  16. Residualization Rates of Near Infrared Dyes for the Rational Design of Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Liao, Jianshan; Atangcho, Lydia; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is widely used for tracking antibodies and biomolecules in vivo. Clinical and preclinical applications include intraoperative imaging, tracking therapeutics, and fluorescent labeling as a surrogate for subsequent radiolabeling. Despite their extensive use, one of the fundamental properties of NIR dyes, the residualization rate within cells following internalization, has not been systematically studied. This rate is required for the rational design of probes and proper interpretation of in vivo results. Procedures In this brief report, we measure the cellular residualization rate of eight commonly used dyes encompassing three core structures (cyanine, BODIPY, and oxazine/thiazine/carbopyronin). Results We identify residualizing (half-life > 24 hrs) and non-residualizing dyes (half-life < 24 hrs) in both the far red (~650-680 nm) and near infrared (~740-800 nm) regions. Conclusions This data will allow researchers to independently and rationally select the wavelength and residualizing nature of dyes for molecular imaging agent design. PMID:25869081

  17. Image-guided robotic delivery system for precise placement of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Cleary, K; Freedman, M; Clifford, M; Lindisch, D; Onda, S; Jiang, L

    2001-07-06

    The effectiveness of conventional solid tumor treatment is limited by the systemic toxicity and lack of specificity of chemotherapeutic agents. Present treatment modalities are frequently insufficient to eliminate competent cancer cells without exceeding the limits of toxicity to normal tissue. The coming generation of cancer therapeutics depends on the precise targeting and sustained release of antitumor agents to overcome these limitations. We are developing an image-guided, robotic system for precise intratumoral placement of anticancer drugs and sustained release devices to advance this new treatment paradigm. The robotic system will use intraoperatively obtained computed tomographic (CT) images from a mobile CT scanner for guidance. The concept is to track patient anatomy and localize instruments using currently available optical tracking technology. Tracking will also be used to register patient anatomy with the images. The physician can then use the registered image to select an appropriate tumor target and entry location and to plan the instrument path. This path will then be transmitted to the robot, which orients and drives the instrument to the desired target under physician control. Achievement of the target is confirmed via intraoperative CT. This system will provide instrument guidance that is precise, direct, and controllable. Error due to poor target visualization and hand unsteadiness should be reduced greatly. The basic components of the system (robot, mobile CT, tracking) have been demonstrated in our laboratory, and the integration of the components is in progress. In future work, we plan to fuse preoperative PET imaging with intraoperative CT to allow functional as well as anatomic image guidance.

  18. Design of water-based ferrofluids as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Casula, Maria F; Corrias, Anna; Arosio, Paolo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Sen, Tapas; Floris, Patrizia; Bruce, Ian J

    2011-05-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization and relaxometric study of ferrofluids based on iron oxide, with potential for use as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs). The effect of different cost-effective, water-based surface modification approaches which can be easily scaled-up for the large scale synthesis of the ferrofluids has been investigated. Surface modification was achieved by silanization, and/or coating with non-toxic commercial dispersants (a lauric polysorbate and a block copolymer with pigment affinic groups, namely Tween 20 and Disperbyk 190) which were added after or during iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. It was observed that all the materials synthesized functioned as negative contrast agents at physiological temperature and at frequencies covered by clinical imagers. The relaxometric properties of the magnetic nanoparticles were significantly improved after surface coating with stabilizers compared to the original iron oxide nanoparticles, with particular reference to the silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The results indicate that the optimization of the preparation of colloidal magnetic ferrofluids by surface modification is effective in the design of novel contrast agents for MRI by enabling better or more effective interaction between the coated iron oxide nanoparticles and protons present in their aqueous environment.

  19. NIR-activated iron oxides as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Pei-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Chia; Li, Meng-Lin

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are commonly used contrast agents for theranostic nanomedicines because of their advantages of good biocompatibility, high stability in physiological conditions, low cytotoxicity and excellent safety record in clinical settings for human use. In this study, we developed a NIR-activated iron oxide (NIR-Fe3O4) nanoparticle as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Unlike traditional iron oxides, the developed NIR-Fe3O4 owns biocompatibility and optical tunability capable of providing strong optical absorption in the NIR range for PA signal generation. Its intrinsic magnetic property enables the active magnetic tumor targeting. Phantom experiments were performed to confirm the tunability of NIR-Fe3O4's optical absorption in NIR and demonstrate its magnetic targeting capability. The PA signal response of NIR-Fe3O4 as a function of concentration was also investigated. The results showed that the PA signal of NIR-Fe3O4 with OD=1.25 was comparable to that of blood at 715 nm - the wavelength of peak absorption of the used NIR-Fe3O4. Moreover, the PA signal from NIR-Fe3O4 could be further improved by magnetic targeting. Overall, we proved that the potential of the developed NIR-Fe3O4 as a good tumor targeting contrast agent of PA imaging.

  20. Environmentally sensitive paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesus; Calle, Daniel; Lizarbe, Blanca; Negri, Viviana; Ubide, Carmen; Fayos, Rosa; Larrubia, Pilar López; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdan, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Even though alterations in the microenvironmental properties of tissues underlie the development of the most prevalent and morbid pathologies, they are not directly observable in vivo by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. This circumstance has lead to the development of a wide variety of exogenous paramagnetic and diamagnetic MRI and MRS probes able to inform non invasively on microenvironmental variables such as pH, pO(2), ion concentration o even temperature. This review covers the fundamentals of environmental contrast and the current arsenal of endogenous and exogenous MRI and MRS contrast enhancing agents available to visualize it. We begin describing the physicochemical background necessary to understand paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast enhancement with a special reference to novel magnetization transfer and (13)C hyperpolarization strategies. We describe then the main macrocyclic structures used to support the environmentally sensitive paramagnetic sensors, including CEST and PARACEST pH sensitive probes, temperature probes and enzyme activity or gene expression activatable probes. Finally we address the most commonly used diamagnetic contrast agents including imidazolic derivatives to reveal extracellular pH and tissue pO(2) values by MRS. The potential applications of these agents in multimodal and molecular imaging approaches are discussed.

  1. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  2. Ni-Fe2O4 nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun

    2011-07-01

    Reported herein is the synthesis of a dextran coating on nickel ferrite (Ni-Fe2O4) nanoparticles via chemical coprecipitation. The aqueous solution of the synthesized nanoparticles showed good colloidal stability, and no precipitate was observed 20 months after the synthesis. The coated nanoparticles were found to be cylindrical in shape in the TEM images, and showed a uniform size distribution with an average length and diameter of 17 and 4 nm, respectively. The coated particles were evaluated as potential T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI. The T1 and T2 relaxations of the hydrogen protons in the water molecules in an aqueous solution of dextran-coated Ni-Fe2O4 nanoparticles were studied. It was found that the T1 relaxivity for the aqueous solution of dextran-coated nanoparticles was slightly greater than that of a commercial Gd-DTPA-BMA contrast agent. The T2 relaxivity, however, was almost twice that of the commercial Gd-DTPA-BMA contrast agent. Animal experimentation also demonstrated that the dextran-coated Ni-Fe2O4 nanoparticles are suitable for use as either T1 or T2 contrast agents in MRI.

  3. Cancer diagnostics using dynamic near-infrared optical imaging and fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Mikhail

    2004-12-01

    A new optical imaging modality has been developed for small animal in vivo imaging of near-infrared fluorescence resulting from fluorescent contrast agents specifically targeted to molecular markers of cancer. The imaging system is comprised of an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) for the detection of ultra-low levels of re-emitted fluorescence following the delivery of an expanded beam of excitation light. The design of the ICCD detection system allows for both continuous wave (CW) and frequency-domain modes of operation. Since the accurate acquisition of frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) data is important for tomographic imaging, the imaging system was also validated using experimentally obtained FDPM measurements of homogenous turbid media and diffusion theory to obtain estimates of the optical properties characteristic of the media. The experiments demonstrated that the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are determined least accurately when relative measurements of average light intensity IrelDC are employed either alone or in a combination with relative modulation amplitude data IrelAC and/or relative phase shift data thetarel. However, when FDPM measurements of thetarel are employed either alone or in combination with IrelAC data, the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients may be found accurate to within 15% and I1%, respectively, of the values obtained from standard single-pixel measurements; a result that suggests that FDPM data obtained from an ICCD detection system may in fact be useful in tomographic imaging. Furthermore, intensified-detection allows for sub-second exposure times, permitting the acquisition of dynamic fluorescence images immediately following administration of the contrast agent. Experimental results demonstrate that when coupled with a suitable pharmacokinetic model describing targeted dye distribution throughout the body, dynamic fluorescence imaging may be used to discriminate spontaneous canine

  4. MR imaging of pulmonary parenchyma and emboli by paramagnetic and superparamagnetic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Thakur, M L; Vinitski, S; Mitchell, D G; Consigny, P M; Lin, S; DeFulvio, J; Rifkin, M

    1990-01-01

    Using experimentally induced pulmonary emboli in an animal model, three intravenously administered contrast agents, Gd-DTPA-albumin microspheres (8-15 microns, 0.2 M particles/mg protein, 39-106 micrograms Gd/mg, 50 mg/ml), Gd-DTPA-liposomes (15-30 microns, 130 micrograms/mg lipid, 6 mg Gd/ml) and superparamagnetic ferrosome, (60 nm, 100 mM iron and 20 mg lipid/ml) were examined for MR imaging. Gd-DTPA entrapped in lung capillaries did not enhance the signal intensity of lung parenchyma, but liposomes (5 ml) served as better Gd-DTPA carriers and increased the parenchymal signal intensity by up to a factor of 2.3. However, neither agent improved delineation of pulmonary emboli. Ferrosome decreased the intensity of lung parenchyma, improving detectability of pulmonary emboli by several factors.

  5. Biodegradable microparticles with surface dimples as a bi-modal imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ri; Lim, Yong Taik; Cho, Kuk Young

    2013-03-12

    Fabrication of physically engineered colloids and their application to the biological fields is emerging importance because of their potential to provide an enhanced performance without altering the chemical properties of biomaterials used. A facile approach is reported to fabricate sub-10-μm-sized PLGA microparticle with small dimples covering the surface by droplet imprinting. Optical and magnetic resonance bioimaging agents are easily co-encapsulated inside the microparticles to obtain a bi-modal imaging agent. Cell internalization efficacy of dimpled particles in DC 2.4 cell is enhanced compared with conventional smooth round-shaped colloids. Our result indicates that morphology-controlled microparticles show promise as a cell labeling with improved cell interaction.

  6. Development of more efficacious [Tc]-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  7. Clinical, biochemical and imaging methods of assessing osteoarthritis and clinical trials with agents claiming 'chondromodulating' activity.

    PubMed

    Theiler, R; Ghosh, P; Brooks, P

    1994-03-01

    This paper reviews, in a first part, methods used for the clinical assessment of osteoarthritis (OA) with special reference, in a second part, to trials of drugs claimed to be chondromodulating agents. The agents examined include glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex (GP-C, Rumalon) and glycosaminoglycan-polysulfate (GAGPS, Arteparon), which both showed some beneficial clinical response. However, their effect on cartilage still remains controversial. The development of a functional hip and knee OA index in clinical assessment and the role of imaging methods and biochemical markers are discussed. In future clinical trials only validated OA indices such as the Lequesne or WOMAC index and the newly established ILAR guidelines for classifying and testing drugs in OA will be accepted for registration purposes. Imaging methods including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the capacity to provide more precise information concerning cartilage destruction in OA joints. In addition, the biochemical assessment of proteoglycan fragments, bone sialoprotein (BSP), cartilage oligometric matrix protein (COMP) and the balance between stromelysin and its inhibitor (TIMP) in synovial fluid would appear to offer potential applications for the determination of joint tissue damage in the early and later stages of OA. However, these biochemical markers have yet to be validated. It is clear that in the 1990s, for a drug to be designated as disease modifying in OA, it will require a more rigorous evaluation than was hitherto required.

  8. Virus-mimicking nano-constructs as a contrast agent for near infrared photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Vullev, Valentine I.; Wang, Lihong V.; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-02-01

    We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice.We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice. Electronic supplemental information (ESI) available: Information on experimental procedure for fabrication of the nano-constructs, photoacoustic imaging, and immunogenic studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34124k

  9. Metabolic Imaging to Assess Treatment Response to Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Serkova, Natalie J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents were considered the basis of anticancer treatment for patients with metastatic tumors. A decrease in tumor burden, assessed by volumetric computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), was considered as a radiological response to cytotoxic chemotherapies. In addition to RECIST-based dimensional measurements, a metabolic response to cytotoxic drugs can be assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluoro-thymidine (FLT) as a radioactive tracer for drug-disrupted DNA synthesis. The decreased 18FLT-PET uptake is often seen concurrently with increased apparent diffusion coefficients by diffusion-weighted imaging due to chemotherapy-induced changes in tumor cellularity. Recently, the discovery of molecular origins of tumorogenesis led to the introduction of novel signal transduction inhibitors (STIs). STIs are targeted cytostatic agents; their effect is based on a specific biological inhibition with no immediate cell death. As such, tumor size is not anymore a sensitive end point for a treatment response to STIs; novel physiological imaging end points are desirable. For receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as modulators of the downstream signaling pathways, an almost immediate inhibition in glycolytic activity (the Warburg effect) and phospholipid turnover (the Kennedy pathway) has been seen by metabolic imaging in the first 24 h of treatment. The quantitative imaging end points by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolic PET (including 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose, FDG, and total choline) provide an early treatment response to targeted STIs, before a reduction in tumor burden can be seen. PMID:27471678

  10. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial perfusion using the paramagnetic contrast agent manganese gluconate.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, S; Lange, R A; Kulkarni, P V; Katz, J; Parkey, R W; Willerson, J T; Peshock, R M

    1989-08-01

    Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging studies have indicated that coronary occlusion does not produce sufficient changes in standard tissue relaxation times to allow the detection of acute ischemia. To identify acute myocardial perfusion abnormalities, the use of the paramagnetic agent manganese gluconate combined with calcium gluconate (MnGlu/CaGlu) was investigated in canine models of acute coronary artery occlusion. In vitro studies showed that MnGlu/CaGlu was a more efficient relaxing agent than gadolinium-DTPA (relaxivity of 7.8 versus 5.1 s-1 mM-1) and demonstrated affinity for normal myocardium. The distribution of MnGlu/CaGlu as measured by manganese-54 tracer studies was proportional to myocardial blood flow in both normal and ischemic tissue. Hearts excised from dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of 0.035 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu were imaged ex vivo using a relatively spin-lattice relaxation time (T1)-weighted gradient reversal technique (repetition time [TR] 50 ms and echo time [TE] 9 ms). These images showed increased signal intensity in the normally perfused myocardium with a mean signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.55 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD). In vivo images obtained in nine dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of the same dose of MnGlu/CaGlu demonstrated the region of hypoperfused myocardium in six dogs with a signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.64 +/- 0.23 (p less than 0.05 versus control). When a higher dose of 0.1 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu was utilized and in vivo imaging was performed using a relatively spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted (TR gated, TE 60 ms) spin-echo sequence in six dogs, the signal intensity of normal myocardium was decreased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Recent molecular discoveries in angiogenesis and antiangiogenic therapies in cancer.

    PubMed

    Welti, Jonathan; Loges, Sonja; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Carmeliet, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Four decades ago, angiogenesis was recognized as a therapeutic target for blocking cancer growth. Because of its importance, VEGF has been at the center stage of antiangiogenic therapy. Now, several years after FDA approval of an anti-VEGF antibody as the first antiangiogenic agent, many patients with cancer and ocular neovascularization have benefited from VEGF-targeted therapy; however, this anticancer strategy is challenged by insufficient efficacy, intrinsic refractoriness, and resistance. Here, we examine recent discoveries of new mechanisms underlying angiogenesis, discuss successes and challenges of current antiangiogenic therapy, and highlight emerging antiangiogenic paradigms.

  12. Imaging primary mouse sarcomas after radiation therapy using cathepsin-activatable fluorescent imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P.; Ferrer, Jorge M.; Kim, Yongbaek; Lee, W. David; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Brigman, Brian E.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS), and other tumors, undergo radiation therapy (RT) prior to surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a handheld imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b positive tumor associated immune cells. Conclusions In this primary mouse model of STS, RT does not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes label tumor cells and tumor associated macrophages. Our results support including patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes. PMID:23391816

  13. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P.; Ferrer, Jorge M.; Kim, Yongbaek; Lee, W. David; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Brigman, Brian E.; Kirsch, David G.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  14. Aptamer-conjugated Magnetic Nanoparticles as Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkar, Mohammad; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Mehrgardi, Masoud A.; Aghaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer is the most effective way to improve the survival rate in women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high spatial resolution and good anatomic details, and its lower sensitivity can be improved by using targeted molecular imaging. In this study, AS1411 aptamer was conjugated to Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles for specific targeting of mouse mammary carcinoma (4T1) cells that overexpress nucleolin. In vitro cytotoxicity of aptamer-conjugated nanoparticles was assessed on 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 (control) cells. The ability of the synthesized nanoprobe to target specifically the nucleolin overexpressed cells was assessed with the MRI technique. Results show that the synthesized nanoprobe produced strongly darkened T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with 4T1 cells, whereas the MR images of HFFF-PI6 cells incubated with the nanoprobe are brighter, showing small changes compared to water. The results demonstrate that in a Fe concentration of 45 μg/mL, the nanoprobe reduced by 90% MR image intensity in 4T1 cells compared with the 27% reduction in HFFF-PI6 cells. Analysis of MR signal intensity showed statistically significant signal intensity difference between 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 cells treated with the nanoprobe. MRI experiments demonstrate the high potential of the synthesized nanoprobe as a specific MRI contrast agent for detection of nucleolin-expressing breast cancer cells. PMID:28028501

  15. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  16. Tissue sensitive imaging and tomography without contrast agents for small animals with Timepix based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanova, E.; Schyns, L. E. J. R.; Ludwig, D.; Jakubek, J.; Le Pape, A.; Sefc, L.; Lotte, S.; Sykora, V.; Turecek, D.; Uher, J.; Verhaegen, F.

    2017-01-01

    The tissue type resolving X-ray radiography and tomography can be performed even without contrast agents. The differences between soft tissue types such as kidney, muscles, fat, liver, brain and spleen were measured based on their spectral response. The Timepix based X-ray imaging detector WidePIX2×5 with 300 μm thick silicon sensors was used for most of the measurements presented in this work. These promising results are used for further optimizations of the detector technology and radiographic methods.

  17. Efficient, non-iterative estimator for imaging contrast agents with spectral x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2015-12-22

    This paper describes an estimator to image contrast agents and body materials with x-ray spectral measurements. Previous implementations were limited to a two function basis set but the new implementation is usable with the three or more basis functions that are required with high atomic number contrast materials. The estimator variance is equal to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and it is unbiased. Its parameters can be computed from measurements of a calibration phantom with the clinical x-ray system and it is non-iterative. The estimator is compared with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator.

  18. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  19. Microwave accelerated synthesis of PET image contrast agents for AD research.

    PubMed

    Kallmerten, A E; Jones, G B

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) offers the potential to provide early onset diagnosis and subsequent intervention, including guided treatment regimens. One of the restricting factors in clinical application of PET technology is the limited availability of radioligands with affinity to specific targets of interest. Given the short half-life of the most popular positron emitter currently used ((18)F; approximately 120 min.) extremely rapid and efficient radiochemistry methods are needed to ensure required compounds are prepared and purified for administration within the 2-3 half life practical limit. Recent efforts to combine microwave mediated synthesis with advanced catalysis in the synthesis of specific categories of AD imaging agents will be presented.

  20. On-chip preparation of nanoscale contrast agents towards high-resolution ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Sally A; McLaughlan, James R; Abou-Saleh, Radwa H; Marston, Gemma; Johnson, Benjamin R G; Freear, Steven; Coletta, P Louise; Markham, Alexander F; Evans, Stephen D

    2016-02-21

    Micron-sized lipid-stabilised bubbles of heavy gas have been utilised as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound (US) imaging for many years. Typically bubbles between 1 and 8 μm in diameter are produced to enhance imaging in US by scattering sound waves more efficiently than surrounding tissue. A potential area of interest for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) are bubbles with diameters <1 μm or 'nanobubbles.' As bubble diameter decreases, ultrasonic resonant frequency increases, which could lead to an improvement in resolution for high-frequency imaging applications when using nanobubbles. In addition, current US contrast agents are limited by their size to the vasculature in vivo. However, molecular-targeted nanobubbles could penetrate into the extra-vascular space of cancerous tissue providing contrast in regions inaccessible to traditional microbubbles. This paper reports a new microfluidic method for the generation of sub-micron sized lipid stabilised particles containing perfluorocarbon (PFC). The nanoparticles are produced in a unique atomisation-like flow regime at high production rates, in excess of 10(6) particles per s and at high concentration, typically >10(11) particles per mL. The average particle diameter appears to be around 100-200 nm. These particles, suspected of being a mix of liquid and gaseous C4F10 due to Laplace pressure, then phase convert into nanometer sized bubbles on the application of US. In vitro ultrasound characterisation from these nanoparticle populations showed strong backscattering compared to aqueous filled liposomes of a similar size. The nanoparticles were stable upon injection and gave excellent contrast enhancement when used for in vivo imaging, compared to microbubbles with an equivalent shell composition.

  1. Rhodamine-123: Radioiodination and evaluation as an agent for imaging and radiotherapy of certain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, S.; Chen, L.B.; Corey, G.; Garneau, J.; Zubrowsky, L.; Strauss, H.W.; Elmaleh, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123) is a cationic lypophilic fluorescent dye which localizes in the mitochondria of living cells. The compound subsequently clears through normal cells but is selectively retained in carcinoma cells. As a result, the compound exhibits anticarcinoma activity both in vitro and in vivo. This high selectivity prompted us to evaluate Rhodamine-123 as an agent for imaging and radiotherapy. Accordingly in the present study Rh-123 was labeled with iodine-125 by chloramine-T. Tissue distributions were studied for C-3Hf/SED brown mice bearing 1 cm diameter implanted SCC VII carcinoma; CDF-1 mice with MB49 bladder carcinoma, nude mice with human CX-1 colon carcinoma and brown mice with murine mammary tumor. The results indicated that (i) initially the radioactivity was taken up by the liver (3.4%), thyroid (3.8%), kidney (2.3%) and tumor (0.8%); (ii) the radioactivity from all the normal tissues cleared within 24 hours but not from the tumors (iii) in tumors the radioactivity remained unchanged. This resulted in higher tumor/blood (1.2%) and tumor/muscle (4.2%) ratios which allows detection of the tumors by gamma camera imaging techniques. In the case of nude mice with human imaging CX-1 colon carcinoma and brown mice with murine mammary tumor the tumor/muscle ratios were interestingly much higher - 8.9% and 9.3%, respectively. These results clearly show that radioiodinated Rh-123 is a potential agent for imaging and radiotherapy of certain tumors.

  2. Vascular Hyperpermeability, Angiogenesis, and Stroma Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Dvorak, Harold F.

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for more than half a century that the tumor microvasculature is hyperpermeable to plasma proteins. However, the identity of the leaky vessels and the consequences of vascular hyperpermeability have received little attention. This article places tumor vascular hyperpermeability in a broader context, relating it to (1) the low-level “basal” permeability of the normal vasculature; (2) the “acute,” short-term hyperpermeability induced by vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF-A) and other vascular permeabilizing agents; and (3) the “chronic” hyperpermeability associated with longer-term exposure to agents such as VPF/VEGF-A that accompanies many types of pathological angiogenesis. Leakage of plasma protein-rich fluids is important because it activates the clotting system, depositing an extravascular fibrin gel provisional matrix that serves as the first step in stroma generation. PMID:22355795

  3. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-07

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner.

  4. Natural products against cancer angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khalid, El Bairi; Ayman, El-Meghawry El-Kenawy; Rahman, Heshu; Abdelkarim, Guaadaoui; Najda, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    The process of angiogenesis is quite well-known nowadays. Some medicines and extracts affecting this process are already used routinely in supporting the conventional treatment of many diseases that are considered angiogenic such as cancer. However, we must be aware that the area of currently used drugs of this type is much narrower than the theoretical possibilities existing in therapeutic angiogenesis. Plant substances are a large and diverse group of compounds that are found naturally in fruits, vegetables, spices, and medicinal plants. They also have different anticancer properties. The aim of this literature review article is to present the current state of knowledge concerning the molecular targets of tumor angiogenesis and the active substances (polyphenols, alkaloids, phytohormones, carbohydrates, and terpenes) derived from natural sources, whose activity against cancer angiogenesis has been confirmed.

  5. Human Arterial Ring Angiogenesis Assay.

    PubMed

    Seano, Giorgio; Primo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a model of human angiogenesis where artery explants from umbilical cords are embedded in gel matrices and subsequently produce capillary-like structures. The human arterial ring (hAR) assay is an innovative system that enables three-dimensional (3D) and live studies of human angiogenesis. This ex vivo model has the advantage of recapitulating several steps of angiogenesis, including endothelial sprouting, migration, and differentiation into capillaries. Furthermore, it can be exploited for (1) identification of new genes regulating sprouting angiogenesis, (2) screening for pro- or anti-angiogenic drugs, (3) identification of biomarkers to monitor the efficacy of anti-angiogenic regimens, and (4) dynamic analysis of tumor microenvironmental effects on vessel formation.

  6. Characterization and performance of a near infrared 2-deoxyglucose optical imaging agent for mouse cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, Joy L.; Volcheck, William; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Simpson, Melanie A; Olive, D. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms exhibit an elevated rate of glycolysis over normal cells. This characteristic can be exploited for optical imaging of tumors in mice. A near infrared fluorophore, IRDye® 800CW, emission maximum 794 nm, was conjugated to 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). An immunofluorescent cell-based assay was used to evaluate specificity and sensitivity of the conjugate in cultured cell monolayers. Dose dependent uptake was established with increasing concentrations of IRDye 800CW 2-DG for epithelial and prostate carcinomas. IRDye 800CW 2-DG was specifically blocked by an antibody against GLUT1 glucose transporter, and by excess unlabeled 2-DG or D-glucose. Signal was increased by a phorbol ester activator of glucose transport. Fluorescence microscopy data confirmed localization of the conjugate in the cytoplasm. Subsequent in vivo studies optimized dose, clearance, and timing for signal capture in nude mouse xenografts. In all cases, tumors were clearly imaged with good signal to noise characteristics. These data indicate that IRDye 800CW 2-DG is a broadly applicable optical imaging agent for in vivo imaging of neoplasms in mice. PMID:18938129

  7. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  8. Bismuth@US-tubes as a Potential Contrast Agent for X-ray Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Eladio J.; Tran, Lesa A.; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Yoon, Diana; Mikos, Antonios G.; Rusakova, Irene A.; Cheong, Benjamin Y.; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2013-01-01

    The encapsulation of bismuth as BiOCl/Bi2O3 within ultra-short (ca. 50 nm) single-walled carbon nanocapsules (US-tubes) has been achieved. The Bi@US-tubes have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Bi@US-tubes have been used for intracellular labeling of pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to show high X-ray contrast in computed tomography (CT) cellular imaging for the first time. The relatively high contrast is achieved with low bismuth loading (2.66% by weight) within the US-tubes and without compromising cell viability. X-ray CT imaging of Bi@US-tubes-labeled MSCs showed a nearly two-fold increase in contrast enhancement when compared to unlabeled MSCs in a 100 kV CT clinical scanner. The CT signal enhancement from the Bi@US-tubes is 500 times greater than polymer-coated Bi2S3 nanoparticles and several-fold that of any clinical iodinated contrast agent (CA) at the same concentration. Our findings suggest that the Bi@US-tubes can be used as a potential new class of X-ray CT agent for stem cell labeling and possibly in vivo tracking. PMID:24288589

  9. Adrenal medulla imaging agents: a structure-distribution relationship study of radiolabeled aralkylguanidines

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, D.M.; Mangner, T.J.; Inbasekaran, M.N.; Brown, L.E.; Wu, J.L.

    1984-02-01

    Fourteen /sup 125/I-labeled aralkylguanidines were synthesized and evaluated as potential imaging agents for the adrenal medullae and tumors of adrenomedullary origin. These guanidines are radiotracer analogues of guanethidine, an antihypertensive agent thought to mediate neuron blockade by uptake into adrenergic nerves. Dog adrenal medullae were used as a model to test radiotracer affinity for catecholamine storage tissue. Tissue distribution studies revealed that a number of radioiodinated guanidines showed pronounced localization in the adrenal medullae following intravenous injection, in certain cases exceeding that of either (-)-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine or (/sup 14/C)guanethidine. (m-(/sup 125/I)Iodobenzyl)guanidine (m-IBG, 2b) gave the best combination of high concentration and selectivity. The low adrenomedullary affinity observed with (/sup 14/C)guanidine and m-(/sup 125/I)iodobenzylamine demonstrates the uniqueness of the aralkylguanidine structure. Preliminary evidence suggests that 2b is a storage analogue of norepinephrine. (/sup 125/I)2a is now being used clinically in imaging and radiotherapy of catecholamine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma.

  10. Modeling contrast agent flow in cerebral aneurysms: comparison of CFD with medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy; Vali, Alireza; Sigovan, Monica; Lawton, Michael; Saloner, David; Boussel, Loic

    2016-11-01

    PURPOSE: The flow in cerebral aneurysms is routinely assessed with X-ray angiography, an imaging technique based on a contrast agent injection. In addition to requiring a patient's catheterization and radiation exposure, the X-ray angiography may inaccurately estimate the flow residence time, as the injection alters the native blood flow patterns. Numerical modeling of the contrast transport based on MRI imaging, provides a non-invasive alternative for the flow diagnostics. METHODS: The flow in 3 cerebral aneurysms was measured in vivo with 4D PC-MRI, which provides time-resolved, 3D velocity field. The measured velocities were used to simulate a contrast agent transport by solving the advection-diffusion equation. In addition, the flow in the same patient-specific geometries was simulated with CFD and the velocities obtained from the Navier-Stokes solution were used to model the transport of a virtual contrast. RESULTS: Contrast filling and washout patterns obtained in simulations based on MRI-measured velocities were in agreement with those obtained using the Navier-Stokes solution. Some discrepancies were observed in comparison to the X-ray angiography data, as numerical modeling of the contrast transport is based on the native blood flow unaffected by the contrast injection. NIH HL115267.

  11. Structural and Magnetic Characterization of Superparamagnetic Iron Platinum Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert M.; Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Esch, Victor; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis, from simple salts, and the physical characterization of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) suitable for use as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. The properties of these particles were determined by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxivity at 4.7 Tesla. TEM showed that the diameters of the particles ranged from 9.3 nm to 10 nm, depending on the mole ratio of iron to platinum precursors, and on the concentration of Octadecylamine (ODA) used in their preparation. The iron to platinum stoichiometry determined by ICP-OES varied from 1.4:1 to 3.7:1 and was similarly dependant on the initial mole ratios of iron and platinum salts, as well as on the concentration of ODA in the reaction. SQUID magnetometry showed that the SIPPs were superparamagnetic and had magnetic moments that increased with increasing iron content from 62 to 72 A•m2/kg Fe. The measured relaxivities of the SIPPs at 4.7 Tesla were higher than commercially available superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), suggesting that these particles may be superior contrast agents in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:22872817

  12. Structural and magnetic characterization of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticle contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert M.; Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Esch, Victor; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the synthesis, from simple salts, and the physical characterization of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) suitable for use as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. The properties of these particles were determined by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance relaxivity at 4.7 T. TEM showed that the diameters of the particles ranged from 9.3 to 10 nm, depending on the mole ratio of iron to platinum precursors, and on the concentration of octadecylamine (ODA) used in their preparation. The iron to platinum stoichiometry determined by ICP-OES varied from 1.4:1 to 3.7:1 and was similarly dependent on the initial mole ratios of iron and platinum salts, as well as on the concentration of ODA in the reaction. SQUID magnetometry showed that the SIPPs were superparamagnetic and had magnetic moments that increased with increasing iron content from 62 to 72 A·m2/kg Fe. The measured relaxivities of the SIPPs at 4.7 T were higher than commercially available superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, suggesting that these particles may be superior contrast agents in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25317380

  13. Bismuth@US-tubes as a Potential Contrast Agent for X-ray Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Eladio J; Tran, Lesa A; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Yoon, Diana; Mikos, Antonios G; Rusakova, Irene A; Cheong, Benjamin Y; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T; Perin, Emerson C; Wilson, Lon J

    2013-10-07

    The encapsulation of bismuth as BiOCl/Bi2O3 within ultra-short (ca. 50 nm) single-walled carbon nanocapsules (US-tubes) has been achieved. The Bi@US-tubes have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Bi@US-tubes have been used for intracellular labeling of pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to show high X-ray contrast in computed tomography (CT) cellular imaging for the first time. The relatively high contrast is achieved with low bismuth loading (2.66% by weight) within the US-tubes and without compromising cell viability. X-ray CT imaging of Bi@US-tubes-labeled MSCs showed a nearly two-fold increase in contrast enhancement when compared to unlabeled MSCs in a 100 kV CT clinical scanner. The CT signal enhancement from the Bi@US-tubes is 500 times greater than polymer-coated Bi2S3 nanoparticles and several-fold that of any clinical iodinated contrast agent (CA) at the same concentration. Our findings suggest that the Bi@US-tubes can be used as a potential new class of X-ray CT agent for stem cell labeling and possibly in vivo tracking.

  14. Octreotide Functionalized Nano-Contrast Agent for Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alexander W; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Ramasamy, Boominathan; Goggi, Julian; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; He, Tao; Robins, Edward G

    2016-12-12

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization has been employed to synthesize branched block copolymer nanoparticles possessing 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N,'N,″N,‴-tetraacetic acid (DO3A) macrocycles within their cores and octreotide (somatostatin mimic) cyclic peptides at their periphery. These polymeric nanoparticles have been chelated with Gd(3+) and applied as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanocontrast agents. This nanoparticle system has an r1 relaxivity of 8.3 mM(-1) s(-1), which is 3 times the r1 of commercial gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). The in vitro targeted binding efficiency of these nanoparticles shows 5 times greater affinity to somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2) with Ki = 77 pM (compared to somatostatin with Ki = 0.385 nM). We have also evaluated the tumor targeting molecular imaging ability of these branched copolymer nanoparticle in vivo using nude/NCr mice bearing AR42J rat pancreatic tumor (SSTR2 positive) and A549 human lung carcinoma tumor (SSTR2 negative) xenografts.

  15. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  16. Microbubbles as a scattering contrast agent for grating-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Velroyen, A; Bech, M; Malecki, A; Tapfer, A; Yaroshenko, A; Ingrisch, M; Cyran, C C; Auweter, S D; Nikolaou, K; Reiser, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-02-21

    In clinically established-absorption-based-biomedical x-ray imaging, contrast agents with high atomic numbers (e.g. iodine) are commonly used for contrast enhancement. The development of novel x-ray contrast modalities such as phase contrast and dark-field contrast opens up the possible use of alternative contrast media in x-ray imaging. We investigate using ultrasound contrast agents, which unlike iodine-based contrast agents can also be administered to patients with renal impairment and thyroid dysfunction, for application with a recently developed novel x-ray dark-field imaging modality. To produce contrast from these microbubble-based contrast agents, our method exploits ultra-small-angle coherent x-ray scattering. Such scattering dark-field x-ray images can be obtained with a grating-based x-ray imaging setup, together with refraction-based differential phase-contrast and the conventional attenuation contrast images. In this work we specifically show that ultrasound contrast agents based on microbubbles can be used to produce strongly enhanced dark-field contrast, with superior contrast-to-noise ratio compared to the attenuation signal. We also demonstrate that this method works well with an x-ray tube-based setup and that the relative contrast gain even increases when the pixel size is increased from tenths of microns to clinically compatible detector resolutions about up to a millimetre.

  17. Microbubbles as a scattering contrast agent for grating-based x-ray dark-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velroyen, A.; Bech, M.; Malecki, A.; Tapfer, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Ingrisch, M.; Cyran, C. C.; Auweter, S. D.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-02-01

    In clinically established—absorption-based—biomedical x-ray imaging, contrast agents with high atomic numbers (e.g. iodine) are commonly used for contrast enhancement. The development of novel x-ray contrast modalities such as phase contrast and dark-field contrast opens up the possible use of alternative contrast media in x-ray imaging. We investigate using ultrasound contrast agents, which unlike iodine-based contrast agents can also be administered to patients with renal impairment and thyroid dysfunction, for application with a recently developed novel x-ray dark-field imaging modality. To produce contrast from these microbubble-based contrast agents, our method exploits ultra-small-angle coherent x-ray scattering. Such scattering dark-field x-ray images can be obtained with a grating-based x-ray imaging setup, together with refraction-based differential phase-contrast and the conventional attenuation contrast images. In this work we specifically show that ultrasound contrast agents based on microbubbles can be used to produce strongly enhanced dark-field contrast, with superior contrast-to-noise ratio compared to the attenuation signal. We also demonstrate that this method works well with an x-ray tube-based setup and that the relative contrast gain even increases when the pixel size is increased from tenths of microns to clinically compatible detector resolutions about up to a millimetre.

  18. Tumour angiogenesis regulation by the miR-200 family

    PubMed Central

    Pecot, Chad V.; Ivan, Cristina; Lu, Chunhua; Wu, Sherry; Han, Hee-Dong; Shah, Maitri Y.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Liu, Yuexin; Kim, Sang Bae; Unruh, Anna; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Huang, Li; Zand, Behrouz; Moreno-Smith, Myrthala; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Taylor, Morgan; Dalton, Heather J.; Sehgal, Vasudha; Wen, Yunfei; Kang, Yu; Baggerly, Keith A.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ram, Prahlad T.; Ravoori, Murali K.; Kundra, Vikas; Zhang, Xinna; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana-Maria; Massion, Pierre P.; Calin, George A.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Zhang, Wei; Sood, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    The miR-200 family is well known to inhibit the epithelial–mesenchymal transition, suggesting it may therapeutically inhibit metastatic biology. However, conflicting reports regarding the role of miR-200 in suppressing or promoting metastasis in different cancer types have left unanswered questions. Here we demonstrate a difference in clinical outcome based on miR-200's role in blocking tumour angiogenesis. We demonstrate that miR-200 inhibits angiogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms by targeting interleukin-8 and CXCL1 secreted by the tumour endothelial and cancer cells. Using several experimental models, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of miR-200 delivery in ovarian, lung, renal and basal-like breast cancers by inhibiting angiogenesis. Delivery of miR-200 members into the tumour endothelium resulted in marked reductions in metastasis and angiogenesis, and induced vascular normalization. The role of miR-200 in blocking cancer angiogenesis in a cancer-dependent context defines its utility as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:24018975

  19. Module-based multiscale simulation of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mathematical modeling of angiogenesis has been gaining momentum as a means to shed new light on the biological complexity underlying blood vessel growth. A variety of computational models have been developed, each focusing on different aspects of the angiogenesis process and occurring at different biological scales, ranging from the molecular to the tissue levels. Integration of models at different scales is a challenging and currently unsolved problem. Results We present an object-oriented module-based computational integration strategy to build a multiscale model of angiogenesis that links currently available models. As an example case, we use this approach to integrate modules representing microvascular blood flow, oxygen transport, vascular endothelial growth factor transport and endothelial cell behavior (sensing, migration and proliferation). Modeling methodologies in these modules include algebraic equations, partial differential equations and agent-based models with complex logical rules. We apply this integrated model to simulate exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. The simulation results compare capillary growth patterns between different exercise conditions for a single bout of exercise. Results demonstrate how the computational infrastructure can effectively integrate multiple modules by coordinating their connectivity and data exchange. Model parameterization offers simulation flexibility and a platform for performing sensitivity analysis. Conclusions This systems biology strategy can be applied to larger scale integration of computational models of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle, or other complex processes in other tissues under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:21463529

  20. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunlade, Olumide Beard, Paul

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  1. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a breast cancer targeting contrast agent for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgroom, Andrew Carson

    Current clinical use of ultrasound for breast cancer diagnostics is strictly limited to a role as a supplementary detection method to other modalities, such as mammography or MRI. A major reason for ultrasound’s role as a secondary method is its inability to discern between cancerous and non-cancerous bodies of similar density, like dense calcifications or benign fibroadenomas. Its detection capabilities are further diminished by the variable density of the surrounding breast tissue with the progression of age. Preliminary studies suggest that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are a good candidate as an in situ contrast agent for ultrasound. By tagging the silica particle surface with the cancer-targeting antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin), suspect regions of interest can be better identified in real time with standard ultrasound equipment. Once the silica-antibody conjugate is injected into the bloodstream and enters the cancerous growth’s vasculature, the antibody arm will bind to HER2, a cell surface receptor known to be dysfunctional or overexpressed in certain types of breast cancer. As more particles aggregate at the cell surface, backscatter of the ultrasonic waves increases as a result of the higher porous silica concentration. This translates to an increased contrast around the lesion boundary. Tumor detection through ultrasound contrast enhancement provides a tremendous advantage over current cancer diagnostics because is it significantly cheaper and can be monitored in real time. Characterization of MCM-41 type MSNs suggests that these particles have sufficient stability and particle size distribution to penetrate through fenestrated tumor vasculature and accumulate in HER2+ breast cancer cells through the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. A study of acoustic properties showed that particle concentration is linearly correlated to image contrast in clinical frequency-range ultrasound, although less pronounced than typical microbubble

  2. Perlecan and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with three HS chains that can bind a number of matrix molecules, cytokines, and growth factors. Perlecan is essential for metazoan life, as shown by genetic manipulations of nematodes, insects, and mice. There are also known human mutations that can be lethal. In vertebrates, new functions of perlecan emerged with the acquisition of a closed vascular system and skeletal connective tissues. Many of perlecan's functions may be related to the binding and presentation of growth factors to high-affinity tyrosine kinase (TK) receptors. Data are accumulating, as discussed here, that similar growth factor-mediated processes may have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:14566013

  3. Incorporation of paramagnetic, fluorescent and PET/SPECT contrast agents into liposomes for multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Nick; Kalber, Tammy L.; Cooper, Margaret S.; Sunassee, Kavitha; Chalker, Samantha L.; Shaw, Karen P.; Ordidge, Katherine L.; Badar, Adam; Janes, Samuel M.; Blower, Philip J.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Hailes, Helen C.; Tabor, Alethea B.

    2013-01-01

    A series of metal-chelating lipid conjugates has been designed and synthesized. Each member of the series bears a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocycle attached to the lipid head group, using short n-ethylene glycol (n-EG) spacers of varying length. Liposomes incorporating these lipids, chelated to Gd3+, 64Cu2+, or 111In3+, and also incorporating fluorescent lipids, have been prepared, and their application in optical, magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging of cellular uptake and distribution investigated in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that these multimodal liposomes can be used as functional MR contrast agents as well as radionuclide tracers for SPECT, and that they can be optimized for each application. When shielded liposomes were formulated incorporating 50% of a lipid with a short n-EG spacer, to give nanoparticles with a shallow but even coverage of n-EG, they showed good cellular internalization in a range of tumour cells, compared to the limited cellular uptake of conventional shielded liposomes formulated with 7% 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[carboxy(polyethyleneglycol)2000] (DSPE-PEG2000). Moreover, by matching the depth of n-EG coverage to the length of the n-EG spacers of the DOTA lipids, we have shown that similar distributions and blood half lives to DSPE-PEG2000-stabilized liposomes can be achieved. The ability to tune the imaging properties and distribution of these liposomes allows for the future development of a flexible tri-modal imaging agent. PMID:23131536

  4. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  5. Dendritic iodinated contrast agents with PEG-cores for CT imaging: synthesis and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanjun; Nitecki, Danute E; Maltby, David; Simon, Gerhard H; Berejnoi, Kirill; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen; Yeh, Benjamin M; Shames, David M; Brasch, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design, synthesize, and initially characterize a representative set of novel constructs for large-molecular radiographic/computed tomography (CT) contrast agents, intended for a primarily intravascular distribution. A new assembly of well-known and biocompatible components consists of paired, symmetrical dendritic polylysines initiated from both ends of a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) core, yielding an array of multiple free amino groups to which were conjugated highly soluble and stable triiodophthalamide ("triiodo") moieties. An array of six dendritic contrast agents was synthesized originally, using three different PEG cores (3, 6, 12 kDa) with t-Boc lysine-generated dendrimer "amplifiers" (from three to five generations) containing 16 to 64 amino groups for conjugation with reactive triiodo moieties. A clinically used, nonionic, small molecular CT contrast agent, iobitridol, was derivatized via a hydroxyl protection/deprotection strategy, introducing a new carboxyl group available for conjugation to the lysine amino groups of dendrimers. Final products were purified by size exclusion chromatography and characterized by NMR, UV, HPLC, and elemental analysis. Preliminary evaluations were conducted for physicochemical characterization and in vivo CT contrast enhancement in a rat model. All six iodinated PEG-core dendrimer conjugates were synthesized in good yields, with a high degree of size monodispersity, large apparent molecular weight, favored physicochemical properties. A representative compound, PEG12000-carbamate-Gen4-IOB conjugate, 27% (w%) rich in iodine, demonstrated a desirable strong and persistent intravascular enhancement with a monoexponential blood half-life of approximately 35 min assayed by dynamic CT imaging and also showed high water solubility (>550 mg/mL at 25 degrees C), large apparent molecular size (comparable to a 143-kDa protein), high hydrophilicity (butanol-water partition coefficient 0.015), and

  6. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  7. Iodinated α-tocopherol nano-emulsions as non-toxic contrast agents for preclinical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Zuber, Guy; Zhao, Minjie; Messaddeq, Nadia; Hallouard, François; Fessi, Hatem; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2013-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is an emerging imaging modality, due to the low cost of the imagers as well as their efficiency in establishing high-resolution (1-100 μm) three-dimensional images of small laboratory animals and facilitating rapid, structural and functional in vivo visualization. However use of a contrast agent is absolutely necessary when imaging soft tissues. The main limitation of micro-CT is the low efficiency and toxicity of the commercially available blood pool contrast agents. This study proposes new, efficient and non-toxic contrast agents for micro-CT imaging. This formulation consists of iodinated vitamin E (α-tocopheryl 2,3,5-triiodobenzoate) as an oily phase, formulated as liquid nano-emulsion droplets (by low-energy nano-emulsification), surrounded by a hairy PEG layer to confer stealth properties. The originality and strength of these new contrast agents lie not only in their outstanding contrasting properties, biocompatibility and low toxicity, but also in the simplicity of their fabrication: one-step synthesis of highly iodinated oil (iodine constitutes 41.7% of the oil molecule weight) and its spontaneous emulsification. After i.v. administration in mice (8.5% of blood volume), the product shows stealth properties towards the immune system and thus acts as an efficient blood pool contrast agent (t(1/2) = 9.0 h), exhibiting blood clearance following mono-exponential decay. A gradual accumulation predominantly due to hepatocyte uptake is observed and measured in the liver, establishing a strong hepatic contrast, persistent for more than four months. To summarize, in the current range of available or developed contrast agents for preclinical X-ray imaging, this agent appears to be one of the most efficient.

  8. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-01

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  9. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  10. DECAFLUOROBUTANE AS A PHASE-CHANGE CONTRAST AGENT FOR LOW-ENERGY EXTRAVASCULAR ULTRASONIC IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Wong, Vincent P.; Luois, Samantha; Mcfarland, Ryan J.; Ross, William D.; Feingold, Steven; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available microbubbles used for ultrasound imaging and therapeutics are limited to intravascular space due to their size distribution in the micron range. Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) have been proposed as a means to overcome this limitation, since droplets formed in the hundred nanometer size range might be able to extravasate through leaky microvasculature, after which they could be activated to form larger highly echogenic microbubbles. Existing PCCAs in the sub-micron size range require substantial acoustic energy to be vaporized, increasing the likelihood of unwanted bioeffects. Thus, there exists a need for PCCAs with reduced acoustic activation energies for use in imaging studies. In this article, it is shown that decafluorobutane, which is normally a gas at room temperature, can be incorporated into metastable liquid sub-micron droplets with appropriate encapsulation methods. The resulting droplets are activatable with substantially less energy than other favored PCCA compounds. Decafluorobutane nanodroplets may present a new means to safely extend ultrasound imaging beyond the vascular space. (E-mail: padayton@bme.unc.edu) PMID:21775049

  11. Natural product inhibitors of ocular angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Rania S.; Basavarajappa, Halesha D.; Corson, Timothy W.

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are characterized by high chemical diversity and biochemical specificity; therefore, they are appealing as lead compounds for drug discovery. Given the importance of angiogenesis to many pathologies, numerous natural products have been explored as potential anti-angiogenic drugs. Ocular angiogenesis underlies blinding eye diseases such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adults of working age, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the elderly. Despite the presence of effective therapy in many cases, these diseases are still a significant health burden. Anti-VEGF biologics are the standard of care, but may cause ocular or systemic side effects after intraocular administration and patients may be refractory. Many anti-angiogenic compounds inhibit tumor growth and metastasis alone or in combination therapy, but a more select subset of them has been tested in the context of ocular neovascular diseases. Here, we review the promise of natural products as anti-angiogenic agents, with a specific focus on retinal and choroidal neovascularization. The multifunctional curcumin and the chalcone isoliquiritigenin have demonstrated promising anti-angiogenic effects in mouse models of DR and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) respectively. The homoisoflavanone cremastranone and the flavonoid deguelin have been shown to inhibit ocular neovascularization in more than one disease model. The isoflavone genistein and the flavone apigenin on the other hand are showing potential in the prevention of retinal and choroidal angiogenesis with long-term administration. Many other products with antiangiogenic potential in vitro such as the lactone withaferin A, the flavonol quercetin, and the stilbenoid combretastatin A4 are awaiting investigation in different ocular disease relevant animal models. These natural products may serve as lead compounds for the design of more specific, efficacious, and affordable

  12. Copper and angiogenesis : unraveling a relationship key to cancer progression.

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, L. F.; Vogt, S. V.; Fukai, TF; Glesne, DG; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from existing vasculature, is a critical process in normal physiology as well as several physiopathologies. A desire to curb the supportive role angiogenesis plays in the development and metastasis of cancers has driven exploration into anti-angiogenic strategies as cancer therapeutics. Key to this, angiogenesis additionally displays an exquisite sensitivity to bioavailable copper. Depletion of copper has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis in a wide variety of cancer cell and xenograft systems. Several clinical trials using copper chelation as either an adjuvant or primary therapy have been conducted. Yet, the biological basis for the sensitivity of angiogenesis remains unclear. Numerous molecules important to angiogenesis regulation have been shown to be either directly or indirectly influenced by copper, yet a clear probative answer to the connection remains elusive. Measurements of copper in biological systems have historically relied on techniques that, although demonstrably powerful, provide little or no information as to the spatial distribution of metals in a cellular context. Therefore, several new approaches have been developed to image copper in a biological context. One such approach relies on synchrotron-derived X-rays from third-generation synchrotrons and the technique of high resolution X-ray fluorescence microprobe (XFM) analysis. Recent applications of XFM approaches to the role of copper in regulating angiogenesis have provided unique insight into the connection between copper and cellular behaviour. Using XFM, copper has been shown to be highly spatially regulated, as it is translocated from perinuclear areas of the cell towards the tips of extending filopodia and across the cell membrane into the extracellular space during angiogenic processes. Such findings may explain the heightened sensitivity of this cellular process to this transition metal and set a new paradigm for the kinds of regulatory

  13. Copper and angiogenesis : unravelling a relationship key to cancer progression.

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, L. A.; Vogt, S.; Fukai, T.; Glesne, D.; Univ. of Illinois

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from existing vasculature, is a critical process in normal physiology as well as several physiopathologies. A desire to curb the supportive role angiogenesis plays in the development and metastasis of cancers has driven exploration into anti-angiogenic strategies as cancer therapeutics. Key to this, angiogenesis additionally displays an exquisite sensitivity to bioavailable copper. Depletion of copper has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis in a wide variety of cancer cell and xenograft systems. Several clinical trials using copper chelation as either an adjuvant or primary therapy have been conducted. Yet, the biological basis for the sensitivity of angiogenesis remains unclear. Numerous molecules important to angiogenesis regulation have been shown to be either directly or indirectly influenced by copper, yet a clear probative answer to the connection remains elusive. Measurements of copper in biological systems have historically relied on techniques that, although demonstrably powerful, provide little or no information as to the spatial distribution of metals in a cellular context. Therefore, several new approaches have been developed to image copper in a biological context. One such approach relies on synchrotron-derived X-rays from third-generation synchrotrons and the technique of high resolution X-ray fluorescence microprobe (XFM) analysis. Recent applications of XFM approaches to the role of copper in regulating angiogenesis have provided unique insight into the connection between copper and cellular behaviour. Using XFM, copper has been shown to be highly spatially regulated, as it is translocated from perinuclear areas of the cell towards the tips of extending filopodia and across the cell membrane into the extracellular space during angiogenic processes. Such findings may explain the heightened sensitivity of this cellular process to this transition metal and set a new paradigm for the kinds of regulatory

  14. Towards a nanoscale mammographic contrast agent: development of a modular pre-clinical dual optical/x-ray agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Niroui, Farnaz; Levitin, Ronald B.; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Rowlands, J. A.; Matsuura, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) can provide improved breast cancer detection and characterization compared to conventional mammography by imaging the effects of tumour angiogenesis. Current small-molecule contrast agents used for CEDM are limited by a short plasma half-life and rapid extravasation into tissue interstitial space. To address these limitations, nanoscale agents that can remain intravascular except at sites of tumour angiogenesis can be used. For CEDM, this agent must be both biocompatible and strongly attenuate mammographic energy x-rays. Nanoscale perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) droplets have good x-ray attenuation and have been used in patients for other applications. However, the macroscopic scale of x-ray imaging (50-100 µm) is inadequate for direct verification that PFOB droplets localize at sites of breast tumour angiogenesis. For efficient pre-clinical optimization for CEDM, we integrated an optical marker into PFOB droplets for microscopic assessment (≪50 µm). To develop PFOB droplets as a new nanoscale mammographic contrast agent, PFOB droplets were labelled with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). The droplets had mean diameters of 160 nm, fluoresced at 635 nm and attenuated x-ray spectra at 30.5 keV mean energy with a relative attenuation of 5.6 ± 0.3 Hounsfield units (HU) mg-1 mL-1 QD-PFOB. With the agent loaded into tissue phantoms, good correlation between x-ray attenuation and optical fluorescence was found (R2 = 0.96), confirming co-localization of the QDs with PFOB for quantitative assessment using x-ray or optical methods. Furthermore, the QDs can be removed from the PFOB agent without affecting its x-ray attenuation or structural properties for expedited translation of optimized PFOB droplet formulations into patients.

  15. Nonlinear Imaging of Microbubble Contrast Agent Using the Volterra Filter: In Vivo Results.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2016-12-01

    A nonlinear filtering approach to imaging the dynamics of microbubble ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) in microvessels is presented. The approach is based on the adaptive third-order Volterra filter (TVF), which separates the linear, quadratic, and cubic components from beamformed pulse-echo ultrasound data. The TVF captures polynomial nonlinearities utilizing the full spectral components of the echo data and not from prespecified bands, e.g., second or third harmonics. This allows for imaging using broadband pulse transmission to preserve the axial resolution and the SNR. In this paper, we present the results from imaging the UCA activity in a 200- [Formula: see text] cellulose tube embedded in a tissue-mimicking phantom using a linear array diagnostic probe. The contrast enhancement was quantified by computing the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) for the different imaging components, i.e., B-mode, pulse inversion (PI), and the TVF components. The temporal mean and standard deviation of the CTR values were computed for all frames in a given data set. Quadratic and cubic images, referred to as QB-mode and CB-mode, produced higher mean CTR values than B-mode, which showed improved sensitivity. Compared with PI, they produced similar or higher mean CTR values with greater spatial specificity. We also report in vivo results from imaging UCA activity in an implanted LNCaP tumor with heterogeneous perfusion. The temporal means and standard deviations of the echogenicity were evaluated in small regions with different perfusion levels in the presence and absence of UCA. The in vivo measurements behaved consistently with the corresponding calculations obtained under microflow conditions in vitro. Specifically, the nonlinear VF components produced larger increases in the temporal mean and standard deviation values compared with B-mode in regions with low to relatively high perfusion. These results showed that polynomial filters such as the TVF can provide an important tool

  16. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongalsky, M. B.; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gulyaev, M. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Pirogov, Yu. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T2) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g.s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  17. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gongalsky, M. B. Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Maximychev, A. V.; Gulyaev, M. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Pirogov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-12-07

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T{sub 1}) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g·s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  18. Radiation dosimetry of iodine-123 HEAT, an alpha-1 receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.D.; Greer, D.M.; Couch, M.W.; Williams, C.M.

    1987-11-01

    Biologic distribution data in the rat were obtained for the alpha-1 adrenoceptor imaging agent (+/-) 2-(beta-(iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl)tetralone (HEAT) labeled with (/sup 123/I). The major excretory routes were through the liver (67%) and the kidney (33%). Internal radiation absorbed dose estimates to nine source organs, total body, the GI tract, gonads, and red bone marrow were calculated for the human using the physical decay data for (/sup 123/I). The critical organ was found to be the lower large intestine, receiving 1.1 rad per mCi of (/sup 123/I)HEAT administered. The total-body dose was found to be 58 mrad per mCi.

  19. Quantum dots and multifunctional nanoparticles: new contrast agents for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Rhyner, Matthew N; Smith, Andrew M; Gao, Xiaohu; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily; Nie, Shuming

    2006-08-01

    Nanometer-sized particles, such as semiconductor quantum dots and iron oxide nanocrystals, have novel optical, electronic, magnetic or structural properties that are not available from either molecules or bulk solids. When linked with tumor-targeting ligands, such as monoclonal antibodies, peptide fragments of tumor-specific proteins or small molecules, these nanoparticles can be used to target tumor antigens (biomarkers) and tumor vasculatures with high affinity and specificity. In the mesoscopic size range of 5-100 nm diameter, quantum dots and related nanoparticles have large surface areas and functional groups that can be linked to multiple diagnostic (e.g., optical, radioisotopic or magnetic) and therapeutic (e.g., anticancer) agents. In this review, recent advances in the development and applications of bioconjugated quantum dots and multifunctional nanoparticles for in vivo tumor imaging and targeting are discussed.

  20. Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Srivastava, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes new strategies for the brain-specific delivery of radionuclides that can be used to evaluate regional cerebral perfusion by single photon imaging techniques. A description of several examples of interesting new strategies that have recently been reported is presented. A new approach at this institution for the brain-specific delivery of radioiodinated iodophenylalkyl-substituted dihyronicotinamide systems is described which shows good brain uptake and retention in preliminary studies in rats. Following transport into the brain these agents appear to undergo facile intracerebral oxidation to the quaternized analogues which do not recross the intact blood-brain barrier and so are effectively trapped in the brain. 49 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Phantom studies with gold nanorods as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging: novel and old approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Stea, Francesco; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Pini, Roberto; Meucci, Sandro; Cecchini, Marco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is emerging as a bioimaging technique. The development of contrast agents extend the potential towards novel application. The design of stable phantoms is needed to achieve a semi-quantitative evaluation of the performance of contrast agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the PA signal generated from gold nanorods (GNRs) loaded in custom made phantoms. VevoLAZR (VisualSonics Inc., Toronto) was used with custom made agar phantom, with 5 parallel polyethylene tubes (with 0.58mm internal and 0.99mm external diameter), and a PDMS phantom, with six parallel channels with sizes from 50 μm to 500 μm, loaded with two different types of GNRs: PEGGNRs (53nm length and 11nm axial diameter, plasmon resonance at 840nm, 87nM (15mM Au equivalent)); and gold nanorods (NPZ) coated in a dense layer of hydrophilic polymers by Nanopartz Inc., Loveland, CO (41nm length and 10nm axial diameter, plasmon resonance at 808nm, 83 nM (14mM Au equivalent)). The absorption spectra acquired with the PA system and the spectrophotometer were compared. The reproducibility and stability of the PA signal were evaluated at different dilutions. The dynamic variation of the PA signal was evaluated as function of the number of the GNRs. The SNR and the contrast were measured across the range of concentrations studied. The custom made agar phantom demonstrated suitable for the characterization of PA contrast agents such as PEG-GNRs and NPZ. The PDMS phantom is promising in the field of photoacoustics, therefore future works will conducted exploiting its precise and controlled geometry.

  2. New calcium-selective smart contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kirti Dhingra; Forgács, Attila; Uh, Hyounsoo; Beyerlein, Michael; Maier, Martin E; Petoud, Stéphane; Botta, Mauro; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2013-12-23

    Calcium plays a vital role in the human body and especially in the central nervous system. Precise maintenance of Ca(2+) levels is very crucial for normal cell physiology and health. The deregulation of calcium homeostasis can lead to neuronal cell death and brain damage. To study this functional role played by Ca(2+) in the brain noninvasively by using magnetic resonance imaging, we have synthesized a new set of Ca(2+) -sensitive smart contrast agents (CAs). The agents were found to be highly selective to Ca(2+) in the presence of other competitive anions and cations in buffer and in physiological fluids. The structure of CAs comprises Gd(3+)-DO3A (DO3A=1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) coupled to a Ca(2+) chelator o-amino phenol-N,N,O-triacetate (APTRA). The agents are designed to sense Ca(2+) present in extracellular fluid of the brain where its concentration is relatively high, that is, 1.2-0.8 mM. The determined dissociation constant of the CAs to Ca(2+) falls in the range required to sense and report changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels followed by an increase in neural activity. In buffer, with the addition of Ca(2+) the increase in relaxivity ranged from 100-157%, the highest ever known for any T1-based Ca(2+)-sensitive smart CA. The CAs were analyzed extensively by the measurement of luminescence lifetime measurement on Tb(3+) analogues, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD), and (17)O NMR transverse relaxation and shift experiments. The results obtained confirmed that the large relaxivity enhancement observed upon Ca(2+) addition is due to the increase of the hydration state of the complexes together with the slowing down of the molecular rotation and the retention of a significant contribution of the water molecules of the second sphere of hydration.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  4. (Fluorine-18 labeled androgens and progestins: Imaging agents for tumors of the prostate and breast)

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1990-09-20

    The objective of this project is to develop fluorine-18 labeled steroids which possess high binding affinity and selectivity for androgen and progesterone receptors and can be used as positron-emission tomographic imaging agents for prostate tumors and breast tumors, respectively. These novel diagnostic agents may enable an accurate estimation of tumor dissemination (metastasis of prostate cancer and lymph node involvement of breast cancer) and an in vivo determination of the endocrine responsiveness of these tumors. Thus, they will provide essential information for the selection of alternative therapies (the extent of surgical ablation, radiation and chemotherapy vs hormonal therapy, etc.), thereby improving the management of prostate and breast cancer patients. Specific aims of the program include: synthesize fluorine-substituted progestins from the following high affinity classes: R5020 (promegestone), norgestrel, RU486, and retroprogestins; synthesize fluorine-substituted androgens from the following high affinity classes: mibolerone, R1881 (metribolone) and 2-oxametribolone; evaluate the receptor binding and non-specific binding of these fluorosteroids by in vitro binding assays; develop and optimize fluoride ion substitution reactions suitable for the rapid, efficient, and convenient preparation of these fluorosteroids in high specific activity, F-18 labeled form; and evaluate the target tissue uptake of the F-18 labeled androgens and progestins in experimental animals. We have synthesized several new fluorine-substituted androgens (1--6) over the past year. Their structures and binding affinity for the androgen receptor (RBA) are listed in this paper. 6 refs.

  5. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles' shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given.

  6. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles’ shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given. PMID:26441654

  7. Preparation and evaluation of radioiodinated 1-(dialkyl-aminoalkyl)-4-phenylpiperazines as potential brain imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.N.; Shourbagy, T.E.

    1985-05-01

    The interest in radioiodinated diamines stems from their similarity to /sup 125/I-HIPDM and to the 1-dialkvlamino-acyl-4-phenylpiperazines that the authors have previously examined as potential brain imaging agents. In this study they converted the 1-(dialkylaminoacyl)-4-phenylpiperazines to their corresponding 1-(dialkylaminoacyl) analogs via reduction with diborane in THF. Radioiodination at the no-carrier-added level with Na/sup 125/I and chloramine-T gave the final compounds, after chromatographic separation, in 30-50% yields. The tissue distributions were determined in rats at 0.25, and 4 hrs after an i.v. injection of the radiochemical. The results indicated that all of the agents were readily extracted by the brain (1.5-2.5% ID) with brain to blood ratios >20. The structure-distribution relationships for this series were, however, decidedly different from the aminoacyl compounds in that morpholino-derivatives had better uptake and retention than the piperidine derivatives. Neither extension of the alkyl chain nor the presence of carrier significantly altered the brain uptake and retention of the radiochemical. Further studies are in progress. In conclusion, they have identified a class of radiotracers that can be readily prepared and show a pattern of brain uptake and retention than the structurally similar 1-dialkylaminoacyl-4-phenylpiperazines.

  8. Low-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles as Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Ian R; Li, Hui; Chen, Juan; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Zhou, Rong; Glickson, Jerry D; Zheng, Gang

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) are a naturally occurring endogenous nanoplatform in mammalian systems. These nanoparticles (22 nm) specifically transport cholesterol to cells expressing the LDL receptor (LDLR). Several tumors overexpress LDLRs presumably to provide cholesterol to sustain a high rate of membrane synthesis. Amphiphilic gadolinium (Gd)-diethylenetria-minepentaacetic acid chelates have been incorporated into the LDL to produce a novel LDLR-targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The number of Gd chelates per LDL particle ranged between 150 and 496 Gd(III). In vitro studies demonstrated that Gd-labeled LDL retained a similar diameter and surface charge as the native LDL particle. In addition, Gd-labeled LDL retained selective cellular binding and uptake through LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Finally, Gd-labeled LDLs exhibited significant contrast enhancement 24 hours after administration in nude mice with human hepatoblastoma G2 xenografts. Thus, Gd-labeled LDL demonstrates potential use as a targeted MRI contrast agent for in vivo tumor detection. PMID:16820095

  9. Removal of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents through advanced water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael G; Keller, Jurg; Poussade, Yvan

    2010-01-01

    Stable gadolinium (Gd) complexes have been used as paramagnetic contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for over 20 years, and have recently been identified as environmental contaminants. As the rare earth elements (REE), which include Gd, are able to be measured accurately at very low concentrations (e.g. Tb is measured at 7 fmol/kg in this study) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), it is possible to determine the fate of this class of compounds during the production of purified recycled water from effluent. Coagulation and microfiltration have negligible removal, with the major removal step occurring across the reverse osmosis membrane where anthropogenic Gd (the amount of Gd attributable to MRI contrast agents) is reduced from 0.39 nmol/kg to 0.59 pmol/kg, a reduction of 99.85%. The RO concentrate has anthropogenic Gd concentrations of 2.6 nmol/kg, an increase in concentration in line with the design characteristics of the plant. The increased concentration in the RO concentrate may allow further development of anthropogenic Gd as a tracer of the fate of the RO concentrate in the environment.

  10. Evaluation of Tumor Micro-Environment in an Animal Model using a Nanoparticle Contrast Agent in Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Badea, Cristian T.; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Fettig, Nicole; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.; Johnson, G A; Annapragada, Ananth

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES Non-invasive longitudinal imaging of tumor vasculature could provide new insights into the development of solid tumors, facilitating efficient delivery of therapeutics. In this study, we report three-dimensional imaging and characterization of tumor vascular architecture using a nanoparticle contrast agent and high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five Balb/c mice implanted with 4T1/Luc syngeneic breast tumors cells were used for the study. The nanoparticle contrast agent was systemically administered and longitudinal CT imaging was performed pre-contrast and at serial time-points post-contrast, for up to 7 days for studying the characteristics of tumor-associated blood vessels. Gene-expression of tumor angiogenic biomarkers was measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). RESULTS Early-phase imaging demonstrated the presence of co-opted and newly developed tumor vessels. The co-opted vessels demonstrated wall-permeability and ‘leakiness’ characteristics evident by an increase in extra-vascular nanoparticle-based signal enhancement visible well beyond the margins of tumor. Diameters of tumor-associated vessels were larger than the contra-lateral normal vessels. Delayed-phase imaging also demonstrated significant accumulation of nanoparticle contrast agent both within and in areas surrounding the tumor. A heterogeneous pattern of signal enhancement was observed both within and among individual tumors. Gene-expression profiling demonstrated significant variability in several angiogenic biomarkers both within and among individual tumors. CONCLUSIONS The nanoparticle contrast agent and high-resolution CT imaging facilitated visualization of co-opted and newly developed tumors vessels as well as imaging of nanoparticle accumulation within tumors. The use of this agent could provide novel insights into tumor vascular biology and could have implications on the monitoring of tumor

  11. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiological pathways that support tumor development while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The authors will focus on natural health products (NHPs) that have a high degree of antiangiogenic activity but also describe some of their many other interactions that can inhibit tumor progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. NHPs target various molecular pathways besides angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the HER-2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the NF-kB transcription factor, the protein kinases, Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are confirming the knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking on clinical trials. More data are required on dose response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations

  12. Dual-energy subtraction imaging utilizing indium as a contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Le Duc, G.; Zhong, Z.; Warkentien, L.; Laster, B.; Thomlinson, W.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of our current work is to establish the minimum detection, of indium contrast agent using dual-energy subtraction imaging above and below indium K-edge. Experiments were performed on the X12 and X17B2 beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source using the same method but with two different set-ups. Experiments were first carried out on InCl{sub 3} solutions, then on V79 Chinese hamster cells and on BALB/c mice excised tumors, labeled with indium. For each experiment, several layers of Lucite were placed in front of the phantom to ensure a 43 mm thickness, dose to that of a mammography examination. Results were the same on X12 and X17B2. As expected, indium-free materials disappeared on subtracted images (water, steel reference and screw). Indium samples were easily distinguishable for the following concentrations: 10-5-2-1 mg/cm{sup 2}. Smaller concentrations were not clearly distinguishable and we were unable to see cell samples and tumors. To conclude, the lowest concentration we can image is around 1 mg/cm{sup 2}. These results agree with theoretical results. Such results also suggest that indium concentration in both cells and tumors is lower than 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the current detection is dose to optimum, we conclude that dual energy subtraction imaging using indium to label tumors cells and tumors is not possible unless the indium uptake is increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  13. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  14. Recent advances in ytterbium-based contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging: promises and prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlan; Liu, Jianhua; Ai, Kelong; Yuan, Qinghai; Lu, Lehui

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is one of the most widely used diagnostic imaging techniques in the clinic, and has raised significant interest in recent years both in research and practice owing to its many advantages such as deep penetration depth, high resolution and facile image processing. Developing heavy metal-based CT contrast agents, especially heavy metal-containing nanoparticulate CT contrast agents, has become a key focus in research fields to address issues of clinical iodinated agents involving short circulation time, low contrast efficiency and potential renal toxicity. In this review, we summarize the development of ytterbium (Yb)-based CT contrast agents and highlight the design and applications of Yb-based nanoparticulate CT contrast agents. Yb has high atomic number and higher abundance in the earth's crust relative to Au, Ta and Bi, which have received much attention as a CT contrast agents. In particular, in contrast to these metal elements, as well as I, Yb has K-edge energy that is located just within the higher-intensity region of X-ray spectra, which can induce significant enhancement in the contrast efficiency. When encapsulated in nanoparticles, Yb can remain in the circulation for a long time. This long in vivo circulation time, combined with the proper K-edge energy and a large absorption cross-section of Yb in the near-infrared region, makes Yb-based nanoparticles particularly promising in angiography, 'multicolor' spectral CT imaging, and multimodal imaging. Finally, we also discuss the prospects and the challenges in the development of Yb-based CT contrast agents.

  15. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  16. Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer by Molecular Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Together with Serum Markers of Tumor-Associated Nuclear Change and Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    and chemokine gene expression following Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella infections. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 2006; 114: 209-23. ... USA ) in TAE buffer and stained with ethidium bromide. The image was captured using a ChemiDoc XRS system (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA). IL-16 mRNA

  17. Dual-modal MRI contrast agent with aggregation-induced emission characteristic for liver specific imaging with long circulation lifetime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yilong; Li, Min; Hong, Yuning; Lam, Jacky W Y; Zheng, Qichang; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-07-09

    We herein report a novel dual-modal MRI contrast agent, TPE-2Gd, for both magnetic and fluorescence imaging. TPE-2Gd consists of a hydrophobic tetraphenylethene (TPE) fluorophore and two hydrophilic gadolinium (Gd) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid moieties. As an amphiphilic molecule, TPE-2Gd aggregates into micelles at a high concentration in aqueous medium. These aggregates are highly emissive, showing an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristic. TPE-2Gd is used as a fluorescent agent for cell imaging, which demonstrates negligible cytotoxicity and excellent photostability owing to its AIE property. As a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, TPE-2Gd exhibits similar longitudinal relaxivity in water (R1,TPE-2Gd = 3.36 ± 0.10 s(-1) per mM of Gd(3+)) as those commercial agents (e.g., Magnevist, R1,magnevist = 3.70 ± 0.02 s(-1) per mM of Gd(3+)). Compared with Magnevist, the circulation lifetime of TPE-2Gd nanoaggregates in living rats is extended from 10 min to 1 h. With relatively high specificity to the liver, the MR imaging could remain hyperintense in liver even after 150 min post injection. These TPE-2Gd nanoparticles can be excreted gradually via renal filtration due to the disassembly of the nanoparticles into small molecules during circulation. TPE-2Gd could thus potentially be used as a liver specific MRI contrast agent for clinical diagnosis.

  18. Biologically-compatible gadolinium(at)(carbon nanostructures) as advanced contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitharaman, Balaji

    2005-11-01

    Paramagnetic gadolinium-based carbon nanostructures are introduced as a new paradigm in high-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent (CA) design. Two Gd C60-based nanomaterials, Gd C60 [C(COOH)2]10 and Gd C60(OH)x are shown to have MRI efficacies (relaxivities) 5 to 20 times larger than any current Gd3+-based CA in clinical use. The first detailed and systematic physicochemical characterization was performed on these materials using the same experimental techniques usually applied to traditional Gd 3+-based CAs. Water-proton relaxivities were measured for the first time on these materials, as a function of magnetic field (5 x 10-4--9.4 T) to elucidate the different interaction mechanisms and dynamic processes influencing the relaxation behavior. These studies attribute the observed enhanced relaxivities completely to the "outer sphere" proton relaxation mechanism. These "outer sphere" relaxation effects are the largest reported for any Gd3+-based agent without inner-sphere water molecules. The proton relaxivities displayed a remarkable pH-dependency, increasing dramatically with decreasing pH (pH: 3--12). The increase in relaxivity resulted mainly from aggregation and subsequent three-order-of-magnitude increase in tauR, the rotational correlation time. Water-soluble fullerene materials (such as the neuroprotective fullerene drug, C3) readily cross cell membranes, suggesting an application for these gadofullerenes as the first intracellular, as well as pH-responsive MRI CAs. Studies performed at 60 MHz in the presence of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, mice serum pH: 7.4) to mimic physiological conditions demonstrated that the aggregates can be disrupted by addition of salts, leading to a decrease in relaxivity. Biological fluids present a high salt concentration and should strongly modify the behavior of any fullerenes/metallofullerene-based drug in vivo. Gd C60[C(COOH)2]10 also showed enhanced relaxivity (23% increase) in the presence of the

  19. A targeted contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of thrombus: implications of spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L O; Bjørnerud, A; Ahlström, H K; Ladd, D L; Fujii, D K

    2001-04-01

    A preparation of ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles coupled to an RGD peptide (RGD-USPIO) was investigated as an MR contrast agent, targeted to activated platelets, in both ex vivo and in vivo thrombus models. Thrombus visualization ex vivo was compared using RGD-USPIO and a non-targeted UPSIO. The influence of thrombus visualization on thrombus exposure time to RGD-USPIO (ex vivo) and on the spatial resolution of the MR image (ex vivo and in vivo) was assessed. RGD-USPIO resulted in better thrombus visualization than non-targeted USPIO ex vivo, and maximum enhancement was achieved after approximately one hour exposure time of the thrombus to RGD-USPIO. The ability to visualize the clots was highly dependent on the spatial resolution of the image. In vivo, an in-plane resolution of less than 0.2 x 0.2 mm(2) was required for good clot visualization after contrast enhancement. It is concluded that the achievable resolution and sensitivity is a potential limitation to the usefulness of active vascular targeting in MRI.

  20. Indium-111-labeled LDL: A potential agent for imaging atherosclerotic disease and lipoprotein biodistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Butler, S.P.; Meinken, G.E.; Wang, T.S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Srivastava, S.C.; Alderson, P.O.; Ginsberg, H.N. )

    1990-03-01

    Radiolabeling of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and external imaging with a gamma camera would offer a means of taking advantage of the metabolic activity of developing atherosclerotic lesions in order to noninvasively detect and determine the extent of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled LDL was prepared and its purity demonstrated by agarose electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. In vitro studies with cultured human fibroblasts demonstrated significant inhibition of iodine-125-({sup 125}I) LDL binding to LDL receptors by {sup 111}In-LDL, although this was less than the inhibition produced by unlabeled LDL. Adrenal gland uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL by hypercholesterolemic rabbits was reduced by 86% compared to the level of uptake observed in normal rabbits. These results were compatible with downregulation of adrenal LDL receptors in the hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL in the atherosclerotic proximal aorta of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was 2.5 times higher than in normal rabbits. These results suggest that {sup 111}In-LDL has the potential to be a useful agent for external imaging of atherosclerotic lesions and lipoprotein biodistribution.

  1. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC. PMID:27525313

  2. Formulation of radiographically detectable gastrointestinal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging: effects of a barium sulfate additive on MR contrast agent effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D L; Muller, H H; Young, S W

    1992-01-01

    Complete and homogeneous distribution of gastrointestinal (GI) contrast media are important factors for their effective use in computed tomography as well as in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A radiographic method (using fluoroscopy or spot films) could be effective for monitoring intestinal filling with GI contrast agents for MR imaging (GICMR), but it would require the addition of a radiopaque agent to most GICMR. This study was conducted to determine the minimum amount of barium additive necessary to be radiographically visible and to evaluate whether this additive influences the signal characteristics of the GICMR. A variety of barium sulfate preparations (3-12% wt/vol) were tested in dogs to determine the minimum quantity needed to make the administered agent visible during fluoroscopy and on abdominal radiographs. Solutions of 10 different potential GI contrast agents (Gd-DTPA, ferric ammonium citrate, Mn-DPDP, chromium-EDTA, gadolinium-oxalate, ferrite particles, water, mineral oil, lipid emulsion, and methylcellulose) were prepared without ("nondoped") and with ("doped") the barium sulfate additive. MR images of the solutions in tubes were obtained at 0.38 T using 10 different spin-echo pulse sequences. Region of interest (ROI) measurements of contrast agent signal intensity (SI) were made. In addition, for the paramagnetic contrast media, the longitudinal and transverse relaxivity (R1 and R2) were measured. A 6% wt/vol suspension of barium was the smallest concentration yielding adequate radiopacity in the GI tract. Except for gadolinium-oxalate, there was no statistically significant difference in SI for doped and non-doped solutions with most pulse sequences used. In addition, the doped and nondoped solutions yielded R1 and R2 values which were comparable. We conclude that barium sulfate 6% wt/vol added to MR contrast agents produces a suspension with sufficient radiodensity to be viewed radiographically, and it does not cause significant alteration in

  3. Radiolabeled biomolecules for early cancer detection and therapy via angiogenesis targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziotis, P.; Psimadas, D.; Fani, M.; Gourni, E.; Loudos, G.; Xanthopoulos, S.; Archimandritis, S. C.; Varvarigou, A. D.

    2006-12-01

    Tumors cannot grow or metastasize without the formation of new blood vessels, i.e. without angiogenesis. A variety of anti-angiogenic agents leading to angiogenesis inhibition are in the clinical trial phase, among which are: (i) molecules which inhibit the action of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors, VEGF and (ii) molecules which obstruct migration, differentiation and proliferation of endothelial cells, via their binding to receptors of the α νβ 3 integrins. Certain derivatives of the abovementioned categories, labeled with radionuclides, which emit γ-radiation or β-particles or positrons, have been proposed and are being evaluated as possible radiopharmaceuticals, for the detection and/or treatment of primary or metastatic cancer at an early stage. For the study of angiogenesis the following have been described: (a) antibodies targeting VEGF, labeled with radionuclides emitting β- and/or γ-radiation, which can be applied for the diagnosis and, possibly, for the treatment of cancer, (b) peptide derivatives which contain the amino-acid sequence RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and compete for the α νβ 3 integrins, with the proteins of the stroma. It has been found that these radiolabeled biomolecules localize in tumors and can be used for the visualization and, possibly, for tumor eradication of primary and metastatic cancer. In our laboratory radiolabeling of biomolecules by beta and/or gamma emitters is a principal research goal. In the present work we are presenting our results on the labeling of monoclonal antibodies and peptides with β- and γ-emitting isotopes, as well as on their in vivo evaluation in experimental animal models, by use of specially dedicated imaging devices.

  4. Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer by Molecular Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Together with Serum Markers of Tumor-Associated Nuclear Change and Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    of ovarian tumors at early stage using imaging indices established in Specific Aim 1. Hens were maintained under standard poultry husbandry practices...Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Poultry Research Farm, for maintenance of the hens. We also thank Heather Lopez, research Assistant, Department of...hens (Gallus domesticus, 74 approximately 4-years old) were reared under standard poultry care and management and 75 provided with feed and water ad

  5. Size effect of Au/PAMAM contrast agent on CT imaging of reticuloendothelial system and tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jian; Liu, Ransheng; Zhang, Aixu; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-entrapped Au nanoparticles were synthesized with distinct sizes to figure out the size effect of Au-based contrast agent on CT imaging of passively targeted tissues. Au/PAMAM nanoparticles were first synthesized with narrow distribution of particles size of 22.2 ± 3.1, 54.2 ± 3.7, and 104.9 ± 4.7 nm in diameters. Size effect leads no significant difference on X-ray attenuation when Au/PAMAM was ≤0.05 mol/L. For CT imaging of a tumor model, small Au/PAMAM were more easily internalized via endocytosis in the liver, leading to more obviously enhanced contrast. Similarly, contrast agents with small sizes were more effective in tumor imaging because of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Overall, the particle size of Au/PAMAM heavily affected the efficiency of CT enhancement in imaging RES and tumors.

  6. Halofuginone inhibits angiogenesis and growth in implanted metastatic rat brain tumor model--an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Rinat; Itzik, Anna; Harel, Hila; Nagler, Arnon; Vlodavsky, Israel; Siegal, Tali

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF) is a potent inhibitor of collagen type alpha1(I). In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001). Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001). In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05). Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03). Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  7. Alpha-v Integrin Targeted PET Imaging of Breast Cancer Angiogenesis and Low-Dose Metronomic Anti-Angiogenic Chemotherapy Efficacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Med Mol Imaging (2008) 35:1489–1498 18F-FPPRGD2 and 18F-FDG PET of Response to Abraxane Therapy Xilin Sun1,2, Yongjun Yan1, Shuanglong Liu3, Qizhen...Belotti D, Vergani V, Drudis T, et al. The microtubule-affecting drug paclitaxel has antiangiogenic activity. Clin Cancer Res. 1996;2:1843–1849. 11. Wang J...227–234. 19. Liu Z, Li ZB, Cao Q, Liu S, Wang F, Chen X. Small-animal PET of tumors with 64Cu-labeled RGD-bombesin heterodimer. J Nucl Med. 2009;50:1168

  8. Stimulus-Responsive Ultrasound Contrast Agents for Clinical Imaging: Motivations, Demonstrations, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Andrew P.; Nakatsuka, Matthew A.; Mattrey, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents allow imaging of the vasculature with excellent resolution and signal-to-noise ratios. Contrast in microbubbles derives from their interaction with an ultrasound wave to generate signal at harmonic frequencies of the stimulating pulse; subtracting the elastic echo caused by the surrounding tissue can enhance the specificity of these harmonic signals significantly. The nonlinear acoustic emission is caused by pressure-driven microbubble size fluctuations, which in both theoretical descriptions and empirical measurements was found to depend on the mechanical properties of the shell that encapsulates the microbubble as well as stabilizes it against the surrounding aqueous environment. Thus biochemically-induced switching between a rigid “off” state and a flexible “on” state provides a mechanism for sensing chemical markers for disease. In our research, we coupled DNA oligonucleotides to a stabilizing lipid monolayer to modulate stiffness of the shell and thereby induce stimulus-responsive behavior. In initial proof-of-principle studies, it was found that signal modulation came primarily from DNA crosslinks preventing the microbubble size oscillations rather than merely damping the signal. Next, these microbubbles were redesigned to include an aptamer sequence in the crosslinking strand, which not only allowed the sensing of the clotting enzyme thrombin but also provided a general strategy for sensing other soluble biomarkers in the bloodstream. Finally, the thrombin-sensitive microbubbles were validated in a rabbit model, presenting the first example of an ultrasound contrast agent that could differentiate between active and inactive clots for the diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis. PMID:25195785

  9. Shed syndecan-2 inhibits angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Giulia; Evans, Alun R.; Kay, Emma; Woodfin, Abigail; McKay, Tristan R.; Nourshargh, Sussan; Whiteford, James R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Angiogenesis is essential for the development of a normal vasculature, tissue repair and reproduction, and also has roles in the progression of diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-2 is expressed on mesenchymal cells in the vasculature and, like the other members of its family, can be shed from the cell surface resulting in the release of its extracellular core protein. The purpose of this study was to establish whether shed syndecan-2 affects angiogenesis. We demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 regulates angiogenesis by inhibiting endothelial cell migration in human and rodent models and, as a result, reduces tumour growth. Furthermore, our findings show that these effects are mediated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor CD148 (also known as PTPRJ) and this interaction corresponds with a decrease in active β1 integrin. Collectively, these data demonstrate an unexplored pathway for the regulation of new blood vessel formation and identify syndecan-2 as a therapeutic target in pathologies characterised by angiogenesis. PMID:25179601

  10. Studies of Jovian atmospheric structure and coloring agents using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strycker, Paul Douglas

    The coloring agents, or chromophores, that are embedded within Jupiter's vertical aerosol structure have not been identified and are poorly characterized. In this dissertation, we present two studies of chromophores in the context of the jovian atmospheric structure. In the first study, we analyzed images acquired with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We employed a radiative transfer code to retrieve single scattering albedo spectra, o0(lambda), for particles in Jupiter's tropospheric haze at seven wavelengths in the near-UV and visible regimes. All o0 curves were absorbing in the blue, and o0(lambda) increased monotonically to approximately unity as wavelength increased. We found accurate fits to all o0(lambda) curves using an empirically derived functional form: o 0(lambda) = 1 -- A exp(--Blambda ). The best-fit parameters for the mean o 0(lambda) curve were A = 25.4 and B = 0.0149 for lambda in units of nm. We performed a principal component analysis (PCA) on our o0(lambda) results and found that one or two chromophores were sufficient to produce the variations in o0(lambda). A PCA of reflectance spectra, I/F(lambda) for the same jovian locations resulted in principal components (PCs) with roughly the same variances as the o0(lambda) PCA, but they did not result in a one-to-one mapping of PC amplitudes between the o 0(lambda) PCA and I/F(lambda) PCA. We suggest that statistical analyses performed on I/F(lambda) have limited applicability to the characterization of chromophores in the jovian atmosphere due to the sensitivity of I/F(lambda) to horizontal variations in the vertical aerosol distribution. In the second study, we collected and analyzed images of Jupiter from 470--900 nm in 2-nm increments. We acquired our data with the New Mexico State University Acousto-optic Imaging Camera using the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We retrieved o0(lambda) for four jovian locations

  11. Dietary compounds galangin and myricetin suppress ovarian cancer cell angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haizhi; Chen, Allen Y.; Rojanasakul, Yon; Ye, Xingqian; Rankin, Gary O.; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Galangin and myricetin are flavonoids isolated from vegetables and fruits which exhibit anti-proliferative activity in human cancer cells. In this study, their anti-angiogenic effects were investigated with in vitro (HUVEC) and in vivo (CAM) models, which showed that galangin and myricetin inhibited angiogenesis induced by OVCAR-3 cells. The molecular mechanisms through which galangin and myricetin suppress angiogenesis were also studied. It was observed that galangin and myricetin inhibited secretion of the key angiogenesis mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and decreased levels of p-Akt, p-70S6K and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) proteins in A2780/CP70 and OVCAR-3 cells. Transient transfection experiments showed that galangin and myricetin inhibited secretion of VEGF by the Akt/p70S6K/ HIF-1α pathway. Moreover, a novel pathway, p21/HIF-1α/VEGF, was found to be involved in the inhibitory effect of myricetin on angiogenesis in OVCAR-3 cells. These data suggest that galangin and myricetin might serve as potential anti-angiogenic agents in the prevention of ovarian cancers dependent on new blood vessel networks. PMID:26113875

  12. Dietary compounds galangin and myricetin suppress ovarian cancer cell angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haizhi; Chen, Allen Y; Rojanasakul, Yon; Ye, Xingqian; Rankin, Gary O; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2015-05-01

    Galangin and myricetin are flavonoids isolated from vegetables and fruits which exhibit anti-proliferative activity in human cancer cells. In this study, their anti-angiogenic effects were investigated with in vitro (HUVEC) and in vivo (CAM) models, which showed that galangin and myricetin inhibited angiogenesis induced by OVCAR-3 cells. The molecular mechanisms through which galangin and myricetin suppress angiogenesis were also studied. It was observed that galangin and myricetin inhibited secretion of the key angiogenesis mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and decreased levels of p-Akt, p-70S6K and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) proteins in A2780/CP70 and OVCAR-3 cells. Transient transfection experiments showed that galangin and myricetin inhibited secretion of VEGF by the Akt/p70S6K/ HIF-1α pathway. Moreover, a novel pathway, p21/HIF-1α/VEGF, was found to be involved in the inhibitory effect of myricetin on angiogenesis in OVCAR-3 cells. These data suggest that galangin and myricetin might serve as potential anti-angiogenic agents in the prevention of ovarian cancers dependent on new blood vessel networks.

  13. MR-Guided Delivery of Hydrophilic Molecular Imaging Agents Across the Blood-Brain Barrier Through Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Airan, Raag D.; Foss, Catherine A.; Ellens, Nicholas P. K.; Wang, Yuchuan; Mease, Ronnie C.; Farahani, Keyvan; Pomper, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A wide variety of hydrophilic imaging and therapeutic agents are unable to gain access to the central nervous system (CNS) due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In particular, unless a particular transporter exists that may transport the agent across the BBB, most agents that are larger than 500 Da or that are hydrophilic will be excluded by the BBB. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), also known as the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in the periphery, has been implicated in various neuropsychiatric conditions. As all agents that target GCPII are hydrophilic and thereby excluded from the CNS, we used GCPII as a platform for demonstrating our MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) technique for delivery of GCPII/PSMA-specific imaging agents to the brain. Procedures Female rats underwent MRgFUS-mediated opening of the BBB. After opening of the BBB, either a radio- or fluorescently labeled ureido-based ligand for GCPII/PSMA was administered intravenously. Brain uptake was assessed for 2-(3-{1-carboxy-5-[(6-[18F]fluoropyridine-3-carbonyl)-amino]-pentyl}-ureido)-pentanedioic acid ([18F]DCFPyL) and YC-27, two compounds known to bind GCPII/PSMA with high affinity, using positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, respectively. Specificity of ligand binding to GCPII/PSMA in the brain was determined with co-administration of a molar excess of ZJ-43, a compound of the same chemical class but different structure from either [18F]DCFPyL or YC-27, which competes for GCPII/PSMA binding. Results Dynamic PET imaging using [18F]DCFPyL demonstrated that target uptake reached a plateau by ~1 h after radiotracer administration, with target/background ratios continuing to increase throughout the course of imaging, from a ratio of ~4:1 at 45 min to ~7:1 by 80 min. NIRF imaging likewise demonstrated delivery of YC-27 to the brain, with clear visualization of tracer in the brain at 24 h. Tissue uptake of both ligands was greatly

  14. Angiogenesis in the Infarcted Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Cochain, Clement; Channon, Keith M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Proangiogenic therapy appeared a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), as de novo formation of microvessels, has the potential to salvage ischemic myocardium at early stages after MI, and is also essential to prevent the transition to heart failure through the control of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and contractility. Recent Advances: Exciting preclinical studies evaluating proangiogenic therapies for MI have prompted the initiation of numerous clinical trials based on protein or gene transfer delivery of growth factors and administration of stem/progenitor cells, mainly from bone marrow origin. Nonetheless, these clinical trials showed mixed results in patients with acute MI. Critical Issues: Even though methodological caveats, such as way of delivery for angiogenic growth factors (e.g., protein vs. gene transfer) and stem/progenitor cells or isolation/culture procedure for regenerative cells might partially explain the failure of such trials, it appears that delivery of a single growth factor or cell type does not support angiogenesis sufficiently to promote cardiac repair. Future Directions: Optimization of proangiogenic therapies might include stimulation of both angiogenesis and vessel maturation and/or the use of additional sources of stem/progenitor cells, such as cardiac progenitor cells. Experimental unraveling of the mechanisms of angiogenesis, vessel maturation, and endothelial cell/cardiomyocyte cross talk in the ischemic heart, analysis of emerging pathways, as well as a better understanding of how cardiovascular risk factors impact endogenous and therapeutically stimulated angiogenesis, would undoubtedly pave the way for the development of novel and hopefully efficient angiogenesis targeting therapeutics for the treatment of acute MI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1100–1113. PMID:22870932

  15. Introducing social cues in multimedia learning: The role of pedagogic agents' image and language in a scientific lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Roxana Arleen

    The present dissertation tested the hypothesis that software pedagogical agents can promote constructivist learning in a discovery-based multimedia environment. In a preliminary study, students who received a computer-based lesson on environmental science performed better on subsequent tests of problem solving and motivation when they learned with the mediation of a fictional agent compared to when they learned the same material from text. In order to investigate further the basis for this personal agent effect, I varied whether the agent's words were presented as speech or on-screen text and whether or not the agent's image appeared on the screen. Both with a fictional agent (Experiment 1) and a video of a human face (Experiment 2), students performed better on tests of retention, problem-solving transfer, and program ratings when words were presented as speech rather than on-screen text (producing a modality effect) but visual presence of the agent did not affect test performance (producing no image effect). Next, I varied whether or not the agent's words were presented in conversational style (i.e., as dialogue) or formal style (i.e., as monologue) both using speech (Experiment 3) and on-screen text (Experiment 4). In both experiments, there was a dialogue effect in which conversational-style produced better retention and transfer performance. Students who learned with conversational-style text rated the program more favorably than those who learned with monologue-style text. The results support cognitive principles of multimedia learning which underlie the understanding of a computer lesson about a complex scientific system.

  16. Paired-agent imaging for resection during surgery (PAIRS) of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Chen, Eunice; Gunn, Jason R.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is correlated with poor prognosis. Complete surgical resection of HNSCC tumors has a large impact on patient survival, where detection of tumor at or close to surgical margins increases the risk of death at 5-years by 90%. In addition, large surgical margins can greatly increase the morbidity experienced by the patient due to functional and cosmetic damage of oral and facial structures. Single fluorescence targeting agents are often used for tumor detection in in vivo pre-clinical imaging; however, the arising signal is qualitative at best because it is a complex mixture of vascular perfusion, vascular leakage, inhibited lymphatic clearance, and receptor binding. In vivo ratiometric receptor concentration imaging (RCI) allows quantification of receptor expression (hence identification of cancerous tissue) by utilizing co-administered paired-agents consisting of a targeted agent and non-targeted perfusion agent to reference the plasma delivery and leakage. A panel of HNSCC tumors with varying levels of EGFR expression (SCC-15 >SCC-25 > SCC-09) have been imaged using ABY-029, a clinically relevant anti-EGFR affibody labeled with IRDye 800CW, and affibody control imaging agent labeled with IRDye 680RD. RCI maps of in vivo tissue have been created and are spatially correlated with EGFR and CD31 immunohistochemistry and basic H and E staining. The RCI threshold parameters for distinguishing tumor from normal tissues (skin and muscle) and the accuracy of margin detection in these tumors will be presented. RCI surgical resection will be further developed using a novel multi-channel, gated fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) imaging system that is capable of performing RCI in normal room light.

  17. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YING-QIN; TANG, YING; FU, RAO; MENG, QIU-HUA; ZHOU, XUE; LING, ZE-MIN; CHENG, XIAO; TIAN, SU-WEI; WANG, GUO-JIE; LIU, XUE-GUO; ZHOU, LI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  18. Evaluation of bias voltage modulation sequence for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array.

    PubMed

    Novell, Anthony; Legros, Mathieu; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Dayton, Paul A; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2014-09-07

    Many clinical diagnoses have now been improved thanks to the development of new techniques dedicated to contrast agent nonlinear imaging. Over the past few years, Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (cMUTs) have emerged as a promising alternative to traditional piezoelectric transducers. One notable advantage of cMUTs is their wide frequency bandwidth. However, their use in nonlinear imaging approaches such as those used to detect contrast agents have been challenging due their intrinsic nonlinear character. We propose a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation (BVM), specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their inherent nonlinear behavior. Theoretical and experimental results show that a complete cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source can be reached when the BVM sequence is implemented. In-vitro validation of the sequence is performed using a cMUT probe connected to an open scanner and a flow phantom setup containing SonoVue microbubbles. Compared to the standard amplitude modulation imaging mode, a 6 dB increase of contrast-to-tissue ratio was achieved when the BVM sequence is applied. These results reveal that the problem of cMUT nonlinearity can be addressed, thus expanding the potential of this new transducer technology for nonlinear contrast agent detection and imaging.

  19. Physicochemical characterization of a novel graphene-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lalwani, Gaurav; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Button, Terry; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel carbon nanostructure-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (MRI CA); graphene nanoplatelets intercalated with manganese (Mn2+) ions, functionalized with dextran (GNP-Dex); and the in vitro assessment of its essential preclinical physicochemical properties: osmolality, viscosity, partition coefficient, protein binding, thermostability, histamine release, and relaxivity. The results indicate that, at concentrations between 0.1 and 100.0 mg/mL, the GNP-Dex formulations are hydrophilic, highly soluble, and stable in deionized water, as well as iso-osmolar (upon addition of mannitol) and iso-viscous to blood. At potential steady-state equilibrium concentrations in blood (0.1–10.0 mg/mL), the thermostability, protein-binding, and histamine-release studies indicate that the GNP-Dex formulations are thermally stable (with no Mn2+ ion dissociation), do not allow non-specific protein adsorption, and elicit negligible allergic response. The r1 relaxivity of GNP-Dex was 92 mM−1s−1 (per-Mn2+ ion, 22 MHz proton Larmor frequency); ~20- to 30-fold greater than that of clinical gadolinium (Gd3+)- and Mn2+-based MRI CAs. The results open avenues for preclinical in vivo safety and efficacy studies with GNP-Dex toward its development as a clinical MRI CA. PMID:23946653

  20. 1,2-hydroxypyridonates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging: TREN-1,2-HOPO.

    PubMed

    Jocher, Christoph J; Moore, Evan G; Xu, Jide; Avedano, Stefano; Botta, Mauro; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2007-10-29

    1,2-Hydroxypyridinones (1,2-HOPO) form very stable lanthanide complexes that may be useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray diffraction of single crystals established that the solid-state structures of the Eu(III) and the previously reported [Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 5452] Gd(III) complex are identical. The recently discovered sensitizing properties of 1,2-HOPO chelates for Eu(III) luminescence [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 10 067] allow for direct measurement of the number of water molecules coordinated to the metal center. Fluorescence measurements of the Eu(III) complex corroborate that, in solution, two water molecules coordinate the lanthanide (q = 2) as proposed from the analysis of NMRD profiles. In addition, fluorescence measurements have verified the anion binding interactions of lanthanide TREN-1,2-HOPO complexes in solution, studied by relaxivity, revealing only very weak oxalate binding (KA = 82.7 +/- 6.5 M-1). Solution thermodynamic studies of the metal complex and free ligand have been carried out using potentiometry, spectrophotometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The metal ion selectivity of TREN-1,2-HOPO supports the feasibility of using 1,2-HOPO ligands for selective lanthanide binding [pGd = 19.3 (2), pZn = 15.2 (2), pCa = 8.8 (3)].

  1. [Physico-chemical and toxicological profile of gadolinium chelates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Idée, J-M; Fretellier, N; Thurnher, M M; Bonnemain, B; Corot, C

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium chelates (GC) are contrast agents widely used to facilitate or to enable diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). From a regulatory viewpoint, GC are drugs. GC have largely contributed to the success of MRI, which has become a major component of clinician's diagnostic armamentarium. GC are not metabolised and are excreted by the kidneys. They distribute into the extracellular compartment. Because of its high intrinsic toxicity, gadolinium must be administered as a chelate. GC can be classified according to two key molecular features: (a) nature of the chelating moiety: either macrocyclic molecules in which gadolinium is caged in the pre-organized cavity of the ligand, or linear, open-chain molecules, (b) ionicity: Gd chelates can be ionic (meglumine or sodium salts) or non-ionic. The thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of the various GCs differ according to these structural characteristics. The kinetic stability of macrocyclic GCs is much higher than that of linear GCs and the thermodynamic stability of ionic GCs is generally higher than that of non-ionic GC, thus leading to a lower risk of gadolinium dissociation. This class of drugs has enjoyed an excellent reputation in terms of safety for a long time, until a causal link with a recently-described serious disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), was evidenced. It is acknowledged that the vast majority of NSF cases are related to the administration of some linear CG in renally-impaired patients. Health authorities, worldwide, released recommendations which drastically reduced the occurrence of new cases.

  2. SERS-barcoded colloidal gold NP assemblies as imaging agents for use in biodiagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Priyanka; Olds, William; Blakey, Idriss; Thurecht, Kristofer J.; Izake, Emad L.; Fredericks, Peter M.

    2014-03-01

    There is a growing need for new biodiagnostics that combine high throughput with enhanced spatial resolution and sensitivity. Gold nanoparticle (NP) assemblies with sub-10 nm particle spacing have the benefits of improving detection sensitivity via Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and being of potential use in biomedicine due to their colloidal stability. A promising and versatile approach to form solution-stable NP assemblies involves the use of multi-branched molecular linkers which allows tailoring of the assembly size, hot-spot density and interparticle distance. We have shown that linkers with multiple anchoring end-groups can be successfully employed as a linker to assemble gold NPs into dimers, linear NP chains and clustered NP assemblies. These NP assemblies with diameters of 30-120 nm are stable in solution and perform better as SERS substrates compared with single gold NPs, due to an increased hot-spot density. Thus, tailored gold NP assemblies are potential candidates for use as biomedical imaging agents. We observed that the hot-spot density and in-turn the SERS enhancement is a function of the linker polymer concentration and polymer architecture. New deep Raman techniques like Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) have emerged that allow detection from beneath diffusely scattering opaque materials, including biological media such as animal tissue. We have been able to demonstrate that the gold NP assemblies could be detected from within both proteinaceous and high lipid containing animal tissue by employing a SORS technique with a backscattered geometry.

  3. Design and synthesis of calcium responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent: Its relaxation and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Jyoti; Datta, Anupama; Chauhan, Kanchan; Kumaran, S Senthil; Tiwari, Anjani K; Kadiyala, K Ganesh; Pal, Sunil; Thirumal, M; Mishra, Anil K

    2014-07-23

    Calcium concentration modulation both inside and outside cell is of considerable interest for nervous system function in normal and pathological conditions. MRI has potential for very high spatial resolution at molecular/cellular level. Design, synthesis and evaluation of Gd-DO3A-AME-NPHE, a calcium responsive MRI contrast agent is presented. The probe is comprised of a Gd(3+)-DO3A core coupled to iminoacetate coordinating groups for calcium induced relaxivity switching. In the absence of Ca(2+) ions, inner sphere water binding to the Gd-DO3A-AME-NPHE is restricted with longitudinal relaxivity, r1 = 4.37 mM(-1) s(-1) at 4.7 T. However, addition of Ca(2+) triggers a marked enhancement in r1 = 6.99 mM(-1) s(-1) at 4.7 T (60% increase). The construct is highly selective for Ca(2+) over competitive metal ions at extracellular concentration. The r1 is modulated by changes in the hydration number (0.2 to 1.05), which was confirmed by luminescence emission lifetimes of the analogous Eu(3+) complex. T1 phantom images establish the capability of complex of visualizing changes in [Ca(2+)] by MRI.

  4. Mid-wave infrared hyperspectral imaging of unknown chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clewes, Rhea J.; Howle, Chris R.; Guicheteau, Jason; Emge, Darren; Ruxton, Keith; Robertson, Gordon; Miller, William; Malcolm, Graeme; Maker, Gareth T.

    2013-05-01

    The ability of a stand-off chemical detector to distinguish two different chemical warfare agents is demonstrated in this paper. Using Negative Contrast Imaging, based upon IR absorption spectroscopy, we were able to detect 1 μl of VX, sulfur mustard and water on a subset of representative surfaces. These experiments were performed at a range of 1.3 metres and an angle of 45° to the surface. The technique employed utilises a Q-switched intracavity MgO:PPLN crystal that generated 1.4 - 1.8 μm (shortwave) and 2.6 - 3.6 μm (midwave) infrared radiation (SWIR and MWIR, respectively). The MgO:PPLN crystal has a fanned grating design which, via translation through a 1064 nm pump beam, enables tuning through the SWIR and MWIR wavelength ranges. The SWIR and MWIR beams are guided across a scene via a pair of raster scanned mirrors allowing detection of absorption features within these spectral regions. This investigation exploited MWIR signatures, as they provided sufficient molecular information to distinguish between toxic and benign chemicals in these proof-of-concept experiments.

  5. Efficient, Non-Iterative Estimator for Imaging Contrast Agents With Spectral X-Ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    An estimator to image contrast agents and body materials with x-ray spectral measurements is described. The estimator is usable with the three or more basis functions that are required to represent the attenuation coefficient of high atomic number materials. The estimator variance is equal to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and it is unbiased. Its parameters are computed from measurements of a calibration phantom with the clinical x-ray system and it is non-iterative. The estimator is compared with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. The estimator first computes a linearized maximum likelihood estimate of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients. Corrections for errors in the initial estimates are computed by interpolation with calibration phantom data. The final estimate is the initial estimate plus the correction. The performance of the estimator is measured using a Monte Carlo simulation. Random photon counting with pulse height analysis data are generated. The mean squared errors of the estimates are compared to the CRLB. The random data are also processed with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. Previous implementations of iterative estimators required advanced physics instruments not usually available in clinical institutions. The estimator mean squared error is essentially equal to the CRLB. The estimator outputs are close to those of the iterative estimator but the computation time is approximately 180 times shorter. The estimator is efficient and has advantages over alternate approaches such as iterative estimators.

  6. Exploring silver as a contrast agent for contrast-enhanced dual-energy X-ray breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsourkas, A; Maidment, A D A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Through prior monoenergetic modelling, we have identified silver as a potential alternative to iodine in dual-energy (DE) X-ray breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of silver and iodine contrast agents in a commercially available DE imaging system through a quantitative analysis of signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Methods: A polyenergetic simulation algorithm was developed to model the signal intensity and noise. The model identified the influence of various technique parameters on SDNR. The model was also used to identify the optimal imaging techniques for silver and iodine, so that the two contrast materials could be objectively compared. Results: The major influences on the SDNR were the low-energy dose fraction and breast thickness. An increase in the value of either of these parameters resulted in a decrease in SDNR. The SDNR for silver was on average 43% higher than that for iodine when imaged at their respective optimal conditions, and 40% higher when both were imaged at the optimal conditions for iodine. Conclusion: A silver contrast agent should provide benefit over iodine, even when translated to the clinic without modification of imaging system or protocol. If the system were slightly modified to reflect the lower k-edge of silver, the difference in SDNR between the two materials would be increased. Advances in knowledge: These data are the first to demonstrate the suitability of silver as a contrast material in a clinical contrast-enhanced DE image acquisition system. PMID:24998157

  7. High-resolution functional imaging with ultrasound contrast agents based on RF processing in an in vivo kidney experiment.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, X A; Willigers, J M; Prinzen, F W; Peschar, M; Ledoux, L A; Hoeks, A P

    2001-02-01

    Knowledge of the relative tissue perfusion distribution is valuable in the diagnosis of numerous diseases. Techniques for the assessment of the relative perfusion distribution, based on ultrasound (US) contrast agents, have several advantages compared to established nuclear techniques. These are, among others, a better spatial and temporal resolution, the lack of exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation and the relatively low cost. In the present study, US radiofrequency (RF) image sequences are acquired, containing the signal intensity changes associated with the transit of a bolus contrast agent through the microvasculature of a dog kidney. The primary objective is to explore the feasibility of calculating functional images with high spatial resolution. The functional images characterize the transit of the contrast agent bolus and represent distributions of peak time, peak value, transit time, peak area, wash-in rate and wash-out decay constant. For the evaluation of the method, dog experiments were performed under optimized conditions where motion artefacts were minimized and an IA injection of the contrast agent Levovist was employed. It was demonstrated that processing of RF signals obtained with a 3.5-MHz echo system can provide functional images with a high spatial resolution of 2 mm in axial resolution, 2 to 5 mm in lateral resolution and a slice thickness of 2 mm. The functional images expose several known aspects of kidney perfusion, like perfusion heterogeneity of the kidney cortex and a different peripheral cortical perfusion compared to the inner cortex. Based on the findings of the present study, and given the results of complimentary studies, it is likely that the functional images reflect the relative perfusion distribution of the kidney.

  8. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors’ ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  9. High-performance dendritic contrast agents for X-ray computed tomography imaging using potent tetraiodobenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    You, Suyeon; Jung, Hye-Youn; Lee, Chaewoon; Choe, Yun Hui; Heo, Ju Young; Gang, Gil-Tae; Byun, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Dong-Eog; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Yoonkyung

    2016-03-28

    The use of computed tomography (CT) for vascular imaging is critical in medical emergencies requiring urgent diagnostic decisions, such as cerebral ischemia and many cardiovascular diseases. Small-molecule iodinated contrast media are often injected intravenously as radiopaque agents during CT imaging to achieve high contrast enhancement of vascular systems. The rapid excretion rate of these agents is overcome by injecting a significantly high dose of iodine, which can have serious side effects. Here we report a simple method to prepare blood-pool contrast agents for CT based on dendrimers for the first time using tetraiodobenzene derivatives as potent radiopaque moieties. Excellent in vivo safety has been demonstrated for these small (13-22nm) unimolecular water-soluble dendritic contrast agents, which exhibit high contrast enhancement in the blood-pool and effectively extend their blood half-lives. Our method is applicable to virtually any scaffold with suitable surface groups and may fulfill the current need for safer, next-generation iodinated CT contrast agents.

  10. Utility of tumor-avid photosensitizers in developing bifunctional agents for tumor imaging and/or phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Chen, Yihui; Zawada, Robert H.; Oseroff, Allan; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2006-02-01

    HPPH (a chlorophyll-a analog) was linked with a cyanine dye and the resulting conjugate was found to be an efficient tumor imaging (fluorescence imaging) and photosensitizing agent (PDT). Our preliminary results suggest that tumor-avid porphyrin-based compounds can be used as vehicles for delivering the desired fluorophores to tumor for fluorescence imaging. In an early diagnosis of microscopic lesions in pre-clinical studies (C3H mice implanted with RIF tumors) the HPPH-cyanine dye conjugate showed tumor-imaging capability (λ ex: 780 nm, λ em: 860 nm) at the non- therapeutic doses that are 100 fold lower than those used therapeutically. Compared to the cyanine dye, the corresponding HPPH-conjugate showed enhanced long-term tumor imaging ability.

  11. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion.

  12. Targeting angiogenesis for the treatment of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Carducci, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While multiple therapies exist that prolong the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer, none are curative. This had led to a search to uncover novel targets for prostate cancer therapy, distinct from those of traditional hormonal approaches, chemotherapies, immunotherapies and bone-targeting approaches. The process of tumor angiogenesis is one target that is being exploited for therapeutic gain. Areas covered The most promising anti-angiogenic approaches for treatment of prostate cancer, focusing on clinical development of selected agents. These include VEGF-directed therapies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, tumor-vascular disrupting agents, immunomodulatory drugs and miscellaneous anti-angiogenic agents. While none of these drugs have yet entered the market for the treatment of prostate cancer, several are now being tested in Phase III registrational trials. Expert opinion The development of anti-angiogenic agents for prostate cancer has met with several challenges. This includes discordance between traditional prostate-specific antigen responses and clinical responses, which have clouded clinical trial design and interpretation, potential inadequate exposure to anti-angiogenic therapies with premature discontinuation of study drugs and the development of resistance to anti-angiogenic monotherapies. These barriers will hopefully be overcome with the advent of more potent agents, the use of dual angiogenesis inhibition and the design of more informative clinical trials. PMID:22413953

  13. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution.

  14. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; Deboef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality.

  15. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; DeBoef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality. PMID:28106110

  16. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  17. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  18. Preparation and Biodistribution of Technetium-99m-Labeled Bis- Misonidazole (MISO) as an Imaging Agent for Tumour Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Fan, Di; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Zhe; Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumour hypoxia is an important aspect in determining the course of tumour therapy. In this study, we developed a novel imaging agent, (99m)Tc-ethylenedicysteine-bis-misonidazole ((99m)Tc-EC-MISO), for diagnosing tumour hypoxia. We used 2-nitroimidazole as a reactant to synthesize the amino derivative of misonidazole (MISO) in the first step and then conjugated the di-amino derivative of MISO to the chelating agent ethylenedicysteine (EC) for labelling (99m)Tc in the second step. (99m)Tc-pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4-) was reduced by tin chloride (SnCl2) for radiolabeling. The radiochemical purity was up to 94%. Tissue biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were conducted on subcutaneous gliomal tumour-bearing mice. The tumour-to-muscle ratio in the (99m)Tc-EC-MISO group increased with time, up to 4.6 at 4 h after injection. SPECT/CT imaging confirmed that the tumours could be visualized clearly with (99m)Tc-EC-MISO at 2 h. By introducing a second 2-nitroimidazole redox centre, an apparent hypoxic accumulation of this novel (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agent in the tumour was observed.

  19. PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D A; Giaccia, A J

    2010-01-01

    Originally identified as the enzymes responsible for catalysing the oxidation of specific, conserved proline residues within hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), the additional roles for the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins have remained elusive. Of the four identified PHD enzymes, PHD2 is considered to be the key oxygen sensor, as knockdown of PHD2 results in elevated HIF protein. Several recent studies have highlighted the importance of PHD2 in tumourigenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence as to the exact role of PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis. The divergence seems to be because of the contribution of stromal-derived PHD2, and in particular the involvement of endothelial cells, vs tumour-derived PHD2. This review summarises our current understanding of PHD2 and tumour angiogenesis, focusing on the influences of PHD2 on vascular normalisation and neovascularisation. PMID:20461086

  20. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F.; Sparks, R.B.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  1. The temporal basis of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravartula, Shilpa

    2017-01-01

    The process of new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) is highly dynamic, involving complex coordination of multiple cell types. Though the process must carefully unfold over time to generate functional, well-adapted branching networks, we seldom hear about the time-based properties of angiogenesis, despite timing being central to other areas of biology. Here, we present a novel, time-based formulation of endothelial cell behaviour during angiogenesis and discuss a flurry of our recent, integrated in silico/in vivo studies, put in context to the wider literature, which demonstrate that tissue conditions can locally adapt the timing of collective cell behaviours/decisions to grow different vascular network architectures. A growing array of seemingly unrelated ‘temporal regulators’ have recently been uncovered, including tissue derived factors (e.g. semaphorins or the high levels of VEGF found in cancer) and cellular processes (e.g. asymmetric cell division or filopodia extension) that act to alter the speed of cellular decisions to migrate. We will argue that ‘temporal adaptation’ provides a novel account of organ/disease-specific vascular morphology and reveals ‘timing’ as a new target for therapeutics. We therefore propose and explain a conceptual shift towards a ‘temporal adaptation’ perspective in vascular biology, and indeed other areas of biology where timing remains elusive. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Systems morphodynamics: understanding the development of tissue hardware’. PMID:28348255

  2. Combining radiotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors: Clinical trial design

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Menard, Cynthia; Camphausen, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a vital role in the multimodality treatment of cancer. Recent advances in RT have primarily involved improvements in dose delivery. Future improvements in tumor control and disease outcomes will likely involve the combination of RT with targeted therapies. Preclinical evaluations of angiogenesis inhibitors in combination with RT have yielded promising results with increased tumor 'cure.' It remains to be seen whether these improvements in tumor control in the laboratory will translate into improved outcomes in the clinic. Multiple differences between these agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy must be taken into account when designing clinical trials evaluating their effectiveness in combination with RT. We discuss important considerations for designing clinical trials of angiogenesis inhibitors with RT.

  3. [Angiogenesis and radiotherapy (vessels, anaemia, oxygen and radiosensitivity)].

    PubMed

    Lartigau, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen plays a direct role in cell death after exposure to ionizing radiations and tumour hypoxia, favoured by anaemia, is a factor of poor treatment response. Tumour phenotype is directly influenced by tissue oxygenation, inducing tumour cells adaptation to the environment and potential resistance to treatment. The correction of tumour hypoxia can increase treatment response. It is however difficult to directly correlate pO2 and vascularisation. Vessels from angiogenesis get endothelial cells but have lost the functions of normal vessels (receptors, muscles...). The role of angiogenesis has been demonstrated on initial tumour growth and on metastatic potential and regulation. Many pre clinical studies have demonstrated the benefit of combining anti angiogenic compounds and cytotoxic agents (chemotherapy drugs and ionizing radiations). Clinical studies are on going and new evaluation models of treatment response will be necessary.

  4. Paramagnetic lipid-coated silica nanoparticles with a fluorescent quantum dot core: a new contrast agent platform for multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Koole, Rolf; van Schooneveld, Matti M; Hilhorst, Jan; Castermans, Karolien; Cormode, David P; Strijkers, Gustav J; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Griffioen, Arjan W; Nicolay, Klaas; Fayad, Zahi A; Meijerink, Andries; Mulder, Willem J M

    2008-12-01

    Silica particles as a nanoparticulate carrier material for contrast agents have received considerable attention the past few years, since the material holds great promise for biomedical applications. A key feature for successful application of this material in vivo is biocompatibility, which may be significantly improved by appropriate surface modification. In this study, we report a novel strategy to coat silica particles with a dense monolayer of paramagnetic and PEGylated lipids. The silica nanoparticles carry a quantum dot in their center and are made target-specific by the conjugation of multiple alphavbeta3-integrin-specific RGD-peptides. We demonstrate their specific uptake by endothelial cells in vitro using fluorescence microscopy, quantitative fluorescence imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. The lipid-coated silica particles introduced here represent a new platform for nanoparticulate multimodality contrast agents.

  5. Paramagnetic lipid-coated silica nanoparticles with a fluorescent quantum dot core: a new contrast agent platform for multimodality imaging

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Rolf; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Hilhorst, Jan; Castermans, Karolien; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Nicolay, Klaas; Fayad, Zahi A.; Meijerink, Andries; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Silica particles as a nanoparticulate carrier material for contrast agents have received considerable attention the past few years, since the material holds great promise for biomedical applications. A key feature for successful application of this material in vivo is biocompatibility, which may be significantly improved by appropriate surface modification. In this study we report a novel strategy to coat silica particles with a dense monolayer of paramagnetic and PEGylated lipids. The silica nanoparticles carry a quantum dot in their centre and are made target-specific by the conjugation of multiple αvβ3-integrin-specifc RGD-peptides. We demonstrate their specific uptake by endothelial cells in vitro using fluorescence microscopy, quantitative fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. The lipid coated silica particles introduced here represent a new platform for nanoparticulate multimodality contrast agents. PMID:19035793

  6. The Impact of “Omic” and Imaging Technologies on Assessing the Host Immune Response to Biodefence Agents

    PubMed Central

    Tree, Julia A.; Flick-Smith, Helen; Elmore, Michael J.; Rowland, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between host and pathogen is important for the development and assessment of medical countermeasures to infectious agents, including potential biodefence pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Ebola virus, and Francisella tularensis. This review focuses on technological advances which allow this interaction to be studied in much greater detail. Namely, the use of “omic” technologies (next generation sequencing, DNA, and protein microarrays) for dissecting the underlying host response to infection at the molecular level; optical imaging techniques (flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy) for assessing cellular responses to infection; and biophotonic imaging for visualising the infectious disease process. All of these technologies hold great promise for important breakthroughs in the rational development of vaccines and therapeutics for biodefence agents. PMID:25333059

  7. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml-1. The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic.

  8. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-21

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml(-1). The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic.

  9. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  10. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-07

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  11. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: A multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a new optical contrast agent, based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside a polymer cladding, so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity, compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo, to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90%, following nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NP’s can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities, for broadband multimodal imaging, usable for diagnostic applications and extendable into use as therapeutic agents as well. PMID:25325364

  12. Multi-stimuli responsive Cu2S nanocrystals as trimodal imaging and synergistic chemo-photothermal therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Romero Aburto, Rebeca; Mitcham, Trevor; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2015-04-01

    A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies.A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methodology and additional experimental results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07139e

  13. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents. Final technical report, January 31, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  14. A natural small molecule voacangine inhibits angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yonghyo; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Voacangine exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Voacangine inhibits tumor-induced angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Voacangine could be the basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, plays a critical role in normal and pathological phenotypes, including solid tumor growth and metastasis. Accordingly, the development of new anti-angiogenic agents is considered an efficient strategy for the treatment of cancer and other human diseases linked with angiogenesis. We have identified voacangine, isolated from Voacanga africana, as a novel anti-angiogenic agent. Voacangine inhibits the proliferation of HUVECs at an IC{sub 50} of 18 {mu}M with no cytotoxic effects. Voacangine significantly suppressed in vitro angiogenesis, such as VEGF-induced tube formation and chemoinvasion. Moreover, the compound inhibits in vivo angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. In addition, voacangine decreased the expression levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} and its target gene, VEGF, in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the naturally occurring compound, voacangine, is a novel anti-angiogenic compound.

  15. Near-infrared absorbing polymer nano-particle as a sensitive contrast agent for photo-acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroyuki; Nojiri, Mayumi; Mukai, Rieko; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2015-01-07

    Polymer nano-particles (PNPs) with a near-infrared (NIR) light absorption were prepared by the nano-emulsion method to develop contrast agents for photo-acoustic (PA) imaging. The PNP containing silicon naphthalocyanine showed a high absorption coefficient up to 10(10) M(-1) cm(-1). This is comparable to plasmonic gold nano-particles, which have been studied as PA contrast agents. For the PNP larger than 100 nm, the enhancement of the PA signal was observed compared to the gold nano-particle with a similar absorption coefficient and size. In the case of the PNP, the heat by the light absorption is confined in the particle due to the low thermal diffusivity of polymer materials. We showed that the strong thermal confinement effect of PNP results in the enhancement of the efficiency of the PA signal generation and that the PA intensity can be enhanced by the increase of the Grüneisen parameter of the matrix polymer of PNP. The PA signal from the PNP of poly(methyl methacrylate) was 9-fold larger than that of gold nano-particles with the same absorption coefficient. We demonstrated that in the in vivo PA imaging the detection limit of PNP was of the order of 10(-13) M. The NIR absorbing PNP will be a promising candidate of a sensitive contrast agent for PA imaging.

  16. Luminescence Enhanced Eu(3+)/Gd(3+) Co-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals as Imaging Agents In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunfei; He, Wangmei; Li, Fang; Perera, Thalagalage Shalika Harshani; Gan, Lin; Han, Yingchao; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Dai, Honglian

    2016-04-27

    Biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescent nano material can be used as an alternative bioimaging agent for early cancer diagnosis, which is crucial to achieve successful treatment. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocyrstals have good biocompatibility and biodegradability, and can be used as an excellent host for luminescent rare earth elements. In this study, based on the energy transfer from Gd(3+) to Eu(3+), the luminescence enhanced imaging agent of Eu/Gd codoping HAP (HAP:Eu/Gd) nanocrystals are obtained via coprecipitation with plate-like shape and no change in crystal phase composition. The luminescence can be much elevated (up to about 120%) with a nonlinear increase versus Gd doping content, which is due to the energy transfer ((6)PJ of Gd(3+) → (5)HJ of Eu(3+)) under 273 nm and the possible combination effect of the cooperative upconversion and the successive energy transfer under 394 nm, respectively. Results demonstrate that the biocompatible HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals can successfully perform cell labeling and in vivo imaging. The intracellular HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals display good biodegradability with a cumulative degradation of about 65% after 72 h. This biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescence enhanced HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystal has the potential to act as a fluorescent imaging agent in vitro and in vivo.

  17. In vivo behavior of 99mTc-fibrinogen and its potential as a thrombus-imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Harwig, S S; Harwig, J F; Coleman, R E; Welch, M J

    1976-01-01

    We have investigated the in vivo behavior of 99mTc-fibrinogen, prepared by a mild and efficient electrolytic method employing tin electrodes. The clearance mechanisms of this agent were studied, and its efficacy for imaging deep-vein thrombi in dogs with an Anger camera was determined. The 99mTc-fibrinogen preparations, which are stable in vitro, undergo partial rapid exchange of the technetium with other plasma proteins and with anions of the blood buffer system in vivo, resulting in an early drop in the percent of radioactivity associated with clottable protein. However, very little or no oxidation to pertechnetate occurs. The nonclottable material is much more rapidly cleared from the blood than the remaining 99mTc-fibrinogen, and the proportion of clottable protein activity increases with time. The fraction of 99mTc-fibrinogen that remains intact in vivo is biologically active and will incorporate into thrombi. Higher thrombus-to-blood activity ratios are obtained with 99mTc-fibrinogen than with radioidinated fibrinogen when both agents are injected into dogs 4 hr after induction of femoral vein thrombosis. Clearly delineated images of the thrombi are obtained, beginning about 2.5 hr after injection. Thus, 99mTc-fibrinogen may be of clinical use as a thrombus-imaging agent in patients under-going active thrombosis, especially in regions of high blood pool.

  18. Development of a one-step embryonic stem cell-based assay for the screening of sprouting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hermant, Bastien; Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Dubessay, Marie-Laure; Prandini, Marie-Hélène; Huber, Philippe; Vittet, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis assays are important tools for the identification of regulatory molecules and the potential development of therapeutic strategies to modulate neovascularization. Although numerous in vitro angiogenesis models have been developed in the past, they exhibit limitations since they do not recapitulate the entire angiogenic process or correspond to multi-step procedures that are not easy to use. Convenient, reliable, easily quantifiable and physiologically relevant assays are still needed for pharmacological screenings of angiogenesis. Results Here, we have optimized an angiogenesis model based on ES cell differentiation for screening experiments. We have established conditions leading to angiogenic sprouting of embryoid bodies during ES cell differentiation in type I three-dimensional collagen gels. Immunostaining experiments carried out during these cultures showed the formation of numerous buds comprising CD31 positive cells, after 11 days of culture of ES cells. Moreover, this one-step model has been validated in response to activators and inhibitors of angiogenesis. Sprouting was specifically stimulated in the presence of VEGF and FGF2. Alternatively, endothelial sprouting induced by angiogenic activators was inhibited by angiogenesis inhibitors such as angiostatin, TGFβ and PF4. Sprouting angiogenesis can be easily quantified by image analysis after immunostaining of endothelial cells with CD31 pan-endothelial marker. Conclusion Taken together, these data clearly validate that this one-step ES differentiation model constitutes a simple and versatile angiogenesis system that should facilitate, in future investigations, the screening of both activators and inhibitors of angiogenesis. PMID:17437635

  19. Molecular Imaging of Ovarian Carcinoma Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    peptides have also been labeled with 18F through electrophilic substitution method (71). The direct fluorination strategy resulted in multiple side...ligand with integrin αvβ3. Substitution of the amino acid in position 4 (D-Phe in lead structure) with tyrosine allows electrophilic radiohalogenation...Hamacher K, Stoecklin G. A comparative study of n.c.a. fluorine -18 labeling of proteins via acylation and photochemical conjugation. Nucl Med Biol. 1996;23

  20. Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Determination of Fractional Tumor Blood Volume: A Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Response to the Vascular Disrupting Agent ZD6126

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Simon P. Howe, Franklyn A.; Griffiths, John R.; Ryan, Anderson J.; Waterton, John C.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess tumor fractional blood volume ({xi}), determined in vivo by susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a noninvasive imaging biomarker of tumor response to the vascular disrupting agent ZD6126. Methods and Materials: The transverse MRI relaxation rate R{sub 2}* of rat GH3 prolactinomas was quantified prior to and following injection of 2.5 mgFe/kg feruglose, an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide intravascular contrast agent, and {xi} (%) was determined from the change in R{sub 2}*. The rats were then treated with either saline or 50 mg/kg ZD6126, and {xi} measured again 24 hours later. Following posttreatment MRI, Hoechst 33342 (15 mg/kg) was administered to the rats and histological correlates from composite images of tumor perfusion and necrosis sought. Results: Irrespective of treatment, tumor volume significantly increased over 24 hours. Saline-treated tumors showed no statistically significant change in {xi}, whereas a significant (p = 0.002) 70% reduction in {xi} of the ZD6126-treated cohort was determined. Hoechst 33342 uptake was associated with viable tumor tissue and was significantly (p = 0.004) reduced and restricted to the rim of the ZD6126-treated tumors. A significant positive correlation between posttreatment {xi} and Hoechst 33342 uptake was obtained (r = 0.83, p = 0.002), providing validation of the MRI-derived measurements of fractional tumor blood volume. Conclusions: These data clearly highlight the potential of susceptibility contrast MRI with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents to provide quantitative imaging biomarkers of fractional tumor blood volume at high spatial resolution to assess tumor vascular status and response to vascular disrupting agents.

  1. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Everdell, N; Rigon, L; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Stride, E; Olivo, A

    2015-07-29

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  2. Optimization of Multi-Pulse Sequences For Nonlinear Contrast Agent Imaging Using a cMUT Array

    PubMed Central

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B.; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology provides advantages such as wide frequency bandwidth, which can be exploited for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the efficiency of traditional multi-pulse imaging schemes, such as pulse inversion (PI), remains limited because of the intrinsic nonlinear character of cMUTs. Recently, a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation sequence (BVM), had been specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their unwanted nonlinear behavior. In this study, we propose to optimize contrast agent detection by combining the BVM sequence with PI and/or chirp reversal (CR). An aqueous dispersion of lipid encapsulated microbubbles was exposed to several combinations of multi-pulse imaging sequences. Approaches were evaluated in vitro using 9 inter-connected elements of a cMUT linear array (excitation frequency of 4 MHz; peak negative pressure of 100 kPa). For sequences using chirp excitations, a specific compression filter was designed to compress and extract several nonlinear components from the received microbubble responses. A satisfactory cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source is achieved when BVM is combined with PI and CR. In comparison with PI and CR imaging modes alone, using sequences incorporating BVM increases the contrast-to-tissue ratio by 10.0 dB and 4.6 dB, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of BVM with CR and PI results in a significant increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio (+29 dB). This enhancement is attributed to the use of chirps as excitation signals and the improved preservation of several nonlinear components contained within the contrast agent response. PMID:25803232

  3. Optimization of multi-pulse sequences for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a cMUT array.

    PubMed

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-04-21

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology provides advantages such as wide frequency bandwidth, which can be exploited for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the efficiency of traditional multi-pulse imaging schemes, such as pulse inversion (PI), remains limited because of the intrinsic nonlinear character of cMUTs. Recently, a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation sequence (BVM), has been specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their unwanted nonlinear behavior. In this study, we propose to optimize contrast agent detection by combining the BVM sequence with PI and/or chirp reversal (CR). An aqueous dispersion of lipid encapsulated microbubbles was exposed to several combinations of multi-pulse imaging sequences. Approaches were evaluated in vitro using 9 inter-connected elements of a cMUT linear array (excitation frequency of 4 MHz; peak negative pressure of 100 kPa). For sequences using chirp excitations, a specific compression filter was designed to compress and extract several nonlinear components from the received microbubble responses. A satisfactory cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source is achieved when BVM is combined with PI and CR. In comparison with PI and CR imaging modes alone, using sequences incorporating BVM increases the contrast-to-tissue ratio by 10.0 dB and 4.6 dB, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of BVM with CR and PI results in a significant increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio (+29 dB). This enhancement is attributed to the use of chirps as excitation signals and the improved preservation of several nonlinear components contained within the contrast agent response.

  4. PLGA nanoparticles from nano-emulsion templating as imaging agents: Versatile technology to obtain nanoparticles loaded with fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, C; Feiner-Gracia, N; Calderó, G; García-Celma, M J; Solans, C

    2016-11-01

    The interest in polymeric nanoparticles as imaging systems for biomedical applications has increased notably in the last decades. In this work, PLGA nanoparticles, prepared from nano-emulsion templating, have been used to prepare novel fluorescent imaging agents. Two model fluorescent dyes were chosen and dissolved in the oil phase of the nano-emulsions together with PLGA. Nano-emulsions were prepared by the phase inversion composition (PIC) low-energy method. Fluorescent dye-loaded nanoparticles were obtained by solvent evaporation of nano-emulsion templates. PLGA nanoparticles loaded with the fluorescent dyes showed hydrodynamic radii lower than 40nm; markedly lower than those reported in previous studies. The small nanoparticle size was attributed to the nano-emulsification strategy used. PLGA nanoparticles showed negative surface charge and enough stability to be used for biomedical imaging purposes. Encapsulation efficiencies were higher than 99%, which was also attributed to the nano-emulsification approach as well as to the low solubility of the dyes in the aqueous component. Release kinetics of both fluorescent dyes from the nanoparticle dispersions was pH-independent and sustained. These results indicate that the dyes could remain encapsulated enough time to reach any organ and that the decrease of the pH produced during cell internalization by the endocytic route would not affect their release. Therefore, it can be assumed that these nanoparticles are appropriate as systemic imaging agents. In addition, in vitro toxicity tests showed that nanoparticles are non-cytotoxic. Consequently, it can be concluded that the preparation of PLGA nanoparticles from nano-emulsion templating represents a very versatile technology that enables obtaining biocompatible, biodegradable and safe imaging agents suitable for biomedical purposes.

  5. Vascular imaging with ultrasound contrast agents: Characterization of pharmaceutical, physiological, and instrumentation parameters that influence clinical efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Gregory Curtis

    Over the last decade, ultrasound contrast media have become important diagnostic tools. Their development lagged behind that of some of the other imaging modalities, even though ultrasound is used worldwide and is a technology that would benefit from an increased signal-to-noise ratio. Ultrasound contrast agents, used as a tool to improve signal, could have global diagnostic applications as well as the possibility of extending the diagnostic capabilities of outdated or inexpensive instruments, which often have poor sensitivity. Part of the lag in contrast agent development was due to the pharmaceutical challenge of creating a safe material that effectively scattered ultrasound. The challenge was further increased by the difficulty of reproducibly predicting and characterizing the properties of these materials in-vitro with results that correlated with clinical data. Additional significant problems included demonstrating the benefits of contrast agents and teaching the clinicians about the interactions between instrumentation and contrast materials so that they could use both tools synergistically to derive maximum diagnostic benefit. The purpose of this work is to reduce these challenges by characterizing the clinically relevant enhancement properties of two different classes of ultrasound contrast materials. The enhancement mechanisms of these agents differ considerably and will be discussed in detail. These differences provide a unique view of the variety of physical characteristics that can be utilized to design ultrasound contrast agents for a range of applications. The in-vitro characterization requirements of the agents differ, and the experimental model characteristics for each are described and demonstrated. The clinical enhancement characteristics are also described, as well as the differing impact of contrast- instrumentation interactions on the efficacy of the agents. Understanding these principles is important because ultrasound contrast agents are

  6. Chlorophyll-a analogues conjugated with aminobenzyl-DTPA as potential bifunctional agents for magnetic resonance imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Slansky, Adam; Dobhal, Mahabeer P; Goswami, Lalit N; Graham, Andrew; Chen, Yihui; Kanter, Peter; Alberico, Ronald A; Spernyak, Joseph; Morgan, Janet; Mazurchuk, Richard; Oseroff, Allan; Grossman, Zachary; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2005-01-01

    A clinically relevant photosensitizer, 3-devinyl-3-(1-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH, a chlorophyll-a derivative), was conjugated with Gd(III)-aminobenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), an experimental magnetic resonance (MR) imaging agent. In vivo reflectance spectroscopy confirmed tumor uptake of HPPH-aminobenzyl-Gd(III)-DTPA conjugate was higher than free HPPH administered intraveneously (iv) to C3H mice with subcutaneously (sc) implanted radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor cells. In other experiments, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with sc implanted Ward Colon Carcinoma cells yielded markedly increased MR signal intensities from tumor regions-of-interest (ROIs) 24 h post-iv injection of HPPH-aminobenzyl-Gd(III)-DTPA conjugate as compared to unconjugated HPPH. In both in vitro (RIF tumor cells) and in vivo (mice bearing RIF tumors and rats bearing Ward Colon tumors) the conjugate produced significant increases in tumor conspicuity at 1.5 T and retained therapeutic efficacy following PDT. Also synthesized were a series of novel bifunctional agents containing two Gd(III) atoms per HPPH molecule that remained tumor-avid and PDT-active and yielded improved MR tumor conspicuity compared to their corresponding mono-Gd(III) analogues. Administered iv at a MR imaging dose of 10 micromol/kg, these conjugates produced severe skin phototoxicity. However, by replacing the hexyl group of the pyropheophorbide-a with a tri(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (PEG-methyl ether), these conjugates produced remarkable MR tumor enhancement at 8 h post-iv injection, significant tumoricidal activity (80% of mice were tumor-free on day 90), and reduced skin phototoxicity compared to their corresponding hexyl ether analogues. The poor water-solubility characteristic of these conjugates was resolved by incorporation into a liposomal formulation. This paper presents the synthesis of tumor-avid contrast enhancing agents for MR imaging and thus represents an important

  7. Mn12 single-molecule magnet aggregates as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinglin; Li, Wen; Zhou, Shengyan; Kong, Daliang; Yang, Haishan; Wu, Lixin

    2011-03-28

    Mn(12) single-molecule magnets have been dispersed in water through an emulsion-assisted self-assembly method with an improved stability in water, in order to investigate the use of Mn(12) as MRI contrast agents.

  8. Anti-biofouling polymer-decorated lutetium-based nanoparticulate contrast agents for in vivo high-resolution trimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Dong, Kai; Liu, Jianhua; Han, Xueli; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-06-25

    Nanomaterials have gained considerable attention and interest in the development of novel and high-resolution contrast agents for medical diagnosis and prognosis in clinic. A classical urea-based homogeneous precipitation route that combines the merits of in situ thermal decomposition and surface modification is introduced to construct polyethylene glycol molecule (PEG)-decorated hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles (PEG-UCNPs). By utilizing the admirable optical and magnetic properties of the yielded PEG-UCNPs, in vivo up-conversion luminescence and T1 -enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of small animals are conducted, revealing obvious signals after subcutaneous and intravenous injection, respectively. Due to the strong X-ray absorption and high atomic number of lanthanide elements, X-ray computed-tomography imaging based on PEG-UCNPs is then designed and carried out, achieving excellent imaging outcome in animal experiments. This is the first example of the usage of hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles as effective nanoprobes. Furthermore, biodistribution, clearance route, as well as long-term toxicity are investigated in detail after intravenous injection in a murine model, indicating the overall safety of PEG-UCNPs. Compared with previous lanthanide fluorides, our nanoprobes exhibit more advantages, such as facile construction process and nearly total excretion from the animal body within a month. Taken together, these results promise the use of PEG-UCNPs as a safe and efficient nanoparticulate contrast agent for potential application in multimodal imaging.

  9. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis--Part I: N, Fe, Se, P, Au, and Ca.

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Orangi, Jafar; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Many inorganic elements are recognized as being essential for the growth of all living organisms. Transfer of nutrients and waste material from cells and tissues in the biological systems are accomplished through a functional vasculature network. Maintenance of the vascular system is vital to the wellbeing of organisms, and its alterations contribute to pathogenesis of many diseases. This article is the first part of a review on the functional role of inorganic elements including nitrogen, iron, selenium, phosphorus, gold, and calcium in angiogenesis. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activity of these elements are briefly summarized. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. The recent aspects of the relationship between different elements and their role in angiogenesis, and production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors were assessed. Several studies emphasized the role of these elements on the different phases of angiogenesis process in vivo. These elements can either enhance or inhibit angiogenesis events. Nitrogen in combination with bisphosphonates has antiangiogenic effects, while nitric oxide promotes the production of angiogenic growth factors. Iron deficiency can stimulate angiogenesis, but its excess suppresses angiogenesis events. Gold nanoparticles and selenium agents have therapeutic effects due to their anti-angiogenic characteristics, while phosphorus and calcium ions are regarded as pro-angiogenic elements. Understanding how these elements impact angiogenesis may provide new strategies for treatment of many diseases with neovascular component.

  10. Europium-doped gadolinium sulfide nanoparticles as a dual-mode imaging agent for T1-weighted MR and photoluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jongjin; Kim, Mi Ae; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Seung Jae; Yang, Ilseung; Cho, Janggeun; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Chulhyun; Park, Joung Kyu

    2012-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of europium-doped gadolinium sulfide (GdS:Eu(3+)) opto-magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) via sonochemistry. Their photoluminescence and strong paramagnetic properties enable these NPs to be utilized as an in vitro cell imaging and in vivo T(1)-weighted MR imaging probe. The GdS:Eu(3+) NPs have a prominent longitudinal (r(1)) relaxivity value, which is a critical parameter for T(1)-weighted MR ima