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Sample records for angiotensin ii activates

  1. Intracellular angiotensin II activates rat myometrium

    PubMed Central

    Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A.; Motoc, Dana; Brailoiu, G. Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II is a modulator of myometrial activity; both AT1 and AT2 receptors are expressed in myometrium. Since in other tissues angiotensin II has been reported to activate intracellular receptors, we assessed the effects of intracellular administration of angiotensin II via microinjection on myometrium, using calcium imaging. Intracellular injection of angiotensin II increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was abolished by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan but not by the AT2 receptor antagonist PD-123319. Disruption of the endo-lysosomal system, but not that of Golgi apparatus, prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of AT1 receptor internalization had no effect, whereas blockade of microautophagy abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i produced by intracellular injection of angiotensin II; this indicates that microautophagy is a critical step in transporting the peptide into the endo-lysosomes lumenum. The response to angiotensin II was slightly reduced in Ca2+-free saline, indicating a major involvement of Ca2+ release from internal stores. Blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors with heparin and xestospongin C or inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U-73122 abolished the response to angiotensin II, supporting the involvement of PLC-IP3 pathway. Angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was slightly reduced by antagonism of ryanodine receptors. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that in myometrial cells, intracellular angiotensin II activates AT1-like receptors on lysosomes and activates PLC-IP3-dependent Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum; the response is further augmented by a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism via ryanodine receptors activation. PMID:21613610

  2. Angiotensin II, sympathetic nerve activity and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity has been reported to be increased in both humans and animals with chronic heart failure. One of the mechanisms believed to be responsible for this phenomenon is increased systemic and cerebral angiotensin II signaling. Plasma angiotensin II is increased in humans and animals with chronic heart failure. The increase in angiotensin II signaling enhances sympathetic nerve activity through actions on both central and peripheral sites during chronic heart failure. Angiotensin II signaling is enhanced in different brain sites such as the paraventricular nucleus, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the area postrema. Blocking angiotensin II type 1 receptors decreases sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex when therapy is administered to the paraventricular nucleus. Injection of an angiotensin receptor blocker into the area postrema activates the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In peripheral regions, angiotensin II elevates both norepinephrine release and synthesis and inhibits norepinephrine uptake at nerve endings, which may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity seen in chronic heart failure. Increased circulating angiotensin II during chronic heart failure may enhance the sympathoexcitatory chemoreflex and inhibit the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In addition, increased circulating angiotensin II can directly act on the central nervous system via the subfornical organ and the area postrema to increase sympathetic outflow. Inhibition of angiotensin II formation and its type 1 receptor has been shown to have beneficial effects in chronic heart failure patients.

  3. Activation of Local Chorionic Villi Angiotensin II Levels But Not Angiotensin (1–7) in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Lauren; Merrill, David C.; Neves, Liomar A.A.; Stovall, Kathryn; Gallagher, Patricia E.; Diz, Debra I.; Moorefield, Cheryl; Gruver, Courtney; Ferrario, Carlos M.; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2009-01-01

    The chorionic villi in the placenta are responsible for the regulation of fetal oxygen and nutrient transport. Although the peripheral renin-angiotensin system is activated during normal pregnancy, the regulation of the local chorionic villi renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. Therefore, placental chorionic villous tissue was collected from nulliparous third-trimester normotensive or preeclamptic subjects and was analyzed for angiotensin peptide content, angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, neprilysin, angiotensin II type 1 (AT1), angiotensin II type 2, Mas receptor mRNAs, and angiotensin receptor density and subtype. Angiotensin II in chorionic villi was significantly higher in preeclamptic subjects, whereas angiotensin (1–7) was not different. Angiotensinogen and AT1 receptor gene expression was significantly higher in preeclamptic subjects. No differences were observed in renin, ACE, ACE2, or neprilysin gene expression. Mas receptor mRNA in preeclamptic subjects was decreased. The AT1 receptor was the predominant receptor subtype in normal and preeclamptic chorionic villi. There was no difference in the density of the AT1, angiotensin II type 2, and angiotensin (1–7) receptors. These results indicate that enhanced chorionic villous expression of angiotensin II may result from increased angiotensinogen. Elevated angiotensin II, acting through the AT1 receptor, may favor vasoconstriction in placental chorionic villi and contribute to impaired fetal blood flow and decreased fetal nutrition observed during preeclampsia. PMID:18259034

  4. Urinary angiotensin II: a marker of renal tissue activity?

    PubMed

    Reams, G; Villarreal, D; Wu, Z; Bauer, J H

    1994-01-01

    The methodology for the collection, extraction, separation and measurement of urinary angiotensin II [the octapeptide, ANG(1-8)] is described. To determine the origin of urinary ANG(1-8), mean arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics and the arterial, renal venous and urinary concentrations of ANG(1-8) were examined prior to and following the constant intra-arterial infusion of tritiated angiotensin II [3H-ANG(1-8)] in graded doses of 0.5, 2.0 and 2.5 ng/kg/min in 5 uninephrectomized, anesthetized female dogs. The infusion of 3H-ANG-(1-8) had no significant effect on mean arterial pressure, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow or urine flow rate. The mean concentration of ANG(1-8) in the urine was 3.7 fmol/ml. None or only trace amounts of 3H-ANG(1-8) were detected in the urine in spite of marked increases in renal arterial 3H-ANG(1-8) concentrations. These observations suggest that urinary ANG(1-8) was derived de novo from the intrarenal generation of angiotensin II. In addition, plasma and urinary concentrations of ANG(1-8) were assessed in patients with essential hypertension undergoing treatment with either a diuretic (n = 14) or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (n = 14). Although the concentrations of plasma ANG(1-8) responded appropriately to the respective therapies, the urinary excretion of ANG(1-8) was not different following either therapy. These data suggest that ANG(1-8) collected from the urinary bladder may not occur in adequate concentrations to accurately assess the activity of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system.

  5. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects include: Dizziness Elevated blood potassium level (hyperkalemia) Localized swelling of tissues (angioedema) There have been ... 31, 2016. Townsend RR. Major side effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers. http://www.uptodate. ...

  6. Central Renin-Angiotensin System Activation and Inflammation Induced by High-Fat Diet Sensitize Angiotensin II-Elicited Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Thunhorst, Robert L; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G; Felder, Robert B; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has been shown to promote renin-angiotensin system activity and inflammation in the brain and to be accompanied by increased sympathetic activity and blood pressure. Our previous studies demonstrated that administration of a subpressor dose of angiotensin (Ang) II sensitizes subsequent Ang II-elicited hypertension. The present study tested whether high-fat diet (HFD) feeding also sensitizes the Ang II-elicited hypertensive response and whether HFD-induced sensitization is mediated by an increase in renin-angiotensin system activity and inflammatory mechanisms in the brain. HFD did not increase baseline blood pressure, but enhanced the hypertensive response to Ang II compared with a normal-fat diet. The sensitization produced by the HFD was abolished by concomitant central infusions of either a tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline, an Ang II type 1 receptor blocker, irbesartan, or an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline. Furthermore, central pretreatment with tumor necrosis factor-α mimicked the sensitizing action of a central subpressor dose of Ang II, whereas central pentoxifylline or minocycline abolished this Ang II-induced sensitization. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of lamina terminalis tissue indicated that HFD feeding, central tumor necrosis factor-α, or a central subpressor dose of Ang II upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines, whereas inhibition of Ang II type 1 receptor and of inflammation reversed these changes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of Ang II-elicited hypertension is mediated by upregulation of the brain renin-angiotensin system and of central proinflammatory cytokines. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  8. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Angiotensin II causes cellular proliferation in infantile haemangioma via angiotensin II receptor 2 activation.

    PubMed

    Itinteang, Tinte; Marsh, Reginald; Davis, Paul Frank; Tan, Swee Thong

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the angiotensin peptides and their agonists and antagonists on cellular proliferation in proliferating infantile haemangioma (IH) in vitro explants. Proliferating IH samples from six patients were cultured in vitro in the presence of angiotensin I (ATI) alone, or AT1 and the ACE inhibitor, ramipril, or ATII alone, or ATII with the ATII receptor 1 (ATIIR1) blocker, losartan, or ATII with the ATIIR2 blocker, PD123319, or the ATIIR2 agonist, CGP42112. After 6 days in culture, the IH tissue pieces were harvested, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. The effect of each treatment type on cellular proliferation was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of these tissue pieces using the proliferation marker, Ki67. There was a significant increase in cellular proliferation in the ATI and ATII treated IH tissues compared with control samples. Their effect on cellular proliferation was reduced by adding ramipril and PD123319, respectively. CGP42112, but not losartan, significantly increased cellular proliferation. Our findings suggest a key regulatory role of ATI and ATII in promoting cellular proliferation in IH, and establish a role for ACE and ATIIR2 in the proliferation of this tumour. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Advanced Glycation End Products Activate a Chymase-Dependent Angiotensin II Generating Pathway in Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Vijay; Wang, Wansheng; Huang, Xiao Ru; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Truong, Luan D.; Lan, Hui Y

    2006-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II is a key mediator of diabetes-related vascular disease. It is now recognized that in addition to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), chymase is an important alternative angiotensin II generating enzyme in hypertension and diabetes. However, the mechanism of induction of chymase in diabetes remains unknown. Methods and Results: Here we report that chymase is upregulated in coronary and renal arteries in patients with diabetes by immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of vascular chymase is associated with deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), increase in expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), and activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase. In vitro, AGEs can induce chymase expression and chymase-dependent angiotensin II generation in human vascular smooth muscle cells via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. This is confirmed by blockade of AGE-induced vascular chymase expression with a neutralizing RAGE antibody and an inhibitor to ERK1/2, and by overexpression of the dominant negative-ERK1/2. Compared to ACE, chymase contributes to the majority of angiotensin II production (more than 70%, p<0.01) in response to AGEs. Further more, AGE-induced Angiotensin II production is blocked by the anti-RAGE antibody and by inhibition of ERK1/2 MAP kinase activities. Conclusions: Advanced glycation end products, a hallmark of diabetes, induce chymase via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Chymase initiates an important alternative angiotensin II generating pathway in diabetes and may play a critical role in diabetic vascular disease. PMID:16520412

  11. Angiotensin II Stimulates H+-ATPase Activity in Intercalated Cells from Isolated Mouse Connecting Tubules and Cortical Collecting Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Carsten A.; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Uhlig, Ulrike; Giebisch, Gerhard H.; Breton, Sylvie; Brown, Dennis; Geibel, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Intercalated cells in the collecting duct system express V-type H+-ATPases which participate in acid extrusion, bicarbonate secretion, and chloride absorption depending on the specific subtype. The activity of H+-ATPases is regulated by acid-base status and several hormones, including angiotensin II and aldosterone. Angiotensin II stimulates chloride absorption mediated by pendrin in type B intercalated cells and this process is energized by the activity of H+-ATPases. Moreover, angiotensin II stimulates bicarbonate secretion by the connecting tubule (CNT) and early cortical collecting duct (CCD). In the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II (10 nM) on H+-ATPase activity and localization in isolated mouse connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Angiotensin II stimulated Na+-independent intracellular pH recovery about 2-3 fold, and this was abolished by the specific H+-ATPase inhibitor concanamycin. The effect of angiotensin II was mediated through type 1 angiotensin II receptors (AT1-receptors) because it could be blocked by saralasin. Stimulation of H+-ATPase activity required an intact microtubular network - it was completely inhibited by colchicine. Immunocytochemistry of isolated CNT/CCDs incubated in vitro with angiotensin II suggests enhanced membrane associated staining of H+-ATPases in pendrin expressing intercalated cells. In summary, angiotensin II stimulates H+-ATPases in CNT/CCD intercalated cells, and may contribute to the regulation of chloride absorption and bicarbonate secretion in this nephron segment. PMID:22116365

  12. Central renin-angiotensin system activation and inflammation induced by high fat diet sensitize angiotensin II-elicited hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Baojian; Thunhorst, Robert L.; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G.; Felder, Robert B.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has been shown to promote renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and inflammation in the brain and to be accompanied by increased sympathetic activity and blood pressure (BP). Our previous studies demonstrated that administration of a subpressor dose of angiotensin (Ang) II sensitizes subsequent Ang II-elicited hypertension. The present study tested whether high fat diet (HFD) feeding also sensitizes the Ang II-elicited hypertensive response and whether HFD-induced sensitization is mediated by an increase in RAS activity and inflammatory mechanisms in the brain. HFD did not increase baseline BP, but enhanced the hypertensive response to Ang II compared to a normal fat diet. The sensitization produced by the HFD was abolished by concomitant central infusions of either a tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline, an Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) blocker, irbesartan or an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline. Furthermore, central pretreatment with TNF-α mimicked the sensitizing action of a central subpressor dose of Ang II, whereas central pentoxifylline or minocycline abolished this Ang II-induced sensitization. RT-PCR analysis of lamina terminalis tissue indicated that HFD feeding, central TNF-α or a central subpressor dose of Ang II upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the RAS and proinflammatory cytokines, whereas inhibition of AT1-R and of inflammation reversed these changes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of Ang II-elicited hypertension is mediated by upregulation of the brain RAS and of central proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26573717

  13. Direct Activation of ENaC by Angiotensin II: Recent Advances and New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the principal effector of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). It initiates myriad processes in multiple organs integrated to increase circulating volume and elevate systemic blood pressure. In the kidney, Ang II stimulates renal tubular water and salt reabsorption causing antinatriuresis and antidiuresis. Activation of RAAS is known to enhance activity of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. In addition to its well described stimulatory actions on aldosterone secretion, Ang II is also capable to directly increase ENaC activity. In this brief review, we discuss recent findings about non-classical Ang II actions on ENaC and speculate about its relevance for renal sodium handling. PMID:23180052

  14. New Perspectives in the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) II: Albumin Suppresses Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Activity in Human

    PubMed Central

    Fagyas, Miklós; Úri, Katalin; Siket, Ivetta M.; Fülöp, Gábor Á.; Csató, Viktória; Daragó, Andrea; Boczán, Judit; Bányai, Emese; Szentkirályi, István Elek; Maros, Tamás Miklós; Szerafin, Tamás; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila

    2014-01-01

    About 8% of the adult population is taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat cardiovascular disease including hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. These drugs decrease mortality by up to one-fifth in these patients. We and others have reported previously that endogenous inhibitory substances suppress serum ACE activity, in vivo, similarly to the ACE inhibitor drugs. Here we have made an effort to identify this endogenous ACE inhibitor substance. ACE was crosslinked with interacting proteins in human sera. The crosslinked products were immunoprecipitated and subjected to Western blot. One of the crosslinked products was recognized by both anti-ACE and anti-HSA (human serum albumin) antibodies. Direct ACE-HSA interaction was confirmed by binding assays using purified ACE and HSA. HSA inhibited human purified (circulating) and human recombinant ACE with potencies (IC50) of 5.7±0.7 and 9.5±1.1 mg/mL, respectively. Effects of HSA on the tissue bound native ACE were tested on human saphenous vein samples. Angiotensin I evoked vasoconstriction was inhibited by HSA in this vascular tissue (maximal force with HSA: 6.14±1.34 mN, without HSA: 13.54±2.63 mN), while HSA was without effects on angiotensin II mediated constrictions (maximal force with HSA: 18.73±2.17 mN, without HSA: 19.22±3.50 mN). The main finding of this study is that HSA was identified as a potent physiological inhibitor of the ACE. The enzymatic activity of ACE appears to be almost completely suppressed by HSA when it is present in its physiological concentration. These data suggest that angiotensin I conversion is limited by low physiological ACE activities, in vivo. PMID:24691203

  15. Protection of protease-activated receptor 2 mediated vasodilatation against angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Under conditions of cardiovascular dysfunction, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) agonists maintain vasodilatation activity, which has been attributed to increased cyclooxygenase-2, nitric oxide synthase and calcium-activated potassium channel (SK3.1) activities. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist mediated vasodilatation is unknown under conditions of dysfunction caused by angiotensin II. The main purpose of our study was to determine whether PAR2-induced vasodilatation of resistance arteries was attenuated by prolonged angiotensin II treatment in mice. We compared the vasodilatation of resistance-type arteries (mesenteric) from angiotensin II-treated PAR2 wild-type mice (WT) induced by PAR2 agonist 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly) to the responses obtained in controls (saline treatment). We also investigated arterial vasodilatation in angiotensin II-treated PAR2 deficient (PAR2-/-) mice. Results 2fly-induced relaxations of untreated arteries from angiotensin II-treated WT were not different than saline-treated WT. Treatment of arteries with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and SK3.1 inhibitor (L-NAME + TRAM-34) blocked 2fly in angiotensin II-treated WT. Protein and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 were increased, and cyclooxygenase activity increased the sensitivity of arteries to 2fly in only angiotensin II-treated WT. These protective vasodilatation mechanisms were selective for 2fly compared with acetylcholine- and nitroprusside-induced relaxations which were attenuated by angiotensin II; PAR2-/- were protected against this attenuation of nitroprusside. Conclusions PAR2-mediated vasodilatation of resistance type arteries is protected against the negative effects of angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice. In conditions of endothelial dysfunction, angiotensin II induction of cyclooxygenases increases sensitivity to PAR2 agonist and the preserved vasodilatation mechanism involves activation of SK3.1. PMID:21955547

  16. A Fluorometric Method of Measuring Carboxypeptidase Activities for Angiotensin II and Apelin-13

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan; Wysocki, Jan; Serfozo, Peter; Ye, Minghao; Souma, Tomokazu; Batlle, Daniel; Jin, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of the biologically potent octapeptide angiotensin Ang II-(1-8) is mediated by the activities of several peptidases. The conversion of Ang II to the septapeptide Ang-(1-7) is of particular interest as the latter also confers organ protection. The conversion is catalyzed by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and other enzymes that selectively cleave the peptide bond between the proline and the phenylalanine at the carboxyl terminus of Ang II. The contribution of various enzyme activities that collectively lead to the formation of Ang-(1-7) from Ang II, in both normal conditions and in disease states, remains only partially understood. This is largely due to the lack of a reliable and sensitive method to detect these converting activities in complex samples, such as blood and tissues. Here, we report a fluorometric method to measure carboxypeptidase activities that cleave the proline-phenylalanine dipeptide bond in Ang II. This method is also suitable for measuring the conversion of apelin-13. The assay detects the release of phenylalanine amino acid in a reaction with the yeast enzyme of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL). When used in cell and mouse organs, the assay can robustly measure endogenous Ang II and apelin-13-converting activities involved in the renin-angiotensin and the apelinergic systems, respectively. PMID:28378780

  17. Enhanced angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and systemic reactivity to angiotensin II in normotensive rats exposed to a high-sodium diet

    PubMed Central

    Crestani, Sandra; Júnior, Arquimedes Gasparotto; Marques, Maria C.A.; Sullivan, Jennifer C.; Webb, R. Clinton; da Silva-Santos, J. Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    A high salt diet is associated with reduced activity of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). However, normotensive rats exposed to high sodium do not show changes in systemic arterial pressure. We hypothesized that, despite the reduced circulating amounts of angiotensin II induced by a high salt diet, the cardiovascular system’s reactivity to angiotensin II is increased in vivo, contributing to maintain arterial pressure at normal levels. Male Wistar rats received chow containing 0.27% (control), 2%, 4%, or 8% NaCl for six weeks. The high-sodium diet did not lead to changes in arterial pressure, although plasma levels of angiotensin II and aldosterone were reduced in the 4% and 8% NaCl groups. The 4% and 8% NaCl groups showed enhanced pressor responses to angiotensin I and II, accompanied by unchanged and increased angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, respectively. The 4% NaCl group showed increased expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptors and reduced expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors in the aorta. In addition, the hypotensive effect of losartan was reduced in both 4% and 8% NaCl groups. In conclusion these results explain, at least in part, why the systemic arterial pressure is maintained at normal levels in non-salt sensitive and healthy rats exposed to a high salt diet, when the functionality of RAAS appears to be blunted, as well as suggest that angiotensin II has a crucial role in the vascular dysfunction associated with high salt intake, even in the absence of hypertension. PMID:24321189

  18. Pravastatin activates activator protein 2 alpha to argument the angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Liang, Wen-Jing; Shan, Mei-Rong; Wang, Xue-Qing; Zhou, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Yuan; Guo, Tao; Li, Peng; Yu, Hai-Ya; Liu, Chao; Yin, Ya-Ling; Wang, Yu-Lin; Dong, Bo; Pang, Xin-Yan; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2017-02-04

    We have previously reported that activation of AMP-activated kinase alpha 2 (AMPKα2) by nicotine or angiotensin II (AngII) instigates formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in Apoe-/- mice. Statins, used to treat hyperlipidemia widely, activate AMPK in vascular cells. We sought to examine the effects of pravastatin on AAA formation and uncover the molecular mechanism. The AAA model was induced by AngII and evaluated by incidence, elastin degradation, and maximal abdominal aortic diameter in Apoe-/- mice. The phosphorylated levels of AMPKα2 and activator protein 2 alpha (AP-2α) were examined in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) or in mice. We observed that pravastatin (50 mg/kg/day, 8 weeks) remarkably increased the AngII-induced AAA incidence in mice. In VSMCs, pravastatin increased the levels of pAMPK, pAP-2α, and MMP2 in both basal and AngII-stressed conditions, which were abolished by tempol and compound C. Pravastatin-upregulated MMP2 was abrogated by AMPKα2 or AP-2α siRNA. Lentivirus-mediated gene silence of AMPKα2 or AP-2α abolished pravastatin-worsened AAA formations in AngII-infused Apoe-/- mice. Clinical investigations demonstrated that both AMPKα2 and AP-2α phosphorylations were increased in AAA patients or human subjects taking pravastatin. In conclusion, pravastatin promotes AAA formation through AMPKα2-dependent AP-2α activations.

  19. Role of angiotensin II receptor subtype activation in cognitive function and ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Mogi, Masaki

    2011-07-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1) ) receptor blockers (ARBs) reduce the onset of stroke, stroke severity and the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. We can expect that ARBs exert these effects by both AT(1) receptor blockade and angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2) ) receptor stimulation. Moreover, recent experimental results support the notion that AT(2) receptor stimulation with AT(1) receptor blockade could contribute to protection against ischaemic brain damage at least partly due to an increase in cerebral blood flow and decrease in oxidative stress, and prevent cognitive decline. Cellular therapy has been focused on as a new therapeutic approach to restore injured neurons. In this context, it has been reported that AT(2) receptor stimulation enhances neurite outgrowth and decreases neural damage, thereby enhancing neurogenesis. Moreover, additional beneficial effects of ARBs with an AT(1) receptor blocking action with a partial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonistic effect have been reported, and interaction of AT(2) receptor activation and PPAR-γ might be involved in these ARBs' effects. This article reviews the effects of regulation of activation of angiotensin II receptor subtypes on ischaemic brain damage and cognitive function, focusing on the effects of AT(2) receptor stimulation. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Activation Induces Structural Changes in the Liganded Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Martin; Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian J.; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) binds to and activates the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (hAT1) of the G protein-coupled receptor class A family. Several activation mechanisms have been proposed for this family, but they have not yet been experimentally validated. We previously used the methionine proximity assay to show that 11 residues in transmembrane domain (TMD) III, VI, and VII of the hAT1 receptor reside in close proximity to the C-terminal residue of AngII. With the exception of a single change in TMD VI, the same contacts are present on N111G-hAT1, a constitutively active mutant; this N111G-hAT1 is a model for the active form of the receptor. In this study, two series of 53 individual methionine mutations were constructed in TMD I, II, IV, and V on both receptor forms. The mutants were photolabeled with a neutral antagonist, 125I-[Sar1,p-benzoyl-l-Phe8]AngII, and the resulting complexes were digested with cyanogen bromide. Although no new contacts were found for the hAT1 mutants, two were found in the constitutively active mutants, Phe-77 in TMD II and Asn-200 in TMD V. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a direct ligand contact with TMD II and TMD V has been reported. These contact point differences were used to identify the structural changes between the WT-hAT1 and N111G-hAT1 complexes through homology-based modeling and restrained molecular dynamics. The model generated revealed an important structural rearrangement of several TMDs from the basal to the activated form in the WT-hAT1 receptor. PMID:19635801

  1. Angiotensin II activates endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase via AT1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Hirata, Y; Emori, T; Imai, T; Marumo, F

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether angiotensin (ANG) II, a vasoconstrictor hormone, activates constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) in endothelial cells (ECs), we investigated the cellular mechanism by which ANG II induces nitric oxide (NO) formation in cultured bovine ECs. ANG II rapidly (within 1 min) and dose-dependently (10(-9)-10(-6) M) increased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production. This effect of ANG II was abolished by a NOS inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. An ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist (DuP 753), but not an ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist (PD 123177), dose-dependently inhibited ANG II-induced NOx production. A Ca(2+)-channel blocker (barnidipine) failed to affect ANG II-induced NOx production, whereas an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA) and a calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) abolished NOx production induced by ANG II. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (H-7) and down-regulation of endogenous PKC after pretreatment with phorbol ester decreased NOx production stimulated by ANG II. ANG II transiently stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation, and increased cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations; these effects were blocked by DuP 753. Our data demonstrate that ANG II stimulates NO release by activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cNOS via AT1 receptors in bovine ECs.

  2. Aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    van der Lubbe, Nils; Lim, Christina H; Meima, Marcel E; van Veghel, Richard; Rosenbaek, Lena Lindtoft; Mutig, Kerim; Danser, Alexander H J; Fenton, Robert A; Zietse, Robert; Hoorn, Ewout J

    2012-06-01

    We and others have recently shown that angiotensin II can activate the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Because WNK4 was previously shown to be a negative regulator of NCC, it has been postulated that angiotensin II converts WNK4 to a positive regulator. Here, we ask whether aldosterone requires angiotensin II to activate NCC and if their effects are additive. To do so, we infused vehicle or aldosterone in adrenalectomized rats that also received the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. In the presence of losartan, aldosterone was still capable of increasing total and phosphorylated NCC twofold to threefold. The kinases WNK4 and SPAK also increased with aldosterone and losartan. A dose-dependent relationship between aldosterone and NCC, SPAK, and WNK4 was identified, suggesting that these are aldosterone-sensitive proteins. As more functional evidence of increased NCC activity, we showed that rats receiving aldosterone and losartan had a significantly greater natriuretic response to hydrochlorothiazide than rats receiving losartan only. To study whether angiotensin II could have an additive effect, rats receiving aldosterone with losartan were compared with rats receiving aldosterone only. Rats receiving aldosterone only retained more sodium and had twofold to fourfold increase in phosphorylated NCC. Together, our results demonstrate that aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC and that WNK4 appears to act as a positive regulator in this pathway. The additive effect of angiotensin II may favor electroneutral sodium reabsorption during hypovolemia and may contribute to hypertension in diseases with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

  3. Angiotensin II activates the RhoA exchange factor Arhgef1 in humans.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Maria Luigia; Brégeon, Jérémy; Devos, Nabila; Chadeuf, Gilliane; Blanchard, Anne; Azizi, Michel; Pacaud, Pierre; Jeunemaître, Xavier; Loirand, Gervaise

    2015-06-01

    Although a causative role for RhoA-Rho kinase has been recognized in the development of human hypertension, the molecular mechanism(s) and the RhoA guanine exchange factor(s) responsible for the overactivation of RhoA remain unknown. Arhgef1 was identified as a RhoA guanine exchange factor involved in angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated regulation of vascular tone and hypertension in mice. The aim of this study was to determine whether Arhgef1 is activated and involved in the activation of RhoA-Rho kinase signaling by Ang II in humans. In vitro stimulation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Ang II (0.1 μmol/L) induced activation of Arhgef1 attested by its increased tyrosine phosphorylation. Silencing of Arhgef1 expression by siRNA inhibited Ang II-induced activation of RhoA-Rho kinase signaling. In normotensive subjects, activation of the renin-angiotensin system by a low-salt diet for 7 days increased RhoA-Rho kinase signaling and stimulated Arhgef1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that Arhgef1 mediates Ang II-induced RhoA activation in humans. Moreover, they show that measurement of RhoA guanine exchange factor activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells might be a useful method to evaluate RhoA guanine exchange factor activity in humans. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Measurement of immunoreactive angiotensin peptides in rat tissues: some pitfalls in angiotensin II analysis.

    PubMed

    De Silva, P E; Husain, A; Smeby, R R; Khairallah, P A

    1988-10-01

    Angiotensin II, the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, is an endocrine and paracrine regulator of tissue function. To determine its physiological role, it is important to quantify angiotensin II and related fragment peptides in tissues and plasma as a first step toward understanding angiotensin II metabolism within tissues. A fully characterized, sensitive, and reproducible immunochemical assay has been developed for quantitating angiotensin II immunoreactivity in tissues and plasma. We identified two methodological events of critical importance, incompletely addressed in previously reported studies. First, the nonspecific interference resulting from Sep-Pak processing was found to be due to hydrophobic impurities in the octade-casilane absorbent which were eliminated by washing the Sep-Pak with tetrahydrofuran and hexane before use. Second, a significant discrepancy was observed in the recoveries of angiotensin II and 125I-angiotensin II added to tissue extracts following high-pressure liquid chromatography. Angiotensin II immunoreactivity extracted from decapitated rat adrenal gland, brain, and kidney (target organs for angiotensin II), ovary and uterus (potential target organs for angiotensin II), and plasma has been characterized. The predominant component of the angiotensin II immunoreactivity was the biologically active octapeptide angiotensin II. However, in the brain, the ratio of angiotensin II to C-terminal angiotensin II immunoreactive fragments was lower than observed in other tissues studied. Other angiotensin II C-terminal immunoreactive peptide fragments-the biologically active heptapeptide and the biologically inactive angiotensin(3-8) and angiotensin(4-8)--were also detected in variable quantities in the various tissues.

  5. Angiotensin II-Activated Protein Kinase D Mediates Acute Aldosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Brian A.; Olala, Lawrence; Arun, Senthil Nathan; Parker, Peter M.; George, Mariya V.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin II (AngII)-aldosterone system can contribute to cardiovascular disease, such that an understanding of this system is critical. Diacylglycerol-sensitive serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) is activated by AngII in several systems, including the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line NCI H295R, where this enzyme enhances chronic (24 hours) AngII-evoked aldosterone secretion. However, the role of PKD in acute AngII-elicited aldosterone secretion has not been previously examined. In primary cultures of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, which secrete detectable quantities of aldosterone in response to secretagogues within minutes, PKD was activated in response to AngII, but not an elevated potassium concentration or adrenocorticotrophic hormone. This activation was time- and dose-dependent and occurred through the AT1, but not the AT2, receptor. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of constitutively-active PKD resulted in enhanced AngII-induced aldosterone secretion; whereas overexpression of a dominant-negative PKD construct decreased AngII-stimulated aldosterone secretion. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKD mediates acute AngII-induced aldosterone secretion. PMID:19961896

  6. Sulforaphane Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Testicular Cell Death via Activation of NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonggang; Xin, Ying; Tan, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Although angiotensin II (Ang II) was reported to facilitate sperm motility and intratesticular sperm transport, recent findings shed light on the efficacy of Ang II in stimulating inflammatory events in testicular peritubular cells, effect of which may play a role in male infertility. It is still unknown whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death, which may be a more direct action of Ang II in male infertility. Therefore, the present study aims to determine whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death and whether this action can be prevented by sulforaphane (SFN) via activating nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), the governor of antioxidant-redox signalling. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and Nrf2 gene knockout mice were treated with Ang II, in the presence or absence of SFN. In WT mice, SFN activated testicular NRF2 expression and function, along with a marked attenuation in Ang II-induced testicular oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic cell death. Deletion of the Nrf2 gene led to a complete abolishment of these efficacies of SFN. The present study indicated that Ang II may result in testicular apoptotic cell death, which can be prevented by SFN via the activation of NRF2. PMID:28191275

  7. Angiotensin II induces MMP 2 activity via FAK/JNK pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Eugenio; Pérez de la Blanca, Enrique; Urso, Loredana; González, Irene; Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes

    2009-03-20

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and are modified in response to a variety of stimuli such as bioactive peptides, cytokines and/or grown factors. In this study, we demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces a time- and dose-dependent increase in the activity of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP 2) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The effect of Ang II was markedly attenuated in cells pretreated with wortmannin and LY294002, two selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), indicating that PI3K plays a key role in regulating MMP 2 activity. Similar results were observed when HUVEC were pretreated with genistein, a non-selective tyrosine kinases inhibitor, or with the specific Src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, demonstrating the involvement of protein tyrosine kinases, and particularly Src-family tyrosine kinases on the downstream signaling pathway of Ang II receptors. Furthermore, Ang II-induced MMP 2 activation was markedly blocked by SP600125, a selective c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, or pre-treatment of cells with antisense oligonucleotide to focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating that both molecules were important for the activation of MMP 2 by Ang II receptor stimulation. In conclusion, these results suggest that Ang II mediates an increase in MMP 2 activity in macrovascular endothelial cells through signal transduction pathways dependent on PI3K and Src-family tyrosine kinases activation, as well as JNK and FAK phosphorylation.

  8. PPAR alpha activator fenofibrate inhibits myocardial inflammation and fibrosis in angiotensin II-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Diep, Quy N; Benkirane, Karim; Amiri, Farhad; Cohn, Jeffrey S; Endemann, Dierk; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2004-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha is highly expressed in the heart. PPAR alpha may play a role in cardiac hypertrophy, but effects on cardiac function, inflammation, and fibrosis are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the PPAR alpha activator fenofibrate prevents myocardial inflammation and fibrosis in angiotensin (Ang) II-infused rats. Sprague Dawley rats received Ang II (120 ng/kg/min subcutaneously), fenofibrate (100 mg/kg/d p.o.), or Ang II + fenofibrate. After 7 d, systolic blood pressure (mmHg) was elevated (P < 0.01) in Ang II-infused rats (173 +/- 4) vs. controls (115 +/- 2) and reduced by fenofibrate (137 +/- 5). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that Ang II upregulated cardiac nuclear factor kappa B activity by 50%. Ang II significantly increased cardiac expression of vascular-cell adhesion molecule-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Increases in expression of these inflammatory mediators were normalized by fenofibrate. Ang II-induced expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1, collagen deposition, and macrophage infiltration were partially prevented by fenofibrate. The PPAR alpha activator fenofibrate prevented development of hypertension, and improved myocardial inflammation and collagen deposition in Ang II-infused rats. The hypolipidemic drug fenofibrate may be useful in prevention and treatment of myocardial disease associated with hypertension and hyperlipidemia.

  9. Metabolic switch and hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes following treatment with angiotensin II are prevented by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Bettina Johanna; Lenski, Matthias; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2008-11-21

    Angiotensin II induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but its consequences on cardiomyocyte metabolism and energy supply are not completely understood. Here we investigate the effect of angiotensin II on glucose and fatty acid utilization and the modifying role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of metabolism and proliferation. Treatment of H9C2 cardiomyocytes with angiotensin II (Ang II, 1 microm, 4 h) increased [(3)H]leucine incorporation, up-regulated the mRNA expression of the hypertrophy marker genes MLC, ANF, BNP, and beta-MHC, and decreased the phosphorylation of the negative mTOR-regulator tuberin (TSC-2). Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes showed similar results. Western blot analysis revealed a time- and concentration-dependent down-regulation of AMPK-phosphorylation in the presence of angiotensin II, whereas the protein expression of the catalytic alpha-subunit remained unchanged. This was paralleled by membrane translocation of glucose-transporter type 4 (GLUT4), increased uptake of [(3)H]glucose and transient down-regulation of phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), whereas fatty acid uptake remained unchanged. Similarly, short-term transaortic constriction in mice resulted in down-regulation of P-AMPK and P-ACC but up-regulation of GLUT4 membrane translocation in the heart. Preincubation of cardiomyocytes with the AMPK stimulator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR; 1 mM, 4 h) completely prevented the angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. In addition, AICAR reversed the metabolic effects of angiotensin II: GLUT4 translocation was reduced, but ACC phosphorylation and TSC phosphorylation were elevated. In summary, angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes is accompanied by decreased activation of AMPK, increased glucose uptake, and decreased mTOR inhibition. Stimulation with the AMPK activator AICAR reverses these metabolic changes, increases fatty acid utilization, and inhibits

  10. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  11. Angiotensin II Contributes to Renal Fibrosis Independently of Notch Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lavoz, Carolina; Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Rayego-Mateos, Sandra; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Alique, Matilde; Ortiz, Alberto; Mezzano, Sergio; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have described that the Notch signaling pathway is activated in a wide range of renal diseases. Angiotensin II (AngII) plays a key role in the progression of kidney diseases. AngII contributes to renal fibrosis by upregulation of profibrotic factors, induction of epithelial mesenchymal transition and accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins. In cultured human tubular epithelial cells the Notch activation by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) has been involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition. AngII mimics many profibrotic actions of TGF-β1. For these reasons, our aim was to investigate whether AngII could regulate the Notch/Jagged system in the kidney, and its potential role in AngII-induced responses. In cultured human tubular epithelial cells, TGF-β1, but not AngII, increased the Notch pathway-related gene expression, Jagged-1 synthesis, and caused nuclear translocation of the activated Notch. In podocytes and renal fibroblasts, AngII did not modulate the Notch pathway. In tubular epithelial cells, pharmacological Notch inhibition did not modify AngII-induced changes in epithelial mesenchymal markers, profibrotic factors and extracellular matrix proteins. Systemic infusion of AngII into rats for 2 weeks caused tubulointerstitial fibrosis, but did not upregulate renal expression of activated Notch-1 or Jagged-1, as observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Moreover, the Notch/Jagged system was not modulated by AngII type I receptor blockade in the model of unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice. These data clearly indicate that AngII does not regulate the Notch/Jagged signaling system in the kidney, in vivo and in vitro. Our findings showing that the Notch pathway is not involved in AngII-induced fibrosis could provide important information to understand the complex role of Notch system in the regulation of renal regeneration vs damage progression. PMID:22792351

  12. Brain-mediated dysregulation of the bone marrow activity in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jun, Joo Yun; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Qi, Yanfei; Afzal, Aqeela; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S; Grant, Maria B; Mocco, J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2012-11-01

    Oxidative stress in the brain is implicated in increased sympathetic drive, inflammatory status, and vascular dysfunctions, associated with development and establishment of hypertension. However, little is known about the mechanism of this impaired brain-vascular communication. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress in the brain cardioregulatory areas, such as the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, is driven by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and leads to increased inflammatory cells (ICs) and decreased/dysfunctional endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), thereby compromising vasculature repair and accelerating hypertension. Chronic angiotensin II infusion resulted in elevated blood pressure and sympathetic vasomotor drive, decreased spontaneous baroreflex gain, and increased microglia activation in the paraventricular nucleus. This was associated with 46% decrease in bone marrow (BM)-derived EPCs and 250% increase in BM ICs, resulting in 5-fold decrease of EPC/IC ratio in the BM. Treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, a scavenger of mitochondrial O(2)(-·), intracerebroventricularly but not subcutaneously attenuated angiotensin II-induced hypertension, decreased activation of microglia in the paraventricular nucleus, and normalized EPCs/ICs. This functional communication between the brain and BM was confirmed by retrograde neuronal labeling from the BM with green fluorescent protein-tagged pseudorabies virus. Administration of green fluorescent protein-tagged pseudorabies virus into the BM resulted in predominant labeling of paraventricular nucleus neurons within 3 days, with some fluorescence in the nucleus tractus solitarius, the rostral ventrolateral medulla, and subfornical organ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and corrects the imbalance in EPCs/ICs in the BM. They suggest that an imbalance in

  13. Adiponectin protects against angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis through activation of PPAR-alpha.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koichi; Maeda, Norikazu; Sonoda, Mina; Ohashi, Koji; Hibuse, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Nishida, Makoto; Hiuge, Aki; Kurata, Akifumi; Kihara, Shinji; Shimomura, Iichiro; Funahashi, Tohru

    2008-05-01

    Adiponectin is recognized as an antidiabetic, antiatherosclerotic, and anti-inflammatory protein derived from adipocytes. However, the role of adiponectin in cardiac fibrosis remains uncertain. We herein explore the effects of adiponectin on cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II). Wild-type (WT), adiponectin knockout (Adipo-KO), and PPAR-alpha knockout (PPAR-alpha-KO) mice were infused with Ang II at 1.2 mg/kg/d. Severe cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular dysfunction were observed in Ang II-infused Adipo-KO mice compared to WT mice. Adenovirus-mediated adiponectin treatment improved the above phenotypes and the dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related mRNAs in Adipo-KO mice, whereas such amelioration was not observed in PPAR-alpha-KO mice despite adiponectin accumulation in heart tissue. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, adiponectin improved the reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and elevation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity induced by Ang II. Adiponectin significantly enhanced PPAR-alpha activity, whereas the adiponectin-dependent PPAR-alpha activation was diminished by Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK. The present study suggests that adiponectin protects against Ang II-induced cardiac fibrosis possibly through AMPK-dependent PPAR-alpha activation.

  14. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF MINERALOCORTICOID AND ANGIOTENSIN II ON INCENTIVE AND MESOLIMBIC ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Grafe, Laura A.; Flanagan-Cato, Loretta M.

    2016-01-01

    The controls of thirst and sodium appetite are mediated in part by the hormones aldosterone and angiotensin II (AngII). The present study examined the behavioral and neural mechanisms of altered effort-value in animals treated with systemic mineralocorticoids, intracerebroventricular AngII, or both. First, rats treated with mineralocorticoid and AngII were tested in the progressive ratio operant task. The willingness to work for sodium versus water depended on hormonal treatment. In particular, rats treated with both mineralocorticoid and AngII preferentially worked for access to sodium versus water compared with rats given only one of these hormones. Second, components of the mesolimbic dopamine pathway were examined for modulation by mineralocorticoids and AngII. Based on cFos immunohistochemistry, AngII treatment activated neurons in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens, with no enhancement by mineralocorticoid pretreatment. In contrast, western blot analysis revealed that combined hormone treatment increased levels of phospho-tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area. Thus, mineralocorticoid and AngII treatments differentially engaged the mesolimbic pathway based on tyrosine hydroxylase levels versus cFos activation. PMID:26730722

  15. Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor-Mediated Janus Kinase 2 Activation Induces Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Granzow, Michaela; Schierwagen, Robert; Klein, Sabine; Kowallick, Benita; Huss, Sebastian; Linhart, Markus; Reza Mazar, Irela G.; Görtzen, Jan; Vogt, Annabelle; Schildberg, Frank A.; Gonzalez-Carmona, Maria A.; Wojtalla, Alexandra; Krämer, Benjamin; Nattermann, Jacob; Siegmund, Sören V.; Werner, Nikos; Fürst, Dieter O.; Laleman, Wim; Knolle, Percy; Shah, Vijay H.; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Trebicka, Jonel

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the renin angiotensin system resulting in stimulation of angiotensin-II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1R) is an important factor in the development of liver fibrosis. Here, we investigated the role of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) as a newly described intra-cellular effector of AT1R in mediating liver fibrosis. Fibrotic liver samples from rodents and humans were compared to respective controls. Transcription, protein expression, activation, and localization of JAK2 and downstream effectors were analyzed by realtime polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy. Experimental fibrosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL), CCl4 intoxication, thioacetamide intoxication or continuous AngII infusion. JAK2 was inhibited by AG490. In vitro experiments were performed with primary rodent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (KCs), and hepatocytes as well as primary human and human-derived LX2 cells. JAK2 expression and activity were increased in experimental rodent and human liver fibrosis, specifically in myofibroblastic HSCs. AT1R stimulation in wild-type animals led to activation of HSCs and fibrosis in vivo through phosphorylation of JAK2 and subsequent RhoA/Rho-kinase activation. These effects were prevented in AT1R–/– mice. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2 attenuated liver fibrosis in rodent fibrosis models. In vitro, JAK2 and downstream effectors showed increased expression and activation in activated HSCs, when compared to quiescent HSCs, KCs, and hepatocytes isolated from rodents. In primary human and LX2 cells, AG490 blocked AngII-induced profibrotic gene expression. Overexpression of JAK2 led to increased profibrotic gene expression in LX2 cells, which was blocked by AG490. Conclusion Our study substantiates the important cell-intrinsic role of JAK2 in HSCs for development of liver fibrosis. Inhibition of JAK2 might therefore offer a promising therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:24619965

  16. Angiotensin II Induces Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Activating TFEB-Mediated MuRF1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Du Bois, Philipp; Pablo Tortola, Cristina; Lodka, Doerte; Kny, Melanie; Schmidt, Franziska; Song, Kunhua; Schmidt, Sibylle; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Fielitz, Jens

    2015-08-14

    Skeletal muscle wasting with accompanying cachexia is a life threatening complication in congestive heart failure. The molecular mechanisms are imperfectly understood, although an activated renin-angiotensin aldosterone system has been implicated. Angiotensin (Ang) II induces skeletal muscle atrophy in part by increased muscle-enriched E3 ubiquitin ligase muscle RING-finger-1 (MuRF1) expression, which may involve protein kinase D1 (PKD1). To elucidate the molecular mechanism of Ang II-induced skeletal muscle wasting. A cDNA expression screen identified the lysosomal hydrolase-coordinating transcription factor EB (TFEB) as novel regulator of the human MuRF1 promoter. TFEB played a key role in regulating Ang II-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by transcriptional control of MuRF1 via conserved E-box elements. Inhibiting TFEB with small interfering RNA prevented Ang II-induced MuRF1 expression and atrophy. The histone deacetylase-5 (HDAC5), which was directly bound to and colocalized with TFEB, inhibited TFEB-induced MuRF1 expression. The inhibition of TFEB by HDAC5 was reversed by PKD1, which was associated with HDAC5 and mediated its nuclear export. Mice lacking PKD1 in skeletal myocytes were resistant to Ang II-induced muscle wasting. We propose that elevated Ang II serum concentrations, as occur in patients with congestive heart failure, could activate the PKD1/HDAC5/TFEB/MuRF1 pathway to induce skeletal muscle wasting. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. PPARdelta activation inhibits angiotensin II induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by suppressing intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuy-Sook; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seahyoung; Lim, Hyun-Joung; Park, Hyun-Young

    2009-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors delta (PPARdelta) is known to be expressed ubiquitously, and the predominant PPAR subtype of cardiac cells. However, relatively less is known regarding the role of PPARdelta in cardiac cells except that PPARdelta ligand treatment protects cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effect of selective PPARdelta ligand L-165041 on angiotensin II (AngII) induced cardiac hypertrophy and its underlying mechanism using cardiomyocyte. According to our data, L-165041 (10 microM) inhibited AngII-induced [(3)H] leucine incorporation, induction of the fetal gene atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and increase of cardiomyocyte size. Previous studies have implicated the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in the progress of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. L-165041 pretreatment significantly inhibited AngII-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase and subsequent phosphorylation of FAK. Further experiment using Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 confirmed that Ca(2+) induced FAK phosphorylation, and this was also blocked by L-165041 pretreatment. In addition, overexpression of PPARdelta using adenovirus significantly inhibited AngII-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase and FAK expression, while PPARdelta siRNA treatment abolished the effect of L-165041. These data indicate that PPARdelta ligand L-165041 inhibits AngII induced cardiac hypertrophy by suppressing intracellular Ca(2+)/FAK/ERK signaling pathway in a PPARdelta dependent mechanism.

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 in angiotensin II-induced inflammation and hypertension: regulation of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Talin; Li, Melissa Wei; Lemarié, Catherine A; Simeone, Stefania M C; Pagano, Patrick J; Gaestel, Matthias; Paradis, Pierre; Wassmann, Sven; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2011-02-01

    Vascular oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in angiotensin II-induced hypertension, and mitogen-activated protein kinases participate in these processes. We questioned whether mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a downstream target of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, is involved in angiotensin II-induced vascular responses. In vivo experiments were performed in wild-type and Mk2 knockout mice infused intravenously with angiotensin II. Angiotensin II induced a 30 mm Hg increase in mean blood pressure in wild-type that was delayed in Mk2 knockout mice. Angiotensin II increased superoxide production and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in blood vessels of wild-type but not in Mk2 knockout mice. Mk2 knockdown by small interfering RNA in mouse mesenteric vascular smooth muscle cells caused a 42% reduction in MK2 protein and blunted the angiotensin II-induced 40% increase of MK2 expression. Mk2 knockdown blunted angiotensin II-induced doubling of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, 2.4-fold increase of nuclear p65, and 1.4-fold increase in Ets-1. Mk2 knockdown abrogated the angiotensin II-induced 4.7-fold and 1.3-fold increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA and protein. Angiotensin II enhanced reactive oxygen species levels (by 29%) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity (by 48%), both abolished by Mk2 knockdown. Reduction of MK2 blocked angiotensin II-induced p47phox translocation to the membrane, associated with a 53% enhanced catalase expression. Angiotensin II-induced increase of MK2 was prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor Nox2ds-tat. Mk2 small interfering RNA prevented the angiotensin II-induced 30% increase of proliferation. In conclusion, MK2 plays a critical role in angiotensin II signaling, leading to hypertension, oxidative stress via activation of p47phox and inhibition of antioxidants, and vascular inflammation

  19. Chronic Angiotensin II infusion drives extensive aldosterone-independent ENaC activation

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Minolfa C.; Jensen, V. Behrana; Doris, Peter A.; Navar, L. Gabriel; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2014-01-01

    The inability of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade to reduce hypertension associated with high Angiotensin (Ang) II suggests direct actions of Ang II to regulate tubular sodium reabsorption via the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN). We used freshly isolated ASDN from mice to delineate the synergism and primacy between aldosterone and Ang II in controlling functional ENaC activity. Inhibition of MR specifically prevented the increased number of functionally active ENaC but not ENaC open probability elicited by a low sodium diet. In contrast, we found no functional role of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the regulation of ENaC activity by dietary salt intake. Simultaneous inhibition of MR and Ang II type 1 receptors (AT1R) ameliorated the enhanced ENaC activity caused by low dietary salt intake and produced significantly greater natriuresis than either inhibitor alone. Chronic systemic Ang II infusion induced more than two times greater increase in ENaC activity than observed during dietary sodium restriction. Importantly, ENaC activity remained greatly above control levels during maximal MR inhibition. We conclude that during variations in dietary salt intake both aldosterone and Ang II contribute complementarily to the regulation of ENaC activity in the ASDN. In contrast, in the setting of Ang II-dependent hypertension, ENaC activity is up-regulated well above the physiological range and is not effectively suppressed by inhibition of the aldosterone-MR axis. This provides a mechanistic explanation for the resistance to MR inhibition that occurs in hypertensive subjects having elevated intrarenal Ang II levels. PMID:24060890

  20. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor constitutive activation: from molecular mechanisms to pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petrel, Christophe; Clauser, Eric

    2009-04-29

    Mutations activating the angiotensin II AT(1) receptor are important to identify and characterize because they give access to the activation mechanisms of this G protein coupled receptor and help to characterize the signaling pathways and the potential pathophysiology of this receptor. The different constitutively activated mutations of the AT(1) receptor are mostly localized in transmembrane domains (TM) and their characterization demonstrated that release of intramolecular constraints and movements among these TM are a necessary step for receptor activation. These mutations constitutively activate Gq linked signaling pathways, receptor internalization and maybe the G protein-independent signaling pathways. Expression of such mutations in mice is linked to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, but such natural mutations have not been identified in human pathology.

  1. Ets-1 targeted by microrna-221 regulates angiotensin II-induced renal fibroblast activation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Di, Jia; Jiang, Lei; Zhou, Yang; Cao, Hongdi; Fang, Li; Wen, Ping; Li, Xiurong; Dai, Chunsun; Yang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast activation is one of the most important mechanisms for Angiotensin II (Ang II) in promoting renal fibrosis. Transcription factor Ets-1 is recognized to play a key role in kidney diseases. However, the role and mechanisms of Ets-1 in Ang-II induced fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis are not fully understood. Mice were treated with Ang II via osmotic mini-pumps or Ang II expression plasmid (pAng II). Cultured normal rat kidney interstitial fibroblast (NRK-49F) cells were incubated with Ang II. Role of Ets-1 in renal fibrosis and fibroblast activation were assessed by Western blot, Immunohistochemical staining'MTT, Boyden chamber and Immunofluorescence staining. Effects of miR-221 on Ets-1 and fibroblast activation were investigated by MTT, Boyden chamber, Western blot and Q-PCR. We found that Ets-1 was up-regulated in fibrotic kidneys. Similarly, Ang II could activate NRK-49F cells as demonstrated by up-regulated α-SMA and fibronectin(FN) expression and enhanced cell proliferation and migration. Ang II also induced Ets-1 expression in NRK-49F cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Knock-down of Ets-1 by RNA interference attenuated Ang II-induced activation of NRK-49F cells. Ets-1 was previously reported as a target of microRNA-221 (miR-221). In Ang II-induced fibrotic kidney, miR-221 was down-regulated. Similar results were observed in Ang II treated NRK-49F cells. Ectopic expression of miR-221 mimic attenuated the up-regulation of Ets-1 by Ang II in NRK-49F cells, which further prevented the activation of NRK-49F cells. However, the inhibitor of miR-221 aggravated Ang II induced Ets-1 expression and NRK-49F cells activation. Our study suggests that miR-221/Ets-1 axis takes an important role in mediating AngII induced interstitial fibroblast activation and renal fibrosis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  3. Calpain-10 Activity Underlies Angiotensin II-Induced Aldosterone Production in an Adrenal Glomerulosa Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Seremwe, Mutsa; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone important in the regulation of blood pressure. Aberrant production of aldosterone results in the development and progression of diseases including hypertension and congestive heart failure; therefore, a complete understanding of aldosterone production is important for developing more effective treatments. Angiotensin II (AngII) regulates steroidogenesis, in part through its ability to increase intracellular calcium levels. Calcium can activate calpains, proteases classified as typical or atypical based on the presence or absence of penta-EF-hands, which are involved in various cellular responses. We hypothesized that calpain, in particular calpain-10, is activated by AngII in adrenal glomerulosa cells and underlies aldosterone production. Our studies showed that pan-calpain inhibitors reduced AngII-induced aldosterone production in 2 adrenal glomerulosa cell models, primary bovine zona glomerulosa and human adrenocortical carcinoma (HAC15) cells, as well as CYP11B2 expression in the HAC15 cells. Although AngII induced calpain activation in these cells, typical calpain inhibitors had no effect on AngII-elicited aldosterone production, suggesting a lack of involvement of classical calpains in this process. However, an inhibitor of the atypical calpain, calpain-10, decreased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Consistent with this result, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of calpain-10 inhibited aldosterone production and CYP11B2 expression, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of calpain-10 resulted in increased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Our results indicate that AngII-induced activation of calpain-10 in glomerulosa cells underlies aldosterone production and identify calpain-10 or its downstream pathways as potential targets for the development of drug therapies for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:25836666

  4. Studies on angiotensin II and analogs: impact of substitution in position 8 on conformation and activity.

    PubMed

    Aumelas, A; Sakarellos, C; Lintner, K; Fermandjian, S; Khosla, M C; Smeby, R R; Bumpus, F M

    1985-04-01

    Affinity, residual agonist activity, and inhibitor properties of a series of angiotensin II analogs modified at the COOH-terminal position (X8-substituted peptides) have been probed for structure/conformation-biological activity relationships. The results emphasize (i) the large impact that subtle conformational variations caused by structural alterations in the position 8 side chain have on biological properties, (ii) the implication of the COOH-terminal carboxyl group in both affinity and intrinsic activity, and (iii) the influence that the bulkiness of the side chain in position 8 of antagonists has on the local conformation at the COOH terminus and thus on the inhibitory properties. In the hormone, the phenylalanine-8 ring is required for its steric influence and aromaticity to ensure a fully active conformation at the COOH terminus. Especially, correct orientation of the position 8 carboxyl group relative to the phenyl group of the phenylalanine residue may be necessary for agonistic activation of the angiotensin receptor complex. Replacement of the aromatic ring on the COOH-terminal residue by a nonaromatic group leads to incorrect orientation of the carboxyl group and causes the appearance of antagonist properties. Although the steric effects of the side chain can be modulated by specific interaction of its chemical groups (if any) with the peptide backbone, we found a good correlation between the size of the side chain-e.g., the steric parameter V gamma (the van der Waals volume consisting of the C alpha, C beta, and C gamma atoms), the conformational properties in the backbone (3J HC alpha-NH), and the binding capacities in all compounds tested.

  5. Studies on angiotensin II and analogs: impact of substitution in position 8 on conformation and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Aumelas, A; Sakarellos, C; Lintner, K; Fermandjian, S; Khosla, M C; Smeby, R R; Bumpus, F M

    1985-01-01

    Affinity, residual agonist activity, and inhibitor properties of a series of angiotensin II analogs modified at the COOH-terminal position (X8-substituted peptides) have been probed for structure/conformation-biological activity relationships. The results emphasize (i) the large impact that subtle conformational variations caused by structural alterations in the position 8 side chain have on biological properties, (ii) the implication of the COOH-terminal carboxyl group in both affinity and intrinsic activity, and (iii) the influence that the bulkiness of the side chain in position 8 of antagonists has on the local conformation at the COOH terminus and thus on the inhibitory properties. In the hormone, the phenylalanine-8 ring is required for its steric influence and aromaticity to ensure a fully active conformation at the COOH terminus. Especially, correct orientation of the position 8 carboxyl group relative to the phenyl group of the phenylalanine residue may be necessary for agonistic activation of the angiotensin receptor complex. Replacement of the aromatic ring on the COOH-terminal residue by a nonaromatic group leads to incorrect orientation of the carboxyl group and causes the appearance of antagonist properties. Although the steric effects of the side chain can be modulated by specific interaction of its chemical groups (if any) with the peptide backbone, we found a good correlation between the size of the side chain-e.g., the steric parameter V gamma (the van der Waals volume consisting of the C alpha, C beta, and C gamma atoms), the conformational properties in the backbone (3J HC alpha-NH), and the binding capacities in all compounds tested. PMID:3856867

  6. Fructose stimulates Na/H exchange activity and sensitizes the proximal tubule to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Pablo D; Hong, Nancy J; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Ortiz, Pablo A; Beierwaltes, William H; Imig, John D; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2014-03-01

    The proximal nephron reabsorbs 60% to 70% of the fluid and sodium and most of the filtered bicarbonate via Na/H exchanger 3. Enhanced proximal nephron transport is implicated in hypertension. Our findings show that a fructose-enriched diet causes salt sensitivity. We hypothesized that fructose stimulates luminal Na/H exchange activity and sensitizes the proximal tubule to angiotensin II. Na/H exchange was measured in rat proximal tubules as the rate of intracellular pH (pHi) recovery in fluorescent units/s. Replacing 5 mmol/L glucose with 5 mmol/L fructose increased the rate of pHi recovery (1.8±0.6 fluorescent units/s; P<0.02; n=8). Staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, blocked this effect. We studied whether this effect was because of the addition of fructose or removal of glucose. The basal rate of pHi recovery was first tested in the presence of a 0.6-mmol/L glucose and 1, 3, or 5 mmol/L fructose added in a second period. The rate of pHi recovery did not change with 1 mmol/L but it increased with 3 and 5 mmol/L of fructose. Adding 5 mmol/L glucose caused no change. Removal of luminal sodium blocked pHi recovery. With 5.5 mmol/L glucose, angiotensin II (1 pmol/L) did not affect the rate of pHi recovery (change, -1.1±0.5 fluorescent units/s; n=9) but it increased the rate of pHi recovery with 0.6 mmol/L glucose/5 mmol/L fructose (change, 4.0±2.2 fluorescent units/s; P<0.02; n=6). We conclude that fructose stimulates Na/H exchange activity and sensitizes the proximal tubule to angiotensin II. This mechanism is likely dependent on protein kinase C. These results may partially explain the mechanism by which a fructose diet induces hypertension.

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is required for the behavioural desensitization that occurs after repeated injections of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Vento, Peter J; Daniels, Derek

    2012-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts on central angiotensin type 1 (AT(1)) receptors to increase water and saline intake. Prolonged exposure to Ang II in cell culture models results in a desensitization of the AT(1) receptor that is thought to involve receptor internalization, and a behavioural correlate of this desensitization has been shown in rats after repeated central injections of Ang II. Specifically, rats given repeated injections of Ang II drink less water than control animals after a subsequent test injection of Ang II. In the same conditions, however, repeated injections of Ang II have no effect on Ang II-induced saline intake. Given earlier studies indicating that separate intracellular signalling pathways mediate Ang II-induced water and saline intake, we hypothesized that the desensitization observed in rats may be incomplete, leaving the receptor able to activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK1/2), which play a role in Ang II-induced saline intake without affecting water intake. In support of this hypothesis, we found no difference in MAP kinase phosphorylation after an Ang II test injection in rats given prior treatment with repeated injections of vehicle, Ang II or Sar(1),Ile(4),Ile(8)-Ang II (SII), an Ang II analogue that activates MAP kinase without G protein coupling. In addition, we found that pretreatment with the MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 completely blocked the desensitizing effect of repeated Ang II injections on water intake. Furthermore, Ang II-induced water intake was reduced to a similar extent by repeated injections of Ang II or SII. The results suggest that G protein-independent signalling is sufficient to produce behavioural desensitization of the angiotensin system and that the desensitization requires MAP kinase activation.

  8. Angiotensin II, independent of plasma renin activity, contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Okamoto, Luis E; Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-03-01

    At least half of primary autonomic failure patients exhibit supine hypertension, despite profound impairments in sympathetic activity. Although the mechanisms underlying this hypertension are unknown, plasma renin activity is often undetectable, suggesting renin-angiotensin (Ang) pathways are not involved. However, because aldosterone levels are preserved, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II is intact and contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure. Indeed, circulating Ang II was paradoxically increased in hypertensive autonomic failure patients (52±5 pg/mL, n=11) compared with matched healthy controls (27±4 pg/mL, n=10; P=0.002), despite similarly low renin activity (0.19±0.06 versus 0.34±0.13 ng/mL per hour, respectively; P=0.449). To determine the contribution of Ang II to supine hypertension in these patients, we administered the AT(1) receptor blocker losartan (50 mg) at bedtime in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (n=11). Losartan maximally reduced systolic blood pressure by 32±11 mm Hg at 6 hours after administration (P<0.05), decreased nocturnal urinary sodium excretion (P=0.0461), and did not worsen morning orthostatic tolerance. In contrast, there was no effect of captopril on supine blood pressure in a subset of these patients. These findings suggest that Ang II formation in autonomic failure is independent of plasma renin activity, and perhaps Ang-converting enzyme. Furthermore, these studies suggest that elevations in Ang II contribute to the hypertension of autonomic failure, and provide rationale for the use of AT(1) receptor blockers for treatment of these patients.

  9. Angiotensin II stimulates renal proximal tubule Na(+)-ATPase activity through the activation of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Rangel, L B A; Caruso-Neves, C; Lara, L S; Lopes, A G

    2002-08-31

    Recently, our group described an AT(1)-mediated direct stimulatory effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on the Na(+)-ATPase activity of proximal tubules basolateral membranes (BLM) [Am. J. Physiol. 248 (1985) F621]. Data in the present report suggest the participation of a protein kinase C (PKC) in the molecular mechanism of Ang II-mediated stimulation of the Na(+)-ATPase activity due to the following observations: (i) the stimulation of protein phosphorylation in BLM, induced by Ang II, is mimicked by the PKC activator TPA, and is completely reversed by the specific PKC inhibitor, calphostin C; (ii) the Na(+)-ATPase activity is stimulated by Ang II and TPA in the same magnitude, being these effects abolished by the use of the PKC inhibitors, calphostin C and sphingosine; (iii) the Na(+)-ATPase activity is activated by catalytic subunit of PKC (PKC-M), in a similar and nonadditive manner to Ang II; and (iv) Ang II stimulates the phosphorylation of MARCKS, a specific substrate for PKC.

  10. Angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) is an independent prognosticator of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and promotes cells proliferation via mTOR activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shau-Hsuan; Lu, Hung-I; Chang, Alice Y.W.; Huang, Wan-Ting; Lin, Wei-Che; Lee, Ching-Chang; Tien, Wan-Yu; Lan, Ya-Chun; Tsai, Hsin-Ting; Chen, Chang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the angiotensin II/ angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type II receptor (AT2R) signaling pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression levels of AT1R and AT2R in tissues from 152 surgically resected ESCC patients, and those expression levels were then correlated with treatment outcomes. The angiotensin II/AT1R/AT2R signaling pathway and its biological effects in the context of ESCC were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results In human samples, AT1R overexpression was univariately associated with inferior overall survival and remained multivariately independent (hazard ratio=1.812). In vitro, angiotensin II stimulated the growth of ESCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with irbesartan or AT1R-RNAi knockdown but not treatment with PD123319 significantly decreased the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Angiotensin II also caused mTOR activation in a dose-dependent manner, and everolimus or mTOR-RNAi knockdown significantly suppressed the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Furthermore, AT1R-RNAi knockdown suppressed the activation of mTOR. Clinically, AT1R expression was also correlated with phosphorylated mTOR expression. In a xenograft model, local angiotensin II injection enhanced tumor growth, and this effect could be decreased by treatment with irbesartan or everolimus. In a 4-NQO-induced-ESCC murine model, irbesartan significantly decreased the incidence of esophageal tumor. Conclusions These findings suggest that AT1R overexpression is an independent adverse prognosticator for patients with ESCC and that angiotensin II/AT1R signaling stimulates ESCC growth, in part through mTOR activation. PMID:27564102

  11. Brain-Mediated Dysregulation of the Bone Marrow Activity in Angiotensin II-induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Joo Yun; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Qi, Yanfei; Afzal, Aqeela; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S; Grant, Maria B.; Mocco, J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the brain is implicated in increased sympathetic drive, inflammatory status and vascular dysfunctions, associated with development and establishment of hypertension. However, little is known about the mechanism of this impaired brain-vascular communication. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress in the brain cardioregulatory areas, such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, is driven by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and leads to increased inflammatory cells (ICs) and decreased/dysfunctional endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), thereby compromising vasculature repair and accelerating hypertension. Chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion resulted in elevated blood pressure and sympathetic vasomotor drive, decreased spontaneous baroreflex gain, and increased microglia activation in the PVN. This was associated with 46% decrease in BM EPCs and 250% increase in BM ICs, resulting in 5 fold decrease of EPCs/ICs ratio in the BM. Treatment with mitoTEMPO, a scavenger of mitochondrial O2−• intracerebroventricularly but not subcutaneously, attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension, decreased activation of microglia in the PVN, and normalized EPCs/ICs. This functional communication between the brain and BM was confirmed by retrograde neuronal labeling from the BM with GFP-tagged pseudorabies virus (PRV). Administration of GFP-PRV into the BM resulted in predominant labeling of PVN neurons within 3 days, with some fluorescence in the NTS, RVLM and SFO. Taken together, these data demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial ROS attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension and corrects the imbalance in EPCs/ICs in the BM. They suggest that an imbalance in vascular reparative and ICs may perpetuate vascular pathophysiology in this model of hypertension. PMID:23045460

  12. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 contribute to angiotensin II-induced activation of adventitial fibroblasts from rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    He, Rui-Qing; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Bao-Li; Li, Xiao-Dong; Hong, Mo-Na; Chen, Qi-Zhi; Han, Wei-Qing; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-29

    Adventitial fibroblasts (AFs) can be activated by angiotensin II (Ang II) and exert pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory effects in vascular remodeling. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 play a significant role in fibrogenic and inflammatory diseases. The present study hypothesized that PAR1 and PAR2 are involved in Ang II-induced AF activation and contribute to adventitial remodeling. We found that direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 with PAR1-AP and PAR2-AP led to AF activation, including proliferation and differentiation of AFs, extracellular matrix synthesis, as well as production of pro-fibrotic cytokine TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and MCP-1. Furthermore, PAR1 and PAR2 mediated Ang II-induced AF activation, since both PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists inhibited Ang II-induced proliferation, migration, differentiation, extracellular matrix synthesis and production of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in AFs. Finally, mechanistic study showed that Ang II, via Ang II type I receptor (AT1R), upregulated both PAR1 and PAR2 expression, and transactivated PAR1 and PAR2, as denoted by internalization of both proteins. In conclusion, our results suggest that PAR1 and PAR2 play a critical role in Ang II-induced AF activation, and this may contribute to adventitia-related pathological changes. - Highlights: • Direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 led to adventitial fibroblast (AF) activation. • PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists attenuated Ang II-induced AF activation. • Ang II induced the upregulation and transactivation of PAR1/PAR2 in AFs.

  13. Mechanical strain and collagen potentiate mitogenic activity of angiotensin II in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, K; Wilson, E; Chatterjee, K; Ives, H E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of extracellular matrix proteins and mechanical strain on the mitogenic activity of angiotensins I and II (AI and AII) were examined in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. VSM cells on various extracellular matrices were exposed to AII (1 microM) for 48 h. On plastic, AII induced only a 1.6-fold increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, but on fibronectin- or type I collagen-coated plastic, the response to AII was enhanced from two- to fourfold. On a type I collagen-coated silicone elastomer, to which mechanical strain was applied, [3H]thymidine incorporation dramatically increased to a maximum of 53-fold. Dup 753 (10(-5) M) blocked the AII-induced increase in DNA synthesis. AI also increased DNA synthesis in VSM cells, and this response was also enhanced by mechanical strain. Mitogenic activity of AI was blocked by ramiprilat (10(-5) M), indicating that its mitogenic activity was via conversion to AII. The synergy between AII and strain was completely eliminated by neutralizing antibodies to PDGF AB (3 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, the mitogenic effect of AII in unstrained cells was also synergistic with submaximal concentrations of PDGF AB (1 ng/ml). Thus, the synergy between AII and mechanical strain probably results from synergism between AII and PDGF secreted in response to strain. PMID:8254054

  14. Na(+)-H+ exchanger kinetics in adrenal glomerulosa cells and its activation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, P.R.; Kim, S.Y.; Williams, G.H.; Canessa, M.L. )

    1990-07-01

    We have studied the kinetic properties of basal and angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulated Na(+)-H+ exchange in adrenal glomerulosa cells by measuring changes in cytosolic pH (pHi) and initial rates of 22Na uptake in the presence or absence of dimethylamiloride (DMA). The cells were studied under basal conditions, at constant pHi with varied external sodium (Na+o), and at varied pHi with constant Na+o (50 mM). In 2,7-biscarboxyethyl-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein loaded cells under basal conditions, pHi rose from 7.09 +/- 0.02 to 7.19 +/- 0.02. Similarly, DMA-sensitive Na influx was enhanced from 9.2 +/- 1.3 to 14.8 +/- 2.1 nmol Na+/mg protein x min (P less than 0.01) by ANG II. In cells acid-loaded by preincubation in Na(+)-free media (pHi 6.8), addition of varying Na+o resulted in a rapid H+ efflux that was markedly inhibited by DMA. DMA-sensitive Na+ influx into these acidified cells with varied Na+o exhibited a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 23 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 43 nmol Na+/mg protein x min. By varying pHi (from pHi 7.1 to 6.2), DMA-sensitive Na+ influx likewise showed activation with cellular acidification with a pK at pHi 7.09. At pHi 6.8, ANG II decreased the Km for Na+o from 23 to 17 mM and increased the Vmax from 43 to 53 nmol Na+/mg protein x min. The pHi dependence of DMA-sensitive Na+ influx was not affected by ANG II (pK at pHi 7.03). DMA also inhibited AII-stimulated aldosterone secretion and Na+ influx similarly. These results indicate that Na(+)-H+ exchange in adrenal glomerulosa cells is functioning under basal conditions, and is modulated by ANG II with enhanced Na+o affinity and Vmax but without a shift in pHi dependence (similar to ANG II effects on vascular smooth muscle cells). These effects suggest an important role for Na(+)-H+ exchange during ANG II stimulation of aldosterone production by glomerulosa cells.

  15. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Node, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109TM3, Phe182ECL2, Gln257TM6, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108TM3, Ser109TM3, Ala163TM4, Phe182ECL2, Lys199TM5, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. PMID:26121982

  16. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109(TM3), Phe182(ECL2), Gln257(TM6), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108(TM3), Ser109(TM3), Ala163(TM4), Phe182(ECL2), Lys199(TM5), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R.

  17. Angiotensin II activates the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway and induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression in rat endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Florencia; Sacerdoti, Flavia; De León, Romina; Gentile, Teresa; Canellada, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, plays a role in the process of uterine decidualization and blastocyst attachment. On the other hand, overexpression of COX-2 is involved in the proliferation of the endometrial tissue during endometriosis. Deregulation of the renin-angiotensin-system plays a role in the pathophysiology of endometriosis and pre-eclampsia. Angiotensin II increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by targeting phospholypase C-gamma in endometrial stromal cells (ESC). A key element of the cellular response to Ca(2+) signals is the activity of the Ca(2+)- and calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Our first aim was to study whether angiotensin II stimulated Cox-2 gene expression in rat ESC and to analyze whether calcineurin activity was involved. In cells isolated from non-pregnant uteri, COX-2 expression--both mRNA and protein--was induced by co-stimulation with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PIo), as well as by angiotensin II. Pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A inhibited this induction. We further analyzed the role of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in the induction of Cox-2 gene expression in non-pregnant rat ESC. Cyclosporin A abolished NFATc1 dephosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. Cyclosporin A also inhibited the transcriptional activity driven by the Cox-2 promoter. Exogenous expression of the peptide VIVIT -specific inhibitor of calcineurin/NFAT binding- blocked the activation of Cox-2 promoter and the up-regulation of COX-2 protein in these cells. Finally we analyzed Cox-2 gene expression in ESC of early-pregnant rats. COX-2 expression--both mRNA and protein--was induced by stimulation with PIo as well as by angiotensin II. This induction appears to be calcineurin independent, since it was not abrogated by cyclosporin A. In conclusion, angiotensin II induced Cox-2 gene expression by activating the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in endometrial stromal

  18. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  19. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  20. The anti-adipogenic effect of angiotensin II on human preadipose cells involves ERK1,2 activation and PPARG phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Paula; Acuña, María José; Cifuentes, Mariana; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2010-07-01

    Despite the importance of adipocyte formation for adipose tissue physiology, current knowledge about the mechanisms that regulate the recruitment of progenitor cells to undergo adipogenic differentiation is limited. A role for locally generated angiotensin II emerged from studies with human and murine cells. Preadipose cells from different human fat depots show reduced response to adipogenic stimuli when exposed to angiotensin II. This investigation sought to gain an insight into the intracellular mechanisms involved in the anti-adipogenic response of human preadipose cells from omental fat to angiotensin II. Its effect was evaluated on cells stimulated to adipogenic differentiation in vitro, by assessment of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and expression of early markers of adipogenesis. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase(1,2) (ERK(1,2)) pathway activation was inferred from the phosphorylated to total ERK(1,2) ratio determined by western blot. Exposure to angiotensin II throughout the 10-day differentiation period resulted in a reduced adipogenic response. A similar anti-adipogenic effect was observed when this hormone was present during the first 48 h of induction to differentiation. Angiotensin II treatment had no consequences on CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) induction, but increased the phosphorylated form of the key adipogenic regulator PPARG. Upon angiotensin II exposure, a raise of phosphorylated ERK(1,2) was determined, which was more prominent 8-20 h after induction of adipogenesis (when controls reached negligible values). Chemical inhibition of ERK(1,2) phosphorylation prevented angiotensin II-dependent reduction in adipogenesis. These results support the participation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK(1,2) pathway in the anti-adipogenic effect of angiotensin II on preadipose cells from human omental adipose tissue.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin N; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N; Horwath, Julie A; Clark, Catharine G; Davisson, Robin L

    2015-05-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Young, Colin N.; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N.; Horwath, Julie A.; Clark, Catharine G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. PMID:25980014

  3. Liver Angiotensinogen Is the Primary Source of Renal Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Niimura, Fumio; Shimizu, Akihiro; Pastan, Ira; Saito, Akihiko; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Ichikawa, Iekuni

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II content in the kidney is much higher than in the plasma, and it increases more in kidney diseases through an uncertain mechanism. Because the kidney abundantly expresses angiotensinogen mRNA, transcriptional dysregulation of angiotensinogen within the kidney is one potential cause of increased renal angiotensin II in the setting of disease. Here, we observed that kidney-specific angiotensinogen knockout mice had levels of renal angiotensinogen protein and angiotensin II that were similar to those levels of control mice. In contrast, liver-specific knockout of angiotensinogen nearly abolished plasma and renal angiotensinogen protein and renal tissue angiotensin II. Immunohistochemical analysis in mosaic proximal tubules of megalin knockout mice revealed that angiotensinogen protein was incorporated selectively in megalin-intact cells of the proximal tubule, indicating that the proximal tubule reabsorbs filtered angiotensinogen through megalin. Disruption of the filtration barrier in a transgenic mouse model of podocyte-selective injury increased renal angiotensin II content and markedly increased both tubular and urinary angiotensinogen protein without an increase in renal renin activity, supporting the dependency of renal angiotensin II generation on filtered angiotensinogen. Taken together, these data suggest that liver-derived angiotensinogen is the primary source of renal angiotensinogen protein and angiotensin II. Furthermore, an abnormal increase in the permeability of the glomerular capillary wall to angiotensinogen, which characterizes proteinuric kidney diseases, enhances the synthesis of renal angiotensin II. PMID:22518004

  4. Angiotensin II Triggered p44/42 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Mediates Sympathetic Excitation in Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Weiss, Robert M.; Felder, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II), acting via angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1-R) in the brain, activates the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure (HF). We recently reported that ANG II stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to upregulate brain AT1-R in HF rats. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ANG II-activated MAPK signaling pathways contribute to sympathetic excitation in HF. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PD98059 and UO126, two selective p44/42 MAPK inhibitors, induced significant decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in HF rats, but had no effect on these variables in SHAM rats. Pretreatment with losartan attenuated the effects of PD98059. ICV administration of the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 had no effect on MAP, HR or RSNA in HF. The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 induced a small decrease in MAP and HR, but no change in RSNA. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated increased p44/42 MAPK activity in neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of HF rats, co-localized with Fra-like activity (indicating chronic neuronal excitation). ICV PD98059 and UO126 reduced Fra-like activity in PVN neurons in HF rats. In confirmatory acute studies, ICV ANG II increased MAP, HR and RSNA in baroreceptor-denervated rats and Fra-LI immunoreactivity in the PVN of neurally intact rats. Central administration of PD98059 markedly reduced these responses. These data demonstrate that intracellular p44/42 MAPK activity contributes to ANG II-induced PVN neuronal excitation and augmented sympathetic nerve activity in rats with HF. PMID:18574076

  5. Renal protection in chronic kidney disease: hypoxia-inducible factor activation vs. angiotensin II blockade

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Aihua; Arndt, Mary Ann K.; Satriano, Joseph; Singh, Prabhleen; Rieg, Timo; Thomson, Scott; Tang, Tong

    2010-01-01

    The 5/6th nephrectomy or ablation/infarction (A/I) preparation has been used as a classic model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We observed increased kidney oxygen consumption (QO2) and altered renal hemodynamics in the A/I kidney that were normalized after combined angiotensin II (ANG II) blockade. Studies suggest hypoxia inducible factor as a protective influence in A/I. We induced hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and HIF target proteins by two different methods, cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and dimethyloxalyglycine (DMOG), for the first week after creation of A/I and compared the metabolic and renal hemodynamic outcomes to combined ANG II blockade. We also examined the HIF target proteins expressed by using Western blots and real-time PCR. Treatment with DMOG, CoCl2, and ANG II blockade normalized kidney oxygen consumption factored by Na reabsorption and increased both renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. At 1 wk, CoCl2 and DMOG increased kidney expression of HIF by Western blot. In the untreated A/I kidney, VEGF, heme oxygenase-1, and GLUT1 were all modestly increased. Both ANG II blockade and CoCl2 therapy increased VEGF and GLUT1 but the cobalt markedly so. ANG II blockade decreased heme oxygenase-1 expression while CoCl2 increased it. By real-time PCR, erythropoietin and GLUT1 were only increased by CoCl2 therapy. Cell proliferation was modestly increased by ANG II blockade but markedly after cobalt therapy. Metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities were corrected equally by ANG II blockade and HIF therapies. However, the molecular patterns differed significantly between ANG II blockade and cobalt therapy. HIF induction may prove to be protective in this model of CKD. PMID:20881034

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinase 1 Causes Vasoconstriction and Enhances Vessel Reactivity to Angiotensin II via Protease-Activated Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Mishra, Nikita; Strauss, Jerome F; Walsh, Scott W

    2016-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) is an activator of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1), which is known to mediate the release of endothelin 1 (ET-1) in endothelial cells and activate the RhoA kinase (ROCK) pathway. Recently, we reported increased serum and vascular MMP-1 in women with preeclampsia and hypothesized that the action of MMP-1 on PAR-1 might have vasoconstrictive effects. Resistance-sized omental arteries obtained from normal pregnant women were mounted on a myograph system and perfused with MMP-1 in a dose range of 0.025 to 25 ng/mL or with angiotensin II (Ang II) in a dose range of 0.001 to 10 µmol/L in the presence of intraluminal MMP-1 (2.5 ng/mL) perfusion. Angiotensin II dose response was also performed with omental arteries from women with preeclampsia. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 caused dose-dependent vasoconstriction in endothelium-intact, but not in endothelium-denuded, vessels from normal pregnant women, which was blocked by inhibitors of PAR-1 and ET-1 type A receptor blocker. Intraluminal perfusion with a constant amount of MMP-1 enhanced vessel reactivity to Ang II, which was blocked by inhibitors of PAR-1, ROCK, and ET-1. Enhanced vascular reactivity to Ang II was observed in endothelium-intact, but not in endothelium-denuded, arteries of women with preeclampsia. Inhibitors of PAR-1, ROCK, and ET-1 blocked enhanced vascular reactivity to Ang II in endothelium-intact preeclamptic arteries. These data demonstrate that MMP-1 has potent vasoconstrictor effects and the ability to enhance vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor hormones, which are mediated by an endothelial PAR-1, ROCK, and ET-1 pathway. Increased circulating levels of MMP-1 and its increased expression in systemic vessels of women with preeclampsia may contribute to the development of maternal hypertension. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Anti-Plasmodium Activity of Angiotensin II and Related Synthetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Ceres; de Oliveira Junior, Vani Xavier; Fázio, Marcos Antonio; Nacif-Pimenta, Rafael; Miranda, Antonio; Pimenta, Paulo F. P.; Capurro, Margareth Lara

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium species are the causative agents of malaria, the most devastating insect-borne parasite of human populations. Finding and developing new drugs for malaria treatment and prevention is the goal of much research. Angiotensins I and II (ang I and ang II) and six synthetic related peptides designated Vaniceres 1-6 (VC1-VC6) were assayed in vivo and in vitro for their effects on the development of the avian parasite, Plasmodium gallinaceum. Ang II and VC5 injected into the thoraces of the insects reduced mean intensities of infection in the mosquito salivary glands by 88% and 76%, respectively. Although the mechanism(s) of action is not completely understood, we have demonstrated that these peptides disrupt selectively the P.gallinaceum cell membrane. Additionally, incubation in vitro of sporozoites with VC5 reduced the infectivity of the parasites to their vertebrate host. VC5 has no observable agonist effects on vertebrates, and this makes it a promising drug for malaria prevention and chemotherapy. PMID:18820728

  8. Angiotensin II: role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Córdova, Gonzalo; Salas, José Diego

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, the main protein reservoir in the body, is a tissue that exhibits high plasticity when exposed to changes. Muscle proteins can be mobilized into free amino acids when skeletal muscle wasting occurs, a process called skeletal muscle atrophy. This wasting is an important systemic or local manifestation under disuse conditions (e.g., bed rest or immobilization), in starvation, in older adults, and in several diseases. The molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting imply the activation of specific signaling pathways which ultimately manage muscle responses to modulate biological events such as increases in protein catabolism, oxidative stress, and cell death by apoptosis. Many factors have been involved in the generation and maintenance of atrophy in skeletal muscle, among them angiotensin II (Ang-II), the main peptide of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Together with Ang-II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT-1 receptor) are expressed in skeletal muscle, forming an important local axis that can regulate its function. In many of the conditions that lead to muscle wasting, there is an impairment of RAS in a global or local fashion. At this point, there are several pieces of evidence that suggest the participation of Ang-II, ACE, and AT-1 receptor in the generation of skeletal muscle atrophy. Interestingly, the Ang-II participation in muscle atrophy is strongly ligated to the regulation of hypertrophic activity of factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). In this article, we reviewed the current state of Ang-II and RAS function on skeletal muscle wasting and its possible use as a therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle function under atrophic conditions.

  9. Lesion of the Subfornical Organ attenuates Neuronal Activation of the Paraventricular Nucleus in response to Angiotensin II in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Jessica; Collister, John P

    2011-09-23

    The subfornical organ, one of the central circumventricular organs, has been shown to mediate many of the effects of circulating angiotensin II (AngII). Where these signals are processed downstream is not fully understood. The SFO does indeed project to prominent cardiovascular regulatory centers such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), of whose neurons are activated by central AngII. We reasoned that AngII sensed at the SFO would cause neuronal activation at downstream hypothalamic areas such as the median preoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus, and as such would be diminished in animals with lesions of the SFO. To test this hypothesis, groups of rats underwent either SFO lesion (SFOx) or sham operation. Five days later rats were instrumented with radiotelemetry transducers for monitoring of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and venous catheters for infusions. MAP and heart rate were measured continuously. After a 4 day control period, infusion of AngII (0.575 µg/kg/min) was begun for a period of 2 hours. Rats were then sacrificed and brains were processed for neuronal Fos expression. AngII produced Fos expression in the SFO, MnPO and PVN of sham rats. Fos expression was greatly attenuated in the PVN of SFOx rats. These results support our hypothesis, suggesting that AngII sensitive neurons of the SFO can mediate neuronal activation in the PVN.

  10. Mechanical activation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors causes actin remodelling and myogenic responsiveness in skeletal muscle arterioles.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kwangseok; Zhao, Guiling; Hong, Zhongkui; Sun, Zhe; Yang, Yan; Clifford, Philip S; Davis, Michael J; Meininger, Gerald A; Hill, Michael A

    2016-12-01

    Candesartan, an inverse agonist of the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT1 R), causes a concentration-dependent inhibition of pressure-dependent myogenic tone consistent with previous reports of mechanosensitivity of this G protein-coupled receptor. Mechanoactivation of the AT1 R occurs independently of local angiotensin II production and the type 2 angiotensin receptor. Mechanoactivation of the AT1 R stimulates actin polymerization by a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism, but independently of a change in intracellular Ca(2+) . Using atomic force microscopy, changes in single vascular smooth muscle cell cortical actin are observed to remodel following mechanoactivation of the AT1 R. The Gq/11 protein-coupled angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 R) has been shown to be activated by mechanical stimuli. In the vascular system, evidence supports the AT1 R being a mechanosensor that contributes to arteriolar myogenic constriction. The aim of this study was to determine if AT1 R mechanoactivation affects myogenic constriction in skeletal muscle arterioles and to determine underlying cellular mechanisms. Using pressure myography to study rat isolated first-order cremaster muscle arterioles the AT1 R inhibitor candesartan (10(-7) -10(-5)  m) showed partial but concentration-dependent inhibition of myogenic reactivity. Inhibition was demonstrated by a rightward shift in the pressure-diameter relationship over the intraluminal pressure range, 30-110 mmHg. Pressure-induced changes in global vascular smooth muscle intracellular Ca(2+) (using Fura-2) were similar in the absence or presence of candesartan, indicating that AT1 R-mediated myogenic constriction relies on Ca(2+) -independent downstream signalling. The diacylglycerol analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) reversed the inhibitory effect of candesartan, while this rescue effect was prevented by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF 109203X. Both candesartan and PKC inhibition caused increased G-actin levels

  11. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mingming; Zhao, Chengrui; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Li; Liu, Huirong; Ma, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb) based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII). Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients' sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases. PMID:27057554

  12. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance in salt-sensitive hypertension: role of angiotensin II activation of NFκB.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Liu, Chang; Tian, Runxia; Nishiyama, Akira; Raij, Leopoldo

    2015-05-01

    We have previously shown that in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats, impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and to insulin is mechanistically linked to up-regulation of angiotensin (Ang) II actions and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor (NF)κB. Here we investigated whether Ang II activation of NFκB contributed to insulin resistance in the skeletal muscle of this animal model. DS rats were fed either a normal (NS, 0.5% NaCl) or high (HS, 4% NaCl) salt diet for 6 weeks. In addition, 3 separate groups of HS rats were given angiotensin receptor 1 blocker candesartan (ARB, 10 mg/kg/day in drinking water), antioxidant tempol (1 mmol/L in drinking water) or NFκB inhibitor PDTC (150 mg/kg in drinking water). DS rats manifested an increase in soleus muscle Ang II content, ROS production and phosopho-IκBα/IκBα ratio, ARB or tempol reduced ROS and phospho-IκBα/IκBα ratio. Hypertensive DS rats also manifested a reduction in glucose infusion rate, impaired insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and Glut-4 translocation in the soleus muscle, which were prevented with treatment of either ARB, tempol, or PDTC. Data from the rat diabetes signaling pathway PCR array showed that 8 genes among 84 target genes were altered in the muscle of hypertensive rats with the increase in gene expression of ACE1 and 5 proinflammatory genes, and decrease of 2 glucose metabolic genes. Incubation of the muscle with NFκB SN50 (a specific peptide inhibitor of NFκB) ex vivo reversed changes in hypertension-induced gene expression. The current findings strongly suggest that the activation of NFκB inflammatory pathway by Ang II play a critical role in skeletal muscle insulin resistance in salt-sensitive hypertension.

  13. Catechins inhibit angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Won, Sun-Mi; Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jung; Park, Kwon-Moo; Lee, Won-Jung

    2006-10-31

    Catechins, components of green tea, reduce the incidence of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is highly implicated in the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), resulting in atherosclerosis. The acting mechanisms of the catechins remain to be defined in the proliferation of VSMC induced by Ang II. Here we report that catechin, epicatechin (EC), epicatechingallate (ECG) or epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) significantly inhibits the Ang II-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation into the primary cultured rat aortic VSMC. Ang II increases the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2), c-jun-N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK 1/2), or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mRNA expression of c-jun and c-fos. The EGCG pretreatment inhibits the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2, JNK 1/2, or p38 MAPK, and the expression of c-jun or c-fos mRNA. U0126, a MEK inhibitor, SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, or SB203580, a p38 inhibitor, attenuates the Ang II-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation into the VSMC. In conclusion, catechins inhibit the Ang II-stimulated VSMC proliferation via the inhibition of the Ang II-stimulated activation of MAPK and activator protein-1 signaling pathways. The antiproliferative effect of catechins may be associated with the reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases by the intake of green tea. Catechins may be useful in the development of prevention and therapeutics of vascular diseases.

  14. CBP knockdown inhibits angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation through downregulating NF-kB transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Si-si; Chen, Jing; Xu, Sheng-kai; Li, Wan-qiang; Wang, Ji-chun

    2010-07-01

    CREB binding protein (CBP), a powerful transcriptional co-activator for various transcriptional factors, regulates cell behavior in many cell types. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to vascular lesion by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation and migration. Therefore, we examined whether CBP knockdown could suppress Ang II-induced VSMCs proliferation, and elucidated its underlying molecular mechanism. We constructed lentiviral vector expressing CBP-specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that efficiently silenced CBP. VSMCs proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay. Protein and mRNA expression of CBP and relevant cytokines were examined by Western blot, ELISA, and real-time PCR, respectively. We also used luciferase reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) to detect Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kB) transcriptional activity and DNA binding. Meanwhile, NF-kB p65 subunit nuclear translocation was confirmed by immunoblotting. Lentiviral-mediated CBP-shRNAs at different multiplicities of infection (MOI = 100, 150) both significantly suppressed Ang II-induced CBP expression. Knockdown of CBP markedly inhibited Ang II-stimulated VSMCs proliferation and cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-6) production. However, this inhibitory effect was not enhanced at MOI of 150 compared with MOI of 100 (P > 0.05). CBP siRNA showed the potent inhibition on Ang II-induced NF-kB transcriptional activity. Similarly, no significant difference was found between CBP siRNA lentivirus treatment groups. Furthermore, CBP gene silencing had no effect on NF-kB nuclear translocation and DNA binding. These findings suggest that CBP knockdown inhibits Ang II-induced VSMCs proliferation and the mechanism is involved with downregulation of NF-kB transcriptional activity, not through reduction in NF-kB nuclear translocation or DNA binding. Maintaining proper CBP level may be a potential therapeutic target for Ang II-induced cardiovascular

  15. Losartan inhibits STAT1 activation and protects human glomerular mesangial cells from angiotensin II induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Sumin; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Yang, Xue; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Lining

    2012-01-01

    Human glomerular mesangial cells (HMCs) have a finite lifespan, and eventually enter irreversible growth arrest known as cellular senescence, which is thought to contribute to kidney ageing and age-related kidney disorders, such as chronic kidney disease. The signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is a latent transcription factor involved in a variety of signal transduction pathways, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, but whether it could regulate HMC senescence still remains to be explored. In our study, the induction of angiotensin II (Ang II)-accelerated HMC senescence, as judged by increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal)-positive staining cells, morphological changes, and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. STAT1 activity and the expression of p53 and p21(Cip1) were increased after Ang II treatment. STAT1 knockdown using RNA interference significantly inhibited the progression of HMC senescence and decreased the elevated expression of p53 and p21(Cip1). Pretreating HMCs with Ang II receptor blocker losartan also inhibited the progression of HMC senescence and STAT1 activity. Our results indicate that STAT1 is implicated in the mediation of Ang II-induced HMC senescence through p53/ p21(Cip1) pathway, and that losartan could attenuate HMC senescence by regulating STAT1. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine reduced ROS production and STAT1 activity induced by Ang II, indicating that Ang II uses ROS as a second messenger to regulate STAT1 activity.

  16. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  17. Interleukin-6 Knockout Prevents Angiotensin II Hypertension: Role of Renal Vasoconstriction and JAK2/STAT3 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brands, Michael W.; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.L.; Inscho, Edward W.; Al-Azawi, Hind; Allen, Ashlyn J.; Labazi, Hicham

    2012-01-01

    Chronic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion stimulates IL-6 release, and we and others have shown that preventing the increase in IL-6 significantly attenuates AngII hypertension. This study measured renal blood flow (RBF) chronically, using Transonic flow probes in wildtype (WT) and IL-6 knockout (KO) mice, to determine the role of renal blood flow regulation in that response. AngII infusion at 200, 800, and 3600 ng/kg/min caused a dose-dependent decrease in renal blood flow in WT mice, and the response at 800 ng/kg/min was compared between WT and IL-6 KO mice. AngII infusion increased plasma IL-6 concentration in WT mice and increased MAP (19 hrs/day; DSI telemetry) from 113±4 to 149±4 mmHg (Δ 36 mmHg) over the 7-day infusion period, and that effect was blocked in IL-6 KO mice (119±7 to 126±7 mmHg). RBF decreased to an average of 61±8% of control over the 7-day period (control = 0.86±0.02 ml/min) in the WT mice; however, the average decrease to 72±6% of control (control = 0.88±0.02 ml/min) in the KO mice was not significantly different. There also was no difference in afferent arteriolar constriction by AngII in blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephrons in WT vs. KO mice. Phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 in renal cortex homogenates increased significantly in AngII-infused WT mice, and that effect was prevented completely in AngII-infused IL-6 KO mice. These data suggest that IL-6-dependent activation of the renal JAK2/STAT3 pathway plays a role in AngII hypertension, but not by mediating the effect of AngII to decrease total renal blood flow. PMID:20921429

  18. Plasma renin activities, angiotensin II concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values in dogs with severe heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Kitoh, K; Inoue, H; Ohba, Y; Suzuki, F; Sasaki, Y

    2000-04-01

    Relationships among plasma renin activities (PRA), plasma angiotensin II (ATII) concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values were examined in dogs with ascitic pulmonary heartworm disease and acute- and chronic-vena caval syndrome (CS). PRA, plasma ATII concentration and plasma ANP concentration tended to be higher or were significantly higher in dogs with ascites, acute- and chronic-CS. PRA correlated significantly with plasma ATII concentration, WBC count, ALP activity, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, creatinine, sodium, potassium, and chloride, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ATII concentration correlated significantly with WBC count, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, sodium, and potassium, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ANP concentration did not correlate with PRA or ATII concentration, but correlated significantly only with pulmonary arterial pressure.

  19. Telmisartan prevents angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction in rabbit aorta via activating HGF/Met system and PPARγ pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ze-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Ling; Qian, Hai-Yan; Fang, Nan; Wang, Bang-Ning; Wang, Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Telmisartan with partial activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) powerfully reduces blood pressure, improves endothelial function and lipid metabolism. Hepatocyte growth factor/mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (HGF/Met) system in the local vasculature plays a pivotal role in maintaining normal endothelial function. This study is aimed to evaluate whether telmisartan directly prevents angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED) via activating HGF/Met system and/or PPARγ pathway. The isolated aortic rings of rabbits were incubated with Ang II (0.01-1 μM), telmisartan (0.1-10 μM), SU11274 (5 μM) as a specific Met inhibitor, GW9662 (10 μM) as a PPARγ antagonist alone or a combination for 6 h. Ang II obviously inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of HGF, Met and PPARγ, and the accumulative concentration-relaxation of the aortic rings to acetylcholine, among which the inhibitory effect of 1 μM Ang II was most significant. By contrast, telmisartan significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HGF, Met, and PPARγ, thus preventing Ang II-induced ED in a dose-dependent pattern. However, SU11274, GW9662 or a combination of both partially abolished the protective effects derived from telmisartan, with the effect of SU11274 exceeding that of GW9662. These results demonstrate that Ang II-induced ED in rabbit aortic rings in vitro can be prevented by telmisartan through selective PPARγ-modulating pathway. Moreover, this study indicates for the first time that activating HGF/Met system in the local vasculature is involved in the protective mechanism of telmisartan. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. (-)-Epicatechin Suppresses Angiotensin II-induced Cardiac Hypertrophy via the Activation of the SP1/SIRT1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zeng-Xiang; Wan, Lin; Wang, Ren-Jun; Shi, Yuan-Qi; Liu, Guang-Zhong; Zheng, Si-Jia; Hou, Hui-Ling; Han, Wei; Hai, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Flavonol (-)-epicatechin (EPI) is present in high amounts in cocoa and tea products, and has been shown to exert beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the precise mechanism of EPI on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy has not yet been determined. In this study, we examined whether EPI could inhibit cardiac hypertrophy. We utilised cultured neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes and mice for immunofluorescence, immunochemistry, qRT-PCR, and western blot analyses. 1µM EPI significantly inhibited 1µM angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increase of cardiomyocyte size, as well as the mRNA and protein levels of ANP, BNP and β-MHC in vitro. The effects of EPI were accompanied with an up-regulation of SP1 and SIRT1, and were abolished by SP1 inhibition. Up-regulation of SP1 could block Ang II-induced increase in cardiomyocyte size, as well as the mRNA and protein levels of ANP, BNP and β-MHC, and increase the protein levels of SIRT1 in vitro. Moreover, 1 mg/kg body weight/day EPI significantly inhibited mouse cardiac hypertrophy induced by Ang II, which could be eliminated by SP1 inhibition in vivo. Our data indicated that EPI inhibited AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy by activating the SP1/SIRT1 signaling pathway. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Roscovitine inhibits ERK1/2 activation induced by angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Ying; Han, Mei; Zheng, Bin; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2008-01-23

    Roscovitine is a potent CDK inhibitor often used as a biological tool in cell-cycle studies, but its working mechanism and real targets in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) remain unclear. In this study, we observed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by Ang II was abrogated by pretreating VSMCs with roscovitine for 15h. Pretreating VSMCs with roscovitine also inhibited Ang II-induced c-Jun expression and phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that roscovitine could suppress the DNA binding activity of c-Jun and activation of angiotensinogen promoter by Ang II. These results suggest that roscovitine represses Ang II-induced angiotensinogen expression by inhibiting activation of ERK1/2 and c-Jun.

  2. Angiotensin II regulates brain (pro)renin receptor expression through activation of cAMP response element-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Wencheng; Liu, Jiao; Hammond, Sean L; Tjalkens, Ronald B; Saifudeen, Zubaida; Feng, Yumei

    2015-07-15

    We reported that brain (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression levels are elevated in DOCA-salt-induced hypertension; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. To address whether ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling is involved in this regulation, we implanted a DOCA pellet and supplied 0.9% saline as the drinking solution to C57BL/6J mice. Sham pellet-implanted mice that were provided regular drinking water served as controls. Concurrently, mice were intracerebroventricularly infused with the AT1R blocker losartan, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 3 wk. Intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan or captopril attenuated DOCA-salt-induced PRR mRNA elevation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role for ANG II/AT1R signaling in regulating PRR expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. To test which ANG II/AT1R downstream transcription factors were involved in PRR regulation, we treated Neuro-2A cells with ANG II with or without CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) or AP-1 (activator protein-1) inhibitors, or CREB siRNA. CREB and AP-1 inhibitors, as well as CREB knockdown abolished ANG II-induced increases in PRR levels. ANG II also induced PRR upregulation in primary cultured neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ANG II treatment increased CREB binding to the endogenous PRR promoter in both cultured neurons and hypothalamic tissues of DOCA-salt hypertensive mice. This increase in CREB activity was reversed by AT1R blockade. Collectively, these findings indicate that ANG II acts via AT1R to upregulate PRR expression both in cultured cells and in DOCA-salt hypertensive mice by increasing CREB binding to the PRR promoter.

  3. Angiotensin II regulates brain (pro)renin receptor expression through activation of cAMP response element-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; Liu, Jiao; Hammond, Sean L.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Saifudeen, Zubaida

    2015-01-01

    We reported that brain (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression levels are elevated in DOCA-salt-induced hypertension; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. To address whether ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling is involved in this regulation, we implanted a DOCA pellet and supplied 0.9% saline as the drinking solution to C57BL/6J mice. Sham pellet-implanted mice that were provided regular drinking water served as controls. Concurrently, mice were intracerebroventricularly infused with the AT1R blocker losartan, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 3 wk. Intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan or captopril attenuated DOCA-salt-induced PRR mRNA elevation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role for ANG II/AT1R signaling in regulating PRR expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. To test which ANG II/AT1R downstream transcription factors were involved in PRR regulation, we treated Neuro-2A cells with ANG II with or without CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) or AP-1 (activator protein-1) inhibitors, or CREB siRNA. CREB and AP-1 inhibitors, as well as CREB knockdown abolished ANG II-induced increases in PRR levels. ANG II also induced PRR upregulation in primary cultured neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ANG II treatment increased CREB binding to the endogenous PRR promoter in both cultured neurons and hypothalamic tissues of DOCA-salt hypertensive mice. This increase in CREB activity was reversed by AT1R blockade. Collectively, these findings indicate that ANG II acts via AT1R to upregulate PRR expression both in cultured cells and in DOCA-salt hypertensive mice by increasing CREB binding to the PRR promoter. PMID:25994957

  4. Tagging SNPs in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes and response of renin activity, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations to antihypertensive treatment in Kazakans.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weili; Zhang, Yuanming; Shan, Zimei; Wang, Qian; Huang, Yongdi; Wang, Chenchen; Yan, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Polymorphisms of REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 may be associated with responses of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activity phenotypes to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) antihypertensive treatment. A total of 400 first diagnosed Kazak hypertensives were randomly allocated to two groups and received a 3-week course of either captopril and atenolol as monotherapy under double blinding. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed by covariance analyses between baseline level and responses of blood pressure, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations with tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes. A false discovery rate method was used to adjust multiple testing. After adjustment for multiple testing, we found that the G allele of rs6676670 (T/G) in intron 1 of REN was significantly associated with higher baseline aldosterone concentrations (p < 0.0001, explained variance (EV) = 2.3%). Significant associations after adjustments were also found between the A allele of rs2887284, with higher baseline renin activity (p = 0.022, EV = 1.0%), higher responses of renin (p = 0.018 EV = 5.4%), and higher responses of angiotensin II (p = 0.0255, EV = 3.13%) to the treatment of ACEI. The carriers of the A allele of rs2887284 appeared to be more sensitive to the ACEI treatment. rs2887284 in intron 9 of REN is associated with the response of renin and angiotensin II levels to ACEI treatment.

  5. Angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart. Predominance of the angiotensin-converting enzyme pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, L S; Abraham, W T; Meixell, G E; Vamvakias, B N; Quaife, R A; Lowes, B D; Roden, R L; Peacock, S J; Groves, B M; Raynolds, M V

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the contribution of myocardial tissue angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (Ang II) formation in the human heart is low compared with non-ACE pathways. However, little is known about the actual in vivo contribution of these pathways to Ang II formation in the human heart. To examine angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart, we administered intracoronary 123I-labeled angiotensin I (Ang I) with and without intracoronary enalaprilat to orthotopic heart transplant recipients. The fractional conversion of Ang I to Ang II, calculated after separation of angiotensin peptides by HPLC, was 0.415 +/- 0.104 (n = 5, mean +/- SD). Enalaprilat reduced fractional conversion by 89%, to a value of 0.044 +/- 0.053 (n = 4, P = 0.002). In a separate study of explanted hearts, a newly developed in vitro Ang II-forming assay was used to examine cardiac tissue ACE activity independent of circulating components. ACE activity in solubilized left ventricular membrane preparations from failing hearts was 49.6 +/- 5.3 fmol 125I-Ang II formed per minute per milligram of protein (n = 8, +/- SE), and 35.9 +/- 4.8 fmol/min/mg from nonfailing human hearts (n = 7, P = 0.08). In the presence of 1 microM enalaprilat, ACE activity was reduced by 85%, to 7.3 +/- 1.4 fmol/min/mg in the failing group and to 4.6 +/- 1.3 fmol/min/mg in the nonfailing group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the predominant pathway for angiotensin II formation in the human heart is through ACE. Images PMID:7657820

  6. Angiotensin II directly stimulates ENaC activity in the cortical collecting duct via AT(1) receptors.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Warnock, David G; Bell, P Darwin

    2002-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) helps to regulate overall renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water, yet its effects in the distal nephron have not been well studied. The purpose of these studies was to determine whether AngII stimulates luminal Na(+) transport in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)), as a reflection of Na(+) transport across the apical membrane, was measured with fluorescence microscopy using sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI) in isolated, perfused CCD segments dissected from rabbit kidneys. Control [Na(+)](i), during perfusion with 25 mM NaCl and a Na(+)-free solution in the bath containing the Na(+)-ionophore monensin (10 microM, to eliminate basolateral membrane Na(+) transport) averaged 19.3 +/- 5.2 mM (n = 16). Increasing luminal [NaCl] to 150 mM elevated [Na(+)](i) by 9.87 +/- 1.5 mM (n = 7; P < 0.05). AngII (10(-9) M) added to the lumen significantly elevated baseline [Na(+)](i) by 6.3 +/- 1.0 mM and increased the magnitude (Delta = 25.2 +/- 3.7 mM) and initial rate ( approximately 5 fold) of change in [Na(+)](i) to increased luminal [NaCl]. AngII when added to the bath had similar stimulatory effects; however, AngII was much more effective from the lumen. Thus, AngII significantly increased the apical entry of Na(+) in the CCD. To determine if this apical entry step occurred via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), studies were performed using the specific ENaC blocker, benzamil hydrochloride (10(-6) M). When added to the perfusate, benzamil almost completely inhibited the elevations in [Na(+)](i) to increased luminal [NaCl] in both the presence and absence of AngII. These results suggest that AngII directly stimulates Na(+) channel activity in the CCD. AT(1) receptor blockade with candesartan or losartan (10(-6) M) prevented the stimulatory effects of AngII. Regulation of ENaC activity by AngII may play an important role in distal Na(+) reabsorption in health and disease.

  7. Influence of season on plasma antidiuretic hormone, angiotensin II, aldosterone and plasma renin activity in young volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sugenoya, Junichi; Sato, Maki; Shimizu, Yuuki; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Iwase, Satoshi

    2010-05-01

    We investigated seasonal changes in hormonal and thermoregulatory responses. Eight volunteers were subjected to the experiment at four times of the year: around the vernal and autumnal equinoxes, and at the summer and winter solstices at latitude 35 degrees N. Plasma antidiuretic hormone (ADH), angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone (ALD) and plasma renin activity (PRA) were analyzed before and after water immersion. Seasonal changes in thermoregulatory responses were assessed by measuring core temperature and sweat rate during immersion of the leg in hot water (at 42 degrees C) for 30 min in a room maintained at 26 degrees C. The concentration of plasma ADH and ALD before water immersion was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. The concentrations of ANG II and PRA did not show seasonal variations. Changes in tympanic temperature during water immersion showed significant differences between seasons, and were higher in winter than in other seasons. The sweat rate was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. In summary, ADH and ALD concentrations displayed a seasonal rhythm with marked elevation in summer; this may be a compensative mechanism to prevent dehydration from increased sweat loss during summer due to heat acclimatization.

  8. Blockage of angiotensin II type 2 receptor prevents thyroxine-mediated cardiac hypertrophy by blocking Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Carneiro-Ramos, M S; Diniz, G P; Nadu, A P; Almeida, J; Vieira, R L P; Santos, R A S; Barreto-Chaves, M L M

    2010-05-01

    Although most of effects of Angiotensin II (Ang II) related to cardiac remodelling can be attributed to type 1 Ang II receptor (AT(1)R), the type 2 receptor (AT(2)R) has been shown to be involved in the development of some cardiac hypertrophy models. In the present study, we investigated whether the thyroid hormone (TH) action leading to cardiac hypertrophy is also mediated by increased Ang II levels or by change on AT(1)R and AT(2)R expression, which could contribute to this effect. In addition, we also evaluated the possible contribution of AT(2)R in the activation of Akt and in the development of TH-induced cardiac hypertrophy. To address these questions, Wistar rats were treated with thyroxine (T(4), 0.1 mg/kg BW/day, i.p.), with or without AT(2)R blocker (PD123319), for 14 days. Cardiac hypertrophy was identified based on heart/body weight ratio and confirmed by analysis of atrial natriuretic factor mRNA expression. Cardiomyocyte cultures were used to exclude the influence of TH-related hemodynamic effects. Our results demonstrate that the cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased (80%, P < 0.001) as well as the AT(2)R expression (50%, P < 0.05) in TH-induced cardiac hypertrophy. The critical involvement of AT(2)R to the development of this cardiac hypertrophy in vivo was evidenced after administration of AT(2) blocker, which was able to prevent in 40% (P < 0.01) the cardiac mass gain and the Akt activation induced by TH. The role of AT(2)R to the TH-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also confirmed after using PD123319 in the in vitro studies. These findings improve understanding of the cardiac hypertrophy observed in hyperthyroidism and provide new insights into the generation of future therapeutic strategies.

  9. NO and endogenous angiotensin II interact in the generation of renal sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    McKeogh, Donogh F; O'Donaughy, Theresa L; Brooks, Virginia L

    2004-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) appears to inhibit sympathetic tone in anesthetized rats. However, whether NO tonically inhibits sympathetic outflow, or whether endogenous angiotensin II (ANG II) promotes NO-mediated sympathoinhibition in conscious rats is unknown. To address these questions, we determined the effects of NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and heart rate (HR) in conscious, unrestrained rats on normal (NS), high-(HS), and low-sodium (LS) diets, in the presence and absence of an ANG II receptor antagonist (AIIRA). When arterial pressure was kept at baseline with intravenous hydralazine, NOS inhibition with l-NAME (10 mg/kg i.v.) resulted in a profound decline in RSNA, to 42 +/- 11% of control (P < 0.01), in NS animals. This effect was not sustained, and RSNA returned to control levels by 45 min postinfusion. l-NAME also caused bradycardia, from 432 +/- 23 to 372 +/- 11 beats/min postinfusion (P < 0.01), an effect, which, in contrast, was sustained 60 min postdrug. The effects of NOS inhibition on RSNA and HR did not differ between NS, HS, and LS rats. However, when LS and HS rats were pretreated with AIIRA, the initial decrease in RSNA after l-NAME infusion was absent in the LS rats, while the response in the HS group was unchanged by AIIRA. These findings indicate that, in contrast to our hypotheses, NOS activity provides a stimulatory input to RSNA in conscious rats, and that in LS animals, but not HS animals, this sympathoexcitatory effect of NO is dependent on the action of endogenous ANG II.

  10. Angiotensin II Blockade and Renal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Current national guidelines have recommended the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, including angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), in preference to other antihypertensive agents for treating hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the renoprotective effects of ARBs are multiple and complex. Blood pressure reduction by systemic vasodilation with an ARB contributes to its beneficial effects in treating kidney disease. Furthermore, ARB-induced renal vasodilation results in an increase in renal blood flow, leading to improvement of renal ischemia and hypoxia. ARBs are also effective in reducing urinary albumin excretion through a reduction in intraglomerular pressure and the protection of glomerular endothelium and/or podocyte injuries. In addition to blocking angiotensin II-induced renal cell and tissue injuries, ARBs can decrease intrarenal angiotensin II levels by reducing proximal tubular angiotensinogen and production of collecting duct renin, as well as angiotensin II accumulation in the kidney. In this review, we will briefly summarize our current understanding of the pharmacological effects of an ARB in the kidney. We will also discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the renoprotective effects of ARBs on type 2 diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23176216

  11. Angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II regulates water flow through aquaporins in a clam worm.

    PubMed

    Satou, Ryousuke; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Ido, Hiroki; Tomomatsu, Masayuki; Suzuki, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    Angiotensin III has been reported to exist in various animals and tissues. The physiological role, however, is still unclear except that brain angiotensin III is a central regulator of vasopressin release. In this study, angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II enhanced an increase in body weight of clam worms of Perinereis sp. under a hypo-osmotic condition and suppressed a decrease in body weight under a hyper-osmotic condition. When clam worms were treated with tetrachloroaurate (III) after angiotensin-treatment, these enhancing and suppressive effects of the angiotensins under hypo- and hyper-osmotic conditions were inhibited. In contrast, when clam worms were pretreated with tetrachloroaurate (III) before angiotensin-treatment, these effects of angiotensins were not inhibited. Since tetrachloroaurate (III) is a representative blocker of aquaporins, these results indicate that angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II regulates water flow through aquaporins in clam worms.

  12. Elevated glucose and angiotensin II increase 12-lipoxygenase activity and expression in porcine aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, R; Gu, J L; Rossi, J; Gonzales, N; Lanting, L; Xu, L; Nadler, J

    1993-01-01

    The lipoxygenase (LO) pathway of arachidonate metabolism has been suggested to play a key role in atherosclerosis and in mediating several actions of angiotensin II (AII). However, the relationship between LO activation and factors linked to accelerated diabetic vascular disease such as hyperglycemia and AII is not known. We have investigated the effect of high glucose (HG; 25 mM) and AII on LO activity as well as LO protein and mRNA expression in porcine aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMCs). We observed that cells cultured in HG had significantly higher levels of the cell-associated LO products 12- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). AII added to cells grown in HG specifically further increased only cell-associated 12-HETE levels. Using immunoblot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCRs, we demonstrated the presence in PVSMCs of porcine leukocyte-type 12-LO protein and mRNA, respectively. Furthermore, the levels of both were markedly upregulated by AII as well as by HG. These studies suggest that enhanced 12-LO activity and expression are mechanisms for accelerated vascular disease produced by HG and AII in diabetes mellitus. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8506339

  13. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  14. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  15. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan enhances running endurance of skeletal muscle through activation of the PPAR-δ/AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoli; Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Liqun; Ma, Shuangtao; Yang, Dachun; Zhao, Zhigang; Yan, Zhencheng; He, Hongbo; Cao, Tingbing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2011-07-01

    Clinical trials have shown that angiotensin II receptor blockers reduce the new onset of diabetes in hypertensives; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of telmisartan on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-δ) and the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in cultured myotubes, as well as on the running endurance of wild-type and PPAR-δ-deficient mice. Administration of telmisartan up-regulated levels of PPAR-δ and phospho-AMPKα in cultured myotubes. However, PPAR-δ gene deficiency completely abolished the telmisartan effect on phospho-AMPKαin vitro. Chronic administration of telmisartan remarkably prevented weight gain, enhanced running endurance and post-exercise oxygen consumption, and increased slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres in wild-type mice, but these effects were absent in PPAR-δ-deficient mice. The mechanism is involved in PPAR-δ-mediated stimulation of the AMPK pathway. Compared to the control mice, phospho-AMPKα level in skeletal muscle was up-regulated in mice treated with telmisartan. In contrast, phospho-AMPKα expression in skeletal muscle was unchanged in PPAR-δ-deficient mice treated with telmisartan. These findings highlight the ability of telmisartan to improve skeletal muscle function, and they implicate PPAR-δ as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan enhances running endurance of skeletal muscle through activation of the PPAR-δ/AMPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Liqun; Ma, Shuangtao; Yang, Dachun; Zhao, Zhigang; Yan, Zhencheng; He, Hongbo; Cao, Tingbing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials have shown that angiotensin II receptor blockers reduce the new onset of diabetes in hypertensives; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of telmisartan on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-δ) and the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in cultured myotubes, as well as on the running endurance of wild-type and PPAR-δ-deficient mice. Administration of telmisartan up-regulated levels of PPAR-δ and phospho-AMPKα in cultured myotubes. However, PPAR-δ gene deficiency completely abolished the telmisartan effect on phospho-AMPKαin vitro. Chronic administration of telmisartan remarkably prevented weight gain, enhanced running endurance and post-exercise oxygen consumption, and increased slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres in wild-type mice, but these effects were absent in PPAR-δ-deficient mice. The mechanism is involved in PPAR-δ-mediated stimulation of the AMPK pathway. Compared to the control mice, phospho-AMPKα level in skeletal muscle was up-regulated in mice treated with telmisartan. In contrast, phospho-AMPKα expression in skeletal muscle was unchanged in PPAR-δ-deficient mice treated with telmisartan. These findings highlight the ability of telmisartan to improve skeletal muscle function, and they implicate PPAR-δ as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20477906

  17. The role of angiotensin II receptors in stroke protection.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2012-06-01

    The hypothesis that angiotensin II (Ang II) might have a stroke-protective role was first proposed by Brown and Brown about 25 years ago. Their hypothesis was generated from the results of the first Medical Research Council trial in patients with mild to moderate hypertension, which showed that patients treated with the diuretic bendrofluazide had a 70% decrease in strokes compared with those treated with the β-blocker propranolol for similar blood pressure reduction. This hypothesis, which remained dormant for many years, was recently resurrected by several experimental studies that showed that the brain possesses its own renin-angiotensin system (RAS) similar to the one existing in the systemic circulation. These studies also showed that the brain RAS plays an important role in stroke prevention and neuronal protection through its active peptide Ang II. In addition, these studies demonstrated that the beneficial effects of Ang II are mediated through stimulation of its subtype 2 receptors, and possibly through stimulation of the subtype 4 receptors by Ang IV, a metabolite of Ang II. Drugs that selectively block the Ang II subtype 1 receptors, such as the angiotensin receptor blockers, have shown superior protection against strokes and neuronal damage than drugs that decrease the generation of Ang II, such as the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and β-blockers. In this review, the role of the Ang II receptors and their mechanism of action regarding stroke prevention are discussed in view of the evidence from experimental and clinical studies.

  18. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits TGF-β-, angiotensin II-, aldosterone-, high glucose-, and albumin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Han; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ja Seon; Chang, Jai Won; Kim, Soon Bae; Park, Jung Sik; Lee, Sang Koo

    2013-03-15

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a novel mechanism that promotes renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), angiotensin II, aldosterone, high glucose, and urinary albumin are well-known causes of EMT and renal fibrosis. We examined whether and how activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppressed EMT induced by the above agents in tubular epithelial cells. All experiments were performed using HK-2 cells. Protein expression was measured by Western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Exposure of tubular cells to TGF-β (10 ng/ml), angiotensin II (1 μM), aldosterone (100 nM), high glucose (30 mM), and albumin (5 mg/ml) for 5 days induced EMT, as shown by upregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and downregulation of E-cadherin. ROS and NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression were increased, and antioxidants such as tiron and N-acetylcysteine inhibited EMT induction. Metformin (the best known clinical activator of AMPK) suppressed EMT induction through inhibition of ROS via induction of heme oxygenase-1 and endogenous antioxidant thioredoxin. An AMPK inhibitor (compound C) and AMPK small interfering RNA blocked the effect of metformin, and another AMPK activator [5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β riboside (AICAR)] exerted the same effects as metformin. In conclusion, AMPK activation might be beneficial in attenuating the tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced by TGF-β, angiotensin II, aldosterone, high glucose, and urinary albumin.

  19. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  20. Valsartan ameliorates ageing-induced aorta degeneration via angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated ERK activity.

    PubMed

    Shan, HaiYan; Zhang, Siyang; Li, Xuelian; Yu, Kai; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Xinyue; Jin, Bo; Bai, XiaoJuan

    2014-06-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays important roles in ageing-related disorders through its type 1 receptor (AT1 R). However, the role and underlying mechanisms of AT1R in ageing-related vascular degeneration are not well understood. In this study, 40 ageing rats were randomly divided into two groups: ageing group which received no treatment (ageing control), and valsartan group which took valsartan (selective AT1R blocker) daily for 6 months. 20 young rats were used as adult control. The aorta structure were analysed by histological staining and electron microscopy. Bcl-2/Bax expression in aorta was analysed by immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The expressions of AT1 R, AT2 R and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were detected. Significant structural degeneration of aorta in the ageing rats was observed, and the degeneration was remarkably ameliorated by long-term administration of valsartan. With ageing, the expression of AT1R was elevated, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was decreased and meanwhile, an important subgroup of MAPKs, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity was elevated. However, these changes in ageing rats could be reversed to some extent by valsartan. In vitro experiments observed consistent results as in vivo study. Furthermore, ERK inhibitor could also acquire partial effects as valsartan without affecting AT1R expression. The results indicated that AT1R involved in the ageing-related degeneration of aorta and AT1R-mediated ERK activity was an important mechanism underlying the process.

  1. Expression of non-angiotensin II -125I-CGP 42112 binding sites on activated microglia after kainic acid induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Jöhren, O; Viswanathan, M; Saavedra, J M

    1995-12-08

    [125I]CGP 42112, first developed to identify angiotensin II receptor subtype 2 (AT2), was recently shown to bind to a novel non-angiotensin binding site in injured rat brain tissue. We addressed the question whether non-angiotensin [125I]CGP 42112 binding appears after kainic acid induced hippocampal neurodegeneration, a process of neuronal cell death at a distance from the toxin injection site. After intraventricular kainic acid injection, we found non-angiotensin [125I]CGP 42112 binding in the hippocampal areas CA3 (4 and 14 days after injection), CA1 and CA4 and the subiculum (14 days after injection). In addition, 14 days after kainic acid injection, [125I]CGP 42112 binding was found in 50% of the animals, in the thalamus, amygdala and piriform cortex, areas receiving projections from the hippocampus and suffering kainic acid induced delayed neurodegeneration. The loss of neurons in these regions was accompanied by an accumulation of activated microglia as demonstrated by immunostaining with the specific antibodies OX-42 and ED1. The time course and regional pattern of OX-42/ED1 positive immunostaining was identical with the appearance and distribution of the non-angiotensin [125I]CGP 42112 binding site. The non-angiotensin [125I]CGP 42112 binding was not detected in brain regions unaffected by kainic acid injection. Our findings indicate the expression of a novel [125I]CGP 42112 binding site on activated microglia. This site appears at a distance from the lesion and may be of importance in the process of neuronal death and brain tissue repair.

  2. Angiotensin-(1-7): an active member of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Kucharewicz, I; Pawlak, R; Matys, T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2002-12-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] is an active member of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). It counterbalances vasoconstriction, mitogenic, arrhythmogenic and prothrombotic actions of Ang II. Inducing natiuresis and diuresis opposes also the water and sodium retention produced by Ang II. Till now the specific receptor side for Ang-(1-7) has been not cloned, but the current data strongly suggest that an interaction (cross-talk) between angiotensin receptors may play a role in the effects of Ang-(1-7).

  3. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Increases Arginase Activity and Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction in Corpora Cavernosa from Angiotensin-II Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toque, Haroldo A.; Romero, Maritza J.; Tostes, Rita C.; Shatanawi, Alia; Chandra, Surabhi; Carneiro, Zidonia N.; Inscho, Edward W.; Webb, R. Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Caldwell, R. William

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Angiotensin II (AngII) activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and elevates arginase activity in endothelial cells. Upregulation of arginase activity has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability. However, signaling pathways activated by AngII in the penis are largely unknown. Aim We hypothesized that activation of p38 MAPK increases arginase activity and thus impairs penile vascular function in AngII-treated mice. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing saline or AngII (42 μg/kg/h) for 14 days and co-treated with p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB 203580 (5 μg/kg/day), beginning 2 days before minipump implantation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured. Corpus cavernosum (CC) tissue was used for vascular functional studies and protein expression levels of p38 MAPK, arginase and constitutive NOS, and arginase activity. Main Outcome Measures Arginase expression and activity; expression of phospho-p38 MAPK, -eNOS and nNOS proteins; endothelium-dependent and nitrergic nerve-mediated relaxations were determined in CC from control and AngII-infused mice. Results AngII increased SBP (22%) and increased CC arginase activity and expression (~2-fold), and phosphorylated P38 MAPK levels (30%) over control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented these effects. Endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced by AngII and this effect was prevented by SB 203580 (P<0.01). AngII (2-week) did not alter nitrergic function. However, SB 203580 significantly increased nitrergic relaxation in both control and AngII tissue at lower frequencies. Maximum contractile responses for phenylephrine and electrical field stimulation were increased by AngII (56% and 171%, respectively), and attenuated by SB 203580 treated. AngII treatment also decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 compared to control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented all these changes. Conclusion p38

  4. Effect of angiotensin II on rhythmic per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and heart and daily rhythm of activity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Herichová, Iveta; Šoltésová, Dorota; Szántóová, Kristína; Mravec, Boris; Neupauerová, Denisa; Veselá, Anna; Zeman, Michal

    2013-09-10

    Endogenous daily rhythms are generated by the hierarchically organized circadian system predominantly synchronized by the external light (L): dark (D) cycle. During recent years several humoral signals have been found to influence the generation and manifestation of daily rhythm. Since most studies have been performed under in vitro conditions, the mechanisms employed under in vivo conditions need to be investigated. Our study focused on angiotensin II (angII)-mediated regulation of Per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and heart and spontaneous locomotor activity in Wistar rats under synchronized conditions. Angiotensin II was infused (100ng/kg/min) via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 7 or 28days. Samples were taken in 4-h intervals during a 24hcycle and after a light pulse applied in the first and second part of the dark phase. Gene expression was measured using real time PCR. Locomotor activity was monitored using an infrared camera with a remote control installed in the animal facility. Seven days of angII infusion caused an increase in blood pressure and heart/body weight index and 28days of angII infusion also increased water intake in comparison with controls. We observed a distinct daily rhythm in Per2 expression in the SCN and heart of control rats and infused rats. Seven days of angII infusion did not influence Per2 expression in the heart. 28days of angII treatment caused significant phase advance and a decrease in nighttime expression of Per2 and influenced expression of clock controlled genes Rev-erb alpha and Dbp in the heart compared to the control. Four weeks of angII infusion decreased the responsiveness of Per2 expression in the SCN to a light pulse at the end of the dark phase of the 24hcycle. Expression of mRNA coding angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) showed a daily rhythm in the heart of control rats. Four weeks of angII infusion caused a decrease in amplitude of rhythmic

  5. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by metformin ablates angiotensin II-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and hypertension in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Duan, Quanlu; Song, Ping; Ding, Ye; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-07-01

    Metformin, one of the most frequently prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes, reportedly exerts BP-lowering effects in patients with diabetes. However, the effects and underlying mechanisms of metformin on BP in non-diabetic conditions remain to be determined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of metformin on angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion-induced hypertension in vivo. The effects of metformin on BP were investigated in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice and in mice lacking AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPKα2) mice with or without Ang II infusion. Also, the effect of metformin on Ang II-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was explored in cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Metformin markedly reduced BP in Ang II-infused WT mice but not in AMPKα2-deficient mice. In cultured hVSMCs, Ang II treatment resulted in inactivation of AMPK, as well as the subsequent induction of spliced X-box binding protein-1, phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α and expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa, representing three well-characterized ER stress biomarkers. Moreover, AMPK activation by metformin ablated Ang II-induced ER stress in hVSMCs. Mechanistically, metformin-activated AMPKα2 suppressed ER stress by increasing phospholamban phosphorylation. Metformin alleviates Ang II-triggered hypertension in mice by activating AMPKα2, which mediates phospholamban phosphorylation and inhibits Ang II-induced ER stress in vascular smooth muscle cells. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Angiotensin II-induced Akt activation through the epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by phospholipid metabolites derived by activation of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Malik, Kafait U

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)), phospholipase D (PLD), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Akt in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between Akt activation by Ang II and other signaling molecules in rat VSMC. Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced by the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol, but not by its inactive analog 2-butanol, and by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the PLD cofactor ADP-ribosylation factor, and in cells infected with retrovirus containing PLD(2) siRNA or transfected with PLD(2) antisense but not control LacZ or sense oligonucleotide. Diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor II diminished Ang II-induced and diC8-phosphatidic acid (PA)-increased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PLD-dependent Akt activation is mediated by PA. Ang II-induced EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by 1-butanol and PLD(2) siRNA and also by cPLA(2) siRNA. In addition, the inhibitor of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) reduced both Ang II- and AA-induced EGFR transactivation. Furthermore, ETYA, cPLA(2) antisense, and cPLA(2) siRNA attenuated Ang II-elicited PLD activation. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-flurophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] reduced PLD activity and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation elicited by Ang II. Pyrrolidine-1, a cPLA(2) inhibitor, and cPLA(2) siRNA decreased p38 MAPK activity. These data indicate that Ang II-stimulated Akt activity is mediated by cPLA(2)-dependent, p38 MAPK regulated PLD(2) activation and EGFR transactivation. We propose the following scheme of the sequence of events leading to activation of Akt in VSMC by Ang II: Ang II-->cPLA(2)-->AA-->p38 MAPK-->PLD(2)-->PA-->EGFR-->Akt.

  7. Angiotensin II–Induced MMP-2 Activity and MMP-14 and Basigin Protein Expression Are Mediated via the Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1–Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 Pathway in Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pons, Marianne; Cousins, Scott W.; Alcazar, Oscar; Striker, Gary E.; Marin-Castaño, Maria E.

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of various lipid-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) deposits under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been observed in eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). RPE-derived matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-14, and basigin (BSG) are major enzymes involved in the maintenance of ECM turnover. Hypertension (HTN) is a systemic risk factor for AMD. It has previously been reported that angiotensin II (Ang II), one of the most important hormones associated with HTN, increases MMP-2 activity and its key regulator, MMP-14, in RPE, inducing breakdown of the RPE basement membrane, which may lead to progression of sub-RPE deposits. Ang II exerts most of its actions by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Herein is explored the MAPK signaling pathway as a potential key intracellular modulator of Ang II–induced increase in MMP-2 activity and MMP-14 and BSG protein expression. It was observed that Ang II stimulates phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 MAPK in RPE cells and ERK/p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in mice. These effects were mediated by Ang II type 1 receptors. Blockade of ERK or p38 MAPK abrogated the increase in MMP-2 activity and MMP-14 and BSG proteins in ARPE-19 cells. A better understanding of the molecular events by which Ang II induces ECM dysregulation is of critical importance to further define its contribution to the progression of sub-RPE deposits in AMD patients with HTN. PMID:21641389

  8. Combined blockade of angiotensin II and prorenin receptors ameliorates podocytic apoptosis induced by IgA-activated mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joseph C K; Chan, Loretta Y Y; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Tang, Sydney C W; Lai, Kar Neng

    2015-07-01

    Glomerulo-podocytic communication plays an important role in the podocytic injury in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). In this study, we examine the role of podocytic angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AT1R) and prorenin receptor (PRR) in podocytic apoptosis in IgAN. Polymeric IgA (pIgA) was isolated from patients with IgAN and healthy controls. Conditioned media were prepared from growth arrested human mesangial cells (HMC) incubated with pIgA from patients with IgAN (IgA-HMC media) or healthy controls (Ctl-HMC media). A human podocyte cell line was used as a model to examine the regulation of the expression of AT1R, PRR, TNF-α and CTGF by IgA-HMC media. Podocytic nephrin expression, annexin V binding and caspase 3 activity were used as the functional readout of podocytic apoptosis. IgA-HMC media had no effect on AngII release by podocytes. IgA-HMC media significantly up-regulated the expression of AT1R and PRR, down-regulated nephrin expression and induced apoptosis in podocytes. Mono-blockade of AT1R, PRR, TNF-α or CTGF partially reduced podocytic apoptosis. IgA-HMC media activated NFκB, notch1 and HEY1 expression by podocytes and dual blockade of AT1R with PRR, or anti-TNF-α with anti-CTGF, effectively rescued the podocytic apoptosis induced by IgA-HMC media. Our data suggests that pIgA-activated HMC up-regulates the expression of AT1R and PRR expression by podocytes and the associated activation of NFκB and notch signalling pathways play an essential role in the podocytic apoptosis induced by glomerulo-podocytic communication in IgAN. Simultaneously targeting the AT1R and PRR could be a potential therapeutic option to reduce the podocytic injury in IgAN.

  9. Use of Enterally Delivered Angiotensin II Type Ia Receptor Antagonists to Reduce the Severity of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Koga, Hiroyuki; Larsen, Scott D.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Turbiak, Anjanette J.; Jin, Xiaohong; Lucas, Peter C.; Lipka, Elke; Hillfinger, John; Kim, Jae Seung

    2011-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces inflammation in several organ systems. Having found a fourfold increase in angiotensin II type Ia receptor expression in a dextran sodium sulfate colitis model, we targeted blockade with angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists to prevent colitis development. Because hypotension is a major complication of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists use, we hypothesized that use of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists compounds which lack cell membrane permeability, and thus enteric absorption, would allow for direct enteral delivery at far higher concentrations than would be tolerated systemically, yet retain efficacy. Methods Based on the structure of the angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist losartan, deschloro-losartan was synthesized, which has extremely poor cell membrane permeability. Angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy was evaluated by determining the ability to block NF-κB activation in vitro. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in mice and angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy delivered transanally was assessed. Results In vitro, deschloro-losartan demonstrated near equal angiotensin II type Ia receptor blockade compared to losartan as well as another angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist, candesartan. In the dextran sodium sulfate model, each compound significantly improved clinical and histologic scores and epithelial cell apoptosis. Abundance of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL6 mRNA were significantly decreased with each compound. In vitro and in vivo intestinal drug absorption, as well as measures of blood pressure and mucosal and colonic blood flow, showed significantly lower uptake of deschloro-losartan compared to losartan and candesartan. Conclusions This study demonstrated efficacy of high-dose angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists in this colitis model. We postulate that a specially designed angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist with

  10. Angiotensin II in Refractory Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Elio; Gleeson, Patrick J; Annoni, Filippo; Agosta, Sara; Orlando, Sergio; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Scolletta, Sabino

    2017-05-01

    Refractory septic shock is defined as persistently low mean arterial blood pressure despite volume resuscitation and titrated vasopressors/inotropes in patients with a proven or suspected infection and concomitant organ dysfunction. Its management typically requires high doses of catecholamines, which can induce significant adverse effects such as ischemia and arrhythmias. Angiotensin II (Ang II), a key product of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, is a vasopressor agent that could be used in conjunction with other vasopressors to stabilize critically ill patients during refractory septic shock, and reduce catecholamine requirements. However, very few clinical data are available to support Ang II administration in this setting. Here, we review the current literature on this topic to better understand the role of Ang II administration during refractory septic shock, differentiating experimental from clinical studies. We also consider the potential role of exogenous Ang II administration in specific organ dysfunction and possible pitfalls with Ang II in sepsis. Various issues remain unresolved and future studies should investigate important topics such as: the optimal dose and timing of Ang II administration, a comparison between Ang II and the other vasopressors (epinephrine; vasopressin), and Ang II effects on microcirculation.

  11. Angiotensin(1-7) attenuated Angiotensin II-induced hepatocyte EMT by inhibiting NOX-derived H2O2-activated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1β/Smad circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Li; Huang, Shan; Ma, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Wen-Yong; Wang, Dan; Jin, Si-Yi; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Yang; Li, Xu

    2016-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is correlated with NAPDH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS-induced NOD-like receptor pyrin domain containing-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a novel mechanism of EMT. Angiotensin II (AngII) induces EMT by regulating intracellular ROS. Nevertheless, it has not been reported whether AngII could induce hepatocyte EMT. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] can inhibit the effects of AngII via a counter-regulatory mechanism. However, whether Ang-(1-7) attenuated the effects of AngII on hepatocyte EMT remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether Ang-(1-7) attenuated AngII-induced hepatocyte EMT by inhibiting the NOX-derived ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1ß/Smad circuit. In vivo, two animal models were established. In the first model, rats were infused AngII. In the second model, Ang-(1-7) was constantly infused into double bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. In vitro, hepatocytes were pretreated with antioxidant, NLRP3 siRNA, NOX4 siRNA, or Ang-(1-7) before exposure to AngII. In vitro, AngII induced hepatocyte EMT, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), diphenylene iodonium (DPI), and NOX4 siRNA. NLRP3 inflammasome, which was activated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), mediated AngII-induced hepatocyte EMT. Ang-(1-7) suppressed AngII-induced EMT by inhibiting the NOX-derived H2O2-activated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1ß/Smad circuit. In vivo, infusion of AngII induced activation of H2O2-correlated NLRP3 inflammasome in rat livers and accumulation of α-collagen I (Col1A1) in hepatocytes. Infusion of Ang-(1-7) alleviated BDL-induced liver fibrosis and inhibited the expression of Col1A1 and the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in hepatocytes. Ang-(1-7) attenuated AngII-induced hepatocyte EMT by inhibiting the NOX-derived H2O2-activated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1ß/Smad circuit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Loss of Resistance to Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension in the Jackson Laboratory Recombination-Activating Gene Null Mouse on the C57BL/6J Background.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Pai, Amrita V; West, Crystal A; Wu, Xie; Speth, Robert C; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    Resistance to angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension in T-cell-deficient male mice with a targeted mutation in the recombination-activating gene-1 (Rag1) on the C57BL/6J background (B6.Rag1(-/-) -M), which was reported by 5 independent laboratories including ours before 2015, has been lost. In mice purchased from Jackson Laboratory in 2015 and 2016, the time course and magnitude increase in mean arterial pressure induced by 2 weeks of Ang II infusion at 490 ng/kg per minute was identical between B6.Rag1(-/-) -M and male wild-type littermates. Moreover, there were no differences in the time course or magnitude increase in mean arterial pressure at the lowest dose of Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute) that increased mean arterial pressure. This loss in Ang II resistance is independent of T cells. Angiotensin type 1-receptor binding was 1.4-fold higher in glomeruli isolated from recently purchased B6.Rag1(-/-) -M suggesting an increase in renal angiotensin type 1-receptor activity masks the blood pressure protection afforded by the lack of T cells. The phenotypic change in B6.Rag1(-/-) -M has implications for investigators using this strain to study mechanisms of T-cell modulation of Ang II-dependent blood pressure control. These findings also serve as a reminder that the universal drive for genetic variation occurs in all animals including inbred mouse strains and that spontaneous mutations leading to phenotypic change can compromise experimental reproducibility over time and place. Finally, these observations illustrate the importance of including experimental details about the location and time period over which animals are bred in publications involving animal studies to promote rigor and reproducibility in the scientific literature. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Rac2 GTPase activation by angiotensin II is modulated by Ca2+/calcineurin and mitogen-activated protein kinases in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    El Bekay, Rajaa; Alba, Gonzalo; Reyes, M Edith; Chacón, Pedro; Vega, Antonio; Martín-Nieto, José; Jiménez, Juan; Ramos, Eladio; Oliván, Josefina; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2007-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) highly stimulates superoxide anion production by neutrophils. The G-protein Rac2 modulates the activity of NADPH oxidase in response to various stimuli. Here, we describe that Ang II induced both Rac2 translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and Rac2 GTP-binding activity. Furthermore, Clostridium difficile toxin A, an inhibitor of the Rho-GTPases family Rho, Rac and Cdc42, prevented Ang II-elicited O2-/ROS production, phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, and Rac2 activation. Rac2 GTPase inhibition by C. difficile toxin A was accompanied by a robust reduction of the cytosolic Ca(2)(+) elevation induced by Ang II in human neutrophils. Furthermore, SB203580 and PD098059 act as inhibitors of p38MAPK and ERK1/2 respectively, wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, and cyclosporin A, a calcineurin inhibitor, hindered both translocation of Rac2 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and enhancement of Rac2 GTP-binding elicited by Ang II. These results provide evidence that the activation of Rac2 by Ang II is exerted through multiple signalling pathways, involving Ca(2)(+)/calcineurin and protein kinases, the elucidation of which should be insightful in the design of new therapies aimed at reversing the inflammation of vessel walls found in a number of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Increased colonic mucosal angiotensin I and II concentrations in Crohn's colitis.

    PubMed

    Jaszewski, R; Tolia, V; Ehrinpreis, M N; Bodzin, J H; Peleman, R R; Korlipara, R; Weinstock, J V

    1990-06-01

    To define a potential role for the angiotensin system in Crohn's colitis, the colonic mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were measured in endoscopic biopsy samples from patients with active Crohn's colitis (n = 20), ulcerative colitis (n = 13), other forms of colitis (n = 3), and normal controls (n = 17). Colonic mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were greater in patients with Crohn's colitis than in normal subjects (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.001, respectively). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were also higher in Crohn's colitis than in ulcerative colitis (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.001, respectively), and levels of angiotensin II were higher in Crohn's than in other forms of colitis (p = 0.014). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II correlated well with the degree of macroscopic inflammation in Crohn's colitis (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001 and r = 0.68, p less than 0.001, respectively). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I correlated fairly well with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (r = 0.46, p less than 0.05) while angiotensin II levels correlated poorly. These studies suggest that angiotensin I and II may have a role in the inflammation associated with Crohn's colitis.

  15. Clinical Profile of Eprosartan: A Different Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Blankestijn, P. J; Rupp, H

    2008-01-01

    Rationale. The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important. Angiotensin II receptor blocker drugs (ARBs) have provided a useful class of anti-hypertensive drugs. Eprosartan is a relatively new ARB which is chemically distinct (non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole) from all other ARBs (biphenyl tetrazoles). An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system. Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs. The distinct properties of this non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole ARB might be relevant in the effort to reduce cardiovascular risk, also beyond its blood pressure lowering capacity. PMID:18855637

  16. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated augmentation of renal interstitial fluid angiotensin II in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akira; Seth, Dale M; Navar, L Gabriel

    2003-10-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension is associated with augmented intrarenal concentrations of Ang II; however, the distribution of the increased intrarenal Ang II has not been fully established. To determine the changes in renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations in Ang II-induced hypertension and the consequences of treatment with an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker. Rats were selected to receive vehicle (5% acetic acid subcutaneously; n = 6), Ang II (80 ng/min subcutaneously, via osmotic minipump; n = 7) or Ang II plus an AT1 receptor antagonist, candesartan cilexetil (10 mg/kg per day, in drinking water; n = 6) for 13-14 days, at which time, experiments were performed on anesthetized rats. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the renal cortex and were perfused at 2 microl/min. The effluent dialysate concentrations of Ang I and Ang II were measured by radioimmunoassay and reported values were corrected for the equilibrium rates at this perfusion rate. Ang II-infused rats developed greater mean arterial pressures (155 +/- 7 mmHg) than vehicle-infused rats (108 +/- 3 mmHg). Ang II-infused rats showed greater plasma (181 +/- 30 fmol/ml) and kidney (330 +/- 38 fmol/g) Ang II concentrations than vehicle-infused rats (98 +/- 14 fmol/ml and 157 +/- 22 fmol/g, respectively). Renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations were much greater than plasma concentrations, averaging 5.74 +/- 0.26 pmol/ml in Ang II-infused rats - significantly greater than those in vehicle-infused rats (2.86 +/- 0.23 pmol/ml). Candesartan treatment prevented the hypertension (87 +/- 3 mmHg) and led to increased plasma Ang II concentrations (441 +/- 27 fmol/ml), but prevented increases in kidney (120 +/- 15 fmol/g) and renal interstitial fluid (2.15 +/- 0.12 pmol/ml) Ang II concentrations. These data indicate that Ang II-infused rats develop increased renal interstitial fluid concentrations of Ang II, which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance and

  17. Neonatal Growth Restriction-Related Leptin Deficiency Enhances Leptin-Triggered Sympathetic Activation and Central Angiotensin II Receptor-Dependent Stress-Evoked Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peotta, Veronica; Rahmouni, Kamal; Segar, Jeffrey L.; Morgan, Donald A.; Pitz, Kate M.; Rice, Olivia M.; Roghair, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonatal growth restriction (nGR) leads to leptin deficiency and increases the risk of hypertension. Previous studies have shown nGR-related hypertension is normalized by neonatal leptin (nLep) and exacerbated by psychological stress. With recent studies linking leptin and angiotensin signaling, we hypothesized that nGR-induced nLep deficiency increases adult leptin sensitivity; leading to leptin- or stress-induced hypertension, through a pathway involving central angiotensin II type 1 receptors. Methods We randomized mice with incipient nGR, by virtue of their presence in large litters, to vehicle or physiologic nLep supplementation (80 ng/g/d). Adult caloric intake and arterial pressure were monitored at baseline, during intracerebroventricular losartan infusion and during systemic leptin administration. Results nGR increased leptin-triggered renal sympathetic activation and hypertension with increased leptin receptor expression in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus; all of those nGR-associated phenotypes were normalized by nLep. nGR mice also had stress-related hyperphagia and hypertension, but only the stress hypertension was blocked by central losartan infusion. Conclusion nGR leads to stress hypertension through a pathway that involves central angiotensin II receptors, and nGR-associated leptin deficiency increases leptin-triggered hypertension in adulthood. These data suggest potential roles for preservation of neonatal growth and nLep supplementation in the prevention of nGR-related hypertension. PMID:27049292

  18. Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans is attenuated by low sodium intake and angiotensin II co-infusion.

    PubMed

    van Twist, Daan J L; Houben, Alfons J H M; de Haan, Michiel W; Mostard, Guy J M; Kroon, Abraham A; de Leeuw, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    Current evidence suggests that angiotensin-(1-7) plays an important role in the regulation of tissue blood flow. This evidence, however, is restricted to studies in animals and human forearm. Therefore, we studied the effects of intrarenal angiotensin-(1-7) infusion on renal blood flow in hypertensive humans. To assess the influence of renin-angiotensin system activity, sodium intake was varied and co-infusion with angiotensin II was performed in a subgroup. In 57 hypertensive patients who were scheduled for renal angiography, renal blood flow was measured ((133)Xenon washout method) before and during intrarenal infusion of angiotensin-(1-7) (3 incremental doses: 0.27, 0.9, and 2.7 ng/kg per minute). Patients were randomized into low or high sodium intake. These 2 groups of patients received angiotensin-(1-7), with or without intrarenal co-infusion of angiotensin II (0.3 ng/kg per minute). Angiotensin-(1-7) infusion resulted in intrarenal vasodilation in patients adhering to a sodium-rich diet. This vasodilatory effect of angiotensin-(1-7) was clearly attenuated by low sodium intake, angiotensin II co-infusion, or both. Regression analyses showed that the prevailing renin concentration was the only independent predictor of angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation. In conclusion, angiotensin-(1-7) induces renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans, but the effect of angiotensin-(1-7) is clearly attenuated by low sodium intake and co-infusion of angiotensin II. This supports the hypothesis that angiotensin-(1-7) induced renal vasodilation depends on the degree of renin-angiotensin-system activation.

  19. Plasma angiotensin II concentrations in diabetic ketoacidosis and in hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P A; Gonggrijp, H; Crowley, M J; Ferriss, J B; O'Sullivan, D J

    1981-01-01

    Plasma angiotensin II concentrations were measured in 14 patients in diabetic ketoacidosis and in two patients with hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycemia, before treatment and again when blood glucose control was restored. In the ketoacidosis group plasma angiotensin II before treatment was markedly raised in all patients with otherwise uncomplicated diabetes, but was within the normal range in some patients with long-term complications such as neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy. Mean angiotensin II before treatment was significantly higher in otherwise uncomplicated patients than in those with long-term complications. However, plasma angiotensin II decreased with improved control in all. Angiotensin II levels did not correlate with indices of rehydration such as changes in blood urea, packed cell volume and calculated changes in plasma volume. There was, however, a significant negative association between pre-treatment angiotensin II and pH. Two patients with hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycemia were more dehydrated but less acidotic. Pre-treatment angiotensin II in each was well below the mean of the ketoacidosis group. These data are further evidence that the renin-angiotensin system may be imparied in diabetics with long-term complications. In addition, they suggest that factors other than fluid depletion are also important in activating the renin-angiotensin system in uncontrolled diabetes.

  20. Cardiac Overexpression of Constitutively Active Galpha q Causes Angiotensin II Type1 Receptor Activation, Leading to Progressive Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Naoko; Kashihara, Toshihide; Shimojo, Hisashi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Nakada, Tsutomu; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Mende, Ulrike; Taira, Eiichi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Sanbe, Atsushi; Hirose, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Transgenic mice with transient cardiac expression of constitutively active Galpha q (Gαq-TG) exhibt progressive heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias after the initiating stimulus of transfected constitutively active Gαq becomes undetectable. However, the mechanisms are still unknown. We examined the effects of chronic administration of olmesartan on heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia in Gαq-TG mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Olmesartan (1 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was chronically administered to Gαq-TG from 6 to 32 weeks of age, and all experiments were performed in mice at the age of 32 weeks. Chronic olmesartan administration prevented the severe reduction of left ventricular fractional shortening, and inhibited ventricular interstitial fibrosis and ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in Gαq-TG. Electrocardiogram demonstrated that premature ventricular contraction (PVC) was frequently (more than 20 beats/min) observed in 9 of 10 vehicle-treated Gαq-TG but in none of 10 olmesartan-treated Gαq-TG. The collected QT interval and monophasic action potential duration in the left ventricle were significantly shorter in olmesartan-treated Gαq-TG than in vehicle-treated Gαq-TG. CTGF, collagen type 1, ANP, BNP, and β-MHC gene expression was increased and olmesartan significantly decreased the expression of these genes in Gαq-TG mouse ventricles. The expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 3 and 6 channel and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) proteins but not angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor was increased in Gαq-TG ventricles compared with NTG mouse ventricles. Olmesartan significantly decreased TRPC6 and tended to decrease ACE expressions in Gαq-TG. Moreover, it increased AT1 receptor in Gαq-TG. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation plays an important role in the development of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia in Gαq-TG mouse model of heart failure

  1. Neuronal angiotensin II type 1 receptor upregulation in heart failure: activation of activator protein 1 and Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Lie; Roy, Shyamal K; Cornish, Kurtis G; Zucker, Irving H

    2006-10-27

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of mortality in developed countries. Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the development and progression of CHF. Many of the important functions of Ang II are mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R), including the increase in sympathetic nerve activity in CHF. However, the central regulation of the AT(1)R in the setting of CHF is not well understood. This study investigated the AT(1)R in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of rabbits with CHF, its downstream pathway, and its gene regulation by the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1). Studies were performed in 5 groups of rabbits: sham (n=5), pacing-induced (3 to 4 weeks) CHF (n=5), CHF with intracerebroventricular (ICV) losartan treatment (n=5), normal with ICV Ang II treatment (n=5), and normal with ICV Ang II plus losartan treatment (n=5). AT(1)R mRNA and protein expressions, plasma Ang II, and AP-1-DNA binding activity were significantly higher in RVLM of CHF compared with Sham rabbits (240.4+/-30.2%, P<0.01; 206.6+/-25.8%, P<0.01; 280+/-36.5%, P<0.05; 207+/-16.4%, P<0.01, respectively). Analysis of the stress-activated protein kinase/Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) pathway showed that phosphorylated c-Jun proteins, phosphorylated JNK proteins, and JNK activity increased significantly in RVLM of CHF compared with sham (262.9+/-48.1%, 213.8+/-27.7%, 148.2+/-10.1% of control, respectively). Importantly, ICV losartan in CHF rabbits attenuated these increases. ICV Ang II in normal rabbits simulated the molecular changes seen in CHF. This effect was blocked by concomitant ICV losartan. In addition, Ang II-induced AT(1)R expression was blocked by losartan and a JNK inhibitor, but not by extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38 MAP kinase inhibitors in a neuronal cell culture. These data suggest that central Ang II activates the AT(1)R, SAPK/JNK pathway. AP-1 may further regulate gene expression in RVLM in the CHF state.

  2. The Sirt1 activator SRT1720 attenuates angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis in apoE{sup −/−} mice through inhibiting vascular inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi xi; Zhang, Man; Cai, Yuehua; Zhao, Qihui; Dai, Wenjian

    2015-10-02

    Activation of the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) has been shown consistent antiinflammatory function. However, little information is available on the function of SIRT1 during Angiotensin II (AngII)-induced atherosclerosis. Here we report atheroprotective effects of sirt1 activation in a model of AngII-accelerated atherosclerosis, characterized by suppression pro-inflammatory transcription factors Nuclear transcription factor (NF)-κB and Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription. (STAT) signaling pathway, and atherosclerotic lesion macrophage content. In this model, administration of the SIRT1 agonist SRT1720 substantially attenuated AngII-accelerated atherosclerosis with decreasing blood pressure and inhibited NF-κB and STAT3 activation, which was associated with suppression of inflammatory factor and atherogenic gene expression in the artery. In vitro studies demonstrated similar changes in AngII-treated VSMCs and macrophages: SIRT1 activation inhibited the expression levels of proinflammatory factor. These studies uncover crucial proinflammatory mechanisms of AngII and highlight actions of SIRT1 activation to inhibit AngII signaling, which is atheroprotective. - Highlights: • SRT1720 reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in aortic arches and atherosclerotic lesion macrophage content. • SRT1720 could inhibit the phosphorylation of STAT3 and p65 phosphorylation and translocation. • SRT1720 could inhibit the expression of proinflammatory factor.

  3. Inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme, Angiotensin II Receptor Blocking, and Blood Pressure Lowering Bioactivity across Plant Families.

    PubMed

    Patten, Glen S; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. Interest in medicinal or nutraceutical plant bioactives to reduce hypertension has increased dramatically. The main biological regulation of mammalian blood pressure is via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The key enzyme is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) that converts angiotensin I into the powerful vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II. Angiotensin II binds to its receptors (AT1) on smooth muscle cells of the arteriole vasculature causing vasoconstriction and elevation of blood pressure. This review focuses on the in vitro and in vivo reports of plant-derived extracts that inhibit ACE activity, block angiotensin II receptor binding and demonstrate hypotensive activity in animal or human studies. We describe 74 families of plants that exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity and 16 plant families with potential AT1 receptor blocking activity, according to in vitro studies. From 43 plant families including some of those with in vitro bioactivity, the extracts from 73 plant species lowered blood pressure in various normotensive or hypertensive in vivo models by the oral route. Of these, 19 species from 15 families lowered human BP when administered orally. Some of the active plant extracts, isolated bioactives and BP-lowering mechanisms are discussed.

  4. The angiotensin II receptor 2 is expressed and mediates angiotensin II signaling in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Königshoff, Melanie; Wilhelm, Anke; Jahn, Andreas; Sedding, Daniel; Amarie, Oana Veronica; Eul, Bastian; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Günther, Andreas; Eickelberg, Oliver; Rose, Frank

    2007-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe interstitial lung disease unresponsive to currently available therapies. In IPF, initial alveolar epithelial cell damage leads to activation of fibroblast-(myo)fibroblasts, which deposit an increased amount of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix. Angiotensin II (ANGII) signaling, mediated via angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) or type 2 (AGTR2), controls tissue remodeling in fibrosis, but the relevance of AGTR2 remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated increased expression of AGTR1 und AGTR2 in human and rodent lung tissues from patients with IPF and mice subjected to bleomycin-induced fibrosis, respectively. Both AGTR1 und AGTR2 localized to interstitial fibroblasts. Quantitative analysis of cell surface expression in primary mouse fibroblasts revealed a significant increase of AGTR2 surface expression in fibrotic fibroblasts, whereas AGTR1 surface expression levels remained similar. ANGII treatment of normal fibroblasts led to enhanced migration and proliferation, which was abrogated after pretreatment with losartan (LOS), an AGTR1 inhibitor. In contrast, in fibrotic fibroblasts, migration and proliferation was modified only by AGTR2, but not AGTR1 inhibition (using PD123319). ANGII-induced effects were mediated via phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and p42/44, which was blocked via LOS and PD123319, respectively. Similar effects of AGTR1 and AGTR2 inhibition were observed using conditioned media of alveolar epithelial cells, a prominent source of ANGII in the lung in vivo. In summary, we conclude that ANGII signaling occurs primarily via AGTR1 in normal fibroblasts, while AGTR2-mediated effects are dominant on activated (myo)-fibroblasts, a receptor switch that may perturb epithelial-mesenchymal interaction, thereby further perpetuating fibrogenesis.

  5. Glucose and angiotensin II-derived endothelial extracellular vesicles regulate endothelial dysfunction via ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Hida, Mari; Narimatsu, Haruka; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2017-02-01

    In various diseases, including diabetes, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been detected in circulation and tissues. EVs are small membrane vesicles released from various cell types under varying conditions. Recently, endothelial cell-derived EVs (EEVs) were identified as a marker of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes, but the ensuing mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we dissected the ensuing pathways with respect to nitric oxide (NO) production under the condition of type 2 diabetes. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were stimulated with glucose alone and with glucose in combination with angiotensin II (Ang II) for 48 h. In supernatants from glucose + Ang II-stimulated HUVECs, release of EEVs was assessed using Western blotting with an anti-CD144 antibody. EEV release was significantly increased after stimulation of HUVECs, and high glucose + Ang II-derived EEVs impaired ACh-induced vascular relaxation responses and NO production in mice aortic rings. Furthermore, high glucose + Ang II-derived EEVs induced ERK1/2 signalling and decreased endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein expression in mice aortas. Furthermore, in the presence of the MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, high glucose plus Ang II treatment stimulated EEVs in HUVECs and those EEVs prevented the impairments of ACh-induced relaxation and NO production in mice aortas. These data strongly indicate that high glucose and Ang II directly affect endothelial cells and the production of EEVs; the resultant EEVs aggravate endothelial dysfunction by regulating eNOS protein levels and ERK1/2 signalling in mice aortas.

  6. Developmental effect of antenatal exposure to betamethasone on renal angiotensin II activity in the young adult sheep

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jianli; Chappell, Mark C.; Rose, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Antenatal corticosteroids may have long-term effects on renal development which have not been clearly defined. Our objective was to compare the responses to intrarenal infusions of ANG II in two groups of year-old, male sheep: one group exposed to a clinically relevant dose of betamethasone before birth and one not exposed. We wished to test the hypothesis that antenatal steroid exposure would enhance renal responses to ANG II in adult life. Six pairs of male sheep underwent unilateral nephrectomy and renal artery catheter placement. The sheep were infused for 24 h with ANG II or with ANG II accompanied by blockade of the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2) receptor. Baseline mean arterial blood pressure among betamethasone-exposed sheep was higher than in control animals (85.8 ± 2.2 and 78.3 ± 1.0 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.003). Intrarenal infusion of ANG II did not increase systemic blood pressure (P ≥ 0.05) but significantly decreased effective renal plasma flow and increased renal artery resistance (P < 0.05). The decrease in flow and increase in resistance were significantly greater in betamethasone- compared with vehicle-exposed sheep (betamethasone P < 0.05, vehicle P ≥ 0.05). This effect appeared to be mediated by a heightened sensitivity to the AT1 receptor among betamethasone-exposed sheep. Sodium excretion initially decreased in both groups during ANG II infusion; however, a rebound was observed after 24 h. AT1 blockade was followed by a significant rebound after 24 h in both groups. AT2 blockade blunted the 24-h rebound effect among the vehicle-exposed sheep compared with the betamethasone-exposed sheep. In conclusion, antenatal corticosteroid exposure appears to modify renal responsiveness to ANG II by increasing AT1- and decreasing AT2 receptor-mediated actions particularly as related to renal blood flow and sodium excretion. PMID:20071463

  7. Early interference with p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Wei, Shun-Guang; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2013-04-01

    Blood-borne angiotensin II (ANG II) can upregulate p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and ANG II type-1 receptors in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), a critical cardiovascular and autonomic center. We tested the hypothesis that brain p44/42 MAPK signaling contributes to the development of ANG II-induced hypertension. The ANG II infusion (120 ng/kg per min, subcutaneously) induced increases in phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK and ANG II type-1 receptors in the PVN after 1 week, before the onset of hypertension, that were sustained as hypertension developed during a 2- or 3-week infusion protocol. Bilateral PVN microinjections of small interfering RNAs for p44/42 MAPK, at the onset of the ANG II infusion or 1 week later, prevented the early increase in p44/42 MAPK activity. The early treatment normalized ANG II type-1 receptor expression in the PVN and attenuated the hypertensive response to the 2-week infusion of ANG II. The later small interfering RNA microinjections had a transient effect on ANG II type-1 receptor expression in PVN and no effect on the hypertensive response to the 3-week infusion of ANG II. The early treatment also normalized the pressure response to ganglionic blockade. The ANG II infusion induced increases in mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines that were not affected by either small interfering RNA treatment. These results suggest that the full expression of ANG II-induced hypertension depends on p44/42 MAPK-mediated effects. A potential role for p44/42 MAPK in modulating the ANG II-induced central inflammatory response might also be considered. MAPK signaling in PVN may be a novel target for early intervention in the progression of ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  8. Angiotensin II stimulates calcineurin activity in proximal tubule epithelia through AT-1 receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-gamma1 isoform.

    PubMed

    Lea, Janice P; Jin, Shao G; Roberts, Brian R; Shuler, Michael S; Marrero, Mario B; Tumlin, James A

    2002-07-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) contributes to the maintenance of extracellular fluid volume by regulating sodium transport in the nephron. In nonepithelial cells, activation of phospholipase C (PLC) by AT-1 receptors stimulates the generation of 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and the release of intracellular calcium. Calcineurin, a serine-threonine phosphatase, is activated by calcium and calmodulin, and both PLC and calcineurin have been linked to sodium transport in the proximal tubule. An examination of whether AngII activates calcineurin in a model of proximal tubule epithelia (LLC-PK1 cells) was performed; AngII increased calcineurin activity within 30 s. An examination of whether AngII activates PLC in proximal tubule epithelia was also performed after first showing that all three families of PLC isoforms are present in LLC-PK1 cells. Application of AngII increased IP(3) generation by 60% within 15 s, which coincided with AngII-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-gamma1 isoform also observed at 15 s. AngII-induced tyrosine phosphorylation was blocked by the AT-1 receptor antagonist, Losartan. Subsequently, an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphorylation blocked the AngII-induced activation of calcineurin, as did coincubation with an inhibitor of PLC activity and with an antagonist of the AT-1 receptor. It is therefore concluded that AngII stimulates calcineurin phosphatase activity in proximal tubule epithelial cells through a mechanism involving AT-1 receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC isoform.

  9. CHBPR-Angiotensin II stimulates renin in inner medullary collecting duct cells via PKC and independent of ENaC and mineralocorticoid receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Alexis A.; Liu, Liu; Lara, Lucienne S.; Seth, Dale M; Navar, L. Gabriel; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2011-01-01

    Collecting duct (CD) renin is stimulated by angiotensin (Ang) II providing a pathway for Ang I generation and further conversion to Ang II. Ang II stimulates epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) via Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and increases mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activity due to increased aldosterone release. Our objective was to determine if CD renin augmentation is mediated directly by AT1R or via ENaC and MR. In vivo studies examined the effects of ENaC blockade (amiloride; 5 mg/kg/day) on CD renin expression and urinary renin content (URC) in Ang II-infused rats (80 ng/min, 2 weeks). Ang II infusion increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), medullary renin mRNA, URC and intrarenal Ang II levels. Amiloride co-treatment did not alter these responses despite reduction in the rate of progression of SBP. In primary cultures of inner medullary CD (IMCD) cells, renin mRNA and (pro)renin protein levels increased with Ang II (100 nmol/L), and candesartan (AT1R antagonist) prevented this effect. Aldosterone (10−10 to 10−7 mol/L) with or without amiloride did not modify the upregulation of renin mRNA in Ang II treated cells. However, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with calphostin C prevented the Ang II-mediated increases in renin mRNA and (pro)renin protein levels. Furthermore, PKC activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased renin expression to the same extent as Ang II. These data indicate that AT1R-mediated increase in CD renin is induced directly by Ang II via PKC pathway and that this regulation is independent of MR activation or ENaC activity. PMID:21282553

  10. Role of IRS-4 in PI3-K activation by insulin in HepG2 cells, modulation by Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Rodrigo Sebastián; Forneris, Myriam Liliana; Uranga, Romina María; Salvador, Gabriela Alejandra; Ciuffo, Gladys María

    2010-04-09

    Insulin receptor substrate-4 (IRS-4) has a limited tissue expression and its modulation by tyr-phosphorylation is still controversial. We evaluated the participation of IRS-4 in the cross-talk between Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Insulin (Ins) receptors in HepG2 cells. Ins (10(-7)M) induced tyr-phosphorylation of IRS-4 (maximal at 5 min), an effect potentiated by Ang II AT(1) receptors. Phosphatydilinositol-3 kinase (PI3-K) inhibitors Wortmanin or LY294002 reduced Ang II effect on tyr-phosphorylation of IRS-4 to a level comparable to that of Ins alone. Physical association between IRS-4 substrate and PI3-K was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Recruitment of PI3-K by IRS-4 was induced by Ins (10(-7)M, 5 min) not by Ang II (10(-7)M) and this was inhibited by Wortmanin and LY294002. Ang II did not modify either the association or activation of PI3-K in immunocomplexes. The present data provide novel evidence of IRS-4 phosphorylation mediated by Ins, an effect modulated by Ang II. We report also Ins-induced PI3-K activation mediated by IRS-4. Our findings suggest a role for IRS-4 as a docking protein in the Ins signaling pathway that involves PI3-K association and activation. The present data suggest a possible participation of IRS-4 in cell proliferation Ins-induced.

  11. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  12. Na+,K+-ATPase activity and responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle to norepinephrine, angiotensin II and calcium ionophore A23187 in guinea pig aortic strips.

    PubMed

    Sekine, K; Yamakawa, K; Ogata, E

    1984-01-01

    The functional significance of the Na+,K+-ATPase activity in defining the sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle response to pressor stimuli was studied in guinea pig aortic strips. Subthreshold doses of ouabain (10(-8), 10(-7), 10(-6)M), potentiated the norepinephrine- and angiotensin II-induced contractile responses, dose-dependently. Furthermore, in the presence of subthreshold dose of ouabain (10(-6)M), tension developments were observed with subthreshold doses of norepinephrine and angiotensin II. The mechanism by which subthreshold dose of ouabain potentiated the norepinephrine-induced contractile response was revealed to involve the enhancement both of sensitivity and contractile activity. Ouabain (10(-6)M) potentiated the norepinephrine- and A23187-induced contractile responses, even in the presence of verapamil. These facts indicate that suppression of the vascular Na+,K+-ATPase activity could favor the development of hypertension through potentiating contractile responses to various stimuli and that the potentiation could be a reflection, at least partly, of the decrease in Ca2+-efflux.

  13. Activation of Thiazide-Sensitive Co-Transport by Angiotensin II in the cyp1a1-Ren2 Hypertensive Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ashek, Ali; Menzies, Robert I.; Mullins, Linda J.; Bellamy, Christopher O. C.; Harmar, Anthony J.; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Flatman, Peter W.; Mullins, John J.; Bailey, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic rats with inducible expression of the mouse Ren2 gene were used to elucidate mechanisms leading to the development of hypertension and renal injury. Ren2 transgene activation was induced by administration of a naturally occurring aryl hydrocarbon, indole-3-carbinol (100 mg/kg/day by gastric gavage). Blood pressure and renal parameters were recorded in both conscious and anesthetized (butabarbital sodium; 120 mg/kg IP) rats at selected time-points during the development of hypertension. Hypertension was evident by the second day of treatment, being preceded by reduced renal sodium excretion due to activation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride co-transporter. Renal injury was evident after the first day of transgene induction, being initially limited to the pre-glomerular vasculature. Mircoalbuminuria and tubuloinsterstitial injury developed once hypertension was established. Chronic treatment with either hydrochlorothiazide or an AT1 receptor antagonist normalized sodium reabsorption, significantly blunted hypertension and prevented renal injury. Urinary aldosterone excretion was increased ∼20 fold, but chronic mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism with spironolactone neither restored natriuretic capacity nor prevented hypertension. Spironolactone nevertheless ameliorated vascular damage and prevented albuminuria. This study finds activation of sodium-chloride co-transport to be a key mechanism in angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. Furthermore, renal vascular injury in this setting reflects both barotrauma and pressure-independent pathways associated with direct detrimental effects of angiotensin II and aldosterone. PMID:22558431

  14. Oxidative DNA Damage in Kidneys and Heart of Hypertensive Mice Is Prevented by Blocking Angiotensin II and Aldosterone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Susanne; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Zimnol, Anna; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recently, we could show that angiotensin II, the reactive peptide of the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, causes the formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in kidneys and hearts of hypertensive mice. To further investigate on the one hand the mechanism of DNA damage caused by angiotensin II, and on the other hand possible intervention strategies against end-organ damage, the effects of substances interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system on angiotensin II-induced genomic damage were studied. Methods In C57BL/6-mice, hypertension was induced by infusion of 600 ng/kg • min angiotensin II. The animals were additionally treated with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker eplerenone and the antioxidant tempol. DNA damage and the activation of transcription factors were studied by immunohistochemistry and protein expression analysis. Results Administration of angiotensin II led to a significant increase of blood pressure, decreased only by candesartan. In kidneys and hearts of angiotensin II-treated animals, significant oxidative stress could be detected (1.5-fold over control). The redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB were activated in the kidney by angiotensin II-treatment (4- and 3-fold over control, respectively) and reduced by all interventions. In kidneys and hearts an increase of DNA damage (3- and 2-fold over control, respectively) and of DNA repair (3-fold over control) was found. These effects were ameliorated by all interventions in both organs. Consistently, candesartan and tempol were more effective than eplerenone. Conclusion Angiotensin II-induced DNA damage is caused by angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated formation of oxidative stress in vivo. The angiotensin II-mediated physiological increase of aldosterone adds to the DNA-damaging effects. Blocking angiotensin II and mineralocorticoid receptors therefore

  15. Angiotensin II acts through the angiotensin 1a receptor to upregulate pendrin

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.; Hong, Seongun; Pech, Vladimir; Bailey, James L.; Agazatian, Diana; Matthews, Sharon W.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Le, Thu; Inagami, Tadashi; Whitehill, Florence M.; Weiner, I. David; Farley, Donna B.; Kim, Young Hee

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin is an anion exchanger expressed in the apical regions of B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells. Since angiotensin II increases pendrin-mediated Cl− absorption in vitro, we asked whether angiotensin II increases pendrin expression in vivo and whether angiotensin-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. While blood pressure was similar in pendrin null and wild-type mice under basal conditions, following 2 wk of angiotensin II administration blood pressure was 31 mmHg lower in pendrin null than in wild-type mice. Thus pendrin null mice have a blunted pressor response to angiotensin II. Further experiments explored the effect of angiotensin on pendrin expression. Angiotensin II administration shifted pendrin label from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane, independent of aldosterone. To explore the role of the angiotensin receptors in this response, pendrin abundance and subcellular distribution were examined in wild-type, angiotensin type 1a (Agtr1a) and type 2 receptor (Agtr2) null mice given 7 days of a NaCl-restricted diet (< 0.02% NaCl). Some mice received an Agtr1 inhibitor (candesartan) or vehicle. Both Agtr1a gene ablation and Agtr1 inhibitors shifted pendrin label from the apical plasma membrane to the subapical space, independent of the Agtr2 or nitric oxide (NO). However, Agtr1 ablation reduced pendrin protein abundance through the Agtr2 and NO. Thus angiotensin II-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. Angiotensin II acts through the Agtr1a to shift pendrin from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane. This Agtr1 action may be blunted by the Agtr2, which acts through NO to reduce pendrin protein abundance. PMID:21921024

  16. Angiotensin II-induced pro-fibrotic effects require p38MAPK activity and transforming growth factor beta 1 expression in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Vazquez, Yaneisi; Acuña, María José; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Simon, Felipe; Salas, José Diego; Alvarez Ruf, Joel; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2012-11-01

    Fibrotic disorders are typically characterised by excessive connective tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition that preclude the normal healing of different tissues. Several skeletal muscle dystrophies are characterised by extensive fibrosis. Among the factors involved in skeletal muscle fibrosis is angiotensin II (Ang-II), a key protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We previously demonstrated that myoblasts responded to Ang-II by increasing the ECM protein levels mediated by AT-1 receptors, implicating an Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) by a NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent mechanism. In this paper, we show that in myoblasts, Ang-II induced the increase of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression through its AT-1 receptor. This effect is dependent of the NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX)-induced ROS, as indicated by a decrease of the expression of both pro-fibrotic factors when the ROS production was inhibited via the NOX inhibitor apocynin. The increase in pro-fibrotic factors levels was paralleled by enhanced p38MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to Ang-II. However, only the p38MAPK activity was critical for the Ang-II-induced fibrotic effects, as indicated by the decrease in the Ang-II-induced TGF-β1 and CTGF expression and fibronectin levels by SB-203580, an inhibitor of the p38MAPK, but not by U0126, an inhibitor of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we showed that the Ang-II-dependent p38MAPK activation, but not the ERK1/2 phosphorylation, was necessary for the NOX-derived ROS. In addition, we demonstrated that TGF-β1 expression was required for the Ang-II-induced pro-fibrotic effects evaluated by using SB-431542, an inhibitor of TGF-βRI kinase activity, and by knocking down TGF-β1 levels by shRNA technique. These results strongly suggest that the fibrotic response to Ang-II is mediated by the AT-1 receptor and requires the p38MAPK phosphorylation, NOX-induced ROS, and TGF

  17. Ability of the new AT1 receptor blocker azilsartan to block angiotensin II-induced AT1 receptor activation after wash-out.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shin-ichiro; Matsuo, Yoshino; Nakayama, Asuka; Tomita, Sayo; Suematsu, Yasunori; Saku, Keijiro

    2014-03-01

    The recently approved angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB) azilsartan strongly reduces blood pressure (BP) in patients with hypertension. We previously reported that azilsartan showed unique binding behavior to the AT1 receptor because of its 5-oxo-1,2,4-oxadiazole moiety. However, the ability of azilsartan to block Ang II-dependent AT1 receptor activation is not yet clear. Azilsartan and a derivative of azilsartan (azilsartan-7H) that lacks a carboxyl group at the benzimidazole ring were used. Ang II-induced inositol phosphate (IP) production and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation were analyzed in a cell-based wash-out assay. Azilsartan, but not azilsartan-7H, completely blocked Ang II-induced IP production and ERK activation. Our previous report demonstrated that azilsartan mainly interacts with Tyr(113), Lys(199), and Gln(257) in the AT1 receptor. The interactions between azilsartan and Tyr(113) and Gln(257), but not Lys(199), were critical for blocking Ang II-induced IP production and ERK activation after wash-out. Although our findings regarding the molecule-specific effects of azilsartan are based on basic research, they may lead to an exciting insight into the mechanism of azilsartan.

  18. Enhancement by exogenous and locally generated angiotensin II of purinergic neurotransmission via angiotensin type 1 receptor in the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Onaka, Uran; Fujii, Koji; Abe, Isao; Fujishima, Masatoshi

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to enhance sympathetic neurotransmission in the vasculature by increasing the release of noradrenaline, but little is known about the effect on the co-released transmitter, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). In the present study we have examined the effect of angiotensin II on the excitatory junction potential (e.j.p.) elicited by repetitive field stimulation in the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery, to establish the angiotensin II receptor subtype involved in modulating the release of ATP and the role of the endothelium in converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Suramin (300 μM), a P2 purinoceptor antagonist, abolished both the e.j.ps and depolarizing response to α,β-methylene-ATP, a stable analogue of ATP, without affecting the resting membrane potential and noradrenaline-induced depolarization. Angiotensin II (0.1 μM) affected neither the resting membrane potential nor the amplitude of the first e.j.p., but increased the amplitudes of the subsequent e.j.ps. This enhancing effect of angiotensin II was abolished by CV-11974 (0.1 μM), an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but unaffected by PD 123319 (1 μM), an angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, or CGP 42112A (1 μM), AT2 receptor ligand. Angiotensin I (0.1 μM) exerted a similar effect on e.j.ps to that of angiotensin II. CV-11974 (0.1 μM) or temocaprilat (10 μM), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, abolished the effect of angiotensin I. Removal of the endothelium did not alter the action of angiotensin I. The results of the present study indicate that the release of ATP from sympathetic nerves innervating the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery, as determined from the magnitude of the e.j.p., can be enhanced by angiotensin II via activation of prejunctional AT1 receptors. Qualitatively similar effects were observed with angiotensin I, which appears to be converted into angiotensin II by a subendothelial process

  19. Arsenic causes aortic dysfunction and systemic hypertension in rats: Augmentation of angiotensin II signaling.

    PubMed

    Waghe, Prashantkumar; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Gupta, Priyanka; Kandasamy, Kannan; Choudhury, Soumen; Kutty, Harikumar Sankaran; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2015-07-25

    The groundwater pollutant arsenic can cause various cardiovascular disorders. Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, plays an important role in vascular dysfunction by promoting changes in endothelial function, vascular reactivity, tissue remodeling and oxidative stress. We investigated whether modulation of angiotensin II signaling and redox homeostasis could be a mechanism contributing to arsenic-induced vascular disorder. Rats were exposed to arsenic at 25, 50 and 100ppm of sodium arsenite through drinking water consecutively for 90 days. Blood pressure was recorded weekly. On the 91st day, the rats were sacrificed for blood collection and isolation of thoracic aorta. Angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II levels were assessed in plasma. Aortic reactivity to angiotensin II was assessed in organ-bath system. Western blot of AT1 receptors and G protein (Gαq/11), ELISA of signal transducers of MAP kinase pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed in aorta. Arsenic caused concentration-dependent increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure from the 10th, 8th and 7th week onwards, respectively. Arsenic caused concentration-dependent enhancement of the angiotensin II-induced aortic contractile response. Arsenic also caused concentration-dependent increase in the plasma levels of angiotensin II and angiotensin converting enzyme and the expression of aortic AT1 receptor and Gαq/11 proteins. Arsenic increased aortic protein kinase C activity and the concentrations of protein tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Further, arsenic increased aortic mRNA expression of Nox2, Nox4 and p22phox, NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation. The results suggest that arsenic-mediated enhancement of angiotensin II signaling could be an important mechanism in the arsenic-induced vascular disorder, where ROS could augment the angiotensin II signaling through activation

  20. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid Contributes to the Inhibition of K+ Channel Activity and Vasoconstrictor Response to Angiotensin II in Rat Renal Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Kristopher G.; Williams, Jan M.; Pabbidi, Malikarjuna R.; Didion, Sean P.; Falck, John R.; Zhuo, Jialong; Roman, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) contributes to the vasoconstrictor effect of angiotensin II (ANG II) in renal microvessels by preventing activation of the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (KCa) in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. ANG II increased the production of 20-HETE in rat renal microvessels. This response was attenuated by the 20-HETE synthesis inhibitors, 17-ODYA and HET0016, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor AACOF3, and the AT1 receptor blocker, Losartan, but not by the AT2 receptor blocker, PD123319. ANG II (10-11 to 10-6 M) dose-dependently decreased the diameter of renal microvessels by 41 ± 5%. This effect was blocked by 17-ODYA. ANG II (10-7 M) did not alter KCa channel activity recorded from cell-attached patches on renal VSM cells under control conditions. However, it did reduce the NPo of the KCa channel by 93.4 ± 3.1% after the channels were activated by increasing intracellular calcium levels with ionomycin. The inhibitory effect of ANG II on KCa channel activity in the presence of ionomycin was attenuated by 17-ODYA, AACOF3, and the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U-73122. ANG II induced a peak followed by a steady-state increase in intracellular calcium concentration in renal VSM cells. 17-ODYA (10-5 M) had no effect on the peak response, but it blocked the steady-state increase. These results indicate that ANG II stimulates the formation of 20-HETE in rat renal microvessels via the AT1 receptor activation and that 20-HETE contributes to the vasoconstrictor response to ANG II by blocking activation of KCa channel and facilitating calcium entry. PMID:24324797

  1. Angiotensin II receptor type 2 activation is required for cutaneous sensory hyperinnervation and hypersensitivity in a rat hind paw model of inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Many pain syndromes are associated with abnormal proliferation of peripheral sensory fibers. We showed previously that angiotensin II, acting through its type 2 receptor (AT2), stimulates axon outgrowth by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. In this study, we assessed whether AT2 mediates nociceptor hyperinnervation in the rodent hind paw model of inflammatory pain. Plantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), but not saline, produced marked thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity through 7 days. This was accompanied by proliferation of dermal and epidermal PGP9.5- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) axons, and dermal axons immunoreactive for GFRα2 but not tyrosine hydroxylase or neurofilament H. Continuous infusion of the AT2 antagonist PD123319 beginning with CFA injection completely prevented hyperinnervation as well as hypersensitivity over a 7 day period. A single PD123319 injection 7 days after CFA also reversed thermal hypersensitivity and partially reversed mechanical hypersensitivity 3 hours later, without affecting cutaneous innervation. Angiotensin II synthesizing proteins renin and angiotensinogen were largely absent after saline but abundant in T-cells and macrophages in CFA-injected paws with or without PD123319. Thus, emigrant cells at the site of inflammation apparently establish a renin-angiotensin system, and AT2 activation elicits nociceptor sprouting and heightened thermal and mechanical sensitivity. Perspective Short-term AT2 activation is a potent contributor to thermal hypersensitivity, while long-term effects (such as hyperinnervation) also contribute to mechanical hypersensitivity. Pharmacological blockade of AT2 signaling represents a potential therapeutic strategy aimed at biological mechanisms underlying chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:23726047

  2. Adhesion ability of angiotensin II with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Preu, Julia; Tiefenauer, Louis; Gutberlet, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The octa-peptide angiotensin II (Ang II, (H2NAspArgValTyrIleHisProPheCOOH)) is one of the key player on blood pressure regulation in mammals. Predominantly binding to the Angiotensin type 1 and 2 receptors, the hormone is one of several peptide ligands binding to G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The active hormone derives from a high molecular weight precursor sequentially cleaved by the proteases renin and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). The chemical nature of the amino acid sequence has an impact on the behavior in the proximity of membranes, demonstrated using different membrane model systems and biophysical methods. Applying electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering a detailed view on the adhesion of the peptide with model membrane surfaces was performed. The role of specific amino acids involved in the interaction with the phospholipid head group were investigated and, studying a truncated version of Ang II, Ang (1-7), the key role of the C-terminal phenylalanine was proven. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acid abolishes the binding of the peptide to the membrane surface. A shift in pH, altering the protonation state of the central histidine residue impairs the adhesion of Ang II.

  3. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in vascular smooth muscle regulates blood pressure homeostasis through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-angiotensin II receptor type 1 axis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Jiang, Weidong; Cantalupo, Anna; Sessa, William C; Giordano, Frank J

    2013-09-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health issue for which only a small proportion of cases have a known mechanistic pathogenesis. Of the defined causes, none have been directly linked to heightened vasoconstrictor responsiveness, despite the fact that vasomotor tone in resistance vessels is a fundamental determinant of blood pressure. Here, we reported a previously undescribed role for smooth muscle hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in controlling blood pressure homeostasis. The lack of HIF-1α in smooth muscle caused hypertension in vivo and hyperresponsiveness of resistance vessels to angiotensin II stimulation ex vivo. These data correlated with an increased expression of angiotensin II receptor type I in the vasculature. Specifically, we show that HIF-1α, through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, reciprocally defined angiotensin II receptor type I levels in the vessel wall. Indeed, pharmacological blockade of angiotensin II receptor type I by telmisartan abolished the hypertensive phenotype in smooth muscle cell-HIF-1α-KO mice. These data revealed a determinant role of a smooth muscle HIF-1α/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ/angiotensin II receptor type I axis in controlling vasomotor responsiveness and highlighted an important pathway, the alterations of which may be critical in a variety of hypertensive-based clinical settings.

  4. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  5. Small-molecule inhibitors of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protect against angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew W; Kinzenbaw, Dale A; Modrick, Mary L; Faraci, Frank M

    2013-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is known to promote vascular disease and hypertension in part by formation of cytokines, such as interleukin-6. However, the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in these processes and Ang II/interleukin-6 signaling is unclear. Using 2 models, we tested the hypothesis that STAT3 is essential for Ang II-induced vascular dysfunction and hypertension. Incubation of isolated carotid arteries from C57BL/6J mice with Ang II overnight increased superoxide ≈2-fold and reduced vasodilator responses to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine by ≈50% versus controls (P<0.05). These effects were prevented by the addition of small-molecular inhibitors of STAT3 activation (S3I-201 or STATTIC). In vivo, administration of Ang II (1.4 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) using osmotic minipumps increased arterial pressure by ≈40 mm Hg at day 14 compared with vehicle-treated mice, and this effect was prevented by S3I-201 treatment (5 mg/kg IP, QOD). After systemic treatment with Ang II, dilator responses to acetylcholine were reduced by ≈30% to 50% in carotid artery and basilar arteries, whereas S3I-201 treatment prevented most of this impairment (P<0.05). In contrast to effects on vascular function and blood pressure, S31-201 did not prevent Ang II-induced hypertrophy in the carotid artery. These findings provide the first evidence that inhibitors of STAT3 activation protect against Ang II-induced oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension. Because Ang II promotes vascular disease in the presence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors, these results suggest that selective targeting of STAT3 may have substantial therapeutic potential.

  6. Angiotensin II-independent upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by activation of the (Pro)renin receptor in rat renal inner medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alexis A; Luffman, Christina; Bourgeois, Camille R T; Vio, Carlos P; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2013-02-01

    During renin-angiotensin system activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandins attenuate the pressor and antinatriuretic effects of angiotensin II (AngII) in the renal medulla. The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is abundantly expressed in the collecting ducts (CD) and its expression is augmented by AngII. PRR overexpression upregulates COX-2 via mitogen-activated kinases/extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 in renal tissues; however, it is not clear whether this effect occurs independently or in concert with AngII type 1 receptor (AT1R) activation. We hypothesized that PRR activation stimulates COX-2 expression independently of AT(1)R in primary cultures of rat renal inner medullary cells. The use of different cell-specific immunomarkers (aquaporin-2 for principal cells, anion exchanger type 1 for intercalated type-A cells, and tenascin C for interstitial cells) and costaining for AT(1)R, COX-2, and PRR revealed that PRR and COX-2 were colocalized in intercalated and interstitial cells whereas principal cells did not express PRR or COX-2. In normal rat kidney sections, PRR and COX-2 were colocalized in intercalated and interstitial cells. In rat renal inner medullary cultured cells, treatment with AngII (100 nmol/L) increased COX-2 expression via AT(1)R. In addition, AngII and rat recombinant prorenin (100 nmol/L) treatments increased extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 phosphorylation, independently. Importantly, rat recombinant prorenin upregulated COX-2 expression in the presence of AT(1)R blockade. Inhibition of mitogen-activated kinases/extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 suppressed COX-2 upregulation mediated by either AngII or rat recombinant prorenin. Furthermore, PRR knockdown using PRR-short hairpin RNA blunted the rat recombinant prorenin-mediated upregulation of COX-2. These results indicate that COX-2 expression is upregulated by activation of either PRR or AT(1)R via mitogen-activated kinases/extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 in rat renal

  7. CARMA3/Bcl10/MALT1-dependent NF-κB activation mediates angiotensin II-responsive inflammatory signaling in nonimmune cells

    PubMed Central

    McAllister-Lucas, Linda M.; Ruland, Jürgen; Siu, Katy; Jin, Xiaohong; Gu, Shufang; Kim, David S. L.; Kuffa, Peter; Kohrt, Dawn; Mak, Tak W.; Nuñez, Gabriel; Lucas, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a peptide hormone that, like many cytokines, acts as a proinflammatory agent and growth factor. After injury to the liver, the hormone assists in tissue repair by stimulating hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells to synthesize extracellular matrix proteins and secrete secondary cytokines and by stimulating myofibroblasts to proliferate. However, under conditions of chronic liver injury, all of these effects conspire to promote pathologic liver fibrosis. Much of this effect of Ang II results from activation of the proinflammatory NF-κB transcription factor in response to stimulation of the type 1 Ang II receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Here, we characterize a previously undescribed signaling pathway mediating Ang II-dependent activation of NF-κB, which is composed of three principal proteins, CARMA3, Bcl10, and MALT1. Blocking the function of any of these proteins, through the use of either dominant-negative mutants, RNAi, or gene targeting, effectively abolishes Ang II-dependent NF-κB activation in hepatocytes. In addition, Bcl10−/− mice show defective hepatic cytokine production after Ang II treatment. Evidence also is presented that this pathway activates NF-κB through ubiquitination of IKKγ, the regulatory subunit of the IκB kinase complex. These results elucidate a concrete series of molecular events that link ligand activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor to stimulation of the NF-κB transcription factor. These findings also uncover a function of the CARMA, Bcl10, and MALT1 proteins in cells outside the immune system. PMID:17101977

  8. Small Molecules with Similar Structures Exhibit Agonist, Neutral Antagonist or Inverse Agonist Activity toward Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hanzawa, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Naoki; Fujino, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Matsuo, Yoshino; Yanagisawa, Hiroaki; Koike, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Saku, Keijiro

    2012-01-01

    Small differences in the chemical structures of ligands can be responsible for agonism, neutral antagonism or inverse agonism toward a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Although each ligand may stabilize the receptor conformation in a different way, little is known about the precise conformational differences. We synthesized the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan, R239470 and R794847, which induced inverse agonism, antagonism and agonism, respectively, and then investigated the ligand-specific changes in the receptor conformation with respect to stabilization around transmembrane (TM)3. The results of substituted cysteine accessibility mapping studies support the novel concept that ligand-induced changes in the conformation of TM3 play a role in stabilizing GPCR. Although the agonist-, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist-binding sites in the AT1 receptor are similar, each ligand induced specific conformational changes in TM3. In addition, all of the experimental data were obtained with functional receptors in a native membrane environment (in situ). PMID:22719858

  9. Drinking behaviour in rats treated with isoprenaline, angiotensin II or angiotensin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Emma

    1979-01-01

    1. Isoprenaline hydrochloride injected subcutaneously in rats given a choice test of 1·8% NaCl and water, first induced saline intake which started immediately and was almost concluded in 15 min, followed by a copious water intake. When either saline or water were given in a separate test, saline intake surpassed the water intake in the first 15 min. 2. The delay of 15, 30 or 60 min after injection of isoprenaline, 100 μg/kg, before drinking was allowed, significantly reduced saline intake but did not modify the amount of water subsequently drunk. 3. Isoprenaline caused a sudden drop in arterial blood pressure, the extent and duration depending on the dose. The time of maximum drop 3-4 min after injection coincided with the time the rat drank salt. 4. Isoprenaline-induced saline drinking was significantly reduced after bilateral nephrectomy but water intake was unaffected. 5. The beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent, propranolol, inhibited isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake, while the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine abolished isoprenaline-induced NaCl intake and enhanced water intake. 6. Saralasin acetate (P-113), a competitive inhibitor of angiotensin II, given into the third brain ventricle, prevented the isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake as well as angiotensin II-induced drinking. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor SQ-20881 reduced the isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake. 7. In conclusion, hypotension might be a component of salt drinking evoked by isoprenaline although the dipsogenic action of beta-stimulation is mainly due to endogenous renin-angiotensin activation. PMID:231100

  10. Angiotensin II-induced protein kinase D activates the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors and promotes StAR mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Olala, Lawrence O; Choudhary, Vivek; Johnson, Maribeth H; Bollag, Wendy B

    2014-07-01

    Aldosterone synthesis is initiated upon the transport of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol is hydrolyzed to pregnenolone. This process is the rate-limiting step in acute aldosterone production and is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. We have previously shown that angiotensin II (AngII) activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) promotes acute aldosterone production in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, but the mechanism remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the downstream signaling effectors of AngII-stimulated PKD activity. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutively active serine-to-glutamate PKD mutant enhances, whereas the dominant-negative serine-to-alanine PKD mutant inhibits, AngII-induced StAR mRNA expression relative to the vector control. PKD has been shown to phosphorylate members of the activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) family of leucine zipper transcription factors, which have been shown previously to bind the StAR proximal promoter and induce StAR mRNA expression. In primary glomerulosa cells, AngII induces ATF-2 and CREB phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, overexpression of the constitutively active PKD mutant enhances the AngII-elicited phosphorylation of ATF-2 and CREB, and the dominant-negative mutant inhibits this response. Furthermore, the constitutively active PKD mutant increases the binding of phosphorylated CREB to the StAR promoter. Thus, these data provide insight into the previously reported role of PKD in AngII-induced acute aldosterone production, providing a mechanism by which PKD may be mediating steroidogenesis in primary bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells.

  11. Angiotensin-(1-7) blocks the angiotensin II-stimulated superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Polizio, Ariel Héctor; Gironacci, Mariela Mercedes; Tomaro, Maria Luján; Peña, Clara

    2007-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7), a bioactive compound of the renin-angiotensin system, exerts effects leading to blood pressure reduction which counterbalance Ang II pressor actions. The present study was conducted to examine Ang-(1-7) and Ang II effects on superoxide anion production in rat aorta using the lucigenin chemiluminescence method. Ang II dose-dependently increased superoxide anion formation when compared to control levels; a maximal increase (2.5-fold) was observed with 1 x 10(-10)M peptide concentration. The Ang II-stimulated superoxide formation was blocked by 1 x 10(-10)M losartan, the specific AT(1) receptor antagonist, but not by 1 x 10(-10)M PD 123319, the AT(2) receptor antagonist, suggesting that the increased superoxide levels caused by Ang II are mediated through AT(1) receptors activation. The Ang II-stimulated superoxide production was not modified by 2 x 10(-8)M allopurinol or 1 x 10(-7)M indomethacin, but was completely abolished by NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors: 1 x 10(-8)M diphenylene iodonium, or 2 x 10(-8)M apocynin, demonstrating that NAD(P)H oxidase participates in such response. In contrast to Ang II, Ang-(1-7) concentrations ranging 1 x 10(-12) to 1 x 10(-6)M did not modify superoxide anion levels, but prevented the Ang II-enhanced superoxide production. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) blocks the pro-oxidant effects of Ang II, thus reducing the superoxide anion production and delaying the hypertension development.

  12. Photoreleasable ligands to study intracrine angiotensin II signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Létourneau, Myriam; Folch, Benjamin; Doucet, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Louis R; Mamarbachi, Aida M; Pétrin, Darlaine; Hébert, Terence E; Fournier, Alain; Chatenet, David; Allen, Bruce G; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that intracellular angiotensin II (Ang-II) contributes to the regulation of cardiac contractility, renal salt reabsorption, vascular tone and metabolism; however, work on intracrine Ang-II signalling has been limited to indirect approaches because of a lack of selective intracellularly-acting probes. Here, we aimed to synthesize and characterize cell-permeant Ang-II analogues that are inactive without uncaging, but release active Ang-II upon exposure to a flash of UV-light, and act as novel tools for use in the study of intracrine Ang-II physiology. We prepared three novel caged Ang-II analogues, [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II, Ang-II-ODMNB and [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II-ODMNB, based upon the incorporation of the photolabile moiety 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl (DMNB). Compared to Ang-II, the caged Ang-II analogues showed 2–3 orders of magnitude reduced affinity toward both angiotensin type-1 (AT1R) and type-2 (AT2R) receptors in competition binding assays, and greatly-reduced potency in contraction assays of rat thoracic aorta. After receiving UV-irradiation, all three caged Ang-II analogues released Ang-II and potently induced the contraction of rat thoracic aorta. [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II showed the most rapid photolysis upon UV-irradiation and was the focus of subsequent characterization. Whereas Ang-II and photolysed [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation (via AT1R) and cGMP production (AT2R), caged [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II did not. Cellular uptake of [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II was 4-fold greater than that of Ang-II and significantly greater than uptake driven by the positive-control HIV TAT(48–60) peptide. Intracellular photolysis of [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II induced an increase in nucleoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]n), and initiated 18S rRNA and nuclear factor kappa B mRNA synthesis in adult cardiac cells. We conclude that caged Ang-II analogues represent powerful new tools for use in the selective study of intracrine signalling via Ang-II. PMID:25433071

  13. Prevention of RhoA activation and cofilin-mediated actin polymerization mediates the antihypertrophic effect of adenosine receptor agonists in angiotensin II- and endothelin-1-treated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Asad; Gan, Xiaohong Tracey; Thomas, Ashley; Karmazyn, Morris

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptor activation has been shown to be associated with diminution of cardiac hypertrophy and it has been suggested that endogenously produced adenosine may serve to blunt pro-hypertrophic processes. In the present study, we determined the effects of two pro-hypertrophic stimuli, angiotensin II (Ang II, 100 nM) and endothelin-1 (ET-1, 10 nM) on Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) activation in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and whether the latter serves as a target for the anti-hypertrophic effect of adenosine receptor activation. Both hypertrophic stimuli potently increased RhoA activity with peak activation occurring 15-30 min following agonist addition. These effects were associated with significantly increased phosphorylation (inactivation) of cofilin, a downstream mediator of RhoA, an increase in actin polymerization, and increased activation and nuclear import of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. The ability of both Ang II and ET-1 to activate the RhoA pathway was completely prevented by the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N (6)-cyclopentyladenosine, the A2a receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, the A3 receptor agonist N (6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-methyluronamide as well as the nonspecific adenosine analog 2-chloro adenosine. All effects of specific receptor agonists were prevented by their respective receptor antagonists. Moreover, all adenosine agonists prevented either Ang II- or ET-1-induced hypertrophy, a property shared by the RhoA inhibitor Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 or the actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B. Our study therefore demonstrates that both Ang II and ET-1 can activate the RhoA pathway and that prevention of the hypertrophic response to both agonists by adenosine receptor activation is mediated by prevention of RhoA stimulation and actin polymerization.

  14. Mechanisms of angiotensin II natriuresis and antinatriuresis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Hall, J E; Montani, J P; Guyton, A C; Langford, H G; Cornell, J E

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of changes in renal arterial pressure (RAP), renal hemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption in mediating the natriuretic and antinatriuretic actions of angiotensin II (ANG II). In seven anesthetized dogs, endogenous ANG II formation was blocked with captopril, and ANG II was infused intravenously at rates of 5-1,215 ng X kg-1 X min-1 while RAP was either servo-controlled at the preinfusion level or permitted to increase. When RAP was servo-controlled, ANG II infusion at all rates from 5-1,215 ng X kg-1 X min-1 decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) and fractional sodium excretion (FENa) while increasing fractional reabsorption of lithium (FRLi) (an index of proximal tubular fractional sodium reabsorption) and causing no change in calculated distal tubule fractional sodium reabsorption (FRDNa). When RAP was permitted to increase, ANG II infusion rates up to 45 ng X kg-1. min-1 also decreased UNaV and FENa while increasing FRLi and causing no change in FRDNa. However, at 135 ng X kg-1 X min-1 and above, UNaV and FENa increased while FRLi and FRDNa decreased when RAP was allowed to rise, even though renal blood flow and filtration fraction were not substantially different from the values observed when RAP was servo-controlled. Filtered sodium load was slightly higher when RAP was permitted to increase during ANG II infusion compared with when RAP was servo-controlled, although the differences were not statistically significant. Thus, even very large doses of ANG II cause antinatriuresis when RAP is prevented from increasing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Angiotensin II Stimulates Thick Ascending Limb NO Production via AT2 Receptors and Akt1-dependent Nitric-oxide Synthase 3 (NOS3) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Marcela; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely stimulates thick ascending limb (TAL) NO via an unknown mechanism. In endothelial cells, activation of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2) stimulates NO. Akt1 activates NOS3 by direct phosphorylation. We hypothesized that Ang II stimulates TAL NO production via AT2-mediated Akt1 activation, which phosphorylates NOS3 at serine 1177. We measured NO production by fluorescence microscopy. In isolated TALs, Ang II (100 nm) increased NO production by 1.1 ± 0.2 fluorescence units/min (p < 0.01). Ang II increased cGMP accumulation by 4.9 ± 1.3 fmol/μg (p < 0.01). Upon adding the AT2 antagonist PD123319 (1 μm), Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 ± 0.1 fluorescence units/min; p < 0.001 versus Ang II); adding the AT1 antagonist losartan (1 μm) resulted in Ang II stimulating NO by 0.9 ± 0.1 fluorescence units/min. Akt inhibitor (5 μm) blocked Ang II-stimulated NO (−0.1 ± 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus inhibitor alone). Phospho-Akt1 increased by 72% after 5 min (p < 0.006), returning to basal after 10 min. Phospho-Akt2 did not change after 5 min but increased by 115 and 163% after 10 and 15 min (p < 0.02). Phospho-Akt3 did not change. An AT2 agonist increased pAkt1 by 78% (p < 0.02), PI3K inhibition blocked this effect. In TALs transduced with dominant negative Akt1, Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 ± 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus 1.2 ± 0.2 for controls; p < 0.001). Ang II increased phospho-NOS3 at serine 1177 by 130% (p < 0.01) and 150% after 5 and 10 min (p < 0.02). Ang II increased phosphoNOS3 at serine 633 by 50% after 5 min (p < 0.01). Akt inhibition prevented NOS3 phosphorylation. We concluded that Ang II enhances TAL NO production via activation of AT2 and Akt1-dependent phosphorylation of NOS3 at serines 1177 and 633. PMID:20299462

  16. Angiotensin II stimulates thick ascending limb NO production via AT(2) receptors and Akt1-dependent nitric-oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) activation.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Marcela; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2010-05-14

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely stimulates thick ascending limb (TAL) NO via an unknown mechanism. In endothelial cells, activation of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT(2)) stimulates NO. Akt1 activates NOS3 by direct phosphorylation. We hypothesized that Ang II stimulates TAL NO production via AT(2)-mediated Akt1 activation, which phosphorylates NOS3 at serine 1177. We measured NO production by fluorescence microscopy. In isolated TALs, Ang II (100 nm) increased NO production by 1.1 +/- 0.2 fluorescence units/min (p < 0.01). Ang II increased cGMP accumulation by 4.9 +/- 1.3 fmol/microg (p < 0.01). Upon adding the AT(2) antagonist PD123319 (1 microm), Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 +/- 0.1 fluorescence units/min; p < 0.001 versus Ang II); adding the AT(1) antagonist losartan (1 microm) resulted in Ang II stimulating NO by 0.9 +/- 0.1 fluorescence units/min. Akt inhibitor (5 microm) blocked Ang II-stimulated NO (-0.1 +/- 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus inhibitor alone). Phospho-Akt1 increased by 72% after 5 min (p < 0.006), returning to basal after 10 min. Phospho-Akt2 did not change after 5 min but increased by 115 and 163% after 10 and 15 min (p < 0.02). Phospho-Akt3 did not change. An AT(2) agonist increased pAkt1 by 78% (p < 0.02), PI3K inhibition blocked this effect. In TALs transduced with dominant negative Akt1, Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 +/- 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus 1.2 +/- 0.2 for controls; p < 0.001). Ang II increased phospho-NOS3 at serine 1177 by 130% (p < 0.01) and 150% after 5 and 10 min (p < 0.02). Ang II increased phosphoNOS3 at serine 633 by 50% after 5 min (p < 0.01). Akt inhibition prevented NOS3 phosphorylation. We concluded that Ang II enhances TAL NO production via activation of AT(2) and Akt1-dependent phosphorylation of NOS3 at serines 1177 and 633.

  17. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells.

  18. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Katherine J.; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F.; Keezer, Susan M.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser938 were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K·mg protein−1·min−1 and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser938 is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells. PMID:26582472

  19. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  20. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  1. Salvianolic Acid A Attenuates Cell Apoptosis, Oxidative Stress, Akt and NF-κB Activation in Angiotensin-II Induced Murine Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Xu, Tongda; Du, Yinping; Pan, Defeng; Wu, Wanling; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Yanbin; Li, Dongye

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the role of Salvianolic acid A(SAA), one of the main effective components in Salvia Miltiorrhiza (known as 'Danshen' in traditional Chinese medicine), in apoptotic factors, the production of oxidative products, and the expression of Akt and NF-κB in angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated murine macrophages. In the present study, Ang II was added to mice abdominal macrophages with or without addition of SAA. After cell identification, apoptosis was measured by DNA strand break level with TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax. Intracellular concentrations of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also measured. Western blotting determined the expression of Akt, p-Akt, NF-κB and p-NF-κB. Ly294002 (the inhibitor of PI3K) was used to determine the mechanism of SAA. Ang II (1 µM) significantly increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells and Bax expression, but reduced Bcl-2 expression. These effects were antagonized when the cells were pretreated with SAA. SAA decreased MDA, but increased SOD in the cell lysis solution treated with Ang II. It markedly reduced the level of p-NF-κB, as also p-Akt, which was partly blocked by Ly294002. SAA prevents Ang IIinduced apoptosis, oxidative stress and related protein expression in the macrophages. It also inhibits the activation of Akt.

  2. Angiotensin II Promotes the Development of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Patients via Regulating the T Cells Activities: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhanpu; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Specific T cell phenotype has been reported to potentially contribute to the development of angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced several vascular disorders. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is intimately associated with cardiovascular disease. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between T cell phenotypes and Ang II in T2DM patients combined with carotid atherosclerosis (CA). Material/Methods This study was performed on 50 patients with T2DM in our hospital. Based on the presence of CA, they were divided into CA group (presence of CA, n=30) or T2DM group (absence of CA, n=20). Additionally, 10 healthy participants were selected as controls. Basic characteristics of all participants were collected and recorded. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients and controls with or without Ang II and Ang II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment were used to detect Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell proportions, mRNA levels of T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt as well as the expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17 by flow cytometry, ELISA, and Real-Time PCR. Results Ang II levels were notably higher in patients in the CA group than those in the T2DM and control group (p<0.05). Th1 and Th17 positive cells, mRNA levels of T-bet and RORγt as well as the expression of IFN-γ and IL-17 were significantly increased in the CA group compared with the T2DM group and control group (p<0.05). Moreover, the activities of T cells and related cytokines were significantly increased of healthy controls after Ang II treatment (p<0.05), while these changes were notably weakened by ARB treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Ang II promotes the development of CA in T2DM patients by regulating T cells activities. PMID:27782101

  3. [Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II in patients with severe aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    López-de la Vega, César; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Lomelí-Estrada, Catalina; Pastelín-Hernández, Gustavo; del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Strengthen knowledge about the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis. Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II were compared between two samples: A) forty five patients with severe aortic stenosis, without systemic arterial hypertension and with normal kidney and normal left ventricular systolic function; B) control group: twenty one persons without cardiovascular disease. there would be no difference between urinary levels. The average of angiotensin-(1-7) urinary concentration in severe aortic stenosis patients was 2.102 pmol/mL and 5.591 pmol/mL for the control group. The average of Ang II was 0.704 pmol/mL and 0.185 pmol/mL respectively. Using t-Student test, we determine that the difference in urinary concentration of angiotensin-(1-7) [p=0.633] and the difference of angiotensin II (p=0.631), were statistically significant. documented a statistically significant difference in urinary levels angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7) within the group of patients with severe aortic stenosis.

  4. Structural Basis for Selectivity and Diversity in Angiotensin II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Kate L.; Patel, Nilkanth; Sadybekov, Anastasiia; Zamlynny, Beata; Rudd, Michael T.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Tolstikova, Alexandra; White, Thomas A.; Hunter, Mark S.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Babaoglu, Kerim; Moore, Eric L.; Katz, Ryan D.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Sharma, Sujata; Sheth, Payal; Soisson, Stephen M.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Cherezov, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptors, AT1R and AT2R, serve as key components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. While AT1R plays a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, the function of AT2R is enigmatic with a variety of reported effects. To elucidate the mechanisms for the functional diversity and ligand selectivity between these receptors, we report crystal structures of the human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective and an AT1R/AT2R-dual ligand, respectively, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the same time preventing the recruitment of G proteins/β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signaling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure-activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the interactions critical for ligand binding and selectivity. Our results thus provide insights into the structural basis for distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of novel selective ligands. PMID:28379944

  5. Human adipose tissue cells keep tight control on the angiotensin II levels in their vicinity.

    PubMed

    Schling, Petra; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2002-12-13

    Human adipose tissue expresses all components necessary for the local production of angiotensin II, which has multiple functions in adipose tissue, ranging from regulation of local blood flow to complex influences on tissue homeostasis. Still the mechanisms controlling human adipose tissue angiotensin II concentrations are not yet known. We investigated whether angiotensin II is degraded by human primary cultured preadipocytes and adipocytes and which enzymes are responsible for its metabolism. Distinct but transient angiotensin II production was limited by degradation due to consecutive proteolytic cleavage by endopeptidase and aminopeptidase activities. The endopeptidase could be identified as neprilysin expressed on the surface of both preadipocytes and adipocytes. Degradation of angiotensin II was preceded by a lag phase that was considerably longer in preadipocytes. This time span could not be explained by an induction of neprilysin nor by an increase in its surface localization. Following the lag phase, adipocytes showed a higher degradation activity than preadipocytes as mirrored by increased neprilysin levels and activity measured in their membrane fractions. Our findings demonstrate that human preadipocytes and adipocytes differentially express functional neprilysin and aminopeptidase activity involved in the regulation of angiotensin II concentrations in human adipose tissue.

  6. Angiotensin I conversion to angiotensin II stimulates cortical collecting duct sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Komlosi, Peter; Fuson, Amanda L; Fintha, Attila; Peti-Peterdi, János; Rosivall, Laszlo; Warnock, David G; Bell, Phillip Darwin

    2003-08-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II directly stimulates epithelial sodium channel activity in the rabbit cortical collecting duct. Because Ang I and converting enzyme analogues might be present in the distal nephron, this raises the possibility of intraluminal generation of Ang II. Conversion of Ang I to Ang II was monitored by Ang II-dependent changes in intracellular sodium concentration as a reflection of sodium transport across the apical membrane. This involved imaging-based fluorescence microscopy with sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate in isolated, perfused, cortical collecting-duct segments from rabbit kidney. Principal and intercalated cells were differentiated by rhodamine-conjugated peanut lectin. Control principal cell intracellular sodium concentration, during perfusion with 25 mmol/L NaCl and zero sodium in the bath plus monensin (10(-5) mol/L) averaged 5.8+/-0.14 mmol/L (n=156). The increase in intracellular sodium concentration, when luminal NaCl was increased from 25 to 150 mmol/L, was elevated by 3.5-fold in the presence of intraluminal Ang I (10(-6) mol/L). Also, the effects of Ang I on sodium transport were not significantly different from the effects of Ang II (10(-9) mol/L). Ang I was used in micromolar concentrations to ensure that there was sufficient substrate available for conversion to Ang II. Inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme with captopril reduced the stimulatory effect of Ang I. These results suggest that intraluminal conversion of Ang I to Ang II can occur in the cortical collecting duct, resulting in enhanced apical sodium entry.

  7. Intracisternal galanin/angiotensin II interactions in central cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Parrado, Concepción; Vela, Carmen; Coveñas, Rafael; Yanaihara, Noboru; Fuxe, Kjell; González-Barón, Salvador; Narváez, José A

    2005-04-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interactions between angiotensin II (Ang II) and galanin(1-29) [GAL(1-29)] or its N-terminal fragment galanin(1-15) [GAL(1-15)] on central cardiovascular control. The involvement of angiotensin type1 (AT1) receptor subtype was analyzed by the AT1 antagonist, DuP 753. Anesthesized male Sprague-Dawley rats received intracisternal microinjections of Ang II (3 nmol) with GAL(1-29) (3 nmol) or GAL(1-15) (0.1 nmol) alone or in combination. The changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) recorded from the femoral artery were analyzed. The injection of Ang II and GAL(1-15) alone did not produce any change in MAP. However, coinjections of both Ang II and GAL(1-15) elicited a significant vasopressor response. This response was blocked by DuP 753. Ang II and GAL(1-15) alone produced an increase in HR. The coinjections of Ang II with GAL(1-15) induced an increase in HR not significantly different from the tachycardia produced by each peptide. The presence of DuP 753 counteracted this response. GAL(1-29) alone elicited a transient vasopressor response that disappeared in the presence of Ang II. The coinjections of Ang II with GAL(1-29) and with DuP 753 restored the transient vasopressor effect produced by GAL(1-29). GAL(1-29) produced a slight but significant tachycardic effect that was not modified in the presence of Ang II. The presence of DuP 753 did not modify the tachycardic response produced by Ang II and GAL(1-29). These results give indications for the existence of a differential modulatory effect of Ang II with GAL(1-15) and GAL(1-29) on central blood pressure response that might be dependent on the activity of the angiotensin AT1 receptor subtype.

  8. Distinct properties of telmisartan on agonistic activities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ among clinically used angiotensin II receptor blockers: drug-target interaction analyses.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Hirotoshi; Kurosaki, Eiji; Niimi, Tatsuya; Gato, Katsuhiko; Kawasaki, Yuko; Suwa, Akira; Honbou, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Okumura, Hiroyuki; Sanagi, Masanao; Tomura, Yuichi; Orita, Masaya; Yonemoto, Takako; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    A proportion of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) improves glucose dyshomeostasis and insulin resistance in a clinical setting. Of these ARBs, telmisartan has the unique property of being a partial agonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). However, the detailed mechanism of how telmisartan acts on PPARγ and exerts its insulin-sensitizing effect is poorly understood. In this context, we investigated the agonistic activity of a variety of clinically available ARBs on PPARγ using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Based on physicochemical data, we then reevaluated the metabolically beneficial effects of telmisartan in cultured murine adipocytes. ITC and SPR assays demonstrated that telmisartan exhibited the highest affinity of the ARBs tested. Distribution coefficient and parallel artificial membrane permeability assays were used to assess lipophilicity and cell permeability, for which telmisartan exhibited the highest levels of both. We next examined the effect of each ARB on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. To investigate the impact on adipogenesis, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiated with each ARB in addition to standard inducers of differentiation for adipogenesis. Telmisartan dose-dependently facilitated adipogenesis and markedly augmented the mRNA expression of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), accompanied by an increase in the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and protein expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). In contrast, other ARBs showed only marginal effects in these experiments. In accordance with its highest affinity of binding for PPARγ as well as the highest cell permeability, telmisartan superbly activates PPARγ among the ARBs tested, thereby providing a fresh avenue for treating hypertensive patients with metabolic derangement.

  9. Norepinephrine metabolism in neuronal cultures is increased by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Shalit, S.L.; Kalberg, C.J.; Raizada, M.K.

    1987-06-01

    In this study the authors have examined the actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) on catecholamine metabolism in neuronal brain cell cultures prepared from the hypothalamus and brain stem. Neuronal cultures prepared from the brains of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit specific neuronal uptake mechanisms for both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), and also monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity. Separate neuronal uptake sites for NE and DA were identified by using specific neuronal uptake inhibitors for each amine. In previous studies, they determined that ANG II (10 nM-1 ..mu..M) stimulates increased neuronal (/sup 3/H)NE uptake by acting as specific receptors. They have confirmed these results here and in addition have shown that ANG II has not significant effects on neuronal (/sup 3/H)DA uptake. These results suggest that the actions of ANG II are restricted to the NE transporter in neuronal cultures. It is possible that ANG II stimulates the intraneuronal metabolism of at least part of the NE that is taken up, because the peptide stimulates MAO activity, an effect mediated by specific ANG II receptors. ANG II had no effect on COMT activity in neuronal cultures. Therefore, the use of neuronal cultures of hypothalamus and brain stem they have determined that ANG II can specifically alter NE metabolism in these areas, while apparently not altering DA metabolism.

  10. Leptin Mediates High-Fat Diet Sensitization of Angiotensin II-Elicited Hypertension by Upregulating the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Zhongming; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G; Thunhorst, Robert L; Felder, Robert B; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is characterized by increased circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin, which can increase sympathetic nerve activity and raise blood pressure. A previous study revealed that rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) have an enhanced hypertensive response to subsequent angiotensin II administration that is mediated at least, in part, by increased activity of brain renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines. This study tested whether leptin mediates this HFD-induced sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension by interacting with brain renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokine mechanisms. Rats fed an HFD for 3 weeks had significant increases in white adipose tissue mass, plasma leptin levels, and mRNA expression of leptin and its receptors in the lamina terminalis and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Central infusion of a leptin receptor antagonist during HFD feeding abolished HFD sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension. Furthermore, central infusion of leptin mimicked the sensitizing action of HFD. Concomitant central infusions of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist irbesartan, the tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis inhibitor pentoxifylline, or the inhibitor of microglial activation minocycline prevented the sensitization produced by central infusion of leptin. RT-PCR analysis indicated that either HFD or leptin administration upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in the lamina terminalis and paraventricular nucleus. The leptin antagonist and the inhibitors of angiotensin II type 1 receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis, and microglial activation all reversed the expression of these genes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension is mediated by leptin through upregulation of central renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines. © 2016 American Heart

  11. Dual Activation of TRIF and MyD88 Adaptor Proteins by Angiotensin II Evokes Opposing Effects on Pressure, Cardiac Hypertrophy and Inflammatory Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Madhu V.; Cicha, Michael Z.; Meyerholz, David K.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Abboud, François M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is recognized as an immune disorder whereby immune cells play a defining role in the genesis and progression of the disease. The innate immune system and its component toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key determinants of the immunological outcome through their pro-inflammatory response. TLR activated signaling pathways utilize several adaptor proteins of which adaptor proteins MyD88 and TRIF define two major inflammatory pathways. In this study, we compared the contributions of MyD88 and TRIF adaptor proteins to angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in mice. Deletion of MyD88 did not prevent cardiac hypertrophy and the pressor response to Ang II tended to increase. Moreover, the increase in inflammatory gene expression (Tnfa, Nox4 and Agtr1a) was significantly greater in the heart and kidney of MyD88-deficient mice compared with wild type mice. Thus, pathways involving MyD88 may actually restrain the inflammatory responses. On the other hand, in mice with non-functional TRIF (Trifmut mice), Ang II induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy were abrogated, and pro-inflammatory gene expression in heart and kidneys was unchanged or decreased. Our results indicate that Ang II induces activation of a pro-inflammatory innate immune response, causing hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy. These effects require functional adaptor protein TRIF-mediated pathways. However, the common MyD88 dependent signaling pathway, which is also activated simultaneously by Ang II, paradoxically exerts a negative regulatory influence on these responses. PMID:26195481

  12. Angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotension II in the rostral ventrolateral medulla modulate the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex and sympathetic activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Min; Shi, Zhen; Gao, Juan; Han, Ying; Yuan, Ning; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2010-04-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) plays a pivotal role in regulating sympathetic vasomotor activity. The cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) contributes to the enhanced sympathetic outflow in chronic heart failure and hypertension. The aim of the present study was to determine whether angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang-(1-7) in the RVLM modulate the CSAR and sympathetic activity. Bilateral sinoaortic denervation and vagotomy were carried out in anesthetized rats. The CSAR was evaluated as the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) response to epicardial application of capsaicin. The effects of bilateral microinjection of Ang II, Ang-(1-7), the AT(1) receptor antagonist losartan or the Mas receptor antagonist D: -alanine-Ang-(1-7) (A-779) into the RVLM were determined. Either Ang II or Ang-(1-7) enhanced the CSAR as well as increased RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with losartan but not the A-779 abolished the effects of Ang II, while A-779 but not the losartan eliminated the effects of Ang-(1-7). The RVLM microinjection of losartan alone had no direct effect on the CSAR, RSNA, and MAP, but A-779 alone attenuated the CSAR and decreased RSNA and MAP. These results indicate that Ang-(1-7) is as effective as Ang II in sensitizing the CSAR and increasing sympathetic outflow. In contrast to Ang II, the effects of Ang-(1-7) are not mediated by AT(1) receptors but by Mas receptors. Mas receptors, but not the AT(1) receptors, in the RVLM are involved in the tonic control of the CSAR.

  13. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  14. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  15. Novel EGFR inhibitors attenuate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kesong; Tian, Xinqiao; Qian, Yuanyuan; Skibba, Melissa; Zou, Chunpeng; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jingying; Xu, Zheng; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an important risk factor for heart failure. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this current study was to examine the role of EGFR in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we observed that both Ang II and EGF could increase the phospohorylation of EGFR and protein kinase B (AKT)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and then induce cell hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. Both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic silencing significantly reduced Ang II-induced EGFR signalling pathway activation, hypertrophic marker overexpression, and cell hypertrophy. In addition, our results showed that Ang II-induced EGFR activation is mediated by c-Src phosphorylation. In vivo, Ang II treatment significantly led to cardiac remodelling including cardiac hypertrophy, disorganization and fibrosis, accompanied by the activation of EGFR signalling pathway in the heart tissues, while all these molecular and pathological alterations were attenuated by the oral administration with EGFR inhibitors. In conclusion, the c-Src-dependent EGFR activation may play an important role in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and inhibition of EGFR by specific molecules may be an effective strategy for the treatment of Ang II-associated cardiac diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. Angiotensin II-related hypertension and eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marin Garcia, Pablo Jesus; Marin-Castaño, Maria Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic vascular disease, especially hypertension, has been suspected as a risk factor for some eye diseases including, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Hypertension can contribute to chronic diseases by hemodynamic injury and/or cellular actions induced by hypertension-related hormones or growth factors. Among the most important is Angiotensin II (Ang II), which controls blood pressure and induces different cellular functions that may be dependent or independent of its effect on blood pressure. Importantly, as is true for heart, kidney and other organs, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the eye. So, even in the absence of hypertension, local production of Ang II could be involved in eye diseases. The goal of this manuscript is to review the most relevant scientific evidence supporting the role of the RAS activation, in the development of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, and highlight the importance of Ang II in the etiology of these diseases. PMID:25276298

  17. Angiotensin II has acute effects on TRPC6 channels in podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Palygin, Oleg; Chubinskiy-Nadezhdin, Vladislav; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Ma, Rong; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A key role for podocytes in the pathogenesis of proteinuric renal diseases has been established. Angiotensin II causes depolarization and increased intracellular calcium concentration in podocytes; members of the cation TRPC channels family, particularly TRPC6, are proposed as proteins responsible for calcium flux. Angiotensin II evokes calcium transient through TRPC channels and mutations in the gene encoding the TRPC6 channel result in the development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of angiotensin II on intracellular calcium ion levels and endogenous channels in intact podocytes of freshly isolated decapsulated mouse glomeruli. An ion channel with distinct TRPC6 properties was identified in wild type, but was absent in TRPC6 knockout mice. Single channel electrophysiological analysis found that angiotensin II acutely activated native TRPC-like channels in both podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli and TRPC6 channels transiently overexpressed in CHO cells; the effect was mediated by changes in the channel open probability. Angiotensin II evoked intracellular calcium transients in the wild type podocytes, which was blunted in TRPC6 knockout glomeruli. Pan-TRPC inhibitors gadolinium and SKF 96365 reduced the response in wild type glomerular epithelial cells, whereas the transient in TRPC6 knockout animals was not affected. Thus, angiotensin II-dependent activation of TRPC6 channels in podocytes may have a significant role in the development of kidney diseases. PMID:24646854

  18. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  19. Diacylglycerol kinase theta is translocated and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependently activated by noradrenaline but not angiotensin II in intact small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A J; Draeger, A; Houssa, B; van Blitterswijk , W J; Ohanian, V; Ohanian, J

    2001-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates the lipid second messenger DG to phosphatidic acid. We reported previously that noradrenaline (NA), but not angiotensin II (AII), increases membrane-associated DGK activity in rat small arteries [Ohanian and Heagerty (1994) Biochem. J. 300, 51-56]. Here, we have identified this DGK activity as DGKtheta, present in both smooth muscle and endothelial cells of these small vessels. Subcellular fractionation of artery homogenates revealed that DGKtheta was present in nuclear, plasma membrane (and/or Golgi) and cytosolic fractions. Upon NA stimulation, DGKtheta translocated towards the membrane and cytosol (155 and 153% increases relative to the control, respectively) at 30 s, followed by a return to near-basal levels at 5 min; AII was without effect. Translocation to the membrane was to both Triton-soluble and -insoluble fractions. NA, but not AII, transiently increased DGKtheta activity in immunoprecipitates (126% at 60 s). Membrane translocation and DGKtheta activation were regulated differently: NA-induced DGKtheta activation, but not translocation, was dependent on transient activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K). In addition, DGK activity co-immunoprecipitated with protein kinase B, a downstream effector of PI 3-K, and was increased greatly by NA stimulation. The rapid and agonist-specific activation of DGKtheta suggests that this pathway may have a physiological role in vascular smooth-muscle responses. PMID:11115406

  20. Activation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor leads to movement of the sixth transmembrane domain: analysis by the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stéphane S; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard

    2007-07-01

    The role of transmembrane domain six (TMD6) of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor, which is predicted to undergo conformational changes after agonist binding, was investigated using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. Each residue in the Lys240-Leu265 fragment was mutated, one at a time, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). This treatment led to a significant reduction in binding of (125)I-[Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII to the F249C, H256C, T260C, and V264C mutant receptors, suggesting that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor. It is noteworthy that this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD6 cysteines engineered in a constitutively active AT(1) receptor. Indeed, mutant F249C was insensitive to MTSEA treatment, whereas the sensitivity of mutant V264C decreased. Under these conditions, one other mutant, F261C, was found to be sensitive to MTSEA treatment. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT(1) receptor causes TMD6 to pivot. This movement moves the top (extracellular side) of TMD6 toward the binding pocket and simultaneously distances the bottom (intracellular side) away from the binding pocket. Using this approach, we identified key elements within TMD6 that contribute to the activation of class A GPCRs through structural rearrangements.

  1. DIOL Triterpenes Block Profibrotic Effects of Angiotensin II and Protect from Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-López, Raquel; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Gómez-Hurtado, Nieves; Delgado, Carmen; Visitación Bartolomé, Maria; San Román, José Alberto; Cordova, Claudia; Lahera, Vicente; Nieto, Maria Luisa; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    myofibroblasts. They inhibit the angiotensin II-induced proliferation in a PPAR-γ-dependent manner, while at high doses they activate pathways of programmed cell death that are dependent on JNK and PPAR-γ. PMID:22844495

  2. Acute effects of angiotensin II on myocardial performance.

    PubMed

    Broomé, M; Haney, M; Häggmark, S; Johansson, G; Aneman, A; Biber, B

    2001-10-01

    Specific angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors exist in many organs including peripheral blood vessels, cardiac myocytes and the central nervous system. This suggests multiple sites of actions for Ang II throughout the cardiovascular system. Cardiac effects of Ang II are not completely understood, though its prominent vasoconstrictor actions are well described. This study was designed to assess left ventricular function during administration of Ang II using relatively load-independent methods in a whole-animal model. Ang II was infused in incremental doses (0-200 microg x h(-1)) in anaesthetised instrumented pigs (n=10). Cardiac systolic and diastolic function were evaluated by analysis of the left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) increased dose-dependently with Ang II, while cardiac output (CO) remained unchanged. Systolic function indices, end-systolic elastance (Ees) and preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW), demonstrated dose-dependent increases. The diastolic function parameter tau (tau) did not change with increasing Ang II dose. Ang II infusion caused increases in contractility indices in anaesthetised pigs in the doses used in this study. The mechanisms for these systolic function effects may be a direct myocardial effect or modulated through changes in autonomic nervous system activity.

  3. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

  4. Left ventricular hypertrophy and angiotensin II receptor blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Maeda, K; Nakamura, M; Watanabe, T; Yoshikawa, J; Hirohashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II plays a significant role in cell growth and proliferation in model systems and in humans. Numerous studies have shown that left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) increases the risk of coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack; all-cause deaths, and sudden death. The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) has provided beneficial effects on LVH regression and on cardiac remodeling in the presence of hypertension and heart failure. The new class of ARBs appears to provide cardioprotective effects that are similar to those of the ACE inhibitors. Most of the beneficial effects provided by these agents appear to be related to a more complete blockade of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor. However, costimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor appears to increase nitric oxide and thus causes some bradykinin-like effects. Evidence for the role of angiotensin II in promoting LVH as well as abnormal regulation of the angiotensin II signal transduction pathways in model systems and in humans has been reviewed. Secondly, the mechanisms for the beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers studied in model systems and in humans, including possible involvement in the formation of reactive oxygen species by mononuclear cells, are presented. Finally, results from large-scale interventions such as the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction (LIFE) study, as well as an overview of the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial involving the use of ARB in high-risk patients, are presented.

  5. Angiotensin II-induced relaxation of anococcygeus smooth muscle via desensitization of AT1 receptor, and activation of AT2 receptor associated with nitric-oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, Márcio A F; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Rattan, Satish

    2004-10-01

    We evaluated the role of receptor desensitization, activation of AT(2) receptors, and enzymatic degradation of angiotensin II (Ang II) by amino/neutral endopeptidases in rat anococcygeus smooth muscle (ASM) relaxation. Ang II (0.3 nM to 10 microM) produced contractions (E(max) = 21.50 +/- 5.73%) followed by passive relaxations (E(max) reduced to 9.08 +/- 2.55%). Contractions were inhibited (E(max) = 13.67 +/- 2.03%) by losartan (0.1 microM; AT(1) antagonist) but not by PD123,319 [S-(+)-1-([4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl)-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridine-6-carboxylic acid] (0.1 microM; AT(2) antagonist). Conversely, the passive relaxation was inhibited (E(max) = 18.00 +/- 3.45%) by PD123,319 but not by losartan. Ang II (0.3 microM to 100 microM) produced initial contractions (E(max) = 11.49 +/- 9.39%) followed by active relaxations [I(max) (maximum inhibition elicited by the agonist) = 47.85 +/- 4.23%] on strips precontracted by bethanechol (100 microM). A second administration of Ang II on the background of bethanechol (1 h later) resulted in stronger relaxations (I(max) = 64.03 +/- 5.47%) without the initial contractions. N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester [nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor], ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one; guanylate cyclase inhibitor), PD123,319, and tetrodotoxin (neurotoxin) inhibited the relaxations. The presence of AT(1) and AT(2) receptors was confirmed by Western blot. Experiments with amastatin (1 microM) and thiorphan (1 microM), aminopeptidase, and neutral endopeptidase inhibitors, respectively, excluded the involvement of enzymatic degradation in Ang II-induced relaxation of ASM. In conclusion, the rat ASM relaxation by Ang II is the result of active and passive relaxations. The passive relaxation depends on desensitization of excitatory AT(1) receptors, and the active relaxation is mediated by stimulation of AT(2) receptors and activation of the neuronal NOS/soluble guanylate

  6. Trans- but not cis-resveratrol impairs angiotensin-II-mediated vascular inflammation through inhibition of NF-κB activation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma upregulation.

    PubMed

    Rius, Cristina; Abu-Taha, May; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Piqueras, Laura; Cerda-Nicolas, Jose-Miguel; Issekutz, Andrew C; Estañ, Luís; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban J; Orallo, Francisco; Sanz, Maria-Jesus

    2010-09-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang-II) displays inflammatory activity and is implicated in several cardiovascular disorders. This study evaluates the effect of cis- and trans (t)-resveratrol (RESV) in two in vivo models of vascular inflammation and identifies the cardioprotective mechanisms that underlie them. In vivo, Ang-II-induced arteriolar leukocyte adhesion was inhibited by 71% by t-RESV (2.1 mg/kg, i.v.), but was not affected by cis-RESV. Because estrogens influence the rennin-angiotensin system, chronic treatment with t-RESV (15 mg/kg/day, orally) inhibited ovariectomy-induced arteriolar leukocyte adhesion by 81%, partly through a reduction of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) expression and circulating levels of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha. In an in vitro flow chamber system, t-RESV (1-10 microM) undermined the adhesion of human leukocytes under physiological flow to Ang-II-activated human endothelial cells. These effects were accompanied by reductions in monocyte and endothelial CAM expression, chemokine release, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Interestingly, t-RESV increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in human endothelial and mononuclear cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of RESV is produced by its t-RESV, which possibly interferes with signaling pathways that cause the upregulation of CAMs and chemokine release. Upregulation of proliferator-activated receptor-gamma also appears to be involved in the cardioprotective effects of t-RESV. In this way, chronic administration of t-RESV may reduce the systemic inflammatory response associated with the activation of the rennin-angiotensin system, thereby decreasing the risk of further cardiovascular disease.

  7. The brain renin-angiotensin system modulates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Baltatu, O; Silva, J A; Ganten, D; Bader, M

    2000-01-01

    The potential involvement of the brain renin-angiotensin system in the hypertension induced by subpressor doses of angiotensin II was tested by the use of newly developed transgenic rats with permanent inhibition of brain angiotensinogen synthesis [TGR(ASrAOGEN)]. Basal systolic blood pressure monitored by telemetry was significantly lower in TGR(ASrAOGEN) than in Sprague-Dawley rats (parent strain) (122.5+/-1.5 versus 128.9+/-1.9 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.05). The increase in systolic blood pressure induced by 7 days of chronic angiotensin II infusion was significantly attenuated in TGR(ASrAOGEN) in comparison with control rats (29.8+/-4.2 versus 46. 3+/-2.5 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.005). Moreover, an increase in heart/body weight ratio was evident only in Sprague-Dawley (11.1%) but not in TGR(ASrAOGEN) rats (2.8%). In contrast, mRNA levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and collagen III in the left ventricle measured by ribonuclease protection assay were similarly increased in both TGR(ASrAOGEN) (ANP, x2.5; collagen III, x1.8) and Sprague-Dawley rats (ANP, x2.4; collagen III, x2) as a consequence of angiotensin II infusion. Thus, the expression of these genes in the left ventricle seems to be directly stimulated by angiotensin II. However, the hypertensive and hypertrophic effects of subpressor angiotensin II are at least in part mediated by the brain renin-angiotensin system.

  8. Curcumin inhibits angiotensin II-induced inflammation and proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells by elevating PPAR-γ activity and reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yu; Yang, Mei; Li, Ze; Meng, Zhe

    2017-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII)-induced production of inflammatory factors and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in the progression of atherosclerotic plaques. Growing evidence has demonstrated that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) effectively attenuates AngII-induced inflammation and intercellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) production. Curcumin (Cur) inhibits inflammatory responses by enhancing PPAR-γ activity and reducing oxidative stress in various tissues. The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether Cur inhibits AngII-induced inflammation and proliferation, and its underlying molecular mechanism, in VSMCs. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time PCR were used to measure the protein and mRNA expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured by Griess reaction. Western blot analysis and a DNA-binding assay were used to measure PPAR-γ activity. iROS production was measured using the DCFH-DA method. In rat VSMCs, Cur attenuated AngII‑induced expression of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA and protein in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited NO production by suppressing inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity, and suppressed proliferation of VSMCs. This was accompanied by increased PPAR-γ expression and activation in Cur-pretreated VSMCs. GW9662, a PPAR-γ antagonist, reversed the anti-inflammatory effect of Cur. Moreover, Cur attenuated AngII-induced oxidative stress by downregulating the expression of p47phox, which is a key subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. In conclusion, Cur inhibited the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α, decreased the production of NO, and suppressed the proliferation of VSMCs, by elevating PPAR-γ activity and suppressing oxidative stress, leading to attenuated AngII-induced inflammatory responses in VSMCs.

  9. A Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Imidazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists Combining 2D and 3D QSAR Methods.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh C

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed for correlating the chemical composition of imidazole-5-carboxylic acid analogs and their angiotensin II [Formula: see text] receptor antagonist activity using partial least squares and k-nearest neighbor, respectively. For comparing the three different feature selection methods of 2D-QSAR, k-nearest neighbor models were used in conjunction with simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm and stepwise coupled with partial least square (PLS) showed variation in biological activity. The statistically significant best 2D-QSAR model having good predictive ability with statistical values of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] was developed by SA-partial least square with the descriptors like [Formula: see text]count, 5Chain count, SdsCHE-index, and H-acceptor count, showing that increase in the values of these descriptors is beneficial to the activity. The 3D-QSAR studies were performed using the SA-PLS. A leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient [Formula: see text] and predicate activity [Formula: see text] = 0.7226 were obtained. The information rendered by QSAR models may lead to a better understanding of structural requirements of substituted imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives and also aid in designing novel potent antihypertensive molecules.

  10. Ets-1 upregulation mediates angiotensin II-related cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guanghua; Han, Zhenhua; Meng, Zhe; Wei, Jin; Gao, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Ets-1, the prototypical member of the family of Ets transcription factors, has been shown to participate in tissue fibrotic remodeling. However, its role in cardiac fibrosis has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Ets-1 in profibrotic actions of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and in the in vivo heart. In growth-arrested CFs, Ang II induced Ets-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with Ang II type 1 receptor blocker losartan, protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 partly inhibited this induction accompanied with impaired cell proliferation and production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein, the two downstream targets of Ets-1. Knockdown of Ets-1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the inductive effects of Ang II on cell proliferation and expression of CTGF and PAI-1. Moreover, the levels of Ets-1, PAI-1 and CTGF protein were simultaneously upregulated in left ventricle of Ang II-infused rats in parallel with an increase in the activation of ERK and JNK. Our data suggest that Ets-1 may mediate Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic effects.

  11. Ets-1 upregulation mediates angiotensin II-related cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Guanghua; Han, Zhenhua; Meng, Zhe; Wei, Jin; Gao, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Ets-1, the prototypical member of the family of Ets transcription factors, has been shown to participate in tissue fibrotic remodeling. However, its role in cardiac fibrosis has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Ets-1 in profibrotic actions of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and in the in vivo heart. In growth-arrested CFs, Ang II induced Ets-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with Ang II type 1 receptor blocker losartan, protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 partly inhibited this induction accompanied with impaired cell proliferation and production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein, the two downstream targets of Ets-1. Knockdown of Ets-1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the inductive effects of Ang II on cell proliferation and expression of CTGF and PAI-1. Moreover, the levels of Ets-1, PAI-1 and CTGF protein were simultaneously upregulated in left ventricle of Ang II-infused rats in parallel with an increase in the activation of ERK and JNK. Our data suggest that Ets-1 may mediate Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic effects. PMID:26617730

  12. Angiotensinogen Exerts Effects Independent of Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Wu, Congqing; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Chen, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Mingming; Graham, Mark J.; Mullick, Adam E.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Feldman, David L.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study determined whether angiotensinogen (AGT) has angiotensin (Ang)II-independent effects using multiple genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Approach and Results All study mice were in LDL receptor -/- background and fed a saturated fat-enriched diet. In mice with floxed alleles and a neomycin cassette in intron 2 of the AGT gene (hypoAGT mice), plasma AGT concentrations were > 90% lower compared to their wild type littermates. HypoAGT mice had lower SBP, less atherosclerosis, and diminished body weight gain and liver steatosis. Low plasma AGT concentrations and all phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with hepatocyte-specific deficiency of AGT or pharmacological inhibition of AGT by antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) administration. In contrast, inhibition of AGT cleavage by a renin inhibitor, aliskiren, failed to alter body weight gain and liver steatosis in LDL receptor -/- mice. In mice with established adiposity, administration of AGT ASO versus aliskiren led to equivalent reductions of SBP and atherosclerosis. AGT ASO administration ceased body weight gain and further reduced body weight, whereas aliskiren did not affect body weight gain during continuous saturated fat-enriched diet feeding. Structural comparisons of AGT proteins in zebrafish, mouse, rat and human revealed 4 highly conserved sequences within the des(AngI)AGT domain. des(AngI)AGT, through adeno-associated viral infection in hepatocyte-specific AGT deficient mice, increased body weight gain and liver steatosis, but did not affect atherosclerosis. Conclusions AGT contributes to body weight gain and liver steatosis through functions of the des(AngI)AGT domain, which are independent of AngII production. PMID:26681751

  13. Angiotensin-(1-9) reverses experimental hypertension and cardiovascular damage by inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme/Ang II axis.

    PubMed

    Ocaranza, Maria Paz; Moya, Jackeline; Barrientos, Victor; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Hevia, Daniel; Morales, Cristobal; Pinto, Melissa; Escudero, Nicolás; García, Lorena; Novoa, Ulises; Ayala, Pedro; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; Godoy, Ivan; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Jalil, Jorge E; Michea, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the biological effects of angiotensin-(1-9), but available evidence shows that angiotensin-(1-9) has beneficial effects in preventing/ameliorating cardiovascular remodeling. In this study, we evaluated whether angiotensin-(1-9) decreases hypertension and reverses experimental cardiovascular damage in the rat. Angiotensin-(1-9) (600  ng/kg per min for 2 weeks) reduced already-established hypertension in rats with early high blood pressure induced by angiotensin II infusion or renal artery clipping. Angiotensin-(1-9) also improved cardiac (assessed by echocardiography) and endothelial function in small-diameter mesenteric arteries, cardiac and aortic wall hypertrophy, fibrosis, oxidative stress, collagen and transforming growth factor type β - 1 protein expression (assessed by western blot). The beneficial effect of angiotensin-(1-9) was blunted by coadministration of the angiotensin type 2(AT2) receptor blocker PD123319 (36  ng/kg per min) but not by coadministration of the Mas receptor blocker A779 (100  ng/kg per min). Angiotensin-(1-9) treatment also decreased circulating levels of Ang II, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and oxidative stress in aorta and left ventricle. Whereas, Ang-(1-9) increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA levels in aorta as well as plasma nitrate levels. Angiotensin-(1-9) reduces hypertension, ameliorates structural alterations (hypertrophy and fibrosis), oxidative stress in the heart and aorta and improves cardiac and endothelial function in hypertensive rats. These effects were mediated by the AT2 receptor but not by the angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis.

  14. Origin of the angiotensin II secreted by cells.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1994-03-01

    Circulating angiotensin II is unique in that it is formed in the blood by the interaction of circulating proteins. There are in addition many local renin-angiotensin systems in tissues in which angiotensin II is apparently secreted by various types of cells. This brief review considers the possible pathways for synthesis of locally produced angiotensin II in the brain, the anterior pituitary, the testes, the ovaries, the adrenal cortex, the kidneys, the heart, blood vessel walls, and brown and white fat. Synthesis by cells in culture is also reviewed. The possibility that certain cells contain a complete intracellular renin-angiotensin system is not ruled out, but there are problems with this hypothesis. Proteases other than renin may be involved, and there may be different pathways in different tissues. However, it appears that at least in some tissues, angiotensinogen is produced in one population of cells and transported in a paracrine fashion to other renin-containing cells, where it serves as the substrate for production of angiotensin II.

  15. Measurement of Cardiac Angiotensin II by Immunoassays, HPLC-Chip/Mass Spectrometry, and Functional Assays.

    PubMed

    De Mello, Walmor C; Gerena, Yamil

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms related to the effect of angiotensin II, its level on cardiac tissues, as well as its overexpression represent an important aspect of cardiovascular pharmacology and pathology. Severe alterations of cardiac functions are induced by hypertension including activation of circulating and local cardiac renin angiotensin systems. In this chapter, we are providing the methods and materials necessary for further investigation of this important topic.

  16. Relationship between angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II correlates with hemodynamic changes in human liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Walkíria Wingester; Ribeiro-Oliveira Jr, Antônio; Pereira, Regina Maria; da Cunha Ribeiro, Renata; Almeida, Jerusa; Nadu, Ana Paula; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To measure circulating angiotensins at different stages of human cirrhosis and to further evaluate a possible relationship between renin angiotensin system (RAS) components and hemodynamic changes. METHODS: Patients were allocated into 4 groups: mild-to-moderate liver disease (MLD), advanced liver disease (ALD), patients undergoing liver transplantation, and healthy controls. Blood was collected to determine plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin (Ang) I, Ang II, and Ang-(1-7) levels using radioimmunoassays. During liver transplantation, hemodynamic parameters were determined and blood was simultaneously obtained from the portal vein and radial artery in order to measure RAS components. RESULTS: PRA and angiotensins were elevated in ALD when compared to MLD and controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, Ang II was significantly reduced in MLD. Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were increased in MLD when compared to controls and ALD. During transplantation, Ang II levels were lower and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were higher in the splanchnic circulation than in the peripheral circulation (0.52 ± 0.08 vs 0.38 ± 0.04, P < 0.02), whereas the peripheral circulating Ang II/Ang I ratio was elevated in comparison to splanchnic levels (0.18 ± 0.02 vs 0.13 ± 0.02, P < 0.04). Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios positively correlated with cardiac output (r = 0.66) and negatively correlated with systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.70). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the relationship between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II may play a role in the hemodynamic changes of human cirrhosis. PMID:19469002

  17. Angiotensin II directly impairs adipogenic differentiation of human preadipose cells.

    PubMed

    Palominos, Marisol M; Dünner, Natalia H; Wabitsch, Martin; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin II reduces adipogenic differentiation of preadipose cells present in the stroma-vascular fraction of human adipose tissue, which also includes several cell types. Because of the ability of non-adipose lineage cells in the stroma-vascular fraction to respond to angiotensin II, it is not possible to unequivocally ascribe the anti-adipogenic response to a direct effect of this hormone on preadipose cells. Therefore, we used the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) preadipocyte cell strain to investigate the consequences of angiotensin II treatment on adipogenic differentiation under serum-free conditions, by assessing expression of typical adipocyte markers perilipin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), at the transcript and protein level. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that perilipin and FABP4 transcripts were, respectively, reduced to 0.33 ± 0.07 (P < 0.05) and 0.41 ± 0.19-fold (P < 0.05) in SGBS cells induced to adipogenic differentiation in the presence of angiotensin II. Western Blot analysis corroborated reduction of the corresponding proteins to 0.23 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01) and 0.46 ± 0.30-fold (P < 0.01) the respective controls without angiotensin II. Angiotensin II also impaired morphological changes associated with early adipogenesis. Hence, we demonstrated that angiotensin II is able to directly reduce adipogenic differentiation of SGBS preadipose cells.

  18. Central interactions of aldosterone and angiotensin II in aldosterone- and angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-02-01

    Many studies have implicated both angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (Aldo) in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the progression of renal injury, and cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. In several cases, ANG II and Aldo have been shown to have synergistic interactions in the periphery. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that ANG II and Aldo interact centrally in Aldo- and ANG II-induced hypertension in male rats. In rats with blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measured by DSI telemetry, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and RU28318 or the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist irbesartan significantly inhibited Aldo-induced hypertension. In ANG II-induced hypertension, icv infusion of RU28318 significantly reduced the increase in BP. Moreover, icv infusions of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin attenuated Aldo-induced hypertension. To confirm these effects of pharmacological antagonists, icv injections of either recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying siRNA silencers of AT1aR (AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (MR-siRNA) significantly attenuated the development of Aldo-induced hypertension. The immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of AT1aR-siRNA- or MR-siRNA-injected rats showed a marked reduction in the expression of AT1R or MR in the paraventricular nucleus compared with scrambled siRNA rats. When animals from all studies underwent ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium, there was a smaller reduction in the fall of BP in animals receiving icv AT1R or MR antagonists. These results suggest that ANG II and Aldo interact in the brain in a mutually cooperative manner such that the functional integrity of both brain AT1R and MR are necessary for hypertension to be induced by either systemic ANG II or Aldo. The pressor effects produced by systemic ANG II or Aldo involve increased central ROS and

  19. Salt preference elicited by chronic intracerebroventricular angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Izumi, H; Nakamura, I

    1994-10-01

    1. Much more water was consumed than either 0.9% or 2.7% saline in response to various dipsogenic stimuli in untreated normal replete rats when they had free access to water, 0.9% and 2.7% saline. On the other hand, the rats drank more 0.9% saline than water and 2.7% saline when each solution is the sole drinking fluid offered. 2. A marked increase in preference for 0.9% saline was observed during the chronic i.c.v. injection of angiotensin II at a dose of 25 ng/hr for 7 consecutive days in the three bottle choice test. After the cessation of angiotensin II infusion, most rats (45 out of 50 rats) returned to drink much more water than 0.9% and 2.7% saline, similar to the drinking pattern of the 0.9% saline-treated control rats. However, some rats (5 out of 50 rats) still preferred 0.9% saline and this persisted for up to 3 months although these rats did not show a hypertensive state and an increase of plasma renin activity.

  20. Angiotensin II AT1 Receptors Are Involved in Neuronal Activation Induced by Amphetamine in a Two-Injection Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Maria Constanza; Marchese, Natalia Andrea; Cancela, Liliana M.

    2013-01-01

    It was already found that Ang II AT1 receptors are involved in the neuroadaptative changes induced by a single exposure to amphetamine, and such changes are related to the development of behavioral and neurochemical sensitization. The induction of the immediately early gene c-fos has been used to define brain activated areas by amphetamine. Our aim was to evaluate the participation of AT1 receptors in the neuronal activation induced by amphetamine sensitization. The study examined the c-fos expression in mesocorticolimbic areas induced by amphetamine challenge (0.5 mg/kg i.p) in animals pretreated with candesartan, a selective AT1 receptor blocker (3 mg/kg p.o × 5 days), and amphetamine (5 mg/kg i.p) 3 weeks before the challenge. Increased c-fos immunoreactivity was found in response to the amphetamine challenge in the dorsomedial caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens, and both responses were blunted by the AT1 receptor blocker pretreatment. In the infralimbic prefrontal cortex, increased c-fos immunoreactivity was found in response to amphetamine and saline challenge, and both were prevented by the AT1 receptor blocker. No differences were found neither in ventral tegmental area nor prelimbic cortex between groups. Our results indicate an important role for brain Ang II in the behavioral and neuronal sensitization induced by amphetamine. PMID:24089683

  1. Drinking induced by angiotensin II in fishes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Uemura, H; Takei, Y; Itatsu, N; Ozawa, M; Ichinohe, K

    1983-02-01

    Among 20 species of freshwater fishes examined, Pseudorasbora parva, Rhodeus ocellatus, Cobitis anguillicaudatus, Carassius auratus, Oryzias latipes, Gambusia affinis, and Gyrinocheilus anymonieri were found to drink water like seawater fishes, while 13 remaining species did not drink. For fish species found exclusively in fresh water, angiotensin II (AII) treatment did not induce drinking. In contrast, those freshwater fishes which survive in estuarine brackish water (Leuciscus hakonensis, C. carassius, Parasilurus asotus, G. affinis, Chaenogobius annularis, Tridentiger obscurus, and G. anymonieri responded to AII by drinking. Furthermore, some freshwater fishes which survive either in hypertonic water (C. auratus) or in sea water (Anguilla japonica and O. latipes) also responded to AII by drinking. Of 17 seawater fishes examined, Eptatretus burgeri, Triakis scyllia, and Heterodontus japonicus failed to drink water, and for Trachurus japonicus, Platichthys bicoloratus, and Glossogobius giuris fasciatopunctatus, water intake was minor (similar to freshwater fishes). The 11 remaining seawater fishes drank water. AII did not induce drinking in fishes living exclusively in sea water. However, seawater fishes which survive either in tide pools (Chasmichthys dolichognathus gulosus) or in brackish water (Sillago japonica, Mugil cephalus, G. giuris fasciatopunctatus) responded to AII by drinking. P. bicoloratus, Acanthopagrus schlegeli, and Fugu niphobles were exceptional, in that they survive in brackish water, but did not respond to AII. Although some exceptions exist, it is generally concluded that a drinking response to AII is characteristic of fishes which encounter water more hypertonic than that in which they typically reside. Accordingly, a drinking mechanism induced by AII may be a compensatory emergency reaction to dehydration stress.

  2. Structural basis for selectivity and diversity in angiotensin II receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; ...

    2017-04-20

    The angiotensin II receptors AT1R and AT2R serve as key components of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. AT1R has a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, but the function of AT2R is unclear and it has a variety of reported effects. To identify the mechanisms that underlie the differences in function and ligand selectivity between these receptors, here we report crystal structures of human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective ligand and to an AT1R/AT2R dual ligand, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the samemore » time preventing the recruitment of G proteins or β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signalling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure–activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the crucial interactions for ligand binding and selectivity. Finally, our results thus provide insights into the structural basis of the distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of new selective ligands.« less

  3. Angiotensin II Enhances Connecting Tubule Glomerular Feedback (CTGF)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, YiLin; D’Ambrosio, Martin A.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing Na delivery to epithelial Na channels (ENaC) in the connecting tubule (CNT) causes dilation of the afferent arteriole (Af-Art), a process we call CNT glomerular feedback (CTGF). Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates ENaC in the collecting duct via AT1 receptors. We hypothesized that Ang II in the CNT lumen enhances CTGF by activation of AT1 receptors, protein kinase C (PKC) and ENaC. Rabbit Af-Arts and their adherent CNT were microperfused and preconstricted with norepinephrine. Each experiment involved generating two consecutive concentration-response curves by increasing NaCl in the CNT lumen. During the control period, the maximum dilation of the Af-Art was 7.9 ± 0.4 μm, and the concentration of NaCl in the CNT needed to achieve half maximal response (EC50) was 34.7 ± 5.2 mmol/L. After adding Ang II (10−9 mol/L) to the CNT lumen, the maximal response was 9.5 ± 0.7 μm and the EC50 was 11.6 ± 1.3 mmol/L (P=0.01 vs. control). Losartan, an AT1 antagonist (10−6 mol/L) blocked the stimulatory effect of Ang II, PD123319, an AT2 antagonist (10−6 mol/L) did not. The PKC inhibitor staurosporine (10−8 mol/L) added to the CNT inhibited the stimulatory effect of Ang II. The ENaC inhibitor benzamil (10−6 mol/L) prevented both CTGF and its stimulation by Ang II. We concluded that Ang II in the CNT lumen enhances CTGF via activation of AT1, and that this effect requires activation of PKC and ENaC. Potentiation of CTGF by Ang II could help preserve glomerular filtration rate in the presence of renal vasoconstriction. PMID:20696981

  4. New nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonists. 2. Synthesis, biological properties, and structure-activity relationships of 2-alkyl-4-(biphenylylmethoxy)quinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, R H; Allott, C P; Dennis, M; Fisher, E; Major, J S; Masek, B B; Oldham, A A; Pearce, R J; Rankine, N; Revill, J M

    1992-10-30

    A novel series of nonpeptidic angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonists is reported, derived from linkage of the biphenylcarboxylic acid or biphenylyltetrazole moiety found in previously described antagonists via a methyleneoxy chain to the 4-position of a 2-alkyl quinoline. When evaluated in an in vitro binding assay using a guinea pig adrenal membrane preparation, compounds in this series generally gave IC50 values in the range 0.01-1 microM. Structure-activity studies showed the quinoline nitrogen atom and a short alkyl chain at the quinoline 2-position to be essential for receptor binding. On intravenous administration in a normotensive rat model, the more potent compounds inhibited the AII-induced pressor response with ED50 values in the range 0.1-2.0 mg/kg. One of the compounds, 2-ethyl-4-[[2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy]quinoline (5g), demonstrated good oral activity in two rat models. At doses in the range 1-10 mg/kg in AII-infused, normotensive rats, the compound exhibited a dose-related inhibition of the pressor response with a good duration of action at the higher doses. In a renal hypertensive rat model, compound 5g showed a rapid and sustained lowering of blood pressure at a dose of 5 mg/kg. On the basis of its profile, this compound, designated ICI D8731, has been selected for clinical evaluation.

  5. Calcitonin, angiotensin II and FPP significantly modulate mouse sperm function.

    PubMed

    Fraser, L R; Pondel, M D; Vinson, G P

    2001-03-01

    Fertilization-promoting peptide (FPP) regulates the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cAMP pathway to elicit capacitation-dependent responses, stimulating capacitation in uncapacitated spermatozoa and then arresting it in capacitated cells, thereby inhibiting spontaneous acrosome reactions. Like FPP, calcitonin and angiotensin II are found in seminal plasma and so might affect sperm function; this study investigated responses in uncapacitated and capacitated mouse spermatozoa to these three peptides. Both calcitonin (5 ng/ml) and angiotensin II (1 and 10nmol/l), like FPP (100nmol/l), significantly stimulated capacitation, assessed using chlortetracycline (CTC) fluorescence and fertilization in vitro analyses. Combinations of two or three peptides, at high and low, non-stimulatory concentrations, were more stimulatory than the individual peptides, suggesting that they may act on the same signalling pathway, plausibly AC/cAMP; preliminary data indicate that calcitonin does stimulate cAMP production. In capacitated cells, FPP and calcitonin elicited pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of spontaneous acrosome loss, suggesting involvement of inhibitory G proteins; angiotensin II had no detectable effect. When all three peptides were used, angiotensin II did not interfere with inhibitory responses to FPP/calcitonin. These results suggest that angiotensin II, calcitonin and FPP may somehow modulate the AC/cAMP signal transduction pathway, but the precise mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated.

  6. Angiotensin II-induced delayed stimulation of phospholipase C gamma1 requires activation of both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase gamma and tyrosine kinase in vascular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, Lala; Carricaburu, Valérie; Leblanc, Catherine; Mironneau, Chantal; Mironneau, Jean; Macrez, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    In vascular smooth muscles, angiotensin II (AII) has been reported to activate phospholipase C (PLC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). We investigated the time-dependent effects of AII on both phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3) and inositol phosphates (InsPs) accumulation in permeabilized microsomes from rat portal vein smooth muscle in comparison with those of noradrenaline (NA). AII stimulated an early production of PtdInsP3 (within 30 s) followed by a delayed production of InsPs (within 3-5 min), in contrast to NA which activated only a fast production of InsPs. The use of pharmacological inhibitors and antibodies raised against the PI3K and PLC isoforms expressed in portal vein smooth muscle showed that AII specifically activated PI3Kgamma and that this isoform was involved in the AII-induced stimulation of InsPs accumulation. NA-induced InsPs accumulation depended on PLCbeta1 activation whereas AII-induced InsPs accumulation depended on PLCgamma1 activation. AII-induced PLCgamma1 activation required both tyrosine kinase and PI3Kgamma since genistein and tyrphostin B48 (inhibitors of tyrosine kinase), LY294002 and wortmannin (inhibitors of PI3K) and anti-PI3Kgamma antibody abolished AII-induced stimulation of InsPs accumulation. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma1 was only detected for long-lasting applications of AII and was suppressed by genistein. These data indicate that activation of both PI3Kgamma and tyrosine kinase is a prerequisite for AII-induced stimulation of PLCgamma1 in vascular smooth muscle and suggest that the sequential activation of the three enzymes may be responsible for the slow and long-lasting contraction induced by AII.

  7. Angiotensin II-induced delayed stimulation of phospholipase C γ1 requires activation of both phosphatidiylinositol 3-kinase γ and tyrosine kinase in vascular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoarisoa, Lala; Carricaburu, Valérie; Leblanc, Catherine; Mironneau, Chantal; Mironneau, Jean; Macrez, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    In vascular smooth muscles, angiotensin II (AII) has been reported to activate phospholipase C (PLC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). We investigated the time-dependent effects of AII on both phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3) and inositol phosphates (InsPs) accumulation in permeabilized microsomes from rat portal vein smooth muscle in comparison with those of noradrenaline (NA). AII stimulated an early production of PtdInsP3 (within 30 s) followed by a delayed production of InsPs (within 3-5 min), in contrast to NA which activated only a fast production of InsPs. The use of pharmacological inhibitors and antibodies raised against the PI3K and PLC isoforms expressed in portal vein smooth muscle showed that AII specifically activated PI3Kδ and that this isoform was involved in the AII-induced stimulation of InsPs accumulation. NA-induced InsPs accumulation depended on PLCβ1 activation whereas AII-induced InsPs accumulation depended on PLCγ1 activation. AII-induced PLCδ1 activation required both tyrosine kinase and PI3Kδ since genistein and tyrphostin B48 (inhibitors of tyrosine kinase), LY294002 and wortmannin (inhibitors of PI3K) and anti-PI3Kδ antibody abolished AII-induced stimulation of InsPs accumulation. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCβ1 was only detected for long-lasting applications of AII and was suppressed by genistein. These data indicate that activation of both PI3Kβ and tyrosine kinase is a prerequisite for AII-induced stimulation of PLCβ1 in vascular smooth muscle and suggest that the sequential activation of the three enzymes may be responsible for the slow and long-lasting contraction induced by AII. PMID:16989733

  8. Evidence for extracellular, but not intracellular, generation of angiotensin II in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, H.; Khosla, M.C.; Bumpus, M.; Husain, A. )

    1988-11-01

    Based on the observation that high levels of renin and angiotensin II (Ang II) are found in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), it has been postulated that Ang II is formed intracellularly by the renin-converting enzyme cascade in this tissue. To test this hypothesis, the authors examined renin-angiotensin system components in subcellular fractions of the rat adrenal ZG. Renin activity and immunoreactive-Ang II (IR-Ang II) were observed in vesicular fractions but were not colocalized. In addition, angiotensinogen, angiotensin I, and converting enzyme were not observed in the renin or IR-Ang II-containing vesicular fractions. These data do not support the hypothesis that Ang II is formed intracellularly within the renin-containing vesicles of the ZG. Rather, since modulatable renin release from adrenal ZG slices was observed and renin activity was found in dense vesicular fractions (33-39% sucrose), it is likely that Ang II formation in the ZG is extracellular and initiated by the release of vesicular renin. In ZG lysomal fractions {sup 125}I-labeled Ang II was degraded to {sup 125}I-labeled des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II. Since Ang II antibodies do not recognize des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II, these finding explain why IR-Ang II in the ZG is due predominantly to Ang II and not to its C-terminal immunoreactive fragments.

  9. Angiotensin II Facilitates Fibrogenic Effect of TGF-β1 through Enhancing the Down-Regulation of BAMBI Caused by LPS: A New Pro-Fibrotic Mechanism of Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Lan; Zhao, Xu-Wen; Luo, Hai-Hua; Li, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II has progressively been considered to play an important role in the development of liver fibrosis, although the mechanism isn't fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible pro-fibrotic mechanism, by which angiotensin II would enhance the pro-fibrotic effect of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) through up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and enhancing down-regulation of TGF-β1 inhibitory pseudo-receptor—BAMBI caused by LPS in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Firstly, the synergistic effects of angiotensin II, TGF-β1 and LPS on collagen 1α production were confirmed in vitro by ELISA, in which angiotensin II, LPS and TGF-β1 were treated sequentially, and in vivo by immunofluorescence, in the experiments single or multiple intra-peritoneally implanted osmotic mini-pumps administrating angiotensin II or LPS combined with intra-peritoneal injections of TGF-β1 were used. We also found that only LPS and TGF-β1 weren't enough to induce obvious fibrogenesis without angiotensin II. Secondly, to identify the reason of why angiotensin II is so important, the minute level of TLR4 in activated HSCs - T6 and primary quiescent HSCs of rat, up-regulation of TLR4 by angiotensin II and blockage by different angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) blockers in HSCs were assayed by western blotting in vitro and immunofluorescence in vivo. Finally, BAMBI expression level, which is regulated by LPS-TLR4 pathway, was detected by qRT-PCR and results showed angiotensin II enhanced the down-regulation of BAMBI mRNA caused by LPS in vitro and in vivo, and TLR4 neutralization antibody blocked this interactive effect. These data demonstrated that angiotensin II enhances LPS-TLR4 pathway signaling and further down-regulates expression of BAMBI through up-regulation of TLR4, which results in facilitation of pro-fibrotic activity of TGF-β1. Angiotensin II, LPS and TGF-β1 act synergistically during hepatic fibrogenesis, showing

  10. Genetic depletion of glutathione peroxidase-1 potentiates nephrotoxicity induced by multiple doses of cocaine via activation of angiotensin II AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mai, Huynh Nhu; Chung, Yoon Hee; Shin, Eun-Joo; Kim, Dae-Joong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nguyen, Thuy-Ty Lan; Nam, Yunsung; Lee, Yu Jeung; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jang, Choon-Gon; Ho, Ye-Shih; Lei, Xin Gen; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possible roles of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and oxidative stress responsive nuclear factor κB (NFκB) in renal damage caused by multiple doses of cocaine in glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 gene-depleted mice. Treatment with cocaine resulted in significant increases in malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and pro-apoptotic Bax expression and decreases in the ratio of glutathione (GSH) and its oxidized form (GSSG), GSH-dependent enzymes, and anti-apoptotic factors in the kidney. These alterations were more pronounced in GPx-1 knockout (-/-) mice than in wild type (WT) mice. Notably, the AT1R antagonist losartan protected against the renal toxicity induced by cocaine, whereas the NFκB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate was not protective. The toxicity was more pronounced in GPx-1 (-/-) mice than in WT mice. The protective effect afforded by losartan against cocaine toxicity appeared to be more sensitive in GPx-1 (-/-) mice than that in WT mice. These losartan-mediated protective effects were inhibited by the phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, indicating that losartan provides significant protection from cocaine-induced renal toxicity through PI3K/Akt signaling. Our results suggest that genetic inhibition of GPx-1 potentiates cocaine-induced renal damage via activation of AT1R by inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling, and that AT1R can be a therapeutic target against renal toxicity induced by cocaine.

  11. A frame shifted disulfide bridged analogue of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Boris; Kühn, Christian; Ehlert, Dennis K; Lindeberg, Gunnar; Lindman, Susanna; Karlén, Anders; Hallberg, Anders

    2003-03-20

    N-(2-Mercaptoethyl)glycine [NMGly] was incorporated into the 3 and 5 positions of angiotensin II and oxidized to give the corresponding cyclized disulfide c[NMGly(3,5)]Ang II. The binding affinity to the angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)) of this conformationally constrained analogue, which is related to the potent Ang II agonist c[Hcy(3,5)]Ang II, was examined. The analogue had no affinity to the AT(1) receptor. Theoretical conformational analysis was performed to compare the conformational characteristics of model compounds of c[Hcy(3,5)]Ang II and the frame shifted analogue c[NMGly(3,5)]Ang II in an attempt to explain the lack of affinity.

  12. Intracrine action of angiotensin II in the intact ventricle of the failing heart: angiotensin II changes cardiac excitability from within

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The influence of intracellular injection of angiotensin II (Ang II) on electrical properties of single right ventricular fibers from the failing heart of cardiomyopathic hamsters (TO2) was investigated in the intact ventricle of 8-month-old animals. Intracellular injection was performed using pressure pulses (40–70 psi) for short periods of time (20 ms) while recoding the action potential simultaneously from the same fiber. The results indicated that intracellular Ang II caused a hyperpolarization of 7.7 mV ± 4.3 mV (n = 39) (4 animals) (P < 0.05) followed by a small fall in membrane potential. The action potential duration was significantly increased at 50% and at 90% repolarization, and the refractoriness was significantly enhanced. The effect of intracellular Ang II on action potential duration was related to the inhibition of potassium conductance through PKC activation because Bis-1 (360 nM), a selective PKC inhibitor, abolished the effect of the peptide. Injections performed in different fibers of the same ventricle showed a variable effect of Ang II on action potential duration and generated spontaneous rhythmicity. The effect of intracellular Ang II on action potential duration and cardiac refractoriness remains for more than 1 h after interruption of the intracellular injection of the peptide. PMID:21744071

  13. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein downregulates vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hirohide; Ichiki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Jiro; Takeda, Kotaro; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Toru; Narabayashi, Eriko; Kitamoto, Shiro; Tokunou, Tomotake; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) by hypoxia stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and increases the expression of target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. Although the systemic renin-angiotensin system is activated by hypoxia, the role of PHD in the regulation of the renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. We examined the effect of PHD inhibition on the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R). Hypoxia, cobalt chloride, and dimethyloxalylglycine, all known to inhibit PHD, reduced AT(1)R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of PHD2, a major isoform of PHDs, by RNA interference also reduced AT(1)R expression. Cobalt chloride diminished angiotensin II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Cobalt chloride decreased AT(1)R mRNA through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Oral administration of cobalt chloride (14 mg/kg per day) to C57BL/6J mice receiving angiotensin II infusion (490 ng/kg per minute) for 4 weeks significantly attenuated perivascular fibrosis of the coronary arteries without affecting blood pressure level. These data suggest that PHD inhibition may be beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting renin-angiotensin system via AT(1)R downregulation.

  14. Effects of angiotensin II on the pericyte-containing microvasculature of the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Hajime; Kobayashi, Masato; Li, Qing; Yamanishi, Shigeki; Katsumura, Kozo; Minami, Masahiro; Wu, David M; Puro, Donald G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms by which angiotensin II alters the physiology of the pericyte-containing microvasculature of the retina. Despite evidence that this vasoactive signal regulates capillary perfusion by inducing abluminal pericytes to contract and thereby microvascular lumens to constrict, little is known about the events linking angiotensin exposure with pericyte contraction. Here, using microvessels freshly isolated from the adult rat retina, we monitored pericyte currents via perforated-patch pipettes, measured pericyte calcium levels with fura-2 and visualized pericyte contractions and lumen constrictions by time-lapse photography. We found that angiotensin activates nonspecific cation (NSC) and calcium-activated chloride channels; the opening of these channels induces a depolarization that is sufficient to activate the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) expressed in the retinal microvasculature. Associated with these changes in ion channel activity, intracellular calcium levels rise, pericytes contract and microvascular lumens narrow. Our experiments revealed that an influx of calcium through the NSC channels is an essential step linking the activation of AT1 angiotensin receptors with pericyte contraction. Although not required in order for angiotensin to induce pericytes to contract, calcium entry via VDCCs serves to enhance the contractile response of these cells. In addition to activating nonspecific cation, calcium-activated chloride and voltage-dependent calcium channels, angiotensin II also causes the functional uncoupling of pericytes from their microvascular neighbours. This inhibition of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication suggests a previously unappreciated complexity in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the microvascular response to angiotensin II. PMID:15486015

  15. Captopril avoids hypertension, the increase in plasma angiotensin II but increases angiotensin 1-7 and angiotensin II-induced perfusion pressure in isolated kidney in SHR.

    PubMed

    Castro-Moreno, P; Pardo, J P; Hernández-Muñoz, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Del Valle-Mondragón, L; Pastelín-Hernández, G; Ibarra-Barajas, M; Villalobos-Molina, R

    2012-10-01

    We investigated captopril effects, an ACE inhibitor, on hypertension development, on Ang II and Ang-(1-7) plasma concentrations, on Ang II-induced contraction in isolated kidneys, and on kidney AT1R from spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Five weeks-old SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with captopril at 30 mg/kg/day, in drinking water for 2 or 14 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured, and isolated kidneys were tested for perfusion pressure and AT1R expression; while Ang II and Ang-(1-7) concentrations were determined in plasma. Captopril did not modify SBP in WKY rats and avoided its increase as SHR aged. Plasma Ang-II concentration was ∼4-5 folds higher in SHR rats, and captopril reduced it (P<0.05); while captopril increased Ang-(1-7) by ∼2 fold in all rat groups. Captopril increased Ang II-induced pressor response in kidneys of WKY and SHR rats, phenomenon not observed in kidneys stimulated with phenylephrine, a α₁-adrenoceptor agonist. Captopril did not modify AT1R in kidney cortex and medulla among rat strains and ages. Data indicate that captopril increased Ang II-induced kidney perfusion pressure but not AT₁R density in kidney of WKY and SHR rats, due to blockade of angiotensin II synthesis; however, ACE inhibitors may have other actions like activating signaling processes that could contribute to their diverse effects. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Properties of angiotensin II receptors in glial cells from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Pulakat, L; Río, C; Valcárcel, C; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    The existence and the properties of angiotensin II receptors in the adult bovine and human corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by using Xenopus oocytes and primary glial cell cultures. In oocytes injected with CC mRNA, angiotensin II elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate/Ca(2+)-receptor-channel coupling system. The receptors expressed in oocytes and in CC cultures were pharmacologically similar to the AT1 receptor type as assayed by binding. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies in sections from CC and in glial cultures revealed that the receptors were molecularly related to the AT1 receptor and that they were present in astrocytes. In these cells, activation of the receptors with angiotensin II increased de novo DNA synthesis, promoted the release of aldosterone, and induced c-Fos expression. These findings indicate that CC astrocytes possess functional AT1 receptors that participate in various physiological processes. Images PMID:8170986

  17. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and lactation: an update.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M E; Malecha, S E; Cha, A J

    2000-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly used for the treatment of hypertension. ACEIs have been promoted as first-line therapy for selected patients with chronic hypertension and for the prevention of diabetic nephropathy, thus creating the potential for frequent ACEI exposure among women of childbearing age. ARBs are the most recent addition to the available options for antihypertensive agents. This review specifically focuses on the most up-to-date information regarding these newer antihypertensives with regard to lactation.

  18. Proteinuria, a modifiable risk factor: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).

    PubMed

    Dykeman-Sharpe, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Microalbuminuria and proteinuria have been determined to be modifiable risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease as well as risk factors for cardiovascular events. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have been demonstrated to decrease proteinuria at all stages and slow the progression of renal disease. Proteinuria can be used as a marker of successful treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease in combination with other established targets. This article discusses the various diagnostic tests used for the detection of microalbuminuria and proteinuria and appropriate pharmaceutical treatment.

  19. Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to renal dysfunction and damage caused by angiotensin II in mice.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Anderson, Larry J; Estes, Anne M; Yaghini, Fariborz A; Fang, Xiao R; Porter, Jason; Gonzalez, Frank J; Campbell, William B; Malik, Kafait U

    2012-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology. In view of the critical role of angiotensin II in the kidney, as well as in salt and water homeostasis, and blood pressure regulation, we determined the contribution of cytochrome P450 1B1 to renal dysfunction and injury associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in male Cyp1b1(+/+) and Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II infusion (700 ng/kg per minute) given by miniosmotic pumps for 13 and 28 days increased systolic blood pressure in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice; this increase was significantly reduced in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased renal Cyp1b1 activity, vascular resistance, and reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents and caused endothelial dysfunction in Cyp1b1(+/+) but not Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased water consumption and urine output, decreased urine osmolality, increased urinary Na(+) and K(+) excretion, and caused proteinuria and albuminuria in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice that was diminished in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Infusion of angiotensin II for 28 but not 13 days caused renal fibrosis, tubular damage, and inflammation in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, which was minimized in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased levels of 12- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids; reactive oxygen species; and activity of NADPH oxidase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and c-Src in the kidneys of Cyp1b1(+/+) but not Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. These data suggest that increased thirst, renal dysfunction, and injury and inflammation associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in mice depend on cytochrome P450 1B1 activity, thus indicating that cytochrome P450 1B1 could serve as a novel target for treating renal disease and hypertension.

  20. Angiotensin II for the Treatment of Vasodilatory Shock.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Ashish; English, Shane W; Wang, Xueyuan S; Ham, Kealy; Tumlin, James; Szerlip, Harold; Busse, Laurence W; Altaweel, Laith; Albertson, Timothy E; Mackey, Caleb; McCurdy, Michael T; Boldt, David W; Chock, Stefan; Young, Paul J; Krell, Kenneth; Wunderink, Richard G; Ostermann, Marlies; Murugan, Raghavan; Gong, Michelle N; Panwar, Rakshit; Hästbacka, Johanna; Favory, Raphael; Venkatesh, Balasubramanian; Thompson, B Taylor; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Jensen, Jeffrey; Kroll, Stew; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Tidmarsh, George F; Deane, Adam M

    2017-08-03

    Vasodilatory shock that does not respond to high-dose vasopressors is associated with high mortality. We investigated the effectiveness of angiotensin II for the treatment of patients with this condition. We randomly assigned patients with vasodilatory shock who were receiving more than 0.2 μg of norepinephrine per kilogram of body weight per minute or the equivalent dose of another vasopressor to receive infusions of either angiotensin II or placebo. The primary end point was a response with respect to mean arterial pressure at hour 3 after the start of infusion, with response defined as an increase from baseline of at least 10 mm Hg or an increase to at least 75 mm Hg, without an increase in the dose of background vasopressors. A total of 344 patients were assigned to one of the two regimens; 321 received a study intervention (163 received angiotensin II, and 158 received placebo) and were included in the analysis. The primary end point was reached by more patients in the angiotensin II group (114 of 163 patients, 69.9%) than in the placebo group (37 of 158 patients, 23.4%) (odds ratio, 7.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.76 to 13.3; P<0.001). At 48 hours, the mean improvement in the cardiovascular Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (scores range from 0 to 4, with higher scores indicating more severe dysfunction) was greater in the angiotensin II group than in the placebo group (-1.75 vs. -1.28, P=0.01). Serious adverse events were reported in 60.7% of the patients in the angiotensin II group and in 67.1% in the placebo group. Death by day 28 occurred in 75 of 163 patients (46%) in the angiotensin II group and in 85 of 158 patients (54%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.07; P=0.12). Angiotensin II effectively increased blood pressure in patients with vasodilatory shock that did not respond to high doses of conventional vasopressors. (Funded by La Jolla Pharmaceutical Company; ATHOS-3 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  1. Discovery of a series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with dual activity at angiotensin II type 1 receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A; Edmunds, Jeremy J; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P; Stoner, Chad

    2011-06-23

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPARγ confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPARγ activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC(50) = 1.6 nM) with partial PPARγ agonism (EC(50) = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  2. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  3. [Biphasic effect of angiotensin II on conditioned reflectory reaction patterns in albino rats].

    PubMed

    Hecht, K; Hecht, T; Poppei, M; Treptow, K; Choinowski, S; Nitschkoff, S

    1975-01-01

    40 male albino rats were used to investigate the influence of one single i. v. dose of 10 ng/kg Angiotensin II upon established and stabilized conditional-reflectory response pattern (two-dimensional conditional-reflectory decision process and periodicities of conditional-reflectory processes). At normotonous blood-pressure values, Angiotensin II exerted a biphasic action on the conditional-reflectory response pattern. In the first phase of action (up to 30 min after injection) there prevailed centralnervous inhibition processes, while the second phase of action (30-70 min after injection) was marked by a general centralnervous excitation, which is reflected by extremely short times of response, and a pronounced sensitivity to optic, acoustic and tactile stimuli. The decision capacity of the animals was considerably reduced in both phases. The periodicities of conditional-reflectory processes (duration of periods in the minute range) are strongly disturbed in the first phase of action, and tend to normal in the second phase. Furthermore, Angiotensin II was found to have a selective, hierarchically ordered influence with regard to the duration and intensity of action. Thus, the information processing activity of the CNS underwent most pronounced changes. The centralnervous regulatory functions were less affected; the blood pressure regulation showed little and transient influence by Angiotensin II. In the discussion, the neurotropic and algogenic action of Angiotensin II, and the relation of the octapeptide effect with pathogenetic mechanisms of experimental neurotically induced hypertonia are dealt with.

  4. Angiotensin II activates signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 via Rac1 in the atrial tissue in permanent atrial fibrillation patients with rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hui-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) often experience persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with adverse atrial structural remodeling (ASR) manifested by atrial fibrosis and left atrial enlargement. The aim of this study was to explore the potential molecular signaling mechanisms for atrial fibrosis and ASR. Twenty RHD patients with persistent AF and 10 RHD patients with sinus rhythm (Group A) were recruited in our study, which all underwent transthoracic echocardiography. Right atrial appendage (RAA) tissue samples were obtained from these patients during mitral/aortic valve replacement operation. The AF patients were further divided into two groups according to left atrial diameter (LAD): Group B with LAD ranging 50-65 mm and Group C with LAD >65 mm. Histological examinations were performed with hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining. Atrial angiotensin II (AngII) content was measured by ELISA. Rac1 and STAT3 protein levels were determined by Western blot analysis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated highly organized arrangement of atrial muscles in control Group A and significant derangement in both Group B and C AF patients with reduced cell density and increased cell size. Moreover, Masson's trichrome staining showed that atrial myocytes were surrounded by large trunks of collagen fibers in both Group B and C, but not in Group A. There was a positive correlation between atrial tissue fibrosis and LAD. AngII content was markedly higher in Group C than in Group B than in Group A, which was positively correlated with LAD. Similarly, Rac1 and STAT3 protein levels were found considerably higher in Group C and B than in Group A with excellent correlation to LAD. Our study unraveled for the first time the AngII/Rac1/STAT3 signaling as a mechanism for ASR thereby AF in a particular clinical setting-RHD patients with persistent AF and indicated inhibition of this pathway may help ameliorating adverse ASR.

  5. Effect of des-aspartate-angiotensin I on the actions of angiotensin II in the isolated renal and mesenteric vasculature of hypertensive and STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dharmani, M; Mustafa, M R; Achike, F I; Sim, M K

    2005-07-15

    The present study investigated the action of des-aspartate-angiotensin I (DAA-I) on the pressor action of angiotensin II in the renal and mesenteric vasculature of WKY, SHR and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Angiotensin II-induced a dose-dependent pressor response in the renal vasculature. Compared to the WKY, the pressor response was enhanced in the SHR and reduced in the STZ-induced diabetic rat. DAA-I attenuated the angiotensin II pressor action in renal vasculature of WKY and SHR. The attenuation was observed for DAA-I concentration as low as 10(-18) M and was more prominent in SHR. However, the ability of DAA-I to reduce angiotensin II response was lost in the STZ-induced diabetic kidney. Instead, enhancement of angiotensin II pressor response was seen at the lower doses of the octapeptide. The effect of DAA-I was not inhibited by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist, and indomethacin, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor in both WKY and SHR, indicating that its action was not mediated by angiotensin AT2 receptor and prostaglandins. The pressor responses to angiotensin II in mesenteric vascular bed were also dose-dependent but smaller in magnitude compared to the renal vasculature. The responses were significantly smaller in SHR but no significant difference was observed between STZ-induced diabetic and WKY rat. Similarly, PD123319 and indomethacin had no effect on the action of DAA-I. The findings reiterate a regulatory role for DAA-I in vascular bed of the kidney and mesentery. By being active at circulating level, DAA-I subserves a physiological role. This function appears to be present in animals with diseased state of hypertension and diabetes. It is likely that DAA-I functions are modified to accommodate the ongoing vascular remodeling.

  6. Interleukin-10 deficiency aggravates angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woo-Young; Cha, Hye-Na; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, In-Kye; Park, So-Young

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the role of interleukin (IL)-10 in angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Angiotensin II was infused subcutaneously (1.1mg/kg/day) for one week in IL-10 knockout and wild-type mice, after which cardiac function and hypertrophy were assessed by echocardiogram. IL-10 gene expression in the heart was increased by angiotensin II infusion. Plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and gene expression of BNP in the heart were increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and plasma BNP levels were further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. IL-10 deficiency increased the left ventricular dimension, whereas treatment with angiotensin II increased heart weight. Angiotensin II significantly reduced cardiac function in IL-10 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II infusion, and these increases were further enhanced by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Gene expression of collagen I/III and collagen III protein levels were increased by angiotensin II but not by IL-10 deficiency. Gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase2/9 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and this expression was further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Akt phosphorylation was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II and further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Phosphorylation of p38 was increased by IL-10 deficiency. These results suggest that IL-10 deficiency causes deterioration in cardiac functions in angiotensin II-infused mice, suggesting that IL-10 plays a protective role against angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  8. Angiotensin II potentiates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Witman, Melissa A H; McDaniel, John; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Trinity, Joel D; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Runnels, Sean; Morgan, David E; Sander, Mikael; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter

    2013-03-01

    Aging is characterized by increased sympatho-excitation, expressed through both the α-adrenergic and RAAS (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone) pathways. Although the independent contribution of these two pathways to elevated vasoconstriction with age may be substantial, significant cross-talk exists that could produce potentiating effects. To examine this interaction, 14 subjects (n=8 young, n=6 old) underwent brachial artery catheterization for administration of AngII (angiotensin II; 0.8-25.6 ng/dl per min), NE [noradrenaline (norepinephrine); 2.5-80 ng/dl per min] and AngII with concomitant α-adrenergic antagonism [PHEN (phentolamine); 10 μg/dl per min]. Ultrasound Doppler was utilized to determine blood flow, and therefore vasoconstriction, in both infused and contralateral (control) limbs. Arterial blood pressure was measured directly, and sympathetic nervous system activity was assessed via microneurography and plasma NE analysis. AngII sensitivity was significantly greater in the old, indicated by both greater maximal vasoconstriction (-59±4% in old against -48±3% in young) and a decreased EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) (1.4±0.2 ng/dl per min in old against 2.6±0.7 μg/dl per min in young), whereas the maximal NE-mediated vasoconstriction was similar between these groups (-58±9% in old and -62±5% in young). AngII also increased venous NE in the old group, but was unchanged in the young group. In the presence of α-adrenergic blockade (PHEN), maximal AngII-mediated vasoconstriction in the old was restored to that of the young (-43±8% in old and -39±6% in young). These findings indicate that, with healthy aging, the increased AngII-mediated vasoconstriction may be attributed, in part, to potentiation of the α-adrenergic pathway, and suggest that cross-talk between the RAAS and adrenergic systems may be an important consideration in therapeutic strategies targeting these two pathways.

  9. Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System Promotes Colitis Development

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yongyan; Liu, Tianjing; He, Lei; Dougherty, Urszula; Chen, Li; Adhikari, Sarbani; Alpert, Lindsay; Zhou, Guolin; Liu, Weicheng; Wang, Jiaolong; Deb, Dilip K.; Hart, John; Liu, Shu Q.; Kwon, John; Pekow, Joel; Rubin, David T.; Zhao, Qun; Bissonnette, Marc; Li, Yan Chun

    2016-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays pathogenic roles in renal and cardiovascular disorders, but whether it is involved in colitis is unclear. Here we show that RenTgMK mice that overexpress active renin from the liver developed more severe colitis than wild-type controls. More than 50% RenTgMK mice died whereas all wild-type mice recovered. RenTgMK mice exhibited more robust mucosal TH17 and TH1/TH17 responses and more profound colonic epithelial cell apoptosis compared to wild-type controls. Treatment with aliskiren (a renin inhibitor), but not hydralazine (a smooth muscle relaxant), ameliorated colitis in RenTgMK mice, although both drugs normalized blood pressure. Chronic infusion of angiotensin II into wild-type mice mimicked the severe colitic phenotype of RenTgMK mice, and treatment with losartan [an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)] ameliorated colitis in wild-type mice, confirming a colitogenic role for the endogenous RAS. In human biopsies, pro-inflammatory cytokines were suppressed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were on ARB therapy compared to patients not receiving ARB therapy. These observations demonstrate that activation of the RAS promotes colitis in a blood pressure independent manner. Angiotensin II appears to drive colonic mucosal inflammation by promoting intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and mucosal TH17 responses in colitis development. PMID:27271344

  10. p47(phox) is required for afferent arteriolar contractile responses to angiotensin II and perfusion pressure in mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, En Yin; Solis, Glenn; Luo, Zaiming; Carlstrom, Mattias; Sandberg, Kathryn; Holland, Steven; Wellstein, Anton; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2012-02-01

    Myogenic and angiotensin contractions of afferent arterioles generate reactive oxygen species. Resistance vessels express neutrophil oxidase-2 and -4. Angiotensin II activates p47(phox)/neutrophil oxidase-2, whereas it downregulates NOX-4. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that p47(phox) enhances afferent arteriolar angiotensin contractions. Angiotensin II infusion in p47(phox) +/+ but not -/- mice increased renal cortical NADPH oxidase activity (7±1-12±1 [P<0.01] versus 5±1-7±1 10(3) · RLU · min(-1) · μg protein(-1) [P value not significant]), mean arterial pressure (77±2-91±2 [P<0.005] versus 74±2-77±1 mm Hg [P value not significant]), and renal vascular resistance (7.5±0.4-10.1±0.7 [P<0.01] versus 7.9±0.4-8.3±0.4 mm Hg/mL · min(-1) · gram kidney weight(-1) [P value not significant]). Afferent arterioles from p47(phox) -/- mice had a lesser myogenic response (3.1±0.4 versus 1.4±0.2 dynes · cm(-1) · mm Hg(-1); P<0.02) and a lesser (P<0.05) contraction to 10(-6) M angiotensin II (diameter change +/+: 9.3±0.2-3.4±0.6 μm versus -/-: 9.9±0.6-7.5±0.4 μm). Angiotensin and increased perfusion pressure generated significantly (P<0.05) more reactive oxygen species in p47(phox) +/+ than -/- arterioles. Angiotensin II infusion increased the maximum responsiveness of afferent arterioles from p47(phox) +/+ mice to 10(-6) M angiotensin II yet decreased the response in p47(phox) -/- mice. The angiotensin infusion increased the sensitivity to angiotensin II only in p47(phox) +/+ mice. We conclude that p47(phox) is required to enhance renal NADPH oxidase activity and basal afferent arteriolar myogenic and angiotensin II contractions and to switch afferent arteriolar tachyphylaxis to sensitization to angiotensin during a prolonged angiotensin infusion. These effects likely contribute to hypertension and renal vasoconstriction during infusion of angiotensin II.

  11. Complex pathologies of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms*

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.; Lu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the primary bioactive peptide of the renin angiotensin system that plays a critical role in many cardiovascular diseases. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII into mice induces the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Like human AAAs, AngII-induced AAA tissues exhibit progressive changes and considerable heterogeneity. This complex pathology provides an impediment to the quantification of aneurysmal tissue composition by biochemical and immunostaining techniques. Therefore, while the mouse model of AngII-induced AAAs provides a salutary approach to studying the mechanisms of the evolution of AAAs in humans, meaningful interpretation of mechanisms requires consideration of the heterogeneous nature of the diseased tissue. PMID:21796801

  12. [Angiotensin II inhibitors for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Brunner, H R; Gavras, H

    1976-12-11

    Specific antagonists of the renin angiotensin system have been used to investigate the role of this hormonal system in blood pressure homeostasis and in different types of experimental and clinical hypertension. Using this approach it was possible to show that renin via angiotensin participates actively in blood pressure maintenace, particularly following sodium depletion. Such antagonists, if available for oral administration and taken together with a diuretic, would be useful therapeutically.

  13. Azilsartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, attenuates tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced endothelial cell injury through inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Mao, Ping; Wang, Jia; Wang, Tuo; Xie, Chang-Hou

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) blockers protect against brain ischemia by mechanisms dependent on and independent of arterial blood pressure. However, the effects of AT1-R blockers on brain endothelial cell injury and detailed mechanisms remain unclear. The goal of this study is to investigate whether azilsartan, an AT1-R blocker, could attenuate oxidative injury in endothelial cells via regulating mitochondrial function and inflammatory responses. We found that treatment with azilsartan suppressed tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative damage in murine brain endothelial cells (mBECs) by increasing cell viability, decreasing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and inhibiting cell apoptosis. Azilsartan significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid peroxidation, but had no effect on antioxidant system. We also detected preserved mitochondrial function after azilsartan treatment, as evidenced by increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, preserved ATP synthesis and inhibited mitochondrial swelling. In addition, azilsartan differently regulated expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Pretreatment with eNOS inhibitor L-NIO partially prevented the azilsartan-induced regulation of cytokines and protection. Furthermore, azilsartan-induced protection in our in vitro model was shown to be associated with protein stability of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Overall, our data suggest that the AT1-R blocker azilsartan may have therapeutic values in treating endothelial dysfunction associated neurological disorders through anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anthocyans-rich Aronia melanocarpa extract possesses ability to protect endothelial progenitor cells against angiotensin II induced dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parzonko, Andrzej; Oświt, Aleksandra; Bazylko, Agnieszka; Naruszewicz, Marek

    2015-12-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) may provide protection against atherosclerosis and plaque rupture by their innate ability to replace dysfunctional or damaged endothelial cells in plaque microvessels. There is evidence that angiotensin II may impair the angiogenic functions of EPCs in the atherosclerotic plaque by accelerating senescence and inhibiting their proliferation through oxidative stress induction. In this study, we examined whether chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) fruit extract, containing mainly anthocyanins with potent antioxidative properties, could protect EPCs against angiotensin-induced oxidative stress. EPCs were isolated from peripheral blood of young healthy volunteers and cultivated on fibronectin-coated plates in the presence or absence of angiotensin II (1 µM) and chokeberry extract (1-25 µg/ml). EPCs exposed to chokeberry extract prior to angiotensin II showed a significant increase of proliferation and telomerase activity, and a decrease in the percentage of senescent cells and intracellular ROS formation in comparison to angiotensin II treated cells. Furthermore, extract increased migration ability, adhesion to fibronectin and the angiogenic potential of EPC in vitro diminished by angiotensin II in a concentration-dependent manner. That effect was related to the activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor and the increase of HO-1 expression. Our results suggested that chokeberry extract may protect EPCs against angiotensin II-induced dysfunction and could play a potential role in the prevention of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolomics in angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mervaala, Eero; Biala, Agnieszka; Merasto, Saara; Lempiäinen, Juha; Mattila, Ismo; Martonen, Essi; Eriksson, Ove; Louhelainen, Marjut; Finckenberg, Piet; Kaheinen, Petri; Muller, Dominik N; Luft, Friedrich C; Lapatto, Risto; Oresic, Matej

    2010-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces mitochondrial dysfunction. We tested whether Ang II alters the "metabolomic" profile. We harvested hearts from 8-week-old double transgenic rats harboring human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGRs) and controls (Sprague-Dawley), all with or without Ang II type 1 receptor (valsartan) blockade. We used gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry to detect 247 intermediary metabolites. We used a partial least-squares discriminate analysis and identified 112 metabolites that differed significantly after corrections (false discovery rate q <0.05). We found great differences in the use of fatty acids as an energy source, namely, decreased levels of octanoic, oleic, and linoleic acids in dTGR (all P<0.01). The increase in cardiac hypoxanthine levels in dTGRs suggested an increase in purine degradation, whereas other changes supported an increased ketogenic amino acid tyrosine level, causing energy production failure. The metabolomic profile of valsartan-treated dTGRs more closely resembled Sprague-Dawley rats than untreated dTGRs. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity of cytochrome C oxidase was decreased in dTGRs, whereas complex I and complex II were unaltered. Mitochondria from dTGR hearts showed morphological alterations suggesting increased mitochondrial fusion. Cardiac expression of the redox-sensitive and the cardioprotective metabolic sensor sirtuin 1 was increased in dTGRs. Interestingly, valsartan changed the level of 33 metabolites and induced mitochondrial biogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Thus, distinct patterns of cardiac substrate use in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The finding underscores the importance of Ang II in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cardiac metabolomics, even in healthy hearts.

  16. Angiotensin II, sodium, and cardiovascular hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Harrap, S B; Mitchell, G A; Casley, D J; Mirakian, C; Doyle, A E

    1993-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) may cause cardiovascular hypertrophy as a consequence of increased blood pressure or possibly by direct trophic actions. To dissociate Ang II and blood pressure in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), we used sodium loading during angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment. Animals were treated between 6 and 10 weeks of age with perindopril to lower Ang II and blood pressure, or with perindopril and 1% saline drinking fluid or perindopril and aldosterone infusion to lower Ang II but maintain high blood pressure. Blood pressure, heart weight, and media/lumen ratio of mesenteric resistance arteries were studied while rats were on treatment at 10 weeks of age and 15 weeks after treatment at 25 weeks of age. Perindopril lowered blood pressure and inhibited the development of cardiovascular hypertrophy. Saline or aldosterone restored high blood pressure during perindopril treatment and resulted in increased heart weight/body weight and resistance artery media/lumen ratios in direct proportion to the elevation of blood pressure. Because increased structure occurred despite perindopril treatment, we conclude that direct trophic actions of Ang II are not essential for the development of cardiovascular hypertrophy in young SHR and that the antitrophic actions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors depend more on changes in blood pressure than on Ang II. However, restoration of blood pressure and structure by sodium during perindopril treatment raises the possibility that the design of the cardiovascular system and blood pressure may depend indirectly on Ang II through effects on sodium metabolism.

  17. Control of glomerular filtration rate by circulating angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Coleman, T G; Guyton, A C; Kastner, P R; Granger, J P

    1981-09-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have provided evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in controlling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) through an efferent arteriolar vasoconstrictor mechanism; however, the relative importance of circulating versus intrarenally formed angiotensin II (ANG II) in this control has not been determined. In the present study, the role of circulating ANG II in regulating GFR during reduced renal artery pressure (RAP) was examined in sodium-depleted dogs. After 90 min of infusion of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor SQ 14225, which presumably inhibited formation of both circulating and intrarenal ANG II, reduction of RAP to 81 +/- 2 mmHg resulted in marked decreases in GFR, filtration fraction (FF), and calculated efferent arteriolar resistance (RE), whereas renal blood flow (RBF) was maintained approximately 40% above initial control levels determined before SQ 14225 infusion. Replacement of circulating ANG II during SQ 14225 infusion, by intravenous infusion of ANG II at rates that decreased RBF to control levels, increased GFR, FF, and RE to levels not significantly different from control while RAP was maintained constant by aortic constriction. These observations suggest that circulating ANG II plays an important role in regulating RE and GFR during reductions in RAP. The importance of intrarenally formed ANG II in controlling GFR remains to be determined.

  18. Angiotensin II induces phosphatidic acid formation in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts: evaluation of the roles of phospholipases C and D.

    PubMed

    Booz, G W; Taher, M M; Baker, K M; Singer, H A

    1994-12-21

    Phosphatidic acid has been proposed to contribute to the mitogenic actions of various growth factors. In 32P-labeled neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, 100 nM [Sar1]angiotensin II was shown to rapidly induce formation of 32P-phosphatidic acid. Levels peaked at 5 min (1.5-fold above control), but were partially sustained over 2 h. Phospholipase D contributed in part to phosphatidic acid formation, as 32P- or 3H-phosphatidylethanol was produced when cells labeled with [32P]H3PO4 or 1-O-[1,2- 3H]hexadecyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were stimulated in the presence of 1% ethanol. [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phospholipase D activity was transient and mainly mediated through protein kinase C (PKC), since PKC downregulation reduced phosphatidylethanol formation by 68%. Residual activity may have been due to increased intracellular Ca2+, as ionomycin also activated phospholipase D in PKC-depleted cells. Phospholipase D did not fully account for [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid: 1) compared to PMA, a potent activator of phospholipase D, [Sar1]angiotensin II produced more phosphatidic acid relative to phosphatidylethanol, and 2) PKC downregulation did not affect [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59949 depressed [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation by only 21%, indicating that activation of a phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase also can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid. Thus, additional pathways not involving phospholipases C and D, such as de novo synthesis, may contribute to [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid in these cells. Finally, as previously shown for [Sar1]angiotensin II, phosphatidic acid stimulated mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. CD38 promotes angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Chen, Ting-Tao; Deng, Li-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Jian-Bin; Ji, Guang-Ju; Fu, Mingui; Deng, Ke-Yu; Xin, Hong-Bo

    2017-03-12

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an early hallmark during the clinical course of heart failure and regulated by various signalling pathways. Recently, we observed that mouse embryonic fibroblasts from CD38 knockout mice were significantly resistant to oxidative stress such as H2 O2 -induced injury and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury. In addition, we also found that CD38 knockout mice protected heart from ischaemia reperfusion injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. However, the role of CD38 in cardiac hypertrophy is not explored. Here, we investigated the roles and mechanisms of CD38 in angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Following 14 days of Ang-II infusion with osmotic mini-pumps, a comparable hypertension was generated in both of CD38 knockout and wild-type mice. However, the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were much more severe in wild-type mice compared with CD38 knockout mice. Consistently, RNAi-induced knockdown of CD38 decreased the gene expressions of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and reactive oxygen species generation in Ang-II-stimulated H9c2 cells. In addition, the expression of SIRT3 was elevated in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells, in which SIRT3 may further activate the FOXO3 antioxidant pathway. The intracellular Ca(2+) release induced by Ang-II markedly decreased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells, which might be associated with the decrease of nuclear translocation of NFATc4 and inhibition of ERK/AKT phosphorylation. We concluded that CD38 plays an essential role in cardiac hypertrophy probably via inhibition of SIRT3 expression and activation of Ca(2+) -NFAT signalling pathway. Thus, CD38 may be a novel target for treating cardiac hypertrophy.

  20. Pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II in female mice is enhanced with age: role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pressor response to angiotensin II (AngII) is attenuated in adult females as compared to males via an angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R)-dependent pathway. We hypothesized that adult female mice are protected against AngII-induced hypertension via an enhanced AT2R-mediated pathway and that in reproductively senescent females this pathway is no longer operative. Methods Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry in 4-month-old (adult) and 16-month-old (aged) and aged ovariectomized (aged-OVX) wild-type and AT2R knockout (AT2R-KO) female mice during baseline and 14-day infusion of vehicle (saline) or AngII (600 ng/kg/min s.c.). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine renal gene expression of angiotensin receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in response to 14-day treatment with vehicle or AngII. Results Basal mean arterial pressure was similar between the groups. The pressor response to AngII was augmented in adult AT2R-KO compared to adult wild-type mice (29 ± 3 mmHg versus 10 ± 4 mmHg, respectively, on day 14 as compared to basal mean arterial pressure, P = 0.002). In wild-type mice, pressor responsiveness to AngII was augmented with age, such that the pressor response to AngII was similar between aged AT2R-KO and wild-type female mice (31 ± 4 mmHg versus 34 ± 3 mmHg, respectively, on day 14, P = 0.9). There were no significant differences in pressor responsiveness to AngII between aged and aged-OVX mice. Vehicle-treated aged wild-type mice had a lower renal AT2R/AT1R balance as compared to adult counterparts. In response to AngII, the renal AT2R/AT1R balance in aged wild-type females was greater than that observed in vehicle-treated aged wild-type females and adult wild-type females, yet the protective effects of AT2R activation were not restored. Conclusions The protective role of the AT2R depressor pathway is lost with age in female mice. Therefore

  1. Mammary renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities are modified in rats with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    del Pilar Carrera, Maria; Ramírez-Expósito, Maria Jesus; Mayas, Maria Dolores; García, Maria Jesus; Martínez-Martos, Jose Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Angiotensin II in particular and/or the local renin-angiotensin system in general could have an important role in epithelial tissue growth and modelling; therefore, it is possible that it may be involved in breast cancer. In this sense, previous works of our group showed a predominating role of angiotensin II in tumoral tissue obtained from women with breast cancer. However, although classically angiotensin II has been considered the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system cascade, several of its catabolism products such as angiotensin III and angiotensin IV also possess biological functions. These peptides are formed through the activity of several proteolytic regulatory enzymes of the aminopeptidase type, also called angiotensinases. The aim of this work was to analyse several specific angiotensinase activities involved in the renin-angiotensin system cascade in mammary tissue from control rats and from rats with mammary tumours induced by N-methyl-nitrosourea (NMU), which may reflect the functional status of their target peptides under the specific conditions brought about by the tumoural process. The results show that soluble and membrane-bound specific aspartyl aminopeptidase activities and membrane-bound glutamyl aminopeptidase activity increased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated animals and soluble aminopeptidase N and aminopeptidase B activities significantly decreased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated rats. These changes support the existence of a local mammary renin-angiotensin system and that this system and its putative functions in breast tissue could be altered by the tumour process, in which we suggest a predominant role of angiotensin III. All described data about the renin-angiotensin system in mammary tissue support the idea that it must be involved in normal breast tissue functions, and its disruption could be involved in one or more steps of the carcinogenesis process.

  2. Angiotensin-(1-7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-07-27

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1-7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1-7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1-7) + PD123319. Ang-(1-7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1-7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1-7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell-endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1-7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Angiotensin-(1–7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-01-01

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1–7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1–7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1–7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1–7) + PD123319. Ang-(1–7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1–7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1–7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell–endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1–7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26225830

  4. Intrarenal role of angiotensin II in controlling sodium excretion during dehydration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Trippodo, N C; Hall, J E; Lohmeier, T E; Guyton, A C

    1977-05-01

    1. The intrarenal role of angiotensin II in controlling sodium excretion was examined in anaesthetized, dehydrated dogs by infusing the angiotensin II antagonist Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II directly into the renal artery. Comparisons were made with dehydrated dogs receiving only sodium chloride solution intrarenally. 2. Intrarenal angiotensin II blockade resulted in significant increases in urinary sodium excretion and urine flow rate. 3. The results indicate that during the high-renin state of dehydration endogenous angiotensin II has intrarenal effects which lead to salt and water retention.

  5. Retrieval improvement is induced by water shortage through angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Lia; Maldonado, Héctor; Delorenzi, Alejandro

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) has an evolutionary preserved role in determining adaptative responses to water-shortages. In addition, it has been shown to modulate diverse phases of memory. Still, it is not clear whether ANGII improves or spoils memory. We demonstrated that endogenous angiotensins enhance consolidation of a long-term associative memory in the crab Chasmagnathus and that water shortage improves memory consolidation through brain ANGII actions. Here, we show that weakly trained crabs, when water-deprived, exhibit enhanced retrieval. Subsequently, memory retention is indistinguishable from that of strongly trained crabs. ANGII, but not angiotensin IV, is a necessary and sufficient condition for such enhancing effect. We conclude that ANGII released due to water shortage leads to enhanced memory retrieval. Thus, it seems that ANGII has an evolutionary preserved role as a multifunction coordinator that enables an adaptative response to water-shortage. The facilitation of memory consolidation and retrieval would be among those coordinated functions.

  6. Central mineralocorticoid receptors and the role of angiotensin II and glutamate in the paraventricular nucleus of rats with angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Alexander; Leenen, Frans H H

    2013-05-01

    A chronic increase in circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor-ouabain neuromodulatory pathway in the brain that increases neuronal activation in hypothalamic nuclei, such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and causes progressive hypertension. Several models of chronic sympathetic hyperactivity are associated with an increase in AT1 and glutamate receptor activation in the PVN. The current study evaluated whether increased angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure (BP) in Ang II-hypertensive Wistar rats, and the role of aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway in this enhanced signaling. After subcutaneous infusion of Ang II for 2 weeks, in conscious rats BP and heart rate were recorded after (1) 10-minute bilateral infusions of candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN; (2) 1 hour intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone, and (3) candesartan and kynurenate after eplerenone. Candesartan or kynurenate in the PVN fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. Kynurenate after candesartan or candesartan after kynurenate did not further lower BP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone at 16 hours after its infusion fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. After eplerenone, candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN did not further decrease BP. These findings suggest that increased mineralocorticoid receptor activation in the brain activates a slow neuromodulatory pathway that maintains enhanced AT1 and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN, and thereby the hypertension from a chronic increase in circulating Ang II.

  7. Angiotensin II modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Iwata, Shusuke; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Horio, Nao; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2013-04-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying gustatory detection of dietary sodium is important for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Here, we show that Angiotensin II (AngII), a major mediator of body fluid and sodium homeostasis, modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities, and that this modulation critically influences ingestive behaviors in mice. Gustatory nerve recording demonstrated that AngII suppressed amiloride-sensitive taste responses to NaCl. Surprisingly, AngII also enhanced nerve responses to sweeteners, but had no effect on responses to KCl, sour, bitter, or umami tastants. These effects of AngII on nerve responses were blocked by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) antagonist CV11974. In behavioral tests, CV11974 treatment reduced the stimulated high licking rate to NaCl and sweeteners in water-restricted mice with elevated plasma AngII levels. In taste cells AT1 proteins were coexpressed with αENaC (epithelial sodium channel α-subunit, an amiloride-sensitive salt taste receptor) or T1r3 (a sweet taste receptor component). These results suggest that the taste organ is a peripheral target of AngII. The specific reduction of amiloride-sensitive salt taste sensitivity by AngII may contribute to increased sodium intake. Furthermore, AngII may contribute to increased energy intake by enhancing sweet responses. The linkage between salty and sweet preferences via AngII signaling may optimize sodium and calorie intakes.

  8. The effect of taurine on chronic heart failure: actions of taurine against catecholamine and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen; Azuma, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Taurine, a ubiquitous endogenous sulfur-containing amino acid, possesses numerous pharmacological and physiological actions, including antioxidant activity, modulation of calcium homeostasis and antiapoptotic effects. There is mounting evidence supporting the utility of taurine as a pharmacological agent against heart disease, including chronic heart failure (CHF). In the past decade, angiotensin II blockade and β-adrenergic inhibition have served as the mainstay in the treatment of CHF. Both groups of pharmaceutical agents decrease mortality and improve the quality of life, a testament to the critical role of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin--angiotensin system in the development of CHF. Taurine has also attracted attention because it has beneficial actions in CHF, in part by its demonstrated inhibition of the harmful actions of the neurohumoral factors. In this review, we summarize the beneficial actions of taurine in CHF, focusing on its antagonism of the catecholamines and angiotensin II.

  9. The Novel Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by Chronic Angiotensin II Treatment in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lastra, Guido; Santos, Fernando R.; Hooshmand, Payam; Hooshmand, Paria; Mugerfeld, Irina; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.; Henriksen, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor (type 1) blockers (ARBs) can reduce both hypertension and insulin resistance induced by local and systemic activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The effectiveness of azilsartan medoxomil (AZIL-M), a novel imidazole-based ARB, to facilitate metabolic improvements in conditions of angiotensin II (Ang II)-associated insulin resistance is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of chronic AZIL-M treatment on glucose transport activity and key insulin signaling elements in red skeletal muscle of Ang II-treated rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 8 weeks with or without Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) combined with either vehicle or AZIL-M (1 mg/kg/day). Ang II induced significant (p < 0.05) increases in blood pressure, which were completely prevented by AZIL-M. Furthermore, Ang II reduced insulin-mediated glucose transport activity in incubated soleus muscle, and AZIL-M co-treatment increased this parameter. Moreover, AZIL-M treatment of Ang II-infused animals increased the absolute phosphorylation of insulin signaling molecules, including Akt [both Ser473 (81%) and Thr308 (23%)] and AS160 Thr642 (42%), in red gastrocnemius muscle frozen in situ. Absolute AMPKα (Thr172) phosphorylation increased (98%) by AZIL-M treatment, and relative Thr389 phosphorylation of p70 S6K1, a negative regulator of insulin signaling, decreased (51%) with AZIL-M treatment. These results indicate that ARB AZIL-M improves the in vitro insulin action on glucose transport in red soleus muscle and the functionality of the Akt/AS160 axis in red gastrocnemius muscle in situ in Ang II-induced insulin-resistant rats, with the latter modification possibly associated with enhanced AMPKα and suppressed p70 S6K1 activation. PMID:23922555

  10. Central cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II in trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi

    2008-05-15

    In mammals, a large body of evidence supports the existence of a brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) acting independently or synergistically with the endocrine RAS to maintain diverse physiological functions, notably cardiovascular homeostasis. The RAS is of ancient origin and although most components of the RAS are present within the brain of teleost fishes, little is known regarding the central physiological actions of the RAS in these vertebrates. The present review encompasses the most relevant functional data for a role of the brain RAS in cardiovascular regulations in our experimental animal model, the unanesthetized trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. This paper mainly focuses on the central effect of angiotensin II (ANG II) on heart rate, blood pressure, heart rate variability and cardiac baroreflex, after intracerebroventricular injection or local microinjection of the peptide within the dorsal vagal motor nucleus. The probable implications of the parasympathetic nervous system in ANG II-evoked changes in the cardiac responses are also discussed.

  11. Hypoxia-induced angiotensin II by the lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism mediates radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guozhu; Liu, Ying; Yao, Qiwei; Zheng, Rong; Zhang, Lanfang; Lin, Jie; Guo, Zhaoze; Du, Shasha; Ren, Chen; Yuan, Quan; Yuan, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a principal determinant of arterial blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance. RAS component dysregulation was recently found in some malignancies and correlated with poor patient outcomes. However, the exact mechanism of local RAS activation in tumors is still unclear. Here, we find that the local angiotensin II predominantly exists in the hypoxic regions of tumor formed by nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, where these tumor cells autocrinely produce angiotensin II by a chymase-dependent rather than an angiotensin converting enzyme-dependent mechanism. We further demonstrate in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 and 5–8F cells that this chymase-dependent effect is mediated by increased levels of lactate, a by-product of glycolytic metabolism. Finally, we show that the enhanced angiotensin II plays an important role in the intracellular accumulation of HIF-1α of hypoxic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells and mediates the radiation-resistant phenotype of these nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Thus, our findings reveal the critical role of hypoxia in producing local angiotensin II by a lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism and highlight the importance of local angiotensin II in regulating radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:28205588

  12. Angiotensin II stimulates expression of the chemokine RANTES in rat glomerular endothelial cells. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Ziyadeh, F N; Thaiss, F; Tomaszewski, J; Caron, R J; Wenzel, U; Zahner, G; Helmchen, U; Stahl, R A

    1997-01-01

    Glomerular influx of monocytes/macrophages (M/M) occurs in many immune- and non-immune-mediated renal diseases. The mechanisms targeting M/M into the glomerulus are incompletely understood, but may involve stimulated expression of chemokines. We investigated whether angiotensin II (ANG II) induces the chemokine RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells of the rat and in vivo. ANG II stimulated mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells. The ANG II-induced RANTES protein was chemotactic for human monocytes. Surprisingly, the ANG II-stimulated RANTES expression was transduced by AT2 receptors because the AT2 receptor antagonists PD 123177 and CGP-42112A, but not an AT1 receptor blocker, abolished the induced RANTES synthesis. Intraperitoneal infusion of ANG II (500 ng/h) into naive rats for 4 d significantly stimulated glomerular RANTES mRNA and protein expression compared with solvent-infused controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed induction of RANTES protein mainly in glomerular endothelial cells and small capillaries. Moreover, ANG II- infused animals exhibited an increase in glomerular ED-1- positive cells compared with controls. Oral treatment with PD 123177 (50 mg/liter drinking water) attenuated the glomerular M/M influx without normalizing the slightly elevated systolic blood pressure caused by ANG II infusion, suggesting that the effects on blood pressure and RANTES induction can be separated. We conclude that the vasoactive peptide ANG II may play an important role in glomerular chemotaxis of M/M through local induction of the chemokine RANTES. The observation that the ANG II- mediated induction of RANTES is transduced by AT2 receptors may influence the decision as to which substances might be used for the therapeutic interference with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:9276721

  13. Control of Adipogenesis by the Autocrine Interplays between Angiotensin 1–7/Mas Receptor and Angiotensin II/AT1 Receptor Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Than, Aung; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing; Chen, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII), a peptide hormone released by adipocytes, can be catabolized by adipose angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to form Ang(1–7). Co-expression of AngII receptors (AT1 and AT2) and Ang(1–7) receptors (Mas) in adipocytes implies the autocrine regulation of the local angiotensin system upon adipocyte functions, through yet unknown interactive mechanisms. In the present study, we reveal the adipogenic effects of Ang(1–7) through activation of Mas receptor and its subtle interplays with the antiadipogenic AngII-AT1 signaling pathways. Specifically, in human and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, Ang(1–7)-Mas signaling promotes adipogenesis via activation of PI3K/Akt and inhibition of MAPK kinase/ERK pathways, and Ang(1–7)-Mas antagonizes the antiadipogenic effect of AngII-AT1 by inhibiting the AngII-AT1-triggered MAPK kinase/ERK pathway. The autocrine regulation of the AngII/AT1-ACE2-Ang(1–7)/Mas axis upon adipogenesis has also been revealed. This study suggests the importance of the local regulation of the delicately balanced angiotensin system upon adipogenesis and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:23592774

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  15. Aerobic exercise training-induced left ventricular hypertrophy involves regulatory MicroRNAs, decreased angiotensin-converting enzyme-angiotensin ii, and synergistic regulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin (1-7).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tiago; Hashimoto, Nara Y; Magalhães, Flávio C; Fernandes, Fernanda B; Casarini, Dulce E; Carmona, Adriana K; Krieger, José E; Phillips, M Ian; Oliveira, Edilamar M

    2011-08-01

    Aerobic exercise training leads to a physiological, nonpathological left ventricular hypertrophy; however, the underlying biochemical and molecular mechanisms of physiological left ventricular hypertrophy are unknown. The role of microRNAs regulating the classic and the novel cardiac renin-angiotensin (Ang) system was studied in trained rats assigned to 3 groups: (1) sedentary; (2) swimming trained with protocol 1 (T1, moderate-volume training); and (3) protocol 2 (T2, high-volume training). Cardiac Ang I levels, Ang-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and protein expression, as well as Ang II levels, were lower in T1 and T2; however, Ang II type 1 receptor mRNA levels (69% in T1 and 99% in T2) and protein expression (240% in T1 and 300% in T2) increased after training. Ang II type 2 receptor mRNA levels (220%) and protein expression (332%) were shown to be increased in T2. In addition, T1 and T2 were shown to increase ACE2 activity and protein expression and Ang (1-7) levels in the heart. Exercise increased microRNA-27a and 27b, targeting ACE and decreasing microRNA-143 targeting ACE2 in the heart. Left ventricular hypertrophy induced by aerobic training involves microRNA regulation and an increase in cardiac Ang II type 1 receptor without the participation of Ang II. Parallel to this, an increase in ACE2, Ang (1-7), and Ang II type 2 receptor in the heart by exercise suggests that this nonclassic cardiac renin-angiotensin system counteracts the classic cardiac renin-angiotensin system. These findings are consistent with a model in which exercise may induce left ventricular hypertrophy, at least in part, altering the expression of specific microRNAs targeting renin-angiotensin system genes. Together these effects might provide the additional aerobic capacity required by the exercised heart.

  16. Evodiamine inhibits angiotensin II-induced rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Na; Gong, Qi-Hai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jing-Yi; Lin, Shu-Xian; Hou, Hua-Hua; Wu, Qin; Sun, An-Sheng

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the effects of evodiamine (Evo), a component of Evodiaminedia rutaecarpa Juss.) Benth, on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and further explore the potential mechanisms. Cardiomyocytes from neonatal Sprague Dawley rats were isolated and characterized, and then the cadiomyocyte cultures were randomly divided into control, model (Ang II 0.1 μmol/L), and Evo (0.03, 0.3, 3 μmol/L) groups. The cardiomyocyte surface area, protein level, intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) concentration, activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and content of nitric oxide (NO) were measured, respectively. The mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), calcineurin (CaN), extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK-2), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) of cardiomyocytes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction. The protein expressions of calcineurin catalytic subunit (CnA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) were detected by Western blot analysis. Compared with the control group, Ang II induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy, as evidenced by increased cardiomyocyte surface area, protein content, and ANF mRNA expression; increased intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) concentration and expressions of CaN mRNA, CnA protein, and ERK-2 mRNA, but decreased MKP-1 protein expression (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Compared with Ang II, Evo (0.3, 3 μmol/L) significantly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, decreased the [Ca(2+)]i concentration and expressions of CaN mRNA, CnA protein, and ERK-2 mRNA, but increased MKP-1 protein expression (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Most interestingly, Evo increased the NOS activity and NO production, and upregulated the eNOS mRNA expression (P<0.05). Evo signifificantly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and this effect was partly due to promotion of NO production, reduction of [Ca(2+)]i concentration, and inhibition of CaN and

  17. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of Oxytocin Accelerates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Renal Damage in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Phie, James; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Newton, Patricia; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Chilton, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor are synthesised in the heart and blood vessels but effects of chronic activation of this peripheral oxytocinergic system on cardiovascular function are not known. In acute studies, systemic administration of low dose oxytocin exerted a protective, preconditioning effect in experimental models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of low dose oxytocin following angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage. Angiotensin II (40 μg/Kg/h) only, oxytocin only (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h), or angiotensin II combined with oxytocin (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h) were infused subcutaneously in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days. At day 7, oxytocin or angiotensin-II only did not change hemodynamic parameters, but animals that received a combination of oxytocin and angiotensin-II had significantly elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure compared to controls (P < 0.01). Hemodynamic changes were accompanied by significant left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage at day 28 in animals treated with angiotensin II (P < 0.05) or both oxytocin and angiotensin II, compared to controls (P < 0.01). Prolonged oxytocin administration did not affect plasma concentrations of renin and atrial natriuretic peptide, but was associated with the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, a canonical signalling mechanism in pressure overload-induced cardiovascular disease. These data demonstrate that oxytocin accelerated angiotensin-II induced hypertension and end-organ renal damage, suggesting caution should be exercised in the chronic use of oxytocin in individuals with hypertension.

  18. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of Oxytocin Accelerates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Renal Damage in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phie, James; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Newton, Patricia; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Chilton, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor are synthesised in the heart and blood vessels but effects of chronic activation of this peripheral oxytocinergic system on cardiovascular function are not known. In acute studies, systemic administration of low dose oxytocin exerted a protective, preconditioning effect in experimental models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of low dose oxytocin following angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage. Angiotensin II (40 μg/Kg/h) only, oxytocin only (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h), or angiotensin II combined with oxytocin (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h) were infused subcutaneously in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days. At day 7, oxytocin or angiotensin-II only did not change hemodynamic parameters, but animals that received a combination of oxytocin and angiotensin-II had significantly elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure compared to controls (P < 0.01). Hemodynamic changes were accompanied by significant left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage at day 28 in animals treated with angiotensin II (P < 0.05) or both oxytocin and angiotensin II, compared to controls (P < 0.01). Prolonged oxytocin administration did not affect plasma concentrations of renin and atrial natriuretic peptide, but was associated with the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, a canonical signalling mechanism in pressure overload-induced cardiovascular disease. These data demonstrate that oxytocin accelerated angiotensin-II induced hypertension and end-organ renal damage, suggesting caution should be exercised in the chronic use of oxytocin in individuals with hypertension. PMID:26393919

  19. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  20. Role of p47phox in Vascular Oxidative Stress and Hypertension Caused by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, Ulf; Cai, Hua; Dikalov, Sergey; McCann, Louise; Hwang, Jinah; Jo, Hanjoong; Holland, Steven M.; Harrison, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension caused by angiotensin II is dependent on vascular superoxide (O2·–) production. The nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase is a major source of vascular O2·– and is activated by angiotensin II in vitro. However, its role in angiotensin II–induced hypertension in vivo is less clear. In the present studies, we used mice deficient in p47phox, a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase, to study the role of this enzyme system in vivo. In vivo, angiotensin II infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day for 7 days) increased systolic blood pressure from 105±2 to 151±6 mm Hg and increased vascular O2·– formation 2- to 3-fold in wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, in p47phox−/− mice the hypertensive response to angiotensin II infusion (122±4 mm Hg; P<0.05) was markedly blunted, and there was no increase of vascular O2·– production. In situ staining for O2·– using dihydroethidium revealed a marked increase of O2·–production in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells of angiotensin II–treated WT mice, but not in those of p47phox−/− mice. To directly examine the role of the NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial production of O2·–, endothelial cells from WT and p47phox−/− mice were cultured. Western blotting confirmed the absence of p47phox in p47phox−/− mice. Angiotensin II increased O2·– production in endothelial cells from WT mice, but not in those from p47phox−/− mice, as determined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These results suggest a pivotal role of the NAD(P)H oxidase and its subunit p47phox in the vascular oxidant stress and the blood pressure response to angiotensin II in vivo. PMID:12364355

  1. Radioligand binding assays: application of [(125)I]angiotensin II receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Leifert, Wayne R; Bucco, Olgatina; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Patten, Glen S

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is an octapeptide hormone with a key role in blood pressure regulation. AngII increases blood pressure by stimulating G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle. AngII receptors are therefore an important target in patients with high blood pressure. Strategies to lower high blood pressure (hypertension) include the use of drugs that compete for AngII at the angiotensin II Type 1 receptors (ATR) using ATR antagonists (e.g., irbesartan, valsartan, and losartan). This chapter will demonstrate the subtype specificity of ATR binding and we discuss some of the key experiments that are necessary in optimizing some of the parameters for GPCR screening. The latter protocols include saturation binding to determine K (d) and B (max), as well as competition/inhibition experiments to determine the IC(50) of binding. For these experiments we have used rat liver membranes which express ATR (type 1a) in relatively abundant amounts. Additionally, rat liver membrane preparations can be easily prepared in "bulk," frozen away for extended periods (up to 1 year) and used when necessary with no loss of receptor binding activity using the radiolabeled angiotensin II analogue, [(125)I][Sar(1),I le(8)]AngII.

  2. Angiotensin II receptors in amphibian kidney. [Calyptocephalella caudiverbera

    SciTech Connect

    Tchernitchin, S.M.; Galli, S.M.; Raizada, M.

    1986-03-05

    The localization of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors in the Amphibia kidney was investigated by radioautography and binding studies. /sup 125/I-Ang II was injected into the dorsal aorta of anesthetized toads, Calyptocephalella caudiverbera. The kidney excised 2 and 10 min after injection show intense labeling in the glomeruli and a lesser amount in the tubules. Ang II labeling was found in the proximal, distal and collecting tubules. The thin connecting segment (diluting segment) also shows a distinct labeling. Afferent and efferent arterioles and interstitial connective tissue do not show radioautographic granules above the background level. Ang II binding studies of glomerular and tubular membranes show that the binding of /sup 125/I-Ang II is higher in the glomerular than in the tubular membranes with a Kd of 1.9 x 10/sup -9/M and 1.0 x 10/sup -9/M respectively. Their results show that angiotensin II receptors in the amphibian nephron are present in the glomeruli and tubular segments, supporting the hypothesis of the intrarenal action of Ang II in this group of vertebrates.

  3. Metabolism of vasoactive peptides by human endothelial cells in culture. Angiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II) and angiotensinase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A R; Erdös, E G

    1977-04-01

    Cultured endothelial cells provide a model for the study of interactions of vasoactive peptides with endothelium. Endothelial cell cultured from veins of human umbilical cords contain both angiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II) and angiotensinase activities. Intact monolayers of cells can both activate angiotensin I and inactivate bradykinin when the peptides are added to culture flasks in protein-free medium. Intact suspended cells or lysed cells convert angiotensin I to angiotensin II, inactivate bradykinin, and hydrolyze hippuryldiglycine to hippuric acid and diglycine. These actions are inhibited by SQ 20881, the specific inhibitor of converting enzyme. The kininase activity of endothelial cells was partially inhibited by antibody to human lung converting enzyme. Endothelial cells also inactivate longer analogs of bradykinin, such as kallidin, methionyl-lysyl bradykinin, and bradykinin coupled covalently to 500,000 mol wt dextran. The endothelial cells retained converting enzyme activity through four successive subcultures, indicating that the enzyme is synthesized by the cells surface, and it is apparently a marker for endothelial cells, since cultured human fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and baby hamster kidney cells do not have it. Endothelial cells also contain an aminopheptidase which hydrolyzes both angiotensin II and the synthetic substrate, alpha-L-aspartyl beta-naphthylamide. The angiotensinase activity increased when the cells were lysed, which suggests that the enzyme is localized within the cells, Hydrolysis of both alpha-L-aspartyl beta-naphthylamide and angiotensin II was inhibited by omicron-phenanthroline, indicating that the enzyme is an A-tipe anigotensinase.

  4. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers suppress the cell proliferation effects of angiotensin II in breast cancer cells by inhibiting AT1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Du, Ning; Feng, Jiang; Hu, Li-Juan; Sun, Xin; Sun, Hai-Bing; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Ren, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Chronic stress and a high-fat diet are well-documented risk factors associated with the renin-angiotensin system in the development of breast cancer. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a novel component of the renin-angiotensin system. Several recent studies have focused on the function of AT1R in cell proliferation during cancer development. Thus, we hypothesized that angiotensin II (Ang Ⅱ) can promote proliferation of breast cancer via activated AT1R; the activation of AT1R may play an important role in promoting breast cancer growth, and AT1R blocker (ARB) may suppress the promotional effect on proliferation by antagonizing AT1R. The expression level of AT1R was found to be significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells by immunohistochemistry, but no correlation between AT1R expression and ER/PR/Her-2 expression was observed. The AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cell line exhibited high expression of AT1R protein, and we generated the AT1R(-)-MCF-7 cell line using RNA interference. ARBs, and in particular irbesartan, effectively inhibited the effects of Ang II on cell proliferation, cell cycle development and downstream AT1R signaling events, including the activation of the Ras-Raf-MAPK pathway and the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB. Irbesartan also significantly altered p53, PCNA and cyclin D1 expression, which was also influenced by activated AT1R in AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that ARBs may be useful as a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  5. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M.; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J.; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Siedlecki, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 minute injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 minute unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 hours after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant, RANTES; a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared to transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 minute injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation. PMID:25469849

  6. Effects of angiotensin II and its blockers Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II and DuP 753 on drinking in ducks in relation to properties of subfornical organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Simon, E; Schmid, H A

    1996-01-01

    Properties of systemically applied angiotensin II in stimulating water intake of normally hydrated ducks were studied and the results compared with properties of angiotensin II-responsive neurons of the subfornical organ which are considered as targets for circulating angiotensin II acting as a dipsogen. Following intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline (2000 mosmol.kg-1 at 0.3 ml.min-1 for 1 h), intravenous infusion of 0.3 ml.min-1 isotonic saline with angiotensin II (200 ng.min-1), starting 1 h later, stimulated drinking in each case at an angiotensin II plasma level of about 1400 pg.ml-1. Without hypertonic priming, the same angiotensin II infusion did not stimulate drinking in each experiment; however, if effective, repeated infusions of ANGII induced stable dipsogenic responses. Angiotensin II infusions did not alter plasma levels of antidiuretic hormone. Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II, a non-selective angiotensin II antagonist, acted weakly as a partial agonist when infused at a dose 200-fold higher than angiotensin II and effectively blocked the dipsogenic action of angiotensin II; this corresponds to the inhibition of angiotensin II-induced excitation by Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II observed in duck subfornical organ neurons. DuP 753 (losartan), an angiotensin II antagonist specifically blocking AT1 receptors in mammals, had equivocal effects on angiotensin II-induced drinking in ducks at rates 50- and 200-fold higher than angiotensin II, which corresponds to the weak inhibitory action of this compound on angiotensin II-induced neuronal excitation in the duck SFO. Blood pressure was only marginally elevated by the applied angiotensin II dose and Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II had no effect.

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7) has a dual role on growth-promoting signalling pathways in rat heart in vivo by stimulating STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation and inhibiting angiotensin II-stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Giani, Jorge F; Gironacci, Mariela M; Muñoz, Marina C; Turyn, Daniel; Dominici, Fernando P

    2008-05-01

    Angiotensin (ANG) II contributes to cardiac remodelling by inducing the activation of several signalling molecules, including ERK1/2, Rho kinase and members of the STAT family of proteins. Angiotensin-(1-7) is produced in the heart and inhibits the proliferative actions of ANG II, although the mechanisms of this inhibition are poorly understood. Accordingly, in the present study we examined whether ANG-(1-7) affects the ANG II-mediated activation of ERK1/2 and Rho kinase, STAT3 and STAT5a/b in rat heart in vivo. We hypothesized that ANG-(1-7) inhibits these growth-promoting pathways, counterbalancing the trophic action of ANG II. Solutions of normal saline (0.9% NaCl) containing ANG II (8 pmol kg(-1)) plus ANG-(1-7) in increasing doses (from 0.08 to 800 pmol kg(-1)) were administered via the inferior vena cava to anaesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 5 min, hearts were removed and ERK1/2, Rho kinase, STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation was determined by Western blotting using phosphospecific antibodies. Angiotensin II stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase phosphorylation (2.3 +/- 0.2- and 2.1 +/- 0.2-fold increase over basal values, respectively), while ANG-(1-7) was without effect. The ANG II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Rho kinase was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by ANG-(1-7) and disappeared in the presence of the Mas receptor antagonist d-Ala7-ANG-(1-7). Both ANG II and ANG-(1-7) increased STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation to a similar extent (130-140% increase). The ANG-(1-7)-stimulated STAT phosphorylation was blocked by the AT(1) receptor antagonist losartan and not by d-Ala7-ANG-(1-7). Our results show a dual action of ANG-(1-7), that is, a stimulatory effect on STAT3 and 5a/b phosphorylation through AT(1) receptors and a blocking action on ANG II-stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase phosphorylation through Mas receptor activation. The latter effect could be representative of a mechanism for a protective role of ANG-(1-7) in the heart by

  8. Angiotensin II-regulated transcription regulatory genes in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Damian G; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2010-11-29

    Transcription regulatory genes are crucial modulators of cell physiology and metabolism whose intracellular levels are tightly controlled in response to extracellular stimuli. We previously reported a set of 29 transcription regulatory genes modulated by angiotensin II in H295R human adrenocortical cells and their roles in regulating the expression of the last and unique enzymes of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid biosynthetic pathways, 11β-hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase, respectively, using gene expression reporter assays. To study the effect of this set of transcription regulatory genes on adrenal steroidogenesis, H295R cells were transfected by high-efficiency nucleofection and aldosterone and cortisol were measured in cell culture supernatants under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. BCL11B, BHLHB2, CITED2, ELL2, HMGA1, MAFF, NFIL3, PER1, SERTAD1, and VDR significantly stimulated aldosterone secretion, while EGR1, FOSB, and ZFP295 decreased aldosterone secretion. BTG2, HMGA1, MITF, NR4A1, and ZFP295 significantly increased cortisol secretion, while BCL11B, NFIL3, PER1, and SIX2 decreased cortisol secretion. We also report the effect of some of these regulators on the expression of endogenous aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. In summary, this study reports for the first time the effects of a set of angiotensin II-modulated transcription regulatory genes on aldosterone and cortisol secretion and the expression levels of the last and unique enzymes of the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid biosynthetic pathways. Abnormal regulation of mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid secretion is involved in several pathophysiological conditions. These transcription regulatory genes may be involved in adrenal steroidogenesis pathologies; thus they merit additional study as potential candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Pressure promotes angiotensin II--mediated migration of human coronary smooth muscle cells through increase in oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2002-02-01

    Angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. We examined the effects of pressure on the angiotensin II--mediated increase in oxidative stress and migration of cultured human coronary smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Increased pressure (100 mm Hg) by helium gas for 48 hours increased angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress as evaluated by flow cytometry and SMC migration (from 15.9 +/- 2.2 to 32.0 +/- 2.4 cells per 4 high-power fields, P<0.05; n=8). The pressure-induced increases in oxidative stress observed appear to involve phospholipase D (PLD) and protein kinase C (PKC), inasmuch as the indirect PLD inhibitor suramin, at 100 micromol/L, and the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine, at 1 micromol/L, completely blocked the increase in angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress induced by pressure. Pressure-induced increase in angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress was inhibited by diphenylene iodonium chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, by 79% (P<0.05, n=8). Losartan (1 micromol/L), its active metabolite E3174 (1 micromol/L), and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (100 mmol/L) but not PD123319 (1 micromol/L) also blocked pressure-induced increases in angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress and SMC migration (P<0.05, n=8). These findings suggest a novel cellular mechanism whereby pressure regulates the angiotensin II--mediated migration of SMCs, possibly via angiotensin II type 1 receptors, and which involves PLD-mediated, PKC-mediated, and NADPH oxidase--mediated increases in oxidative stress.

  10. Limiting angiotensin II signaling with a cell penetrating peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of the angiotensin II type I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Mierke, Dale; Berg, Eric; Shia, Michael; Fishman, Jordan; Sallum, Christine; Polgar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A cell-penetrating peptide consisting of the second intracellular loop (IC2) of the Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) linked to the HIV transactivating regulatory protein (TAT) domain was used to identify the role of this motif for intracellular signal transduction. HEK-293 cells stably transfected with AT1R cDNA and primary cultures of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressing endogenous AT1 receptor were exposed to the cell-penetrating peptide construct and the effect on angiotensin II signaling determined. The AT1 IC2 peptide effectively inhibited AngII stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover and calcium influx. It also limited the activation of Akt/PKB as determined by an inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and completely abolished the AngII dependent activation of the transcriptional factor NFκB. In contrast, the AT1 IC2 peptide had no effect on AngII/AT1 receptor activation of ERK. These results illustrate the potential of using cell penetrating peptides to both delineate receptor-mediated signal transduction as well as to selectively regulate G protein coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20492449

  11. miR-155 functions downstream of angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 and calcineurin to regulate cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Zheng; Tong, Xin Zhu; Xie, Hua Qiang; Luo, Tao; Hua, Xian Ping; Wang, Han Qin

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by maladaptive tissue remodeling that may lead to heart failure or sudden death. MicroRNAs (miRs) are negative regulators of angiotensin II and the angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1), which are two components involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, the interaction between angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1) signaling and miR-155 was investigated. Rat H9C2 (2-1) cardiomyocytes were transfected with miR-155 analogues or inhibitors, then stimulated with angiotensin II to induce cardiac hypertrophy. miR-155 expression was revealed to be altered following transfection with chemically-modified miR-155 analogues and inhibitors in rat cardiomyocytes. In cell cardiac hypertrophy models, the cell surface area, AGTR1, atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain-β mRNA expression levels were revealed to be lower in cells stimulated with miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin alone (P<0.05), as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, calcineurin mRNA and protein, intracellular free calcium and nuclear factor of activated T-cells-4 proteins were downregulated in miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II, as compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin II alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that miR-155 may improve cardiac hypertrophy by downregulating AGTR1 and suppressing the calcium signaling pathways activated by AGTR1.

  12. miR-155 functions downstream of angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 and calcineurin to regulate cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Zheng; Tong, Xin Zhu; Xie, Hua Qiang; Luo, Tao; Hua, Xian Ping; Wang, Han Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by maladaptive tissue remodeling that may lead to heart failure or sudden death. MicroRNAs (miRs) are negative regulators of angiotensin II and the angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1), which are two components involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, the interaction between angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1) signaling and miR-155 was investigated. Rat H9C2 (2–1) cardiomyocytes were transfected with miR-155 analogues or inhibitors, then stimulated with angiotensin II to induce cardiac hypertrophy. miR-155 expression was revealed to be altered following transfection with chemically-modified miR-155 analogues and inhibitors in rat cardiomyocytes. In cell cardiac hypertrophy models, the cell surface area, AGTR1, atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain-β mRNA expression levels were revealed to be lower in cells stimulated with miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin alone (P<0.05), as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, calcineurin mRNA and protein, intracellular free calcium and nuclear factor of activated T-cells-4 proteins were downregulated in miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II, as compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin II alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that miR-155 may improve cardiac hypertrophy by downregulating AGTR1 and suppressing the calcium signaling pathways activated by AGTR1. PMID:27588076

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) decreases skeletal muscle atrophy induced by angiotensin II through a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Franco; Morales, María Gabriela; Meneses, Carla; Simon, Felipe; Brandan, Enrique; Abrigo, Johanna; Vazquez, Yaneisi; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass, an increase in myosin heavy chain (MHC) degradation and increase in the expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases: atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Angiotensin II (AngII) induces muscle atrophy. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], through its receptor Mas, produces the opposite effects than AngII. We assessed the effects of Ang-(1-7) on the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by AngII. Our results show that Ang-(1-7), through Mas, prevents the effects induced by AngII in muscle gastrocnemius: the decrease in the fibre diameter, muscle strength and MHC levels and the increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Ang-(1-7) also induces AKT phosphorylation. In addition, our analysis in vitro using C2C12 myotubes shows that Ang-(1-7), through a mechanism dependent on Mas, prevents the decrease in the levels of MHC and the increase in the expression of the atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, both induced by AngII. Ang-(1-7) induces AKT phosphorylation in myotubes; additionally, we demonstrated that the inhibition of AKT with MK-2206 decreases the anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7). Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that Ang-(1-7) counteracts the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by AngII through a mechanism dependent on the Mas receptor, which involves AKT activity. Our study indicates that Ang-(1-7) is novel molecule with a potential therapeutical use to improve muscle wasting associated, at least, with pathologies that present high levels of AngII.

  14. Intrarenal angiotensin II and its contribution to the genesis of chronic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Navar, L Gabriel; Prieto, Minolfa C; Satou, Ryousuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The increased activity of intrarenal renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in a setting of elevated arterial pressure elicits renal vasoconstriction, increased sodium reabsorption, proliferation, fibrosis and renal injury. Increases in intrarenal and interstitial angiotensin (Ang) II levels are due to increased AT1 receptor mediated Ang II uptake and stimulation of renal angiotensinogen (AGT) mRNA and protein expression. Augmented proximal tubule AGT production increases tubular AGT secretion and spillover of AGT into the distal nephron and urine. Increased renin formation by principal cells of the collecting ducts forms Ang I from AGT thus increasing Ang II. The catalytic actions of renin and prorenin are enhanced by prorenin receptors (PRRs) on the intercalated cells. The resultant increased intrarenal Ang II levels contribute to the genesis of chronic hypertension. PMID:21339086

  15. Chymase-dependent production of angiotensin II: an old enzyme in old hearts.

    PubMed

    Froogh, Ghezal; Pinto, John T; Le, Yicong; Kandhi, Sharath; Aleligne, Yeabsra; Huang, An; Sun, Dong

    2017-02-01

    Age-dependent alteration of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and generation of angiotensin II (Ang II) are well documented. By contrast, RAS-independent generation of Ang II in aging and its responses to exercise have not been explored. To this end, we examined the effects of chymase, a secretory serine protease, on the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-independent conversion of Ang I to Ang II. We hypothesized that age-dependent alteration of cardiac Ang II formation is chymase dependent in nature and is prevented by exercise training. Experiments were conducted on hearts isolated from young (3 mo), aged sedentary (24 mo), and aged rats chronically exercised on a treadmill. In the presence of low Ang I levels and downregulation of ACE expression/activity, cardiac Ang II levels were significantly higher in aged than young rats, suggesting an ACE-independent response. Aged hearts also displayed significantly increased chymase expression and activity, as well as upregulation of tryptase, a biological marker of mast cells, confirming a mast cell-sourced increase in chymase. Coincidently, cardiac superoxide produced from NADPH oxidase (Nox) was significantly enhanced in aged rats and was normalized by exercise. Conversely, a significant reduction in cardiac expression of ACE2 followed by lower Ang 1-7 levels and downregulation of the Mas receptor (binding protein of Ang 1-7) in aged rats were completely reversed by exercise. In conclusion, local formation of Ang II is increased in aged hearts, and chymase is primarily responsible for this increase. Chronic exercise is able to normalize the age-dependent alterations via compromising chymase/Ang II/angiotensin type 1 receptor/Nox actions while promoting ACE2/Ang 1-7/MasR signaling.

  16. Therapeutic trials comparing angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Elliott, W J

    2000-08-01

    Two independent pharmacologic methods of specifically interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been brought to the marketplace: angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). These agents have the potential not only to be very widely used for a broad variety of clinical indications but also to compete against each other as treatments for hypertension, heart failure, renal impairment, and other conditions. Many short-term comparative studies of these two classes of drugs have now been completed. Most have focused on surrogate endpoints, such as blood pressure, renal function, or cough. These studies have generally concluded that ARBs are better tolerated but that the two drug classes otherwise have similar efficacy. The largest clinical trial comparing ARBs and ACE inhibitors thus far completed, Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE 2), failed to confirm the results of a smaller study; it did not demonstrate a significant improvement in outcomes (death or hospitalization for heart failure) with an ARB used alone, despite better tolerability. Many longer-term outcome studies with survival endpoints are under way, but most will compare the combination against an ACE inhibitor alone. These studies will define the optimal use of these agents in medicine for decades to come.

  17. Auto-inhibitory regulation of angiotensin II functionality in hamster aorta during the early phases of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Cristina; Pernomian, Larissa; Côco, Hariane; Gomes, Mayara Santos; Franco, João José; Marchi, Kátia Colombo; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; Uyemura, Sergio Akira; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; de Oliveira, Ana Maria

    2016-06-15

    Emerging data point the crosstalk between dyslipidemia and renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Advanced dyslipidemia is described to induce RAS activation in the vasculature. However, the interplay between early dyslipidemia and the RAS remains unexplored. Knowing that hamsters and humans have a similar lipid profile, we investigated the effects of early and advanced dyslipidemia on angiotensin II-induced contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II (1.0pmol/l to 1.0µmol/l) were obtained in the hamster thoracic aorta. We also investigated the modulatory action of NAD(P)H oxidase on angiotensin II-induced contraction using ML171 (Nox-1 inhibitor, 0.5µmol/l) and VAS2870 (Nox-4 inhibitor, 5µmol/l). Early dyslipidemia was detected in hamsters treated with a cholesterol-rich diet for 15 days. Early dyslipidemia decreased the contraction induced by angiotensin II and the concentration of Nox-4-derived hydrogen peroxide. Advanced dyslipidemia, observed in hamsters treated with cholesterol-rich diet for 30 days, restored the contractile response induced by angiotensin II by compensatory mechanism that involves Nox-4-mediated oxidative stress. The hyporresponsiveness to angiotensin II may be an auto-inhibitory regulation of the angiotensinergic function during early dyslipidemia in an attempt to reduce the effects of the upregulation of the vascular RAS during the advanced stages of atherogenesis. The recovery of vascular angiotensin II functionality during the advanced phases of dyslipidemia is the result of the upregulation of redox-pro-inflammatory pathway that might be most likely involved in atherogenesis progression rather than in the recovery of vascular function. Taken together, our findings show the early phase of dyslipidemia may be the most favorable moment for effective atheroprotective therapeutic interventions.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-α produced in the kidney contributes to angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiandong; Patel, Mehul B; Griffiths, Robert; Mao, Alice; Song, Young-soo; Karlovich, Norah S; Sparks, Matthew A; Jin, Huixia; Wu, Min; Lin, Eugene E; Crowley, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Immune system activation contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the resulting progression of chronic kidney disease. In this regard, we recently identified a role for proinflammatory Th1 T-lymphocyte responses in hypertensive kidney injury. Because Th1 cells generate interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), we hypothesized that interferon-γ and TNF-α propagate renal damage during hypertension induced by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, after confirming that mice genetically deficient of Th1 immunity were protected from kidney glomerular injury despite a preserved hypertensive response, we subjected mice lacking interferon-γ or TNF-α to our model of hypertensive chronic kidney disease. Interferon deficiency had no impact on blood pressure elevation or urinary albumin excretion during chronic angiotensin II infusion. By contrast, TNF-deficient (knockout) mice had blunted hypertensive responses and reduced end-organ damage in our model. As angiotensin II-infused TNF knockout mice had exaggerated endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the kidney and enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability, we examined the actions of TNF-α generated from renal parenchymal cells in hypertension by transplanting wild-type or TNF knockout kidneys into wild-type recipients before the induction of hypertension. Transplant recipients lacking TNF solely in the kidney had blunted hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and augmented renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, confirming a role for kidney-derived TNF-α to promote angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation by limiting renal nitric oxide generation.

  19. Potential effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade in adipose tissue and bone.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, and also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Blockade of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure, and the favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. Similarly, bone metabolism is closely regulated by hormones and cytokines, which have effects on both bone resorption and deposition. It is known that the receptors of Ang II are expressed in culture osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and Ang II is postulated to be able to act upon the cells involved in bone metabolism. In in vitro system, Ang II induced the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption. Importantly, it was demonstrated by the sub-analysis of a recent clinical study that the fracture risk was significantly reduced by the usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To treat the subgroups of hypertensive patients with osteoporosis RAS can be considered a novel target.

  20. Mineralocorticoid and angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the subfornical organ mediate angiotensin II - induced hypothalamic reactive oxygen species and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Bing S; White, Roselyn A; Chen, Aidong; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2016-08-04

    Activation of angiotensinergic pathways by central aldosterone (Aldo)-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway plays a critical role in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. The subfornical organ (SFO) contains both MR and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R) and can relay the signals of circulating Ang II to downstream nuclei such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). In Wistar rats, subcutaneous (sc) infusion of Ang II at 500ng/min/kg for 1 or 2weeks increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining in a nucleus - specific pattern. Intra-SFO infusion of AAV-MR- or AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R mRNA expression in the SFO and decreased MR mRNA. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA prevented increases in ROS in the PVN and RVLM. MR- but not AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented the Ang II-induced ROS in the SON. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension as assessed by telemetry. These results indicate that Aldo-MR signaling in the SFO is needed for the activation of Ang II-AT1R-ROS signaling from the SFO to the PVN and RVLM. Activation of Aldo-MR signaling from the SFO to the SON may enhance AT1R dependent activation of pre-sympathetic neurons in the PVN. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Angiotensin II down-regulates natriuretic peptide receptor-A expression and guanylyl cyclase activity in H9c2 (2-1) cardiac myoblast cells: Role of ROS and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Gopi, Venkatachalam; Subramanian, Vimala; Manivasagam, Senthamizharasi; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2015-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) system is suggested as an endogenous anti-hypertrophic protective mechanism of the heart. We have shown previously that Angiotensin II (ANG II), an effector molecule of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, down-regulates NPR-A expression and its activity in vivo rat heart. However, the underlying mechanism by which ANG II down-regulates NPR-A expression in the heart is not well understood. Hence, the present investigation was aimed to determine whether ANG II-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NF-κB are involved in the down-regulation of NPR-A activity in H9c2 (2-1) cardiac myoblast cells. The H9c2 (2-1) cardiac myoblast cells were exposed to ANG II (10(-7) M for 20 h) with/or without blocker treatment (losartan-10 µM, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)-10 mM and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)-100 µM). On exposure, ANG II induced a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in the expression of Npr1 (coding for NPR-A) gene and NPR-A receptor-dependent guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity. The level of expression of proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-myc, and c-jun) and natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) was increased in ANG II-treated cells when compared with control cells. Interestingly, ANG II-dependent repression of Npr1 gene expression and guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity was completely restored on treatment with losartan, while only a partial reversal was observed in NAC- and PDTC-co-treated cells. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that ROS-mediated NF-κB activation mechanism is critically involved in the ANG II-mediated down-regulation of NPR-A expression and its GC activity.

  2. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  3. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage

    PubMed Central

    Balarezo, María G.; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2015-01-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article. Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan’s blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking

  4. l-Carnitine ameliorates the oxidative stress response to angiotensin II by modulating NADPH oxidase through a reduction in protein kinase c activity and NF-κB translocation to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Blanca, Antonio J; Ruiz-Armenta, María V; Zambrano, Sonia; Miguel-Carrasco, José L; González-Roncero, Francisco M; Fortuño, Ana; Revilla, Elisa; Mate, Alfonso; Vázquez, Carmen M

    2017-08-01

    l-Carnitine (LC) exerts beneficial effects in arterial hypertension due, in part, to its antioxidant capacity. We investigated the signalling pathways involved in the effect of LC on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced NADPH oxidase activation in NRK-52E cells. Ang II increased the generation of superoxide anion from NADPH oxidase, as well as the amount of hydrogen peroxide and nitrotyrosine. Co-incubation with LC managed to prevent these alterations and also reverted the changes in NADPH oxidase expression triggered by Ang II. Cell signalling studies evidenced that LC did not modify Ang II-induced phosphorylation of Akt, p38 MAPK or ERK1/2. On the other hand, a significant decrease in PKC activity, and inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) translocation, were attributable to LC incubation. In conclusion, LC counteracts the pro-oxidative response to Ang II by modulating NADPH oxidase enzyme via reducing the activity of PKC and the translocation of NF-kB to the nucleus.

  5. Angiotensin II Moderately Decreases Plasmodium Infection and Experimental Cerebral Malaria in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Baravian, Charlotte; Edagha, Innocent; Ty, Maureen C; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Xu, Wenyue; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a peptide hormone that regulates blood pressure, has been proposed as a protective factor against cerebral malaria based on a genetic analysis. In vitro studies have documented an inhibitory effect of angiotensin II on Plasmodium growth, while studies using chemical inhibitors of angiotensin II in mice showed protection against experimental cerebral malaria but not major effects on parasite growth. To determine whether the level of angiotensin II affects Plasmodium growth and/or disease outcome in malaria, elevated levels of angiotensin II were induced in mice by intradermal implantation of osmotic mini-pumps providing constant release of this hormone. Mice were then infected with P. berghei and monitored for parasitemia and incidence of cerebral malaria. Mice infused with angiotensin II showed decreased parasitemia seven days after infection. The development of experimental cerebral malaria was delayed and a moderate increase in survival was observed in mice with elevated angiotensin II, as confirmed by decreased number of cerebral hemorrhages compared to controls. The results presented here show for the first time the effect of elevated levels of angiotensin II in an in vivo model of malaria. The decreased pathogenesis observed in mice complements a previous human genetic study, reinforcing the hypothesis of a beneficial effect of angiotensin II in malaria.

  6. Angiotensin II Moderately Decreases Plasmodium Infection and Experimental Cerebral Malaria in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Baravian, Charlotte; Edagha, Innocent; Ty, Maureen C.; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Xu, Wenyue; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a peptide hormone that regulates blood pressure, has been proposed as a protective factor against cerebral malaria based on a genetic analysis. In vitro studies have documented an inhibitory effect of angiotensin II on Plasmodium growth, while studies using chemical inhibitors of angiotensin II in mice showed protection against experimental cerebral malaria but not major effects on parasite growth. To determine whether the level of angiotensin II affects Plasmodium growth and/or disease outcome in malaria, elevated levels of angiotensin II were induced in mice by intradermal implantation of osmotic mini-pumps providing constant release of this hormone. Mice were then infected with P. berghei and monitored for parasitemia and incidence of cerebral malaria. Mice infused with angiotensin II showed decreased parasitemia seven days after infection. The development of experimental cerebral malaria was delayed and a moderate increase in survival was observed in mice with elevated angiotensin II, as confirmed by decreased number of cerebral hemorrhages compared to controls. The results presented here show for the first time the effect of elevated levels of angiotensin II in an in vivo model of malaria. The decreased pathogenesis observed in mice complements a previous human genetic study, reinforcing the hypothesis of a beneficial effect of angiotensin II in malaria. PMID:26376293

  7. Angiotensin II Signaling in Human Preadipose Cells: Participation of ERK1,2-Dependent Modulation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Dünner, Natalia; Quezada, Carolina; Berndt, F. Andrés; Cánovas, José; Rojas, Cecilia V.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system expressed in adipose tissue has been implicated in the modulation of adipocyte formation, glucose metabolism, triglyceride accumulation, lipolysis, and the onset of the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. As we investigated angiotensin II signal transduction mechanisms in human preadipose cells, an interplay of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and Akt/PKB became evident. Angiotensin II caused attenuation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), at serine 473; the p-Akt/Akt ratio decreased to 0.5±0.2-fold the control value without angiotensin II (p<0.001). Here we report that the reduction of phosphorylated Akt associates with ERK1,2 activities. In the absence of angiotensin II, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 or PD98059 resulted in a 2.1±0.5 (p<0.001) and 1.4±0.2-fold (p<0.05) increase in the p-Akt/Akt ratio, respectively. In addition, partial knockdown of ERK1 protein expression by the short hairpin RNA technique also raised phosphorylated Akt in these cells (the p-Akt/Akt ratio was 1.5±0.1-fold the corresponding control; p<0.05). Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 prevented the reduction of p-Akt/Akt by angiotensin II. An analogous effect was found on the phosphorylation status of Akt downstream effectors, the forkhead box (Fox) proteins O1 and O4. Altogether, these results indicate that angiotensin II signaling in human preadipose cells involves an ERK1,2-dependent attenuation of Akt activity, whose impact on the biological functions under its regulation is not fully understood. PMID:24098385

  8. Apelin Is a Negative Regulator of Angiotensin II-Mediated Adverse Myocardial Remodeling and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Zhou; Wang, Wang; Jin, Hai-Yan; Chen, Xueyi; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Xu, Ying-Le; Song, Bei; Penninger, Josef M; Oudit, Gavin Y; Zhong, Jiu-Chang

    2017-10-03

    The apelin pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis and disease. However, the exact role of pyr1-apelin-13 in angiotensin (Ang) II-mediated heart disease remains unclear. We used apelin-deficient (APLN(-)(/y)) and apolipoprotein E knockout mice to evaluate the regulatory roles of pyr1-apelin-13. The 1-year aged APLN(-)(/y) mice developed myocardial hypertrophy and dysfunction with reduced angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 levels. Ang II infusion (1.5 mg kg(-)(1) d(-)(1)) for 4 weeks potentiated oxidative stress, pathological hypertrophy, and myocardial fibrosis in young APLN(-)(/y) hearts resulting in exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction. Importantly, daily administration of 100 μg/kg pyr1-apelin-13 resulted in upregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 levels, decreased superoxide production and expression of hypertrophy- and fibrosis-related genes leading to attenuated myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction in the Ang II-infused apolipoprotein E knockout mice. In addition, pyr1-apelin-13 treatment largely attenuated Ang II-induced apoptosis and ultrastructural injury in the apolipoprotein E knockout mice by activating Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation signaling. In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, exposure of Ang II decreased angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 protein and increased superoxide generation, cellular proliferation, and migration, which were rescued by pyr1-apelin-13, and Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase agonist stimulation. The increased superoxide generation and apoptosis in cultured cardiofibroblasts in response to Ang II were strikingly prevented by pyr1-apelin-13 which was partially reversed by cotreatment with the Akt inhibitor MK2206. In conclusion, pyr1-apelin-13 peptide pathway is a negative regulator of aging-mediated and Ang II-mediated adverse myocardial remodeling and dysfunction and represents a potential candidate to prevent and treat

  9. Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the onset and development of cardiac remodelling associated with changes of autophagy. Angiotensin1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] is a newly established bioactive peptide of renin-angiotensin system, which has been shown to counteract the deleterious effects of Ang II. However, the precise impact of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy remained essentially elusive. The aim of the present study was to examine if Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced autophagy and the underlying mechanism involved. Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to Ang II for 48 hrs while mice were infused with Ang II for 4 weeks to induce models of cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. LC3b-II and p62, markers of autophagy, expression were significantly elevated in cardiomyocytes, suggesting the presence of autophagy accompanying cardiac hypertrophy in response to Ang II treatment. Besides, Ang II induced oxidative stress, manifesting as an increase in malondialdehyde production and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. Ang-(1-7) significantly retarded hypertrophy, autophagy and oxidative stress in the heart. Furthermore, a role of Mas receptor in Ang-(1-7)-mediated action was assessed using A779 peptide, a selective Mas receptor antagonist. The beneficial responses of Ang-(1-7) on cardiac remodelling, autophagy and oxidative stress were mitigated by A779. Taken together, these result indicated that Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Activity in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Handjani, Farhad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Kalafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. The exact pathogenesis of AA remains unknown, although recent studies support a T-cell mediated autoimmune process. On the other hand, some studies have proposed that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a role in autoimmunity. Therefore, we assessed serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a component of this system, in AA. Methods. ACE activity was measured in the sera of 19 patients with AA and 16 healthy control subjects. In addition, the relationship between severity and duration of the disease and ACE activity was evaluated. Results. Serum ACE activity was higher in the patient group (55.81 U/L) compared to the control group (46.41 U/L), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.085). Also, there was no correlation between ACE activity and severity (P = 0.13) and duration of disease (P = 0.25) in the patient group. Conclusion. The increased serum ACE activity found in this study may demonstrate local involvement of the RAAS in the pathogenesis of AA. Assessment of ACE in a study with a larger sample size as well as in tissue samples is recommended in order to further evaluate the possible role of RAAS in AA. PMID:25349723

  11. A Low-Protein Diet Enhances Angiotensin II Production in the Lung of Pregnant Rats but Not Nonpregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haijun; Tanchico, Daren Tubianosa; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary angiotensin II production is enhanced in pregnant rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. Here we assessed if LP diet induces elevations in angiotensin II production in nonpregnant rats and whether Ace expression and ACE activity in lungs are increased. Nonpregnant rats were fed a normal (CT) or LP diet for 8, 12, or 17 days and timed pregnant rats fed for 17 days from Day 3 of pregnancy. Plasma angiotensin II, expressions of Ace and Ace2, and activities of these proteins in lungs, kidneys, and plasma were measured. These parameters were compared among nonpregnant rats or between nonpregnant and pregnant rats fed different diets. Major findings are as follows: (1) plasma angiotensin II levels were slightly higher in the LP than CT group on Days 8 and 12 in nonpregnant rats; (2) expression of Ace and Ace2 and abundance and activities of ACE and ACE2 in lungs, kidneys, and plasma of nonpregnant rats were unchanged by LP diet except for minor changes; (3) the abundance and activities of ACE in lungs of pregnant rats fed LP diet were greater than nonpregnant rats, while those of ACE2 were decreased. These results indicate that LP diet-induced increase in pulmonary angiotensin II production depends on pregnancy. PMID:27195150

  12. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase–Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Angiotensin II–Induced Inflammation and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimian, Talin; Li, Melissa Wei; Lemarié, Catherine A.; Simeone, Stefania M.C.; Pagano, Patrick J.; Gaestel, Matthias; Paradis, Pierre; Wassmann, Sven; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in angiotensin II–induced hypertension, and mitogen-activated protein kinases participate in these processes. We questioned whether mitogen-activated protein kinase–activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a downstream target of p38 mitogen–activated protein kinase, is involved in angiotensin II–induced vascular responses. In vivo experiments were performed in wild-type and Mk2 knockout mice infused intravenously with angiotensin II. Angiotensin II induced a 30 mm Hg increase in mean blood pressure in wild-type that was delayed in Mk2 knockout mice. Angiotensin II increased superoxide production and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in blood vessels of wild-type but not in Mk2 knockout mice. Mk2 knockdown by small interfering RNA in mouse mesenteric vascular smooth muscle cells caused a 42% reduction in MK2 protein and blunted the angiotensin II–induced 40% increase of MK2 expression. Mk2 knockdown blunted angiotensin II–induced doubling of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, 2.4-fold increase of nuclear p65, and 1.4-fold increase in Ets-1. Mk2 knockdown abrogated the angiotensin II–induced 4.7-fold and 1.3-fold increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA and protein. Angiotensin II enhanced reactive oxygen species levels (by 29%) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity (by 48%), both abolished by Mk2 knockdown. Reduction of MK2 blocked angiotensin II–induced p47phox translocation to the membrane, associated with a 53% enhanced catalase expression. Angiotensin II–induced increase of MK2 was prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor Nox2ds-tat. Mk2 small interfering RNA prevented the angiotensin II–induced 30% increase of proliferation. In conclusion, MK2 plays a critical role in angiotensin II signaling, leading to hypertension, oxidative stress via activation of p47phox and inhibition of antioxidants, and

  13. Angiotensin II revisited: new roles in inflammation, immunology and aging

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Ariela; Cassis, Paola; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    That the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in regulation of blood pressure, vasoconstriction, sodium intake and potassium excretion is well established. Studies in the last few years have however documented new roles for this molecule as a pro-inflammatory molecule and more recently as a possible pro-fibrotic agent that contributes to progressive deterioration of organ function in disease. Binding of Ang II to its receptors (in particular AT1) mediates intracellular free radical generation that contributes to tissue damage by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction. Blocking Ang II signalling protects against neurodegenerative processes and promotes longevity in rodents. Altogether these findings open the unanticipated perspective for exploring Ang II signalling in therapeutic interventions in inflammatory diseases and aging-related tissue injury. This review extends from the discovery of Ang II and its implications in renal and cardiovascular physiology to cover the roles of the system in inflammation, tissue injury, autoimmunity, oxidative stress and aging. PMID:20597104

  14. Activation of CB1 receptors by 2-arachidonoylglycerol attenuates vasoconstriction induced by U46619 and angiotensin II in human and rat pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Karpińska, Olga; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Kloza, Monika; Ambroz Ewicz, Ewa; Kozłowski, Tomasz; Kasacka, Irena; Malinowska, Barbara; Kozłowska, Hanna

    2017-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that endocannabinoids acting via cannabinoid CB1 receptors may modulate vascular responses of various vasoconstrictors in the rodent systemic vasculature. The aim of the study was to investigate whether endocannabinoids modulate the contractile responses evoked by a thromboxane A2 analog (U46619), angiotensin II (ANG II), serotonin (5-HT), and phenylephrine, which stimulate distinct Gq/11 protein-coupled receptors (thromboxane, ANG II type 1, 5-HT2, and α1-adrenergic receptors) in isolated endothelium-intact human and rat pulmonary arteries (hPAs and rPAs, respectively). The CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (1 μM) and diacylglycerol lipase (2-arachidonoylglycerol synthesis enzyme) inhibitor RHC80267 (40 μM) enhanced contractions induced by U46619 in hPAs and rPAs and by ANG II in rPAs in an endothelium-dependent manner. AM251 did not influence vasoconstrictions induced by 5-HT or phenylephrine in rPAs. The monoacylglycerol lipase (2-arachidonoylglycerol degradation enzyme) inhibitor JZL184 (1 μM), but not the fatty acid amide hydrolase (anandamide degradation enzyme) inhibitor URB597 (1 μM), attenuated contractions evoked by U46619 in hPAs and rPAs and ANG II in rPAs. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol concentration-dependently induced relaxation of hPAs, which was inhibited by endothelium denudation or AM251 and enhanced by JZL184. Expression of CB1 receptors was confirmed in hPAs and rPAs using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The present study shows the protective interaction between the endocannabinoid system and vasoconstriction in response to U46619 and ANG II in the human and rat pulmonary circulation. U46619 and ANG II may stimulate rapid endothelial release of endocannabinoids (mainly 2-arachidonoylglycerol), leading to CB1 receptor-dependent and/or CB1 receptor-independent vasorelaxation, which in the negative feedback mechanism reduces later agonist-induced vasoconstriction. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Renal denervation attenuates aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Rui; Ruan, Cheng-Chao; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yong-Jie; Ma, Yu; Zhu, Ding-Liang; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system interacts with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we sought to determine if renal denervation (RDN) inhibits aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. Bilateral RDN or SHAM operation was performed before chronic 14-day Ang II subcutaneous infusion (200ng/kg/min) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral RDN blunted Ang II-induced hypertension and ameliorated the mesenteric vascular dysfunction. Cardiovascular hypertrophy in response to Ang II was significantly attenuated by RDN as shown by histopathology and transthoracic echocardiography. Moreover, Ang II-induced vascular and myocardial inflammation and fibrosis were suppressed by RDN with concurrent decrease in fibronectin and collagen deposition, macrophage infiltration, and MCP-1 expression. Interestingly, RDN also inhibited Ang II-induced aldosterone expression in the plasma, kidney and heart. This was associated with the reduction of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the adrenal gland. Ang II promoted aldosterone secretion which was partly attenuated by CGRP in the adrenocortical cell line, suggesting a protective role of CGRP in this model. Activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway was both inhibited by RDN especially in the heart. These results suggest that the regulation of the renal sympathetic nerve in Ang II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes is likely mediated by aldosterone, with CGRP involvement. PMID:27661131

  16. Angiotensin II Increased Neuronal Stem Cell Proliferation: Role of AT2R

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Yang, Lu; Buch, Shilpa; Gao, Lie

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), known a potent vasoactive substance in the renin-angiotensin system in the brain, plays a critical role in systemic blood pressure control. However, increasing evidence indicated that the physiological role of Ang II go beyond its vasoactive effect. In the present study, we demonstrated that Ang II type-1 receptor (AT1R) and type-2 receptor (AT2R) were expressed in primary rat hippocampal neuronal stem cells (NSCs). Treatment of rat hippocampal NSCs with Ang II increased cell proliferation. Pretreatment of NSCs with specific AT2R, but not AT1R, antagonist significantly suppressed Ang II-induced cell proliferation. Furthermore, Ang II stimulated ERK and Akt phosphorylation in NSCs. Pretreatment of MEK inhibitor, but not PI3K inhibitor, inhibited Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation as well as cell proliferation. In addition, stimulation of NSCs with Ang II decreased expression of KV 1.2/KV 3.1 channels and blocked K+ currents which lie downstream of ERK activation. Taken together, these findings underpin the role of AT2R as a novel target that regulates cell proliferation mediated by Ang II with implications for therapeutic intervention for regulation of neurogenesis. PMID:23691054

  17. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  18. Angiotensin II cell signaling: physiological and pathological effects in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja K; Griendling, Kathy K

    2007-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is a central component of the physiological and pathological responses of cardiovascular system. Its primary effector hormone, angiotensin II (ANG II), not only mediates immediate physiological effects of vasoconstriction and blood pressure regulation, but is also implicated in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. The myriad effects of ANG II depend on time (acute vs. chronic) and on the cells/tissues upon which it acts. In addition to inducing G protein- and non-G protein-related signaling pathways, ANG II, via AT(1) receptors, carries out its functions via MAP kinases (ERK 1/2, JNK, p38MAPK), receptor tyrosine kinases [PDGF, EGFR, insulin receptor], and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases [Src, JAK/STAT, focal adhesion kinase (FAK)]. AT(1)R-mediated NAD(P)H oxidase activation leads to generation of reactive oxygen species, widely implicated in vascular inflammation and fibrosis. ANG II also promotes the association of scaffolding proteins, such as paxillin, talin, and p130Cas, leading to focal adhesion and extracellular matrix formation. These signaling cascades lead to contraction, smooth muscle cell growth, hypertrophy, and cell migration, events that contribute to normal vascular function, and to disease progression. This review focuses on the structure and function of AT(1) receptors and the major signaling mechanisms by which angiotensin influences cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

  19. Effect of angiotensin II infusion on rhythmic clock gene expression and local renin-angiotensin system in the aorta of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Herichova, I; Zsoldosova, K; Vesela, A; Zeman, M

    2014-07-01

    Endogenous daily rhythms in physiology are regulated by the circadian system consisting of the central and peripheral components. The renin-angiotensin system, involved predominantly in water balance and blood pressure control, exerts 24 h rhythmicity in many of its parameters. The present study is aimed to study possible interactions between these two control systems. We analyzed effects induced by angiotensin II administration on clock gene expression in the aorta of rat and an ability of angiotensin II to influence the local tissue renin-angiotensin system. Angiotensin II was infused in a dose of 100 ng/kg/min by subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 28 days to male Wistar rats. Gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Angiotensin II administration resulted in an increase in blood pressure, heart weight/body weight index, and water intake in comparison with controls. We observed a significant phase advance in per2 and npas2 mRNA rhythms and decreased mesor of npas2 rhythmic expression in the aorta of angiotensin II-treated rats compared to control. Angiotensin II administration did not influence daily pattern and level of at1 mRNA expression. The ratio ace/ace2 showed a rhythmic pattern in the aorta of control rats with peak levels in the dark period. Angiotensin II infusion influenced clock gene expression and diminished a daily rhythm in ace/ace2 mRNA ratio indicating modulatory effect of angiotensin II on tissue renin-angiotensin system in the aorta.

  20. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α is critical for angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nayaab S; Song, Chi Young; Jennings, Brett L; Estes, Anne M; Fang, Xiao R; Bonventre, Joseph V; Malik, Kafait U

    2015-04-01

    Angiotensin II activates cytosolic phospholipase A(2)α (cPLA2α) and releases arachidonic acid from tissue phospholipids, which mediate or modulate ≥1 cardiovascular effects of angiotensin II and has been implicated in hypertension. Because arachidonic acid release is the rate limiting step in eicosanoid production, cPLA2α might play a central role in the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of angiotensin II infusion for 13 days by micro-osmotic pumps on systolic blood pressure and associated pathogenesis in wild type (cPLA2α(+/+)) and cPLA2α(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure in cPLA2α(+/+) mice was abolished in cPLA2α(-/-) mice; increased systolic blood pressure was also abolished by the arachidonic acid metabolism inhibitor, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid in cPLA2α(+/+) mice. Angiotensin II in cPLA2α(+/+) mice increased cardiac cPLA2 activity and urinary eicosanoid excretion, decreased cardiac output, caused cardiovascular remodeling with endothelial dysfunction, and increased vascular reactivity in cPLA2α(+/+) mice; these changes were diminished in cPLA2α(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II also increased cardiac infiltration of F4/80(+) macrophages and CD3(+) T lymphocytes, cardiovascular oxidative stress, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers p58(IPK), and CHOP in cPLA2α(+/+) but not cPLA2α(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased cardiac activity of ERK1/2 and cSrc in cPLA2α(+/+) but not cPLA2α(-/-) mice. These data suggest that angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes are mediated by cPLA2α activation, most likely through the release of arachidonic acid and generation of eicosanoids with predominant prohypertensive effects and activation of ≥1 signaling molecules, including ERK1/2 and cSrc. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Angiotensin II receptor blockers in the treatment of the cardiovascular disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2008-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease (CVD) continuum is a chain of events that begins with a host of risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, visceral obesity, and smoking. If left untreated, it might progress to atherosclerosis, left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, left ventricular remodeling, left ventricular enlargement, and eventually endstage heart disease and death. Initiation of treatment, at any stage in its course, might prevent or delay its further progression. This review discusses data from doubleblind, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have investigated the effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on various stages of the CVD continuum. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for relevant English-language double-blind RCTs using the years 1995 to 2008 and the terms angiotensin type II receptor blocker, renin-angiotensin system, hypertension, heart failure, left ventricular hypertropby, renal disease, stroke, and cerebrovascular disease. A total of 13 studies were included in this review. The results suggest that ARB-based therapy has cardioprotective, cerebroprotective, and renoprotective effects, including regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, reduction in the risk of stroke, and slowing of the progression of renal disease. Treatment of CVD risk factors, including hypertension, is increasingly recognized as a way to interrupt the CVD continuum. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to the development and progression of CVD, and RAS blockade has been reported to be beneficial at all stages of the CVD continuum.

  2. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) in renal and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chow, Bryna S M; Allen, Terri J

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is well-considered to be the principal effector of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which binds with strong affinity to the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1R) and type 2 (AT2R) receptor subtype. However, activation of both receptors is likely to stimulate different signalling mechanisms/pathways and produce distinct biological responses. The haemodynamic and non-haemodynamic effects of Ang II, including its ability to regulate blood pressure, maintain water-electrolyte balance and promote vasoconstriction and cellular growth are well-documented to be mediated primarily by the AT1R. However, its biological and functional effects mediated through the AT2R subtype are still poorly understood. Recent studies have emphasized that activation of the AT2R regulates tissue and organ development and provides in certain context a potential counter-regulatory mechanism against AT1R-mediated actions. Thus, this review will focus on providing insights into the biological role of the AT2R, in particular its actions within the renal and cardiovascular system. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Azilsartan: a newly approved angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sum

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic disease that leads to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Blood pressure control is essential to prevent end-organ complications, such as stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, or kidney disease. Azilsartan is the eighth angiotensin II receptor blocker approved for the management of hypertension, alone or in combination with other agents. At the approved dosage, it reduces systolic blood pressure by 12 to 15 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 7 to 8 mm Hg. A higher dose of azilsartan (80 mg) was superior to valsartan 320 mg or olmesartan 40 mg in lowering systolic blood pressure in short-term studies. Additional blood pressure reduction is expected when azilsartan is used adjunctively with a diuretic. However, the effects of azilsartan on cardiovascular morbidity or mortality are still lacking. Azilsartan is well tolerated; the most common side effects are headache and diarrhea. No cases of hyperkalemia have been reported in 6-week clinical trials. Worsening of renal function and hypotension should be monitored, particularly in those with baseline risk factors. It is unknown whether azilsartan would join angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other angiotensin receptor blockers as the preferred hypertensive agents for end-organ protection. At this time, azilsartan should be considered as an alternative agent for mild-to-moderate hypertension, or as an adjunctive therapy when preferred agents fail to maintain optimal blood pressure control. It is also an option for those patients who have contraindications or cannot tolerate other antihypertensive agents, including dry cough induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

  4. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  5. Strict angiotensin blockade prevents the augmentation of intrarenal angiotensin II and podocyte abnormalities in type 2 diabetic rats with microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Akira; Nakagawa, Toshitaka; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Yukiko; Okada, Noriyuki; Konishi, Yoshio; Morikawa, Takashi; Okumura, Michiaki; Meda, Isseiki; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Hosomi, Naohisa; Mori, Takefumi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Imanishi, Masahito

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Beneficial effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers have been indicated for patients with diabetic nephropathy. We investigated the effects of an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, telmisartan, on intrarenal angiotensin II levels and the progression of albuminuria or glomerular injury in type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with microalbuminuria. Methods and Results Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were randomly treated with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day, orally), hydralazine (25 mg/kg/day in drinking water) or vehicle from the initiation of albuminuria (13 weeks old). At this age, Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats showed low but detectable albuminuria (1.0±0.1 mg/day) and higher systolic blood pressure, postprandial blood glucose and kidney angiotensin II levels than age-matched nondiabetic Long–Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats. At 35 weeks of age, vehicle-treated Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats did not show apparent glomerular injury or tubulointerstitial fibrosis but did exhibit severe albuminuria (72.6±5.9 mg/day) and accumulation of cytoplasmic granules containing albumin in podocytes. Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats also showed higher systolic blood pressure, postprandial blood glucose, collagen gene expression, desmin staining (a marker of podocyte injury) and angiotensin II levels than Long–Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats. Treatment with telmisartan did not affect postprandial blood glucose but decreased systolic blood pressure, collagen gene expression, desmin staining and angiotensin II levels. Telmisartan also prevented the development of albuminuria (0.6±0.1 mg/day at 35 weeks old) and accumulation of cytoplasmic granules. Hydralazine treatment resulted in a similar reduction in systolic blood pressure and partially attenuated the albuminuria (35.4±1.8 mg/day at 35 weeks old) but did not affect the other parameters. Conclusion The present results suggest the contribution of

  6. AT2R autoantibodies block angiotensin II and AT1R autoantibody-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Liles, Campbell; Li, Hongliang; Veitla, Vineet; Liles, Jonathan T; Murphy, Taylor A; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Yu, Xichun; Kem, David C

    2015-10-01

    Activating autoantibodies to the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) are associated with hypertensive disorders. The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) is known to counter-regulate the actions of AT1R. We investigated whether AT2R autoantibodies produced in immunized rabbits will activate AT2R and suppress the vasopressor responses to angiotensin II and AT1R-activating autoantibodies. Five rabbits immunized with a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of AT2R developed high AT2R antibody titers. Rabbit anti-AT2R sera failed to directly dilate isolated rat cremaster arterioles; however, when co-perfused with angiotensin II or AT1R-activating autoantibodies, the anti-AT2R sera significantly inhibited their contractile effects. Rabbit anti-AT2R sera recognized a predominant sequence near the N-terminus of the AT2R second extracellular loop. A decoy peptide based on this sequence effectively reversed the opposing effect of the anti-AT2R sera on angiotensin II-induced contraction of rat cremaster arterioles. A similar blockade of the anti-AT2R sera effect was observed with the AT2R antagonist PD 123319 and the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. Rabbit anti-AT2R sera reacted specifically with AT2R. No cross-reactivity with AT1R was observed. Blood pressure did not change in immunized animals. However, the pressor responses to incremental angiotensin II infusions were blunted in immunized animals. Thirteen subjects with primary aldosteronism demonstrated increased AT2R autoantibody levels compared with normal controls. In conclusion, AT2R autoantibodies produced in immunized rabbits have the ability to activate AT2R and counteract the AT1R-mediated vasoconstriction. These autoantibodies provide useful and selective tools for the study of their roles in blood pressure regulation and possible therapeutic intervention. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. [Vasoprotective effects of statins and angiotensin II blockers in atherothrombosis].

    PubMed

    Egido, J; Ruiz-Ortega, M; Muñoz-García, B; Martín-Ventura, J L; Blanco-Colio, L M

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, including atherothrombosis, is the most frequent cause of mortality in the Western World. In the last years, major advances have been made in the pathogenesis of this disease. Currently, the drugs most widely used are the inhibitors of the HMG-CoA reductase (statins) and the antihypertensive drugs, mainly angiotensin II blockers. The first group has been shown to be effective on cardiovascular disease due to atherothrombosis, and the second group on hypertensive disease. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these two situations can improve with the concomitant use of both drugs.

  8. Angiotensin II stimulates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    King, Victoria L; English, Victoria L; Bharadwaj, Kalyani; Cassis, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission by regulating norepinephrine (NE) synthesis, release, and uptake. These effects of AngII contribute to cardiovascular control. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that chronic AngII infusion decreased body weight of rats. We hypothesized that AngII facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue and may thereby decrease body weight. The effect of chronic AngII infusion on the NE uptake transporter and NE turnover was examined in metabolic (interscapular brown adipose tissue, ISBAT; epididymal fat, EF) and cardiovascular tissues (left ventricle, LV; kidney) of rats. To examine the uptake transporter saturation isotherms were performed using [3H]nisoxetine (NIS). At doses that lowered body weight, AngII significantly increased ISBAT [3H]NIS binding density. To quantify NE turnover, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) was injected in saline-infused, AngII-infused, or saline-infused rats that were pair-fed to food intake of AngII-infused rats. AngII significantly increased the rate of NE decline in all tissues compared to saline. The rate of NE decline in EF was increased to a similar extent by AngII and by pair feeding. In rats administered AngII and propranolol, reductions in food and water intake and body weight were eliminated. These data support the hypothesis that AngII facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue. Increased sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue following AngII exposure is suggested to contribute to reductions in body weight. PMID:24224084

  9. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Rat Hepatic Fibrosis via Downregulating Angiotensin II Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Wang, Lina; Yan, Xiuchuan; Wang, Qinglan; Tao, Yanyan; Li, Junxia; Peng, Yuan; Liu, Ping; Liu, Chenghai

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in hepatic fibrosis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), one of the water-soluble components from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, has been used to treat hepatic fibrosis, but it is still not clear whether the effect of Sal B is related to angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling pathway. In the present study, we studied Sal B effect on rat liver fibrosis and Ang-II related signaling mediators in dimethylnitrosamine-(DMN-) induced rat fibrotic model in vivo and Ang-II stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in vitro, with perindopril or losartan as control drug, respectively. The results showed that Sal B and perindopril inhibited rat hepatic fibrosis and reduced expression of Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1R) and ERK activation in fibrotic liver. Sal B and losartan also inhibited Ang II-stimulated HSC activation including cell proliferation and expression of type I collagen I (Col-I) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) production in vitro, reduced the gene expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), and downregulated AT1R expression and ERK and c-Jun phosphorylation. In conclusion, our results indicate that Sal B may exert an antihepatic fibrosis effect via downregulating Ang II signaling in HSC activation. PMID:23243430

  10. Angiotensin II causes weight loss and decreases circulating insulin-like growth factor I in rats through a pressor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Brink, M; Wellen, J; Delafontaine, P

    1996-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system regulates normal cardiovascular homeostasis and is activated in certain forms of hypertension and in heart failure. Angiotensin II has multiple physiological effects and we have shown recently that its growth-promoting effects on vascular smooth muscle require autocrine activation of the IGF I receptor. To study the effect of angiotensin II on circulating IGF I, we infused rats with 500 ng/kg/min angiotensin II for up to 14 d. Angiotensin II markedly reduced plasma IGF I levels (56 and 41% decrease at 1 and 2 wk, respectively) and IGF binding protein-3 levels, and increased IGF binding protein-2 levels, a pattern suggestive of dietary restriction. Compared with sham, angiotensin II-infused hypertensive rats lost 18-26% of body weight by 1 wk, and pair-feeding experiments indicated that 74% of this loss was attributable to a reduction in food intake. The vasodilator hydralazine and the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan had comparable effects to reverse angiotensin II-induced hypertension, but only losartan blocked the changes in body weight and in circulating IGF I and its binding proteins produced by angiotensin II. Moreover, in Dahl rats that were hypertensive in response to a high-salt diet, none of these changes occurred. Thus, angiotensin II produces weight loss through a pressor-independent mechanism that includes a marked anorexigenic effect and an additional (likely metabolic) effect. These findings have profound implications for understanding the pathophysiology of conditions, such as congestive heart failure, in which the renin-angiotensin system is activated. PMID:8647943

  11. Knockdown of mineralocorticoid or angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus prevents angiotensin II hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aidong; Huang, Bing S; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2014-01-01

    Circulating Ang II activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) – angiotensin II (Ang II) – angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) pathway in the hypothalamus. To obtain insights into the actual neuronal projections involved, adeno-associated virus carrying small interfering RNA against either AT1aR (AAV-AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (AAV-MR-siRNA) were infused into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in Wistar rats. Intra-PVN infusion of AAV-AT1aR-siRNA or AAV-MR-siRNA decreased AT1R or MR expression in the PVN but not in the subfornical organ (SFO) or supraoptic nucleus (SON). Subcutaneous infusion of Ang II at 500 ng kg−1 min−1 for 2 weeks increased mean arterial pressure by 60–70 mmHg, and increased AT1R and MR expression in the SFO, SON and PVN. Intra-PVN AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R but not MR expression in the PVN, and MR-siRNA prevented MR but not AT1R expression in the PVN. The increases in AT1R and MR expression in both the SFO and the SON were not changed by the two AAV-siRNAs. Specific knockdown of AT1R or MR in the PVN by AAV-siRNA each prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension. Prevention of the subcutaneous Ang II-induced increase in MR but not the increase in AT1R by knockdown of MR and vice versa suggests an independent regulation of MR and AT1R expression in the PVN. Both AT1R and MR activation in the PVN play a critical role in Ang II-induced hypertension in rats. PMID:24973408

  12. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists and heart failure: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors remain the first-line option.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    (1) Some angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) reduce mortality in patients with heart failure (captopril, enalapril, ramipril and trandolapril), and in patients with recent myocardial infarction and heart failure or marked left ventricular dysfunction (captopril, ramipril and trandolapril). (2) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, otherwise known as angiotensin receptor blockers, have haemodynamic effects similar to ACE inhibitors, but differ in their mechanism of action and certain adverse effects. (3) Five clinical trials have evaluated angiotensin II receptor antagonists (candesartan, losartan and valsartan) in terms of their effect on mortality and on the risk of clinical deterioration in patients with symptomatic heart failure, but without severe renal failure, hyperkalemia or hypotension. In these trials, candesartan and valsartan were used at much higher doses than those recommended for the treatment of arterial hypertension. (4) In patients with heart failure who were not taking an angiotensin II receptor antagonist or an ACE inhibitor at enrollment, no significant difference was found between losartan and captopril in terms of mortality or the risk of clinical deterioration. (5) In patients with heart failure who had stopped taking an ACE inhibitor because of adverse effects, candesartan had no effect on mortality as compared with placebo, but it did reduce the risk of clinical deterioration (3 fewer hospitalisations per year per 100 patients). However, candesartan was associated with adverse effects such as renal failure and hyperkalemia, especially in patients who had experienced these same adverse effects while taking an ACE inhibitor. (6) In patients with heart failure who were already taking an ACE inhibitor, adjunctive candesartan or valsartan treatment did not influence mortality in comparison to the addition of a placebo. Adding candesartan or valsartan reduced the risk of hospitalisation (between 1 and 3 fewer hospitalisations

  13. The role of the renal effects of angiotensin II in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Young, D B; Lohmeier, T E; Hall, J E; Declue, J E; Bengis, R G; Coleman, T G; Guyton, A C

    1980-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is involved in many forms of clinical and experimental hypertension. Although angiotensin II has powerful vasoconstrictor properties, it is doubtful that any substance can produce sustained hypertension solely by increasing total peripheral resistance. Since the authors have demonstrated previously that alterations in the kidney's ability to excrete sodium can affect long-term arterial blood pressure regulation, they investigated angiotensin's effect on renal function in several experimental models. The results of these studies clearly demonstrate that angiotensin has a powerful direct antinatriuretic effect, the magnitude of which is sufficient to cause marked hypertension at angiotensin concentrations well within the pathophysiological range.

  14. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors.

  15. Angiotensin II (de)sensitization: Fluid intake studies with implications for cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and hypertension is the most common risk factor for death. Although many anti-hypertensive pharmacotherapies are approved for use in the United States, rates of hypertension have increased over the past decade. This review article summarizes a presentation given at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. The presentation described work performed in our laboratory that uses angiotensin II-induced drinking as a model system to study behavioral and cardiovascular effects of the renin-angiotensin system, a key component of blood pressure regulation, and a common target of anti-hypertensives. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a potent dipsogen, but the drinking response shows a rapid desensitization after repeated injections of AngII. This desensitization appears to be dependent upon the timing of the injections, requires activation of the AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor, requires activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members, and involves the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region as a critical site of action. Moreover, the response does not appear to be the result of a more general suppression of behavior, a sensitized pressor response to AngII, or an aversive state generated by the treatment. More recent studies suggest that the treatment regimen used to produce desensitization in our laboratory also prevents the sensitization that occurs after daily bolus injections of AngII. Our hope is that these findings can be used to support future basic research on the topic that could lead to new developments in treatments for hypertension.

  16. Purification of an angiotensin II binding protein by using antibodies to a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, T.S.; Dion, L.D.; Bost, K.L.; Oparil, S.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have generated a monospecific antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded by an RNA complementary to the mRNA for angiotensin II (AII) and determined whether this antibody recognizes the AII receptor. They demonstrate that the antibody competes specifically with /sup 125/I-labeled AII for the same binding site on rat adrenal membranes. Furthermore, they show this antibody inhibits the secretion of aldosterone from cultured rat adrenal cells, suggesting that the antibody recognizes the biologically relevant AII receptor. Finally, they demonstrate that antibody to the complementary peptide can be used to immunoaffinity-purify a protein of M/sub r/ 66,000 that specifically binds radiolabeled AII.

  17. Angiotensin II stimulates basolateral 50-pS K channels in the thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxiao; Luan, Haiyan; Wu, Peng; Fan, Lili; Wang, Lijun; Duan, Xinpeng; Zhang, Dandan; Wang, Wen-Hui; Gu, Ruimin

    2014-03-01

    We used the patch-clamp technique to examine the effect of angiotensin II (ANG II) on the basolateral K channels in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the rat kidney. Application of ANG II increased the channel activity and the current amplitude of the basolateral 50-pS K channel. The stimulatory effect of ANG II on the K channels was completely abolished by losartan, an inhibitor of type 1 angiotensin receptor (AT1R), but not by PD123319, an AT2R antagonist. Moreover, inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) also abrogated the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the basolateral K channels in the TAL. This suggests that the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the K channels was induced by activating PLC and PKC pathways. Western blotting demonstrated that ANG II increased the phosphorylation of c-Src at tyrosine residue 416, an indication of c-Src activation. This effect was mimicked by PKC stimulator but abolished by calphostin C. Moreover, inhibition of NADPH oxidase (NOX) also blocked the effect of ANG II on c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation. The role of Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in mediating the effect of ANG II on the basolateral K channel was further suggested by the experiments in which inhibition of SFK abrogated the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the basolateral 50-pS K channel. We conclude that ANG II increases basolateral 50-pS K channel activity via AT1R and that activation of AT1R stimulates SFK by a PLC-PKC-NOX-dependent mechanism.

  18. Hypotensive effect of angiotensin II after AT1-receptor blockade with losartan.

    PubMed

    Matys, T; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Recent data suggest that hypotensive effect of losartan may not be attributed solely to AT1-receptor blockade, but also to excessive AT2 or other receptors stimulation by elevated angiotensin II and its derivative peptides. Therefore in the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II on mean blood pressure after AT -receptor blockade with losartan. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetised and received injection of either losartan (30 mg/kg, 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or saline (the same volume and route) followed by bolus injection of angiotensin II (100, 300 or 1,000 ng/kg; 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or 1-hour infusion of angiotensin II (200 ng/kg/min; 2.5 ml/kg/h, i.v.). Control animals received saline instead. Angiotensin II, given either as the injection or the infusion, caused an evident increase in mean blood pressure (p ranged from 0.05 to 0.001 depending on the experimental group). Losartan caused a rapid drop in mean blood pressure and blunted the hypertensive effect of angiotensin II (p < 0.01). Moreover, in the losartan-pretreated animals the hypotensive phase was enhanced by the infusion, but not single injection of angiotensin II, which was most evident from the 30 th minute of observation (p < 0.05 vs control). In conclusion, hypotensive effect of losartan may be amplified by simultaneous increase in angiotensin II level, the situation observed during chronic AT1-receptor blockade.

  19. Molecular and cellular effects of azilsartan: a new generation angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Takashi; Ho, Christopher; Wang, Jiaming; Vilardi, Ryan; Kurtz, Theodore W

    2011-12-01

    Azilsartan medoxomil is a newly approved angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) reported to lower 24-h blood pressure more effectively than maximally recommended doses of older ARBs. Although azilsartan is considered to be an unusually potent angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, little is known about the potential pleiotropic effects of this molecule. We investigated pleiotropic features of azilsartan in cell-based assay systems independent of its effects on blood pressure. In cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, azilsartan enhanced adipogenesis and exerted greater effects than valsartan on expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), PPARδ, leptin, adipsin, and adiponectin. The effects of azilsartan on adipocyte differentiation and gene expression were observed at concentrations of azilsartan that did not classically stimulate PPAR activity in cell-based transactivation assays. Azilsartan also potently inhibited vascular cell proliferation in the absence of exogenously supplemented angiotensin II. In aortic endothelial cells, azilsartan inhibited cell proliferation at concentrations as low as 1 μmol/l, whereas valsartan showed little or no antiproliferative effects at concentrations below 10 μmol/l. Antiproliferative effects of azilsartan were also observed in cells lacking AT1 receptors. In addition, azilsartan, but not valsartan, blocked angiotensin II-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells 4-8 h after washout of drug from the incubation media. These findings suggest that azilsartan can function as a pleiotropic ARB with potentially beneficial effects on cellular mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease through actions that could involve more than just blockade of AT1 receptors and/or reduction in blood pressure.

  20. Endothelin-1, but not angiotensin II, induces afferent arteriolar myosin diphosphorylation as a potential contributor to prolonged vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Kosuke; Wang, Xuemei; Kathol, Iris; Loutzenhiser, Kathy; Loutzenhiser, Rodger; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    Bolus administration of endothelin-1 elicits long-lasting renal afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction, in contrast to transient constriction induced by angiotensin II. Vasoconstriction is generally evoked by myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation at Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), which is enhanced by Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). LC20 can be diphosphorylated at Ser19 and Thr18, resulting in reduced rates of dephosphorylation and relaxation. Here we tested whether LC20 diphosphorylation contributes to sustained endothelin-1 but not transient angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction. Endothelin-1 treatment of isolated arterioles elicited a concentration- and time-dependent increase in LC20 diphosphorylation at Thr18 and Ser19. Inhibition of MLCK or ROCK reduced endothelin-1-evoked LC20 mono- and diphosphorylation. Pretreatment with an ETB but not an ETA receptor antagonist abolished LC20 diphosphorylation, and an ETB receptor agonist induced LC20 diphosphorylation. In contrast, angiotensin II caused phosphorylation exclusively at Ser19. Thus, endothelin-1 and angiotensin II induce afferent arteriolar constriction via LC20 phosphorylation at Ser19 due to calcium activation of MLCK and ROCK-mediated inhibition of MLCP. Endothelin-1, but not angiotensin II, induces phosphorylation of LC20 at Thr18. This could contribute to the prolonged vasoconstrictor response to endothelin-1.

  1. Angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in Japanese elderly, high-risk, hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2012-10-01

    It is unknown whether high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy or angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker combination therapy is better in elderly hypertensive patients with high cardiovascular risk. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of these treatments in elderly, high-risk Japanese hypertensive patients. The OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-end point study of 1164 hypertensive patients aged 65 to 84 years with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension during treatment with olmesartan 20 mg/d were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg/d olmesartan (high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker) or a calcium channel blocker + 20 mg/d olmesartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death. During a 3-year follow-up, blood pressure was significantly lower in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group than in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group. Mean blood pressure at 36 months was 135.0/74.3 mm Hg in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group and 132.6/72.6 mm Hg in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group. More primary end points occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group than in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group (58 vs 48 events, hazard ratio [HR], 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.92; P=.17). In patients with cardiovascular disease at baseline, more primary events occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group (HR, 1.63, P=.03); in contrast, fewer events were observed in the subgroup without cardiovascular disease (HR, 0.52, P=.14). This treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant (P=.02). The angiotensin II receptor blocker and

  2. Identification and characterization of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was demonstrated by radioligand binding. A single class of finding sites with a K/sub D/ of 0.7 nM was characterized. The use of radioligands also allows the localization of receptors by autoradiography. Autoradiography demonstrated that approximately 50% of the isolated cells bound angiotensin II. It was of interest to see if angiotensin II bound to a cell that possessed a certain phenotype. In order to evaluate this possibility a technique was developed that combined autoradiography and immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that angiotensin II binding sites were not localized preferentially to either norepinephrine or epinephrine cells. Binding of angiotensin II was associated with the release of intracellular catecholamine stores. Cells were pre-loaded with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and secretion was monitored by following radioactivity released into the supernatant. Alternatively, release of endogenous catecholamines was determined by fluorometric assay.

  3. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  4. Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme activity in cultured endothelial cells by hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Stalcup, S A; Lipset, J S; Woan, J M; Leuenberger, P; Mellins, R B

    1979-01-01

    Endothelial cells in tissue culture degrade bradykinin and convert angiotensin I to angiotensin II. These are both functions of a single dipeptidyl hydrolase, angiotensin converting enzyme. Monolayer cultures were prepared from human, rabbit, pig, and calf vessels. Angiotensin converting enzyme activity was assessed by adding either bradykinin or angiotensin I to the cells in culture flasks, and measuring residual peptide over time by radioimmunoassay. Peptide degradation was inhibited by the specific converting enzyme inhibitor, SQ 20881. The flasks were equilibrated with varying hypoxic gas mixtures: hypoxia rapidly (less than 2 min) decreased enzyme activity and room air restored it as rapidly. The extent to which activity was reduced was a direct function of PO2 (r = 0.93, P less than 0.001), and there was no enzyme activity below a PO2 of 30 mm Hg. Four preparations were studied with respect to decrease in enzyme activity by hypoxia: (a) intact cells in monolayer, (b) sonicated cells, (c) sonicated cells from which converting enzyme was partially dissolved by a detergent, and (d) purified converting enzyme. Hypoxia had progressively less of an inhibiting effect on the enzyme activity of the preparations as the degree of cell integrity decreased. Hypoxia inhibits angiotensin converting enzyme activity in cultured endothelial cells, but the effect of hypoxia is not on the enzyme per se, but appears to be a unique characteristic of the endothelial cell. Images PMID:221532

  5. Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme activity in cultured endothelial cells by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Stalcup, S A; Lipset, J S; Woan, J M; Leuenberger, P; Mellins, R B

    1979-05-01

    Endothelial cells in tissue culture degrade bradykinin and convert angiotensin I to angiotensin II. These are both functions of a single dipeptidyl hydrolase, angiotensin converting enzyme. Monolayer cultures were prepared from human, rabbit, pig, and calf vessels. Angiotensin converting enzyme activity was assessed by adding either bradykinin or angiotensin I to the cells in culture flasks, and measuring residual peptide over time by radioimmunoassay. Peptide degradation was inhibited by the specific converting enzyme inhibitor, SQ 20881. The flasks were equilibrated with varying hypoxic gas mixtures: hypoxia rapidly (less than 2 min) decreased enzyme activity and room air restored it as rapidly. The extent to which activity was reduced was a direct function of PO2 (r = 0.93, P less than 0.001), and there was no enzyme activity below a PO2 of 30 mm Hg. Four preparations were studied with respect to decrease in enzyme activity by hypoxia: (a) intact cells in monolayer, (b) sonicated cells, (c) sonicated cells from which converting enzyme was partially dissolved by a detergent, and (d) purified converting enzyme. Hypoxia had progressively less of an inhibiting effect on the enzyme activity of the preparations as the degree of cell integrity decreased. Hypoxia inhibits angiotensin converting enzyme activity in cultured endothelial cells, but the effect of hypoxia is not on the enzyme per se, but appears to be a unique characteristic of the endothelial cell.

  6. Effect of angiotensin II and captopril on renal tubular function in man.

    PubMed Central

    Düsing, R; Moritz, J; Glänzer, K; Kramer, H J

    1985-01-01

    The effects of nonpressor doses of intravenous angiotensin II and of the converting enzyme inhibitor captopril on renal excretory function were investigated in eight healthy volunteers during sustained water diuresis on a constant intake of 150 mmol sodium per day. The angiotensin II-analogue val5-angiotensin II-asp1-beta-amide was infused i.v. at an average dose of 2.6 ng kg-1 min-1 which was the highest dose without a significant effect on arterial blood pressure. This subpressor dose of angiotensin II significantly decreased urine volume, urinary excretion of sodium, chloride and phosphate and distal delivery [(CH2O + CCl)/GFR X 100] in the absence of changes in GFR or distal fractional chloride absorption [CH2O/(CH2O + CCl)]. In a second series of experiments, an oral dose of 50 mg of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril was given to the sodium replete volunteers. In this study, captopril did not affect arterial blood pressure, GFR or any of the determined parameters of renal tubular function. Our results strongly suggest that the nonpressor dose of angiotensin II induced renal retention of sodium chloride via increased absorption in the proximal tubule. Thus, they further support the concept that angiotensin II participates in the regulation of renal sodium chloride excretion by affecting proximal tubular absorptive capacity. However, in the sodium replete stage, angiotensin II is of no major importance in regulating sodium chloride excretion. PMID:3884028

  7. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Renita E.; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics. PMID:26808388

  8. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Horton, Renita E; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L; Sheehy, Sean P; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.

  9. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J; Bonventre, Joseph V; Siedlecki, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 min injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 min unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury, blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild-type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild-type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 h after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant RANTES, a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared with transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 min injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation.

  10. Role of the NADPH oxidases in the subfornical organ in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lob, Heinrich E; Schultz, David; Marvar, Paul J; Davisson, Robin L; Harrison, David G

    2013-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species and the NADPH oxidases contribute to hypertension via mechanisms that remain undefined. Reactive oxygen species produced in the central nervous system have been proposed to promote sympathetic outflow, inflammation, and hypertension, but the contribution of the NADPH oxidases to these processes in chronic hypertension is uncertain. We therefore sought to identify how NADPH oxidases in the subfornical organ (SFO) of the brain regulate blood pressure and vascular inflammation during sustained hypertension. We produced mice with loxP sites flanking the coding region of the NADPH oxidase docking subunit p22(phox). SFO-targeted injections of an adenovirus encoding cre-recombinase markedly diminished p22(phox), Nox2, and Nox4 mRNA in the SFO, as compared with a control adenovirus encoding red-fluorescent protein injection. Increased superoxide production in the SFO by chronic angiotensin II infusion (490 ng/kg min(-1) × 2 weeks) was blunted in adenovirus encoding cre-recombinase-treated mice, as detected by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Deletion of p22(phox) in the SFO eliminated the hypertensive response observed at 2 weeks of angiotensin II infusion compared with control adenovirus encoding red-fluorescent protein-treated mice (mean arterial pressures=97 ± 15 versus 154 ± 6 mm Hg, respectively; P=0.0001). Angiotensin II infusion also promoted marked vascular inflammation, as characterized by accumulation of activated T-cells and other leukocytes, and this was prevented by deletion of the SFO p22(phox). These experiments definitively identify the NADPH oxidases in the SFO as a critical determinant of the blood pressure and vascular inflammatory responses to chronic angiotensin II, and further support a role of reactive oxygen species in central nervous system signaling in hypertension.

  11. Pentaerithrityl tetranitrate improves angiotensin II induced vascular dysfunction via induction of heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmacher, Swenja; Wenzel, Philip; Schulz, Eberhard; Oelze, Matthias; Mang, Christian; Kamuf, Jens; Gori, Tommaso; Jansen, Thomas; Knorr, Maike; Karbach, Susanne; Hortmann, Marcus; Mäthner, Falk; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrate pentaerithrityl tetranitrate treatment is devoid of nitrate tolerance, which has been attributed to the induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1. With the present study we tested, whether chronic treatment with pentaerithrityl tetranitrate can improve angiotensin-II induced vascular oxidative stress and dysfunction. In contrast to isosorbide-5-mononitrate (75mg/kg/d/7d), treatment with pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (15mg/kg/d/7d) improved the impaired endothelial and smooth muscle function and normalized vascular and cardiac reactive oxygen species production (mitochondria, NADPH oxidase activity and uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase) as assessed by dihydroethidine staining, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and quantification of dihydroethidine oxidation products in angiotensin-II (1mg/kg/d/7d) treated rats. The antioxidant features of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate were recapitulated in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In addition to increase in heme oxygenase-1 protein expression, pentaerithrityl tetranitrate but not isosorbide-5-mononitrate normalized vascular reactive oxygen species formation, augmented aortic protein levels of the tetrahydrobiopterin-synthesizing enzymes GTP-cyclohydrolase-I and dihydrofolate reductase in angiotensin-II treated rats, thereby preventing endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. Knockout of heme oxygenase-1 completely abolished the beneficial effects of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate in angiotensin-II treated mice, whereas heme oxygenase-1 induction by hemin (25mg/kg) mimicked the effect of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate. Improvement of vascular function in this particular model of arterial hypertension by pentaerithrityl tetranitrate largely depends on the induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 and identifies pentaerithrityl tetranitrate, in contrast to isosorbide-5-mononitrate, as an organic nitrate being able to improve rather than to worsen endothelial function. PMID

  12. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate improves angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction via induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Swenja; Wenzel, Philip; Schulz, Eberhard; Oelze, Matthias; Mang, Christian; Kamuf, Jens; Gori, Tommaso; Jansen, Thomas; Knorr, Maike; Karbach, Susanne; Hortmann, Marcus; Mäthner, Falk; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    The organic nitrate pentaerythritol tetranitrate is devoid of nitrate tolerance, which has been attributed to the induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. With the present study, we tested whether chronic treatment with pentaerythritol tetranitrate can improve angiotensin II-induced vascular oxidative stress and dysfunction. In contrast to isosorbide-5 mononitrate (75 mg/kg per day for 7 days), treatment with pentaerythritol tetranitrate (15 mg/kg per day for 7 days) improved the impaired endothelial and smooth muscle function and normalized vascular and cardiac reactive oxygen species production (mitochondria, NADPH oxidase activity, and uncoupled endothelial NO synthase), as assessed by dihydroethidine staining, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence, and quantification of dihydroethidine oxidation products in angiotensin II (1 mg/kg per day for 7 days)-treated rats. The antioxidant features of pentaerythritol tetranitrate were recapitulated in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In addition to an increase in HO-1 protein expression, pentaerythritol tetranitrate but not isosorbide-5 mononitrate normalized vascular reactive oxygen species formation and augmented aortic protein levels of the tetrahydrobiopterin-synthesizing enzymes GTP-cyclohydrolase I and dihydrofolate reductase in angiotensin II-treated rats, thereby preventing endothelial NO synthase uncoupling. Haploinsufficiency of HO-1 completely abolished the beneficial effects of pentaerythritol tetranitrate in angiotensin II-treated mice, whereas HO-1 induction by hemin (25 mg/kg) mimicked the effect of pentaerythritol tetranitrate. Improvement of vascular function in this particular model of arterial hypertension by pentaerythritol tetranitrate largely depends on the induction of the antioxidant enzyme HO-1 and identifies pentaerythritol tetranitrate, in contrast to isosorbide-5 mononitrate, as an organic nitrate able to improve rather than to worsen endothelial function.

  13. The Cooperative Effect of Local Angiotensin-II in Liver with Adriamycin Hepatotoxicity on Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Eylem; Guven, Celal; Sahin, Leyla; Dursun, Nurcan

    2016-03-28

    Adriamycin (ADR) is a drug used clinically for anticancer treatment; however, it causes adverse effects in the liver. The mechanism by which these adverse effects occur remains unclear, impeding efforts to enhance the therapeutic effects of ADR. Its hepatotoxicity might be related to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. The interaction between ADR and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the liver is unclear. ADR might activate the RAS. Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) leads to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study we investigated whether ADR's hepatotoxicity interacts with local RAS in causing oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat liver. Rats were divided into 5 groups: control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril, co-treated ADR with Aliskiren, and co-treated ADR with both captopril and Aliskiren. Mitochondria and cytosol were separated from the liver, then biochemical measurements were made from them. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were evaluated. ADR remarkably decreased MMP and ATP in liver mitochondria (p<0.05). Co-administration with ADR and Aliskiren and captopril improved the dissipation of MMP (p<0.05). The decreased ATP level was restored by treatment with inhibitors of ACE and renin. Angiotensin-II may contribute to hepatotoxicity of in the ADR via mitochondrial oxidative production, resulting in the attenuation of MMP and ATP production.

  14. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  15. The Cooperative Effect of Local Angiotensin-II in Liver with Adriamycin Hepatotoxicity on Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Taskin, Eylem; Guven, Celal; Sahin, Leyla; Dursun, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Background Adriamycin (ADR) is a drug used clinically for anticancer treatment; however, it causes adverse effects in the liver. The mechanism by which these adverse effects occur remains unclear, impeding efforts to enhance the therapeutic effects of ADR. Its hepatotoxicity might be related to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. The interaction between ADR and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the liver is unclear. ADR might activate the RAS. Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) leads to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study we investigated whether ADR’s hepatotoxicity interacts with local RAS in causing oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat liver. Material/Methods Rats were divided into 5 groups: control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril, co-treated ADR with Aliskiren, and co-treated ADR with both captopril and Aliskiren. Mitochondria and cytosol were separated from the liver, then biochemical measurements were made from them. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were evaluated. Results ADR remarkably decreased MMP and ATP in liver mitochondria (p<0.05). Co-administration with ADR and Aliskiren and captopril improved the dissipation of MMP (p<0.05). The decreased ATP level was restored by treatment with inhibitors of ACE and renin. Conclusions Angiotensin-II may contribute to hepatotoxicity of in the ADR via mitochondrial oxidative production, resulting in the attenuation of MMP and ATP production. PMID:27019222

  16. A review of mutagenesis studies of angiotensin II type 1 receptor, the three-dimensional receptor model in search of the agonist and antagonist binding site and the hypothesis of a receptor activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y; Nakamura, N; Inagami, T

    1997-07-01

    To seek the mechanism whereby agonists, competitive antagonists and insurmountable antagonists affect the receptor function differently, by reviewing recent mutagenesis studies of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) in which the binding of the agonist and antagonists and receptor signaling were affected. We built a model of seven transmembrane spanning domains of the AT1 receptors using bacteriorhodopsin as a template. The carboxy terminal of angiotensin II binds to Lys199 in transmembrane domain 5, whereas the guanidinium group of Arg2 binds to Asp281 in transmembrane domain 7. Results of studies using mutagenesis supporting proposed ligand-docking models are discussed. HYPOTHESIS FOR THE LIGAND-INDUCED RECEPTOR SIGNALING MECHANISM: We submit a set of hypotheses for a mechanism whereby the ligand binding induces changes in the receptor conformation by the rotation of transmembrane helices as the initial event for the subsequent activation of a G protein. In this mechanism antagonists are not capable of rotating the helices but agonists are able to do so, which results in the formation of a hydrogen bond between Asp74 in transmembrane domain 2 and Tyr292 in transmembrane domain 7. This mechanism also provides plausible explanation for the activation of monoamine receptors. Competitive antagonists share the same binding sites with agonists, but insurmountable antagonists do not, and binding of the latter does not preclude agonist binding, for example, to Asp281. This hypothesis of the intrareceptor signaling mechanism and the receptor model indicate that some amino acid residues essential for the signaling play their roles in the intrareceptor activation mechanism, whereas others participate directly in ligand binding.

  17. Regulation of L-type inward calcium channel activity by captopril and angiotensin II via the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase pathway in cardiomyocytes from volume-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Alvin, Zikiar; Laurence, Graham G.; Coleman, Bernell R; Zhao, Aiqiu; Hajj-Moussa, Majd; Haddad, Georges E.

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure can be caused by pro-hypertrophic humoral factors such as angiotensin II (Ang II), which regulates protein kinase activities. The intermingled responses of these kinases lead to the early compensated cardiac hypertrophy, but later to the uncompensated phase of heart failure. We have shown that although beneficial, cardiac hypertrophy is associated with modifications in ion channels that are mainly mediated through mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. This study evaluates the control of L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) by the Ang II/PI3K pathway in hypertrophied ventricular myocytes from volume-overload rats using the perforated patch-clamp technique. To assess activation of the ICa,L in cardiomyocytes, voltages of 350 ms in 10 mV increments from a holding potential of −85 mV were applied to cardiocytes, with a pre-pulse to −45 mV for 300 ms. Volume overload-induced hypertrophy reduces ICa,L, whereas addition of Ang II alleviates the hypertrophic-induced decrease in a PI3K-dependent manner. Acute administration of Ang II (10−6 mol/L) to normal adult cardiomyocytes had no effect; however, captopril reduced their basal ICa,L. In parallel, captopril regressed the hypertrophy and inverted the Ang II effect on ICa,L seemingly through a PI3K upstream effector. Thus, it seems that regression of cardiac hypertrophy by captopril improved ICa,L partly through PI3K. PMID:21423294

  18. Angiotensin II enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through the interaction between activated hepatic stellate cells and the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakamura, Keishi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shinichi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated by angiotensin II (AngII) facilitate stromal fibrosis and tumor progression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AngII has been known as a growth factor which can promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells. However, in the past, the relationship between AngII and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the microenvironment around cancer and the role of AngII on EMT of cancer cells has not been reported in detail. SDF-1 and its specific receptor, CXCR4, are now receiving attention as a mechanism of cell progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined whether activated HSCs promote tumor fibrogenesis, tumor progression and distant metastasis by mediating EMT via the AngII/AngII type 1 receptor (AT-1) and the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Two human ICC cell lines and a human HSC line, LI-90, express CXCR4. Significantly higher concentration of SDF-1α was released into the supernatant of LI-90 cells to which AngII had been added. SDF-1α increased the proliferative activity of HSCs and enhanced the activation of HSCs as a growth factor. Furthermore, addition of SDF-1α and AngII enhanced the increase of the migratory capability and vimentin expression, reduced E-cadherin expression, and translocated the expression of β-catenin into the nucleus and cytoplasm in ICC cells. Co-culture with HSCs also enhanced the migratory capability of ICC cells. These findings suggest that SDF-1α, released from activated HSCs and AngII, play important roles in cancer progression, tumor fibrogenesis, and migration in autocrine and paracrine fashion by mediating EMT. Our mechanistic findings may provide pivotal insights into the molecular mechanism of the AngII and SDF-1α-initiated signaling pathway that regulates fibrogenesis in cancerous stroma, tumor progression and meta-stasis of tumor cells expressing AT-1 and CXCR4.

  19. miR-34a Modulates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy by Direct Inhibition of ATG9A Expression and Autophagic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Ye, Jing; Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; You, Xiangyu; Liu, Benrong; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by thickening myocardium and decreasing in heart chamber volume in response to mechanical or pathological stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. This study investigated altered miRNA expression and autophagic activity in pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was used and confirmed by heart morphology, induction of cardiomyocyte autophagy, altered expression of autophagy-related ATG9A, LC3 II/I and p62 proteins, and decrease in miR-34a expression. The in vitro data showed that in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by Ang II, miR-34a expression was downregulated, whereas ATG9A expression was up-regulated. Moreover, miR-34a was able to bind to ATG9A 3′-UTR, but not to the mutated 3′-UTR and inhibited ATG9A protein expression and autophagic activity. The latter was evaluated by autophagy-related LC3 II/I and p62 levels, TEM, and flow cytometry in rat cardiomyocytes. In addition, ATG9A expression induced either by treatment of rat cardiomyocytes with Ang II or ATG9A cDNA transfection upregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in both morphology and expression of hypertrophy-related genes (i.e., ANP and β-MHC), whereas knockdown of ATG9A expression downregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, miR-34a antagonized Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy, whereas inhibition of miR-34a expression aggravated Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy (such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy-related ANP and β-MHC expression and cardiomyocyte morphology). This study indicates that miR-34a plays a role in regulation of Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity. PMID:24728149

  20. The Hippo pathway is controlled by Angiotensin II signaling and its reactivation induces apoptosis in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wennmann, D O; Vollenbröker, B; Eckart, A K; Bonse, J; Erdmann, F; Wolters, D A; Schenk, L K; Schulze, U; Kremerskothen, J; Weide, T; Pavenstädt, H

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo pathway fulfills a crucial function in controlling the balance between proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in cells. Recent studies showed that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) serve as upstream regulators of Hippo signaling, that either activate or inactivate the Hippo pathway via the large tumor suppressor kinase (LATS) and its substrate, the co-transcription factor Yes-associated protein (YAP). In this study, we focused on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), which belongs to the GPCR family and has an essential role in the control of blood pressure and water homeostasis. We found that Angiotensin II (Ang II) inactivates the pathway by decreasing the activity of LATS kinase; therefore, leading to an enhanced nuclear shuttling of unphosphorylated YAP in HEK293T cells. This shuttling of YAP is actin-dependent as disruption of the actin cytoskeleton inhibited dephosphorylation of LATS and YAP. Interestingly, in contrast to HEK293T cells, podocytes, which are a crucial component of the glomerular filtration barrier, display a predominant nuclear YAP localization in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, stimulation with Ang II did not alter Hippo pathway activity in podocytes, which show a deactivated pathway. Reactivation of the LATS kinase activity in podocytes resulted in an increased cytoplasmic YAP localization accompanied by a strong induction of apoptosis. Thus, our work indicates that the control of LATS activation and subsequent YAP localization is important for podocyte homeostasis and survival. PMID:25393475

  1. Chronic blockade of angiotensin II formation during sodium deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Smith, M J; Coleman, T G

    1979-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) regulates arterial pressure (AP) and renal function during chronic sodium deprivation. Intravenous infusion of the converting enzyme inhibitor SQ 14225 (14 microgram.kg-1.mm-1) for 8 days in 12 sodium-deficient dogs caused a marked decrease in AP from 90 +/- 1 to 67 +/- 2 mmHg and a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), filtration fraction (FF), and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC). Despite the fall in AP and GFR, urinary Na excretion and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) increased above control levels. In four dogs, infusion of aldosterone (200 micrograms/day) for 8 days during continuous SQ 14225 infusion restored PAC to levels above control, but did not significantly change AP or renal function from the values observed during SQ 14225 infusion alone. However, infusion of angiotensin II (AII) (10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1) for 5--8 days during continuous SQ 14225 infusion almost completely restored AP and renal function to control levels. These data indicate that the RAS plays a major role in regulating AP, renal hemodynamics, and Na excretion during Na deprivation, probably through the direct effects of AII rather than through changes in PAC.

  2. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. VITAMIN D AND THE VASCULAR SENSITIVITY TO ANGIOTENSIN II IN OBESE CAUCASIANS WITH HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand; Forman, John P.; Williams, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and vitamin D deficiency have both been linked to augmented activity of the tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We investigated whether obesity status influenced the relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and vascular RAS activity. 25(OH)D levels were measured in hypertensive obese (n=39) and hypertensive non-obese (n=58) Caucasian individuals. RAS activity was assessed via plasma renin activity, and evaluation of the vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II (AngII) using the mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to an infusion of AngII. Among obese subjects, 25(OH)D was an independent positive predictor of the MAP response to AngII (β = 0.70, r = 0.41, p < 0.01); lower 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a blunted MAP response to AngII. In contrast, 25(OH)D did not significantly predict the vascular sensitivity to AngII in non-obese subjects (β = 0.10, r = 0.07, p = 0.62). A multivariable adjusted interaction model confirmed that the positive relationship between 25(OH)D and the vascular sensitivity to AngII strengthened with obesity (p-interaction = 0.03). These findings demonstrate a positive association between 25(OH)D and the vascular sensitivity to AngII in obese hypertensives, and further suggest that vascular RAS activity may progressively increase when 25(OH)D deficiency occurs in obesity. Future studies to evaluate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on vascular RAS activity in obesity are needed. PMID:21124341

  4. Angiotensin II enhances endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction through upregulating endothelin type A receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Jie; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Juan, Chi-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chen, Chin-Chang; Ho, Low-Tone

    2014-08-22

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is the most potent vasoconstrictor by binding to endothelin receptors (ETAR) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The complex of angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang II type one receptor (AT1R) acts as a transient constrictor of VSMCs. The synergistic effect of ET-1 and Ang II on blood pressure has been observed in rats; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesize that Ang II leads to enhancing ET-1-mediated vasoconstriction through the activation of endothelin receptor in VSMCs. The ET-1-induced vasoconstriction, ET-1 binding, and endothelin receptor expression were explored in the isolated endothelium-denuded aortae and A-10 VSMCs. Ang II pretreatment enhanced ET-1-induced vasoconstriction and ET-1 binding to the aorta. Ang II enhanced ETAR expression, but not ETBR, in aorta and increased ET-1 binding, mainly to ETAR in A-10 VSMCs. Moreover, Ang II-enhanced ETAR expression was blunted and ET-1 binding was reduced by AT1R antagonism or by inhibitors of PKC or ERK individually. In conclusion, Ang II enhances ET-1-induced vasoconstriction by upregulating ETAR expression and ET-1/ETAR binding, which may be because of the AngII/Ang II receptor pathways and the activation of PKC or ERK. These findings suggest the synergistic effect of Ang II and ET-1 on the pathogenic development of hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanism of pulmonary conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II in the dog.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oparil, S.; Tregear, G. W.; Koerner, T.; Barnes, B. A.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    The conversion mechanism was studied in vivo in the pulmonary circulation of the intact anesthetized dog and in vitro in plasma by using L-Leu-angiotensin I, D-Leu-angiotensin I, and des-Leu-angiotensin I which had been synthesized by the solid-phase technique. The results obtained indicate that pulmonary conversion in vivo and plasma conversion in vitro occur via a dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase and that a D-amino acid at the C-terminus prevents conversion.

  6. Opposite effects of angiotensin II and nitric oxide on neurons in the duck subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Schmid, H A; Schäfer, F; Simon, E

    1995-03-10

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is known to activate neurons in the subfornical organ (SFO) of mammals and birds and this activation is regarded as the basis for the ANGII induced increase in water intake. Application of the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside inhibited the activity in 10 out of 12 duck SFO neurons, 8 of which were in addition excited by ANGII. These data, in combination with the histochemical detection of NO synthase in the duck SFO, demonstrate the involvement of NO in SFO mediated responses and might represent the cellular basis for the observed opposite effects of ANGII and NO on water intake.

  7. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor regulates ROMK-like K+ channel activity in the renal cortical collecting duct during high dietary K+ adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi; Zavilowitz, Beth; Ren, Jin; Liu, Wen; Chan, Pokman; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Estilo, Genevieve; Jackson, Edwin K.; Wang, Wen-Hui; Satlin, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    The kidney adjusts K+ excretion to match intake in part by regulation of the activity of apical K+ secretory channels, including renal outer medullary K+ (ROMK)-like K+ channels, in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). ANG II inhibits ROMK channels via the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) during dietary K+ restriction. Because AT1Rs and ANG II type 2 receptors (AT2Rs) generally function in an antagonistic manner, we sought to characterize the regulation of ROMK channels by the AT2R. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ANG II increased ROMK channel activity in CCDs isolated from high-K+ (HK)-fed but not normal K+ (NK)-fed rats. This response was blocked by PD-123319, an AT2R antagonist, but not by losartan, an AT1R antagonist, and was mimicked by the AT2R agonist CGP-42112. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase is present in CCD cells that express ROMK channels. Blockade of NO synthase with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and free NO with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt completely abolished ANG II-stimulated ROMK channel activity. NO enhances the synthesis of cGMP, which inhibits phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that normally degrade cAMP; cAMP increases ROMK channel activity. Pretreatment of CCDs with IBMX, a broad-spectrum PDE inhibitor, or cilostamide, a PDE3 inhibitor, abolished the stimulatory effect of ANG II on ROMK channels. Furthermore, PKA inhibitor peptide, but not an activator of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), also prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II. We conclude that ANG II acts at the AT2R to stimulate ROMK channel activity in CCDs from HK-fed rats, a response opposite to that mediated by the AT1R in dietary K+-restricted animals, via a NO/cGMP pathway linked to a cAMP-PKA pathway. PMID:25100281

  8. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor regulates ROMK-like K⁺ channel activity in the renal cortical collecting duct during high dietary K⁺ adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Liao, Yi; Zavilowitz, Beth; Ren, Jin; Liu, Wen; Chan, Pokman; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Estilo, Genevieve; Jackson, Edwin K; Wang, Wen-Hui; Satlin, Lisa M

    2014-10-01

    The kidney adjusts K⁺ excretion to match intake in part by regulation of the activity of apical K⁺ secretory channels, including renal outer medullary K⁺ (ROMK)-like K⁺ channels, in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). ANG II inhibits ROMK channels via the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) during dietary K⁺ restriction. Because AT1Rs and ANG II type 2 receptors (AT2Rs) generally function in an antagonistic manner, we sought to characterize the regulation of ROMK channels by the AT2R. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ANG II increased ROMK channel activity in CCDs isolated from high-K⁺ (HK)-fed but not normal K⁺ (NK)-fed rats. This response was blocked by PD-123319, an AT2R antagonist, but not by losartan, an AT1R antagonist, and was mimicked by the AT2R agonist CGP-42112. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase is present in CCD cells that express ROMK channels. Blockade of NO synthase with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and free NO with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt completely abolished ANG II-stimulated ROMK channel activity. NO enhances the synthesis of cGMP, which inhibits phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that normally degrade cAMP; cAMP increases ROMK channel activity. Pretreatment of CCDs with IBMX, a broad-spectrum PDE inhibitor, or cilostamide, a PDE3 inhibitor, abolished the stimulatory effect of ANG II on ROMK channels. Furthermore, PKA inhibitor peptide, but not an activator of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), also prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II. We conclude that ANG II acts at the AT2R to stimulate ROMK channel activity in CCDs from HK-fed rats, a response opposite to that mediated by the AT1R in dietary K⁺-restricted animals, via a NO/cGMP pathway linked to a cAMP-PKA pathway.

  9. The blocking of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and RhoA/Rho kinase activity in hypertensive patients: Effect of olmesartan medoxomil and implication with cardiovascular-renal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ravarotto, Verdiana; Pagnin, Elisa; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Fragasso, Antonio; Carraro, Gianni; Rossi, Barbara; Calò, Lorenzo A

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiological role of oxidative stress (OxSt) in hypertension and target organ damage is recognized. Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces OxSt via NAD(P)H oxidase activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines/growth factors leading to cardiovascular-renal remodeling. Ang II stimulates the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway, which is deeply involved in the development of cardiovascular-renal remodeling via OxSt induction. Olmesartan, an Ang II type 1 receptor blocker, possesses antioxidant and activating nitric oxide system-related effects, which we have shown in terms of p22(phox) reduction, heme oxygenase-1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide increase. This study evaluates in 15 untreated hypertensive patients the effect of olmesartan treatment on p63RhoGEF, key in Ang II-induced ROCK activation, and MYPT-1 phosphorylation, a marker of ROCK activity. The p63RhoGEF protein level and MYPT-1 phosphorylation (Western blot) were evaluated at baseline, and after three and six months of olmesartan treatment. Olmesartan normalized systolic and diastolic BP (p < 0.001), reduced p63RhoGEF level: 1.3±0.25 d.u. (baseline) vs 1.0±0.29 (three months), p < 0.0001 vs 1.0±0.22, (six months), p < 0.0001 and MYPT-1 phosphorylation: 1.2 ±0.14 (baseline) vs 0.9±0.19 (three months), p = 0.008, vs 0.8±0.16 (six months), p = 0.001. These data added to our previous results further provide a mechanistic rationale for olmesartan's antioxidant/anti-inflammatory potential translation, in the long term, toward anti-atherosclerotic/anti-remodeling effects reported by clinical trials. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Deo, Permal; Hewawasam, Erandi; Karakoulakis, Aris; Claudie, David J; Nelson, Robert; Simpson, Bradley S; Smith, Nicholas M; Semple, Susan J

    2016-11-04

    There is a need to develop potential new therapies for the management of diabetes and hypertension. Australian medicinal plants collected from the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) homelands, Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia were investigated to determine their therapeutic potential. Extracts were tested for inhibition of protein glycation and key enzymes relevant to the management of hyperglycaemia and hypertension. The inhibitory activities were further correlated with the antioxidant activities. Extracts of five selected plant species were investigated: Petalostigma pubescens, Petalostigma banksii, Memecylon pauciflorum, Millettia pinnata and Grewia mesomischa. Enzyme inhibitory activity of the plant extracts was assessed against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antiglycation activity was determined using glucose-induced protein glycation models and formation of protein-bound fluorescent advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Antioxidant activity was determined by measuring the scavenging effect of plant extracts against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and using the ferric reducing anti-oxidant potential assay (FRAP). Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined. Extracts of the leaves of Petalostigma banksii and P. pubescens showed the strongest inhibition of α-amylase with IC50 values of 166.50 ± 5.50 μg/mL and 160.20 ± 27.92 μg/mL, respectively. The P. pubescens leaf extract was also the strongest inhibitor of α-glucosidase with an IC50 of 167.83 ± 23.82 μg/mL. Testing for the antiglycation potential of the extracts, measured as inhibition of formation of protein-bound fluorescent AGEs, showed that P. banksii root and fruit extracts had IC50 values of 34.49 ± 4.31 μg/mL and 47.72 ± 1.65 μg/mL, respectively, which were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than other extracts. The inhibitory effect on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and the antiglycation potential of the

  11. Angiotensin II, Aldosterone, and Anti-Inflammatory Lymphocytes: Interplay and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kasal, Daniel Arthur B.; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is recognized as an important factor in the pathophysiology of hypertension, with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) playing a key role in the disease. Initially described because of its contribution to extracellular fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, the RAAS has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling, oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine production, and adhesion molecule synthesis by the vascular wall. Both angiotensin II and aldosterone are involved in these systemic effects, activating innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper highlights some aspects connecting RAAS to the hypertensive phenotype, based on experimental and clinical studies, with emphasis on new findings regarding the contribution of an increasingly studied population of T lymphocytes: the T-regulatory lymphocytes. These cells can suppress inflammation and may exert beneficial vascular effects in animal models of hypertension. PMID:22685633

  12. Angiotensin II, hypertension, and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Roelofs, Monica; van der Lugt, Robert; Heerschap, Arend; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen Ahr

    2016-01-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced hypertension on systolic blood pressure, and treatment with the angiotensin II receptor blockers, eprosartan mesylate, after one month of induced hypertension in wild-type C57bl/6j and AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 (AβPP/PS1/Alzheimer's disease) mice. AβPP/PS1 showed higher systolic blood pressure than wild-type. Subsequent eprosartan mesylate treatment restored this elevated systolic blood pressure in all mice. Functional connectivity was decreased in angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease and wild-type mice, and only 12 months of Alzheimer's disease mice showed impaired cerebral blood flow. Only angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease mice exhibited decreased spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Altogether, angiotensin II-induced hypertension not only exacerbated Alzheimer's disease-like pathological changes such as impairment of cerebral blood flow, functional connectivity, and cognition only in Alzheimer's disease model mice, but it also induced decreased functional connectivity in wild-type mice. However, we could not detect hypertension-induced overexpression of Aβ nor increased neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest a link between midlife hypertension, decreased cerebral hemodynamics and connectivity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Eprosartan mesylate treatment restored and beneficially affected cerebral blood flow and connectivity. This model could be used to investigate prevention/treatment strategies in early Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Angiotensin II induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy probably through histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Yang, Shuang

    2009-09-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a pathophysiological role in the genesis of cardiac hypertrophy as a hypertrophic stimulus. But little is known about the terminal steps, in which Ang II reprograms cardiac gene expression. Histone deacetyltransferases (HDACs) are considered as the integrators of divergent stress-response pathways during heart remodeling. However, the exact role of HDACs in the hypertrophic process is not clear yet. Therefore, we studied the expression of HDAC2, one of Class I HDACs, and the effect of valproic acid (VPA), a nonspecific HDAC inhibitor, in the Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were prepared from 1-day-old Wistar rats and treated with Ang II. The mRNA levels of HDAC2 and beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC), a hypertrophic marker gene, were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein expression of HDAC2 and c-fos, an immediate early response gene, was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and the surface areas of cardiomyocytes were measured using Motic Images software. The expression levels of HDAC2 mRNA and protein were increased in a time-dependent manner during the hypertrophic process, accompanied with the increment of beta-MHC and c-fos proteins. Ang II also increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes by more than twofold. VPA significantly reversed these changes. These results suggest that Ang II may induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through HDACs in combination with c-fos and that VPA has the protective effect on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thus, HDAC inhibition is a feasible therapeutic strategy that holds promise in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy.

  14. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  15. Imbalance of angiotensin type 1 receptor and angiotensin II type 2 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla: potential mechanism for sympathetic overactivity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lie; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Wei; Zucker, Irving H

    2008-10-01

    Upregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT(1)R) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contributes to the sympathoexcitation in the chronic heart failure (CHF). However, the role of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)R) is not clear. In this study, we measured AT(1)R and AT(2)R protein expression in the RVLM and determined their effects on renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate in anesthetized sham and CHF rats. We found that (1) although AT(1)R expression in the RVLM was upregulated, the AT(2)R was significantly downregulated (CHF: 0.06+/-0.02 versus sham: 0.15+/-0.02, P<0.05); (2) simultaneously stimulating RVLM AT(1)R and AT(2)R by angiotensin II evoked sympathoexcitation, hypertension, and tachycardia in both sham and CHF rats with greater responses in CHF; (3) stimulating RVLM AT1R with angiotensin II plus the specific AT(2)R antagonist PD123319 induced a larger sympathoexcitatory response than simultaneously stimulating AT(1)R and AT(2)R in sham rats, but not in CHF; (4) activating RVLM AT(2)R with CGP42112 induced a sympathoinhibition, hypotension, and bradycardia only in sham rats (renal sympathetic nerve activity: 36.4+/-5.1% of baseline versus 102+/-3.9% of baseline in artificial cerebrospinal fluid, P<0.05); (5) pretreatment with 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a general inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism, into the RVLM attenuates the CGP42112-induced sympathoinhibition. These results suggest that AT(2)R in the RVLM exhibits an inhibitory effect on sympathetic outflow, which is, at least partially, mediated by an arachidonic acid metabolic pathway. These data implicate a downregulation in the AT(2)R as a contributory factor in the sympathoexcitation in CHF.

  16. Decrease in blood pressure and regression of cardiovascular complications by angiotensin II vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Futoshi; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kyutoku, Mariko; Miyake, Takashi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have been recently developed to treat various diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and Alzheimer's disease in addition to infectious diseases. However, before use in the clinical setting, vaccines targeting self-antigens must be demonstrated to be effective and safe, evoking an adequate humoral immune response from B cells while avoiding T cell activation in response to self. Although the vaccine targeting angiotensin II (Ang II) is efficient in rodents and humans, little is known regarding the immunological activation and safety of the vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency and safety of an Ang II peptide vaccine in mice. Immunization with Ang II conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) successfully induced the production of anti-Ang II antibody, which blocked Ang II signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells. However, Ang II itself did not activate T cells, as assessed by the proliferation and lymphokine production of T cells in immunized mice, whereas KLH activated T cells. In an Ang II-infused model, the non-immunized mice showed high blood pressure (BP), whereas the immunized mice (Ang II-KLH) showed a significant decrease in systolic BP, accompanied by significant reductions in cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Importantly, anti-Ang II antibody titer was not elevated even after the administration of large amounts of Ang II, indicating that Ang II itself boosted antibody production, most likely due to less activation of T cells. In addition, no accumulation of inflammatory cells was observed in immunized mice, because endogenous Ang II would not activate T cells after immunization with Ang II-KLH. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccines targeting Ang II might be effective to decrease high BP and prevent cardiovascular complications without severe side effects.

  17. Effects of angiotensin II on arginine-vasopressin in physiological and pathological situations in man.

    PubMed

    Padfield, P L; Morton, J J

    1977-08-01

    Studies were designed to determine whether angiotensin II has a direct stimulatory effect on arginine-vasopressin in man and to determine the role, if any, played by angiotensin II in the control of vasopressin release in physiological and pathological conditions. Acute infusion of angiotensin II in normal volunteers produced small but definite increases in plasma levels of arginine-vasopressin (5-4+/-0-3(S.E.M.) to 6-4+/-0-2 pg/ml) only when plasma angiotensin II levels were supraphysiological. Concurrent measurements of plasma arginine-vasopressin and angiotensin II were made during acute changes in fluid balance and posture in normal volunteers and in clinical conditions characterized by high plasma levels of angiotensin II (Addison's disease and Bartter's syndrome). The results of these studies allow us to conclude that there is little to suggest a direct effect of angiotensin II which is likely to be relevant to the normal physiological control of arginine-vasopressin in man.

  18. Production of angiotensin II receptors type one (AT1) and type two (AT2) during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mallow, H; Trindl, A; Löffler, G

    2000-01-01

    During their development from progenitor cells, adipocytes not only express enzymatic activities necessary for the storage of triglycerides, but also achieve the capability to produce a number of endocrine factors such as leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), complement factors, adiponectin/adipoQ, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), angiotensin II and others. Angiotensin II is produced from angiotensinogen by the proteolytic action of renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and several data point to the existence of a complete local renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue, including angiotensin II receptors. In this study, we directly monitored the production of angiotensin II type one receptor (AT1) and angiotensin II type two receptor (AT2) proteins during the adipose conversion of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by immunodetection with specific antibodies. AT1 receptors could be detected throughout the whole differentiation period. The strong AT2 signal in preadipocytes however was completely lost during the course of differentiation, which suggests that expression of AT2 receptors is inversely correlated to the adipose conversion program.

  19. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  20. The angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis reduces myonuclear apoptosis during recovery from angiotensin II-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Carla; Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Simon, Felipe; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang (1-7)] is a peptide belonging to the non-classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Ang (1-7), through its receptor Mas, has an opposite action to angiotensin II (Ang II), the typical peptide of the classical RAS axis. Ang II produces skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterised by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is the decrease of the myofibrillar proteins produced by the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), evidenced by the increase in the expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases: atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. In addition, it has been described that Ang II also induces myonuclear apoptosis during muscle atrophy. We assessed the effects of Ang (1-7) and Mas participation on myonuclear apoptosis during skeletal muscle atrophy induced by Ang II. Our results show that Ang (1-7), through Mas, prevents the effects induced by Ang II in the diaphragm muscles and decreases several events associated with apoptosis in the diaphragm (increased apoptotic nuclei, increased expression of caspase-8 and caspase-9, increased caspase-3 activity and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio). Concomitantly, Ang (1-7) also attenuates the decrease in fibre diameter and muscle strength, and prevents the increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 during the muscle wasting induced by Ang II. Interestingly, these effects of Ang (1-7) are dependent on the Mas receptor. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that Ang (1-7) prevents myonuclear apoptosis during the recovery of skeletal muscle atrophy induced by Ang II.

  1. Structure of the Human Angiotensin II Type 1 (AT1) Receptor Bound to Angiotensin II from Multiple Chemoselective Photoprobe Contacts Reveals a Unique Peptide Binding Mode*

    PubMed Central

    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs. PMID:23386604

  2. Structure of the human angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor bound to angiotensin II from multiple chemoselective photoprobe contacts reveals a unique peptide binding mode.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-03-22

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs.

  3. Effect of the non peptide angiotensin II antagonist, GR117289C on the vasoconstrictor actions of angiotensin II in the human forearm

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, D.; Webster, J.; Nixon, A.; Young, M. M. R.; Smith, J.; Benjamin, N.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: GR117289C is a non peptide, selective angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonist. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this agent, given orally, could attenuate the vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II(AII) infused locally into the forearm circulation in man. METHODS: Eight healthy male subjects were studied on four occasions in a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover study. Five hours (approximate time of peak dynamic effect) following dosing with GR117289C (300 mg, 100 mg, 10 mg or placebo), A II was infused in incremental doses (0, 0.1, 0.4, 1.6, 6.2, 25 and 100 pmol min-1) into the left brachial artery, each for 10 min. Forearm blood flow was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography. RESULTS: GR117289C inhibits the vasoconstrictor effects of A II in a dose dependent manner. The active treatment: placebo ratios of forearm blood flow in the infused arm during the highest dose of AII (100 pmol min-1) were: GR117289C 10 mg, 1.12 (95% C.I. 0.81-1.55; P = 0.478), 100 mg, 1.43 (95% C.I. 1.01-2.01; P = 0.042) and 300 mg, 1.62 (95% C.I. 1.17-2.24; P = 0.006). There was no significant difference in blood pressure between each of the treatment groups and placebo. CONCLUSIONS: GR117289C is a pharmacologically active, oral A II antagonist in healthy men. PMID:9088589

  4. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Deficiency Leads to Hypersensitivity of the Pressor Response Against Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Norikazu; Kanasaki, Keizo; Kanasaki, Megumi; Takeda, Satoru; Koya, Daisuke

    2017-06-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes 2-hydroxyestradiol into 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME); COMT deficiency has shown to be associated with hypertension in men and preeclampsia, the disease associated with hypersensitivity of pressor response against angiotensin II (Ang II). Here, we found that COMT deficiency could explain the hypersensitivity of pressor response against Ang II in mice because of the lack of 2-ME-dependent suppression of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R). Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to COMT inhibitor (COMTi: 25 mg/kg per day) or oil (control) for 4 weeks, with or without low-dose Ang II infusion (ANGII: 70 ng/kg per minute) for the last 3 weeks. The Ang II-infused mice were treated with 2-ME (10 ng/d) or vehicle for the last 1 week. We obtained the following experimental groups: control, ANGII, COMTi, COMTi+ANGII, and COMTi+ANGII+2-ME. We performed similar experiments using the in vivo administration of small interfering RNA of COMT instead of COMTi. Neither ANGII nor COMTi exhibited significant alterations in systolic blood pressure. Compared with ANGII or COMTi, COMTi+ANGII displayed significantly higher systolic blood pressure, albuminuria, and glomerular endotheliosis; 2-ME normalized such alterations. Similar phenotypes were observed in COMT small interfering RNA-treated mice. In the aorta of COMT-deficient mice, AT1R expression was increased; 2-ME suppressed AT1R expression. The 2-ME exhibited peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonistic activity in vitro and ex vivo plasma from pregnant female mice as well. In vitro, 2-ME suppressed both basal and Ang II-induced AT1R levels in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-dependent manner. The 2-ME is relevant to combat COMT deficiency-associated hypertensive disorders via suppression of AT1R by its peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Albuminuria enhances NHE3 and NCC via stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress/angiotensin II axis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanjun; Zhuang, Yibo; Hu, Caiyu; Zhang, Xintong; Ding, Guixia; Zhang, Yue; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Hua, Hu; Huang, Songming; He, John Ci-Jiang; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-07-26

    Imbalance of salt and water is a frequent and challenging complication of kidney disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms remain elusive. Employing an albumin overload mouse model, we discovered that albuminuria enhanced the expression of NHE3 and NCC but not other transporters in murine kidney in line with the stimulation of angiotensinogen (AGT)/angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II cascade. In primary cultures of renal tubular cells, albumin directly stimulated AGT/ACE/Ang II and upregulated NHE3 and NCC expression. Blocking Ang II production with an ACE inhibitor normalized the upregulation of NHE3 and NCC in cells. Interestingly, albumin overload significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and administration of a SOD2 mimic (MnTBAP) normalized the expression of NHE3, NCC, and the components of AGT/ACE pathway affected by albuminuria, indicating a key role of mitochondria-derived oxidative stress in modulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and renal sodium transporters. In addition, the functional data showing the reduced urinary excretion of Na and Cl and enhanced response to specific NCC inhibitor further supported the regulatory results of sodium transporters following albumin overload. More importantly, the upregulation of NHE3 and NCC and activation of ACE/Ang II signaling pathway were also observed in albuminuric patient kidneys, suggesting that our animal model accurately replicates the human condition. Taken together, these novel findings demonstrated that albuminuria is of importance in resetting renal salt handling via mitochondrial oxidative stress-initiated stimulation of ACE/Ang II cascade. This may also offer novel, effective therapeutic targets for dealing with salt and water imbalance in proteinuric renal diseases.

  6. Angiotensin II infusion induces marked diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Bashir M; Yoshida, Tadashi; Semprun-Prieto, Laura; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are characterized by increased angiotensin II (Ang II) levels and are often accompanied by significant skeletal muscle wasting that negatively impacts mortality and morbidity. Both CHF and CKD patients have respiratory muscle dysfunction, however the potential effects of Ang II on respiratory muscles are unknown. We investigated the effects of Ang II on diaphragm muscle in FVB mice. Ang II induced significant diaphragm muscle wasting (18.7±1.6% decrease in weight at one week) and reduction in fiber cross-sectional area. Expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1) and of the pro-apoptotic factor BAX was increased after 24 h of Ang II infusion (4.4±0.3 fold, 3.1±0.5 fold and 1.6±0.2 fold, respectively, compared to sham infused control) suggesting increased muscle protein degradation and apoptosis. In Ang II infused animals, there was significant regeneration of injured diaphragm muscles at 7 days as indicated by an increase in the number of myofibers with centralized nuclei and high expression of embryonic myosin heavy chain (E-MyHC, 11.2±3.3 fold increase) and of the satellite cell marker M-cadherin (59.2±22.2% increase). Furthermore, there was an increase in expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, 1.8±0.3 fold increase) in Ang II infused diaphragm, suggesting the involvement of IGF-1 in diaphragm muscle regeneration. Bone-marrow transplantation experiments indicated that although there was recruitment of bone-marrow derived cells to the injured diaphragm in Ang II infused mice (267.0±74.6% increase), those cells did not express markers of muscle stem cells or regenerating myofibers. In conclusion, Ang II causes marked diaphragm muscle wasting, which may be important for the pathophysiology of respiratory muscle dysfunction and cachexia in conditions such as CHF and CKD.

  7. Solving the cardiac hypertrophy riddle: The angiotensin II-mechanical stress connection.

    PubMed

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2013-11-08

    A series of studies conducted 20 years ago, documenting the cardiac hypertrophy phenotype and its underlying signaling mechanism induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and mechanical stress, showed a remarkable similarity between the effect of the Gαq agonist and that of mechanical forces on cardiac hypertrophy. Subsequent studies confirmed the involvement of autocrine/paracrine mechanisms, including stretch-induced release of Ang II in load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Recent studies showed that the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor is also directly activated by mechanical forces, suggesting that AT1 receptors play an important role in mediating load-induced cardiac hypertrophy through both ligand- and mechanical stress-dependent mechanisms.

  8. Angiotensin II induces differential insulin action in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Surapongchai, Juthamard; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is reportedly involved in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of two ANGII doses on the phenotypic characteristics of insulin resistance syndrome and insulin action and signaling in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with either saline (SHAM) or ANGII at a commonly used pressor dose (100 ng/kg/min; ANGII-100) or a higher pressor dose (500 ng/kg/min; ANGII-500) via osmotic minipumps for 14 days. We demonstrated that ANGII-100-infused rats exhibited the phenotypic features of non-obese insulin resistance syndrome, including hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance of glucose uptake in the soleus muscle, whereas ANGII-500-treated rats exhibited diabetes-like symptoms, such as post-prandial hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion and hypertriglyceridemia. At the cellular level, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the soleus muscle of the ANGII-100 group was 33% lower (P < 0.05) than that in the SHAM group and was associated with increased insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Ser(307) and decreased Akt Ser(473) and AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation and GLUT-4 expression. However, ANGII-500 infusion did not induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance or impair insulin signaling elements as initially anticipated. Moreover, we found that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the ANGII-500 group was accompanied by the enhanced expression of ACE2 and MasR proteins, which are the key elements in the non-classical pathway of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic infusion with these two pressor doses of ANGII induced differential metabolic responses at both the systemic and skeletal muscle levels. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  9. Inhibition of Angiotensin II receptors during pregnancy induces malformations in developing rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Susana I; Seltzer, Alicia M; Fuentes, Lucia B; Forneris, Myriam L; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2008-06-24

    Evidence suggests that Angiotensin II plays an important role in the complex process of renal organogenesis. Rat kidney organogenesis starts between E13-14 and lasts up to 2 weeks after birth. The present study demonstrates histologic modifications and changes in receptor localisation in animals born from mothers treated with Angiotensin II, Losartan or PD123319 (1.0 mg/kg/day) during late pregnancy. Angiotensin II-treated animals exhibited very well developed tubules in the renal medulla in coincidence with higher AT(1) binding. Control animals exhibited angiotensin AT(2) binding in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, while in the Angiotensin II-treated animals binding was observed to the inner stripe. In Angiotensin II-treated 1-week-old animals, the nephrogenic zone contained fewer immature structures, and more developed collecting tubules than control animals. Treatment with Losartan resulted in severe renal abnormalities. For newborn and 1-week-old animals, glomeruli exhibited altered shape and enlarged Bowman spaces, in concordance with a loss of [(125)I]Angiotensin II binding in the cortex. Blockade with PD123319 led to an enlarged nephrogenic zone with increased number of immature glomeruli, and less glomeruli in the juxtamedullary area. Autoradiography showed a considerable loss of AT(1) binding in the kidney cortex of PD123319-treated animals at both ages. The present results show for the first time histomorphological and receptor localisation alterations following treatment with low doses of Losartan and PD123319 during pregnancy. These observations confirm previous assumptions that in the developing kidney Angiotensin II exerts stimulatory effects through AT(1) receptors that might be counterbalanced by angiotensin AT(2) receptors.

  10. Angiotensin II dependent cardiac remodeling in the eel Anguilla anguilla involves the NOS/NO system.

    PubMed

    Filice, Mariacristina; Amelio, Daniela; Garofalo, Filippo; David, Sabrina; Fucarino, Alberto; Jensen, Frank Bo; Imbrogno, Sandra; Cerra, Maria Carmela

    2017-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII), the principal effector of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS), plays an important role in controlling mammalian cardiac morpho-functional remodelling. In the eel Anguilla anguilla, one month administration of AngII improves cardiac performance and influences the expression and localization of molecules which regulate cell growth. To deeper investigate the morpho-functional chronic influences of AngII on the eel heart and the molecular mechanisms involved, freshwater eels (A. anguilla) were intraperitoneally injected for 2 months with AngII (1 nmol g BW(-1)). Then the isolated hearts were subjected to morphological and western blotting analyses, and nitrite measurements. If compared to control animals, the ventricle of AngII-treated hearts showed an increase in compacta thickness, vascularization, muscle mass and fibrosis. Structural changes were paralleled by a higher expression of AT2 receptor and a negative modulation of the ERK1-2 pathway, together with a decrease in nitrite concentration, indicative of a reduced Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production. Moreover, immunolocalization revealed, particularly on the endocardial endothelium (EE) of AngII-treated hearts, a significant reduction of phosphorylated NOS detected by peNOS antibody accompanied by an increased expression of the eNOS disabling protein NOSTRIN, and a decreased expression of the positive regulators of NOS activity, pAkt and Hsp90. On the whole, results suggest that, in the eel, AngII modulates cardiac morpho-functional plasticity by influencing the molecular mechanisms that control NOS activity and the ERK1-2 pathway.

  11. Angiotensin II Causes β-Cell Dysfunction Through an ER Stress-Induced Proinflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stanley M H; Lau, Yeh-Siang; Miller, Alyson A; Ku, Jacqueline M; Potocnik, Simon; Ye, Ji-Ming; Woodman, Owen L; Herbert, Terence P

    2017-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with an increase in the activation of the renin angiotensin system, whose inhibition reduces the incidence of new-onset diabetes. Importantly, angiotensin II (AngII), independently of its vasoconstrictor action, causes β-cell inflammation and dysfunction, which may be an early step in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine how AngII causes β-cell dysfunction. Islets of Langerhans were isolated from C57BL/6J mice that had been infused with AngII in the presence or absence of taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and effects on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, inflammation, and β-cell function determined. The mechanism of action of AngII was further investigated using isolated murine islets and clonal β cells. We show that AngII triggers ER stress, an increase in the messenger RNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and promotes β-cell dysfunction in murine islets of Langerhans both in vivo and ex vivo. These effects were significantly attenuated by TUDCA, an inhibitor of ER stress. We also show that AngII-induced ER stress is required for the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and is caused by reactive oxygen species and IP3 receptor activation. These data reveal that the induction of ER stress is critical for AngII-induced β-cell dysfunction and indicates how therapies that promote ER homeostasis may be beneficial in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  12. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II type I receptor gene polymorphisms with extreme obesity in Polish individuals.

    PubMed

    Pacholczyk, Marta; Ferenc, Tomasz; Kowalski, Jan; Adamczyk, Przemysław; Chojnowski, Jacek; Ponikowska, Irena

    2013-08-01

    There is strong evidence for the presence of a functional renin-angiotensin system in human adipose tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of polymorphic variants of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE I/D) and angiotensin II type I receptor gene (AGTR1 A1166C) with extreme obesity and obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to examine their combined effect on extremely obese patients. Overall, no significant associations were detected between ACE and AGTR1 gene polymorphisms and extreme obesity. However, extremely obese patients with T2DM showed an increased frequency of ACE II genotype compared with controls (p<0.05) and with non-diabetic extremely obese patients (p<0.01). The results suggest that II genotype of ACE was a significant contributor to extreme obesity in AA homozygotes of AGTR1 gene, regardless of the presence of T2DM. Moreover, the analysis of genetic polymorphisms demonstrated that ACE II and AGTR1 AC genotypes were most frequently observed in patients with extreme obesity and T2DM. On the basis of our results, we suggest that ACE II homozygosity may be a significant predictor of extreme obesity and T2DM and that the interaction between ACE and AGTR1 genes may be considered a predisposing factor for extreme obesity and extreme obesity-associated T2DM development.

  13. Urinary angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 increases in diabetic nephropathy by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker olmesartan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masanori; Oikawa, Osamu; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a member of the renin-angiotensin system that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to the seven-amino acid peptide fragment Ang-(1-7). We evaluated the changes in urinary ACE2 levels in response to treatment with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker olmesartan in diabetes patients with nephropathy. This prospective, open-label, interventional study was conducted with 31 type 2 diabetes patients with nephropathy. After initial evaluation, patients received 20 mg/day olmesartan, which was increased to 40 mg/day over a 24-week period. In diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease, olmesartan significantly increased urinary ACE2 levels independently of blood pressure and plasma aldosterone levels and reduced albuminuria, urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and plasma aldosterone levels. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that the change in urinary L-FABP levels was an independent predictor of increased urinary ACE2 levels. Olmesartan may have the unique effect of increasing urinary ACE2 levels. However, whether this contributes to olmesartan's renoprotective effect must be examined further. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Regulation of ERK5 by insulin and angiotensin-II in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Girish; Goalstone, Marc Lee; E-mail: Marc.Goalstone@uchsc.edu

    2007-03-23

    ERK5 is involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The proliferative actions of insulin and angiotensin-II (A-II) in VSMC are mediated in part by ERK1/2. We hypothesized that insulin and A-II also regulate ERK5 activity in VSMC. Acute treatment (<60 min) with insulin or A-II increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 15 min and ERK5 at 5 min. Chronic treatment ({<=}8 h) with insulin increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 4 h and ERK5 by 8 h. A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by 8 h and ERK5 by 4 h. The EC{sub 50} for insulin treatment effecting ERK1/2 and ERK5 phosphorylation was 1.5 and 0.1 nM, whereas the EC{sub 50} for A-II was 2 nM, each. Insulin plus A-II induced an additive effect only on ERK5 phosphorylation. Inhibition of insulin- and A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK5 and ERK1/2 by PD98059 and Wortmannin exhibited differential and time-dependent effects. Taken together, these data indicate that insulin and A-II regulate the activity of ERK5, but different from that seen for ERK1/2.

  15. Sex chromosome effects unmasked in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Xie; Liu, Jun; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.; Watkins, Rebecca; Arnold, Arthur P.; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in mean arterial pressure (MAP) are reported in many experimental models of hypertension and are ascribed to gonadal sex based of studies showing gonadectomy and gonadal hormone replacement affect MAP. The interpretation of these studies, however, has been confounded by differences in the sex chromosome complement (XX vs. XY). To investigate the sex chromosome complement independently of gonadal sex, we used the four core genotype (FCG) mouse model in which gonadal sex is separated from the sex chromosome complement enabling comparisons among XX and XY females and XX and XY males. We found that in the gonadectomized (GDX) FCG, MAP after 2 weeks of angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (200 ng/kg/min) was greater in XX than XY [MAP (mm Hg): GDX-XX-Female, 148±4.5; GDX-XY-Female, 133±4.4; GDX-XX-Male, 149±9.4; GDX-XY-Male, 138±5.5; p<0.03, XX vs XY; n=8-9/grp]. In contrast, no sex chromosome effects (SCE) were found on heart rate (HR) body weight (BW) or plasma Ang II 2 weeks after Ang II infusion. This study suggests that in addition to effects of gonadal hormones on blood pressure, X- or Y-linked genes, parental imprinting or X mosaicism contribute to sex differences in hypertension. Furthermore, the finding that MAP was greater in XX mice compared to XY mice in the GDX state suggests adverse SCE encoded within the XX sex chromosome complement could contribute to hypertension in women with ovarian hormone deficiency such as postmenopausal women and women with premature ovarian failure. PMID:20231528

  16. Characterization of functional urotensin II receptors in human skeletal muscle myoblasts: comparison with angiotensin II receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jian-shen; Minor, Lisa K; Smith, Charles; Hu, Bing; Yang, Jing; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Damiano, Bruce

    2005-04-01

    The properties of urotensin II (U-II) receptor (UT receptor) and angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor (AT receptor) in primary human skeletal myoblasts (HSMM) and differentiated skeletal myotubes (HSMMT) were characterized. Radiolabeled U-II and ANG II bound specifically to HSMM with Kd's of 0.31 nM (2311 receptors/cell) and 0.61 nM (18,257 receptors/cell), respectively. The cyclic segment of U-II peptide, CFWKYC, was the minimal sequence required for binding, with the WKY residues essential. Inhibitor studies suggested AT1 is the predominant ANG II receptor. After radioligand binding, under conditions designed to minimize receptor internalization, half the bound U-II was resistant to acid washing suggesting that U-II binds tightly to its receptor in a quasi-irreversible fashion. The AT1 receptor-bound radioligand was completely removed under the same conditions. RT-PCR detected the expression of mRNAs for UT and AT1 receptors. Western blotting showed that U-II and ANG II signaled via ERK1/2 kinase. UT receptor was not lost upon differentiation into myotubes since both mRNA for UT receptor and U-II binding were still present. ANG II receptors were also present as shown by ANG II-induced calcium mobilization.

  17. Polymorphisms in angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin I-converting enzyme genes and breast cancer risk among Chinese women in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Van Den Berg, David; Lee, Hin-Peng; Yu, Mimi C

    2005-02-01

    Angiotensin II is converted from its precursor by angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and has been shown to mediate growth in breast cancer cell lines via ligand-induced activity through the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). Earlier we showed that women with the low activity genotype of the ACE gene have a statistically significantly ( approximately 50%) reduced breast cancer risk compared with those possessing the high activity ACE genotype. To further test the hypothesis that angiotensin II participates in breast carcinogenesis through AGTR1, we examined genetic polymorphisms in the 5'-region of the AGTR1 gene (A-168G, C-535T and T-825A) in relation to risk of breast cancer in 258 breast cancer cases and 670 female controls within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Relative to the homozygotes, individual genotypes with one or two copies of the respective allelic variants (putative low risk genotypes) were each associated with an approximately 30% reduction in risk of breast cancer. Risk of breast cancer decreased with increasing number of low risk AGTR1 genotypes after adjustment for potential confounders. Relative to those carrying no low risk genotypes (homozygous for A, C and T alleles for the three polymorphisms, respectively), the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.84 (0.51-1.37) for women possessing one low risk genotype and 0.68 (0.46-1.01) for women possessing two or three low risk genotypes (P for trend = 0.05). When both AGTR1 and ACE gene polymorphisms were examined simultaneously, women possessing at least one AGTR1 low risk genotype in combination with the ACE low activity genotype had an odds ratio of 0.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.62) compared with those possessing the ACE high activity genotype and no AGTR1 low risk genotype. Our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the angiotensin II effect by blockade of ACE and/or AGTR1 could be potential targets for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  18. Relative atrial natriuretic peptide deficiency and inadequate renin and angiotensin II suppression in obese hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Asferg, Camilla L; Nielsen, Søren J; Andersen, Ulrik B; Linneberg, Allan; Møller, Daniel V; Hedley, Paula L; Christiansen, Michael; Goetze, Jens P; Esler, Murray; Jeppesen, Jørgen L

    2013-07-01

    Obesity is a strong risk factor for hypertension, but the mechanisms by which obesity leads to hypertension are incompletely understood. On this background, we assessed dietary sodium intake, serum levels of natriuretic peptides (NPs), and the activity of the renin-angiotensin system in 63 obese hypertensive men (obeseHT: body mass index, ≥30.0 kg/m(2); 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, ≥130/80 mm Hg), in 40 obese normotensive men (obeseNT: body mass index, ≥30.0 kg/m(2); 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, <130/80 mm Hg), and in 27 lean normotensive men (leanNT: body mass index, 20.0-24.9 kg/m(2); 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, <130/80 mm Hg). All study subjects were medication free. As a surrogate estimate for dietary sodium intake, we measured sodium excretion in a 24-hour urine collection and we measured serum levels of midregional proatrial NP and plasma levels of renin and angiotensin II. The obese men had higher mean (±SD) urinary sodium excretion (obeseHT, 213.6±85.2 mmol; obeseNT, 233.0±70.0 mmol) than the lean normotensive men (leanNT, 155.5±51.7 mmol; P=0.003). ObeseHT had lower (median [interquartile range]) serum midregional proatrial NP levels (49.2 [37.3-64.7] pmol/L) than leanNT (69.3 [54.3-82.9] pmol/L; P=0.003), whereas obeseNT had midregional proatrial NP levels in between (54.1 [43.2-64.7] pmol/L); obeseNT had lower (median [interquartile range]) plasma levels of renin (5.0 [3.0-8.0] mIU/L versus 9.0 [4.0-18.0]) and angiotensin II (2.4 [1.5-3.5] pmol/L versus 4.2 [2.2-7.9]) than obeseHT (P≤0.049), whereas obeseHT had similar plasma levels of renin and angiotensin