Science.gov

Sample records for angle light scattering

  1. Angle- and Spectral-Dependent Light Scattering from Plasmonic Nanocups

    SciTech Connect

    King, Nicholas S.; Li, Yang; Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Brannan, Travis; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2011-09-27

    As optical frequency nanoantennas, reduced-symmetry plasmonic nanoparticles have light-scattering properties that depend strongly on geometry, orientation, and variations in dielectric environment. Here we investigate how these factors influence the spectral and angular dependence of light scattered by Au nanocups. A simple dielectric substrate causes the axial, electric dipole mode of the nanocup to deviate substantially from its characteristic cos² θ free space scattering profile, while the transverse, magnetic dipole mode remains remarkably insensitive to the presence of the substrate. Nanoscale irregularities of the nanocup rim and the local substrate permittivity have a surprisingly large effect on the spectral- and angle-dependent light-scattering properties of these structures.

  2. Wide-angle light scattering (WALS) for soot aggregate characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Oltmann, Hergen; Reimann, Joerg; Will, Stefan

    2010-03-15

    A novel set-up for the experimental determination of aggregate morphology in combustion processes based on elastic light scattering has been designed and realized. A key feature of this wide-angle light scattering (WALS) approach is an ellipsoidal mirror which is used to collect scattered light over a wide angular range of about 10-170 . The set-up employs a cw solid-state laser as light source and an intensified CCD-camera as detector. By means of the mirror the scattered light is imaged onto the detector allowing for a simultaneous acquisition of a full scattering diagram with a high angular resolution of about 0.6 . To demonstrate the performance of the approach, measurements for various sooting flames produced by premixed combustion in a flat flame burner were carried out, where the burner was operated with different equivalence ratios and fuels. It is shown that radii of gyration of soot particles may efficiently be obtained from an analysis of the scattering diagrams. (author)

  3. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett N.; James, Robert H.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Calogero, Don

    2015-09-15

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  4. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering.

    PubMed

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, HyunJoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2014-05-28

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from -70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth.

  5. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    PubMed Central

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, HyunJoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from −70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth. PMID:24867385

  6. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Youngju; Jung, Jaehwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, Hyunjoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, Yongkeun

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from -70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth.

  7. Development of wide-angle 2D light scattering static cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Linyan; Liu, Qiao; Shao, Changshun; Su, Xuantao

    2016-10-01

    We have recently developed a 2D light scattering static cytometer for cellular analysis in a label-free manner, which measures side scatter (SSC) light in the polar angular range from 79 to 101 degrees. Compared with conventional flow cytometry, our cytometric technique requires no fluorescent labeling of the cells, and static cytometry measurements can be performed without flow control. In this paper we present an improved label-free static cytometer that can obtain 2D light scattering patterns in a wider angular range. By illuminating the static microspheres on chip with a scanning optical fiber, wide-angle 2D light scattering patterns of single standard microspheres with a mean diameter of 3.87 μm are obtained. The 2D patterns of 3.87 μm microspheres contain both large-angle forward scatter (FSC) and SSC light in the polar angular range from 40 to 100 degrees, approximately. Experimental 2D patterns of 3.87 μm microspheres are in good agreement with Mie theory simulated ones. The wide-angle light scattering measurements may provide a better resolution for particle analysis as compared with the SSC measurements. Two dimensional light scattering patterns of HL-60 human acute leukemia cells are obtained by using our static cytometer. Compared with SSC 2D light scattering patterns, wide-angle 2D patterns contain richer information of the HL-60 cells. The obtaining of 2D light scattering patterns in a wide angular range could help to enhance the capabilities of our label-free static cytometry for cell analysis.

  8. Finite-size effect in light transmission through highly forward scattering media at grazing angles.

    PubMed

    Marinyuk, V V; Sheberstov, S V

    2016-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of light transmission through a disordered medium with large (compared to the light wavelength) inhomogeneities. Both numerical integration and analytic treatments of the radiative transfer equation are performed. An effect of the single-scattering phase function on the total transmittance is found in a subdiffusion thickness range. The effect reveals itself at grazing angles of incidence and originates from small-angle multiple scattering of light. A simple analytic formula for the total transmittance is derived. Our results are in good agreement with data of independent numerical calculations.

  9. Multi-angle Light Scattering Device for Aerosol Particle Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    SUBJECT TERMS b. ABSTRACT 2. REPORT TYPE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Kansas State University 2 Fairchild Hall Manhattan , KS 66506 -1100 31-Jul-2014...currently measuring scattering from Arizona road dust, various sizes of abrasive grits and planning soot studies, some cloud processed. The project

  10. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-03

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  11. Single-shot measurement of soot aggregate sizes by wide-angle light scattering (WALS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmann, H.; Reimann, J.; Will, S.

    2012-01-01

    The wide-angle light scattering (WALS) approach has been utilized for the measurement of soot aggregate sizes (radii of gyration) in flames on a single-shot basis. Key elements are a pulsed laser and an ellipsoidal mirror, which images the light scattered within a plane onto an intensified CCD camera, thus allowing for an instantaneous acquisition of a full scattering diagram with high resolution. Results for a laminar premixed flame exhibit good agreement with averaged data and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. The applicability of the technique to unsteady combustion processes is demonstrated by measuring aggregate sizes in a weakly turbulent jet-diffusion flame. In both cases light scattering results are verified by data obtained from electron microscopy analysis of sampled soot.

  12. Small angle light scattering characterization of single micrometric particles in microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannhauser, David; Romeo, Giovanni; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2013-04-01

    A CCD-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus has been used to characterize single micrometric particles flowing in a micro-channel. The measured scattering vector spans the range 2x10-2 - 6:8x101μm-1. The incident laser light is collimated to a spot of about 50 μm in diameter at the sample position with a divergence lower than 0.045 rad. Such small collimated laser beam opens the possibility to perform on-line SALS of micron-sized particles flowing in micro-channels. By properly designing the micro-channel and using a viscoelastic liquid as suspending medium we are able to realize a precise 3D focusing of the target particles. The forward scattering emitted from the particle is collected by a lens with high numerical aperture. At the focal point of that lens a homemade beam stop is blocking the incident light. Finally, a second lens maps the scattered light on the CCD sensor, allowing to obtain far field images on short distances. Measurements with mono-disperse polystyrene particles, both in quiescent and in-flow conditions have been realized. Experiments in-flow allow to measure the single particle scattering. Results are validated by comparison with calculations based on the Lorenz-Mie theory. The quality of the measured intensity profiles confirms the possibility to use our apparatus in real multiplex applications, with particles down to 1 μm in radius.

  13. Dual wavelength multiple-angle light scattering system for cryptosporidium detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buaprathoom, S.; Pedley, S.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple, dual wavelength, multiple-angle, light scattering system has been developed for detecting cryptosporidium suspended in water. Cryptosporidium is a coccidial protozoan parasite causing cryptosporidiosis; a diarrheal disease of varying severity. The parasite is transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water, particularly drinking-water, but also accidental ingestion of bathing-water, including swimming pools. It is therefore important to be able to detect these parasites quickly, so that remedial action can be taken to reduce the risk of infection. The proposed system combines multiple-angle scattering detection of a single and two wavelengths, to collect relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering phase functions from tested suspension, and multivariate data analysis techniques to obtain characterizing information of samples under investigation. The system was designed to be simple, portable and inexpensive. It employs two diode lasers (violet InGaN-based and red AlGaInP-based) as light sources and silicon photodiodes as detectors and optical components, all of which are readily available. The measured scattering patterns using the dual wavelength system showed that the relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering pattern of cryptosporidium oocysts was significantly different from other particles (e.g. polystyrene latex sphere, E.coli). The single wavelength set up was applied for cryptosporidium oocysts'size and relative refractive index measurement and differential measurement of the concentration of cryptosporidium oocysts suspended in water and mixed polystyrene latex sphere suspension. The measurement results showed good agreement with the control reference values. These results indicate that the proposed method could potentially be applied to online detection in a water quality control system.

  14. Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2000-01-01

    A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

  15. Sizing aerosolized fractal nanoparticle aggregates through Bayesian analysis of wide-angle light scattering (WALS) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Franz J. T.; Will, Stefan; Daun, Kyle J.

    2016-11-01

    Inferring the size distribution of aerosolized fractal aggregates from the angular distribution of elastically scattered light is a mathematically ill-posed problem. This paper presents a procedure for analyzing Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS) data using Bayesian inference. The outcome is probability densities for the recovered size distribution and aggregate morphology parameters. This technique is applied to both synthetic data and experimental data collected on soot-laden aerosols, using a measurement equation derived from Rayleigh-Debye-Gans fractal aggregate (RDG-FA) theory. In the case of experimental data, the recovered aggregate size distribution parameters are generally consistent with TEM-derived values, but the accuracy is impaired by the well-known limited accuracy of RDG-FA theory. Finally, we show how this bias could potentially be avoided using the approximation error technique.

  16. Characterization of Nanocellulose Using Small-Angle Neutron, X-ray, and Dynamic Light Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yimin; Liu, Kai; Zhan, Chengbo; Geng, Lihong; Chu, Benjamin; Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2017-02-16

    Nanocellulose extracted from wood pulps using TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and sulfuric acid hydrolysis methods was characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The dimensions of this nanocellulose (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber (TOCN) and sulfuric acid hydrolyzed cellulose nanocrystal (SACN)) revealed by the different scattering methods were compared with those characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SANS and SAXS data were analyzed using a parallelepiped-based form factor. The width and thickness of the nanocellulose cross section were ∼8 and ∼2 nm for TOCN and ∼20 and ∼3 nm for SACN, respectively, where the fitting results from SANS and SAXS profiles were consistent with each other. DLS was carried out under both the VV mode with the polarizer and analyzer parallel to each other and the HV mode having them perpendicular to each other. Using rotational and translational diffusion coefficients obtained under the HV mode yielded a nanocellulose length qualitatively consistent with that observed by TEM, whereas the length derived by the translational diffusion coefficient under the VV mode appeared to be overestimated.

  17. [Evaluation of molecular weights of hyaluronate preparations by multi-angle laser light scattering].

    PubMed

    Yomota, Chikako

    2003-01-01

    Hyaluronate (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polysaccharide, has been used for osteoarthritis, periartritis of the shoulder and rheumatoid arthritis by intraarticular administration, and in ophthalmic surgery such as anterior segment surgery, and eye lotion. In this study, the molecular weight (Mw) of HA preparations were estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) system consisted of a refractometer (RI) and a multi-angle laser light scattering (MALS). From the results, it has been clarified that a successful characterization of HA samples with Mw up to 2 - 3 x 10(6) g/mol was possible by multidetector system.

  18. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering and quasi-elastic light scattering for characterization of polymersomes: comparison with classical techniques.

    PubMed

    Till, Ugo; Gaucher-Delmas, Mireille; Saint-Aguet, Pascale; Hamon, Glenn; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Chassenieux, Christophe; Payré, Bruno; Goudounèche, Dominique; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise; Violleau, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Polymersomes formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, such as poly(ethyleneoxide-b-ε-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) or poly(ethyleneoxide-b-methylmethacrylate), were characterized by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), multi-angle light scattering (MALS), and refractive index detection, leading to the determination of their size, shape, and molecular weight. The method was cross-examined with more classical ones, like batch dynamic and static light scattering, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results show good complementarities between all the techniques; asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation being the most pertinent one when the sample exhibits several different types of population.

  19. Particle sizing by measurement of forward-scattered light at two angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental and practical limitations to particle sizing by measurement of forward scattered light are presented. Methods to minimize the limitations are described. Two types of instruments are compared.

  20. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  1. A stress-controlled shear cell for small-angle light scattering and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, S.; Ramos, L.; Fromental, J. M.; Prévot, G.; Jelinek, R.; Cipelletti, L.

    2016-12-01

    We develop and test a stress-controlled, parallel plates shear cell that can be coupled to an optical microscope or a small angle light scattering setup, for simultaneous investigation of the rheological response and the microscopic structure of soft materials under an imposed shear stress. In order to minimize friction, the cell is based on an air bearing linear stage, the stress is applied through a contactless magnetic actuator, and the strain is measured through optical sensors. We discuss the contributions of inertia and of the small residual friction to the measured signal and demonstrate the performance of our device in both oscillating and step stress experiments on a variety of viscoelastic materials.

  2. Small-angle light scattering from polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal films

    SciTech Connect

    Loiko, V. A. Maschke, U.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Konkolovich, A. V.; Misckevich, A. A.

    2008-10-15

    A method is developed for modeling and computing the angular distribution of light scattered forward from a single-layer polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) film. The method is based on effective-medium approximation, anomalous diffraction approximation, and far-field single-scattering approximation. The angular distribution of forward-scattered light is analyzed for PDLC films with droplet size larger than the optical wavelength. The method can be used to study field-and temperature-induced phase transitions in LC droplets with cylindrical symmetry by measuring polarized scattered light intensity.

  3. Solution Properties of 1,3-Cyclohexadiene Polymers by Small Angle Neutron and Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Seok I; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Wignall, George D; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy; Britt, Phillip F; Terao, Ken; Nakamura, Yo

    2006-01-01

    1,3-Cyclohexdiene polymers (PCHD) and their derivatives are of interest due to the six-member rings in the main chain, which are expected to impart higher mechanical strength and better thermal and chemical stability, as compared to common vinyl polymers. For example, hydrogenated PCHD has the highest glass transition temperature (T{sub g} {approx} 231 C) of all hydrocarbon polymers, and it also shows good heat, weather, impact, abrasion, and chemical resistance as well as low water absorption. In addition, PCHD has unique photochemical properties, such as excellent transparency, due to the isolated double bonds in the main chain. Also, block copolymers containing PCHD show unusual phase separation behavior. For example, a styrene/1,3-CHD block copolymer (PS-b-PCHD) with 50 vol % CHD (1,4/1,2 {approx} 95/5) exhibits a core-shell or hollow cylinder morphology, while a typical styrene/acyclic diene (isoprene or butadiene) block copolymer with similar composition exhibits a lamellar structure. Such phase behavior and many other properties strongly depend on the conformation of the polymer in solution or bulk. However, almost no data have been reported on the conformation of PCHD, probably because of the lack of well-defined and well-characterized samples. Here we report solution properties of PCHD in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and chloroform by multiangle laser light scattering, viscometry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS).

  4. Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels by light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering and rheology.

    PubMed

    Santinath Singh, S; Aswal, V K; Bohidar, H B

    2011-06-01

    Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were investigated as a function of their volumetric mixing ratio, [Formula: see text] , 1.0 and 2.0 using dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and rheology. The degree of non-ergodicity ( X = 0.2 ± 0.02) , which was extracted as a heterodyne contribution from the measured dynamic structure factor data remained less than that of homogeneous solutions where ergodicity is expected (X = 10. The static structure factor, I(q) , results obtained from SANS were interpreted in the Guinier regime (low-q , which implied the existence of ≈ 250 nm long rod-like structures (double-helix bundles), and the power law (intermediate-q regions) yielded I (q) ~ q(−α) with α = 2.3 , 1.8 and 1.6 for r = 0.5 , 1.0 and 2.0. This is indicative of the presence of Gaussian chains at low r , while at r = 2 there was a propensity of rod-shaped structures. The gel strength and transition temperatures measured from frequency sweep and temperature ramp studies were suggestive of the presence of a stronger association between the two biopolymer networks at higher r . The results indicate that the internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were highly dependent on the volumetric mixing ratio.

  5. Small-angle light scattering by airborne particulates: Environnement S.A. continuous particulate monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Thaury, Claire; Mineau, Jean-Luc; Gaubicher, Bertrand

    2010-08-01

    Airborne particulate matter may have an effect on human health. It is therefore necessary to determine and control in real time the evolution of the concentration and mass of particulates in the ambient air. These parameters can be obtained using optical methods. We propose here a new instrument, 'CPM' (continuous particulate monitor), for the measurement of light scattered by ambient particulates at small angles. This geometry allows simultaneous and separate detections of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 fractions of airborne particulate matter, with no influence of their chemical nature and without using theoretical calculations. The ambient air is collected through a standard sampling head (PM10 inlet according to EN 12341, PM2.5 inlet according to EN 14907; or PM1, TSP inlets, standard US EPA inlets). The analysis of the first measurements demonstrates that this new instrument can detect, for each of the seven defined size ranges, real-time variations of particulate content in the ambient air. The measured concentrations (expressed in number per liter) can be converted into total mass concentrations (expressed in micrograms per cubic meter) of all fractions of airborne particulate matters sampled by the system. Periodic comparison with a beta-attenuation mass monitor (MP101M Beta Gauge Analyzer from Environnement S.A. company) allows the calculation of a calibration factor as a function of the mean particulate density that is used for this conversion. It is then possible to provide real-time relative variations of aerosol mass concentration.

  6. Integral indicatrix of light scattering from {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} spherical particles in the region of small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, V.N.; Shapovalov, K.A.

    1995-05-01

    The integral indicatrix of light scattering from a {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} spherical particle is studied as a function of the phase shift. It is shown analytically in the WKB approximation and numerically on the basis of the Mie theory and the WKB approximation that the dependence of the integral indicatrix on the phase shift is similar to that for the factor of light scattering efficiency. Asymptotic expressions for the integral indicatrix are obtained for large diffraction parameters in the limiting cases of small and large phase shifts in the region of small angles. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  8. Scattering attributes of one-dimensional semiconducting oxide nanomaterials individually probed for varying light-matter interaction angles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Daniel S.; Singh, Manpreet; Zhou, Hebing; Milchak, Marissa; Hahm, Jong-in

    2015-01-01

    We report the characteristic optical responses of one-dimensional semiconducting oxide nanomaterials by examining the individual nanorods (NRs) of ZnO, SnO2, indium tin oxide, and zinc tin oxide under precisely controlled, light-matter interaction geometry. Scattering signals from a large set of NRs of the different types are evaluated spatially along the NR length while varying the NR tilt angle, incident light polarization, and analyzer rotation. Subsequently, we identify material-indiscriminate, NR tilt angle- and incident polarization-dependent scattering behaviors exhibiting continuous, intermittent, and discrete responses. The insight gained from this study can advance our fundamental understanding of the optical behaviors of the technologically useful nanomaterials and, at the same time, promote the development of highly miniaturized, photonic and bio-optical devices utilizing the spatially controllable, optical responses of the individual semiconducting oxide NRs. PMID:26549887

  9. Scattering attributes of one-dimensional semiconducting oxide nanomaterials individually probed for varying light-matter interaction angles

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Daniel S.; Singh, Manpreet; Zhou, Hebing; Milchak, Marissa; Hahm, Jong-in

    2015-10-12

    We report the characteristic optical responses of one-dimensional semiconducting oxide nanomaterials by examining the individual nanorods (NRs) of ZnO, SnO{sub 2}, indium tin oxide, and zinc tin oxide under precisely controlled, light-matter interaction geometry. Scattering signals from a large set of NRs of the different types are evaluated spatially along the NR length while varying the NR tilt angle, incident light polarization, and analyzer rotation. Subsequently, we identify material-indiscriminate, NR tilt angle- and incident polarization-dependent scattering behaviors exhibiting continuous, intermittent, and discrete responses. The insight gained from this study can advance our fundamental understanding of the optical behaviors of the technologically useful nanomaterials and, at the same time, promote the development of highly miniaturized, photonic and bio-optical devices utilizing the spatially controllable, optical responses of the individual semiconducting oxide NRs.

  10. Distribution angle control of a light-emitting diode downlight lens with high color uniformity using a scattering polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Keiichi; Oosumi, Kazumasa; Koizumi, Fumiaki; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed a light-emitting diode (LED) downlight lens that is made of a highly scattered optical transmission (HSOT) polymer. The HSOT polymer contains optimized heterogeneous structures that produce homogeneously scattered light with forward directivity. The full width at half maximum of the illuminance distribution angle can be increased from 16.7° to 37.9° as the concentration of the scattering particles in the HSOT polymer LED downlight lenses of identical shape is increased from 0.015 to 0.100 wt%. The colors in an illuminated area are highly uniform, which is not discernible by the human eye, with a high output efficiency greater than 85 %.

  11. Cell growth characteristics from angle- and polarization-resolved light scattering: Prospects for two-dimensional correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herran Cuspinera, Roxana M.; Hore, Dennis K.

    2016-11-01

    We highlight the potential of generalized two-dimensional correlation analysis for the fingerprinting of cell growth in solution monitored by light scattering, where the synchronous and asynchronous responses serve as a sensitive marker for the effect of growth conditions on the distribution of cell morphologies. The polarization of the scattered light varies according to the cell size distribution, and so the changes in the polarization over time are an excellent indicator of the dynamic growth conditions. However, direct comparison of the polarization-, time-, and angle-resolved signals between different experiments is hindered by the subtle changes in the data, and the inability to easily adapt models to account for these differences. Using Mie scattering simulations of different growth conditions, and some preliminary experimental data for a single set of conditions, we illustrate that correlation analysis provides rapid and sensitive qualitative markers of growth characteristics.

  12. Multi-angle static and dynamic light scattering investigation of lysozyme association: From crystallization to liquid liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Kazuo; Kanzaki, Noriko

    2007-06-01

    The association of hen egg white lysozyme was observed using time-resolved multi-angle static and dynamic light scattering. In solutions containing 1.2 M of NaCl with a pH of 4.6 buffered by 50 mM of NaAc, and maintained at 20C, the apparent molecular weight Mw, and gyration radius Rg, of lysozyme aggregates were measured at 0.3-5-s intervals for various lysozyme concentrations from 8 to 32 mg/mL using static light scattering. At 32 mg/mL, liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) occurred. The (Kc/ΔR(q)) vs. q2 plot had a non-linear shape with a maximum at a particular q2, indicating that the aggregate size distribution was within a narrow range. This had not been observed in our previous studies of high-molecular-weight proteins. The dynamic light scattering data were consistent with those of static light scattering; i.e., CONTIN analysis showed clear bimodal (monomer and aggregate) distributions. Fractal dimension analysis of the aggregates with the protein concentration showed that the inner structure of the scatterer formed during LLPS was rigid in the final stage, which supports a two-step nucleation model.

  13. Observation of Brewster Angle Light Scattering from Air Bubbles Rising in Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-25

    At the bottom of this pipe a hollow needle is placed which is connected to an air supply. By regulating the air through the needle bubbles were...back scattering direction a beamsplitter was inserted in the light path. Then a retroreflector was placed behind the beamsplitter. The beam coming...out of the retroreflector is reflected at 45’ off the beamsplitter and then focused to a point. This point now defines the backwards direction. 03 0 t W

  14. The effect of pressure, isotopic (H/D) substitution, and other variables on miscibility in polymer-solvent systems. The nature of the demixing process; dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A research program examining the effects of pressure, isotope substitution and other variables on miscibility in polymer solvent systems is described. The techniques employed included phase equilibrium measurements and dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering.

  15. Molecular weight-gyration radius relation of globular proteins: a comparison of light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering and structure-based data.

    PubMed

    Smilgies, Detlef-M; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa

    2015-10-01

    The molecular weight-gyration radius relation for a number of globular proteins based on experimental light scattering data is compared with small-angle X-ray scattering data recently published by Mylonas & Svergun [J. Appl. Cryst. (2007 ▸), 40, s245-s249]. In addition, other recent experimental data and theoretical calculations are reviewed. It is found that the MW-Rg relation for the globular proteins is well represented by a power law with an exponent of 0.37 (2).

  16. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  17. Accurate Size and Size-Distribution Determination of Polystyrene Latex Nanoparticles in Aqueous Medium Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Asymmetrical Flow Field Flow Fractionation with Multi-Angle Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Takahashi, Kayori; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AFFFF) using multi-angle light scattering (MALS) with consideration of band broadening in AFFFF separation. The intensity-average diameter determined by DLS and AFFFF-MALS agreed well within the estimated uncertainties, although the size distribution of PS-latex determined by DLS was less reliable in comparison with that determined by AFFFF-MALS.

  18. Associative phase separation of beta-lactoglobulin/pectin solutions: a kinetic study by small angle static light scattering.

    PubMed

    Girard, Maude; Sanchez, Christian; Laneuville, Sandra I; Turgeon, Sylvie L; Gauthier, Sylvie F

    2004-05-01

    Interpolymer complexation between beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and pectin led to phase separation. Small angle static light scattering and phase contrast microscopy were used to monitor the phase separation of beta-lg/low-methoxyl or high-methoxyl-pectin (LM- or HM-pectin) dispersions as they were slowly acidified from pH 7 to 4 with glucono-delta-lactone (GDL). The monotonic decrease in scattered light intensity with the wave vector was associated with a nucleation and growth phase separation mechanism. Microscopic observations and turbidity measurements showed the increase of complex amounts with lower pH and at higher beta-lg/pectin ratios. The formation of intrapolymer complexes was initiated at pH 6.4 with the LM-pectin and at pH 5.0 with the HM-pectin. Local ordering with increasing amounts of small complexes was observed as scattered light intensity increased at intermediate q values. The beta-lg/LM-pectin complexes at the 5:1 and the 2:1 weight ratios and the beta-lg/HM-pectin complexes at 5:1 weight ratio have fractal structures. The formation of large amounts of small assemblies and sedimentation would be responsible for the decrease in the number and volume mean diameters and fractal dimension of beta-lg/LM-pectin complexes over time.

  19. Angle resolved scatter measurement of bulk scattering in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Miller, J. Keith; Shori, Ramesh K.; Goorsky, Mark S.

    2015-02-01

    Bulk scattering in polycrystalline laser materials (PLM), due to non-uniform refractive index across the bulk, is regarded as the primary loss mechanism leading to degradation of laser performance with higher threshold and lower output power. The need for characterization techniques towards identifying bulk scatter and assessing the quality. Assessment of optical quality and the identification of bulk scatter have been by simple visual inspection of thin samples of PLMs, thus making the measurements highly subjective and inaccurate. Angle Resolved Scatter (ARS) measurement allows for the spatial mapping of scattered light at all possible angles about a sample, mapping the intensity for both forward scatter and back-scatter regions. The cumulative scattered light intensity, in the forward scatter direction, away from the specular beam is used for the comparison of bulk scattering between samples. This technique employ the detection of scattered light at all angles away from the specular beam directions and represented as a 2-D polar map. The high sensitivity of the ARS technique allows us to compare bulk scattering in different PLM samples which otherwise had similar transmitted beam wavefront distortions.

  20. Ternary systems of nonionic surfactant Brij 35, water and various simple alcohols: Structural investigations by small-angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Matija; Bester-Rogac, Marija; Jamnik, Andrej; Kunz, Werner; Touraud, Didier; Bergmann, Alexander; Glatter, Otto

    2006-02-01

    Structural properties of ternary systems composed of nonionic surfactant dodecyl-poly(ethylene oxide-23) ether (C12E23, commercial name: Brij 35), water and various alcohols from ethanol to 1-decanol have been investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. All measurements were performed at the temperature 25 degrees C. SAXS experimental data were put on absolute scale using water as a secondary standard. The data of water-rich mixtures at low to moderate surfactant concentrations were evaluated using the generalized indirect Fourier transformation method (GIFT), which is based on the simultaneous determination of the intra- and inter-particle scattering contributions. In this way, the size and the shape of interacting scattering particles in real space could be deduced. The systems with a relatively low surfactant concentration (5 mass%) were studied most extensively. In these cases, the water-rich regions of the phase diagrams could be investigated into more detail, since in the alcohol-rich regions problems with the GIFT evaluation of the SAXS data were encountered. The presented results demonstrate the level of structural details that can be obtained on the basis of scattering methods and point out the specific stages of data evaluation and interpretation where one must be extremely precautious. As such they reveal the inner structuration of the complex ternary systems of our present interest. In parallel, they also indicate that the longer chain alcohols actually behave as real oil phases in the studied systems, as one might expect, and also confirm the well-known properties of different short to medium chain alcohols that act as co-solvents and/or co-surfactants in microemulsion systems depending on their chain length.

  1. Synthetic Fourier transform light scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Youngchan; Hillman, Timothy R; Min, Bumki; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-09-23

    We present synthetic Fourier transform light scattering, a method for measuring extended angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual microscopic samples. By measuring the light fields scattered from the sample plane and numerically synthesizing them in Fourier space, the angle range of the ARLS patterns is extended up to twice the numerical aperture of the imaging system with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Extended ARLS patterns of individual microscopic polystyrene beads, healthy human red blood cells (RBCs), and Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs are presented.

  2. Both improvements of the light extraction efficiency and scattered angle of GaN-LED using sub-micron Fresnel lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinyu; Chen, Linsen; Shen, Su; Wan, Wenqiang

    2015-11-01

    With the demanding requirements for light source, light emitting diodes (LED) attracts more and more attention because of its inherent advantages such as low power consumption, high reliability and longevity. However, there are two disadvantages for LED, one is the low light extraction efficiency resulting from the total internal reflection, and the other is the relative large scattered angle. In order to improve the light extraction efficiency and collimate the out-coupling light, a sub-micron Fresnel lens array is introduced and investigated in this paper. The focal length of the proposed Fresnel lens is 3μm and the minimum width of the outmost ring is about 150nm. To calculate and analyze the light extraction efficiency and the scattered angle of LED with such Fresnel lens array structure, we optimize the parameters of the Fresnel lens, such as the depth of the Fresnel lens array structure and the thickness of the p-type gallium nitride layer by using the finite difference time domain method (FDTD). By comparing the discussed patterned GaN-based LED with that traditional flat LEDs, it can be found that significant enhancement factor of the light extraction efficiency, which is improved by 3.5 times, can be obtained and the scattered angle at half maximum can be decreased 50° from 60° with this novel Fresnel lens structure. It will be expected that the proposed sub-micron structure can find wide applications in LEDs industry.

  3. Application of GPC/LALLS to cellulose research. [Gel permeation chromatography/low-angle laser light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cael, J.J.; Cietek, D.J.; Kolpak, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of gel permeation chromatography and low-angle laser light scattering (GPC/LALLS) have been combined for absolute determination of cellulose molecular weights and molecular weight distributions (MWD). The GPC/LALLS technique has been applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) solutions of cellulose tricarbanilate (CTC) derivatives prepared from celluloses having a wide range of molecular weights. The molecular weight data obtained are consistent with values determined by intrinsic viscosity methods; and as a consequence of the absolute nature of this technique, Mark-Houswink coefficients can be predicted from a single, broad-distribution, linear homopolymer without recourse to tedious and time-consuming fractional precipitation methods. A unique application of the technique has been in correlating GPC/LALLS molecular weight data with the viscosity of nonderivatized celluloses dissolved in 0.5 M cupiethylenediamine hydroxide (CuEn). The procedure yields an absolute viscosity-molecular weight relationship which is comparable with a similar relationship originally derived from cellulose nitrates. The results indicate that the weight-average degree of polymerization (DP/sub w/) for CTC preparations is considerably greater than that obtained from cellulose nitrates, and this discrepancy, in DP/sub w/ has been attributed to errors in the Mark-Houwink coefficients for the cellulose nitrate-acetone system. 25 references, 9 figures, 7 tables.

  4. How Spirals and Gaps Driven by Companions in Protoplanetary Disks Appear in Scattered Light at Arbitrary Viewing Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-07-01

    Direct imaging observations of protoplanetary disks at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths have revealed structures of potentially planetary origin. Investigations of observational signatures from planet-induced features have so far focused on disks viewed face-on. Combining 3D hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simulations, we study how the appearance of the spiral arms and the gap produced in a disk by a companion varies with inclination and position angle in NIR scattered light. We compare the cases of a 3M J and a 0.1M ⊙ companion, and make predictions suitable for testing with Gemini/GPI, Very Large Telescope/NACO/SPHERE, and Subaru/HiCIAO/SCExAO. We find that the two trailing arms produced by an external perturber can have a variety of morphologies in inclined systems—they may appear as one trailing arm; two trailing arms on the same side of the disk; or two arms winding in opposite directions. The disk ring outside a planetary gap may also mimic spiral arms when viewed at high inclinations. We suggest potential explanations for the features observed in HH 30, HD 141569 A, AK Sco, HD 100546, and AB Aur. We emphasize that inclined views of companion-induced features cannot be converted into face-on views using simple and commonly practiced image deprojections.

  5. A study of alcohol-induced gelation of beta-lactoglobulin with small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin echo, and dynamic light scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Koji; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Osaka, Noboru; Endo, Hitoshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2010-04-07

    Gelation of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) in various alcohol-water mixtures with 0.1 M (M = mol L(-1)) hydrochloric acid was investigated with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), neutron spin echo (NSE), and time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TRDLS) measurements. The beta-Lg in alcohol-water solutions undergoes gelation at specific alcohol concentrations where the alcohol-induced alpha-helical structure of beta-Lg is stabilized. The SANS profiles showed that beta-Lg exists as a single molecule at a low alcohol concentration. With increasing alcohol concentration, the profiles indicate a power law behavior of approximately 1.7 when the samples gelate. These behaviors were observed in all alcohol-water mixtures used, but the alcohol concentrations where the SANS profiles change shift to a lower alcohol concentration region with an increase in the size of the hydrophobic group of the alcohols. Apparent diffusion constants, obtained from the intermediate scattering function (ISF) of NSE and the intensity time correlation function (ITCF) of TRDLS, mainly depend on the viscosity of alcohol-water mixtures before gelation. After gelation, on the other hand, the ISFs of gels do not change appreciably in the range of the NSE time scale, indicating the microscopically rigid structure of beta-Lg gel. The ITCF functions obtained from TRDLS follow a double exponential decay type before gelation, but a logarithmic one (exponent alpha = 0.7) after gelation. It is most likely that the alcohol-induced gelation undergoes a similar mechanism to that for the heat-induced one at pH = 7 where beta-Lg aggregates stick together to form a fractal network, although the gelation time is faster in the former than in the latter.

  6. Modulated heterodyne light scattering set-up for measuring long relaxation time at small and wide angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Nancy; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto

    2012-08-01

    We present a simple, compact, and versatile experimental setup working in the heterodyne detection mode with modulation of the reference beam. The system is implemented with a collection optics based on a unimodal optical fiber coupler. This choice allows the heterodyne to be used in a wide range of scattering angles, even for very small ones, without losing the optical beating. The apparatus can be successfully used to study translational diffusive dynamics of dispersed particles at scattering angles smaller than 5° and it is suitable for exploring slow relaxation processes in sub-Hertz frequency domain, for example, in glass-forming systems. It is also possible to measure the electrophoretic mobility by applying an electric field into a charged particles solution.

  7. Investigation on the structure of water/AOT/IPM/alcohols reverse micelles by conductivity, dynamic light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Chen, Yingjun; Liu, Jiexiang; Zhao, Chuanzhuang; Zhang, Haijiao

    2012-03-29

    We have systematically investigated the effect of alcohols (ethanol, propanol, butanol, and pentanol) on the structure of the water/AOT/IPM system using conductivity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The results show that no percolation phenomenon is observed in the water/AOT/IPM system, whereas the addition of ethanol (propanol and butanol) induces apparently percolation. The threshold water content (W(p)) depends closely on the alcohol type and concentration. The effect of alcohols on the conductance behavior is discussed from the physical properties of alcohols, the interfacial flexibility, and the attractive interactions between droplets. The hydrodynamic diameter of droplets (d(H)) obtained from DLS increases markedly with the increase in water content (W(0)); however, it decreases gradually with increasing alcohol chain length and concentration. SAXS measurements display distinctly the shoulder, the low hump peaks, and the heavy tail phenomenon in the pair distance distribution function p(r) profile, which rely strongly on the alcohol species and its concentration. The gyration radius (R(g)) increases with increasing W(0), and decreases with the increase of alcohol chain length and concentration. Schematic diagram of the conductance mechanism of water/AOT/IPM/alcohol systems is primarily depicted. Three different phases of the discrete droplets, the oligomers, and the isolated ellipsoidal droplets existed in the different W(0) ranges correspond to three different stages in the conductivity-W(0) curve. Coupling the structure characteristics of reverse micelles obtained from DLS and SAXS techniques with conductivity could be greatly helpful to deeply understand the percolation mechanism of water/AOT/IPM/alcohols systems.

  8. A mobile system for a comprehensive online-characterization of nanoparticle aggregates based on wide-angle light scattering and laser-induced incandescence.

    PubMed

    Huber, Franz J T; Altenhoff, Michael; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    A mobile demonstrator for the comprehensive online-characterization of gas-borne nanoparticle aggregates is presented. Two optical measurement techniques are combined, both utilizing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. Aggregate size and fractal dimension are measured by Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS). An ellipsoidal mirror images elastically scattered light from scattering angles between 10° and 165° onto a CCD-camera chip resulting in an almost complete scattering diagram with high angular resolution. Primary particle size and volume fraction are measured by time-resolved Laser-Induced Incandescence (TiRe-LII). Here, particles are heated up to about 3000 K by the short laser pulse, the enhanced thermal radiation signal is detected with gated photomultiplier tubes. Analysis of the signal decay time and maximum LII-signal allows for the determination of primary particle diameter and volume fraction. The performance of the system is demonstrated by combined measurements on soot nanoparticle aggregates from a soot aerosol generator. Particle and aggregate sizes are varied by using different equivalence ratios of the combustion in the generator. Soot volume fraction can be adjusted by different levels of dilution with air. Online-measurements were carried out demonstrating the favorable performance of the system and the potential for industrial applications such as process control and product development. The particle properties obtained are confirmed through transmission electron microscopy analysis on representative samples.

  9. A mobile system for a comprehensive online-characterization of nanoparticle aggregates based on wide-angle light scattering and laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Franz J. T.; Altenhoff, Michael; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    A mobile demonstrator for the comprehensive online-characterization of gas-borne nanoparticle aggregates is presented. Two optical measurement techniques are combined, both utilizing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. Aggregate size and fractal dimension are measured by Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS). An ellipsoidal mirror images elastically scattered light from scattering angles between 10° and 165° onto a CCD-camera chip resulting in an almost complete scattering diagram with high angular resolution. Primary particle size and volume fraction are measured by time-resolved Laser-Induced Incandescence (TiRe-LII). Here, particles are heated up to about 3000 K by the short laser pulse, the enhanced thermal radiation signal is detected with gated photomultiplier tubes. Analysis of the signal decay time and maximum LII-signal allows for the determination of primary particle diameter and volume fraction. The performance of the system is demonstrated by combined measurements on soot nanoparticle aggregates from a soot aerosol generator. Particle and aggregate sizes are varied by using different equivalence ratios of the combustion in the generator. Soot volume fraction can be adjusted by different levels of dilution with air. Online-measurements were carried out demonstrating the favorable performance of the system and the potential for industrial applications such as process control and product development. The particle properties obtained are confirmed through transmission electron microscopy analysis on representative samples.

  10. Size fractionation and size characterization of nanoemulsions of lipid droplets and large unilamellar lipid vesicles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Vezočnik, Valerija; Rebolj, Katja; Sitar, Simona; Ota, Katja; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Štrus, Jasna; Sepčić, Kristina; Pahovnik, David; Maček, Peter; Žagar, Ema

    2015-10-30

    Asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique coupled to a multi-angle light-scattering detector (AF4-MALS) was used together with dynamic light-scattering (DLS) in batch mode and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the size characteristics of the trioleoylglycerol lipid droplets covered by a monolayer of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, in water phase. These lipid droplet nanoemulsions (LD) were formed by ultrasonication. In parallel, the size characteristics of large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUV) prepared by extrusion and composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol were determined. LD and LUV were prepared at two different molar ratios (1/1, 4/1) of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. In AF4-MALS, various cross-flow conditions and mobile phase compositions were tested to optimize the separation of LD or LUV particles. The particle radii, R, as well as the root-mean-square radii, Rrms, of LD and LUV were determined by AF4-MALS, whereas the hydrodynamic radii, Rh, were obtained by DLS. TEM visualization revealed round shape particles of LD and LUV.

  11. Spectral angle resolved scattering of thin film coatings.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sven; Unglaub, David; Trost, Marcus; Cheng, Xinbin; Zhang, Jinlong; Duparré, Angela

    2014-02-01

    The light scattering of interference coatings is strongly dependent on the wavelength. In addition to the general strong increase of scattering as the wavelengths get shorter, dramatic scatter effects in and around the resonance regions can occur. This is discussed in detail for highly reflective and chirped mirrors. A new instrument is presented which enables spectral angle resolved scatter measurements of high-quality optical components to be performed between 250 and 1500 nm.

  12. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  13. Biological cell classification by multiangle light scattering

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, G.C.; Crowell, J.M.; Mullaney, P.F.

    1975-06-03

    The specification is directed to an apparatus and method for detecting light scattering from a biological cell. Light, preferably from a coherent source of radiation, intercepts an individual biological cell in a stream of cells passing through the beam. Light scattered from the cell is detected at a selected number of angles between 0 and 90/sup 0/ to the longitudinal axis of the beam with a circular array of light responsive elements which produce signals representative of the intensity of light incident thereon. Signals from the elements are processed to determine the light-scattering pattern of the cell and therefrom its identity.

  14. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  15. Implementation and performance of SIBYLS: a dual endstation small-angle X-ray scattering and macromolecular crystallography beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Classen, Scott; Hura, Greg L.; Holton, James M.; Rambo, Robert P.; Rodic, Ivan; McGuire, Patrick J.; Dyer, Kevin; Hammel, Michal; Meigs, George; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Tainer, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The SIBYLS beamline (12.3.1) of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, supported by the US Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, is optimized for both small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and macromolecular crystallography (MX), making it unique among the world’s mostly SAXS or MX dedicated beamlines. Since SIBYLS was commissioned, assessments of the limitations and advantages of a combined SAXS and MX beamline have suggested new strategies for integration and optimal data collection methods and have led to additional hardware and software enhancements. Features described include a dual mode monochromator [containing both Si(111) crystals and Mo/B4C multilayer elements], rapid beamline optics conversion between SAXS and MX modes, active beam stabilization, sample-loading robotics, and mail-in and remote data collection. These features allow users to gain valuable insights from both dynamic solution scattering and high-resolution atomic diffraction experiments performed at a single synchrotron beamline. Key practical issues considered for data collection and analysis include radiation damage, structural ensembles, alternative conformers and flexibility. SIBYLS develops and applies efficient combined MX and SAXS methods that deliver high-impact results by providing robust cost-effective routes to connect structures to biology and by performing experiments that aid beamline designs for next generation light sources. PMID:23396808

  16. On-line direct determination of the second virial coefficient of a natural polysaccharide using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle laser light scattering.

    PubMed

    Girod, S; Baldet-Dupy, P; Maillols, H; Devoisselle, J M

    2002-01-11

    By combining a size-exclusion chromatographic (SEC) separation and an on-line multi-angle light scattering (MALLS) analysis, we have elaborated an original methodology permitting on-line direct determination of the second virial coefficient of molar mass fractions of polydisperse polysaccharides. By assimilating the SEC-MALLS data to a batch mode acquisition, we have obtained on-line the complete Zimm plot of the eluted fractions, leading to knowledge of their weight-average molar mass Mw, radius of gyration r(g) and second virial coefficient A2. Our methodology was successfully applied to a iota carrageenan sample in LiCl 100 mM, EDTA 1 g/l.

  17. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  18. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  19. Amorphous supramolecular structure of carboxymethyl cellulose in aqueous solution at different pH values as determined by rheology, small angle X-ray and light scattering.

    PubMed

    Dogsa, Iztok; Tomšič, Matija; Orehek, Janez; Benigar, Elizabeta; Jamnik, Andrej; Stopar, David

    2014-10-13

    Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) is one of the most widely used thickening agents in industry. The combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), static and dynamic light scattering, as well as viscosity measurements and microscopy at different pH values was utilized to explore the physicochemical properties of CMC on a scale ranging from individual macromolecules to supramolecular assemblies. The supramolecular structure of CMC was represented as a set of characteristic sample subspaces based on SAXS data utilizing the string-of-beads model. The results indicate that at pH 7.0 individual CMC molecules are approximately uniformly distributed in a supramolecular structure owing to strong intra- and intermolecular repulsive interactions. The structure of CMC is most expanded at the value of pKa, where it has the largest radius of gyration, persistence length, and size of heterogeneous regions. Below pKa the majority of the CMC sample volume belongs to the low density subspaces. Most of CMC molecules, however, reside in a few high density subspaces. Dynamically, supramolecular structure of CMC is composed of fast diffusive relaxation processes embedded in a background of non-diffusive slow relaxation process at high pH and mostly slow relaxation processes at low pH. The rheological properties of CMC at different pH values were directly related to the CMC supramolecular structure in the aqueous environment.

  20. Particle chaos and pitch angle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Speiser, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    Pitch angle scattering is a factor that helps determine the dawn-to-dusk current, controls particle energization, and it has also been used as a remote probe of the current sheet structure. Previous studies have interpreted their results under the exception that randomization will be greatest when the ratio of the two timescales of motion (gyration parallel to and perpendicular to the current sheet) is closet to one. Recently, the average expotential divergence rate (AEDR) has been calculated for particle motion in a hyperbolic current sheet (Chen, 1992). It is claimed that this AEDR measures the degree of chaos and therefore may be thought to measure the randomization. In contrast to previous expectations, the AEDR is not maximized when Kappa is approximately equal to 1 but instead increases with decreasing Kappa. Also contrary to previous expectations, the AEDR is dependent upon the parameter b(sub z). In response to the challenge to previous expectations that has been raised by this calculation of the AEDR, we have investigated the dependence of a measure of particle pitch angle scattering on both the parameters Kappa and b(sub z). We find that, as was previously expected, particle pitch angle scattering is maximized near Kappa = 1 provided that Kappa/b(sub z) greater than 1. In the opposite regime, Kappa/b(sub z) less than 1, we find that particle pitch angle scattering is still largest when the two timescales are equal, but the ratio of the timescales is proportional to b(sub z). In this second regime, particle pitch angle scattering is not due to randomization, but is instead due to a systematic pitch angle change. This result shows that particle pitch angle scattering need not be due to randomization and indicates how a measure of pitch angle scattering can exhibit a different behavior than a measure of chaos.

  1. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-06

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data.

  2. Wide angle light collection with ultralow reflection and super scattering by silicon micro-nanostructures for thin crystalline silicon solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sonali; Kundu, Avra; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional c-Si solar cells employ micron-sized pyramids for achieving reduced reflection (˜10%) and enhanced light trapping by multiple bounces (maximum 3) of the incident light. Alternatively, bio-mimetic, moth-eye sub-wavelength nanostructures offer broadband antireflection properties (˜3%) suitable for solar cell applications in the optical regime. However, such structures do not provide any advantage in the charge carrier extraction process as radial junctions cannot be formed in such sub-wavelength dimensions and they have high surface area causing increased charged carrier recombination. The choice of the geometry for achieving optimum photon-electron harvesting for solar applications is therefore very critical. Cross-fertilization of the conventional solar cell light-trapping techniques and the sub-wavelength nanostructures results in unique micro-nanostructures (structures having sub-wavelength dimensions as well as dimensions of the order of few microns) which provide advanced light management capabilities along with the ability of realizing radial junctions. It is seen that an ultralow reflection along with wide angle light collection is obtained which enables such structures to overcome the morning, evening and winter light losses in solar cells. Further, super-scattering in the structures offer enhanced light trapping not only in the structure itself but also in the substrate housing the structure. Ray and wave optics have been used to understand the optical benefits of the structures. It is seen that the aspect ratio of the structures plays the most significant role for achieving such light management capabilities, and efficiencies as high as 12% can be attained. Experiments have been carried out to fabricate a unique micro-nanomaze-like structure instead of a periodic array of micro-nanostructures with the help of nanosphere lithography and the MacEtch technique. It is seen that randomized micro-nanomaze geometry offers very good antireflection

  3. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  4. Bidirectional scattering of light from tree leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, Thomas W.; Smith, James A.; Harnden, Joann M.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory goniometer consisting of an He-Ne laser (632.8 nm), vertical leaf holder, and silicon photovoltaic detector was used to measure the bidirectional scattering (both transmittance and reflectance) of red oak and red maple. The illumination angles were 0, 30, and 60 deg, and the scattering was recorded approximately every 10 deg in the principal plane. The scattering profiles obtained show the non-Lambertian characteristics of the scattering, particularly for the off-nadir illumination directions. The transmitted light was more isotropic than the reflected light.

  5. Light Scattering by Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ming; Ji, Xia

    Nowadays, with the development of technology, particles with size at nanoscale have been synthesized in experiments. It is noticed that anisotropy is an unavoidable problem in the production of nanospheres. Besides, nonspherical nanoparticles have also been extensively used in experiments. Comparing with spherical model, spheroidal model can give a better description for the characteristics of nonspherical particles. Thus the study of analytical solution for light scattering by spheroidal particles has practical implications. By expanding incident, scattered, and transmitted electromagnetic fields in terms of appropriate vector spheroidal wave functions, an analytic solution is obtained to the problem of light scattering by spheroids. Unknown field expansion coefficients can be determined with the combination of boundary conditions and rotational-translational addition theorems for vector spheroidal wave functions. Based on the theoretical derivation, a Fortran code has been developed to calculate the extinction cross section and field distribution, whose results agree well with those obtain by FDTD simulation. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 91230203.

  6. Absolute molecular weight determination of hypromellose acetate succinate by size exclusion chromatography: use of a multi angle laser light scattering detector and a mixed solvent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Raymond; Ilasi, Nicholas; Sekulic, Sonja S

    2011-12-05

    Molecular weight distribution is an important quality attribute for hypromellose acetate succinate (HPMCAS), a pharmaceutical excipient used in spray-dried dispersions. Our previous study showed that neither relative nor universal calibration method of size exclusion chromatography (SEC) works for HPMCAS polymers. We here report our effort to develop a SEC method using a mass sensitive multi angle laser light scattering detector (MALLS) to determine molecular weight distributions of HPMCAS polymers. A solvent screen study reveals that a mixed solvent (60:40%, v/v 50mM NaH(2)PO(4) with 0.1M NaNO(3) buffer: acetonitrile, pH* 8.0) is the best for HPMCAS-LF and MF sub-classes. Use of a mixed solvent creates a challenging condition for the method that uses refractive index detector. Therefore, we thoroughly evaluated the method performance and robustness. The mean weight average molecular weight of a polyethylene oxide standard has a 95% confidence interval of (28,443-28,793) g/mol vs. 28,700g/mol from the Certificate of Analysis. The relative standard deviations of average molecular weights for all polymers are 3-6%. These results and the Design of Experiments study demonstrate that the method is accurate and robust.

  7. The application of low angle light scattering to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the dynamics of formation of oligomers in heme protein sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabino, Luis G.; Guimarães, Wellinson Gadelha; Costa, Pedro Mikael; Carepo, Marta S. P.; Gondim, Ana C. S.; Lopes, Luiz G. F.; Sousa, Eduardo H. S.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the structural organization and oligomerization properties of the sensory kinase protein DevS using low-angle light scattering (LALS) and gel filtration chromatography (HPLC). In addition, the structural characteristics of FixL and BSA were investigated and compared with DevS to better elucidate LALS technique. DevS is a direct and specific O2 sensing protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and acts as an activator of the transcription factor protein DevR. This latter triggers the latency state of tuberculosis under hypoxic conditions. DevS has been briefly evaluated under different conditions of concentration, ionic strength and temperature. LALS and gel filtration (HPLC) analysis were performed right after DevS purification process. The results of LALS for BSA proved to be highly reliable with a Rh value of c.a. 3.7 nm. Considering BSA a globular protein, the molecular weight estimative, using LALS was near 67 KDa, which is reasonably within the value reported in the literature. Preliminary LALS results showed a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) varying from 4.2-15.0 nm for DevS protein, and an average of 6.7 nm. These data supported, along with gel filtration, a dimer (~130 KDa) and tetramer (255 KDa) as the main DevS species. Additionally, it was found higher oligomeric species by gel filtration suggesting either an equilibrium of oligomers or an aggregation process that deserves further studies.

  8. Determination of the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin under varying pH and ionic strength by composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingfang; Acosta, Diana M; Whitney, Jon R; Podgornik, Rudolf; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering (CG-MALS) is an emerging technique for the determination of intermolecular interactions via the second virial coefficient B22. With CG-MALS, detailed studies of the second virial coefficient can be carried out more accurately and effectively than with traditional methods. In addition, automated mixing, delivery and measurement enable high speed, continuous, fluctuation-free sample delivery and accurate results. Using CG-MALS we measure the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solutions at various values of pH and ionic strength of a univalent salt (NaCl). The systematic variation of the second virial coefficient as a function of pH and NaCl strength reveals the net charge change and the isoelectric point of BSA under different solution conditions. The magnitude of the second virial coefficient decreases to 1.13 x 10(-5) ml*mol/g(2) near the isoelectric point of pH 4.6 and 25 mM NaCl. These results illuminate the role of fundamental long-range electrostatic and van der Waals forces in protein-protein interactions, specifically their dependence on pH and ionic strength.

  9. Directional light scattering from individual Au nanocup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jinjun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Bo

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the optical scattering properties of gold nanocup with different orientation and fractional height by full vector finite element method. All of the scattering cross section, the distribution of electric field intensity, and the ability of directional light scattering are simulated, respectively. It is demonstrated that the scattering cross section of Au nanocup is a superposition of scattering spectrum of a transverse mode and an axial mode. The wavelength and the intensity of the maximum value of the scattering cross section increase initially then reduce with the fractional height increasing for transverse mode, while they increase monotonously with the fractional height increasing for axial mode. Furthermore, the calculation results show that the ability of redirecting incident light of Au nanocup mainly depends on the transverse mode. And the deflected angle of scattering increases with the fractional height of Au nanocup decreasing. These results indicate that Au nanocup has a promising application in the planar plasmon devices.

  10. Improved Optics For Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Harry Michael

    1995-01-01

    Improved optical train devised for use in light-scattering measurements of quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and laser spectroscopy. Measurements performed on solutions, microemulsions, micellular solutions, and colloidal dispersions. Simultaneous measurements of total intensity and fluctuations in total intensity of light scattered from sample at various angles provides data used, in conjunction with diffusion coefficients, to compute sizes of particles in sample.

  11. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  12. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 54 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs.

  14. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  15. Review of light scattering literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Marie K.

    1994-06-01

    This report reviews the recent literature of static and dynamic light scattering of dilute and semidilute polymer solutions and gels, as obtained from the Chemical Abstracts Macromolecular Sections, and an electronic literature search. In general, this review has been confined to the interests of the Polymer Research Branch, specifically experimental light scattering studies of synthetic polymers in solution. In order to further limit the size of this review, light scattering for phase separation studies or particle size analysis have been excluded, as well as light scattering used strictly for size exclusion chromatography detection.

  16. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  17. Hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering investigation of the size, shape and metal-release of silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium for nano-risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Marassi, Valentina; Casolari, Sonia; Roda, Barbara; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Panzavolta, Silvia; Tofail, Syed A M; Ortelli, Simona; Delpivo, Camilla; Blosi, Magda; Costa, Anna Luisa

    2015-03-15

    Due to the increased use of silver nanoparticles in industrial scale manufacturing, consumer products and nanomedicine reliable measurements of properties such as the size, shape and distribution of these nano particles in aqueous medium is critical. These properties indeed affect both functional properties and biological impacts especially in quantifying associated risks and identifying suitable risk-mediation strategies. The feasibility of on-line coupling of a fractionation technique such as hollow-fiber flow field flow fractionation (HF5) with a light scattering technique such as MALS (multi-angle light scattering) is investigated here for this purpose. Data obtained from such a fractionation technique and its combination thereof with MALS have been compared with those from more conventional but often complementary techniques e.g. transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. The combination of fractionation and multi angle light scattering techniques have been found to offer an ideal, hyphenated methodology for a simultaneous size-separation and characterization of silver nanoparticles. The hydrodynamic radii determined by fractionation techniques can be conveniently correlated to the mean average diameters determined by multi angle light scattering and reliable information on particle morphology in aqueous dispersion has been obtained. The ability to separate silver (Ag(+)) ions from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via membrane filtration during size analysis is an added advantage in obtaining quantitative insights to its risk potential. Most importantly, the methodology developed in this article can potentially be extended to similar characterization of metal-based nanoparticles when studying their functional effectiveness and hazard potential.

  18. Multiple-Fiber-Optic Probe For Light-Scattering Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple-fiber-optical probe developed for use in measuring light scattered at various angles from specimens of materials. Designed for both static and dynamic light-scattering measurements of colloidal dispersions. Probe compact, rugged unit containing no moving parts and remains stationary during operation. Not restricted to operation in controlled, research-laboratory environment. Positioned inside or outside light-scattering chamber. Provides simultaneous measurements at small angular intervals over range of angles, made to include small scattering angles by orienting probe in appropriate direction.

  19. Resonance enhanced dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Plum, Markus A; Menges, Bernhard; Fytas, George; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Steffen, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel light scattering setup that enables probing of dynamics near solid surfaces. An evanescent wave generated by a surface plasmon resonance in a metal layer is the incident light field in the dynamic light scattering experiment. The combination of surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering leads to a spatiotemporal resolution extending a few hundred nanometers from the surface and from microseconds to seconds. The comparison with evanescent wave dynamic light scattering identifies the advantages of the presented technique, e.g., surface monitoring, use of metal surfaces, and biorelevant systems. For both evanescent wave geometries, we define the scattering wave vector necessary for the analysis of the experimental relaxation functions.

  20. Scattered light mapping of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolker, T.; Dominik, C.; Min, M.; Garufi, A.; Mulders, G. D.; Avenhaus, H.

    2016-12-01

    Context. High-contrast scattered light observations have revealed the surface morphology of several dozen protoplanetary disks at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Inclined disks offer the opportunity to measure part of the phase function of the dust grains that reside in the disk surface which is essential for our understanding of protoplanetary dust properties and the early stages of planet formation. Aims: We aim to construct a method which takes into account how the flaring shape of the scattering surface of an optically thick protoplanetary disk projects onto the image plane of the observer. This allows us to map physical quantities (e.g., scattering radius and scattering angle) onto scattered light images and retrieve stellar irradiation corrected images (r2-scaled) and dust phase functions. Methods: The scattered light mapping method projects a power law shaped disk surface onto the detector plane after which the observed scattered light image is interpolated backward onto the disk surface. We apply the method on archival polarized intensity images of the protoplanetary disk around HD 100546 that were obtained with VLT/SPHERE in the R' band and VLT/NACO in the H and Ks bands. Results: The brightest side of the r2-scaled R' band polarized intensity image of HD 100546 changes from the far to the near side of the disk when a flaring instead of a geometrically flat disk surface is used for the r2-scaling. The decrease in polarized surface brightness in the scattering angle range of 40°-70° is likely a result of the dust phase function and degree of polarization which peak in different scattering angle regimes. The derived phase functions show part of a forward scattering peak, which indicates that large, aggregate dust grains dominate the scattering opacity in the disk surface. Conclusions: Projection effects of a protoplanetary disk surface need to be taken into account to correctly interpret scattered light images. Applying the correct scaling for the

  1. Fourier transform light scattering angular spectroscopy using digital inline holography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2012-10-01

    A simple and practical method for measuring the angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual objects is reported. Employing the principle of inline holography and a Fourier transform light scattering technique, both the static and dynamic scattering patterns from individual micrometer-sized objects can be effectively and quantitatively obtained. First, the light scattering measurements were performed on individual polystyrene beads, from which the refractive index and diameter of each bead were retrieved. Also, the measurements of the static and dynamic light scattering from intact human red blood cells are demonstrated. Using the present method, an existing microscope can be directly transformed into a precise instrument for ARLS measurements.

  2. Light scattering measurement of sodium polyacrylate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Nisha; Norwood, David; Boone, Steven; Massie-Boyer, Valerie

    2015-03-01

    In the presentation, we will describe the use of a multi-detector HPLC incorporating the DAWN EOS multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector to measure the properties such as molecular weight, RMS radius, contour and persistence length and polydispersity of sodium polyacrylate products. The samples of sodium polyacrylate are used in various industries as thickening agents, coating dispersants, artificial snow, laundry detergent and disposable diapers. Data and results obtained from the experiment will be presented.

  3. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  4. Selective scattering polymer dispersed liquid crystal film for light enhancement of organic light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinghua; McGraw, Greg; Ma, Ruiqing; Brown, Julie; Yang, Deng-Ke

    2017-02-20

    We developed a novel light enhancing film for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) based on polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC). In the film, the liquid crystal droplets are unidirectionally aligned along the film normal direction and exhibit selective scattering. The film scatters light emitted only in directions with large incident angles but not light emitted in directions with small incident angles. When the light is scattered, it changes propagation direction and exits the OLED. The PDLC film reduces the total internal reflection and thus can significantly increase the light efficiency of the OLED.

  5. Investigating hard sphere interactions through spin echo scattering angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Adam

    Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) allows neutron scattering instruments to perform real space measurements on large micron scale samples by encoding the scattering angle into the neutron's spin state via Larmor precession. I have built a SESAME instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source. I have also assisted in the construction of a modular SESAME instrument on the ASTERIX beamline at Los Alamos National lab. The ability to tune these instruments has been proved mathematically and optimized and automated experimentally. Practical limits of the SESAME technique with respect to polarization analyzers, neutron spectra, Larmor elements, and data analysis were investigated. The SESAME technique was used to examine the interaction of hard spheres under depletion. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres suspended in decalin had previously been studied as a hard sphere solution. The interparticle correlations between the spheres were found to match the Percus-Yevick closure, as had been previously seen in dynamical light scattering experiments. To expand beyond pure hard spheres, 900kDa polystyrene was added to the solution in concentrations of less than 1% by mass. The steric effects of the polystyrene were expected to produce a short-range, attractive, "sticky" potential. Experiment showed, however, that the "sticky" potential was not a stable state and that the spheres would eventually form long range aggregates.

  6. Multiple small angle neutron scattering: A new two-dimensional ultrasmall angle neutron scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenzweig, C.; Hils, T.; Muehlbauer, S.; Ay, M.; Lorenz, K.; Georgii, R.; Gaehler, R.; Boeni, P.

    2007-11-12

    We report on the demonstration experiment of the multiple small angle neutron scattering (MSANS) technique at a 5.6 m long neutron beam line, leading to a q resolution of 3x10{sup -4} A{sup -1}. The MSANS technique is based on two two-dimensional multihole apertures placed at the front end of the collimator and close to the sample, respectively. By choosing the proper MSANS geometry, individual diffraction patterns are superimposed leading to a large gain in intensity. Using MSANS as an option for standard small angle neutron scattering beam lines, the q resolution could be increased to 10{sup -5} A{sup -1} without dramatically sacrificing intensity.

  7. Zeno: Critical Fluid Light Scattering Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Boukari, Hacene; Gent, David A.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    1996-01-01

    The Zeno (Critical Fluid Light Scattering) experiment is the culmination of a long history of critical fluid light scattering in liquid-vapor systems. The major limitation to making accurate measurements closer to the critical point was the density stratification which occurs in these extremely compressible fluids. Zeno was to determine the critical density fluctuation decay rates at a pair of supplementary angles in the temperature range 100 mK to 100 (mu)K from T(sub c) in a sample of xenon accurately loaded to the critical density. This paper gives some highlights from operating the instrument on two flights March, 1994 on STS-62 and February, 1996 on STS-75. More detail of the experiment Science Requirements, the personnel, apparatus, and results are displayed on the Web homepage at http://www.zeno.umd.edu.

  8. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  9. Inelastic light scattering from correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereaux, Thomas P.; Hackl, Rudi

    2007-01-01

    Inelastic light scattering is an intensively used tool in the study of electronic properties of solids. Triggered by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates and by new developments in instrumentation, light scattering in both the visible (Raman effect) and x-ray part of the electromagnetic spectrum has become a method complementary to optical (infrared) spectroscopy while providing additional and relevant information. The main purpose of the review is to position Raman scattering with regard to single-particle methods like angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and other transport and thermodynamic measurements in correlated materials. Particular focus will be placed on photon polarizations and the role of symmetry to elucidate the dynamics of electrons in different regions of the Brillouin zone. This advantage over conventional transport (usually measuring averaged properties) provides new insights into anisotropic and complex many-body behavior of electrons in various systems. Recent developments in the theory of electronic Raman scattering in correlated systems and experimental results in paradigmatic materials such as the A15 superconductors, magnetic and paramagnetic insulators, compounds with competing orders, as well as the cuprates with high superconducting transition temperatures are reviewed. An overview of the manifestations of complexity in the Raman response due to the impact of correlations and developing competing orders is presented. In a variety of materials, observations which may be understood and a summary of important open questions that pave the way to a detailed understanding of correlated electron systems, are discussed.

  10. Laser Light Scattering with Multiple Scattering Suppression Used to Measure Particle Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tin, Padetha; Lock, James A.; Cannell, David S.; Smart, Anthony E.; Taylor, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light scattering is the technique of choice for noninvasively sizing particles in a fluid. The members of the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) project in laser light scattering at the NASA Lewis Research Center have invented, tested, and recently enhanced a simple and elegant way to extend the concentration range of this standard laboratory particle-sizing technique by several orders of magnitude. With this technique, particles from 3 nm to 3 mm can be measured in a solution. Recently, laser light scattering evolved to successfully size particles in both clear solutions and concentrated milky-white solutions. The enhanced technique uses the property of light that causes it to form tall interference patterns at right angles to the scattering plane (perpendicular to the laser beam) when it is scattered from a narrow laser beam. Such multiple-scattered light forms a broad fuzzy halo around the focused beam, which, in turn, forms short interference patterns. By placing two fiber optics on top of each other and perpendicular to the laser beam (see the drawing), and then cross-correlating the signals they produce, only the tall interference patterns formed by singly scattered light are detected. To restate this, unless the two fiber optics see the same interference pattern, the scattered light is not incorporated into the signal. With this technique, only singly scattered light is seen (multiple-scattered light is rejected) because only singly scattered light has an interference pattern tall enough to span both of the fiber-optic pickups. This technique is simple to use, easy to align, and works at any angle. Placing a vertical slit in front of the signal collection fibers enhanced this approach. The slit serves as an optical mask, and it significantly shortens the time needed to collect good data by selectively masking out much of the unwanted light before cross-correlation is applied.

  11. Characterization of the refolding and reassembly of an integral membrane protein OmpF porin by low-angle laser light scattering photometry coupled with high-performance gel chromatography.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasushi

    2002-06-28

    The refolding and reassembly of an integral membrane protein OmpF porin denatured in sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) into its stable species by the addition of n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG) have been studied by means of circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and low-angle laser light scattering photometry coupled with high-performance gel chromatography. The minimal concentration where change in the secondary structure was induced by the addition of OG was found to be 6.0 mg/ml in CD experiments. A species unfolded further than the SDS-denatured form of this protein was observed at an early stage (5-15 min) of refolding just above the minimal OG concentration. In addition, the CD spectrum of protein species obtained above the minimal OG concentration showed that the protein is composed of a beta-structure which is different from the native structure of this protein. In light scattering experiments, no changes in molecular assemblies were observed when the OG concentration was below its minimal refolding concentration determined by CD measurements. Above the minimal concentration, a compact monomeric species was observed when denatured OmpF porin was incubated for 5 min at 25 degrees C in a refolding medium containing 1 mg/ml SDS and 7 mg/ml OG, and then injected into columns equilibrated with the refolding medium. After an incubation of 24 h before injection into the columns, predominant dimerization of this protein was observed in addition to incorrect aggregation.

  12. LIGHT SCATTERING: Fast path-integration technique in simulation of light propagation through highly scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, Aleksandr V.; Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    2004-06-01

    Based on the path-integration technique and the Metropolis method, the original calculation scheme is developed for solving the problem of light propagation through highly scattering objects. The elimination of calculations of 'unnecessary' realisations and the phenomenological description of processes of multiple small-angle scattering provided a drastic increase (by nine and more orders of magnitude) in the calculation rate, retaining the specific features of the problem (consideration of spatial inhomogeneities, boundary conditions, etc.). The scheme allows one to verify other fast calculation algorithms and to obtain information required to reconstruct the internal structure of highly scattering objects (of size ~1000 scattered lengths and more) by the method of diffusion optical tomography.

  13. Light Scattering in Exoplanet Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-10-01

    Transit spectroscopy is currently the leading technique for studying exoplanet atmospheric composition, and has led to the detection of molecular species, clouds, and/or hazes for numerous worlds outside the Solar System. The field of exoplanet transit spectroscopy will be revolutionized with the anticipated launch of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2018. Over the course of the design five year mission for JWST, the observatory is expected to provide in-depth observations of many tens of transiting exoplanets, including some worlds in the poorly understood 2-4 Earth-mass regime. As the quality of transit spectrum observations continues to improve, so should models of exoplanet transits. Thus, certain processes initially thought to be of second-order importance should be revisited and possibly added to modeling tools. For example, atmospheric refraction, which was commonly omitted from early transit spectrum models, has recently been shown to be of critical importance in some terrestrial exoplanet transits. Beyond refraction, another process that has seen little study with regards to exoplanet transits is light multiple scattering. In most cases, scattering opacity in exoplanet transits has been treated as equivalent to absorption opacity. However, this equivalence cannot always hold, such as in the case of a strongly forward scattering, weakly absorbing aerosol. In this presentation, we outline a theory of exoplanet transit spectroscopy that spans the geometric limit (used in most modern models) to a fully multiple scattering approach. We discuss a new technique for improving model efficiency that effectively separates photon paths, which tend to vary slowly in wavelength, from photon absorption, which can vary rapidly in wavelength. Using this newly developed approach, we explore situations where cloud or haze scattering may be important to JWST observations of gas giants, and comment on the conditions necessary for scattering to become a major

  14. Light scattering characterization of optical components: BRDF, BTDF, and scatter losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Sven; Finck, Alexander; Katsir, Dina; Zeitner, Uwe; Duparré, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Light scattering caused by imperfections of optical components can critically affect the performance of optical systems in terms of losses and image degradation. Because of the numerous potential sources of scattering such as roughness, surface and sub-surface defects, bulk inhomogeneities, as well as coatings, scattering properties must be carefully specified and measured at the wavelengths of application. Bidirectional Reflectance and Transmittance Distribution Functions (BRDF / BTDF) are used to quantify the angle resolved scattering properties. The data can be used as an input for optical engineering software just as FRED, ASAP, ZEMAX for stray light modeling. In addition, analyzing the scattered light can provide valuable information about the relevant imperfections. The presentation provides an overview of instrumentation for light scattering measurements at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the extreme ultraviolet and the infrared spectral regions. Examples of applications will be discussed ranging from superpolished mirrors to diffraction gratings, interference coatings, and black absorbing coatings.

  15. Light scattering in colloidal solution of magnetite in electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Yerin, Constantine V

    2007-04-15

    Light scattering by magnetite particles in kerosene under the simultaneous action of crossed electric and magnetic fields was studied. Decreasing of variation of light scattering intensity at some values of electric and magnetic fields have been found. Values of fields at which a minimum of light scattering intensity occur depend on the angle between laser beam and the plane of crossed fields.

  16. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Smith, Charles W.; Matthaeus, William H.

    1988-01-01

    A dissipation range is incorporated in the turbulence model to reconcile the divergent conclusions from studies of cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic magnetic turbulence. The Fokker-Planck coefficient for pitch-angle scattering is calculated. It is shown that the slab form of the Fokker-Plank coefficient (Jokipii, 1966) is valid at very low energies, while the nonslab form (Fisk, 1974) is valid at intermediate energies.

  17. Collisionless pitch-angle scattering of runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is discovered that the tokamak field geometry generates a toroidicity induced broadening of the pitch-angle distribution of runaway electrons. This collisionless pitch-angle scattering is much stronger than the collisional scattering and invalidates the gyro-center model for runaway electrons. As a result, the energy limit of runaway electrons is found to be larger than the prediction of the gyro-center model and to depend heavily on the background magnetic field.

  18. Linear correlation between bacterial overexpression of recombinant peptides and cell light scatter.

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne-Mazeau, F; Maftah, A; Cenatiempo, Y; Julien, R

    1996-01-01

    Fusion of multiple copies of a test peptide leads to insoluble inclusion bodies. Their presence within bacteria increases either forward-angle light scattering or, to a lesser extent, right-angle light scattering. A linear correlation has been established between cell forward-angle scattering and the level of overexpression of atrial natriuretic peptide. The correlation is valid only for unlysed cells and is protein product specific. PMID:8702299

  19. A rapid and accurate method for the quantitative estimation of natural polysaccharides and their fractions using high performance size exclusion chromatography coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering and refractive index detector.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Kit-Leong; Wu, Ding-Tao; Zhao, Jing; Li, Shao-Ping

    2015-06-26

    In this study, a rapid and accurate method for quantitative analysis of natural polysaccharides and their different fractions was developed. Firstly, high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was utilized to separate natural polysaccharides. And then the molecular masses of their fractions were determined by multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS). Finally, quantification of polysaccharides or their fractions was performed based on their response to refractive index detector (RID) and their universal refractive index increment (dn/dc). Accuracy of the developed method for the quantification of individual and mixed polysaccharide standards, including konjac glucomannan, CM-arabinan, xyloglucan, larch arabinogalactan, oat β-glucan, dextran (410, 270, and 25 kDa), mixed xyloglucan and CM-arabinan, and mixed dextran 270 K and CM-arabinan was determined, and their average recoveries were between 90.6% and 98.3%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were ranging from 10.68 to 20.25 μg/mL, and 42.70 to 68.85 μg/mL, respectively. Comparing to the conventional phenol sulfuric acid assay and HPSEC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection (HPSEC-ELSD) analysis, the developed HPSEC-MALLS-RID method based on universal dn/dc for the quantification of polysaccharides and their fractions is much more simple, rapid, and accurate with no need of individual polysaccharide standard, as well as free of calibration curve. The developed method was also successfully utilized for quantitative analysis of polysaccharides and their different fractions from three medicinal plants of Panax genus, Panax ginseng, Panax notoginseng and Panax quinquefolius. The results suggested that the HPSEC-MALLS-RID method based on universal dn/dc could be used as a routine technique for the quantification of polysaccharides and their fractions in natural resources.

  20. Dynamic light scattering homodyne probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Inventor); Cannell, David S. (Inventor); Smart, Anthony E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical probe for analyzing a sample illuminated by a laser includes an input optical fiber operably connectable to the laser where the input optical fiber has an entrance end and an exit end. The probe also includes a first beam splitter where the first beam splitter is adapted to transmit an alignment portion of a light beam from the input fiber exit end and to reflect a homodyning portion of the light beam from the input fiber. The probe also includes a lens between the input fiber exit end and the first beam splitter and a first and a second output optical fiber, each having an entrance end and an exit end, each exit end being operably connectable to respective optical detectors. The probe also includes a second beam splitter which is adapted to reflect at least a portion of the reflected homodyning portion into the output fiber entrance ends and to transmit light from the laser scattered by the sample into the entrance ends.

  1. Determination of wood grain direction from laser light scattering pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonaho, Simo-Pekka; Palviainen, Jari; Tolonen, Yrjö; Silvennoinen, Raimo

    2004-01-01

    Laser light scattering patterns from the grains of wood are investigated in detail to gain information about the characteristics of scattering patterns related to the direction of the grains. For this purpose, wood samples of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) and silver birch ( Betula pubescens) were investigated. The orientation and shape of the scattering pattern of laser light in wood was found to correlate well with the direction of grain angles in a three-dimensional domain. The proposed method was also experimentally verified.

  2. Limits of applicability of the concept of scattering amplitude in small-angle scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.; Lvov, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of the concept of scattering amplitude to the description of small-angle scattering experiments has been considered. An expression has been obtained for a scattered radiation flux on a detector under much milder conditions than the condition of Fraunhofer diffraction. The influence of incoherence of the source on the results has been evaluated.

  3. An experimental study of light scattering by large, irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Audrey F.; Hapke, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    The intensity and polarization of light scattered by a variety of types of artificial partices large compared to the wavelength were measured as a function of phase angle. Shape, surface roughness, absorption coefficient, and internal scattering coefficient were varied systematically and their effects studied. Scattering by clear, smooth-surfaced spheres is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the geometrical optics (ray theory) approximation to physical optics (Mie theory). The phase functions of almost all of the particles measured have both forward and backward scattering lobes. A two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein function generally provides reasonably good descriptions of the data, while keeping the number of free parameters to the minimum necessary. On a double Henyey- Greenstein parameter plot all of the particles fall into an L-shaped area of restricted size in which the location is characteristic of the particle type. Formalisms based on the equivalent slab model are also given for estimating the scattering efficiency of a large, irregular particle. For most dielectric particles the transmitted, forward scattered light is partially negatively polarized. It is this component that is respopnsible for the well-known maximum in the polarization curves of planetary regoliths at phase angles around 100 deg. For phase angles between about 30 deg and 70 deg the internally scattered light is found to be randomly polarized in the particles studied here, so that the only contribution to the second component of the Stokes vector is by Fresnel reflection from the particle surface. If this empirical result is general, measurement of the second Stokes vector of the light scattered from a regolith at these angles may provide a method of remotely measuring the mean refractive index.

  4. Emerging applications of small angle solution scattering in structural biology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2015-03-01

    Small angle solution X-ray and neutron scattering recently resurfaced as powerful tools to address an array of biological problems including folding, intrinsic disorder, conformational transitions, macromolecular crowding, and self or hetero-assembling of biomacromolecules. In addition, small angle solution scattering complements crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and other structural methods to aid in the structure determinations of multidomain or multicomponent proteins or nucleoprotein assemblies. Neutron scattering with hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation, or X-ray scattering with sucrose contrast variation to a certain extent, is a convenient tool for characterizing the organizations of two-component systems such as a nucleoprotein or a lipid-protein assembly. Time-resolved small and wide-angle solution scattering to study biological processes in real time, and the use of localized heavy-atom labeling and anomalous solution scattering for applications as FRET-like molecular rulers, are amongst promising newer developments. Despite the challenges in data analysis and interpretation, these X-ray/neutron solution scattering based approaches hold great promise for understanding a wide variety of complex processes prevalent in the biological milieu.

  5. Experimental studies of laser light scattering in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sawyer; Grobe, Rainer; Su, Charles

    2006-05-01

    We inject an angularly collimated laser beam into a scattering medium of a non-dairy creamer-water solution and examine the distribution of the scattered light along the optical axis as a function of the source-detector spacing. The experimental and simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation on the optical axis suggest four regimes characterizing the transition from un-scattered to diffusive light. We compare the data with theoretical predictions based on a first-order scattering theory for regions close to the source, and with diffusion-like theories for larger source-detector spacings. We comment on the impact of the measurement on the light distribution and show that the regime of validity of these theories can depend on the experimental parameters such as the diameter and acceptance angle of the detection fiber.

  6. Correlating the morphological and light scattering properties of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Marina

    The scattered light pattern from a biological cell is greatly influenced by the internal structure and optical properties of the cell. This research project examines the relationships between the morphological and scattering properties of biological cells through numerical simulations. The mains goals are: (1) to develop a procedure to analytically model biological cells, (2) to quantitatively study the effects of a range of cell characteristics on the features of the light scattering patterns, and (3) to classify cells based on the features of their light scattering patterns. A procedure to create an analytical cell model was developed which extracted structural information from the confocal microscopic images of cells and allowed for the alteration of the cell structure in a controlled and systematic way. The influence of cell surface roughness, nuclear size, and mitochondrial volume density, spatial distribution, size and shape on the light scattering patterns was studied through numerical simulations of light scattering using the Discrete Dipole Approximation. It was found that the light scattering intensity in the scattering angle range of 25° to 45° responded to changes in the surface fluctuation of the cell and the range of 90° to 110° was well suited for characterization of mitochondrial density and nuclear size. A comparison of light scattering pattern analysis methods revealed that the angular distribution of the scattered light and Gabor filters were most helpful in differentiating between the cell characteristics. In addition, a measured increase in the Gabor energy of the light scattering patterns in response to an increase in the complexity of the cell models suggested that a complex nuclear structure and mitochondria should be included when modeling biological cells for light scattering simulations. Analysis of the scattering pattern features with Gabor filters resulted in discrimination of the cell models according to cell surface roughness

  7. Analysis of photopolarimetric data of comets at small phase angles by rough surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Mukai, T.

    1990-07-01

    A comparison of cometary rough surface scattering model calculation results with observations has indicated that negative polarization is produced, over a phase-angle range of less than 20 deg, by the variation of polarization angle of reflected light due to a contribution from (1) different sites on large, rough particles, and/or (2) multiple internal reflection within small dielectric particles. The opposition effect in cometary comas is caused by large, rough particle reflection. The mixing model for cometary grains, encompassing small particles and large rough ones composed in both cases of slightly absorbing material, is seen as explaining the photopolarimetric data of comets in the backward-scattering region.

  8. Static laser light scattering (SLLS) investigations of the scattering parameters of a synthetic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazy, R.; El-Baradie, B.; El-Shaer, A.; El-Mekawey, F.

    1999-09-01

    A laser light scattering system was built to study the scattering parameters of some materials in solution form. The light source used was an argon-ion laser at wavelength 488 nm (all lines). The investigated material was a synthetic polymer which has a wide range of applications in the field of teeth medicine applications. This is polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) which is used for the formation of artificial clamps. The PMMA was solved in both acetone and methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK). The acetone solvent is chosen for its high specific refractive index increment dn/dc at the same wavelength 488 nm as the argon laser source. The angular distribution of the scattered laser light intensities of PMMA dissolved in acetone was measured at different scattering angles from 30 to 150° for each concentration. The angular distributions have a symmetrical behavior about the scattering angle π/2; by using the scattered intensities the Zimm plot was formed. The weight average molecular weight (WAMW) was determined, the two other scattering parameters like as radius of gyration, h, and the second verial coefficient, A2 were determined.

  9. Monte carlo calculations of light scattering from clouds.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W

    1968-03-01

    The scattering of visible light by clouds is calculated from an efficient Monte Carlo code which follows the multiple scattered path of the photon. The single scattering function is obtained from the Mie theory by integration over a particle size distribution appropriate for cumulus clouds at 0.7-micro wavelength. The photons are followed through a sufficient number of collisions and reflections from the lower surface (which may have any desired albedo) until they make a negligible contribution to the intensity. Various variance reduction techniques are used to improve the statistics. The cloud albedo and the mean optical path of the transmitted and reflected photons are given as a function of the solar zenith angle, optical thickness, and surface albedo. The numerous small angle scatterings of the photon in the direction of the incident beam are followed accurately and produce a greater penetration into the cloud than is obtained with a more isotropic and less realistic phase function.

  10. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1997-06-01

    We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

  11. SASBDB, a repository for biological small-angle scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Erica; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Previtali, Gianpietro; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) are fundamental tools used to study the global shapes of proteins, nucleic acids, macromolecular complexes and assemblies in solution. Due to recent advances in instrumentation and computational methods, the quantity of experimental scattering data and subsequent publications is increasing dramatically. The need for a global repository allowing investigators to locate and access experimental scattering data and associated models was recently emphasized by the wwPDB small-angle scattering task force (SAStf). The small-angle scattering biological data bank (SASBDB) www.sasbdb.org has been designed in accordance with the plans of the SAStf as part of a future federated system of databases for biological SAXS and SANS. SASBDB is a comprehensive repository of freely accessible and fully searchable SAS experimental data and models that are deposited together with the relevant experimental conditions, sample details and instrument characteristics. At present the quality of deposited experimental data and the accuracy of models are manually curated, with future plans to integrate automated systems as the database expands. PMID:25352555

  12. Low frequency seabed scattering at low grazing angles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Low-frequency (LF) seabed scattering at low grazing angles (LGA) is almost impossible to directly measure in shallow water (SW), except through inversion from reverberation. The energy flux method for SW reverberation is briefly introduced in this paper. The closed-form expressions of reverberation in an isovelocity waveguide, derived from this method, indicate that in the three-halves law range interval multimode/ray sea bottom scattering with different incident and scattering angles in forming the reverberation may equivalently be represented by the bottom backscattering at a single range-dependent angle. This equivalent relationship is used to derive the bottom backscattering strength (BBS) as a function of angle and frequency. The LF&LGA BBS is derived in a frequency band of 200-2500 Hz and in a grazing angle range of 1.1°-14.0° from reverberation measurements at three sites with sandy bottoms. This is based on three previous works: (1) The closed-form expressions of SW reverberation [Zhou, (Chinese) Acta Acustica 5, 86-99 (1980)]; (2) the effective geo-acoustic model of sandy bottoms that follows the Biot model [Zhou et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2847-2866 (2009)] and (3) A quality database of wideband reverberation level normalized to source level [Zhou and Zhang, IEEE J. Oceanic Eng. 30, 832-842 (2005)].

  13. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P.; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd–Fe–B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters. PMID:27321149

  14. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P.; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd-Fe-B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters.

  15. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-06-20

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd-Fe-B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters.

  16. Semi-imaging light pipe for collecting weakly scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, George W.; Simons, Tad D.

    1998-09-01

    A simple reflective light pipe, formed from a cylindrical tube with an external reflective coating and a small central aperture, can be a highly efficient optical element for collecting light from molecular scattering processes along the path of a laser beam. When the laser beam is co-linear with the axis of the light pipe, scattered light from any location along the interaction region (near the pipe axis) re-images repeatedly to another location along the axis of the pipe. This semi-imaging property of the light pipe permits a large fraction of the total scattered light to re- image along the entire length of the interaction region. If one observes through the small central aperture, scattered light from the single segment of the laser beam in view appears to come from all the locations along the interaction length, as well as from the single segment. In this manner, one can have the advantage of collecting scattered light from a small segment (and thus onto a small detector), while observing an effective interaction length that is many times longer than the segment. Measurements from practical light pipes confirm effective gains of about 10X with light pipes a few centimeters long (Effective gain is defined as the ratio of light collected with the light pipe divided by the light collected from a direct image of the beam using the collection optics).

  17. Correction of sunspot intensities for scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Correction of sunspot intensities for scattered light usually involves fitting theoretical curves to observed aureoles (Zwaan, 1965; Staveland, 1970, 1972). In this paper we examine the inaccuracies in the determination of scattered light by this method. Earlier analyses are extended to examine uncertainties due to the choice of the expression for limb darkening. For the spread function, we consider Lorentzians and Gaussians for which analytic expressions for the aureole can be written down. Lorentzians lead to divergence and normalization difficulties, and should not be used in scattered light determinations. Gaussian functions are more suitable.

  18. Scattering of light by bispheres with touching and separated components.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, M I; Mackowski, D W; Travis, L D

    1995-07-20

    We use the T-matrix method as described by Mishchenko and Mackowski [Opt. Lett. 19, 1604 (1994)] to compute light scattering by bispheres in fixed and random orientations extensively. For all our computations the index of refraction is fixed at a value 1.5 + 0.005i, which is close to the refractive index of mineral tropospheric aerosols and was used in previous extensive studies of light scattering by spheroids and Chebyshev particles. For monodisperse bispheres with touching components in a fixed orientation, electromagnetic interactions between the constituent spheres result in a considerably more complicated interference structure in the scattering patterns than that for single monodisperse spheres. However, this increased structure is largely washed out by orientational averaging and results in scattering patterns for randomly oriented bispheres that are close to those for single spheres with size equal to the size of the bisphere components. Unlike other nonspherical particles such as cubes and spheroids, randomly oriented bispheres do not exhibit pronounced enhancement of side scattering and reduction of backscattering and positive polarization at side-scattering angles. Thus the dominant feature of light scattering by randomly oriented bispheres is the single scattering from the component spheres, whereas the effects of cooperative scattering and concavity of the bisphere shape play a minor role. The only distinct manifestations of nonsphericity and cooperative scattering effects for randomly oriented bispheres are the departure of the ratio F(22)/F(11) of the elements of the scattering matrix from unity, the inequality of the ratios F(33)/F(11) and F(44)/F(11), and nonzero linear and circular backscattering depolarization ratios. Our computations for randomly oriented bispheres with separated wavelengthsized components show that the component spheres become essentially independent scatterers at as small a distance between their centers as 4 times their

  19. 14 CFR 23.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 23... Equipment Lights § 23.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, each position light must, as installed, show unbroken light within the dihedral...

  20. Windows for small-angle X-ray scattering cryostats.

    PubMed

    Lurio, Laurence; Mulders, Norbert; Paetkau, Mark; Jemian, Pete R; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec

    2007-11-01

    To determine the suitability of commonly used windows for small-angle X-ray scattering, a range of materials, including Kapton, (aluminized) Mylar, beryllium, high-purity aluminium foil, mica and silicon nitride have been studied. At small wavevector transfers, Q, in the range 2 x 10(-3) to 0.2 nm(-1), the scattering from Kapton, mica and beryllium is reasonably well described by power laws in Q with exponents of -3.25, -3.6 and -3.9, respectively. There are large variations in the scattering from mica, but a freshly cleaved natural mica window was by far the weakest scatterer. For applications where radiation in the infrared or visible range should be blocked, aluminized Mylar is the most suitable material. Both Mylar and Kapton can be used to make very simple demountable superfluid-tight windows using indium O-ring seals.

  1. Structured light, transmission, and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.

    2011-03-01

    Numerous theoretical and experimental studies have established the principle that beams conveying orbital angular momentum offer a rich scope for information transfer. However, it is not clear how far it is practicable to operate such a concept at the single-photon level - especially when such a beam propagates through a system in which scattering can occur. In cases where scattering leads to photon deflection, it produces losses; however in terms of the retention of information content, there should be more concern over forward scattering. Based on a quantum electrodynamical formulation of theory, this paper aims to frame and resolve the key issues. A quantum amplitude is constructed for the representation of single and multiple scattering events in the propagation an individual photon, from a suitably structured beam. The analysis identifies potential limitations of principle, undermining complete fidelity of quantum information transmission.

  2. Microscopic Imaging and Spectroscopy with Scattered Light

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Nada N.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Optical contrast based on elastic scattering interactions between light and matter can be used to probe cellular structure and dynamics, and image tissue architecture. The quantitative nature and high sensitivity of light scattering signals to subtle alterations in tissue morphology, as well as the ability to visualize unstained tissue in vivo, has recently generated significant interest in optical scatter based biosensing and imaging. Here we review the fundamental methodologies used to acquire and interpret optical scatter data. We report on recent findings in this field and present current advances in optical scatter techniques and computational methods. Cellular and tissue data enabled by current advances in optical scatter spectroscopy and imaging stand to impact a variety of biomedical applications including clinical tissue diagnosis, in vivo imaging, drug discovery and basic cell biology. PMID:20617940

  3. Mid-infrared (λ = 8.4-9.9 μm) light scattering from porcine tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakat, Sabbir; Michel, Anna P. M.; Bors, Kevin A.; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2012-08-01

    Back-scattering of mid-infrared light from porcine skin is studied versus wavelength and angle for a Quantum Cascade laser and a broadband infrared light source. Scattering is detected over 30° away from the specular angle for both sources, and modulation patterns with angle are seen when using the laser. A nonlinear increase in scattered light intensity versus input power indicates that directional scattering from within the skin is dominant. Collagen fibers in the dermis layer, over 200 μm deep into the skin, are conducive to such scattering. We conclude that mid-infrared light penetrates deep enough for potential glucose detection in dermal interstitial fluid.

  4. Light scattering and cell volumes in osmotically stressed and frozen-thawed cells.

    PubMed

    McGann, L E; Walterson, M L; Hogg, L M

    1988-01-01

    Recent reports, indicating that under some conditions the intensity of light scattering from cells is a nonlinear function of cell volume, have led to the widespread generalization that intensity of low-angle light scattering indicates cell size. This study was performed to measure the relationships between light scattering and cell volumes in an-isotonic solutions and after a freeze-thaw stress. Cell volumes in isolated human lymphocytes, human granulocytes, and hamster fibroblasts were deliberately altered by exposure to anisotonic solutions. Boyle-vant Hoff plots of cell volume as a function of inverse osmotic pressure showed that the cells behaved as osmometers. Similar plots of right-angle and low-angle light scattering showed that the intensity of light scattering varied inversely with cell volume. In other experiments where cells were frozen without cryoprotectant at various sub zero temperatures to -25 degrees C and then thawed rapidly, cell viability decreased progressively with decreasing temperature, as did the intensity of both low-angle and right-angle light scattering, although cell volumes remained relatively constant. The intensity of both low- and high-angle light scattering varied inversely with cell volumes in hypertonic and hypotonic solutions, but cell damage induced by freezing and thawing resulted in significant reductions in the intensity of low-angle light scattering with little change in cell volume. These observations show that light scattering and cell volumes can vary independently, and they underline the need for a better understanding of the phenomenon of light scattering from living cells.

  5. Light scattering regimes along the optical axis in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. D.; O'Connell, A. K.; Menon, S.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2006-12-01

    We inject an angularly collimated laser beam into a scattering medium of a nondairy creamer-water solution and examine the distribution of the scattered light along the optical axis as a function of the source-detector spacing. The experimental and simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation suggest four regimes characterizing the transition from unscattered to diffusive light. We compare the data also with theoretical predictions based on a first-order scattering theory for regions close to the source, and with diffusionlike theories for larger source-detector spacings. We demonstrate the impact of the measurement process and the effect of the unavoidable absorption of photons by the detection fiber on the light distribution inside the medium. We show that the range of validity of these theories can depend on the experimental parameters such as the diameter and acceptance angle of the detection fiber.

  6. Light scattering regimes along the optical axis in turbid media.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S D; O'connell, A K; Menon, S; Su, Q; Grobe, R

    2006-12-01

    We inject an angularly collimated laser beam into a scattering medium of a nondairy creamer-water solution and examine the distribution of the scattered light along the optical axis as a function of the source-detector spacing. The experimental and simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation suggest four regimes characterizing the transition from unscattered to diffusive light. We compare the data also with theoretical predictions based on a first-order scattering theory for regions close to the source, and with diffusionlike theories for larger source-detector spacings. We demonstrate the impact of the measurement process and the effect of the unavoidable absorption of photons by the detection fiber on the light distribution inside the medium. We show that the range of validity of these theories can depend on the experimental parameters such as the diameter and acceptance angle of the detection fiber.

  7. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10°. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 Å -1, where x=sin( θ⧸2)⧸ λ. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  8. Differential Light Scattering from Spherical Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunsting, Albert; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    The differential scattered light intensity patterns of spherical mammalian cells were measured with a new photometer which uses high-speed film as the light detector. The scattering objects, interphase and mitotic Chinese hamster ovary cells and HeLa cells, were modeled as (a) a coated sphere, accounting for nucleus and cytoplasm, and (b) a homogeneous sphere when no cellular nucleus was present. The refractive indices and size distribution of the cells were measured for an accurate comparison of the theoretical model with the light-scattering measurements. The light scattered beyond the forward direction is found to contain information about internal cellular morphology, provided the size distribution of the cells is not too broad. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:4134589

  9. Deep Water Cherenkov Light Scatter Meter

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, L; Petta, C.; Russo, G.V.

    2000-12-31

    The relevant parameters for the site choice of an underwater neutrino's telescope are discussed. The in situ measurement of the scattering distribution of the cherenkov light requires a suitable experimental setup. Its main features are described here.

  10. Small-angle scattering and 3D structure interpretation.

    PubMed

    Trewhella, Jill

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on advances in the application of solution small-angle scattering (SAS) in structural analysis of biomolecules and the complexes they form. Examples highlighted illustrate the unique contribution of SAS, using both X-rays and neutrons, in hybrid or integrative modelling methods. The increased information content when neutron scattering with contrast variation is used is a particular focus. Finally, progress toward an agreed reporting framework, the development of open data and model archives, and the importance of these initiatives is covered.

  11. The Amsterdam-Granada Light Scattering Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Dabrowska, D. D.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Amsterdam Light Scattering Database proved to be a very successful way of promoting the use of the data obtained with the Amsterdam Light Scattering apparatus at optical wavelengths. Many different research groups around the world made use of the experimental data. After the closing down of the Dutch scattering apparatus, a modernized and improved descendant, the IAA Cosmic Dust Laboratory (CoDuLab), has been constructed at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA) in Granada, Spain. The first results of this instrument for water droplets and for two samples of clay particles have been published. We would now like to make these data also available to the community in digital form by introducing a new light scattering database, the Amsterdam-Granada Light Scattering Database (www.iaa.es/scattering). By combining the data from the two instruments in one database we ensure the continued availability of the old data, and we prevent fragmentation of important data over different databases. In this paper we present the Amsterdam-Granada Light Scattering Database.

  12. Comparative Study of Light Scattering from Hepatoma Cells and Hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wang, Rongrong; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao; Guo, Xiaoen

    2012-11-01

    Primary liver cancer is one of the highest mortality malignant tumors in the world. China is a high occurrence area of primary liver cancer. Diagnosis of liver cancer, especially early diagnosis, is essential for improving patients' survival. Light scattering and measuring method is an emerging technology developed in recent decades, which has attracted a large number of biomedical researchers due to its advantages, such as fast, simple, high accuracy, good repeatability, and non-destructive. The hypothesis of this project is that there may be some different light scattering information between hepatoma cells and hepatocyte. Combined with the advantages of the dynamic light scattering method and the biological cytology, an experimental scheme to measure the light scattering information of cells was formulated. Hepatoma cells and hepatic cells were irradiated by a semiconductor laser (532 nm). And the Brookhaven BI-200SM wide-angle light scattering device and temperature control apparatus were adopted. The light scattering information of hepatoma cells and hepatic cells in vitro within the 15°C to 30°C temperature range was processed by a BI-9000AT digital autocorrelator. The following points were found: (a) the scattering intensities of human hepatic cells and hepatoma cells are nearly not affected by the temperature factor, and the former is always greater than the latter and (b) the relaxation time of hepatoma cells is longer than that of hepatic cells, and both the relaxation time are shortened with increasing temperature from 15°C to 25°C. It can be concluded that hepatoma cells could absorb more incident light than hepatic cells. The reason may be that there exists more protein and nucleic acid in cancerous cells than normal cells. Furthermore, based on the length relaxation time, a conclusion can be inferred that the Brownian movement of cancer cells is greater.

  13. Microscope spectrometer for light scattering investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara, Aude; Lopez-Rios, Tomas; Dumont, Sylvain; Gay, Frederic; Quemerais, Pascal

    2010-08-01

    We describe a setup including a microscope to study volumes of a few {mu}m{sup 3} by static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) in a backscattering configuration. Light scattered by individual objects of micrometric size can be analyzed in the 400-800 nm spectral range. This setup can also be employed to study both diluted and concentrated colloidal solutions by DLS measurements. For diluted solutions we found evidence of the fluctuations of the number of particles in a confocal volume. We discuss their contribution to the autocorrelation function of the scattered intensity measured as a function of time.

  14. Accounting for thermodynamic non-ideality in the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data of proteins.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J

    2016-12-01

    Hydrodynamic studies of the solution properties of proteins and other biological macromolecules are often hard to interpret when the sample is present at a reasonably concentrated solution. The reason for this is that solutions exhibit deviations from ideal behaviour which is manifested as thermodynamic non-ideality. The range of concentrations at which this behaviour typically is exhibited is as low as 1-2 mg/ml, well within the range of concentrations used for their analysis by techniques such as small-angle scattering. Here we discuss thermodynamic non-ideality used previously used in the context of light scattering and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation and apply it to the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data. The results show that there is a complementarity between the radially averaged structure factor derived from small-angle X-ray scattering/small-angle neutron scattering studies and the second virial coefficient derived from sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation experiments.

  15. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering) from polymers and colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been remarkably successful in providing detailed quantitative structural information on complex everyday materials, such as polymers and colloids, which are often of considerable industrial as well as academic interest. This paper reviews some recent SANS experiments on polymers and colloids, including ferrofluids, and discusses the use of these apparently complex systems as general physical models of the liquid or solid state.

  16. Large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, Wim; Passarino, Giampiero

    1998-04-01

    A critical assessment is given of the theoretical uncertainty in the predicted cross-sections for large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1, with or without t-channel subtraction. To this end a detailed comparison is presented of the results obtained with the programs ALIBABA and TOPAZ0. Differences in the implementation of the radiative corrections and the effect of missing higher-order terms are critically discussed. © 1998

  17. Light Scattering from Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-17

    us (V. Ruiz Cortes) was supported by a CONACYT and CICESE scholarship. 5. REFERENCES I.-K.A. O’Donnell and E.R. Mdndez, "Experimental study of...Calculated variation of scattenng for increasing roughness. The angle of incidence is 800. The solid line is (DAJA45-90-C-0026). VRC thanks CONACYT and for a

  18. Expressive Single Scattering for Light Shaft Stylization.

    PubMed

    Kol, Timothy R; Klehm, Oliver; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Eisemann, Elmar

    2016-04-14

    Light scattering in participating media is a natural phenomenon that is increasingly featured in movies and games, as it is visually pleasing and lends realism to a scene. In art, it may further be used to express a certain mood or emphasize objects. Here, artists often rely on stylization when creating scattering effects, not only because of the complexity of physically correct scattering, but also to increase expressiveness. Little research, however, focuses on artistically influencing the simulation of the scattering process in a virtual 3D scene. We propose novel stylization techniques, enabling artists to change the appearance of single scattering effects such as light shafts. Users can add, remove, or enhance light shafts using occluder manipulation. The colors of the light shafts can be stylized and animated using easily modifiable transfer functions. Alternatively, our system can optimize a light map given a simple user input for a number of desired views in the 3D world. Finally, we enable artists to control the heterogeneity of the underlying medium. Our stylized scattering solution is easy to use and compatible with standard rendering pipelines. It works for animated scenes and can be executed in real time to provide the artist with quick feedback.

  19. Hadronic light-by-light scattering in muonium hyperfine splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S. G.; Shelyuto, V. A.; Vainshtein, A. I.

    2008-09-15

    We consider an impact of hadronic light-by-light scattering on the muonium hyperfine structure. A shift of the hyperfine interval {delta}{nu}(Mu){sub HLBL} is calculated with the light-by-light scattering approximated by the exchange of pseudoscalar and pseudovector mesons. Constraints from the operator product expansion in QCD are used to fix parameters of the model similar to the one used earlier for the hadronic light-by-light scattering in calculations of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. The pseudovector exchange is dominant in the resulting shift, {delta}{nu}(Mu){sub HLBL}=-0.0065(10) Hz. Although the effect is tiny it is useful in understanding the level of hadronic uncertainties.

  20. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  1. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  2. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Prather, William S.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  3. The Whiteness of Things and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Calza, G.; Oss, S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss some simple experiments dealing with intriguing properties of light and its interaction with matter. In particular, we show how to emphasize that light reflection, refraction and scattering can provide a proper, physical description of human perception of the "colour" white. These experiments can be used in the classroom with an enquiry…

  4. BIOISIS: Biological Macromolecules by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tainer, John [Scripps Research Institute; Hura, Greg [LBNL; Rambo, Robert P. [LBNL

    BIOISIS is an open access database dedicated to the study of biological macromolecules by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). BIOISIS aims to become the complete source for the deposition, distribution and maintenance of small angle X-ray scattering data and technologies. The database is designed around the concept of an ôexperimentö and relates a specific experiment to a set of genes, organisms, computational models and experimental data. As of May 2012, BIOSIS contains 7,118 genes covering four different organisms. Forty-two modeled structures are available. Clicking on a structures reveals scattering curves, experimental conditions, and experimental values. The data are collected at Beamline 12.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS).[Copied with editing from http://www.bioisis.net/about

  5. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is providing and coordinating the technology for placing a compact Laser Light Scattering (LLS) instrument in a microgravity environment. This will be accomplished by defining and assessing user requirements for microgravity experiments, coordinating needed technological developments, and filling technical gaps. This effort is striving to brassboard and evaluate a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument. The progress of the program is reported.

  6. Research on the illumination model based on light scattering properties of steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanjiong; Kong, Jianyi; Xu, Pan; Liu, Cancan; Zheng, Guo

    2015-12-01

    Experimental scheme was designed based on the steel production process, surface optical characteristics and BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) illumination model theory. The relationship between the light incidence angle, surface roughness and laws of light scattering under a particular light-source conditions were found through a series of light scattering characteristics experiments for different steel plate surface. The results showed that there was an apparent specular reflection peak on steel surface. surface light scattering was influenced greatly by light incidence angle and surface roughness, and it showed the law of exponential distribution functions. Thus the improved semi-empirical light scattering mathematical model which based on roughness factor and surface Gaussian distribution of micro-plane components has been formed through non-linear model fitting and optimization. The surface illumination model has been proposed to accurately describe the light intensity distribution of steel plate surface and provide a theoretical method for the design of optimal imaging system.

  7. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-09-28

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and angstrom length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle's size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchical structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well as the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X-ray characterization tools. We conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-ray scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  8. Coherent Detector for Near-Angle Scattering and Polarization Characterization of Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven A.; Chipman, Russell A.; Daugherty, Brian J.; McClain, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses the difficulty of measuring scattering properties of coated mirrors extremely close to the specular reflection peak. A prototype Optical Hetero dyne Near-angle Scatterometer (OHNS) was developed. Light from a long-coherence-length (>150 m) 532-nm laser is split into two arms. Acousto-optic modulators frequency shift the sample and reference beams, establishing a fixed beat frequency between the beams. The sample beam is directed at very high f/# onto a mirror sample, and the point spread function (PSF) formed after the mirror sample is scanned with a pinhole. This light is recombined by a non-polarizing beam splitter and measured through heterodyne detection with a spectrum analyzer. Polarizers control the illuminated and analyzed polarization states, allowing the polarization dependent scatter to be measured. The bidirectional reflective or scattering distribution function is normally measured through use of a scattering goniometer instrument. The instrumental beam width (collection angle span) over which the scatterometer responds is typically many degrees. The OHNS enables measurement at angles as small as the first Airy disk diameter.

  9. Angle-resolved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on metallic nanostructured plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Baumberg, Jeremy J; Kelf, Timothy A; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Cintra, Suzanne; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh E; Bartlett, Phillip N; Russell, Andrea E

    2005-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is an ideal tool for identifying molecules from the "fingerprint" of their molecular bonds; unfortunately, this process lacks a full microscopic understanding and, practically, is plagued with irreproducibility. Using nanostructured metal surfaces, we demonstrate strong correlations between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements. Evidence for simultaneous ingoing and outgoing resonances in wavelength and angle sheds new light on the Raman enhancement process, allowing optimization of a new generation of reproducible Raman substrates.

  10. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G; Scheel, A; Henniger, J

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  11. Scattered light corrections to Sun photometry: analytical results for single and multiple scattering regimes.

    PubMed

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2007-04-01

    Analytical equations for the diffused scattered light correction factor of Sun photometers are derived and analyzed. It is shown that corrections are weakly dependent on the atmospheric optical thickness. They are influenced mostly by the size of aerosol particles encountered by sunlight on its way to a Sun photometer. In addition, the accuracy of the small-angle approximation used in the work is studied with numerical calculations based on the exact radiative transfer equation.

  12. Survey of background scattering from materials found in small-angle neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J. G.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of beam attenuation and background scattering for common materials placed in a neutron beam are presented over the temperature range of 300–700 K. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements have also been made, to determine the fraction of the background that is either inelastic or quasi-elastic scattering as measured with a 3He detector. Other background sources considered include double Bragg diffraction from windows or samples, scattering from gases, and phonon scattering from solids. Background from the residual air in detector vacuum vessels and scattering from the 3He detector dome are presented. The thickness dependence of the multiple scattering correction for forward scattering from water is calculated. Inelastic phonon background scattering at small angles for crystalline solids is both modeled and compared with measurements. Methods of maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio by material selection, choice of sample thickness and wavelength, removal of inelastic background by TOF or Be filters, and removal of spin-flip scattering with polarized beam analysis are discussed. PMID:26306088

  13. Survey of background scattering from materials found in small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Barker, J G; Mildner, D F R

    2015-08-01

    Measurements and calculations of beam attenuation and background scattering for common materials placed in a neutron beam are presented over the temperature range of 300-700 K. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements have also been made, to determine the fraction of the background that is either inelastic or quasi-elastic scattering as measured with a (3)He detector. Other background sources considered include double Bragg diffraction from windows or samples, scattering from gases, and phonon scattering from solids. Background from the residual air in detector vacuum vessels and scattering from the (3)He detector dome are presented. The thickness dependence of the multiple scattering correction for forward scattering from water is calculated. Inelastic phonon background scattering at small angles for crystalline solids is both modeled and compared with measurements. Methods of maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio by material selection, choice of sample thickness and wavelength, removal of inelastic background by TOF or Be filters, and removal of spin-flip scattering with polarized beam analysis are discussed.

  14. Light scattering by radially inhomogeneous fuel droplets in a high-temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Michael; Hirleman, E. Dan; Saleheen, Hasan I.; Chowdhury, Dipakbin Q.; Hill, Steven C.

    1993-05-01

    Light scattering by radially inhomogeneous fuel droplets has been calculated using both geometrical optics (GO) and the exact separation of variables (SV) solutions. The refractive index profiles of the fuel droplets were those calculated by Kneer et al. The GO and SV solutions agree very well in the forward direction (for scattering angles between 30 and 60 degrees), and less well in the backward direction (for scattering angles between 140 and 170 degrees). Both amplitudes and phases of the scattered light are compared. The agreement in the backward direction is much better for 40 micrometers diameter droplets than for 20 micrometers diameter droplets.

  15. 14 CFR 27.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 27... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, each forward...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 29... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 29.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section,...

  17. Polarization of scattered light in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubaker, Hamed M.; Tománek, Pavel

    2012-02-01

    The real-time nondestructive inspection of biological tissues begins to be one of important tools which could contribute to better human life not only in medical diagnosis but also in everyday mankind activities. A biological tissue is considered as a turbid medium in which light is scattered. Although single or multiple scattering in tissue multiple randomizes polarization states of incident light, linear, circular and elliptical polarization states in the medium are considered, and there are circumstances when appreciable degree of polarization can be observed in diffusive scattering. Our work shows that with a sufficient degree of sensitivity is possible to detect structural changes due to the aging of processed meat by using Mueller matrix polarimeter. Moreover, it demonstrated that the degree of polarization of the backscattered light is sensitive to the optical properties of specimen material and to its thickness.

  18. Polarization of scattered light in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubaker, Hamed M.; Tománek, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    The real-time nondestructive inspection of biological tissues begins to be one of important tools which could contribute to better human life not only in medical diagnosis but also in everyday mankind activities. A biological tissue is considered as a turbid medium in which light is scattered. Although single or multiple scattering in tissue multiple randomizes polarization states of incident light, linear, circular and elliptical polarization states in the medium are considered, and there are circumstances when appreciable degree of polarization can be observed in diffusive scattering. Our work shows that with a sufficient degree of sensitivity is possible to detect structural changes due to the aging of processed meat by using Mueller matrix polarimeter. Moreover, it demonstrated that the degree of polarization of the backscattered light is sensitive to the optical properties of specimen material and to its thickness.

  19. Small angle neutron scattering using a triple axis spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmend, F.U.; Kamal, I.; Yunus, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    SANS technique has been developed on a triple axis neutron spectrometer at TRIGA Mark II (3 MW) research reactor, AERE, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Double crystal (with very small mosaic spread {approximately} 1 min.) diffraction known as Bonse and Hart`s method has been employed in this technique. Such a device is a useful tool for small angle scattering in the Q range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -1} {Angstrom}{sup -1} and for real time experiments at short time scales. Therefore, large objects and large distance interparticle correlations can be investigated easily by this method. Test measurements using alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) sample has been carried out to exploit this method. The radius of gyration has been determined and the data has been fitted to the scattering function of a sphere.

  20. Small-angle neutron scattering study of polymeric micellar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Chu, B. ); Schneider, D.K. )

    1994-11-17

    Polymeric micellar structures formed by a PEO-PPO-PEO copolymer in o-xylene in the presence of water were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. In order to reveal the detailed micellar structure, different contrasts among the micellar core, the micellar shell, and the dispersing medium (background) were constructed by selectively changing the protonated/deuterated combination of water and xylene. The micellar structure could be well described by a core-shell structure with the scattering behavior of the micellar shell being very similar to that of a star polymer. The solubilized water existed not only in the micellar core but also in the micellar shell. The volume fraction of a copolymer segments in the micellar shell was rather low, being of the order of 0.2. There seemed to be no sharp interface between the micellar core and the micellar shell. 25 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  2. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. E. Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-15

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  3. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Mildner, D F R

    2016-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.

  4. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-05-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. Furthermore, the aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.

  5. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-05-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding tomore » the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. Furthermore, the aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.« less

  6. Characterization of photosynthetic supramolecular assemblies using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Marone, P.; Wagner, A.M.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1995-12-31

    We are using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to resolve structural features of supramolecular assemblies of photosynthetic proteins in liquid and frozen solutions. SANS resolves the size, shape, and structural homogeneity of macromolecular assemblies in samples identical to those used for spectroscopic assays of photosynthetic function. Likely molecular structures of the supramolecular assemblies can be identified by comparing experimental scattering data with scattering profiles calculated for model supramolecular assemblies built from crystal structures of the individual proteins. SANS studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, RC, presented here, show that the detergent solubilized RC exists in a variety of monomeric and aggregation states. The distribution between monomer and aggregate was found to depend strongly upon detergent, temperature and nature of additives, such as ethylene glycol used for low temperature spectroscopy and polyethylene glycol used for crystallization. Likely aggregate structures are being identified by fitting the experimental scattering profiles with those calculated for model aggregates built-up using the RC crystal structure. This work establishes the foundation for using SANS to identify intermediates in the RC crystallization pathways, and for determining likely structures of complexes formed between the RC and its physiological reaction partners, cytochrome c, and the LHI antenna complex.

  7. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry. PMID:27275140

  8. Large Solid Angle Spectrometer for Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gelebart, F.; Morand, M.; Dermigny, Q.; Giura, P.; Shukla, A.; Rueff, J.-P.

    2007-01-19

    We have designed a large solid angle spectrometer mostly devoted to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of materials under extreme conditions (high pressure / temperature) in the hard x-ray range. The new IXS spectrometer is designed to optimize the photon throughput while preserving an excellent resolving power of {approx}10000 in the considered energy range. The spectrometer consists of an array of up to 4 spherically bent 0.5 m radius analyzer crystals and a solid-state detector positioned on the Rowland circle. The four analyzers can cover a solid angle more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional spectrometers. The spectrometer is to be installed on the GALAXIES beamline at SOLEIL in the near future.

  9. Lattice QCD Calculation of Hadronic Light-by-Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy; Gryniuk, Oleksii; von Hippel, Georg; Meyer, Harvey B; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2015-11-27

    We perform a lattice QCD calculation of the hadronic light-by-light scattering amplitude in a broad kinematical range. At forward kinematics, the results are compared to a phenomenological analysis based on dispersive sum rules for light-by-light scattering. The size of the pion pole contribution is investigated for momenta of typical hadronic size. The presented numerical methods can be used to compute the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Our calculations are carried out in two-flavor QCD with the pion mass in the range of 270-450 MeV and contain so far only the diagrams with fully connected quark lines.

  10. Influences of refractive index on forward light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xueshan; Shen, Jianqi; Yin, Pengteng; Hu, Shiyu; Bi, Duo

    2014-04-01

    The influence of the relative refractive index (RRI) of the particles to the surrounding medium on the small-angle forward scattering signals is studied, based on the Mie theory, the Debye series expansion (DSE) and the Fraunhofer diffraction theory. It comes to the conclusion that, for small particles, the influence on the forward scattering signals is mainly due to the part of the internal reflection if the RRI deviates from 1. However, when the RRI is close to 1, the effects on the forward scattered light from both the surface reflection and the internal reflection are great. For large particles, the contributions of the surface reflection and the internal reflection to the forward scattered light are much weaker than the diffraction when the RRI deviates from 1. When the RRI is very close to 1, the effects on the forward scattered light from the internal reflection are great. To determine the influence of the RRI in detail, the modified Chahine algorithm is employed. The inversion results cannot give the correct PSD for small particles if the RRI used in the inversion procedure does not match the one of the sample. The result shows that it is necessary to determine the exact value of the RRI and one should avoid the RRI close to 1 by choosing dispersion with proper refractive index in practice.

  11. Cylindrical aggregates of chlorophylls studied by small-angle neutron scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, D.L.; Katz, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron small-angle scattering has demonstrated tubular chlorophyll aggregates formed by self-assembly of a variety of chlorophyll types in nonpolar solvents. The size and other properties of the tubular aggregates can be accounted for by stereochemical properties of the chlorophyll molecules. Features of some of the structures are remarkably similar to light harvesting chlorophyll complexes in vivo, particularly for photosynthetic bacteria. These nanotube chlorophyll structures may have applications as light harvesting biomaterials where efficient energy transfer occurs from an excited state which is highly delocalized.

  12. Nonlinear light scattering by a dipole monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbukh, B. B.; Averbukh, I. B.

    2013-08-01

    Scattering of a strong p-polarized monochromatic field by a dipole monolayer is considered. It is shown that a triplet should be observed at incident angles (between the wave vector of the incident wave and the normal to the monolayer surface) not too close to π/2 in the spectrum of the scattered radiation. For grazing incidence of a strong field on the monolayer, waves with frequencies of the strong field and the high-frequency component of the triplet scatter forward and backward. In this case, radiation with frequency of the low-frequency component of the triplet propagates in the form of two inhomogeneous waves along the monolayer on both sides of it, exponentially decaying with distance from the monolayer.

  13. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Furmann, Agnieszka; Clarkson, Chris R.

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using the chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.

  14. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; ...

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using themore » chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.« less

  15. Light-like scattering in quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Donoghue, John F.; Holstein, Barry R.; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We consider scattering in quantum gravity and derive long-range classical and quantum contributions to the scattering of light-like bosons and fermions (spin-0, spin- 1/2 , spin-1) from an external massive scalar field, such as the Sun or a black hole. This is achieved by treating general relativity as an effective field theory and identifying the non-analytic pieces of the one-loop gravitational scattering amplitude. It is emphasized throughout the paper how modern amplitude techniques, involving spinor-helicity variables, unitarity, and squaring relations in gravity enable much simplified computations. We directly verify, as predicted by general relativity, that all classical effects in our computation are universal (in the context of matter type and statistics). Using an eikonal procedure we confirm the post-Newtonian general relativity correction for light-like bending around large stellar objects. We also comment on treating effects from quantum ℏ dependent terms using the same eikonal method.

  16. Light Scattering based detection of food pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current methods for detecting foodborne pathogens are mostly destructive (i.e., samples need to be pretreated), and require time, personnel, and laboratories for analyses. Optical methods including light scattering based techniques have gained a lot of attention recently due to its their rapid a...

  17. Distinguishing morphological changes with polarized light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T. M.; Aida, T.; Carpenter, S.; Freyer, J. P.; Mourant, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Results of work determining how different biological structures contribute to light scattering will be presented. Further, measurements of phantoms that mimic structural changes expected in vivo will be presented. It is found that polarized measurements can discriminate between phantoms with similar properties.

  18. Cooperative light scattering in any dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Tyler; Sanders, Barry C.; Deng, Hui

    2017-03-01

    We present a theory of cooperative light scattering valid in any dimension: connecting theories for an open line, open plane, and open space in the nonrelativistic regime. This theory includes near-field and dipole-orientation effects, highlighting how field-mode confinement controls the phenomena. We present an experimental implementation for planar collective effects.

  19. Small angle x-ray scattering with edge-illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modregger, Peter; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Benarafa, Charaf; Schittny, Johannes C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Endrizzi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Sensitivity to sub-pixel sample features has been demonstrated as a valuable capability of phase contrast x-ray imaging. Here, we report on a method to obtain angular-resolved small angle x-ray scattering distributions with edge-illumination- based imaging utilizing incoherent illumination from an x-ray tube. Our approach provides both the three established image modalities (absorption, differential phase and scatter strength), plus a number of additional contrasts related to unresolved sample features. The complementarity of these contrasts is experimentally validated by using different materials in powder form. As a significant application example we show that the extended complementary contrasts could allow the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema in a murine model. In support of this, we demonstrate that the properties of the retrieved scattering distributions are consistent with the expectation of increased feature sizes related to pulmonary emphysema. Combined with the simplicity of implementation of edge-illumination, these findings suggest a high potential for exploiting extended sub-pixel contrasts in the diagnosis of lung diseases and beyond.

  20. Small angle x-ray scattering with edge-illumination

    PubMed Central

    Modregger, Peter; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Benarafa, Charaf; Schittny, Johannes C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Endrizzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity to sub-pixel sample features has been demonstrated as a valuable capability of phase contrast x-ray imaging. Here, we report on a method to obtain angular-resolved small angle x-ray scattering distributions with edge-illumination- based imaging utilizing incoherent illumination from an x-ray tube. Our approach provides both the three established image modalities (absorption, differential phase and scatter strength), plus a number of additional contrasts related to unresolved sample features. The complementarity of these contrasts is experimentally validated by using different materials in powder form. As a significant application example we show that the extended complementary contrasts could allow the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema in a murine model. In support of this, we demonstrate that the properties of the retrieved scattering distributions are consistent with the expectation of increased feature sizes related to pulmonary emphysema. Combined with the simplicity of implementation of edge-illumination, these findings suggest a high potential for exploiting extended sub-pixel contrasts in the diagnosis of lung diseases and beyond. PMID:27491917

  1. Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering in Ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.

    The eye is not just a "window to the soul"; it can also be a "window to the human body." The eye is built like a camera. Light which travels from the cornea to the retina traverses through tissues that are representative of nearly every tissue type and fluid type in the human body. Therefore, it is possible to diagnose ocular and systemic diseases through the eye. Quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) also known as dynamic light scattering (DLS) is a laboratory technique routinely used in the characterization of macromolecular dispersions. QELS instrumentation has now become more compact, sensitive, flexible, and easy to use. These developments have made QELS/DLS an important tool in ophthalmic research where disease can be detected early and noninvasively before the clinical symptoms appear.

  2. Scattered light in the STIS echelle modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W.; Bowers, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) echelle spectra obtained during the Early Release Observations have non-zero residuals in the cores of saturated interstellar lines, indicating the need for a scattered light correction. A rough measure of the magnitude of the needed correction shows the ratio of the interorder to the in-order flux in different echelle modes in both pre-launch calibration images of a continuum lamp source and in post-launch images of stellar continuum sources. The interorder and in-order fluxes are computed by averaging the central 200 pixels in the dispersion direction. The amount of scattered light in the interorder region rises toward shorter wavelengths for two reasons: (1) the order separation decreases toward shorter wavelengths; and (2) the amount of echelle scattering is expected to have an inverse dependence on wavelength. At the shortest wavelengths the fraction of light scattered into the interorder region can be 10% for the Near-ultraviolet-Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (NUV-MAMA) and 15% for the Far-ultraviolet-Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (FUV-MAMA).

  3. Multiple Light Scattering Probes of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffold, Frank

    2007-02-01

    I will discuss both static and dynamic properties of diffuse waves. In practical applications the optical properties of colloidal systems play an important role, for example in commercial products such as sunscreen lotions, food (drinks), coatings but also in medicine for example in cataract formation (eye lens turbidity). It is thus of importance to know the key parameters governing optical turbidity from the single to the multiple scattering regime. Temporal fluctuations of multiply scattered light are studied with photon correlation spectroscopy (Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy). This DWS method and its various implementations will be treated.

  4. A novel small-angle neutron scattering detector geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Jackson, Andrew; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Piscitelli, Francesco; Kirstein, Oliver; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel 2π detector geometry for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) applications is presented and its theoretical performance evaluated. Such a novel geometry is ideally suited for a SANS instrument at the European Spallation Source (ESS). Motivated by the low availability and high price of 3He, the new concept utilizes gaseous detectors with 10B as the neutron converter. The shape of the detector is inspired by an optimization process based on the properties of the conversion material. Advantages over the detector geometry traditionally used on SANS instruments are discussed. The angular and time resolutions of the proposed detector concept are shown to satisfy the requirements of the particular SANS instrument. PMID:24046504

  5. Radiation damage study using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétfalvi, E.; Török, Gy; Rosta, L.

    2000-03-01

    Nuclear radiation provides important changes in the microstructure of metallic components of nuclear power plant and research reactors, influencing their mechanical properties. The investigation of this problem has primary interest for the safety and life-time of such nuclear installations. For the characterization of this kind of nanostructures small angle neutron scattering technique is a very useful tool. We have carried out experiments on samples of irradiated reactor vessel material and welded components of VVER-440-type reactors on the SANS instrument at the Budapest Research Reactor. In our measurements irradiated as well as non-irradiated samples were compared and magnetic field was applied for viewing the magnetic structure effects of the materials. A clear modification of the structure due to irradiation was obtained. Our data were analyzed by the ITP92 code, the inverse Fourier transform program of O. Glatter [1].

  6. Small angle neutron scattering studies of vesicle stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.

    1997-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate the structure of mixed colloids of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) with the bile salt, cholylglycine (CG), in D{sub 2}O as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). At atmospheric pressure, the system forms an isotropic phase of mixed, single bilayer vesicles (SLV`s). Increasing the external hydrostatic pressure brought about significant changes in particle morphology. At T = 25 C, application of a pressure of 3.5 MPa resulted in the collapse of the SLV`s. Further increase of P, up to 51.8 MPa, resulted in a transition from a phase of ordered (stacked), collapsed vesicles to one of stacked, ribbon-like particles. A similar collapse of the vesicles was observed at higher temperature (T = 37 C) with increasing P, but at this temperature, no ribbon phase was found at the highest pressure explored.

  7. Modeling stray light from rough surfaces and subsurface scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James E.; Goshy, John J.; Pfisterer, Richard N.

    2014-09-01

    Over the years we have developed an adequate theory and understanding of surface scatter from smooth optical surfaces (Rayleigh-Rice), moderately rough surfaces with paraxial incident and scattered angles (Beckmann- Kirchhoff) and even for moderately rough surfaces with arbitrary incident and scattered angles where a linear systems formulation requiring a two-parameter family of surface transfer functions is required to characterize the surface scatter process (generalized Harvey-Shack). However, there is always some new material or surface manufacturing process that provides non-intuitive scatter behavior. The linear systems formulation of surface scatter is potentially useful even for these situations. In this paper we will present empirical models of several classes of rough surfaces or materials (subsurface scatter) that allow us to accurately model the scattering behavior at any incident angle from limited measured scatter data. In particular, scattered radiance appears to continue being the natural quantity that exhibits simple, elegant behavior only in direction cosine space.

  8. Atmospheric particulate analysis using angular light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Using the light scattering matrix elements measured by a polar nephelometer, a procedure for estimating the characteristics of atmospheric particulates was developed. A theoretical library data set of scattering matrices derived from Mie theory was tabulated for a range of values of the size parameter and refractive index typical of atmospheric particles. Integration over the size parameter yielded the scattering matrix elements for a variety of hypothesized particulate size distributions. A least squares curve fitting technique was used to find a best fit from the library data for the experimental measurements. This was used as a first guess for a nonlinear iterative inversion of the size distributions. A real index of 1.50 and an imaginary index of -0.005 are representative of the smoothed inversion results for the near ground level atmospheric aerosol in Tucson.

  9. Particle sizing by weighted measurements of scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a measurement method, applicable to a poly-dispersion of particles, in which the intensity of scattered light at any angle is weighted by a factor proportional to that angle. Determination is then made of four angles at which the weighted intensity is four fractions of the maximum intensity. These yield four characteristic diameters, i.e., the diameters of the volume/area mean (D sub 32 the Sauter mean) and the volume/diameter mean (D sub 31); the diameters at cumulative volume fractions of 0.5 (D sub v0.5 the volume median) and 0.75 (D sub v0.75). They also yield the volume dispersion of diameters. Mie scattering computations show that an average diameter less than three micrometers cannot be accurately measured. The results are relatively insensitive to extraneous background light and to the nature of the diameter distribution. Also described is an experimental method of verifying the conclusions by using two microscopic slides coated with polystyrene microspheres to simulate the particles and the background.

  10. Calculations of scattered light from rigid polymers by Shifrin and Rayleigh-Debye approximations.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, M F

    1989-01-01

    We show that the commonly used Rayleigh-Debye method for calculating light scattering can lead to significant errors when used for describing scattering from dilute solutions of long rigid polymers, errors that can be overcome by use of the easily applied Shifrin approximation. In order to show the extent of the discrepancies between the two methods, we have performed calculations at normal incidence both for polarized and unpolarized incident light with the scattering intensity determined as a function of polarization angle and of scattering angle, assuming that the incident light is in a spectral region where the absorption of hemoglobin is small. When the Shifrin method is used, the calculated intensities using either polarized or unpolarized scattered light give information about the alignment of polymers, a feature that is lost in the Rayleigh-Debye approximation because the effect of the asymmetric shape of the scatterer on the incoming polarized electric field is ignored. Using sickle hemoglobin polymers as an example, we have calculated the intensity of light scattering using both approaches and found that, for totally aligned polymers within parallel planes, the difference can be as large as 25%, when the incident electric field is perpendicular to the polymers, for near forward or near backward scattering (0 degrees or 180 degrees scattering angle), but becomes zero as the scattering angle approaches 90 degrees. For randomly oriented polymers within a plane, or for incident unpolarized light for either totally oriented or randomly oriented polymers, the difference between the two results for near forward or near backward scattering is approximately 15%. PMID:2605302

  11. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Radiant intensity of light scattered from clouds.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W

    1968-04-01

    A Monte Carlo method that accurately allows for the numerous small angle scattering events is used to calculate the reflected and transmitted radiance and flux of visible radiation that has interacted with cumulus clouds. The variation of these quantities with solar zenith angle, optical thickness of the cloud, and surface albedo is studied. When the surface albedo is zero, the reflected radiance has a relative maximum at the horizon (except for very thick clouds and incident beam near zenith). When the incident beam is near the horizon, there is a strong maximum in the reflected radiance on the solar horizon and a pronounced minimum near the zenith. There is a relative maximum in the transmitted radiance around the direction of the incident beam until the cloud becomes thick in that direction. In most instances, the variations are greatly decreased when the surface albedo is unity.

  13. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2016-03-01

    Wide-angle Compton scattering (WACS) belongs to the family of exclusive processes, with large values of s, - t , and - u , that can reveal nucleon structure. In the pQCD version of WACS, three active quarks and two hard gluons are required to share the momentum. pQCD predictions for the WACS disagree with the cross sections currently available. In contrast, handbag mechanism calculations involving a single quark coupled to the spectator through GPDs, are compatible with the cross sections. Measurements of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL have been found to be inconsistent with the predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the handbag mechanism, at least at very large angles. There are handbag calculations, including quark and hadron helicity flip, which contradicts pQCD by finding that KLL ≠ALL . A measurement of ALL has been approved to run at Jefferson Lab and which has the potential to clarify the nature of the reaction mechanism in WACS and illuminate the role of quark orbital angular momentum. It will utilize a pure untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target. After an introduction, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  14. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Near-Angle Scattering of Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A. (Inventor); Daugherty, Brian J. (Inventor); McClain, Stephen C. (Inventor); Macenka, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining the near angle scattering of a sample reflective surface comprising the steps of: a) splitting a beam of light having a coherence length of greater than or equal to about 2 meters into a sample beam and a reference beam; b) frequency shifting both the sample beam and the reference beam to produce a fixed beat frequency between the sample beam and the reference beam; c) directing the sample beam through a focusing lens and onto the sample reflective surface, d) reflecting the sample beam from the sample reflective surface through a detection restriction disposed on a movable stage; e) recombining the sample beam with the reference beam to form a recombined beam, followed by f) directing the recombined beam to a detector and performing heterodyne analysis on the recombined beam to measure the near-angle scattering of the sample reflective surface, wherein the position of the detection restriction relative to the sample beam is varied to occlude at least a portion of the sample beam to measure the near-angle scattering of the sample reflective surface. An apparatus according to the above method is also disclosed.

  15. Influence of convection on the stimulated concentration light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhanov, I. S.; Krivokhizha, S. V.; Chaikov, L. L.

    2016-08-01

    A non-linear growth of the scattering intensity and the frequency shift of the spectral lines of scattered light close to the half-width of the spontaneous scattering in the back scattering of light in the suspensions of latex nanoparticles in water were found. It proves that we observed a stimulated scattering of light on the particle concentration variations. Influence of convection is taken into account using Doppler measurements of fluid flow.

  16. Visible Inelastic Light Scattering from Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Roger Allen

    In this work we studied the spectral shape of the intense continuum of light scattered inelastically from "bare" metals used in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering. We derived cross sections, presented their spectral properties, and experimentally sought to characterize the observable spectral shape. Three scattering cross sections are derived. The development includes exposure of assumptions and limitations in the derivation. Elucidated are: contributions due to the few angstrom drastic spatial and polarization variations of the applied electromagnetic field at jellium metal surfaces; fluctuation induced light scattering, such as, spin density, charge density (plasmon and single electron), and current density fluctuations; and the light coupling operators that arise from a choice of gauge used in photoemission rather than the customary Coulomb gauge. The result is a set of matrix elements that carry the important physics of light scattering by metallic electrons, and that is more complete than is found in the Surface Enhanced Raman literature. Using one of these matrix elements in the electric dipole approximation we have developed a quantum chemistry computer algorithm to evaluate the strength of light interaction with any metal surface which can be modeled as a cluster. The algorithm uses spd Slater-type bases and can study transition and noble metals. It was tested on some model systems. A formalism is presented for further developing the algorithm to calculate adsorbed molecular vibrational Raman cross sections in the limit of the long wavelength electric dipole approximation. We further present known continuum spectral shapes from familiar light coupling operators (a subset of those we derived) and associate them with our experimentally observed spectral shapes. In the experimental study of spectral shapes we found the mechanical disorder, due to cold working smooth metals during polishing, to correlate with the strength of the continuum. Using microscopic

  17. A Light Scattering Layer for Internal Light Extraction of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keunsoo; Shin, Jin-Wook; Park, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Jonghee; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Cho, Doo-Hee; Lim, Jong Tae; Oh, Min-Cheol; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Moon, Jaehyun

    2016-07-13

    We propose and fabricate a random light scattering layer for light extraction in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with silver nanodots, which were obtained by melting silver nanowires. The OLED with the light scattering layer as an internal light extraction structure was enhanced by 49.1% for the integrated external quantum efficiency (EQE). When a wrinkle structure is simultaneously used for an external light extraction structure, the total enhancement of the integrated EQE was 65.3%. The EQE is maximized to 65.3% at a current level of 2.0 mA/cm(2). By applying an internal light scattering layer and wrinkle structure to an OLED, the variance in the emission spectra was negligible over a broad viewing angle. Power mode analyses with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations revealed that the use of a scattering layer effectively reduced the waveguiding mode while introducing non-negligible absorption. Our method offers an effective yet simple approach to achieve both efficiency enhancement and spectral stability for a wide range of OLED applications.

  18. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of the diffuse scatter of mid-infrared (MIR) laser light from explosives residues on surfaces. Experiments were performed using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) tunable between 7 and 8 μm (1270 to 1400 cm-1) for surface illumination. A mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector was used to detect backscattered spectra as a function of surface angle at a 2 meter standoff. A ferroelectric focal plane array was used to build hyperspectral images at a 0.5 meter standoff. Residues of RDX, tetryl, and TNT were investigated on surfaces including a painted car door for angles between zero (specular) and 50 degrees. We observe spectral signatures of the explosives in the diffuse scattering geometry which differ significantly from those observed in transmission geometries. Characterization of the scattered light spectra of explosives on surfaces will be essential for understanding the performance of standoff explosives detection instruments and developing robust spectral analysis techniques.

  19. Antibody elbow angles are influenced by their light chain class

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R; Zemla, A; Wilson, I; Rupp, B

    2006-01-12

    We have examined the elbow angles for 365 different Fab fragments, and observe that Fabs with lambda light chains have adopted a wider range of elbow angles than their kappa-chain counterparts, and that the lambda light chain Fabs are frequently found with very large (>195{sup o}) elbow angles. This apparent hyperflexibility of lambda-chain Fabs may be due to an insertion in their switch region, which is one residue longer than in kappa chains, with glycine occurring most frequently at the insertion position. A new, web-based computer program that was used to calculate the Fab elbow angles is also described.

  20. Light-scattering and dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Craig; Manickavasagam, Siva; Pinar Mengüc, M.; Andrews, Rodney

    2005-08-01

    Elliptically polarized light-scattering measurements were performed to investigate the dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Xylene- and pyridine-derived MWNT powders were dispersed in water and ethanol in separate optic cells and allowed to sit undisturbed over a two-week time period after probe sonication. Continuous light-scattering measurements taken between scattering angles of 10-170 deg and repeated over several days showed that the nanotubes formed fractal-like networks. The pyridine-derived MWNTs showed greater dispersion variation over time, tending to aggregate and clump much faster than the xylene-derived tubes. The water suspensions appeared much more stable than the ethanol suspensions, which transformed into nonfractal morphology after a few hours. We relate the dispersion stability to size and fringe patterns on the outer surface of the nanotubes. Measured values of fractal dimension were distinctly lower than those in previous studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Profiles of both diagonal and off-diagonal scattering matrix elements are presented.

  1. Bacterial Identification Using Light Scattering Measurements: a Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The light scattering properties of single bacterial cells were examined as a possible means of identification. Three species were studied with streptococcus faecalis exhibiting a unique pattern; the light-scattering traces for staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli were quite similar although differences existed. Based on preliminary investigations, the light scattering approach appeared promising with additional research needed to include a wide variety of bacterial species, computer capability to handle and analyze data, and expansion of light scattering theory to include bacterial cells.

  2. Designs and Reliability Evaluations of a Scattered Light Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang-Min

    The purpose of my work was to develop an in-plane stray light measurement system having the advantage of being easily applicable in both motion control and optical configurations. First of all, mechanical designs were conducted based on both 3D modeling and structural analysis through a finite element method (FEM). Optical configurations for both the incident source and the detector were designed to achieve minimum observed source convergence angle of the system. The control panel and micro stepping system were programmed for automated measurement. Finally, the designed system was calibrated and aligned. In order to evaluate the system reliability for scatter measurements from various surface conditions, a total of 9 samples were used. Scattering analysis for bidirectional scatter distribution functions of the samples were conducted: rough surface, smooth surface and small particles. ABg model, Rayleigh-Rice theory and Generalized Harvey-Shack theory were used to verify the scatter measurements. The results indicate that the designed system was appropriately developed for measuring scattering phenomena by rough surface, smooth surface and small particles.

  3. In vivo measurement of mid-infrared light scattering from human skin

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Liakat, Sabbir; Bors, Kevin; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2013-01-01

    Two mid-infrared light sources, a broadband source from a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and a pulsed Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser, are used to measure angle-resolved backscattering in vivo from human skin across a broad spectral range. Scattering profiles measured using the FTIR suggest limited penetration of the light into the skin, with most of the light interacting with the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis. Scattering profiles from the QC laser show modulation patterns with angle suggesting interaction with scattering centers in the skin. The scattering is attributed to interaction of the laser light with components such as collagen fibers and capillaries in the dermis layer of the skin. PMID:23577287

  4. Small angle scattering polarization biopsy: a comparative analysis of various skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Yermolenko, S. B.; Ivashko, P. V.; Reshetnikova, E. M.; Galkina, E. M.; Utz, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    An approach to differentiation of the morphological features of normal and pathological human epidermis on the base of statistical analysis of the local polarization states of laser light forward scattered by in-vitro tissue samples is discussed. The eccentricity and the azimuth angle of local polarization ellipses retrieved for various positions of the focused laser beam on the tissue surface, and the coefficient of collimated transmittance are considered as the diagnostic parameters for differentiation. The experimental data obtained with the psoriasis, discoid lupus erythematosus, alopecia, lichen planus, scabies, demodex, and normal skin samples are presented.

  5. Analysis of light scattered by turbid media in cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Tromp, R Hans; Liemert, André; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2014-07-22

    The angle dependence of the transmitted light through a cylindrical turbid sample (latex suspension, developing milk gel, draining/coarsening milk, and protein foams) in a standard light scattering setup was analyzed in terms of the transport mean free path length or scattering length l* (a measure for the turbidity) and the absorption length labs. By variation of the concentration of an absorbing dye, the independence of l* and labs was demonstrated. The resulting value of the specific extinction coefficient of the dye was found to be in fair agreement with direct spectroscopic determination and practically identical in milk and latex suspensions. The validity of this technique for obtaining l* was demonstrated by monitoring the acid-induced gelation of milk. The possibility to simultaneously determine l* and labs was used to follow the time development of a draining and coarsening protein foam which contained an absorbing dye. It was shown that labs can be used as a measure for the volume fraction of air in the foam. This method of monitoring the transmission of multiple light scattering provides an easy way to determine l* and, specifically for foams, quantitative data dominated by the bulk of the foam.

  6. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples.

  7. Influence of forward and multiple light scatter on the measurement of beam attenuation in highly scattering marine environments.

    PubMed

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2004-08-20

    Using three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations, we examine the effect of beam transmissometer geometry on the relative error in the measurement of the beam-attenuation coefficient in an aquatic environment characterized by intense light scattering, especially within submerged bubble clouds entrained by surface-wave breaking. We discuss the forward-scattering error associated with the detection of photons scattered at small angles (< 1 degrees) and the multiple-scattering error associated with the detection of photons scattered more than once along the path length of the instrument. Several scattering phase functions describing bubble clouds at different bubble void fractions in the water are considered. Owing to forward-scattering error, a beam-attenuation meter (beam transmissometer) with a half-angle of receiver acceptance of 1.0 degrees and a path length of 0.1 m can underestimate the true beam attenuation within the bubble cloud by more than 50%. For bubble clouds with a beam attenuation of as much as 100 m(-1), the multiple-scattering error is no more than a few percent. These results are compared with simulations for some example phase functions that are representative of other scattering regimes found in natural waters. The forward-scattering error for the Petzold phase function of turbid waters is 16% for a typical instrument geometry, whereas for the Henyey-Greenstein phase function with the asymmetry parameter of 0.7 and 0.9 the error range is 8-28%.

  8. Measurements of near forward scattered laser light in a large ICF plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.D., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We describe an instrument which measures the angular spread and spectrum of near forward scattered laser light from a probe beam in a long scalelength laser-plasma. The instrument consists of a combination of time integrating and time resolving detectors which measure the scattered light amplitude over four orders of magnitude for a range of angles. These measurements allow us to study the beam spray resulting from various laser and plasma conditions and determine the density fluctuations associated with this beam spray.

  9. Measurement of light scattering in deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragos, N.; Balasi, K.; Domvoglou, T.; Kiskiras, I.; Lenis, D.; Maniatis, M.; Stavropoulos, G.

    2016-04-01

    The deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, being prepared by the KM3NET collaboration, will contain thousands of optical sensors to readout. The accurate knowledge of the optical properties of deep-sea water is of great importance for the neutrino event reconstruction process. In this study we describe our progress in designing an experimental setup and studying a method to measure the parameters describing the absorption and scattering characteristics of deep-sea water. Three PMTs will be used to measure in situ the scattered light emitted from six laser diodes in three different wavelengths covering the Cherenkov radiation spectrum. The technique for the evaluation of the parameters is based on Monte Carlo simulations and our results show that we are able to determine these parameters with satisfying precision.

  10. Measurement of energy spectra of small-angle scattering and distribution of optical microinhomogeneities in laser ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Tverdokhleb, P E; Shepetkin, Yu A; Steinberg, I Sh; Belikov, A Yu; Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F

    2014-06-30

    The energy spectra of small-angle light scattering from the samples of Nd:YAG ceramics and the spatial distributions of optical microinhomogeneities in them are measured. The spatial profiles of microinhomogeneities are found using the collinear heterodyne microprobe technique. Based on the obtained data, the comparison of noise and lasing characteristics of foreign and domestic samples of laser ceramics is carried out. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  11. HD100546 multi-epoch scattered light observations

    SciTech Connect

    Avenhaus, Henning; Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Brittain, Sean D.; Carr, John S.; Najita, Joan R.

    2014-07-20

    We present H, K{sub s}, and L' filter polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) data for the transitional disk around HD100546 obtained in 2013, together with an improved re-reduction of previously published 2006 data. We reveal the disk in polarized scattered light in all three filters, achieving an inner working angle of ∼0.''1. Additional, short-exposure observations in the H and K{sub s} filters probe the surroundings of the star down to ∼0.''03 (∼3 AU). HD100546 is fascinating because of its variety of sub-structures possibly related to forming planets in the disk, and PDI is currently the best technique for imaging them in the near-IR. For the first time ever, we detect a disk in L-band PDI data, and we constrain the outer radius of the inner hole to 14 ± 2 AU and its eccentricity to <0.133. A dark lane is detected between ∼0.''2-0.''6 AU in the front side of the disk, which is likely an effect of the scattering angle and the scattering function of the grains. We find a spiral arm in the northeast that has no obvious connection to spiral arms seen before by other authors further out in the disk, but winds are in the same direction (clockwise). The two bright scattering peaks along the semi-major axis are asymmetric, with the southeastern one being significantly brighter. This could be related to the inner companion candidate that is close to the brighter side of the disk at the time of the observations. The scattering color is close to gray between the H and K{sub s} filters ([H]–[K{sub s}] = 0.19 ± 0.11), but the scattering in the L' filter is significantly weaker ([H]–[L'] = –1.08 ± 0.35, [K{sub s}]–[L'] = –1.27 ± 0.35). We measure the position angle of the disk to be 138° ± 3°, consistent with previous observations, and we derive the dust scattering function in the H and K{sub s} filters between ∼35° and ∼130° at two different radii (30-50 and 80-110 AU) and show that our results are consistent with a disk that is more strongly

  12. Light Scattering Study of Titania Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Choonghoon; Sorensen, Chris

    1997-03-01

    We studied the fractal morphology of titania aerosols by light scattering. Titania aerosols were generated by the thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a silica tube furnace. TTIP was evaporated at temperatures up to 80^circC and its vapor was carried by dry nitrogen to a furnace with temperature in the range of 400 - 600^circC. A TEM analysis of the generated particles showed a typical DLCA structure with a monomer diameter about 50 nm. The particles were then made to flow through a narrow outlet as a laminar stream. The light scattering from these particles was measured using a He-Ne laser as a light source. The measured structure factor clearly showed the Rayleigh, Guinier, and fractal regimes. The fractal morphological parameters, such as the cluster radius of gyration, the fractal dimension, and the fractal prefactor were studied from the structure factor as a function of particle generation conditions. The cluster radius of gyration was about 1 μm and showed a modest dependency on the generation conditions. The fractal dimension was about 1.7 in all cases. These results are in good agreement with the TEM analysis.

  13. Light Scattering from Exoplanet Oceans and Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zugger, Michael; Kasting, J. F.; Williams, D. M.; Kane, T. J.; Philbrick, C. R.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital variation in reflected starlight from exoplanets could eventually be used to detect surface oceans. Exoplanets with rough surfaces, or dominated by atmospheric Rayleigh scattering, should reach peak brightness in full phase, orbital longitude = 180deg, whereas ocean planets with transparent atmospheres should reach peak brightness in crescent phase near OL = 30deg. Application of Fresnel theory to a planet with no atmosphere covered by a calm ocean predicts a peak polarization fraction of 1 at OL = 74deg; however, our model shows that clouds, wind-driven waves, aerosols, absorption, and Rayleigh scattering in the atmosphere and within the water column, dilute the polarization fraction and shift the peak to other OLs. Observing at longer wavelengths reduces the obfuscation of the water polarization signature by Rayleigh scattering but does not mitigate the other effects. Planets with thick Rayleigh scattering atmospheres reach peak polarization near OL = 90deg, but clouds and Lambertian surface scattering dilute and shift this peak to smaller OL. A shifted Rayleigh peak might be mistaken for a water signature unless data from multiple wavelength bands are available. Our calculations suggest that polarization alone may not positively identify the presence of an ocean under an Earth-like atmosphere; however polarization adds another dimension which can be used, in combination with unpolarized orbital light curves and contrast ratios, to detect extrasolar oceans, atmospheric water aerosols, and water clouds. Additionally, the presence and direction of the polarization vector could be used to determine planet association with the star, and constrain orbit inclination. This research was funded by the NASA Astrobiology Institute, the University of Washington Virtual Planetary Laboratory, and the Penn State Astrobiology Institute. Authors M. Zugger, J. Kasting, and D. Williams are members of the Penn State Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds.

  14. Branch Content in Hybrid Materials using Small-Angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Greg

    2005-03-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrid materials often display ramified mass- fractal structures characterized by primary particle size, aggregate size, and mass-fractal dimension. Physical properties, such as mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties and electrical conductivity (in carbon composites for instance), can not be predicted using only these structural features since such properties are intimately tied to the degree and type of branching as shown by Witten [1]. Witten suggested the use of the minimum dimension, or the related connectivity dimension, to calculate mechanical response in these hybrid systems. A viable technique to quantify the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension in hybrid materials has, until recently, been absent from the literature. This presentation will discuss the use of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to describe branch content in hybrid materials [2] and will outline an approach to use the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension to predict static and dynamic mechanical properties for hybrid materials based on structure [1, 3]. 1. Witten TA, Rubinstein M, Colby RH Reinforcement of Rubber by Fractal Aggregates J Phys II 3 (3): 367-383 (1993). 2. Beaucage G Determination of branch fraction and minimum dimension of mass-fractal aggregates Phys Rev E 70 (3): art. no. 031401 Part 1 (2004). 3. Kohls DJ, Beaucage G Rational design of reinforced rubber Curr Opin Solid St M 6 (3): 183-194 (2002).

  15. Heparin's solution structure determined by small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Chen, Yin; Cress, Brady F; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Heparin is a linear, anionic polysaccharide that is widely used as a clinical anticoagulant. Despite its discovery 100 years ago in 1916, the solution structure of heparin remains unknown. The solution shape of heparin has not previously been examined in water under a range of concentrations, and here is done so in D2 O solution using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Solutions of 10 kDa heparin-in the millimolar concentration range-were probed with SANS. Our results show that when sodium concentrations are equivalent to the polyelectrolyte's charge or up to a few hundred millimoles higher, the molecular structure of heparin is compact and the shape could be well modeled by a cylinder with a length three to four times its diameter. In the presence of molar concentrations of sodium, the molecule becomes extended to nearly its full length estimated from reported X-ray measurements on stretched fibers. This stretched form is not found in the presence of molar concentrations of potassium ions. In this high-potassium environment, the heparin molecules have the same shape as when its charges were mostly protonated at pD ≈ 0.5, that is, they are compact and approximately half the length of the extended molecules.

  16. Small angle elastic scattering of protons off of spinless nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, A.G.

    1988-07-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 800 MeV protons incident on /sup 12/C, /sup 40/Ca, and /sup 208/Pb in the momentum transfer range 20 MeV/c < q < 130 MeV/c have been measured. The data was taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Special delay-line drift chambers with dead regions for the beam to pass through them were used to obtain the data. Through the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear contributions to the differential cross section in the small angle region, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude ..cap alpha../sub n/(0) = Ref/sub n/(0)/Imf/sub n/(0) is extracted. The importance of knowing this quantity at lower energies in order to study the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering theories is discussed. 130 refs., 60 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. New Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Every, E.; Deyhim, A.; Kulesza, J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of a new Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument for use in National Institute of Standards And Technology (NIST) will be discussed. This instrument is similar to a shorter instrument we designed and delivered to ANSTO in Australia called the Bilby SANS instrument. The NIST VSANS and the ANSTO Bilby SANS instruments have very similar dimensions for length and diameter and have similar requirements for internal detector motion, top access port, walkway supports, and ports; however, the Bilby SANS instrument vacuum requirement was lower (7.5×10-5 Torr) and the entire (60,000 pound) vessel was required to move 1.5 meters on external rails with a repeatability of 100 um, which ADC achieved. The NIST VSANS length is 24 meter, internal diameter 2.3 meter with three internal carriages. The NIST VSANS instrument, which covers the usual SANS range will also allow configuration to cover the range between q ∼⃒ 10-4 A-1 to 10-3 A-1 with a sample beam current of (104 neutrons/s). The key requirements are a second position-sensitive detector system having a 1 mm pixel size and a longer sample-detector flight path of 20 m (i.e., a 40 m instrument).

  18. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-19

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  19. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  20. Scattering of light on rippled surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilarov, V. L.; Korsukov, V. E.; Korsukova, M. M.; Shcherbakov, I. P.

    2015-06-01

    Thin platinum foils and ribbons of the amorphous alloy Fe77Ni1Si9B13 with fractal surfaces made of unidirectional multiscale surface ripples have been prepared. The surface relief and atomic structure of these foils have been investigated by low-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunnelling microscopy. It has been shown that Pt foils with a fractal surface relief have the prospect for application as reflective diffraction gratings. A model has been proposed and used to calculate the light scattering on unidirectional rippled surface structures of Pt foils.

  1. Light scattering from dense cold atomic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bihui; Cooper, John; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically study the propagation of light through a cold atomic medium, where the effects of motion, laser intensity, atomic density, and polarization can all modify the properties of the scattered light. We present two different microscopic models: the "coherent dipole model" and the "random-walk model", both suitable for modeling recent experimental work done in large atomic arrays in the low-light-intensity regime. We use them to compute relevant observables such as the linewidth, peak intensity, and line center of the emitted light. We further develop generalized models that explicitly take into account atomic motion. Those are relevant for hotter atoms and beyond the low-intensity regime. We show that atomic motion can lead to drastic dephasing and to a reduction of collective effects, together with a distortion of the line shape. Our results are applicable to model a full gamut of quantum systems that rely on atom-light interactions, including atomic clocks, quantum simulators, and nanophotonic systems.

  2. Applications of Optical Sensors to the Detection of Light Scattered from Gelling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulone, Donatella; Manno, Mauro; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Martorana, Vincenzo

    Visible light, scattered within an angle of few degrees, (Small Angle Light Scattering, SALS) yields information on the spatial correlations and dynamical properties on the scale of the micrometers. In this way a quick and non-invasive characterization of a variety of samples is feasible. Lately the SALS instruments have been built around multielement optical sensors (CCD, CMOS), allowing the simultaneous measurement of the complete structure factor even during fast kinetics. An assessment of some sensor matrices of different technology will be presented. The omolecular assemblies produced by polysaccharides or proteins can be functional or dysfunctional, their properties being either desirable or detrimental. Anyhow, their morphology often depends, in a very delicate way, on the presence of cosolutes, on the thermal history, on the biopolymer concentration etc. We present some applications of low angle dynamic and static light scattering to the study of gelling systems (agarose, pectin, insulin).

  3. Effect of laser-radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in nanodiamond suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Vanyukov, V. V.; Mogileva, T. N.; Puzyr', A. P.; Bondar', V. S.; Svirko, Yu. P.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of laser radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in aqueous suspensions of detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) in a regime of optical power limiting (OPL) has been studied. It is established that the nonlinear transmission coefficient of DND suspension in the OPL regime in a field of nanosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm is independent of the polarization of incident radiation. The nonlinear scattering of light observed at an angle of 90° in the plane perpendicular to the plane of polarization of the incident radiation depends on the polarization angle in accordance with a trigonometric law. It is shown that the ratio of the signals of scattered radiation for the vertical and horizontal polarizations exhibits nonmonotonic dependence on the laser-beam power density. The results are explained by the Rayleigh-Mie scattering and a change in the size of scattering centers as a result of the effect of a laser upon the DND suspension.

  4. Light organization of small particles by multiple scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Zhi Hong

    Optical manipulation is of broad interest in physics, chemistry, and biology. In the literature, most of the studies are focused on the optical trapping on a single object. In this thesis, we investigated the light-induced interaction of a collection of particles. The light-induced interaction between small particles was studied by a hierarchy of methods including the dipole theory, the multiple scattering and Maxwell stress tensor formalism, and the finite-difference-time-domain method. We showed that the multiple scattering between small particles could induce a binding mechanism to stabilize optically organized structures, but at the same time induced an intrinsic unbinding mechanism. The stability of optically organized structure was studied and a concept of "optical density" was introduced to gauge the destabilizing effect. We found that light-induced forces could bind dielectric spheres into extended structures through two mechanisms, each with its own length scale which could be adjusted by the configuration of the external light source. By manipulating the commensurability of the two length scales, these two mechanisms cooperated to bind a large number of spheres. When the two length scales became incommensurate for some particular incident angle, the competition between the two mechanisms led to modulated structures and other complex phenomena such as re-entrant stability. We searched for the possibility for stabilizing larger clusters. For this purpose, we found that circularly polarized light bound dielectric spheres into large-scale two-dimensional hexagonal lattice and multiple scattering also induced a rotation of optically bound structures. We searched for configurations that could induce optical trapping by field enhancement. Enhanced transmission on perforated metallic film system was studied. Surface modes bound on multi perforated perfect metal plate system were analytical solved and related to different high transmittance modes. Near

  5. Light scattering in artificial fog and simulated with light scattering filter.

    PubMed

    Ikaunieks, Gatis; Colomb, Michéle; Ozolinsh, Maris

    2009-05-01

    Disability glare, affecting e.g. road safety at night, may result either from intraocular light scattering or from external conditions such as fog. Measurements were made of light scattering in fog and compared with intraocular straylight data for normal eyes and eyes with simulated cataract. All measurements were made with a direct compensation flicker method. To estimate light scattering levels in fog, straylight measurements were carried in a fog chamber for different densities of fog. Density was characterized by the meteorological term visibility V and ranged from 7 to 25. Test distance for measurements in the fog was constant at 5 m. Cataract eye conditions were simulated by placing a light scattering polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) filter with scatterers of submicron size in front of the normal eye. All measurements were made using each of three broad-band color stimuli - red, green and blue (produced either with LEDs or a color CRT monitor). Differences were found in both the level and the spectral characteristics of scattering under the different conditions. The measured values of the straylight parameter, s, in artificial fog showed no noticeable spectral dependence at any visibility range. Increasing the visibility range caused an exponential decrease in the straylight. Intraocular straylight measured with the clear eye showed an increase at the red and blue ends of the spectrum as compared to the green. Straylight measured using PDLC plates with different transparency levels showed a spectral dependence which decreased with wavelength. The scattering introduced by the PDLC plate therefore failed to give a valid simulation of cataract and fog conditions for polychromatic stimuli, due to its erroneous spectral dependence.

  6. Quantitative impact of small angle forward scatter on whole blood oximetry using a Beer-Lambert absorbance model.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Serge Emile; Atanya, Monica; Burns, Kevin; Munger, Rejean

    2011-04-21

    It is well known that red blood cell scattering has an impact on whole blood oximetry as well as in vivo retinal oxygen saturation measurements. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of small angle forward scatter on whole blood oximetry for scattering angles found in retinal oximetry light paths. Transmittance spectra of whole blood were measured in two different experimental setups: one that included small angle scatter in the transmitted signal and one that measured the transmitted signal only, at absorbance path lengths of 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 µm. Oxygen saturation was determined by multiple linear regression in the 520-600 nm wavelength range and compared between path lengths and experimental setups. Mean calculated oxygen saturation differences between setups were greater than 10% at every absorbance path length. The deviations to the Beer-Lambert absorbance model had different spectral dependences between experimental setups, with the highest deviations found in the 520-540 nm range when scatter was added to the transmitted signal. These results are consistent with other models of forward scatter that predict different spectral dependences of the red blood cell scattering cross-section and haemoglobin extinction coefficients in this wavelength range.

  7. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Halaney, David L; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E; Feldman, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture.

  8. A study of the polarization of light scattered by vegetation. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woessner, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to better understand the factors that govern the polarization of light scattered from vegetation and soils. The intensity and polarization of light scattered by clover and grass in vivo and soil were measured at a number of different angles of incidence and reflectance. Both individual leaves and natural patches of leaves were measured. The light transmitted through the leaves was found to be negatively polarized. The light scattered from the upper leaf surface was found to be positively polarized in a manner which could be accounted for qualitatively but not quantitatively by the Fresnel reflection coefficients modified by a shadowing function of the form cos sup2 (g/2), where g is the phase angle. Findings indicate that the polarization of light scattered by vegetation is a more complex process than previously thought, and that besides the surface-scattered component of light, the volume-scattered and multiply-scattered components also contribute significantly to the polarization.

  9. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halaney, David L.; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture.

  10. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Halaney, David L.; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture. PMID:26538329

  11. Atom-interferometric studies of light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Yavin, I.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2009-07-01

    We have used an echo-type atom interferometer that manipulates laser-cooled atoms in a single ground state to investigate the effect of light scattering from pulsed and continuous-wave light. The interferometer uses two off-resonant standing-wave pulses applied at times t=0 and t=T to diffract and recombine momentum states separated by 2ℏk at t=2T . Matter wave interference is associated with the formation of a density grating with period λ/2 in the vicinity of this echo time. The grating contrast is measured by recording the intensity of coherently backscattered light. The interferometer is perturbed by an additional pulse applied at t=2T-δT or by continuous-wave background light. If the additional pulse is a standing wave, the momentum states interfering at t=2T are displaced and the grating contrast can be completely recovered due to constructive interference. In this case, the contrast shows a periodic modulation at the atomic recoil frequency as a function of δT . In a recent work, it was shown that the atomic recoil frequency can be measured easily and precisely when using coherence functions to model the signal shape. This paper provides an alternative description of the signal shape through an analytical calculation of echo formation in the presence of an additional standing-wave pulse. Using this treatment, it is possible to model the effects of spontaneous emission and spatial profile of the laser beam on the signal shape. Additionally, the theory predicts scaling laws as a function of the pulse area and the number of additional standing-wave pulses. These scaling laws are investigated experimentally and can be exploited to improve precision measurements of the atomic recoil frequency. We also show that coherence functions can be used to make a direct measurement of the populations of momentum states associated with the ground state under conditions where the Doppler-broadened velocity distribution of the sample is much larger than the recoil

  12. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  13. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  14. Industrial Particle Size Measurement Using Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muly, E. C.; Frock, H. N.

    1980-12-01

    The precise knowledge of particle size and particle size distribution is fundamental to the control of a wide variety of industrial processes. Processing steps as diverse as crystallization, grinding, emulsification, and atomization, produce particles in the size range .1 to 1000 micrometers in diameter. While the object of some processes may be the production of particles of specified sizes, e.g., abrasives and glass beads, other processes may require particle size control for process efficiency, e.g., crystallization, and still others for control of final product quality, e.g., minerals, cement, and ceramics. In many processes more than one of these reasons may be important. A line of instruments has been developed using light scattering to measure various parameters of particulate distributions. These instruments employ laser illumination of a flowing stream of particles, producing Fraunhofer diffraction patterns which are processed both optically and electronically with unique, proprietary techniques. Various parameters of the particle size distribution are measured. The measurement is both rapid and precise. This paper will cover the importance of particle size measurements in various processes, different types of measurement methods, and the application of light scattering technology to size determinations in wet slurries and dry powders. A number of specific applications will be discussed encompassing minerals grinding, Portland cement, and rolling mill emulsions. Some references will be made to energy savings through automation.

  15. Coincidence measurements of electron-impact coherence parameters for e-He scattering in the full range of scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Dziczek, Dariusz; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    Electron impact coherence parameters for inelastic e-He scattering have been measured for the excitation to the 2 {sup 1}P{sub 1} state at collision energy of 100 eV. The experiment was conducted using angular correlation electron-photon coincidence technique with a magnetic angle changer allowing measurements in full range of scattering angles. The results are compared with other experimental data and theoretical predictions available for this collisional system.

  16. Preparing monodisperse macromolecular samples for successful biological small-angle X-ray and neutron-scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Cy M; Graewert, Melissa A; Blanchet, Clément E; Langley, David B; Whitten, Andrew E; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2016-11-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are techniques used to extract structural parameters and determine the overall structures and shapes of biological macromolecules, complexes and assemblies in solution. The scattering intensities measured from a sample contain contributions from all atoms within the illuminated sample volume, including the solvent and buffer components, as well as the macromolecules of interest. To obtain structural information, it is essential to prepare an exactly matched solvent blank so that background scattering contributions can be accurately subtracted from the sample scattering to obtain the net scattering from the macromolecules in the sample. In addition, sample heterogeneity caused by contaminants, aggregates, mismatched solvents, radiation damage or other factors can severely influence and complicate data analysis, so it is essential that the samples be pure and monodisperse for the duration of the experiment. This protocol outlines the basic physics of SAXS and SANS, and it reveals how the underlying conceptual principles of the techniques ultimately 'translate' into practical laboratory guidance for the production of samples of sufficiently high quality for scattering experiments. The procedure describes how to prepare and characterize protein and nucleic acid samples for both SAXS and SANS using gel electrophoresis, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and light scattering. Also included are procedures that are specific to X-rays (in-line SEC-SAXS) and neutrons, specifically preparing samples for contrast matching or variation experiments and deuterium labeling of proteins.

  17. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Investigation of angle-resolved scattering from solid explosives residues on a car door for non-contact sensing geometries. Illumination with a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser tuning between 7 and 8 microns was detected both with a sensitive single point detector and a hyperspectral imaging camera. Spectral scattering phenomena were discussed and possibilities for hyperspectral imaging at large scattering angles were outlined.

  18. A biophysical study of clathrin utilizing light scattering, neutron scattering and structure based computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Matthew Lee

    A principal component in the protein coats of certain post-golgi and endocytic vesicles is clathrin, which appears as a three-legged heteropolymer (known as a triskelion) that assembles into polyhedral baskets principally made up of pentagonal and hexagonal faces. In vitro, this assembly depends on the pH, with baskets forming more readily at low pH and less readily at high pH. We have developed procedures, based on static and dynamic light scattering, to determine the radius of gyration, Rg, and hydrodynamic radius, RH, of isolated triskelia under conditions where basket assembly occurs. Calculations based on rigid molecular bead models of a triskelion show that the measured values can be accounted for by bending of the legs and a puckering at the vertex. We also show that the values of Rg and R H measured for clathrin triskelia in solution are qualitatively consistent with the conformation of an individual triskelion that is part of a "D6 barrel" basket assembly measured by cryo-EM tomography. We extended this study by performing small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on isolated triskelia in solution under conditions where baskets do not assemble. SANS experiments were consistent with previous static light scattering experiments but showed a shoulder in the scattering function at intermediate q-values just beyond the central diffraction peak (the Guinier regime). Theoretical calculations based on rigid bead models of a triskelion showed well-defined features in this region different from the experiment. A flexible bead-spring model of a triskelion and Brownian dynamics simulations were used to generate a time averaged scattering function. This model adequately described the experimental data for flexibilities close to previous estimates from the analysis of electron micrographs.

  19. Determination of light absorption, scattering and anisotropy factor of a highly scattering medium using backscattered circularly polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Alrubaiee, M.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    2007-02-01

    The absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient and the anisotropy factor of a highly scattering medium are determined using the diffuse reflectance of an obliquely incident beam of circularly polarized light. This approach determines both the anisotropy factor and the cutoff size parameter for the fractal continuous scattering medium such as biological tissue and tissue phantoms from depolarization of the backscattered light.

  20. Modeling of light scattering by icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, L.; Mackowski, D.; Pitman, K.; Verbiscer, A.; Buratti, B.; Momary, T.

    2014-07-01

    As a result of ground-based, space-based, and in-situ spacecraft mission observations, a great amount of photometric, polarimetric, and spectroscopic data of icy bodies (satellites of giant planets, Kuiper Belt objects, comet nuclei, and icy particles in cometary comae and rings) has been accumulated. These data have revealed fascinating light-scattering phenomena, such as the opposition surge resulting from coherent backscattering and shadow hiding and the negative polarization associated with them. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these bodies are especially informative as the depth, width, and shape of the absorption bands of ice are sensitive not only to the ice abundance but also to the size of icy grains. Numerous NIR spectra obtained by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have been used to map the microcharacteristics of the icy satellites [1] and rings of Saturn [2]. VIMS data have also permitted a study of the opposition surge for icy satellites of Saturn [3], showing that coherent backscattering affects not only brightness and polarization of icy bodies but also their spectra [4]. To study all of the light-scattering phenomena that affect the photopolarimetric and spectroscopic characteristics of icy bodies, including coherent backscattering, requires computer modeling that rigorously considers light scattering by a large number of densely packed small particles that form either layers (in the case of regolith) or big clusters (ring and comet particles) . Such opportunity has appeared recently with a development of a new version MSTM4 of the Multi-Sphere T-Matrix code [5]. Simulations of reflectance and absorbance spectra of a ''target'' (particle layer or cluster) require that the dimensions of the target be significantly larger than the wavelength, sphere radius, and layer thickness. For wavelength-sized spheres and packing fractions typical of regolith, targets can contain dozens of thousands of spheres that, with the original MSTM

  1. Fourier-transform light scattering of individual colloidal clusters.

    PubMed

    Yu, HyeonSeung; Park, HyunJoo; Kim, Youngchan; Kim, Mahn Won; Park, YongKeun

    2012-07-01

    We present measurements of the scalar-field light scattering of individual dimer, trimer, and tetrahedron shapes among colloidal clusters. By measuring the electric field with quantitative phase imaging at the sample plane and then numerically propagating to the far-field scattering plane, the two-dimensional light-scattering patterns from individual colloidal clusters are effectively and precisely retrieved. The measured scattering patterns are consistent with simulated patterns calculated from the generalized multiparticle Mie solution.

  2. A Study of Brownian Motion Using Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noel A.; Lunacek, Joseph H.

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to investigate molecular motion by means of light scattering. Light from a He-Ne laser is focused into a cell containing a suspension of polystyrene spheres. The scattered light, collected on the photosurface of a photomultiplier tube, is analyzed. The apparatus won first prize in Demonstration Lecture Apparatus in…

  3. Recent applications of small-angle neutron scattering in strongly interacting soft condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignall, G. D.; Melnichenko, Y. B.

    2005-08-01

    Before the application of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to the study of polymer structure, chain conformation studies were limited to light and small-angle x-ray scattering techniques, usually conducted in dilute solution owing to the difficulties of separating the inter- and intrachain contributions to the structure. The unique role of neutron scattering in soft condensed matter arises from the difference in the coherent scattering length between deuterium (bD = 0.67 × 10-12 cm) and hydrogen (bH = -0.37 × 10-12 cm), which results in a marked difference in scattering power (contrast) between molecules synthesized from normal (hydrogeneous) and deuterated monomer units. Thus, deuterium labelling techniques may be used to 'stain' molecules and make them 'visible' in the condensed state and other crowded environments, such as concentrated solutions of overlapping chains. For over two decades, SANS has proved to be a powerful tool for studies of structure-property relationships in polymeric systems and has made it possible to extract unique information about their size, shape, conformational changes and molecular associations. These applications are now so numerous that an exhaustive review of the field is no longer practical, so the authors propose to focus on the use of SANS for studies of strongly interacting soft matter systems. This paper will therefore discuss basic theory and practical aspects of the technique and will attempt to explain the physics of scattering with the minimum of unnecessary detail and mathematical rigour. Examples will be given to demonstrate the power of SANS and to show how it has helped to unveil universal aspects of the behaviour of macromolecules in such apparently diverse systems as polymer solutions, blends, polyelectrolytes and supercritical mixtures. The aim of the authors is to aid potential users who have a general scientific background, but no specialist knowledge of scattering, to understand the potential of the

  4. Measuring the dynamics of structural changes in biological macromolecules from light scattering data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Adriel D.

    1993-01-01

    Examining techniques to study the dynamics of structural changes in various molecules has been an ongoing goal of the space program. Knowing how these phenomena occur in biological systems is fundamental to understanding what is necessary for life to remain functional in the space environment. A hierarchy of biological organization is functionally described when cells join together small organic molecules to form larger and more complex molecules. Characterizing the architecture of a particular macromolecule helps determine how that molecule works in the living cell and is basic to the diversity of life. Understanding this arrangement involves the correlation of the structure of macromolecules with their functions. A light scattering photometer was developed for detecting continuous measurement of the angular spectrum of light scattered by dynamically changing systems. The analysis of light scattered by biological macromolecules can be used to determine concentration, size, shape, molecular weight, and structural changes of cells, such as erythrocytes. Some light scattering photometers can collect and store 120 angular scattering spectra per minute, with an angular resolution of 0.2 deg which can be displayed with computer graphics. The light scattering photometer does the following: functions to produce and detect scattered light; determines scatter angles; and collects, stores, and analyzes data.

  5. Nanostructured metallic rear reflectors for thin solar cells: balancing parasitic absorption in metal and large-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Claire E. R.; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2015-12-01

    Rear reflectors for solar cells comprised of metal films with periodic arrays of nanoscale features on their surface can provide significantly enhanced light trapping in the absorber layer. However these structures can also result in significantly increased parasitic absorption into the metal layer at various wavelengths of light. Conversely these highly absorbing resonances can also coincide with the wavelengths which display the largest enhancement to the cell's photocurrent. As such it is important to understand the underlying causes for such photocurrent enhancements and losses in the metal in order to design the optimum structure for use. 3D Finite-difference-time-domain simulations have been used to model a variety of structures and analyze the spatial distribution of absorption within different materials which make up the structure, the angles at which light will be scattered from the rear surface, as well as the idealized short circuit current from each structure integrated across the AM1.5 spectrum. These reveal the properties of these modes at resonant wavelengths at which absorption into both materials is enhanced. Despite the enhanced coupling of light into the metal at these wavelengths, the amount of light scattered back into the absorber at large angles is also significantly boosted. For a large variety of geometries, the impact of this large angle scattering dominates leading to significant increases to a cell's photocurrent. Our simulations allow us to understand the contributions of multiple plasmonic effects occurring in such structures, allowing selection of the most suitable geometries to achieve large-angle scattering in a desired wavelength range.

  6. Light Scattering by Stochastic Solids, Aggregates and Regoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumme, K.; Rahola, J.

    1999-09-01

    We use our well-tested light scattering code based on a numerical solution of the electromagnetic integral equation to complete the full four by four Muller matrix for light scattering. Our code is very versatile as to the geometry of particles. One of our goals is doing light scattering by various particle forms to understand the two ubiquitous photopolarimetric phenomena of the atmosphereless solar system bodies, comets and interplanetary dust. These are: the universal brightening of the object towards the planetary opposition (opposition effect or spike) and the reversal of linear polarization taking place at the phase angles of about 20(o) . First, we generate stochastically deformed spheres with two different radius covariance functions in the size parameter range from 1 to 7 and apply the power law size distribution to their individual contributions. Our computations quite naturally produce both the opposition effect and the reversal of linear polarization. Second, we create with the diffusion-limited aggregation code closely packed clusters with a power law size distributed particles. Again the above mentioned two phenomena quite naturally follow. These two different particle geometries seem to indicate that an unambiguous inversion of the photopolarimetric data is not possible. This is even more so because the typical cosmic dust particles are almost certainly much bigger than allowed in our code. Finally, we model a planetary regolith by randomly placing several hundred sheres in a cylidrical geometry with a varying packing density. Once again those two phenomena follow. We also compare our computations to our Monte-Carlo code for a horizontally finite cylinder in the radiative transfer regime to see the effects fo close packing. Both the intensity and linear polarization are fairly well reproduced, excluding the forward and backward directions by the ray-optical, radiattive transfer model.

  7. Discrete Sources Method for light scattering analysis of non-axisymmetric features of a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Discrete Sources Method (DSM) has been extended to analyze polarized light scattering by non-axial symmetric nano-sized features on a plane substrate. A detailed description of the corresponding numerical scheme is provided. Using a "fictitious" particle approach the new DSM model enables to consider scattering from such substrate defects as a line bump and a line pit. The developed computer model has been employed for demonstrating the ability to perform a comparative analysis of light scattering from such line features. Simulation results corresponding to the Differential Scattering Cross-Section (DSC) and the integral response for P/S polarized light are presented. It was found that the integral response can change by an order of magnitude depending on the orientation of the linear defect with respect to the direction of the incident laser light. In addition, it was shown that some defects can turn out to be "invisible" if an oblique angle of incidence is chosen.

  8. Angular scattering of light by a homogeneous spherical particle in a zeroth-order Bessel beam and its relationship to plane wave scattering.

    PubMed

    Preston, Thomas C; Reid, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The angular scattering of light from a homogeneous spherical particle in a zeroth-order Bessel beam is calculated using a generalized Lorenz-Mie theory. We investigate the dependence of the angular scattering on the semi-apex angle of the Bessel beam and discuss the major features of the resulting scattering plots. We also compare Bessel beam scattering to plane wave scattering and provide criterion for when the difference between the two cases can be considered negligible. Finally, we discuss a method for characterizing spherical particles using angular light scattering. This work is useful to researchers who are interested in characterizing particles trapped in optical beams using angular dependent light scattering measurements.

  9. LIGHT SCATTERING: Observation of multiple scattering of laser radiation from a light-induced jet of microparticles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat'ev, Andrei V.

    2004-06-01

    Variation in the correlation function of light multiply scattered by a random medium was observed with increasing the incident beam power. The light-induced motion of microparticles in suspension, caused by a high-power laser radiation, serves as an additional factor in the decorrelation of the scattered light. The experimental data are in good agreement with the results of theoretical analysis.

  10. Scattering of circularly polarized light by a rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Shoom, Andrey A.

    2012-07-01

    We study scattering of polarized light by a rotating (Kerr) black hole of mass M and angular momentum J. In order to keep trace of the polarization dependence of photon trajectories one can use the following dimensionless parameter: ɛ=±(ωM)-1, where ω is the photon frequency and the sign + (-) corresponds to the right (left) circular polarization. We assume that |ɛ|≪1 and use the modified geometric optics approximation developed in [Phys. Rev. D 84, 044026 (2011)]; that is, we include the first order in ɛ polarization-dependent terms into the eikonal equation. These corrections modify late-time behavior of photons. We demonstrate that the photon moves along a null curve, which in the limit ɛ=0 becomes a null geodesic. We focus on the scattering problem for polarized light. Namely, we consider the following problems: (i) How does the photon’s bending angle depend on its polarization? (ii) How does the position of the image of a pointlike source depend on its polarization? (iii) How does the arrival time of photons depend on their polarization? We perform the numerical calculations that illustrate these effects for an extremely rotating black hole and discuss their possible applications.

  11. Analytic height correlation function of rough surfaces derived from light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, M.; Shafiei, F.; Fazeli, S. M.; Downer, M. C.; Jafari, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the height correlation function of a homogeneous, isotropic rough surface based on the inverse wave scattering method of Kirchhoff theory. The expression directly relates the height correlation function to diffuse scattered intensity along a linear path at fixed polar angle. We test the solution by measuring the angular distribution of light scattered from rough silicon surfaces and comparing extracted height correlation functions to those derived from atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results agree closely with AFM over a wider range of roughness parameters than previous formulations of the inverse scattering problem, while relying less on large-angle scatter data. Our expression thus provides an accurate analytical equation for the height correlation function of a wide range of surfaces based on measurements using a simple, fast experimental procedure.

  12. Light deflection by light: Effect of incidence angle and inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu

    2016-10-01

    We study the angular deflection of the circularly polarized components of a linearly polarized probe field in a weakly birefringent atomic system in tripod configuration. A spatially inhomogeneous control field incident obliquely onto an atomic vapor cell facilitates a large angular divergence between circular components. We show that the angular resolution can be dynamically controlled by optimally choosing the angle of incidence and the transverse profile of the control beam. For instance, by employing a Laguerre-Gaussian profile of the control field, one can impart a large angular divergence to the circular components close to the entry face of the atomic vapor cell. We further demonstrate how such a medium causes the focusing and refocusing of the probe field, thereby acting as a lens with multiple foci. The absorption in the medium remains negligible at resonance due to electromagnetically induced transparency.

  13. Light scattering by red blood cells in ektacytometry: Fraunhofer versus anomalous diffraction.

    PubMed

    Streekstra, G J; Hoekstra, A G; Nijhof, E J; Heethaar, R M

    1993-05-01

    In the present literature on ektacytometry, small angle light scattering by ellipsoidal red blood cells is commonly approximated by Fraunhofer diffraction. Calculations on a sphere with the size and relative refractive index of a red cell, however, show that Fraunhofer diffraction deviates significantly from exact Mie theory. Anomalous diffraction is found to be a much better approximation. The anomalous diffraction theory is used to calculate the intensity distribution of the light scattered by an ellipsoidally deformed red blood cell. The derived expression shows that the ellipticity of isointensity curves in forward scattered light are equal to the ellipticity of the red blood cell. The theoretical expression is fitted to the intensity patterns measured with an ektacytometer. For the small observation angles used in ektacytometry, the experimental results confirm the validity of the anomalous diffraction approach.

  14. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-24

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  15. Hyper-Rayleigh light scattering from an aqueous suspension of purple membrane.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P K; Rayfield, G W

    1994-07-01

    Here we report the first observation of hyper-Rayleigh light scattering from bacteriorhodopsin in the form of an aqueous suspension of unoriented purple membranes. A typical purple membrane suspension used in our experiments contains approximately 10(8) randomly oriented purple membranes. Each purple membrane contains approximately 10(5) bacteriorhodopsin molecules in a two-dimensional crystallinearray. Hyper-Rayleigh light scattering is observed when the purple membrane suspension is illuminated with light that has a wavelength of 1064 nm. We propose that the 532-nm scattered light from each of the bacteriorhodopsin molecules in a single purple membrane is coherent, and that the scattered light from different purple membranes is incoherent. This proposal is supported by the following experimental observations: (a) the 532-nm light intensity is proportional to the square of the incident power, (b) the intensity of the 532-nm signal is linearly proportional to the concentration of purple membrane in solution, (c) the scattered 532-nm light is incoherent, (d) the scattered 532-nm light intensity decreases if the size of the purple membranes is reduced while the bacteriorhodopsin concentration is kept constant, and (e) the 532-nm light is due to the retinal chromophore of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The ratio of horizontal polarized hyper-Rayleigh scattered light to vertically polarized hyper-Rayleigh scattered light gives the angle (23 ± 4°) of the retinal axis with respect to the plane of the purple membrane. The hyperpolarizability of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule is found to be 5 ± 0.4 × 10(-27) esu.

  16. Analysis of Light Scattering by Nanoobjects on a Plane Surface via Discrete Sources Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Elena; Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    In the last years light scattering by nanostructures is of interest in different areas of science and technology. Analysis of light scattered by nanostructures is an effective tool for a better understanding of their properties. In this work the Discrete Sources Method (DSM) is applied to model light scattering by nanoparticles on a surface. One of attractive features of the DSM is an ability to account for all the features of the modeled system, such as complex refractive index with frequency dispersion of particles and a substrate, scattering interaction of particle and an interface. To demonstrate the variety of possible applications for the DSM, we concentrated on two practical applications. First is light scattering by a nanorod on a surface, which requires the use of a general 3D version of the DSM. The second case discussed in this chapter is light scattering by a nanoshell, which allows the accounting for the axial symmetry of the problem and essential reduction of calculation time. In both cases light scattering characteristics and their dependence on nanostructure characteristics like size, symmetry, incident angle, particle orientation, refractive index and wavelength are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Fractal mechanisms of light scattering in biological tissue and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-11-01

    We use fractal continuous random media to model visible and near-infrared light scattering by biological tissue and cell suspensions. The power law of the reduced scattering coefficient, the anisotropy factor of scattering, and the phase function are derived with good agreement with experimental results. Implications for spectroscopic tissue diagnosis are discussed.

  18. Multiple size scale structures in silica/siloxane composites studied by small-angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beaucage, G.; Schaefer, D.W.; Ulibarri, T.; Black, E.

    1993-12-31

    The physical properties of in-situ produced composites, such as the TEOS-polysiloxane based systems, are directly related to the complex interaction of structural features from the nano- to macro-scopic scales. The nature of these structural interactions are a key element in understanding and controlling mechanical properties in these systems. We believe that the smallest scale structures, in the nanometer range, correlate with properties such as the modulus while large-scale structures on the micron scale effect failure in these materials. This paper discusses techniques for analysis of structural features and interrelation of structural features over these wide ranges of size using small-angle light, x-ray and neutron scattering. Combination of data from different instruments allows for characterization of the interaction between these different size scale features.

  19. Aggregates structure analysis of petroleum asphaltenes with small-angle neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, R.; Hunt, J. E.; Winans, R. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Sato, S.; Takanohashi, T.; Idemitsu Kosan Co.; National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine changes in the structures of petroleum asphaltene aggregates in situ with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Asphaltenes were isolated from three different crude oils: Maya, Khafji, and Iranian Light. An aliquot of the 5 wt % asphaltene solution in deuterated Decalin, 1-methylnaphthalene, or quinoline was loaded in a special stainless steel cell for SANS measurements. SANS data measured at various temperatures from 25 to 350 {sup o}C showed various topological features different with asphaltene or solvent species. A fractal network was formed only with asphaltene of Maya in Decalin, and it remained even at 350 {sup o}C. In all of the solvents, asphaltenes aggregate in the form of a prolate ellipsoid with a high aspect ratio at 25 {sup o}C and got smaller with increasing temperature. That became a compact sphere with the size of around 25 {angstrom} in radius at 350 {sup o}C.

  20. A versatile, low-cost approach to dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pristinski, Denis; Chastek, Thomas Q.

    2009-04-01

    We describe a method for constructing a fiber-optic-based dynamic light scattering (DLS) instrument from commonly available components, without a need for custom-made parts. Details are provided that allow for academic researchers from diverse backgrounds to build this DLS instrument with minimal effort and at a low cost. This approach, while providing good sensitivity and high accuracy (e.g., measuring the size of latex standards to within 1% relative standard deviation), possesses several advantages not found, in their entirety, in existing DLS instrumentation. It was observed that, even though an arbitrary scattering angle could be selected, aligning this instrument to obtain optimal detection efficiency can be completed in as little as a few minutes. Also, complications associated with light refraction at the sample cell interface are avoided. Small volumes (<10 µL) can be measured, for example, by hanging a solution droplet from the fiber optic probe tips. In addition, use of fiber optic probes allows the beam path length to be as short as 1.6 mm while measuring at 90°, which reduces the likelihood of multiple scattering. With minimal customization, compact submersible probes and a portable battery-operated DLS instrument were made as examples of potential implementation. Finally, this approach is versatile, and can be incorporated into a wide variety of reactors, for in situ characterization, and other instrumentation for hybrid measurements. This type of in situ measurement was conducted after mounting the DLS probes inside a standard three-neck flask. This allowed for direct monitoring of the growth of silica nanoparticles prepared via Stöber synthesis.

  1. Modeling diffuse reflectance measurements of light scattered by layered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Shelley B.

    In this dissertation, we first present a model for the diffuse reflectance due to a continuous beam incident normally on a half space composed of a uniform scattering and absorbing medium. This model is the result of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption and a defined beam width. Through comparison with the diffuse reflectance computed using the numerical solution of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for small source-detector separation distances. We then present an explicit model for the diffuse reflectance due to a collimated beam of light incident normally on layered tissues. This model is derived using the corrected diffusion approximation applied to a layered medium, and it takes the form of a convolution with an explicit kernel and the incident beam profile. This model corrects the standard diffusion approximation over all source-detector separation distances provided the beam is sufficiently wide compared to the scattering mean-free path. We validate this model through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Then we use this model to estimate the optical properties of an epithelial layer from Monte Carlo simulation data. Using measurements at small source-detector separations and this model, we are able to estimate the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of epithelial tissues efficiently with reasonable accuracy. Finally, we present an extension of the corrected diffusion approximation for an obliquely incident beam. This model is formed through a Fourier Series representation in the azimuthal angle which allows us to exhibit the break in axisymmetry when combined with the previous analysis. We validate this model with Monte Carlo simulations. This model can also be written in the form of a convolution of an explicit kernel with the incident beam profile. Additionally, it can be used to

  2. Influence of Forward and Multiple Light Scatter on the Measurement of Beam Attenuation in Highly Scattering Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W. Kendall

    2004-08-01

    Using three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations, we examine the effect of beam transmissometer geometry on the relative error in the measurement of the beam-attenuation coefficient in an aquatic environment characterized by intense light scattering, especially within submerged bubble clouds entrained by surface-wave breaking. We discuss the forward-scattering error associated with the detection of photons scattered at small angles (< 1°) and the multiple-scattering error associated with the detection of photons scattered more than once along the path length of the instrument. Several scattering phase functions describing bubble clouds at different bubble void fractions in the water are considered. Owing to forward-scattering error, a beam-attenuation meter (beam transmissometer) with a half-angle of receiver acceptance of 1.0° and a path length of 0.1 m can underestimate the true beam attenuation within the bubble cloud by more than 50%. For bubble clouds with a beam attenuation of as much as 100 m^-1, the multiple-scattering error is no more than a few percent. These results are compared with simulations for some example phase functions that are representative of other scattering regimes found in natural waters. The forward-scattering error for the Petzold phase function of turbid waters is 16% for a typical instrument geometry, whereas for the Henyey-Greenstein phase function with the asymmetry parameter of 0.7 and 0.9 the error range is 8-28%.

  3. The artefacts of radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed scanners and their causation by light scattering from radiation-induced polymers.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Poppinga, Daniela; Harder, Dietrich; Doerner, Karl-Joachim; Poppe, Bjoern

    2014-07-07

    Optical experiments and theoretical considerations have been undertaken in order to understand the causes of the 'orientation effect' and the 'parabola effect', the artefacts impairing the desired light absorption measurement on radiochromic EBT3 films with flatbed scanners. EBT3 films exposed to doses up to 20.9 Gy were scanned with an Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner in landscape and portrait orientation. The horizontally and vertically polarized light components of the scanner were determined, and another Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was disassembled to examine its optical components. The optical properties of exposed and unexposed EBT3 films were studied with incident polarized and unpolarized white light, and the transmitted red light was investigated for its polarization and scattering properties including the distribution of the scattering angles. Neutral density filters were studied for comparison. Guidance was sought from the theory of light scattering from rod-like macromolecular structures. The drastic dose-dependent variation of the transmitted total light current as function of the orientation of front and rear polarizers, interpreted by light scattering theory, shows that the radiation-induced polymerization of the monomers of EBT3 films produces light scattering oscillators preferably polarized at right angles with the coating direction of the film. The directional distribution of the scattered light is partly anisotropic, with a preferred scattering plane at right angles with the coating direction, indicating light scattering from stacks of coherently vibrating oscillators piled up along the monomer crystals. The polyester carrier film also participates in these effects. The 'orientation' and 'parabola' artefacts due to flatbed scanning of radiochromic films can be explained by the interaction of the polarization-dependent and anisotropic light scattering from exposed and unexposed EBT3 films with the quantitative difference

  4. Recovering the vorticity of a light beam after scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salla, Gangi Reddy Perumangattu, Chithrabhanu; Anwar, Ali; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, Ravindra P.

    2015-07-13

    We generate optical vortices and scatter them through a rough surface. However, the scattered light passing through a lens shows the same vorticity when probed at the Fourier plane. The vorticity is measured using a nonseparable state of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light as it cannot be confirmed by the standard interferometric technique. The observed vorticity is found to be independent of the amount of scattered light collected. Therefore, vortices can be used as information carriers even in the presence of scattering media. The experimental results are well supported by the theoretical results.

  5. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  6. Utility of light scatter in the morphological analysis of sperm

    EPA Science Inventory

    We were able to differentiate the morphologically diverse sperm nuclei of four animal species by using an Ortho flow cytometer to detect the forward light scatter from a red (helium-neon) laser. Cytograms depicting the axial light loss and forward red scatter signals revealed uni...

  7. Spectral and angular distribution of light scattered from the elytra of two carabid beetle species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Erbe, A.; Fabritius, H.; Raabe, D.

    2010-06-01

    Color in living organisms is primarily generated by two mechanisms: selective absorption by pigments and structural coloration, or a combination of both. In this study, we investigated the coloration of cuticle from the wings (elytra) of the two ground beetle species Carabus auronitens and Carabus auratus. The greenish iridescent color of both species is created by a multilayer structure consisting of periodically alternating layers with different thicknesses and composition which is located in the 1-2 µm thick outermost layer of the cuticle (epicuticle). Illuminated with white light, reflectance spectra in both linear polarisation show an angle-dependent characteristic peak in the blue/green region of the spectrum. Furthermore, the reflected light is polarised linearly. Scattering experiments with laser illumination at 532 nm show diffuse scattering over a larger angular range. The polarisation dependence of the scattered light is consistent with the interpretation of small inhomogeneities as scattering centres in the elytra.

  8. Label-free identification of individual bacteria using Fourier transform light scattering.

    PubMed

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Kim, Min-Hyeok; Park, HyunJoo; Kang, Suk-Jo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-06-15

    Rapid identification of bacterial species is crucial in medicine and food hygiene. In order to achieve rapid and label-free identification of bacterial species at the single bacterium level, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical method based on Fourier transform light scattering (FTLS) measurements and statistical classification. For individual rod-shaped bacteria belonging to four bacterial species (Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus casei, and Bacillus subtilis), two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps are precisely measured using FTLS technique. The scattering maps are then systematically analyzed, employing statistical classification in order to extract the unique fingerprint patterns for each species, so that a new unidentified bacterium can be identified by a single light scattering measurement. The single-bacterial and label-free nature of our method suggests wide applicability for rapid point-of-care bacterial diagnosis.

  9. Light scattering by marine heterotrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Quinones, Renato A.

    1992-01-01

    Mie theory is applied to estimate scattering by polydispersions of marine heterotrophic bacteria, and a simple expression is derived for the bacterial scattering coefficient. The error incurred in deriving bacterial optical properties by use of the van de Hulst approximations is computed. The scattering properties of natural bacterial assemblages in three marine environments, Georges Bank, Northeast Channel, and Sargasso Sea, are assessed by applying Mie theory to field data on bacterial size and abundance. Results are used to examine the potential contribution of bacteria to the scattering properties of seawater. The utility of using pigment data to predict the magnitude of scattering by bacteria is discussed.

  10. On the scattered light by dilute aqueous dispersions of nanogel particles.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Fernández, J; Ramos, J; Forcada, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2015-07-15

    This work deals with the scattered light by nanoparticles formed by a temperature sensitive polymer networks, namely nanogel particles. The scattered light is measured as a function of the scattering angle at temperatures below and above the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of nanogel particles. Our experimental results indicate that nanogel particles have a core-shell structure, formed by a uniform highly cross-linked core surrounded by a fuzzy shell where the polymer density decays to zero gradually for swollen configurations and sharply for shrunken states. The theoretical fitting of the experimental curves shows that the scattered light at low angle obeys a decreasing power law with the scattering vector, q(-α). The value of exponent α provides information about the radial dependence of the polymer density at the external shell of the particles for swollen nanogels, and about the degree of roughness of the surface for the case of shrunken nanogels. On the one hand, at low temperatures (below the VPPT), the nanogel particle is in the swollen state and the light scattering data show that its shell structure follows a fractal behaviour, with a polymer density that decays as r(α-3), where r is the distance to the particle centre. On the other hand, above the VPPT the results indicate that nanogel collapses into a core of uniform polymer density and a rough shell, with a fractal surface dimension of 2.5.

  11. Scattering of Light and Surface Plasmon Polaritons from Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2013-0049 TR-2013-0049 SCATTERING OF LIGHT AND SURFACE PLASMON POLARITONS FROM ROUGH SURFACES Alexei A...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scattering of Light and Surface Plasmon Polaritons from Rough Surfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-08-C-0230 5b...of several properties of surface plasmon polaritons on structured surfaces are described, together with results for the scattering of surface plasmon

  12. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  13. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  14. Study of erythrocyte membrane fluctuation using light scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoon; Lee, Sangyun; Park, YongKeun; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-03-01

    It is commonly known that alteration of erythrocyte deformability lead to serious microcirculatory diseases such as retinopathy, nephropathy, etc. Various methods and technologies have been developed to diagnose such membrane properties of erythrocytes. In this study, we developed an innovative method to measure hemorheological characteristics of the erythrocyte membrane using a light scattering analysis with simplified optic setting and multi-cell analysis as well. Light scattering intensity through multiple erythrocytes and its power density spectrum were obtained. The results of light scattering analyses were compared in healthy control and artificially hardened sample which was treated with glutaraldehyde. These results were further compared with conventional assays to measure deformable property in hemorheology. We found that light scattering information would reflect the disturbance of membrane fluctuation in artificially damaged erythrocytes. Therefore, measuring fluctuation of erythrocyte membrane using light scattering signal could facilitate simple and precise diagnose of pathological state on erythrocyte as well as related complications.

  15. Limitations for heterodyne detection of Brillouin scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Allemeier, R.T.; Wagner, J.W.; Telschow, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    One means by which elastic properties of a material may be determined is measuring sound wave velocities in the material, from which elastic moduli of interest can be computed. Velocity can be measured by conventional piezoelectric transduction techniques, by applying laser ultrasonics, or by using Brillouin-scattering methods. Brillouin-scattering techniques for determining the sound wave velocity are particularly attractive since they are completely noninvasive. Only a probe beam of light is required since the thermal energy in the material provides the elastic motion. Heterodyne methods for detection of Brillouin-scattered light are considered one possible means to increase the speed of the scattered light frequency detection. Results of experiments with simulated Brillouin scattering suggest that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin-scattered light is feasible. Experiments to detect Brillouin-scattered light, with water as the scattering medium, were designed and interpreted using the results of the simulated scattering experiments. Overall, results showed that it is difficult to narrow the linewidth for Brillouin scattering to an acceptable level. The results given indicate that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin components requires detection bandwidths that are quite small, perhaps 10 Hz or lower. These small bandwidths can be routinely achieved using lock-in amplifier techniques.

  16. MIMO decorrelation for visible light communication based on angle optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyong; Zhu, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Recently, many researchers have used the normal vector tilting to solve the problems about low rate of multiplexing and channel strong correlation in Visible Light Communication Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (VLC-MIMO) system, but they all lack of the theoretical support. In this paper, we establish a channel model about 2×2 VLC-MIMO, then translate the communication problem about vector tilting optimal angle in a certain range into a mathematical problem about seeking the minimum value of function. Finally, we deduced the mathematic expressions about the optimal tilting angles of corresponding LEDs and PDs, and these expressions will provide a theoretical basis for the further study.

  17. Deflection angle of light in an Ellis wormhole geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Koki; Asada, Hideki

    2012-05-01

    We reexamine the light deflection by an Ellis wormhole. The bending angle as a function of the ratio between the impact parameter and the throat radius of the wormhole is obtained in terms of a complete elliptic integral of the first kind. This result immediately yields asymptotic expressions in the weak field approximation. It is shown that an expression for the deflection angle derived (and used) in recent papers is valid at the leading order but it breaks down at the next order because of the nontrivial spacetime topology.

  18. Characterization of porcine peripheral blood leukocytes by light-scattering flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, F I; Williams, T J; el-Awar, F Y; Pang, V F; Hahn, E C

    1987-01-01

    As a basis for other experiments using flow cytometry of porcine peripheral blood leukocytes, cell fractions were isolated by various methods and analyzed by forward angle light scatter and 90 degree light scatter. Cytospin smears of cell samples were also studied by leukocyte differential counts and nonspecific esterase staining. Three main populations of peripheral blood leukocytes [lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes (primarily neutrophils)], were defined in the log 90 degree light scatter by forward angle light scatter histogram. Partial overlap was observed between lymphocyte and monocyte, and between monocyte and granulocyte domains. Correlation between leukocyte differential counts and flow cytometric quantification based on bitmap statistics of appropriate domains was between r = 0.872-0.892 for lymphocyte and granulocyte. Percoll density gradients were used for subfractionation of leukocyte populations, especially for the enrichment of granulocytes. The specific densities were calculated for lymphocytes (1.0585-1.0819 g/cc), monocytes (1.0585-1.0702 g/cc), granulocyte (1.0819-1.0936 g/cc), and erythrocytes (greater than 1.0952 g/cc). We suggest that light scatter characterization is a basis for future studies of porcine blood by flow cytometry. PMID:3453262

  19. Broadband and Broad-Angle Low-Scattering Metasurface Based on Hybrid Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Zhao, Jie; Cheng, Qiang; Dong, Di Sha; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-01-01

    A broadband and broad-angle low-scattering metasurface is designed, fabricated, and characterized. Based on the optimization algorithm and far-field scattering pattern analysis, we propose a rapid and efficient method to design metasurfaces, which avoids the large amount of time-consuming electromagnetic simulations. Full-wave simulation and measurement results show that the proposed metasurface is insensitive to the polarization of incident waves, and presents good scattering-reduction properties for oblique incident waves. PMID:25089367

  20. Effect of the single-scattering phase function on light transmission through disordered media with large inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinyuk, V. V.; Sheberstov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the total transmission coefficient (transmittance) of a disordered medium with large (compared to the light wavelength) inhomogeneities. To model highly forward scattering in the medium we take advantage of the Gegenbauer kernel phase function. In a subdiffusion thickness range, the transmittance is shown to be sensitive to the specific form of the single-scattering phase function. The effect reveals itself at grazing angles of incidence and originates from small-angle multiple scattering of light. Our results are in a good agreement with numerical solutions to the radiative transfer equation.

  1. Depolarization of light in turbid media: a scattering event resolved Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinxin; Wood, Michael F G; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Vitkin, I Alex

    2010-01-10

    Details of light depolarization in turbid media were investigated using polarization-sensitive Monte Carlo simulations. The surviving linear and circular polarization fractions of photons undergoing a particular number of scattering events were studied for different optical properties of the turbid media. It was found that the threshold number of photon scattering interactions that fully randomize the incident polarization (defined here as <1% surviving polarization fraction) is not a constant, but varies with the photon detection angle. Larger detection angles, close to backscattering direction, show lower full depolarization threshold number for a given set of sample's optical properties. The Monte Carlo simulations also confirm that depolarization is not only controlled by the number of scattering events and detection geometry, but is also strongly influenced by other factors such as anisotropy g, medium linear birefringence, and the polarization state of the incident light.

  2. An analysis of scattered light in low dispersion IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basri, G.; Clarke, J. T.; Haisch, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of light scattering from the low-resolution grating in the short wavelength spectrograph of the IUE Observatory was developed, in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of scattering on both continuum and line emission spectra. It is found that: (1) the redistribution of light by grating scattering did not appreciably alter either the shape or the absolute flux level of continuum spectra for A-F stars; (2) late-type stellar continua showed a tendency to flatten when observed in scattered light toward the shorter wavelengths; and (3) the effect of grating scattering on emission lines is to decrease measured line intensities by an increasing percentage toward the shorter wavelengths. The spectra obtained from scattering experiments for solar-type and late type stars are reproduced in graphic form.

  3. Resonant scattering and resultant pitch angle evolution of relativistic electrons by plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Chen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Adopting several realistic models for the wave distribution and ambient plasmaspheric density, we perform a comprehensive analysis to evaluate hiss-induced scattering coefficients, the relative role of each resonant harmonic, and the overall effect of hiss scattering on the pitch angle evolution and associated decay (loss) processes of relativistic electrons. The results show that scattering by the equatorial, highly oblique component of the hiss emission is negligible. A quasi-parallel propagating wave model of hiss emissions provides a good approximation for evaluation of scattering rates of ≤ 2 MeV electrons. However, realistic wave propagation angles as a function of latitude along the field line must be taken into account to accurately quantify the rates of hiss scattering above 2 MeV. Ambient plasma density is also a critical parameter that can influence hiss scattering rates and resultant pitch angle evolution of electron flux. While the first order cyclotron and the Landau resonances are dominant for hiss-induced scattering of less than 2 MeV electrons, higher order resonances become important and even dominant at intermediate equatorial pitch angles for ultra-relativistic (≥ 3 MeV) electrons. Hiss induced electron pitch angle evolution consistently shows a relatively rapid initial transport of electrons from high to lower pitch angles, with a gradual approach towards an equilibrium shape, and a final state where the entire distribution decays exponentially with time. Although hiss scattering rates near the loss cone control the pitch angle evolution and the ultimate loss of ultra-relativistic electrons, the presence of a scattering bottleneck (a pronounced drop in diffusion rate at intermediate pitch angles) significantly affects the loss rate and leads to characteristic top hat shaped pitch angle distributions at energies below ~1 MeV. Decay timescales are determined to be on the order of a few days, tens of days, and > 100 days for 500 keV, 2 Me

  4. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  5. Parity Violation in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, IV, Grady Wilson

    2001-01-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from the proton at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic point (θlab = 12.3 deg. and (Q2) = 0.48 (GeV/c)2) is chosen to provide sensitivity to the strange electric form factor GsE. A 3.36 GeV beam of longitudinally polarized electrons was scattered from protons in a liquid hydrogen target. The scattered flux was detected by a pair of spectrometers which focussed the elastically-scattered electrons onto total-absorption detectors. The detector signals were integrated and digitized by a custom data acquisition system. A feedback system reduced systematic errors by controlling helicity-correlated beam intensity differences at the sub-ppm (part per million) level. The experimental result, A = 14.5 +/- 2.0 (stat) ± 1.1 (syst) ppm, is consistent with the electroweak Standard Model with no additional contributions from strange quarks. In particular, the measurement implies GSE + 0.39 GsM = 0.023 ± 0.040 ± 0.026 (ζGnE), where the last uncertainty is due to the estimated uncertainty in the neutron electric form factor GnE . This result represents the first experimental constraint of the strange electric form factor.

  6. Dynamic Light Scattering of Diabetic Vitreopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebag, J.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Dunker, Stephan; Suh, Kwang I.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes induces pathology throughout the body via nonenzymatic glycation of proteins. Vitreous, which is replete with type 11 collagen, undergoes significant changes in diabetes. The resultant diabetic vitreopathy plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. Detecting these molecular changes could provide insight into diabetic eye disease as well as molecular effects elsewhere in the body. Human eyes were obtained at autopsy and studied in the fresh, unfixed state. Sclera, choroid, and retina were dissected off the vitreous for dark-field slit microscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the former, the entire vitreous was exposed. For the latter, only a window at the equator was dissected in some specimens, and the anterior segment was removed leaving the posterior lens capsule intact in others. DLS was performed to determine particle sizes at multiple sites 0.5 mm apart, spanning the globe at the equator (window dissections) and along the antero-posterior axis. Dark-field slit microscopy in diabetic subjects detected findings typical of age-related vitreous degeneration, but at much younger ages than nondiabetic controls. Noninvasive DLS measurements found a greater heterogeneity and larger particle sizes in vitreous of subjects with diabetes as compared to age-matched controls. DLS can detect and quantify the early molecular effects that cause vitreous collagen fibrils to cross-link and aggregate. This could provide valuable insight into ocular and systemic effects of hyperglycemia, because the molecular changes in diabetic vitreopathy could serve as an index of such effects throughout the body. In addition to the diagnostic implications, this methodology could provide a rapid, reproducible way to monitor the response to therapy with novel agents intended to prevent the complications of diabetes on a molecular level.

  7. A novel screen design for anti-ambient light front projection display with angle-selective absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Tianju; Chen, Weigang; He, Kebo; Zhang, Zhaoyu

    2016-03-01

    Ambient light is destructive to the reflective type projection system's contrast ratio which has great influence on the image quality. In contrast to the conventional front projection, short-throw projection has its advantage to reject the ambient light. Fresnel lens-shaped reflection layer is adapted to direct light from a large angle due to the low lens throw ratio to the viewing area. The structure separates the path of the ambient light and projection light, creating the chance to solve the problem that ambient light is mixed with projection light. However, with solely the lens-shaped reflection layer is not good enough to improve the contrast ratio due to the scattering layer, which contributes a necessarily wide viewing angle, could interfere with both light paths before hitting the layer. So we propose a new design that sets the draft angle surface with absorption layer and adds an angle-selective absorber to separate these two kinds of light. The absorber is designed to fit the direction of the projection light, leading to a small absorption cross section for the projection light and respectfully big absorption cross section for the ambient light. We have calculated the design with Tracepro, a ray tracing program and find a nearly 8 times contrast ratio improvement against the current design in theory. This design can hopefully provide efficient display in bright lit situation with better viewer satisfaction.

  8. Light scattering by randomly irregular dielectric particles larger than the wavelength.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2013-12-01

    We present results of simulation of light scattering by randomly irregular particles that have dimensions larger than the wavelength of incident light. We apply the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method and compare the accurate solution with that obtained using an approximate geometric-optics model. A qualitative agreement is observed for scattering angle curves of intensity at the size parameter of X=60, whereas angular dependence of polarization appears to be more sensitive to the wave effects and requires larger sizes for application of geometrical optics.

  9. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  10. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, C; Cisbani, E; Hamilton, D J; Salmé, G; Wojtsekhowski, B; Ahmidouch, A; Annand, J R M; Baghdasaryan, H; Beaufait, J; Bosted, P; Brash, E J; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Christy, E; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Fowler, M; Frlez, E; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Horn, T; Huber, G M; de Jager, C W; Jensen, E; Jones, M K; Kelleher, A; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; Kohl, M; Kumbartzki, G; Lassiter, S; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Lovelace, H; Luo, W; Mack, D; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Mulholland, J; Nelyubin, V; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Slifer, K; Smith, G; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zheng, X

    2015-10-09

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θ_{cm}^{p}=70°. The longitudinal transfer K_{LL}, measured to be 0.645±0.059±0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  11. Light-Scattering Characteristics of Optical Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Psd) Accession For NTIS GRA&I DTIC TAB Unannounced d ] Justificatio By - Distributon/_ Availability Codes JAvail and/or_ CHAPTER 1...rejection systems, evaluation of machined metal mirrors for high- energy laser applications , laser-radar backscatter signature programs, and a host of...other applications requiring extensive scattering data. If the scattering mechanism were completely understood, surface prepa- ration techniques or

  12. Small-angle approximation to the transfer of narrow laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The broadening and the signal power detected of a laser beam traversing an anisotropic scattering medium were examined using the small-angle approximation to the radiative transfer equation in which photons suffering large-angle deflections are neglected. To obtain tractable answers, simple Gaussian and non-Gaussian functions for the scattering phase functions are assumed. Two other approximate approaches employed in the field to further simplify the small-angle approximation solutions are described, and the results obtained by one of them are compared with those obtained using small-angle approximation. An exact method for obtaining the contribution of each higher order scattering to the radiance field is examined but no results are presented.

  13. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  14. Measuring the distribution of cellulose microfibril angles in primary cell walls by small angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-ray scattering is a well-established method for measuring cellulose microfibril angles in secondary cell walls. However, little data is available on the much thinner primary cell walls. Here, we show that microfibril orientation distributions can be determined by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) even in primary cell walls. The technique offers a number of advantages: samples can be analyzed in the native hydrated state without any preparation which minimizes the risk of artifacts and allows for fast data acquisition. The method provides data averaged over a specimen region, determined by the size of the used X-ray beam and, thus, yields the microfibril orientation distribution within this region. Results Cellulose microfibril orientation distributions were obtained for single cells of the alga Chara corallina, as well as for the multicellular hypocotyl of Arabidopsis thaliana. In both, Chara and Arabidopsis, distributions with a broad scattering around mean microfibril angles of approximately 0° and 90° towards the longitudinal axis of the cells were found. Conclusions With SAXS, the structure of primary cell walls can be analysed in their native state and new insights into the cellulose microfibril orientation of primary cell walls can be gained. The data shows that SAXS can serve as a valuable tool for the analysis of cellulose microfibril orientation in primary cell walls and, in consequence, add to the understanding of its mechanical behaviour and the intriguing mechanisms behind cell growth. PMID:25170343

  15. Measurements and interpretations of light scattering from intact biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeremy D.

    Visible light interacts with biological cells primarily through elastic scattering. The details of how cells scatter light depend on their morphology and their substructures. In this thesis we first present a series of experiments and models to discern the specific contributions of certain sub-cellular constituents to whole-cell scattering. Exploiting the findings of those studies, we report on experiments within model systems of cell death that demonstrate the potential of light scattering measurements as a tool in modern biology. Instrumentation capable of exploiting the findings of this thesis from a biology-relevant microscopy platform is designed and developed. A Mie theory based interpretation of light scattering signals originating from a collection of particles with a broad size distribution is developed. Upon applying this model to scattering data from intact cells, we find that it robustly extracts the size scale of dominant light scattering particles, suggests that scattering measurements are sensitive primarily to mitochondrial and lysosomal morphology, and unites conflicting results in the literature. Using this model as a basis, we present a collection of studies in which we use various strategies of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a biophysical tool to perturb mitochondria and lysosomes, and observe the effects of these perturbations on whole-cell scattering. Through these experiments, we are able to discern the individual contributions of mitochondria and lysosomes to whole-cell light scattering, and demonstrate that mitochondria are responsible for roughly 80% of the scattering signal. Results of experiments aimed at demonstrating the potential role that light scattering measurements have to play in future studies of cell death biology are presented. We first show that mitochondrial-PDT-induced morphology changes measured with light scattering map into the cell killing efficacy of the therapy. We next demonstrate that mitochondrial

  16. Investigation of the effect of scattering agent and scattering albedo on modulated light propagation in water.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Linda; Alley, Derek; Cochenour, Brandon

    2011-04-01

    A recent paper described experiments completed to study the effect of scattering on the propagation of modulated light in laboratory tank water [Appl. Opt.48, 2607 (2009)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.48.002607]. Those measurements were limited to a specific scattering agent (Maalox antacid) with a fixed scattering albedo (0.95). The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of different scattering agents and scattering albedos on modulated light propagation in water. The results show that the scattering albedo affects the number of attenuation lengths that the modulated optical signal propagates without distortion, while the type of scattering agent affects the degree to which the modulation is distorted with increasing attenuation length.

  17. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-08-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure.

  18. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    PubMed Central

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure. PMID:25123449

  19. Numerical analysis of the Fokker-Planck equation with adiabatic focusing: Realistic pitch-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasuik, J.; Fiege, J. D.; Shalchi, A.

    2017-01-01

    We solve the focused transport equation of cosmic rays numerically to investigate non-isotropic models of the pitch-angle scattering coefficient. In previous work, the Fokker-Planck equation was solved either analytically by using approximations, or by using a numerical approach together with simple models for the pitch-angle scattering coefficient. It is the purpose of the current article so compute particle distribution functions as well as the parallel diffusion coefficient by solving numerically the focused transport equation for a more realistic Fokker-Planck coefficient of pitch-angle scattering. Our analytical form for the scattering parameter is based on non-linear diffusion theory that takes into account realistic scattering at pitch-angles close to 90 ° . This general form contains the isotropic form as well as the quasi-linear limit as special cases. We show that the ratio of the diffusion coefficients with and without focusing sensitively depends on the ratio of the turbulent magnetic field and the mean field. The assumed form of the pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficient has an influence on the parallel diffusion coefficient. In all considered cases we found a reduction of the ratio of the diffusion coefficients if the ratio of magnetic fields is reduced.

  20. Threshold energies of light-ion sputtering and heavy-ion sputtering as a function of angle of incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Y.

    1984-03-01

    The angular dependence of threshold energies has been investigated for light-ion sputtering and heavy-ion sputtering, and simple expressions for the angular dependences of threshold energies are derived for these two cases. For not-too-large angles of incidence, the threshold energy of heavy-ion sputtering is a decreasing function of the angle of incidence because of the anisotropy of the velocity distribution of recoil atoms, while the threshold energy of light-ion sputtering shows a weak angular dependence. For grazing angles of incidence, the threshold energies of these two cases are increasing functions of the angle of incidence because of surface scattering. In order to examine these theoretical angular dependences of threshold energies, the computer simulations have been performed using the ACAT code. It is found that in the near-threshold regime the angular dependences of sputtering yield by heavy ions are much different from those by light ions.

  1. Design and analysis of particles detecting system based on near forward light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiao-Jun; Li, Xiao; Yu, Jia-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel design based on near forward light scattering detection system to measure size and concentration distribution of particles in liquids is reported. According to theory of Mie scattering, the influence of relative refractive index, particles size and wavelength on the detection results are discussed. A green optical fiber laser with 532nm was used as the excited light source. As a key part in the detection system, the focusing system using a lens structure to confine light sensitive area with Gauss distribution less than 80 μm2. The lateral size of the sample cell is limited to 100μm. In order to measure the particles in non-overlapping state and improve the accuracy and repeatability, a novel structure in the sample cell was used and particle velocity through the sample cell was controlled by high precision stepper motor control system of micro circulation pump. Particle light scattering signal acquisition was completed by the poly lens combination system, according to the receiving angle relative to the measured particle, which can adjust the light scattering direction to obtain better particles light scattering signal. Photoelectric signal conversion, amplification and acquisition are all the devices with high precision. The measurement results showed that the measurement system was accurate and stable when the particles size in the range of 0.5-5μm.

  2. Nano-Scale Morphology of Melanosomes Revealed by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Gorniak, Thomas; Haraszti, Tamas; Garamus, Vasyl M.; Buck, Andreas R.; Senkbeil, Tobias; Priebe, Marius; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Koehn, Demelza; Salditt, Tim; Grunze, Michael; Anderson, Michael G.; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Melanosomes are highly specialized organelles that produce and store the pigment melanin, thereby fulfilling essential functions within their host organism. Besides having obvious cosmetic consequences – determining the color of skin, hair and the iris – they contribute to photochemical protection from ultraviolet radiation, as well as to vision (by defining how much light enters the eye). Though melanosomes can be beneficial for health, abnormalities in their structure can lead to adverse effects. Knowledge of their ultrastructure will be crucial to gaining insight into the mechanisms that ultimately lead to melanosome-related diseases. However, due to their small size and electron-dense content, physiologically intact melanosomes are recalcitrant to study by common imaging techniques such as light and transmission electron microscopy. In contrast, X-ray-based methodologies offer both high spatial resolution and powerful penetrating capabilities, and thus are well suited to study the ultrastructure of electron-dense organelles in their natural, hydrated form. Here, we report on the application of small-angle X-ray scattering – a method effective in determining the three-dimensional structures of biomolecules – to whole, hydrated murine melanosomes. The use of complementary information from the scattering signal of a large ensemble of suspended organelles and from single, vitrified specimens revealed a melanosomal sub-structure whose surface and bulk properties differ in two commonly used inbred strains of laboratory mice. Whereas melanosomes in C57BL/6J mice have a well-defined surface and are densely packed with 40-nm units, their counterparts in DBA/2J mice feature a rough surface, are more granular and consist of 60-nm building blocks. The fact that these strains have different coat colors and distinct susceptibilities to pigment-related eye disease suggest that these differences in size and packing are of biological significance. PMID:24621581

  3. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, S.; Castelletto, S.; Aruldoss, C.; Scholten, R. E.; Roberts, A.

    2007-08-01

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres.

  4. A light-scattering characterization of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Selser, J C; Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1976-01-01

    A technique has been developed in this paper which enables quasi-elastic laser light scattering to be used to accurately and quantitatively measure the average vesicle diffusion coefficient and the relative dispersion in the diffusion coefficient about this average for dilute polydisperse vesicle suspensions. This technique relies on a theoretical analysis of a modified form of the Z-averaged diffusion coefficient. This modified Z-averaged diffusion coefficient explicitly incorporates vesicle size, structure, and polydispersity in a description of the scattered light autocorrelation spectrum. Light-scattering experiments were performed on a dilute, lobster sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicle suspension and the measured average diffusion coefficient and the diffusion coefficient relative dispersion about this average were determined with accuracies of 2 and 10%, respectively. A comparison of vesicle size inferred from light-scattering results was made with size results from electron microscopic analysis of the same sample. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1252585

  5. Light scattering from nonspherical airborne particles: Experimental and theoretical comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Edwin; Kaye, Paul H.; Guppy, John R.

    1994-10-01

    Spatial intensity distribution of laser light scattered by airborne hazardous particles such as asbestos fiber is studied to classify particles shape and size. Theoretical treatment is based on Rayleigh-Gans formalism. Theoretical and experimental data are in good agreement.

  6. Propagation and scattering of light in fluctuating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, V. L.; Romanov, V. P.; Zubkov, L. A.

    1994-11-01

    The monograph deals with the problems of the propagation and scattering of light in molecular media. The explicit statistical mechanical averaging procedure for the equations of electrodynamics is developed. It permits to transform the molecular level description into the macroscopic one for the electrodynamics of the fluctuating media. In the framework of such an approach, the problems of the molecular correlation contribution into the dielectric permeability, of the calculation of the reflection coefficients with an account of surface layers and of the multiple light scattering are considered. The developed theory is applied to the description of the critical opalescence, the coherent backscattering enhancement, the light scattering depolarization phenomena and the propagation and scattering of light in anisotropic media, including the case of liquid crystals.

  7. Evaluation of advanced light scattering technology for microgravity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, W. J.; Rosenblum, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of modern light scattering equipment and the uses it might have in studying processes in microgravity are evaluated. Emphasis is on the resolution of polydisperse systems. This choice was made since a major use of light scattering was expected to be the study of crystal growth of macromolecules in low gravity environments. An evaluation of a modern photon correlation spectrometer and a Mie spectrometer is presented.

  8. Efficient light propagation for multiple anisotropic volume scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N. |

    1993-12-01

    Realistic rendering of participating media like clouds requires multiple anisotropic light scattering. This paper presents a propagation approximation for light scattered into M direction bins, which reduces the ``ray effect`` problem in the traditional ``discrete ordinates`` method. For a volume of n{sup 3} elements, it takes O(M n{sup 3} log n + M{sup 2} n{sup 3}) time and O(M n{sup 3}) space.

  9. Application of small-angle neutron scattering to the study of forces between magnetically chained monodisperse ferrofluid emulsion droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Dr Nirmesh; Liu, Dr C K; Hawkett, Dr B. S.; Warr, G. G.; Hamilton, William A

    2014-01-01

    The optical magnetic chaining technique (MCT) developed by Leal-Calderon, Bibette and co-workers in the 1990 s allows precise measurements of force profiles between droplets in monodisperse ferrofluid emulsions. However, the method lacks an in-situ determination of droplet size and therefore requires the combination of separately acquired measurements of droplet chain periodicity versus an applied magnetic field from optical Bragg scattering and droplet diameter inferred from dynamic light scattering (DLS) to recover surface force-distance profiles between the colloidal particles. Compound refractive lens (CRL) focussed small-angle scattering (SANS) MCT should result in more consistent measurements of droplet size (form factor measurements in the absence of field) and droplet chaining period (from structure factor peaks when the magnetic field is applied); and, with access to shorter length scales, extend force measurements to closer approaches than possible by optical measurements. We report on CRL-SANS measurements of monodisperse ferrofluid emulsion droplets aligned in straight chains by an applied field perpendicular to the incident beam direction. Analysis of the scattering from the closely spaced droplets required algorithms that carefully treated resolution and its effect on mean scattering vector magnitudes in order to determine droplet size and chain periods to sufficient accuracy. At lower applied fields scattering patterns indicate structural correlations transverse to the magnetic field direction due to the formation of intermediate structures in early chain growth.

  10. Noctilucent cloud polarimetry: Twilight measurements in a wide range of scattering angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Maslov, Igor A.; Kozelov, Boris V.; Dlugach, Janna M.

    2016-06-01

    Wide-field polarization measurements of the twilight sky background during several nights with bright and extended noctilucent clouds in central and northern Russia in 2014 and 2015 are used to build the phase dependence of the degree of polarization of sunlight scattered by cloud particles in a wide range of scattering angles (from 40° to 130°). This range covers the linear polarization maximum near 90° and large-angle slope of the curve. The polarization in this angle range is most sensitive to the particle size. The method of separation of scattering on cloud particles from the twilight background is presented. Results are compared with T-matrix simulations for different sizes and shapes of ice particles; the best-fit model radius of particles (0.06 μm) and maximum radius (about 0.1 μm) are estimated.

  11. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Rondon, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    The applicability of pQCD to exclusive reactions at medium energies is a subject of considerable interest. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. In pQCD, three active quarks and two hard gluons are involved when describing RCS. But the cross sections do not agree with the pQCD predictions. In contrast, a handbag dominance model, involving only one single quark coupling to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs) does a good job of matching the cross section data. A measurement of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL was found inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the hand-bag mechanism. Further Miller's handbag approach, which including quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD and others which demands that KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL has been proposed to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. This experiment will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  12. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2015-04-01

    Whether pQCD can describe exclusive reactions at medium energies remains an area of active study. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. A pQCD description of RCS requires the participation of three quarks and two hard gluons. However its predictions for the RCS cross sections disagree with data while calculations based on the handbag mechanism, involving a single quark coupled to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs), match the data well. The measured longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL is inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations of the handbag mechanism. Furthermore, Miller's approach, which includes quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD where KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL (E12-14-006) has been approved to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C and will be able to discriminate between the various models. E12-14-006 will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  13. Electrically Switchable and Permanently Stable Light Scattering Modes by Dynamic Fingerprint Chiral Textures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ko-Ting; Lee, Po-Yi; Qasim, Malik M; Liu, Cheng-Kai; Cheng, Wen-Fa; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2016-04-27

    Negative dielectric nematic liquid crystals (LCs) doped with two azobenzene materials provide electrically switchable and permanently stable scattering mode light modulators based on dynamic fingerprint chiral textures (DFCT) with inhomogeneously helical axes. These light modulators can be switched between transparent (stable large domains of DFCT) states and scattering (stable small domains of DFCT) states by applying electric fields with different frequencies. The generation of DFCT results from the long flexible side chains of the doped chiral dopant. That is, if the DFCT can be obtained, then the large domains of DFCT reflect an intrinsically stable state. Moreover, the stabilization of the small domains of DFCT are caused by the terminal rigid restricted side chains of the other doped chiral dopant. Experimentally, the required amplitude to switch the light modulator from a scattering (transparent) state to a transparent (scattering) state decreases as the frequency of the applied electric field increases (decreases) within the set limits. This study is the first report on the advantages of the light scattering mode of DFCT, including low operating voltage, permanently stable transmission, wide viewing angle, high contrast, and polarization-independent scattering and transparency.

  14. Light scattering from Sickle Cell Hemoglobin: Polarized and Unpolarized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejing; Hantgan, Roy R.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    1999-11-01

    Sickle cell polymers form due to aggregation of a mutant form of hemoglobin (HbS). The polymerization of HbS leads to microvascular occlusion characteristic of Sickle Cell Disease. A good understanding of HbS polymerization requires a way to quantify the degree of polymerization. As our calculations show, total intensity light scattering is not always linearly dependent on the amount of polymer. Polarized light scattering has been proposed as a more accurate way to measure polymer content. We use a new modulation method to measure all 16 Mueller Matrix elements, which completely describe how the Polarization State of light is altered upon scattering. Preliminary results of light scattering measurements from spheres and hemoglobin show that the instrument works properly. In future experiments, we will attempt to use polarized light scattering as an accurate measure of polymerization. In addition, Polarized light scattering may provide information on the higher order structure of sickle polymer bundles that has not been obtainable by other means.

  15. Q-space analysis of light scattering by Gaussian Random Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, Justin B.; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Chakrabarti, Amitabha

    2016-05-01

    Q-space analysis is applied to the scattered intensity from Gaussian Random Spheres (GRSs). Q-space analysis involves plotting the scattered intensity vs. the magnitude of the scattering wave vector q = 2 k sin θ/2 where k = 2 π / λ with λ the wavelength and θ is the scattering angle, on a log-log plot. The light scattering properties of GRSs were calculated using a discrete dipole approximation algorithm. The GRSs had σ=0.2 and ν=3, where σ is the relative standard deviation in the radial direction, and ν describes fluctuations in the angular direction. Calculations were systematically performed with size parameters ranging from 10 to 30, and with a relative index of refraction, m, ranging from 1.01 to 1.5. The results show quantifiable, power law descriptions of the scattered intensity and a Rayleigh functionality of the forward scattered intensity that depend upon the phase shift parameter ρ = 2 k Req | m - 1 | where Req is an equivalent radius. Similar functionalities have been observed in both spheres and other irregularly shaped particles. These results continue the implication that there is a comprehensive description of light scattering for all particles that can be uncovered with the application of Q-space.

  16. A forward-angle-scattering method for the determination of optical constants and particle size distribution by collimated laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Yu, Xiaoying; Ruan, Liming

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using a secondary optimization technique and forward-angle-scattering method to retrieve optical constants (or complex refractive indices) and particle size distribution (PSD) simultaneously. In this work, two continuous wave lasers of different wavelengths were applied to irradiate the participating samples, and the scattered light of samples with different acceptance angles was obtained. First, the scattered signals within different acceptance angles were calculated by solving the radiative transfer equation. Then, the complex refractive index and PSD were retrieved simultaneously by applying quantum particle swarm optimization. However, the estimated results of PSD were inaccurate. Thus, a secondary optimization, which using the directional radiative intensity as input, was performed to improve the accuracy of PSD based on the first optimization process. Four commonly used kinds of monomodal PSD functions, i.e., the Rosin-Rammler, standard Normal, Logarithmic Normal, and Junge distribution, were retrieved. All results showed that the proposed technique can estimate the complex refractive index and PSD accurately.

  17. Magnetic scattering in the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering and Bragg edge transmission from steel.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yojiro; Morooka, Satoshi; Ohishi, Kazuki; Sato, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Rintaro; Adachi, Nozomu; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Gilbert, Elliot Paul; Sugiyama, Masaaki

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed neutron sources enable the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and Bragg edge transmission. This simultaneous measurement is useful for microstructural characterization in steel. Since most steels are ferromagnetic, magnetic scattering contributions should be considered in both SANS and Bragg edge transmission analyses. An expression for the magnetic scattering contribution to Bragg edge transmission analysis has been derived. The analysis using this expression was applied to Cu steel. The ferrite crystallite size estimated from this Bragg edge transmission analysis with the magnetic scattering contribution was larger than that estimated using conventional expressions. This result indicates that magnetic scattering has to be taken into account for quantitative Bragg edge transmission analysis. In the SANS analysis, the ratio of magnetic to nuclear scattering contributions revealed that the precipitates consist of body-centered cubic Cu0.7Fe0.3 and pure Cu, which probably has 9R structure including elastic strain and vacancies. These results show that effective use of the magnetic scattering contribution allows detailed analyses of steel microstructure.

  18. Magnetic scattering in the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering and Bragg edge transmission from steel1

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Yojiro; Morooka, Satoshi; Ohishi, Kazuki; Sato, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Rintaro; Adachi, Nozomu; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Gilbert, Elliot Paul; Sugiyama, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed neutron sources enable the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and Bragg edge transmission. This simultaneous measurement is useful for microstructural characterization in steel. Since most steels are ferromagnetic, magnetic scattering contributions should be considered in both SANS and Bragg edge transmission analyses. An expression for the magnetic scattering contribution to Bragg edge transmission analysis has been derived. The analysis using this expression was applied to Cu steel. The ferrite crystallite size estimated from this Bragg edge transmission analysis with the magnetic scattering contribution was larger than that estimated using conventional expressions. This result indicates that magnetic scattering has to be taken into account for quantitative Bragg edge transmission analysis. In the SANS analysis, the ratio of magnetic to nuclear scattering contributions revealed that the precipitates consist of body-centered cubic Cu0.7Fe0.3 and pure Cu, which probably has 9R structure including elastic strain and vacancies. These results show that effective use of the magnetic scattering contribution allows detailed analyses of steel microstructure. PMID:27738416

  19. A potential for overestimating the absolute magnitudes of second virial coefficients by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J; Patel, Trushar R; Winzor, Donald J

    2013-04-15

    Theoretical consideration is given to the effect of cosolutes (including buffer and electrolyte components) on the determination of second virial coefficients for proteins by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)-a factor overlooked in current analyses in terms of expressions for a two-component system. A potential deficiency of existing practices is illustrated by reassessment of published results on the effect of polyethylene glycol concentration on the second virial coefficient for urate oxidase. This error reflects the substitution of I(0,c3,0), the scattering intensity in the limit of zero scattering angle and solute concentration, for I(0,0,0), the corresponding parameter in the limit of zero cosolute concentration (c3) as well. Published static light scattering results on the dependence of the apparent molecular weight of ovalbumin on buffer concentration are extrapolated to zero concentration to obtain the true value (M2) and thereby establish the feasibility of obtaining the analogous SAXS parameter, I(0,0,0), experimentally.

  20. Limiting cases of the small-angle scattering approximation solutions for the propagation of laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of photons in a medium with strongly anisotropic scattering is a problem with a considerable history. Like the propagation of electrons in metal foils, it may be solved in the small-angle scattering approximation by the use of Fourier-transform techniques. In certain limiting cases, one may even obtain analytic expressions. This paper presents some of these results in a model-independent form and also illustrates them by the use of four different phase-function models. Sample calculations are provided for comparison purposes

  1. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  2. X-ray small-angle scattering from sputtered CeO{sub 2}/C bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Haviar, S.; Dubau, M.; Khalakhan, I.; Vorokhta, M.; Matolinova, I.; Matolin, V.; Vales, V.; Endres, J.; Holy, V.; Buljan, M.; Bernstorff, S.

    2013-01-14

    Surface and interface morphology of cerium oxide/carbon bilayers used as thin-film catalysts is studied by grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy, and the dependence of the structural parameters on the thicknesses of the constituting layers is investigated. The applicability of x-ray scattering and its advantages over standard analytical methods are discussed.

  3. 2D light scattering label-free cytometry using light-sheet illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meiai; Su, Xuantao

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) light scattering cytometry has been demonstrated as an effective label-free technology for cell analysis. Here we develop the light-sheet illumination in 2D light scattering static cytometry. In our cytometer, a cylindrical lens is used to form the light-sheet for better excitation of the static cells under an inverted microscope. The thickness of the light-sheet measured in fluorescent solution is about 13 μm. Two-dimensional light scattering patterns of standard microspheres and yeast cells are obtained by using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detector via a low numerical aperture (NA 0.4) optical objective. The experimental patterns characterized with fringe structures agree well with Mie theory simulated ones. Our results suggest that the light-sheet illumination is an effective excitation method for 2D light scattering label-free cytometry.

  4. The generation of Ganymede's diffuse aurora through pitch angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Arvind K.; Singhal, Rajendra P.; Singh, Onkar N., II

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse auroral intensities of neutral atomic oxygen OI λ1356 Å emission on Ganymede due to whistler mode waves are estimated. Pitch angle diffusion of magnetospheric electrons into the loss cone due to resonant wave-particle interaction of whistler mode waves is considered, and the resulting electron precipitation flux is calculated. The analytical yield spectrum approach is used for determining the energy deposition of electrons precipitating into the atmosphere of Ganymede. It is found that the intensities (4-30 R) calculated from the precipitation of magnetospheric electrons observed near Ganymede are inadequate to account for the observational intensities (≤ 100 R). This is in agreement with the conclusions reached in previous works. Some acceleration mechanism is required to energize the magnetospheric electrons. In the present work we consider the heating and acceleration of magnetospheric electrons by electrostatic waves. Two particle distribution functions (Maxwellian and kappa distribution) are used to simulate heating and acceleration of electrons. Precipitation of a Maxwellian distribution of electrons can produce about 70 R intensities of OI λ1356 Å emission for electron temperature of 150 eV. A kappa distribution can also yield a diffuse auroral intensity of similar magnitude for a characteristic energy of about 100 eV. The maximum contribution to the estimated intensity results from the dissociative excitation of O2. Contributions from the direct excitation of atomic oxygen and cascading in atomic oxygen are estimated to be only about 1 and 2 % of the total calculated intensity, respectively. The findings of this work are relevant for the present JUNO and future JUICE missions to Jupiter. These missions will provide new data on electron densities, electron temperature and whistler mode wave amplitudes in the magnetosphere of Jupiter near Ganymede.

  5. Small Angle Neutron Scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hammouda, B.; Krueger, S.; Glinka, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The small angle neutron scattering technique is a valuable method for the characterization of morphology of various materials. It can probe inhomogeneities in the sample (whether occurring naturally or introduced through isotopic substitution) at a length scale from the atomic size (nanometers) to the macroscopic (micrometers) size. This work provides an overview of the small angle neutron scattering facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and a review of the technique as it has been applied to polymer systems, biological macromolecules, ceramic, and metallic materials. Specific examples have been included. PMID:28053456

  6. Two-atom model in enhanced ion backscattering near 180/sup 0/ scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Oen, O.S.

    1981-06-01

    The recent discovery by Pronko, Appleton, Holland, and Wilson of an unusual enhancement of the yield of ions backscattered through angles close to 180/sup 0/ from the near surface regions of solids is investigated using a two-atom scattering model. The model predicts an enhancement effect in amorphous solids whose physical origin arises from the tolerance of path for those ions whose inward and outward trajectories lie in the vicinity of the critical impact parameter. Predictions are given of the dependence of the yield enhancement on the following parameters: ion energy, backscattering depth, exit angle, scattering potential, atomic numbers of projectile and target, and atomic density of target.

  7. Pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons from stationary magnetic waves: Continuous Markov process and quasilinear theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, Don S.

    2012-01-15

    We develop a Markov process theory of charged particle scattering from stationary, transverse, magnetic waves. We examine approximations that lead to quasilinear theory, in particular the resonant diffusion approximation. We find that, when appropriate, the resonant diffusion approximation simplifies the result of the weak turbulence approximation without significant further restricting the regime of applicability. We also explore a theory generated by expanding drift and diffusion rates in terms of a presumed small correlation time. This small correlation time expansion leads to results valid for relatively small pitch angle and large wave energy density - a regime that may govern pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons into the geomagnetic loss cone.

  8. Fiber optic probes for laser light scattering: Ground based evaluation for micgrogravity flight experimentation. Integrated coherent imaging fiber optic systems for laser light scattering and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh

    1994-01-01

    The research work presented in this report has established a new class of backscatter fiber optics probes for remote dynamic light scattering capability over a range of scattering angles from 94 degrees to 175 degrees. The fiber optic probes provide remote access to scattering systems, and can be utilized in either a noninvasive or invasive configuration. The fiber optics create an interference free data channel to inaccessible and harsh environments. Results from several studies of concentrated suspension, microemulsions, and protein systems are presented. The second part of the report describes the development of a new technology of wavefront processing within the optical fiber, that is, integrated fiber optics. Results have been very encouraging and the technology promises to have significant impact on the development of fiber optic sensors in a variety of fields ranging from environmental monitoring to optical recording, from biomedical sensing to photolithography.

  9. Light scattering by surface acoustic waves on corrugated metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, W.M.; Grimsditch, M. ); Moretti, A.L.; Kaufman, R.G.; Hulse, G.R. ); Fullerton, E.; Schuller, I.K. )

    1990-03-15

    We report the results of a Brillouin-scattering study of corrugated Ag surfaces. The corrugation plays a dramatic role in the wave-vector--selection rules governing coupling to surface phonons, and this effect is substantially different when the effective wave vector of the surface corrugation is collinear or perpendicular to the scattering plane. In processes that involve the grating wave vector, we show that the coupling mechanism between light and phonons is governed by surface plasmons which introduce a new scattering interaction with unusual polarization features in the Brillouin-scattering process.

  10. Do angles of obliquity apply to 30 degrees scattered radiation from megavoltage beams?

    PubMed

    Biggs, Peter J; Styczynski, John R

    2008-10-01

    The angle of obliquity is used in radiation shielding calculations to account for the longer path length x rays will see when obliquely incident on the protective barrier. According to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), use of the angle of obliquity is explicitly assumed for primary radiation, so that an angle of obliquity for secondary radiation is never addressed. However, in the example section of the latest report, it specifically recommends against using an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation. To check this assumption, the existence or not of an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation has been investigated for bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV and for barriers consisting of concrete, lead, and steel using a Monte Carlo approach. The MCNP Monte Carlo code, v4.2C, has been used to generate scattered radiation at 30 degrees from a water phantom and incident on a secondary barrier at the same angle relative to the normal to the barrier. The barrier thickness was increased from zero to a thickness sufficient to reduce the fluence (f4 tally) to <10(-3). A transmission curve was created for each energy-barrier material combination by normalizing to zero thickness. The results for the first tenth-value layer (TVL) in concrete (5 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 21.7 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 29.7 degrees +/- 3.9 degrees . The results for the first TVL in lead (3 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 27.7 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 20.5 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees . There are no data in the NCRP reports for 30 degrees scattered radiation attenuated by steel with which to make a comparison.

  11. Light scattering modeling of bacteria using spheroids and cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chunxia; Huang, Lihua; Han, Jie; Zhou, Guangchao; Zeng, Aijun; Zhao, Yongkai; Huang, Huijie

    2009-11-01

    Numerical simulations of light scattering by irregularly shaped bacteria are carried out using the T-matrix method. A previously developed T-matrix code for the study of light scattering by randomly oriented non-spherical particles is used for the current purpose and it is validated against Mie-theory using coccus. Simplified particle shapes of spheroids and cylinders for simulating scattering by irregularly shaped bacteria are studied. The results for the angular distributions of the scattering matrix elements of B.Subtilis at wavelength 0.6328μm are presented. Their dependence on shape and model are discussed. Analysis suggests that spheroids perform better than cylinders for B.Subtilis. Calculations of the scatter matrix elements to determine bacteria sizes as well as shapes may be an accurate method and may be used to determine what the bacteria are.

  12. Decreasing Brillouin and Raman scattering by alternating-polarization light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; Cao, L. H.; Li, B.; Xiang, J.; Hao, L.

    2017-03-01

    A new method to reduce the scattering levels of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin (SBS) scattering is proposed using alternating-polarization light. The effect of the new technique is related to the alternating time. If the alternating time is smaller than the growth time, the scattering level of SRS or SBS can be decreased. The SBS process is simulated by the fluid method, and the SRS process is verified by the particle-in-cell method. This method is also compared with the spike trains of uneven duration and delay (STUD) technique. Combining STUD pulses with alternating-polarization light is also discussed. Under proper alternating-polarization parameters, the scattering level of SRS and SBS can be dramatically reduced by more than one order of magnitude.

  13. Ultrasmall Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS) and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) Studies on the Complex Metal Hydride NaAlH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, Tabbetha; Bennett, Christopher; Torres, James; Ilavsky, Jan

    This research seeks to understand the role of ScCl , ZrCl , and VCl catalysts in NaAlH. We have examined these hydrides at multiple length scales using an X-ray scattering instrument which is capable of measuring scattering wave vector, Q, of 0.0001Å to 6.0 Å . The ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) instrument sector 9ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) simultaneously collects using USAXS, SAXS, and WAXS detectors. Studies were performed during in-situ heating up to 170C (just below the H desorption temperature for uncatalyzed NaAlH). Results showed that NaAlH has a surface fractal (highly porous) morphology. Isothermal studies performed at 30C, 65C, 100C, 135C, and 170C reveals changes at low Q (Q~0.001 Å to 0.01 Å) associated with highly interconnected intraparticle porosity which is suitably described by a power-law slope for a Gaussian polymer chain structure of p~2. At high scattering wave vector, Q~0.03 Å , the presence of a pore population which obeys Porod scattering and appears to have a size at 21nm is present. These fine pores increase in their population density as temperature is elevated. The WAXS data reveals thermal expansion to occur, but no solid state phase transformation to the product phase. Currently at NASA-Goddard.

  14. Transformation optofluidics for large-angle light bending and tuning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Chin, L K; Tsai, J M; Tsai, D P; Zheludev, N I; Liu, A Q

    2012-10-07

    Transformation optics is a new art of light bending by designing materials with spatially variable parameters for developing wave-manipulation devices. Here, we introduce a transformation optofluidic Y-branch splitter with large-angle bending and tuning based on the design of a spatially variable index. Differing from traditional splitters, the optofluidic splitter is achieved in an inhomogeneous medium by coordinate transformation. The designed bidirectional gradient index (GRIN) distribution can be achieved practically by the convection-diffusion process of liquid flowing streams. The transformation optofluidic splitter can achieve a much larger split angle with little bend loss than the traditional ones. In the experiments, a large tunable split angle up to 30° is achieved by tuning the flow rates, allowing optical signals to be freely transferred to different channels. Besides the symmetrical branch splitting, asymmetrical Y-branch splitting with approximately equal power splitting is also demonstrated by changing the composition of the liquids. The optofluidic splitter has high potential applications in biological, chemical and biomedical solution measurement and detection.

  15. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.; Bentley, P. M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N. L.; Al-Shammary, H. A. O.; Wood, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100Å scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  16. Small-angle and surface scattering from porous and fractal materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.

    1998-09-18

    We review the basic theoretical methods used to treat small-angle scattering from porous materials, treated as general two-phase systems, and also the basic experimental techniques for carrying out such experiments. We discuss the special forms of the scattering when the materials exhibit mass or surface fractal behavior, and review the results of recent experiments on several types of porous media and also SANS experiments probing the phase behavior of binary fluid mixtures or polymer solutions confined in porous materials. Finally, we discuss the analogous technique of off-specular scattering from surfaces and interfaces which is used to study surface roughness of various kinds.

  17. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  18. Light scattering in optical CT scanning of Presage dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Adamovics, J.; Cheeseborough, J. C.; Chao, K. S.; Wuu, C. S.

    2010-11-01

    The intensity of the scattered light from the Presage dosimeters was measured using a Thorlabs PM100D optical power meter (Thorlabs Inc, Newton, NJ) with an optical sensor of 1 mm diameter sensitive area. Five Presage dosimeters were made as cylinders of 15.2 cm, 10 cm, 4 cm diameters and irradiated with 6 MV photons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Each dosimeter was put into the scanning tank of an OCTOPUS" optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) filled with a refractive index matching liquid. A laser diode was positioned at one side of the water tank to generate a stationary laser beam of 0.8 mm width. On the other side of the tank, an in-house manufactured positioning system was used to move the optical sensor in the direction perpendicular to the outgoing laser beam from the dosimeters at an increment of 1 mm. The amount of scattered photons was found to be more than 1% of the primary light signal within 2 mm from the laser beam but decreases sharply with increasing off-axis distance. The intensity of the scattered light increases with increasing light attenuations and/or absorptions in the dosimeters. The scattered light at the same off-axis distance was weaker for dosimeters of larger diameters and for larger detector-to-dosimeter distances. Methods for minimizing the effect of the light scattering in different types of optical CT scanners are discussed.

  19. Silver nanoparticles on nanopatterned LiF(110) surface studied by extreme ultraviolet light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Giglia, Angelo Nannarone, Stefano; Miotti, Paolo; Parisse, Pietro

    2015-12-21

    A LiF(110) surface featuring a ridge-and-valley nanopatterned structure periodic along the [−1,1,0] direction (period and height of the order of 30 nm and 10 nm, respectively) formed by [001] macrosteps exposing (100) and (010) facets was functionalized by rows of Ag nanoparticles and studied by elastic light scattering in the energy range 50–100 eV. Families of diffraction efficiencies curves were taken at grazing incidence angle and fixed photon energy as a function of scattering angle, and elastic scattering curves were taken at fixed scattering angle as a function of energy. The scattering curves presented well-defined features ascribable to the periodicities of the surface, or equivalently to the reciprocal q{sub X} vectors correlated with the power spectral density features of topological images of atomic force microscopy. Other characteristics of the functionalized surface, including the height of ridge-valley profile, the Ag nanoparticle dimensions, and the material distribution in the scattering plane, were obtained by fitting the experimental zero and first order efficiency curves to simulation results of a parameterized model. The simulations were carried out adapting an in-house code based on the electromagnetic differential method, and the different material properties were taken into account by a space dependent complex dielectric constant. Information along the direction perpendicular to the scattering plane was not accessible but morphological insights were obtained combining light diffraction with atomic force microscopy. The results indicate nanoparticles with a quasi-ellipsoidal shape prolate along the ridge direction with minor and major axes of ∼12 nm and ∼21 nm, respectively.

  20. Silver nanoparticles on nanopatterned LiF(110) surface studied by extreme ultraviolet light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglia, Angelo; Miotti, Paolo; Parisse, Pietro; Nannarone, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    A LiF(110) surface featuring a ridge-and-valley nanopatterned structure periodic along the [-1,1,0] direction (period and height of the order of 30 nm and 10 nm, respectively) formed by [001] macrosteps exposing {100} and {010} facets was functionalized by rows of Ag nanoparticles and studied by elastic light scattering in the energy range 50-100 eV. Families of diffraction efficiencies curves were taken at grazing incidence angle and fixed photon energy as a function of scattering angle, and elastic scattering curves were taken at fixed scattering angle as a function of energy. The scattering curves presented well-defined features ascribable to the periodicities of the surface, or equivalently to the reciprocal qX vectors correlated with the power spectral density features of topological images of atomic force microscopy. Other characteristics of the functionalized surface, including the height of ridge-valley profile, the Ag nanoparticle dimensions, and the material distribution in the scattering plane, were obtained by fitting the experimental zero and first order efficiency curves to simulation results of a parameterized model. The simulations were carried out adapting an in-house code based on the electromagnetic differential method, and the different material properties were taken into account by a space dependent complex dielectric constant. Information along the direction perpendicular to the scattering plane was not accessible but morphological insights were obtained combining light diffraction with atomic force microscopy. The results indicate nanoparticles with a quasi-ellipsoidal shape prolate along the ridge direction with minor and major axes of ˜12 nm and ˜21 nm, respectively.

  1. Simultaneous determination of size and refractive index of red blood cells by light scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, N.; Buddhiwant, P.; Uppal, A.; Majumder, S.K.; Patel, H.S.; Gupta, P.K.

    2006-02-20

    We present a fast and accurate approach for simultaneous determination of both the mean diameter and refractive index of a collection of red blood cells (RBCs). The approach uses the peak frequency of the power spectrum and the corresponding phase angle obtained by performing Fourier transform on the measured angular distribution of scattered light to determine these parameters. Results on the measurement of two important clinical parameters, the mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin concentration of a collection of RBCs, are presented.

  2. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the particle density detectability and particle size detectivity of our fiber-optic light-scattering measurement system. In order to prevent the multiple pregnancy on current in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, we have aimed to develop a new quantitative and non- invasive method to select a single viable human embryo. We employed the measurement of mitochondria localization in an embryo, which may have the correlation with development ability. We applied the angular distribution measurement of the light-scattering intensity from the embryo to obtain the information originated from the mitochondria. The latex spheres with a diameter of 1.0 micrometers were used to simulate the scattering intensity of the mitochondria. The measurement probes of our system consisted of two fibers for illumination and sensing. They were arranged at a right angle to a microscope optical axis to measure the angular distribution of the light-scattering intensity. We observed that the light-scattering intensity increased monotonically in the range from 106 to 1010 particles per ml. Since the mitochondria density in a human embryo corresponded to 2.5 X 107 per ml in the measurement chamber, we may measure the mitochondria density in the human embryo. The angular dependence of light-scattering intensity changed with the sphere diameters. This result showed the possibility of the selective measurement of the mitochondria density in the embryo in spite of the presence of the other cell organelle. We think that our light-scattering measurement system might be applicable to the evaluation method for the embryo viability.

  3. A randomly nano-structured scattering layer for transparent organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jin Woo; Shin, Jin-Wook; Cho, Doo-Hee; Moon, Jaehyun; Joo, Chul Woong; Park, Seung Koo; Hwang, Joohyun; Cho, Nam Sung; Lee, Jonghee; Han, Jun-Han; Chu, Hye Yong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-08-01

    A random scattering layer (RSL) consisting of a random nano-structure (RNS) and a high refractive index planarization layer (HRI PL) is suggested and demonstrated as an efficient internal light-extracting layer for transparent organic light emitting diodes (TOLEDs). By introducing the RSL, a remarkable enhancement of 40% and 46% in external quantum efficiency (EQE) and luminous efficacy (LE) was achieved without causing deterioration in the transmittance. Additionally, with the use of the RSL, the viewing angle dependency of EL spectra was reduced to a marginal degree. The results were interpreted as the stronger influence of the scattering effect over the microcavity. The RSL can be applied widely in TOLEDs as an effective light-extracting layer for extracting the waveguide mode of confined light at the indium tin oxide (ITO)/OLED stack without introducing spectral changes in TOLEDs.A random scattering layer (RSL) consisting of a random nano-structure (RNS) and a high refractive index planarization layer (HRI PL) is suggested and demonstrated as an efficient internal light-extracting layer for transparent organic light emitting diodes (TOLEDs). By introducing the RSL, a remarkable enhancement of 40% and 46% in external quantum efficiency (EQE) and luminous efficacy (LE) was achieved without causing deterioration in the transmittance. Additionally, with the use of the RSL, the viewing angle dependency of EL spectra was reduced to a marginal degree. The results were interpreted as the stronger influence of the scattering effect over the microcavity. The RSL can be applied widely in TOLEDs as an effective light-extracting layer for extracting the waveguide mode of confined light at the indium tin oxide (ITO)/OLED stack without introducing spectral changes in TOLEDs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Simulation results of total (bottom and top) radiance of TOLEDs with the RSL depending on HTL and ETL thicknesses. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01520g

  4. Analysis of the arriving-angle structure of the forward scattered wave on a vertical array in shallow water.

    PubMed

    He, Chuanlin; Yang, Kunde; Ma, Yuanliang; Lei, Bo

    2016-09-01

    The arriving-angle structure for the forward scattered wave on a vertical line array is obtained upon a modified scattering model in the Pekeris waveguide. The structure is investigated and interpreted by the array invariant theory combined with target induced modal coupling effect. Compared with that of the direct blast, the arriving-angle structure of the forward scattering wave owns multi-striations as well as an increased vertical array invariant. The forward scattered angle structure is dependent on the target position on the source-receiver line. Simulations indicate a potential separation for the forward scattered wave overwhelmed by the direct blast.

  5. Modeling of light scattering from features on and within films and light scatter from epitaxial silicon defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiping

    The detection of particles and defects on or within films deposited on wafers using light scattering is of great interest to the semiconductor industry. Numerical calculation of light scattering characteristics from these features is very useful to the development and calibration of wafer inspection tools. A model and associated code is developed by using a modification of the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method to compute the light scattering from a feature with arbitrary shape on or within a filmed surface. The reflection interaction matrix is modified with the Sommerfeld integrals for filmed surfaces. Three-dimensional fast Fourier transform technique is used for accelerating the computation of light scatter from features associated with layered surfaces using the DDA method. Far field scatter is calculated approximately based on the reaction theorem. Model predictions of scattering signatures are compared with experimental results and other numerical models. Comparisons show good agreement for the cases considered, which demonstrates the accuracy and validity of the model. An epitaxial silicon wafer defect sample was fabricated containing typical epitaxial wafer defects such as epitaxial stacking faults, spikes and mounds. Atomic force microscopy was used to determine their physical sizes and shapes. The optical scattering characteristics of these epitaxial silicon wafer defects were studied using the numerical model. A method to discriminate epitaxial crystalline defects and particles is proposed.

  6. Polar structure of disclination loops in nematic liquid crystals probed by second-harmonic-light scattering.

    PubMed

    Pardaev, Shokir A; Williams, J C; Twieg, R J; Jakli, A; Gleeson, J T; Ellman, B; Sprunt, S

    2015-03-01

    Angle-resolved, second-harmonic-light scattering (SHLS) measurements are reported for three different classes of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (NLCs): polar and nonpolar rodlike compounds and a bent-core compound. Results revealing well-defined scattering peaks are interpreted in terms of the electric polarization induced by distortions of the nematic orientational field ("flexopolarity") associated with inversion wall defects, nonsingular disclinations, analogous to Neel walls in ferromagnets, that often exhibit a closed loop morphology in NLCs. Analysis of the SHLS patterns based on this model provides a "proof-of-concept" for a potentially useful method to probe the flexopolar properties of NLCs.

  7. Scattering of light by large bubbles: Coupling of geometrical and physical optics approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentis, Matthias P. L.; Onofri, Fabrice R. A.; Méès, Loic; Radev, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes various phenomena in modeling the light-scattering properties of large spherical bubbles in the context of geometrical and physical optics approximations. Among these phenomena are interference occurring between higher-order rays, the Goos-Hänchen shift, the tunneling phase and the weak caustic associated with the critical angle. When the phenomena are appropriately taken into account, they allow retrieval of most features of the scattering diagrams predicted by the Lorenz-Mie theory, offering new possibilities for the optical characterization of bubbly flows.

  8. Assessing epithelial cell nuclear morphology by using azimuthal light scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chung-Chieh; Lau, Condon; Tunnell, James W.; Hunter, Martin; Kalashnikov, Maxim; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Fulghum, Stephen F.; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2006-11-01

    We describe azimuthal light scattering spectroscopy (ϕ/LSS), a novel technique for assessing epithelial-cell nuclear morphology. The difference between the spectra measured at azimuthal angles ϕ=0° and ϕ=90° preferentially isolates the single backscattering contribution due to large (˜10 μm) structures such as epithelial cell nuclei by discriminating against scattering from smaller organelles and diffusive background. We demonstrate the feasibility of using ϕ/LSS for cancer detection by showing that spectra from cancerous colon tissue exhibit significantly greater azimuthal asymmetry than spectra from normal colonic tissues.

  9. The LS-CODAG experiment for light scattering measurements by dust particles and their aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Cabane, M.; Chassefière, E.; Haudebourg, V.; Worms, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Light scattering measurements are needed to provide links between the currently available observations of scattering by dust in the solar system, and the still unknown properties of the clouds of dust particles and aggregates. The fragility, the fluffiness, and the size of the aggregates make it almos impossible to obtain realistic measurements through computational models or classical laboratory measurements. In order to measure the scattering by dust particles and their aggregates, we have conceived the Light Scattering (LS) experiment for the COsmic Dust AGgregation (CODAG) module. This small and compact instrument has been developed to operate under microgravity conditions, jointly with the CODAG Sounding Rocket experiment (Blum et al., 1998), during ESA rocket flights. The purpose of the experiment is to determine accurately the intensity and the polarization phase functions of the particles that are dispersed in a low pressure chamber, and to document the temporal evolution of their scattering properties, while an aggregation process representative of the solar system formation is starting and spreading out. The instrumental principle relies on simultaneous measurements, performed on a large number of phase angles, from back to forward scattering, of the two polarized components of the scattered intensity.

  10. Cell light scattering characteristic research based on FDTD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Zhu, Hao; Li, Wenchao; Ye, Changbin

    2015-10-01

    As with the number of cancer increases year by year, so it is important to be found and treated earlier. With biological cells and tissues are sensitive to infrared and visible light, cell morphology and physical structure of the optical properties can easily obtain, we can provide theoretical basis for the early diagnosis of cancer by observing the difference of optical properties between normal and cancerous cells. Compared with Mie scattering theory, finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm can analyze any complex structure model. In this paper we use mathematical modeling method to establish the single cell mathematical model and with finite difference time domain algorithm to simulate the propagation and scattering of light in the biological cells, you can calculate the scattering of electromagnetic field distribution at anytime and anywhere. With radar cross section (RCS) to measure the results of the scattering characteristics. Due to the difference between normal cells and cancerous cells are embodied in cell shape, size and the refractive index, through the simulation we can get different cell parameters of light scattering information, Find out the cell parameters change the changing rule of the influence on the scattering characteristics and find out change regularity of scattering characteristics. These data can judge very accurate of the cells is normal or cancerous cells.

  11. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  12. Hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal light scattering device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, M. M.; Khan, A. A.; Kostanyan, A.; Kidambi, P. R.; Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Gardiner, D. J.; Hofmann, S.; Wilkinson, T. D.

    2015-08-01

    A hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal (LC) light scattering device is presented. This device exploits the inherent poly-crystallinity of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene films to induce directional anchoring and formation of LC multi-domains. This thereby enables efficient light scattering without the need for crossed polarisers or separate alignment layers/additives. The hybrid LC device exhibits switching thresholds at very low electric fields (< 1 V μm-1) and repeatable, hysteresis free characteristics. This exploitation of LC alignment effects on CVD graphene films enables a new generation of highly efficient nematic LC scattering displays as well as many other possible applications.A hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal (LC) light scattering device is presented. This device exploits the inherent poly-crystallinity of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene films to induce directional anchoring and formation of LC multi-domains. This thereby enables efficient light scattering without the need for crossed polarisers or separate alignment layers/additives. The hybrid LC device exhibits switching thresholds at very low electric fields (< 1 V μm-1) and repeatable, hysteresis free characteristics. This exploitation of LC alignment effects on CVD graphene films enables a new generation of highly efficient nematic LC scattering displays as well as many other possible applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04094a

  13. Reconstruction of Rain Microstructure From Spectrum of Scattering Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterlyadkin, V.; Gluschenko, A.

    Night photoregistration of light, scattered by drops had proved that practically all drops oscillate as they fall. As drop oscillation frequency W monotony diminish with drop volume V rise, so different fractions of rain form different parts of spectrum. Thereby it is possible to reconstruct rain microstructure from remote optical measure- ments. In common case the form of spectrum depends not only on drop size distri- bution N(V) but also on oscillation amplitudes function, scattering phase function for oscillating drops and on frequency dependence W(V). The statistical treatment of our field data had shown that average oscillation amplitude rise with drop volume V as , where A is a some constant. This result allows to solve the inverse problem: to re- construct drop size distribution N(V) from the power spectrum of light, scattering by rain. Scattering phase function for nonspherical and oscillating drops was calculated in straight-line approximation. Analysis of optical properties of oscillating water drop had shown some optimal measurement geometry for registration of rain microstruc- ture. For low intensity rains it is reasonable to use the effect of abnormal high modu- lation of light scattered by oscillating drops, which we discovered earlier in laboratory condition and under field measurements. (The effect of abnormal high modulation al- lows us to detect 2-3 mm raindrop deformations from 5 m distance). The results of reconstruction of drop size distributions from spectra of light, scattered by rains are presented and discussed.

  14. Analysis of light scattering by two-dimensional inhomogeneities in paper using general radiative transfer theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nukala, Madhuri; Mendrok, Jana

    2014-12-10

    Lateral light scattering simulations of printed dots are analyzed using general radiative transfer theory. We investigated the appearance of a printed paper in relation to the medium parameters like thickness of the paper sample, its optical properties, and the asymmetry factor. It was found that the appearance of a print greatly depends on these factors making it either brighter or darker. A thicker substrate with higher single scattering albedo backed with an absorbing surface makes the dots brighter due to increased number of scattering events. Additionally, it is shown that the optical effects of print also depend on illuminating and viewing angles along with the depth of ink penetration. A larger single scattering angle implies less intensity and the dots appear much blurred due to the shadowing effect prominent when viewed from sides. A fully penetrated dot of the same extinction coefficient as a partial penetrated one is darker due to increased absorption. These results can be used in applications dealing with lateral light scattering.

  15. Studying fractal geometry on submicron length scales by small-angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; Lin, J.

    1988-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that internal surfaces of porous geological materials, such as rocks and lignite coals, can be described by fractals down to atomic length scales. In this paper, the basic properties of self-similar and self-affine fractals are reviewed and how fractal dimensions can be measured by small-angle scattering experiments are discussed.

  16. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-10-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote-sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  17. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-07-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete-dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  18. Dual-angle, self-calibrating Thomson scattering measurements in RFX-MOD

    SciTech Connect

    Giudicotti, L.

    2014-11-15

    In the multipoint Thomson scattering (TS) system of the RFX-MOD experiment the signals from a few spatial positions can be observed simultaneously under two different scattering angles. In addition the detection system uses optical multiplexing by signal delays in fiber optic cables of different length so that the two sets of TS signals can be observed by the same polychromator. Owing to the dependence of the TS spectrum on the scattering angle, it was then possible to implement self-calibrating TS measurements in which the electron temperature T{sub e}, the electron density n{sub e} and the relative calibration coefficients of spectral channels sensitivity C{sub i} were simultaneously determined by a suitable analysis of the two sets of TS data collected at the two angles. The analysis has shown that, in spite of the small difference in the spectra obtained at the two angles, reliable values of the relative calibration coefficients can be determined by the analysis of good S/N dual‑angle spectra recorded in a few tens of plasma shots. This analysis suggests that in RFX-MOD the calibration of the entire set of TS polychromators by means of the similar, dual-laser (Nd:YAG/Nd:YLF) TS technique, should be feasible.

  19. Dual-angle, self-calibrating Thomson scattering measurements in RFX-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Fassina, A.

    2014-11-01

    In the multipoint Thomson scattering (TS) system of the RFX-MOD experiment the signals from a few spatial positions can be observed simultaneously under two different scattering angles. In addition the detection system uses optical multiplexing by signal delays in fiber optic cables of different length so that the two sets of TS signals can be observed by the same polychromator. Owing to the dependence of the TS spectrum on the scattering angle, it was then possible to implement self-calibrating TS measurements in which the electron temperature Te, the electron density ne and the relative calibration coefficients of spectral channels sensitivity Ci were simultaneously determined by a suitable analysis of the two sets of TS data collected at the two angles. The analysis has shown that, in spite of the small difference in the spectra obtained at the two angles, reliable values of the relative calibration coefficients can be determined by the analysis of good S/N dual-angle spectra recorded in a few tens of plasma shots. This analysis suggests that in RFX-MOD the calibration of the entire set of TS polychromators by means of the similar, dual-laser (Nd:YAG/Nd:YLF) TS technique, should be feasible.

  20. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  1. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2014-09-24

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  2. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  3. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE PAGES

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more » However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  4. Quantitative characterization of the contrast mechanisms of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Long, G. G.; Levine, L.E.; Ilavsky, J.; Jemain, P.R.; NIST

    2008-04-01

    A general treatment of X-ray imaging contrast for ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) imaging is presented; this approach makes use of phase propagation and dynamical diffraction theory to account quantitatively for the intensity distribution at the detector plane. Simulated results from a model system of micrometer-sized spherical SiO{sub 2} particles embedded in a polypropylene matrix show good agreement with experimental measurements. Simulations by means of a separate geometrical ray-tracing method also account for the features in the USAXS images and offer a complementary view of small-angle X-ray scattering as a contrast mechanism. The ray-tracing analysis indicates that refraction, in the form of Porod scattering, and, to a much lesser extent, X-ray reflection account for the USAXS imaging contrast.

  5. Small-angle neutron scattering studies from solutions of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Stivala, S.S.; Damle, S.P.; Gregory, J.D.; Bunick, G.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering, SANS, of the proteoglycan subunit of bovine nasal cartilage in 0.15N LiCl at 25/sup 0/C yielded the radius of gyration, R/sub g/, radius of gyration of the cross-section, R/sub q/, persistence length, a, and the molecular weight, M. The following values were obtained: M = 3.9 x 10/sup 6/, R/sub g/ = 745 A, R/sub q/ = 34.6 A and a = 35.2 A. These values compare favorably with those that were obtained from small angle x-ray scattering, SAXS, of a similar extract. The scattering curve of the proteoglycan subunit in D/sub 2/O showed a characteristic broad peak in the specified angular range similar to that observed from SAXS, thus confirming the polyelectrolyte nature of the proteoglycan. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (DT)

  6. Scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by impedance barriers: Dependence on angle of incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu.; Brucoli, G.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2008-05-01

    This paper studies theoretically surface plasmon polariton scattering by one-dimensional defects of metal surface impedance at oblique incidence. Surface impedance boundary conditions are used to formulate an integral equation which can be solved both analytically and numerically to yield the transmission, reflection, and out-of-plane cross section as a function of angle of incidence and other parameters. Numerical calculations, as well as analytical expressions, obtained within the Born approximation are presented. Green’s tensor approach is also applied so as to expand such analysis to region in which the surface impedance boundary conditions are not appropriate. We show that the angular dependencies for surface plasmon polariton scattering by impedance defects and by surface relief defects are essentially different. The angular dependency of surface plasmon polariton scattering by an impedance defect features an analog to Brewster’s angle that is explained in terms of dipole polarization of the defect.

  7. Scattering of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with azimuthal angle difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Po-Chen; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2016-11-01

    Coherent scatterings of surface plasmons coupled to quantun dots have attracted great attention in plasmonics. Recently, an experiment has shown that the quantum dots located nearby a nanowire can be separated not only in distance, but also an angle ϕ along the cylindrical direction. Here, by using the real-space Hamiltonian and the transfer matrix method, we analytically obtain the transmission/reflection spectra of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with an azimuthal angle difference. We find that the scattering spectra can show completely different features due to different positions and azimuthal angles of the quantum dots. When additionally coupling a cavity to the dots, we obtain the Fano-like line shape in the transmission and reflection spectra due to the interference between the localized and delocalized modes.

  8. Scattering of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with azimuthal angle difference

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Chen; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Coherent scatterings of surface plasmons coupled to quantun dots have attracted great attention in plasmonics. Recently, an experiment has shown that the quantum dots located nearby a nanowire can be separated not only in distance, but also an angle ϕ along the cylindrical direction. Here, by using the real-space Hamiltonian and the transfer matrix method, we analytically obtain the transmission/reflection spectra of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with an azimuthal angle difference. We find that the scattering spectra can show completely different features due to different positions and azimuthal angles of the quantum dots. When additionally coupling a cavity to the dots, we obtain the Fano-like line shape in the transmission and reflection spectra due to the interference between the localized and delocalized modes. PMID:27892942

  9. Pitch angle scattering of an energetic magnetized particle by a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, P. M.

    2013-04-15

    The interaction between a circularly polarized wave and an energetic gyrating particle is described using a relativistic pseudo-potential that is a function of the frequency mismatch. Analysis of the pseudo-potential provides a means for interpreting numerical results. The pseudo-potential profile depends on the initial mismatch, the normalized wave amplitude, and the initial angle between the wave magnetic field and the particle perpendicular velocity. For zero initial mismatch, the pseudo-potential consists of only one valley, but for finite mismatch, there can be two valleys separated by a hill. A large pitch angle scattering of the energetic electron can occur in the two-valley situation but fast scattering can also occur in a single valley. Examples relevant to magnetospheric whistler waves show that the energetic electron pitch angle can be deflected 5 Degree-Sign towards the loss cone when transiting a 10 ms long coherent wave packet having realistic parameters.

  10. Stochastic analysis of pitch angle scattering of charged particles by transverse magnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, Don S.; Liu Kaijun; Winske, Dan; Gary, S. Peter

    2009-11-15

    This paper describes a theory of the velocity space scattering of charged particles in a static magnetic field composed of a uniform background field and a sum of transverse, circularly polarized, magnetic waves. When that sum has many terms the autocorrelation time required for particle orbits to become effectively randomized is small compared with the time required for the particle velocity distribution to change significantly. In this regime the deterministic equations of motion can be transformed into stochastic differential equations of motion. The resulting stochastic velocity space scattering is described, in part, by a pitch angle diffusion rate that is a function of initial pitch angle and properties of the wave spectrum. Numerical solutions of the deterministic equations of motion agree with the theory at all pitch angles, for wave energy densities up to and above the energy density of the uniform field, and for different wave spectral shapes.

  11. Light fields in complex media: Mesoscopic scattering meets wave control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, Stefan; Gigan, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    The newly emerging field of wave front shaping in complex media has recently seen enormous progress. The driving force behind these advances has been the experimental accessibility of the information stored in the scattering matrix of a disordered medium, which can nowadays routinely be exploited to focus light as well as to image or to transmit information even across highly turbid scattering samples. An overview of these new techniques, their experimental implementations, and the underlying theoretical concepts following from mesoscopic scattering theory is provided. In particular, the intimate connections between quantum transport phenomena and the scattering of light fields in disordered media, which can both be described by the same theoretical concepts, are highlighted. Particular emphasis is put on how these topics relate to application-oriented research fields such as optical imaging, sensing, and communication.

  12. Scattered light in the IUE spectra of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitner, B.; Chapman, R. D.; Kondo, Y.; Stencel, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    As a result of this work it was found that light scattered from the longer wavelengths constitutes a small but non-negligible, wavelength and time dependent fraction of the measured flux in the far UV. The reality of the UV excess has not been unambigiously ruled out. However, it is noted that there are still uncertainties in the assumed scattering profile. New measurements of the scattering properties of the cross disperser grating are planned in order to verify the results of Mount and Fastie and extend the wavelength coverage into the far wings of the profile. The results of these measurements will no doubt reduce some of these uncertainties. For the present, it is felt that the BCH approach is a significant improvement over the methods heretofore available for the treatment of scattered light in IUE spectra.

  13. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, J.; Netz, U.; Minet, O.; Klose, Annerose D.; Hielscher, A. H.; Scheel, A.; Henniger, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-11-01

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient μs, absorption coefficient μa, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results.

  14. Surface Roughness Metrology By Angular Distributions Of Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilsinn, David E.; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Teague, E. Clayton; MeLay, Michael J.; Giauque, Charles; Scire, Fredric E.

    1985-09-01

    On-line industrial inspection of batch manufactured parts requires fast measurement techniques for surface finish quality. In order to develop the measurement basis for these techniques, a system has been built to determine surface roughness by measuring the angular distributions of scattered light. The system incorporates data gathered from the angular distribution instrument and traditional surface stylus instruments. These data are used both as input and as comparison data in order to test various mathematical models of optical scattering phenomena. The object is to develop a mathematical model that uses the angular distribution of scattered light to deduce surface roughness parameters such as Ra and surface wavelength. This paper describes the results of an experiment in which angular scattered data from surfaces with sinusoidal profiles was used to compute the surface R and wavelength. Stylus measurements of these parameters were made separately. A comparative table is given of the computed and measured values. Estimates of uncertainties are also given.

  15. Methods for analysis of size-exclusion chromatography-small-angle X-ray scattering and reconstruction of protein scattering.

    PubMed

    Malaby, Andrew W; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Irving, Thomas C; Kathuria, Sagar V; Bilsel, Osman; Lambright, David G

    2015-08-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography in line with small-angle X-ray scattering (SEC-SAXS) has emerged as an important method for investigation of heterogeneous and self-associating systems, but presents specific challenges for data processing including buffer subtraction and analysis of overlapping peaks. This paper presents novel methods based on singular value decomposition (SVD) and Guinier-optimized linear combination (LC) to facilitate analysis of SEC-SAXS data sets and high-quality reconstruction of protein scattering directly from peak regions. It is shown that Guinier-optimized buffer subtraction can reduce common subtraction artifacts and that Guinier-optimized linear combination of significant SVD basis components improves signal-to-noise and allows reconstruction of protein scattering, even in the absence of matching buffer regions. In test cases with conventional SAXS data sets for cytochrome c and SEC-SAXS data sets for the small GTPase Arf6 and the Arf GTPase exchange factors Grp1 and cytohesin-1, SVD-LC consistently provided higher quality reconstruction of protein scattering than either direct or Guinier-optimized buffer subtraction. These methods have been implemented in the context of a Python-extensible Mac OS X application known as Data Evaluation and Likelihood Analysis (DELA), which provides convenient tools for data-set selection, beam intensity normalization, SVD, and other relevant processing and analytical procedures, as well as automated Python scripts for common SAXS analyses and Guinier-optimized reconstruction of protein scattering.

  16. Light Scattering by Inhomogeneous Composite Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vandana

    The scattering characteristics of various composites is calculated using the effective medium approximations. There are several effective medium theories that can be applied, each leading to a different result. Experimentally, a set of scattering data for well defined composite spheres is obtained. The effective medium approximations are tested against the experimental results. The Bruggeman (1935) mixing rule and Maxwell Garnett (1904) theory, with proper inclusion and matrix model, lead to good agreement with the measurements. A generalized theory has also been derived (Chylek and Srivastava, 1983) which gives an iterative scheme for calculating the effective refractive index for composite medium. The Chylek-Srivastava iterative rule that takes into account all the electric and magnetic interactions for the absorbing component also leads to a good agreement with the measurements. This generalized theory can be applied to composites that contain a highly absorbing component with particle sizes comparable to the wavelength of incident radiation. Application of the Chylek-Srivastava iterative method to carbon-snow composites leads to calculated snow albedos that are in very good agreement with the measured albedos, eliminating the discrepancies that have existed for many years between calculated and measured albedos. Therefore, small amounts of absorbing impurities like carbon can significantly alter the scattering characteristics of composite particles. Carbon content of snow is also measured at different sites categorized as urban, rural, or remote, depending upon their location and elevation. The content varies according to the location of the site and the time of snow collection. However, ice from Camp Century, Greenland, that is several thousand years old contains the same order of graphitic carbon as does the remote polar surface snow at present. Backscattering of water-ice composites like hailstones depends upon the liquid water content and the topological

  17. POlarized Light Angle Reflectance Instrument I Polarized Incidence (POLAR:I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarto, Anthony W.; Woldemar, Christopher M.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1989-01-01

    The light scattering properties of leaves are used as input data for models which mathematically describe the transport of photons within plant canopies. Polarization measurements may aid in the investigation of these properties. This paper describes an instrument for rapidly determining the bidirectional light scattering properties of leaves illuminated by linearly polarized light. Results for one species, magnolia, show large differences in the bidirectional light scattering properties depending whether or not the electric vector E is parallel to the foliage surface.

  18. Resonance light scattering determination of metallothioneins using levofloxacin-palladium complex as a light scattering probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jin-Hua; Qian, Qiu-Mei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Meng, Xia-Ling; Liu, Lu

    2013-02-01

    A novel method of resonance light scattering (RLS) was developed for the analysis of trace metallothioneins (MTs) in human urine. In a CH3COOH-CH3COONa buffer solution of pH 4.5, the formation of a complex between levofloxacin (LEV)-Pd and MTs led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system, and the enhanced RLS intensity at 468 nm was proportional to the concentration of MTs in the range of 0.059-22.4 μg mL-1. The linear regression equation was ΔI = 127.5 ρ (μg mL-1)-88.02 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992, and the detection limit of 17.8 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation and the average recovery were 3.8-5.4% (n = 11) and 92.15%, respectively. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive, and has been used successfully for the determination of trace MTs in human urine samples.

  19. Scattered light: improving photoacoustic spectral measurement with a drug tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rong; Jiang, Yue-song; Yu, Lan; Wen, Dong-hai; Hua, Hou-qiang; Wu, Xiao-fang

    2013-08-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a powerful tool for the study of the absorption spectra of solid samples. Scattered light, which used to be a main error source in conventional absorption spectroscopy, is not a problem for PAS, and furthermore, in this paper it is helpful for photoacoustic spectroscopy measurement. In this work, the photoacoustic spectra of an olanzapine tablet and its powder have been investigated. Differential analysis was used to eliminate the background signal generated by the photoacoustic cell. It is found that the photoacoustic spectrum of olanzapine in the powdered olanzapine tablet has the same spectral features as that of the pure olanzapine powder, while the photoacoustic spectrum of the olanzapine tablet does not have, although the ingredients in both are completely the same. This phenomenon can be interpreted as the light scattering effects in the powdered olanzapine tablet. The light scattering effects in a solid mixture amplify the photoacoustic spectral features of the main light-absorbing ingredient in the mixture, rather than enhance the measured photoacoustic signal over the whole measured wavelength range, which is different from the influence of light scattering effects on a single-ingredient solid powder. Based on this work, a method is proposed to preliminarily fast identify the light-absorbing ingredient in a solid mixture. Using the method, a drug tablet can be measured directly in solid state and hardly need sample preprocessing, and thus the time for composition analyses will be reduced significantly.

  20. Implementation of focusing and redirecting light through highly scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyotl-Ocelotl, B.; Porras-Aguilar, R.; Ramos-Garcia, R.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    Optical imaging through highly scattering media such as biological tissue is limited by light scattering. Recently, it has been shown that wavefront shaping is a powerful tool to overcome this problem. In this work, wavefront shaping using spatial light modulators is used to compensate static scattering media (piece of translucent tape) to allow focusing of different intensity distributions. Light propagation is engineered into a specific region of interest. For this purpose, a sequential phase shape algorithm was implemented experimentally. This algorithm is used to encode a phase distribution on an incident beam to pre-compensate phase distortions acquired by the beam after propagating through the tape. The sequential algorithm combined with a spatial light modulator is used to synthesize a phase distribution required for redirecting light using wavefront shaping. The scattered light was re-directed at the detector plane, in order to be: i) focused at a single pixel, ii) at squared regions of 3×3 and 5×5 pixeles and iii) a line pattern of 41 pixels of the camera. Furthermore, the region of interest was placed outside the central area of the camera opening the possibility of image formation.

  1. Nonlinear light scattering in a carbon nanotube suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, Gen M; Mogileva, T N; Bulatov, D L; Vanyukov, V V; Okotrub, Aleksandr V

    2010-01-31

    Nonlinear scattering of 1064-nm laser light in an aqueous suspension of purified carbon nanotubes has been studied in relation to their optical power limiting behaviour using z-scan measurements to simultaneously determine the energy and shape of the transmitted and 90{sup 0} circ-scattered pulses. The results indicate that the reduction in transmitted laser pulse energy with increasing incident power density is mainly due to the associated increase in scattered pulse energy. The shape, duration and time shift of the transmitted and 90{sup 0} circ-scattered pulses are intricate functions of incident power density. The data are interpreted in terms of thermally induced nonlinear and Rayleigh scattering processes at high and low incident power densities, respectively. (nonlinear optics phenomena)

  2. Separation and analysis of forward scattered power in laboratory measurements of light beam transmittance through a turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistelli, E.; Bruscaglioni, P.; Ismaelli, A.; Lo Porto, L.; Zaccanti, G.

    1986-02-01

    In laboratory measurements of the transmittance of a light beam through a diffusing medium (water plus latex spheres), a distinction between the attenuated beam power and the received forward scattered power was made possible by the use of a transmissometer whose receiver has a variable field of view. The dependence of the received scattered power on the FOV angle and on the medium optical depth was analyzed. The deduced separated contributions of first- and second-order scattering, as well as the total received scattered power, were compared to the results of calculations.

  3. PREFACE Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen; Terrill, Nicholas

    2010-10-01

    The XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009, was held in Oxford UK, 13-18 September 2009, and was jointly organised under the auspices of the International Union of Crystallography Commission on SAS by a team from the Diamond Light Source and the ISIS Pulsed Neutron Source - their first such joint venture - with help from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council. It was the first time that this long running and successful series of conferences on the application, science and technology of small-angle scattering techniques had been staged in the UK. The UK has a proud heritage in small-angle scattering: as home to one of the world's first SANS instruments (at AERE Harwell), as the site of the world's first 2nd generation X-ray Synchrotron (the SRS at Daresbury with its suite of SAXS beamlines), and latterly as the location of the world's most successful pulsed source SANS instrument. Indeed, 2009 also marked the 25th Anniversary of neutron operations at ISIS and the opening of a Second Target Station. Whilst the SRS ceased operations in 2008, its mantle has been inherited by the Diamond synchrotron. Many delegates took the opportunity to visit both Diamond and ISIS during a conference excursion. Despite the prevailing global economic downturn, we were delighted that 434 delegates from 32 different countries were able to attend SAS-2009; two-thirds were drawn from the UK, Germany, Japan, the USA and France, but there were also sizeable contingents from Australia, Korea, Taiwan and South America. In many ways this geographical spread reflects the present and emerging distribution, respectively, of 3rd generation X-ray synchrotrons and high-flux neutron sources, although the scope of the conference was not solely limited to these probes. Financial support from the IUCr enabled us to grant bursaries to attend SAS-2009 to 12 delegates from emerging countries (Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, India, Nepal, Romania, Russia and the Ukraine). The

  4. A Theory of Exoplanet Transits with Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.

    2017-02-01

    Exoplanet transit spectroscopy enables the characterization of distant worlds, and will yield key results for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. However, transit spectra models are often simplified, omitting potentially important processes like refraction and multiple scattering. While the former process has seen recent development, the effects of light multiple scattering on exoplanet transit spectra have received little attention. Here, we develop a detailed theory of exoplanet transit spectroscopy that extends to the full refracting and multiple scattering case. We explore the importance of scattering for planet-wide cloud layers, where the relevant parameters are the slant scattering optical depth, the scattering asymmetry parameter, and the angular size of the host star. The latter determines the size of the “target” for a photon that is back-mapped from an observer. We provide results that straightforwardly indicate the potential importance of multiple scattering for transit spectra. When the orbital distance is smaller than 10–20 times the stellar radius, multiple scattering effects for aerosols with asymmetry parameters larger than 0.8–0.9 can become significant. We provide examples of the impacts of cloud/haze multiple scattering on transit spectra of a hot Jupiter-like exoplanet. For cases with a forward and conservatively scattering cloud/haze, differences due to multiple scattering effects can exceed 200 ppm, but shrink to zero at wavelength ranges corresponding to strong gas absorption or when the slant optical depth of the cloud exceeds several tens. We conclude with a discussion of types of aerosols for which multiple scattering in transit spectra may be important.

  5. Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering in Outer RB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    We present the equatorial and bounce average pitch angle diffusion coefficients for scattering of relativistic electrons by the H+ mode of EMIC waves. Both the model (prescribed) and self consistent distributions over the wave normal angle are considered. The main results of our calculation can be summarized as follows: First, in comparison with field aligned waves, the intermediate and highly oblique waves reduce the pitch angle range subject to diffusion, and strongly suppress the scattering rate for low energy electrons (E less than 2 MeV). Second, for electron energies greater than 5 MeV, the |n| = 1 resonances operate only in a narrow region at large pitch-angles, and despite their greatest contribution in case of field aligned waves, cannot cause electron diffusion into the loss cone. For those energies, oblique waves at |n| greater than 1 resonances are more effective, extending the range of pitch angle diffusion down to the loss cone boundary, and increasing diffusion at small pitch angles by orders of magnitude.

  6. Inferring mixture Gibbs free energies from static light scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Thurston, George

    We describe a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing that applies to connected, isotropic ternary and quaternary liquid composition domains, including restricted domains which may not touch all binary axes. For restricted domains, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns obtained at different wavelengths can correspond to the same underlying free energy, and supplement the available information. We discuss well-posed problems for this fully nonlinear, degenerate elliptic partial differential equation. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, and indicate how measurement time depends on instrument throughput. These methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain liquid domains. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  7. Laser light scattering as a probe of fractal colloid aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lin, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The extensive use of laser light scattering is reviewed, both static and dynamic, in the study of colloid aggregation. Static light scattering enables the study of the fractal structure of the aggregates, while dynamic light scattering enables the study of aggregation kinetics. In addition, both techniques can be combined to demonstrate the universality of the aggregation process. Colloidal aggregates are now well understood and therefore represent an excellent experimental system to use in the study of the physical properties of fractal objects. However, the ultimate size of fractal aggregates is fundamentally limited by gravitational acceleration which will destroy the fractal structure as the size of the aggregates increases. This represents a great opportunity for spaceborne experimentation, where the reduced g will enable the growth of fractal structures of sufficient size for many interesting studies of their physical properties.

  8. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS).

    PubMed

    Perkins, Stephen J; Wright, David W; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J; Edler, Karen J; Scott, David J; Terrill, Nicholas J; King, Stephen M; Butler, Paul D; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web, and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic 'bottlebrush' polymers.

  9. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS)1

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Stephen J.; Wright, David W.; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H.; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C.; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J.; Edler, Karen J.; Scott, David J.; Terrill, Nicholas J.; King, Stephen M.; Butler, Paul D.; Curtis, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web, and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic ‘bottlebrush’ polymers. PMID:27980506

  10. Optical model of transient light scattering in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Loiko, V. A. Konkolovich, A. V.; Miskevich, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    A static optical model is developed for the effect of field-induced transient scattering on coherent light transmission through ferroelectric liquid crystals. Scattering processes are described by introducing an optically anisotropic medium containing scatterers (transient domains). The results presented in the paper are obtained for a plane parallel layer of ferroelectric liquid crystals with a planar helicoidal structure under normal illumination with a linearly polarized plane wave. An analysis is presented of the coherent transmittance of the layer in static applied electric fields.

  11. Mathematical methods for restricted domain ternary liquid mixture free energy determination using light scattering.

    PubMed

    Wahle, Chris W; Ross, David S; Thurston, George M

    2013-09-28

    We extend methods of solution of a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing to apply to connected, isotropic ternary liquid composition domains that do not touch all three binary axes. To do so we mathematically analyze the problem of inferring needed Dirichlet boundary data, and solving for the free energy, with use of hypothetical static light scattering measurements that correspond to dielectric composition gradient vectors that have distinct directions. The physical idea behind the technique is that contrasting absorption properties of mixture components can result in such distinctly directed dielectric composition gradient vectors, due to their differing wavelength dependences of dielectric response. At suitably chosen wavelengths, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns in the ternary composition triangle can then correspond to the same underlying free energy, and enlarge the scope of available information about the free energy, as shown here. We show how to use distinctly directed dielectric gradients to measure the free energy on both straight lines and curves within the ternary composition triangle, so as to provide needed Dirichlet conditions for light scattering partial differential equation solution. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of noisy light scattering data, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, for various angles between the assumed dielectric gradient vectors, and indicate how the measurement time depends on instrumental throughput parameters. The present analysis methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain such restricted liquid domains, including aqueous solutions of biological macromolecules, micellar mixtures and microemulsions, and many small molecule systems that are important in separation technology.

  12. Mathematical methods for restricted domain ternary liquid mixture free energy determination using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Chris W.; Ross, David S.; Thurston, George M.

    2013-09-01

    We extend methods of solution of a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing to apply to connected, isotropic ternary liquid composition domains that do not touch all three binary axes. To do so we mathematically analyze the problem of inferring needed Dirichlet boundary data, and solving for the free energy, with use of hypothetical static light scattering measurements that correspond to dielectric composition gradient vectors that have distinct directions. The physical idea behind the technique is that contrasting absorption properties of mixture components can result in such distinctly directed dielectric composition gradient vectors, due to their differing wavelength dependences of dielectric response. At suitably chosen wavelengths, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns in the ternary composition triangle can then correspond to the same underlying free energy, and enlarge the scope of available information about the free energy, as shown here. We show how to use distinctly directed dielectric gradients to measure the free energy on both straight lines and curves within the ternary composition triangle, so as to provide needed Dirichlet conditions for light scattering partial differential equation solution. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of noisy light scattering data, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, for various angles between the assumed dielectric gradient vectors, and indicate how the measurement time depends on instrumental throughput parameters. The present analysis methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain such restricted liquid domains, including aqueous solutions of biological macromolecules, micellar mixtures and microemulsions, and many small molecule systems that are important in separation technology.

  13. Goniometric measurements of light scattered in the principal plane from leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory goniometer was designed and built by NASA for acquiring bidirectional scattering data in the principal plane from leaves. Goniometric measurements were taken on individual tree leaves of yellow poplar, red maple, and red oak. Reflectance measurements were taken every 5* and transmittance measurements every 10 in the principal plane. The results indicate that light reflected from leaves usually has a significant specular component. Reflectances measured for 60 incident angle were the most specular. The most isotropic scattering occurred with transmitted light and with 0 incident light reflected from the abaxial surface. The most significant difference observed between the species was due to the heavy wax layer found on the abaxial surface of red oak, which caused the abaxial reflectance to be more specular than it was in the other two species.

  14. Setup for high-temperature surface Brillouin light scattering: Application to opaque thin films and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faurie, D.; Girodon-Boulandet, N.; Kaladjian, A.; Challali, F.; Abadias, G.; Djemia, P.

    2017-02-01

    A setup combining surface Brillouin light scattering with a high-temperature chamber has been developed. The temperature of the sample is controlled with a Bühler HDK chamber for optical measurements (maximum temperature of 1600 °C), in controlled atmospheres or high vacuum (10-6 mbar). This setup allows the study of sound velocity of surface acoustic waves and of the elastic constants of opaque thin films and coatings in situ as a function of temperature from surface Brillouin light scattering, by analyzing the backscattered light from the sample at a fixed angle of incidence. In this paper, we will demonstrate the applications of this setup for metallic glass thin films devitrification study and evaluation of high temperature elastic properties of hard nitride coatings. This kind of study using surface acoustic waves is rare, in contrast to those made on transparent bulk materials.

  15. Laboratory measurements of the light scattering properties of bentonite clay particles embedded in a cylindrical polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Ankur; Ahmed, Gazi A.; Das, Gautam; Karak, Niranjan; Boruah, Ratan; Choudhury, Amarjyoti

    2013-05-01

    The volume scattering function and degree of linear polarization of randomly oriented bentonite clay particles were investigated as a function of scattering angle at 543.5 nm, 594.5 nm and 632.8 nm incident laser wavelengths by using a detector array-incorporated laboratory light scattering setup. Readings were taken in steps of 1° from an angle of 10° to 170° and each detector was separated from the next one by an angle of 10°. A transparent cylindrical polymer matrix made of cycloaliphatic amine-cured thermosetting epoxy resin was used to hold the scattering samples in front of the laser beam. For background correction the measurements were taken in differential mode.

  16. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  17. Dynamic Laser-Light Scattering Study on Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miike, Hidetoshi; Hideshima, Masao; Hashimoto, Hajime; Ebina, Yoshio

    1984-08-01

    The motility changes in growing bacteria in a culture medium were observed with a dynamic light-scattering technique used to analyse the frequency spectrum of the scattered light intensity. Two typical enterobacteriaceae, E. coil and P. morganii, were examined, and the change in the velocity distribution of the bacteria with time was analysed using the observed spectrum. The distribution pattern was found to change from a Gaussian-type to a Saclay-type with time, and the mean speed of the bacteria had a maximum value at around the turning point of the growth curve.

  18. Nonspherical nanoparticles characterization by partially depolarized dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Alexander D.; Shmytkova, Ekaterina A.

    2015-06-01

    The realization of improved depolarized dynamic light scattering method is presented. This technique supports measurement of non-spherical nanoparticals dimensions in liquids. The relations between translational and rotational diffusion coefficients and autocorrelation function of scattered light with polarized and depolarized components in various proportions are derived. Thus measurement of very weak cross-polarized component can be avoided. This improvement permits to reduce measurement time, to improve signal to noise ratio and results precision. The technique was applied for sizing of gold nanorods and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in liquids.

  19. Optical and Geometric Properties of Free Silica Nanoparticles Studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Burkhard; Raschpichler, Christopher; Gruner, Mathias; Antonsson, Egill; Goroncy, Christian; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart

    2016-09-01

    Elastic small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of free silica (SiO2) nanoparticles is reported (d = 100-180 nm). The particles were prepared by a modified Stöber synthesis in narrow size distributions with controlled surface roughness and functionalization. Angle-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering patterns are shown to be sensitive to these changes in particle properties. It is reported that there is an exponential decrease in scattered X-ray intensity towards larger scattering angles as well as distinct oscillations, which is fully explained by Mie theory. Small-angle X-ray scattering of mesoporous nanoparticles with rough surfaces is compared to that of microporous nanoparticles with smooth surfaces, revealing distinct differences that are rationalized by diffuse scattering from nanoparticle pores in addition to the dominating contribution of Mie scattering. Furthermore, results from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments on functionalized silica nanoparticles are presented, where the incorporation of the dye fluorescein isothiocyanate is found to cause changes in the optical properties of the nanoparticles, as compared to non-functionalized samples. Small, but distinct deviations in particle size derived from electron microscopy and from small-angle X-ray scattering are observed. These are rationalized by particle shrinking occurring in electron microscopy as well as slight changes in optical properties of the nanoparticle samples.

  20. Angle-tolerant hybrid plasmonic filters for visible light communications.

    PubMed

    Anous, Noha; Abdallah, Mohamed; Ramadan, Tarek; Qaraqe, Khalid; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-02-01

    This work presents what we believe is a novel design of a hybrid plasmonic-transmission blue filter for visible light communication systems that employ yellow phosphor-coated blue light-emitting diodes. The proposed filter balances the trade-off between transmission performance and tolerance to variation in angles of incidence (AOIs) while maintaining a low cost with limited complexity design. The designed filter operation is based upon quasi-plasmon mode excitation in a hybrid structure of alternating layers of silver and titanium dioxide over a silica substrate. A primary design approach for a hybrid plasmonic filter of five alternating layers is illustrated in detail. Needle optimization technique is further applied to achieve the required filter performance. The designed filter has an insertion loss of ∼1  dB over a spectral range of 400-485 nm and a minimal close to zero polarization-dependent loss for a wide range of AOI (slightly above 50°). The tolerance of the proposed design against fabrication errors is also tested. The performances of the proposed filters are tested for individual and simultaneous variations from the designed thicknesses, with a ±10% standard deviation from each layer's thickness.

  1. Quantitative analysis of angle-resolved scattering properties of ovarian tissue using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Brewer, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Angle-resolved optical scattering properties of ovarian tissue, on different optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging planes, were quantitatively measured by fitting the compounded OCT A-lines into a single scattering model. Higher cross correlation value of angle-resolved scattering coefficients between different OCT imaging planes was found in normal ovaries than was present in malignant ovaries. The mean cross correlation coefficient (MCC) was introduced in this pilot study to characterize and differentiate normal, n=6, and malignant, n=4, ovaries. A specificity of 100 percent and a sensitivity of 100 percent were achieved by setting MCC threshold at 0.6. Collagen properties, within the OCT imaging penetration depth, were also qualitatively studied in terms of their content, structure and directivity. The homogeneous three-dimensional collagen fiber network, observed in the normal ovary, effectively explains the stronger cross correlation of angle-resolved scattering properties on different imaging planes while the heterogeneity, observed in the malignant ovary, suggests a weaker correlation. PMID:23085900

  2. Solution structure and excitation energy transfer in phycobiliproteins of Acaryochloris marina investigated by small angle scattering.

    PubMed

    Golub, M; Combet, S; Wieland, D C F; Soloviov, D; Kuklin, A; Lokstein, H; Schmitt, F-J; Olliges, R; Hecht, M; Eckert, H-J; Pieper, J

    2017-04-01

    The structure of phycobiliproteins of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina was investigated in buffer solution at physiological temperatures, i.e. under the same conditions applied in spectroscopic experiments, using small angle neutron scattering. The scattering data of intact phycobiliproteins in buffer solution containing phosphate can be well described using a cylindrical shape with a length of about 225Å and a diameter of approximately 100Å. This finding is qualitatively consistent with earlier electron microscopy studies reporting a rod-like shape of the phycobiliproteins with a length of about 250 (M. Chen et al., FEBS Letters 583, 2009, 2535) or 300Å (J. Marquart et al., FEBS Letters 410, 1997, 428). In contrast, phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer lacking phosphate revealed a splitting of the rods into cylindrical subunits with a height of 28Å only, but also a pronounced sample aggregation. Complementary small angle neutron and X-ray scattering experiments on phycocyanin suggest that the cylindrical subunits may represent either trimeric phycocyanin or trimeric allophycocyanin. Our findings are in agreement with the assumption that a phycobiliprotein rod with a total height of about 225Å can accommodate seven trimeric phycocyanin subunits and one trimeric allophycocyanin subunit, each of which having a height of about 28Å. The structural information obtained by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering can be used to interpret variations in the low-energy region of the 4.5K absorption spectra of phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer solutions containing and lacking phosphate, respectively.

  3. Pressure injury prediction using diffusely scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David; Lafontant, Alec; Neidrauer, Michael; Weingarten, Michael S.; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Scruggs, Ericka; Rece, Julianne; Fried, Guy W.; Kuzmin, Vladimir L.; Zubkov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    Pressure injuries (PIs) originate beneath the surface of the skin at the interface between bone and soft tissue. We used diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and diffuse near-infrared spectroscopy (DNIRS) to predict the development of PIs by measuring dermal and subcutaneous red cell motion and optical absorption and scattering properties in 11 spinal cord injury subjects with only nonbleachable redness in the sacrococcygeal area in a rehabilitation hospital and 20 healthy volunteers. A custom optical probe was developed to obtain continuous DCS and DNIRS data from sacrococcygeal tissue while the subjects were placed in supine and lateral positions to apply pressure from body weight and to release pressure, respectively. Rehabilitation patients were measured up to four times over a two-week period. Three rehabilitation patients developed open PIs (POs) within four weeks and eight patients did not (PNOs). Temporal correlation functions in the area of redness were significantly different (p<0.01) during both baseline and applied pressure stages for POs and PNOs. The results show that our optical method may be used for the early prediction of ulcer progression.

  4. Flow cytometry of human embryonic kidney cells: A light scattering approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Goolsby, C. L.; Todd, P. W.; Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The mammalian kidney contains cells that transport water, convert vitamin D to active forms, synthesize hormones such a renin and erythropoietin, and produce enzymes such as urokinase, a plasminogen activator. Several of these functions are maintained by human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) cultivated in vitro. Biochemical study of these functions in their individual cell types in vitro requires purified populations of cells. Light-scattering activated cell sorting (LACS) was explored as a means of achieving such purifications. It was found that HEK cells at the first 1 to 5 passages in culture were heterogeneous with respect to 2-parameter light scattering intensity distribution, in which combined measurements included forward angle scattering (2.5 to 19 deg), 90 deg scattering, and time-of-flight size measurements. Size was measured at a resolution of 0.15 microns/channel in 256 channels using pulse-height independent pulse-width measurements. Two-parameter distributions combining these measurements were obtained for HEK cell subpopulations that had been purified by microgravity electrophoresis and subsequently propagated in culture. These distributions contained at least 3 subpopulations in all purified fractions, and results of experiments with prepurified cultured HEK cells indicated that subpopulations of living cells that were high in plasminogen-activator activity also contained the highest per cent of cells with high 90 deg light scatter intensity.

  5. Investigation of unburned carbon particles in fly ash by means of laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, R. Q.; Morlacchi, R.; Calabria, R.; Massoli, P.

    2011-02-01

    A new optical method to determine the percentage of unburned carbon particles in fly ash from combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The technique exploits the different properties of particles of ash and coal in the elastic scattering of polarized light. The polarization measurements were performed using a linearly polarized laser source and a receiving system able to simultaneously detect the scattered radiation polarized in parallel and orthogonal planes, under the scattering angle of 60°. The parallel and perpendicular components of the scattered light intensities are measured in order to determine the polarization ratio. The operation of the system was tested under various conditions using monodisperse glass spheres. The performance of the novel device was assessed in several sets of measurements with samples of fly ash produced from coal fired power plants. A correlation between the relative content of coal and ashes and the polarization ratio of scattered light was demonstrated. The resulting polarization ratio showed values ranging from 1.25 to 0.94 for a carbon content of 1.17 wt% and 16.3 wt%, respectively. The uncertainty on the measured percentage of unburned carbon was about 1%. The proposed device represents an attractive tool for monitoring real-time burnout and combustion efficiency.

  6. Correlative Light and Scanning X-Ray Scattering Microscopy of Healthy and Pathologic Human Bone Sections

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, C.; Siliqi, D.; Bunk, O.; Beraudi, A.; Ladisa, M.; Altamura, D.; Stea, S.; Baruffaldi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning small and wide angle X-ray scattering (scanning SWAXS) experiments were performed on healthy and pathologic human bone sections. Via crystallographic tools the data were transformed into quantitative images and as such compared with circularly polarized light (CPL) microscopy images. SWAXS and CPL images allowed extracting information of the mineral nanocrystalline phase embedded, with and without preferred orientation, in the collagen fibrils, mapping local changes at sub-osteon resolution. This favorable combination has been applied for the first time to biopsies of dwarfism syndrome and Paget's disease to shed light onto the cortical structure of natural bone in healthy and pathologic sections. PMID:22666538

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging under ambient light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinxin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Weili; Huang, Kai-Chih; Yang, Huaidong; Jin, Guofan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ambient light coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (AL-CARS) microscopy that allows CARS imaging to be operated under environment light for field use. CARS signal is modulated at megahertz frequency and detected by a photodiode equipped with a lab-built resonant amplifier, then extracted through a lock-in amplifier. Filters in both spectral domain and frequency domain effectively blocked room light contamination of the CARS image. In situ hyperspectral CARS imaging of tumor tissue under ambient light is demonstrated. PMID:27519113

  8. Investigation of light scattering on a single dust grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlu, Jiri; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Barton, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Complex phenomenon of light scattering by dust grains plays an important role in all dust--light interactions, especially in space, e.g., light passing through dense dusty clouds in the space as well as in the upper atmosphere, dust charging by photoemission, etc. When the wavelength of the incident light is about the size of the grain, the Mie theory is often used to characterize the scattering process. Unfortunately, we have only very limited knowledge of necessary material constants for most of the space-related materials and also the solution of Mie equations for general grain shapes is difficult or unknown. We develop an apparatus for observations of light scattering on small (micrometer-sized) arbitrary shaped dust grains. We directly measure the scattering by levitating grains in the field created by the standing-wave ultrasonic trap, where we can study single grains or small grain clusters. The experiment is performed at atmospheric air --- unlike other experiments, where grains were measured in water or other liquids. Therefore, the background effects are significantly reduced. Currently, the trap is under development and first tests are carried out. Besides initial results, we focus on theoretical computations of the ultrasonic field of the selected trap.

  9. Study of resonance light scattering for remote optical probing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, C. M.; Morey, W. W.; St. Peters, R. L.; Silverstein, S. D.; Lapp, M.; White, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Enhanced scattering and fluorescence processes in the visible and UV were investigated which will enable improved remote measurements of gas properties. The theoretical relationship between scattering and fluorescence from an isolated molecule in the approach to resonance is examined through analysis of the time dependence of re-emitted light following excitation of pulsed incident light. Quantitative estimates are developed for the relative and absolute intensities of fluorescence and resonance scattering. New results are obtained for depolarization of scattering excited by light at wavelengths within a dissociative continuum. The experimental work was performed in two separate facilities. One of these utilizes argon and krypton lasers, single moded by a tilted etalon, and a 3/4 meter double monochromator. This facility was used to determine properties of the re-emission from NO2, I2 and O3 excited by visible light. The second facility involves a narrow-line dye laser, and a 3/4 meter single monochromator. The dye laser produces pulsed light with 5 nsec pulse duration and 0.005 nm spectral width.

  10. Laser light scattering in turbid media Part I: Experimental and simulated results for the spatial intensity distribution.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Edouard; Sedarsky, David L; Paciaroni, Megan E; Meglinski, Igor V; Linne, Mark A

    2007-08-20

    We investigate the scattering and multiple scattering of a typical laser beam (lambda = 800 nm) in the intermediate scattering regime. The turbid media used in this work are homogeneous solutions of monodisperse polystyrene spheres in distilled water. The two-dimensional distribution of light intensity is recorded experimentally, and calculated via Monte Carlo simulation for both forward and side scattering. The contribution of each scattering order to the total detected light intensity is quantified for a range of different scattering phase functions, optical depths, and detection acceptance angles. The Lorentz-Mie scattering phase function for individual particles is varied by using different sphere diameters (D = 1 and 5 mum). The optical depth of the turbid medium is varied (OD = 2, 5, and 10) by employing different concentrations of polystyrene spheres. Detection angles of theta(a) = 1.5 degrees and 8.5 degrees are considered. A novel approach which realistically models the experimental laser source is employed in this paper, and very good agreement between the experimental and simulated results is demonstrated. The data presented here can be of use to validate any other modern Monte Carlo models which generate spatially resolved light intensity distributions. Finally, an effective correction procedure to the Beer-Lambert law is proposed based on the Monte Carlo calculation of the ballistic photon contribution to the total detected light intensity.

  11. Small angle neutron scattering modeling of copper-rich precipitates in steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.

    1997-11-01

    The magnetic to nuclear scattering intensity ratio observed in the scattering from copper rich precipitates in irradiated pressure vessel steels is much smaller than the value of 11.4 expected for a pure copper precipitate in iron. A model for precipitates in pressure vessel steels which matches the observed scattering typically incorporates manganese, nickel, silicon and other elements and it is assumed that the precipitate is non-magnetic. In the present work consideration is given to the effect of composition gradients and ferromagnetic penetration into the precipitate on the small angle scattering cross section for copper rich clusters as distinguished from conventional precipitates. The calculation is an extension of a scattering model for micelles which consist of shells of varying scattering density. A discrepancy between recent SANS scattering experiments on pressure vessel steels was found to be related to applied magnetic field strength. The assumption of cluster structure and its relation to atom probe FIM findings as well as the effects of insufficient field for magnetic saturation is discussed.

  12. Small angle neutron scattering modeling of copper-rich precipitates in steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.

    1997-11-01

    The magnetic-to-nuclear scattering intensity ratio observed in the scattering from copper-rich precipitates in irradiated pressure vessel steels is much smaller than the value of 11.4 expected for a pure copper precipitate in iron. A model for precipitates in pressure vessel steels which matches the observed scattering typically incorporates manganese, nickel, silicon and other elements and it is assumed that the precipitate is non-magnetic. In the present work consideration is given to the effect of composition gradients and ferromagnetic penetration into the precipitate on the small angle scattering cross section for copper-rich clusters as distinguished from conventional precipitates. The calculation is an extension of a scattering model for micelles which consist of shells of varying scattering density. A discrepancy between recent SANS scattering experiments on pressure vessel shells was found to be related to applied magnetic field strength. The assumption of cluster structure and its relation to atom probe FIM findings as well as the effects of insufficient field for magnetic saturation is discussed.

  13. Specular, diffuse, and polarized light scattered by two wheat canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1985-01-01

    Using polarization measurements, the reflectance factor of two wheat canopies is divided into components due to specularly and diffusely reflected light. The data show that two key angles may be predicted, the angle of the polarizer for minimum flux and the angle of incidence of sunlight specularly reflected by a leaf to a sensor. The results show that specular reflection is a key aspect to radiation transfer by two canopies. Results suggest that the advent of heading in wheat may be remotely sensed from polarization measurements of the canopy reflectance.

  14. Small-angle x-ray scattering studies of the manganese stabilizing subunit in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, B.; Tiede, D. M.; Barry, B. A.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2002-08-29

    Small-angle X-ray scattering studies (SAXS) were used to determine the size, shape, and oligomeric composition of the manganese stabilizing protein (MSP) of photosystem II. This extrinsic protein subunit plays an important role in photosynthetic oxygen evolution. As its name implies, MSP stabilizes the tetranuclear Mn cluster of the water oxidation complex. Removal of MSP lowers activity and decreases the stability of active-site manganese. Reconstitution of MSP reverses these effects. In this study, MSP was extracted from spinach PSII membranes using CaCl{sub 2} or urea. Through the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of MSP was determined to be 26.53 kDa. X-ray scattering results show that both samples display a monodisperse scattering pattern; this pattern is consistent with a homogeneous protein solution. The CaCl{sub 2} extracted and urea extracted MSP samples have radii of gyration of 25.9 {+-} 0.4 and 27.0 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, respectively. MSP is shown to be monomeric in solution. This was determined using a cytochrome c standard and the scattering intensity, extrapolated to zero scattering angle, which is proportional to the molecular weight. This SAXS study suggests that, in solution, MSP is a monomeric, elongated prolate ellipsoid with dimensions, 112 x 23 x 23 {angstrom}{sup 3} and an axial ratio of 4.8.

  15. Polarized Light Scattering from Perfect and Perturbed Surfaces and Fundamental Scattering Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-29

    Final Report 01 Mar 90 to 29 Feb 92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5...... . FUNDING NUMBERS" Polarized light scattering from perfect and perturbed surfaces...and fundamental scattering systems 6. AUTHOR(S) 2306/A3 Professor William S. Bickel 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) B. PERFORMING...NOTES J UL 19 9 2 12a. DISTRIBUTION AVAILABILITY STATEMENT • W ). DISTRIBUTION CODE APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED 13

  16. Light-by-light scattering sum rules in light of new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilkin, Igor; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the light-quark meson contributions to three exact light-by-light scattering sum rules in light of new data by the Belle Collaboration, which recently has extracted the transition form factors of the tensor meson f2(1270 ) as well as of the scalar meson f0(980 ). We confirm a previous finding that the η ,η' and helicity-2 f2(1270 ) contributions saturate one of these sum rules up to photon virtualities around 1 Ge V2 . At larger virtualities, our sum rule analysis shows an important contribution of the f2(1565 ) meson and provides a first empirical extraction of its helicity-2 transition form factor. Two further sum rules allow us to predict the helicity-0 and helicity-1 transition form factors of the f2(1270 ) meson. Furthermore, our analysis also provides an update for the scalar and tensor meson hadronic light-by-light contributions to the muon's anomalous magnetic moment.

  17. The Kinetics of Crystallization of Colloids and Proteins: A Light Scattering Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClymer, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Hard-sphere colloidal systems serve as model systems for aggregation, nucleation, crystallization and gelation as well as interesting systems in their own right.There is strong current interest in using colloidal systems to form photonic crystals. A major scientific thrust of NASA's microgravity research is the crystallization of proteins for structural determination. The crystallization of proteins is a complicated process that requires a great deal of trial and error experimentation. In spite of a great deal of work, "better" protein crystals cannot always be grown in microgravity and conditions for crystallization are not well understood. Crystallization of colloidal systems interacting as hard spheres and with an attractive potential induced by entropic forces have been studied in a series of static light scattering experiments. Additionally, aggregation of a protein as a function of pH has been studied using dynamic light scattering. For our experiments we used PMMA (polymethylacrylate) spherical particles interacting as hard spheres, with no attractive potential. These particles have a radius of 304 nanometers, a density of 1.22 gm/ml and an index of refraction of 1.52. A PMMA colloidal sample at a volume fraction of approximately 54% was index matched in a solution of cycloheptyl bromide (CHB) and cis-decalin. The sample is in a glass cylindrical vial that is placed in an ALV static and dynamic light scattering goniometer system. The vial is immersed in a toluene bath for index matching to minimize flair. Vigorous shaking melts any colloidal crystals initially present. The sample is illuminated with diverging laser light (632.8 nanometers) from a 4x microscope objective placed so that the beam is approximately 1 cm in diameter at the sample location. The sample is rotated about its long axis at approximately 3.5 revolutions per minute (highest speed) as the colloidal crystal system is non-ergodic. The scattered light is detected at various angles using the

  18. Thorough small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the instability of liquid micro-jets in air.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Benedetta; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Pérez, Javier; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Liquid jets are of interest, both for their industrial relevance and for scientific applications (more important, in particular for X-rays, after the advent of free-electron lasers that require liquid jets as sample carrier). Instability mechanisms have been described theoretically and by numerical simulation, but confirmed by few experimental techniques. In fact, these are mainly based on cameras, which is limited by the imaging resolution, and on light scattering, which is hindered by absorption, reflection, Mie scattering and multiple scattering due to complex air/liquid interfaces during jet break-up. In this communication it is demonstrated that synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can give quantitative information on liquid jet dynamics at the nanoscale, by detecting time-dependent morphology and break-up length. Jets ejected from circular tubes of different diameters (100-450 µm) and speeds (0.7-21 m s(-1)) have been explored to cover the Rayleigh and first wind-induced regimes. Various solvents (water, ethanol, 2-propanol) and their mixtures have been examined. The determination of the liquid jet behaviour becomes essential, as it provides background data in subsequent studies of chemical and biological reactions using SAXS or X-ray diffraction based on synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers.

  19. Analysis of beam steering by diffraction and the scattering of light by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Jing M.

    This thesis addresses two problems. The first is the performance of non-mechanical beam steering devices based on diffractive optics, and the second is the problem of the scattering of light by turbulence. Two beam steering devices namely holographic optical elements and optical phased arrays are analyzed. Of particular interest are the wavelength selectivity of the uniform volume holographic grating and the impact of dispersion on the spatial and temporal fidelity of an optically transmitted communication signal through both beamsteering devices. Longitudinal refractive index modulation (apodization) in photosensitive glass is used to improve sidelobe. Theoretical methods are developed to model both devices. For uniform grating, it is shown that the temporal dispersion due to the diffraction increase with beam diameter yielding a higher power penalty for large diffraction angles and aperture sizes. For an optical phased array, it is shown the power penalty increase as the diffraction angles and diameters increase. In addition, the scattering of light in turbulent medium is investigated. Of particular interest is to determine region of validity of the Born approximation which is used to compute the scattering field. Pade approximants are used to analyze the propagation through a media having strong turbulent intensity. It is shown that the region of convergence of Born approximation increases as the outer scale of the turbulence decreases. In the case of the strong turbulence, the Born approximation does not capture the correct angular distribution of the scattering intensity.

  20. Characterising density fluctuations in liquid yttria aluminates with small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Wilding, Martin C.; Vu Van, Quang; Majerus, Odile; Hennet, Louis

    2009-01-29

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been measured in the wavevector range 0.01scatter from longer range fluctuating volumes.

  1. Small angle X-ray scattering study of coal soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Parker, J. T.; Seifert, S.; Fletcher, T. H.

    2000-02-14

    The objective of this study is to examine, by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the formation of soot from individual coal particle combustion in a methane flat flame burner. The SAXS instrument at the Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can be used to observe both the formation of spherules and clusters since it can access length scales of 6--6000 {angstrom}. The high X-ray flux enables rapid acquisition of scattering data of various regions of the flame. SAXS data reveal particle size, shape, surface areas, and surface roughness.

  2. Physical characterization and profiling of airway epithelial derived exosomes using light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kesimer, Mehmet; Gupta, Richa

    2015-10-01

    Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles have been gaining interest during the last decade due to their emerging role in biology and, disease pathogenesis and their biomarker potential. Almost all published research related to exosomes and other extracellular vesicles include some form of physical characterization. Therefore, these vesicles should be precisely profiled and characterized physically before studying their biological role as intercellular messengers, biomarkers or therapeutic tools. Using a combination of light scattering techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS) and multi-angle laser light scattering combined with size exclusion separation (SEC-MALLS), we physically characterized and compared distinct extracellular vesicles derived from the apical secretions of two different cultured airway epithelial cells. The results indicated that epithelial cells release vesicles with distinct physical properties and sizes. Human primary tracheobronchial cell culture (HTBE) derived vesicles have a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of approximately 340 nm while their radius of gyration (Rg) is approximately 200 nm. Electron microscopy analysis, however, revealed that their spherical component is 40-100 nm in size, and they carry filamentous, entangled membrane mucins on their surface that increases their overall radius. The mucin decoration on the surface defines their size and charge as measured using light scattering techniques. Their surface properties mirror the properties of the cells from which they are derived. This may provide a unique tool for researchers to elucidate the unanswered questions in normal airway biology and innate and adaptive defense, including the remodeling of airways during inflammation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  3. Chaotic scattering of pitch angles in the current sheet of the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Chen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The modified Harris field model is used to investigate the process of pitch angle scattering by a current sheet. The relationship between the incoming asymptotic pitch angle alpha(in) and the outgoing asymptotic pitch angle alpha(out) is studied from first principles by numerically integrating the equation of motion. Evidence that charged particles undergo chaotic scattering by the current sheet is found. For fixed alpha(in), it is shown that alpha(out) exhibits sensitive dependence on the energy parameter in certain energy ranges. For a fixed energy parameter value in the same energy ranges, alpha(out) sensitively depends on alpha(in). For other energy values, alpha(out) does not show sensitive dependence on alpha(in) for most phase angles. A distribution of alpha(in) is mapped from the asymptotic region to the midplane, and it is found that the resulting particle distribution should have beam structures with well-collimated pitch angles near each resonance energy value. Implications for the particle distribution functions in the earth's magnetotail are discussed.

  4. The impact of dust particle morphological details on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, Osku; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Jeong, Gi Young

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the impact of dust particle surface roughness and internal structure on light scattering. Starting from digital representation of realistically shaped dust particles, we vary the particle morphology, and perform light scattering simulations to both the original and the modified particles. By mapping the changes in morphology to the changes in scattering, we will get information of how strongly and in which way a particular change affects scattering. All investigations have been done with complex, irregular particle shapes. For surface roughness studies we have kept the particle total volume virtually constant during the roughening process, and the roughness element size small enough to keep the overall shape relatively unchanged. For internal structure studies, the size and the external shape are kept constant. These safety measures help ensure that the effects seen are in fact due to the feature studied. The work is notable for model development, because some models can not include surface roughness, for example. In that case, the people who use such models have to adjust for the fact that the results are inaccurate, and by knowing how surface roughness typically changes the scattering results, the adjustment can be made. As a corollary, if it is shown that a particular feature does not change scattering results in any noticeable way, the model developers can confidently ignore or simplify it.

  5. Development of bacterial colony phenotyping instrument using reflected scatter light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Iyll-Joon

    Bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology (BARDOT) involves in differentiating elastic scattering pattern of bacterial colony. This elastic light scatter technology has shown promising label-free classification rate. However, there is limited success in certain circumstances where either a growth media or a colony has higher opacity. This situation is due to the physical principles of the current BARDOT which mainly relies on optical patterns generated by transmitted signals. Incoming light is obstructed and cannot be transmitted through the dense bacterial colonies, such as Lactobacillus, Yeast, mold and soil bacteria. Moreover, a blood agar, widely used in clinical field, is an example of an opaque media that does not allow light to be transmitted through. Therefore, in this research, a newly designed reflection type scatterometer is presented. The reflection type scatterometer measures the elastic scattering pattern generated by reflected signal. A theoretical model to study the optical pattern characteristic with respect to bacterial colony morphology is presented. Both theoretical and experiment results show good agreement that the size of backward scattering pattern has positive correlation to colony aspect ratio, a colony elevation to diameter ratio. Four pathogenic bacteria on blood agar, Escherichia coli K12, Listeria innocua, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus, are tested and measured with proposed instrument. The measured patterns are analyzed with a classification software, and high classification rate can be achieved.

  6. Inverse near-critical-angle scattering as a tool to characterize bubble clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, Fabrice R. A.; Krzysiek, Mariusz; Barbosa, Séverine; Wozniak, Mariusz; Mroczka, Janusz; Yuan, Yijia; Ren, Kuan-Fang

    2010-02-01

    Under real flow conditions, the critical-angle scattering of a spherical bubble is too noisy to obtain directly the bubble diameter and refractive index. To solve this problem and to limit the drawback of any counting technique, the critical angle refractometry and sizing (CARS) technique has been extended as a collective ensemble technique. As an inverse method it allows to get the size distribution and composition of a cloud of bubbles. In this paper we review the principle, the advantages and limits of this new optical particle characterization method.

  7. Angle-beam shear wave scattering from buried crack-like defects in bonded specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Carson T.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Weng, Yu; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic wavefield imaging, which refers to the measurement of wave motion on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, has been previously applied to angle-beam shear wave propagation in simple plates with through-holes and far-surface notches. In this prior work, scattered waves were analyzed using baseline subtraction of wavefields acquired before and after a notch was introduced. In practice, however, defects of interest often occur between bonded layers and it is generally not possible to record data from the same specimen in both the undamaged and damaged states, even in the laboratory. Direct baseline subtraction of wavefields thus becomes impractical as a tool for analyzing scattering. This present work considers measurement and analysis of angle-beam waves in bonded specimens with and without buried defects originating from fastener holes. Data from fastener holes with and without simulated damage in the form of notches are compared, and it is shown that wavefield baseline subtraction, even after correcting for misalignment between scans, is ineffective for isolating scattering from the notch. A combination of frequency-wavenumber filtering and spatial windowing is proposed and implemented as an alternative approach to quantify scattering from damage. Despite unavoidable deviations from specimen-to-specimen caused by factors such as variations in bonding, transducer mounting, and fastener hole machining, it is shown that scattering from buried notches can be clearly visualized in recorded wavefield data of bonded plates containing a buried defect as opposed to "baseline" wavefield data taken from a nominally similar specimen with no defect present. Backscattering is further quantified in the form of scattering patterns at different scattering frames to quantify the effect of the notch on the total backscattered wavefield.

  8. Low-angle X-ray scattering properties of irradiated spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. P. G.; Braz, D.; Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    The scattering of X-rays at low angles (LAXS) is a technique dominated by the coherent scattering process. One characteristic observation of low-angle coherent scattering is the so-called molecular interference effect, being characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. In the present study, LAXS profiles from five different spices are carefully measured in order to establish characteristic scattering signatures. Samples of Ceylon cinnamon, cumin, nutmeg, paprika and black pepper were bought in local market in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The LAXS patterns were obtained using a Shimadzu DRX 6000 diffractometer in reflection geometry. Coherent scattering patterns are measured for the samples for θ=5-35°. The data were collected in 0.05° increments every 3 s. In order to evaluate the possible molecular structure changes caused to the irradiation procedure, the signatures obtained for control (non-irradiated) spices were compared with spice samples irradiated with different doses varying from 3 to 40 kGy. The LAXS patterns of all samples were obtained after 30, 60, 90, 120 days to evaluate the effect of storage period. Scattering profiles from spices irradiated with different irradiation doses were obtained and the results compared. For each spice, there is no considerable deviation in shape in function of the irradiation dose. It indicates that the molecular structure of each analyzed spices is preserved considering the dose range chosen. The results show that the molecular structure was found to be stable during storage at the ambient temperature for up to 4 months.

  9. Light Scattering by Polymers: Two Experiments for Advanced Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, equipment, and results for two experiments are presented. The first involves the measurement of the mass-average and degree of coiling of polystyrene and is interpreted by the full mathematical theory of light scattering. The second is the study of transitions in gelatin. (JN)

  10. A Study of Structural Phase Transitions Using Light Scattering Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    n.g (a" &"I* L TYPE OF REPORT a PERID COVER=o rinal Report, A Study of structural phase transitions using October 1981 light scattering tenchniques S...SWWJUTY CLPWICATION OP ThIS PAGE (VIM1- Sum • . i i - • .. . . . ’ ’ .... . . . ’ ’ ’ . . L .. .. . ’.. . Table of contents 1) Results Page (a

  11. Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R.

    2012-07-15

    The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

  12. Small-angle X-ray scattering method to characterize molecular interactions: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Allec, Nicholas; Choi, Mina; Yesupriya, Nikhil; Szychowski, Brian; White, Michael R; Kann, Maricel G; Garcin, Elsa D; Daniel, Marie-Christine; Badano, Aldo

    2015-07-10

    Characterizing biomolecular interactions is crucial to the understanding of biological processes. Existing characterization methods have low spatial resolution, poor specificity, and some lack the capability for deep tissue imaging. We describe a novel technique that relies on small-angle X-ray scattering signatures from high-contrast molecular probes that correlate with the presence of biomolecular interactions. We describe a proof-of-concept study that uses a model system consisting of mixtures of monomer solutions of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as the non-interacting species and solutions of GNP dimers linked with an organic molecule (dimethyl suberimidate) as the interacting species. We report estimates of the interaction fraction obtained with the proposed small-angle X-ray scattering characterization method exhibiting strong correlation with the known relative concentration of interacting and non-interacting species.

  13. Solution properties of a CO{sub 2}-soluble fluoropolymer via small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, J.B.; Combes, J.R.; Romack, T.J.; Canelas, D.A.; Betts, D.E.; Samulski, E.T.; DeSimone, J.M.; Londono, D.; Wignall, G.D.

    1996-01-31

    In this communication, we report the first characterization of solutions of a high molecular weight polymer in supercritical CO{sub 2} by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is shown that small-angle neutron scattering gives key molecular parameters of an amorphous fluoropolymer in supercritical CO{sub 2}, i.e., the molecular weight, radius of gyration, and second virial coefficient, and thereby gives insights into a polymer chain`s behavior in this unique solvent. The positive sign of the second virial coefficients indicate that this medium is a good solvent - there is no evidence of a collapsed chain conformation. In fact, we conclude from the SANS data that, in CO{sub 2}, the poly(FOA) chain dimensions are expanded relative to those characteristic of its melt. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Failure of the multiple peaking approximation for fast capture processes at milliradian scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Houamer, Salim; Popov, Yuri V.; Dal Cappello, Claude

    2010-03-15

    The first Born approximation is examined for different fast capture processes for the p+He system at incident energies of about 1 MeV. Calculations have been performed for the singly differential cross section (SDCS) for scattering angles 0-0.5 mrad in the laboratory frame. In the case of transfer ionization, we observe that the two-step-2 mechanism has a dominant contribution to the SDCS for the kinematics considered in this work. The present investigation demonstrates that the multiple peaking approximation is a very crude method which fails to describe the SDCS even at scattering angles below 0.5 mrad. We have also presented a doubly differential cross section for the fixed emission energy of 600 eV and compared our results with other theoretical calculations and experiments.

  15. Development and prospects of Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuo, Tai-Sen; Cheng, He; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) is an upgrade of the traditional Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique which can cover three orders of magnitude of length scale from one nanometer to one micrometer. It is a powerful tool for structure calibration in polymer science, biology, material science and condensed matter physics. Since the first VSANS instrument, D11 in Grenoble, was built in 1972, new collimation techniques, focusing optics (multi-beam converging apertures, material or magnetic lenses, and focusing mirrors) and higher resolution detectors combined with the long flight paths and long incident neutron wavelengths have been developed. In this paper, a detailed review is given of the development, principles and application conditions of various VSANS techniques. Then, beam current gain factors are calculated to evaluate those techniques. A VSANS design for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is thereby presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474119, 11305191)

  16. Imaging Polarimetry of Scattered Light from the Buried QSO in IRAS F15307+3252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Jeffrey; Hines, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present new imaging polarimetry observations of the Hyperluminous Infrared Galaxy and Type 2 QSO IRAS F15307+3252 (z = 0.9257). The observations were obtained with the High-Resolution Camera (HRC) of the Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The images show strongly polarized (p ≥ 20%) light extending ~8 kpc southwest from the center of the galaxy. The overall shape suggests that the extended emission has a single-sided, conical structure of apparent half-opening angle ~16 degrees and apex centered at the galaxy nucleus. The polarization position angle (at each resolution element) is perpendicular to the axis of the extended emission, implying that the structure is illuminated by a central source in the galaxy nucleus that is not seen directly. F15307+3252 is known to harbor a buried QSO that was revealed in a polarized spectrum by Hines et al. (1995); the degree of polarization and position angle of this polarized spectrum match those of the extended structure seen in our new HST/ACS data. We thus conclude that this extended emission is light from the buried QSO that is scattered (thus polarized) into our line of sight, and importantly, this object would be classified optically as a Type 1 QSO if viewed from the vantage point of the scattering material. The conical structure of the scattered light suggests that the material blocking our direct line of sight to the QSO has a spatial distribution similar to the dusty torus in lower redshift Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). Assuming that the scattered-light-cone half-opening angle is the same as the dusty torus half-opening angle, we derive a dust-covering fraction of ≥ 95%. This, and comparison between the observed spectral energy distribution of F15307+3252 and that of a composite Type 1 QSO, suggests that the majority of the luminosity in F15307+3252 is powered by the central QSO. Deep HST/ACS images in total light also show clearly that F15307+3252 sits at the center of a

  17. Grazing Angle Proton Scattering: Effects on Chandra and XMM-Newton X-Ray Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    these scattering models calculation . As expected the MCNPX results have broad, low are valid for moderately large angles of incidence, or cases energy...the incident particle will enter into the bulk MCNPX calculated values show a much larger energy losses material, if the particle trajectory is not...properties - Flmov FormuIa Calculation [ and will not change significantly for the mirror materials. SJ Oinc 0.20 MCNPX and Geant4 calculations

  18. Two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors for small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McElhaney, S.A.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, various detectors available for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are discussed, along with some current developments being actively pursued. A section has been included to outline the various methodologies of position encoding/decoding with discussions on trends and limitations. Computer software/hardware vary greatly from institute and experiment and only a general discussion is given to this area. 85 refs., 33 figs.

  19. Light scattering by epitaxial VO{sub 2} films near the metal-insulator transition point

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, Sergiy Fernández, Felix; Rúa, Armando; Figueroa, Jose; Vargas, Kevin; Cordero, Joseph; Aparicio, Joaquin; Sepúlveda, Nelson

    2015-05-14

    Experimental observation of metal-insulator transition in epitaxial films of vanadium dioxide is reported. Hemispherical angle-resolved light scattering technique is applied for statistical analysis of the phase transition processes on mesoscale. It is shown that the thermal hysteresis strongly depends on spatial frequency of surface irregularities. The transformation of scattering indicatrix depends on sample morphology and is principally different for the thin films with higher internal elastic strain and for the thicker films where this strain is suppressed by introduction of misfit dislocations. The evolution of scattering indicatrix, fractal dimension, surface power spectral density, and surface autocorrelation function demonstrates distinctive behavior which elucidates the influence of structural defects and strain on thermal hysteresis, twinning of microcrystallites, and domain formation during the phase transition.

  20. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering by the Magnetic Microstructure of Nanocrystalline Ferromagnets Near Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Weissmüller, J.; McMichael, R. D.; Michels, A.; Shull, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical analysis of elastic magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) due to the nonuniform magnetic microstructure in nanocrystalline ferromagnets. The reaction of the magnetization to the magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropy fields is derived using the theory of micromagnetics. In the limit where the scattering volume is a single magnetic domain, and the magnetization is nearly aligned with the direction of the magnetic field, closed form solutions are given for the differential scattering cross-section as a function of the scattering vector and of the magnetic field. These expressions involve an anisotropy field scattering function, that depends only on the Fourier components of the anisotropy field microstructure, not on the applied field, and a micromagnetic response function for SANS, that can be computed from tabulated values of the materials parameters saturation magnetization and exchange stiffness constant or spin wave stiffness constant. Based on these results, it is suggested that the anisotropy field scattering function SH can be extracted from experimental SANS data. A sum rule for SH suggests measurement of the volumetric mean square anisotropy field. When magnetocrystalline anisotropy is dominant, then a mean grain size or the grain size distribution may be determined by analysis of SH.

  1. Small-angle scatter tomography with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Zhu, Zheyuan; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle x-ray scatter imaging has a high intrinsic contrast in cancer research and other applications, and provides information on molecular composition and micro-structure of the tissue. In general, the implementations of small-angle coherent scatter imaging can be divided into two main categories: direct tomography and angular dispersive computerized tomography. Based on the recent development of energy-discriminative photon-counting detector array, here we propose a computerized tomography setup based on energy-dispersive measurement with a photon-counting detector array. To show merits of the energy-dispersive approach, we have performed numerical tests with a phantom containing various tissue types, in comparison with the existing imaging approaches. The results show that with an energy resolution of ~6 keV, the energy dispersive tomography system with a broadband tabletop x-ray would outperform the angular dispersive system, which makes the x-ray small-angle scatter tomography promising for high-specificity tissue imaging.

  2. Grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering at the wiggler beamline BW4 of HASYLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Perlich, J.; Rubeck, J.; Botta, S.; Gehrke, R.; Roth, S. V.; Ruderer, M. A.; Prams, S. M.; Rawolle, M.; Zhong, Q.; Koerstgens, V.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.

    2010-10-15

    We present an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) to grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS). GIWAXS refers to an x-ray diffraction method, which, based on the measurement geometry, is perfectly suited for the investigation of the material crystallinity of surfaces and thin films. It is shown that the overall experimental GIWAXS setup employing a movable CCD-detector provides the capability of reliable and reproducible diffraction measurements in grazing incidence geometry. Furthermore, the potential usage of an additional detector enables the simultaneous or successive measurement of GIWAXS and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). The new capability is illustrated by the microbeam GIWAXS measurement of a thin film of the conjugated polymer poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT). The investigation reveals the semicrystalline nature of the P3OT film by a clear identification of the wide angle scattering reflexes up to the third order in the [100]-direction as well as the first order in the [010]-direction. The corresponding microbeam GISAXS measurement on the present morphology complements the characterization yielding the complete sample informa-tion from subnanometer up to micrometer length scales.

  3. High-definition projection screen based on multiple light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiromasa; Okumura, Takamitsu; Tagaya, Akihiro; Higuchi, Eizaburo; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2004-05-01

    A novel rear projection screen (Blue Ocean screen, Nitto Jyushi Kogyo, Co., Ltd.) has been developed. Blue Ocean screen is a single polymer plate requiring no lens element. The projected image is formed on the screen surface by the multiple light scattering. An image light is multiply scattered and is converted into homogeneous light distribution efficiently due to the internal particles of micron order dispersed in the acrylic polymer matrix. An ambient light is reduced by the dye molecules doped in the polymer and the anti-reflective coating on the screen surface. The condition of the particles and the concentration of the dye molecules have been optimized by the ray tracing simulation program based on Mie scattering theory using a Monte Carlo method. The screen containing the particles of optimum condition exhibits the wide viewing angle, the well-controlled color balance, and the high sharpness level at the same time. The contrast level of the projected image in ambient light is improved by controlling the concentration of the dye molecules. This paper describes the optimization obtained theoretically and experimentally, and demonstrates the advantage of Blue Ocean screen.

  4. Pitch angle scattering by triggered emissions from the Siple Station wave injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harid, V.; Golkowski, M.; Bell, T. F.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear amplification of whistler mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere , due to gyroresonance with energetic electrons, also known as the phenomena of VLF triggered emissions, has been investigated extensively with analytical formulations, experimental observations and computer simulations. However, the pitch angle scattering of typical triggered emission waveforms has not been specifically considered. Most authors consider particle scattering either in the presence of a monochromatic constant amplitude wave or a broadband incoherent but time-frequency homogenous emission. Although investigation of these two limiting cases has provided valuable insight into radiation belt dynamics, a large class of waves including triggered emissions and chorus do not fall under either of the two descriptions. The inherent symmetry of a constant amplitude monochromatic wave around the equator results in non-cumulative pitch angle change for a large population of electrons. Wave amplification generated during linear and nonlinear growth result in wave gradients that can have a more significant effect on particle pitch angle and energy. In addition, coherent frequency changing signals are capable of shifting the cyclotron resonance condition and significantly perturbing particle trajectories from their adiabatic motion. The wave-injection experiment at Siple Station, Antarctica was designed to study wave growth and triggering processes in the magnetosphere. Amplified signals from Siple Station often show both wave gradients as well advances in phase and frequency. Using a numerical test-particle simulation, we model the effect of typical Siple Station signals on pitch angle scattering and particle precipitation. Results show that triggered emission type wave forms are more efficient in producing large pitch angle changes in resonant particles.

  5. Multiple scattering of light by the surfaces of small Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, K.; Penttilä, A.; Wilkman, O.; Videen, G.

    2014-07-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves in a macroscopic particulate medium composed of microscopic particles constitutes an open computational problem in planetary astrophysics. This problem manifests itself in the absence of inverse methods to address fundamental astronomical observations of small Solar System objects. There are two ubiquitous phenomena observed at small solar phase angles (the Sun-Object-Observer angle) from, for example, asteroids and transneptunian objects. First, a nonlinear increase of brightness is observed toward the zero phase angle in the magnitude scale that is commonly called the opposition effect. Second, the scattered light is observed to be partially linearly polarized parallel to the Sun-Object-Observer plane that is commonly called the negative polarization surge. The aforedescribed polarimetric and photometric observations of small Solar System objects are interpreted using a radiative-transfer coherent-backscattering model (RT-CB, Muinonen 2004) that makes use of a so-called phenomenological fundamental single scatterer (Muinonen and Videen 2012). For the validity of RT-CB, see Muinonen et al. (2012, 2013). The modeling allows us to constrain the single-scattering albedo, phase function, and polarization characteristics as well as the mean free path length between successive scatterings. With the help of laboratory experiments (Muñoz et al. and Peltoniemi et al., present meeting) and exact theoretical methods (e.g., Markkanen et al., present meeting), it further allows us to put constraints on the size, shape, and refractive index of the fundamental scatterers. We illustrate the application of RT-CB by interpreting the polarimetric and photometric observations of the C, M, S, and E-class asteroids.

  6. Convex and concave successions of power-law decays in small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The small-angle scattering (SAS) structure factor from a new model of a 3D deterministic fractal in which the relative positions and the number of structural units vary with fractal iteration number is calculated. It is shown that, depending on the relative positions of scattering units inside the fractal, we can obtain various types of power-law successions, such as: convex/concave - when the absolute value of the scattering exponent of the first power-law decay is higher/smaller than that of the subsequent power- law decay, or any combination of them (i.e. convex-concave or concave-convex). The obtained results can explain experimental SAS (neutron or X-rays) data which are characterized by a succession of power-law decays of arbitrary length.

  7. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at small angles, measured at ANKE-COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarian, Z.

    2016-03-01

    The most accepted approach to describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is the partial wave analysis (PWA), which translates various experimental observables to the common language of the partial waves. The reliable analysis relies not only on the quality experimental data, but also on the measurements of scattering observables over preferably the full angular range. Small angle scattering has been measured for six beam energies between 0.8 and 2.4 GeV using polarized proton beam incident on both proton and deuteron unpolarized targets at COSY-ANKE. This proceeding will report on the published and preliminary results for both pp and pn scattering from this and other recent experiments at ANKE. This study aims to provide the valuable observables to the SAID group in order to improve the phenomenological understanding of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  8. Small angle scattering methods to study porous materials under high uniaxial strain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sylvie Balima, Félix; Pischedda, Vittoria; Legrand, Franck; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2015-02-15

    We developed a high pressure cell for the in situ study of the porosity of solids under high uniaxial strain using neutron small angle scattering. The cell comprises a hydraulically actioned piston and a main body equipped with two single-crystal sapphire windows allowing for the neutron scattering of the sample. The sample cavity is designed to allow for a large volume variation as expected when compressing highly porous materials. We also implemented a loading protocol to adapt an existing diamond anvil cell for the study of porous materials by X-ray small angle scattering under high pressure. The two techniques are complementary as the radiation beam and the applied pressure are in one case perpendicular to each other (neutron cell) and in the other case parallel (X-ray cell). We will illustrate the use of these two techniques in the study of lamellar porous systems up to a maximum pressure of 0.1 GPa and 0.3 GPa for the neutron and X-ray cells, respectively. These devices allow obtaining information on the evolution of porosity with pressure in the pore dimension subdomain defined by the wave-numbers explored in the scattering process. The evolution with the applied load of such parameters as the fractal dimension of the pore-matrix interface or the apparent specific surface in expanded graphite and in expanded vermiculite is used to illustrate the use of the high pressure cells.

  9. Bilayer thickness in unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles: small-angle neutron scattering using contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerka, N.; Uhríková, D.; Teixeira, J.; Balgavý, P.

    2004-07-01

    The thickness of the lipid bilayer in extruded unilamellar vesicles prepared from synthetic 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholines with monounsaturated acyl chains (diCn:1PC, n=14-22) was studied at 30°C in the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. Several contrasts of the neutron scattering length density between the aqueous phase and phospholipid bilayer of vesicles were used. The experimental data were evaluated using the small-angle form of the Kratky-Porod approximation ln[I(q)q2] vs. q2 of the SANS intensity I(q) in the appropriate range of scattering vector values q to obtain the bilayer radius of gyration Rg and its extrapolated value at infinite scattering contrast Rginf. The bilayer thickness parameter evaluated from a linear approximation of dependence of gyration radius on the inverse contrast was then obtained without using any bilayer structure model. The dependence of the thickness parameter dg≅120.5Rginf on the number n of acyl chain carbons was found to be linear with a slope of 1.8+/-0.2Å per one acyl chain carbon. This slope can be used in bilayer-protein interaction studies.

  10. Small-angle scattering and morphologies of ultra-flexible microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Prevost, Sylvain; Lopian, Tobias; Pleines, Maximilian; Diat, Olivier; Zemb, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    The phase diagrams of ternary mixtures of partly miscible solvents containing a hydrotropic co-solvent exhibit a variable miscibility gap and one critical point. This work investigates the entire monophasic region far from and near to the miscibility gap in octan-1-ol/ethanol/water, for which ultra-flexible micro-emulsions (UFMEs) are observed by small-angle scattering techniques. SWAXS (combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering) allows the elucidation of these types of structure. Three distinct areas can be identified in the phase diagram, with scattering data resembling those from direct, bicontinuous and reverse local structures. These UFMEs are far more polydisperse than their surfactant-based counterparts. Water-rich and solvent-rich domains are only delimited by a small excess of hydrotrope, instead of a well defined surfactant layer of fixed area per molecule. It is shown that all scattering spectra obtained for the nanostructured compositions can be modelled by a simple unified analytical model composed of two uncorrelated contributions. The main one is the Ornstein-Zernike formula for composition fluctuations which gives information about the pseudo-phase domain size. The second is a Lorentzian that captures the structure of at least one of the coexisting pseudo-phases. No Porod law can be measured in the SAXS domain. The proposed expression gives access to two characteristic sizes as well as one inter-aggregate distance.

  11. Small angle scattering methods to study porous materials under high uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Sylvie; Balima, Félix; Pischedda, Vittoria; Legrand, Franck; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    We developed a high pressure cell for the in situ study of the porosity of solids under high uniaxial strain using neutron small angle scattering. The cell comprises a hydraulically actioned piston and a main body equipped with two single-crystal sapphire windows allowing for the neutron scattering of the sample. The sample cavity is designed to allow for a large volume variation as expected when compressing highly porous materials. We also implemented a loading protocol to adapt an existing diamond anvil cell for the study of porous materials by X-ray small angle scattering under high pressure. The two techniques are complementary as the radiation beam and the applied pressure are in one case perpendicular to each other (neutron cell) and in the other case parallel (X-ray cell). We will illustrate the use of these two techniques in the study of lamellar porous systems up to a maximum pressure of 0.1 GPa and 0.3 GPa for the neutron and X-ray cells, respectively. These devices allow obtaining information on the evolution of porosity with pressure in the pore dimension subdomain defined by the wave-numbers explored in the scattering process. The evolution with the applied load of such parameters as the fractal dimension of the pore-matrix interface or the apparent specific surface in expanded graphite and in expanded vermiculite is used to illustrate the use of the high pressure cells.

  12. Small-angle scattering and morphologies of ultra-flexible microemulsions1

    PubMed Central

    Prevost, Sylvain; Lopian, Tobias; Pleines, Maximilian; Diat, Olivier; Zemb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The phase diagrams of ternary mixtures of partly miscible solvents containing a hydrotropic co-solvent exhibit a variable miscibility gap and one critical point. This work investigates the entire monophasic region far from and near to the miscibility gap in octan-1-ol/ethanol/water, for which ultra-flexible micro­emulsions (UFMEs) are observed by small-angle scattering techniques. SWAXS (combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering) allows the elucidation of these types of structure. Three distinct areas can be identified in the phase diagram, with scattering data resembling those from direct, bicontinuous and reverse local structures. These UFMEs are far more polydisperse than their surfactant-based counterparts. Water-rich and solvent-rich domains are only delimited by a small excess of hydrotrope, instead of a well defined surfactant layer of fixed area per molecule. It is shown that all scattering spectra obtained for the nanostructured compositions can be modelled by a simple unified analytical model composed of two uncorrelated contributions. The main one is the Ornstein–Zernike formula for composition fluctuations which gives information about the pseudo-phase domain size. The second is a Lorentzian that captures the structure of at least one of the coexisting pseudo-phases. No Porod law can be measured in the SAXS domain. The proposed expression gives access to two characteristic sizes as well as one inter-aggregate distance. PMID:27980512

  13. Disordered Cellulose-Based Nanostructures for Enhanced Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth. Cellulose fibers, such as the one extracted form cotton or woodpulp, have been used by humankind for hundreds of years to make textiles and paper. Here we show how, by engineering light–matter interaction, we can optimize light scattering using exclusively cellulose nanocrystals. The produced material is sustainable, biocompatible, and when compared to ordinary microfiber-based paper, it shows enhanced scattering strength (×4), yielding a transport mean free path as low as 3.5 μm in the visible light range. The experimental results are in a good agreement with the theoretical predictions obtained with a diffusive model for light propagation. PMID:28191920

  14. Multiple light scattering and absorption in reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Terán, Emiliano; Méndez, Eugenio R; Enríquez, Susana; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto

    2010-09-20

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the effects of multiple scattering on the optical properties of reef-building corals. For this, we propose a simplified optical model of the coral and describe in some detail methods for characterizing the coral skeleton and the layer containing the symbiotic algae. The model is used to study the absorption of light by the layer of tissue containing the microalgae by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that, through scattering, the skeleton homogenizes and enhances the light environment in which the symbionts live. We also present results that illustrate the modification of the internal light environment when the corals loose symbionts or pigmentation.

  15. Functional Imaging of Tissue Morphology with Polarized Light Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Vadim

    2001-03-01

    We report a new imaging technique to study the morphology of living epithelial cells in vivo. The method is based on light scattering spectroscopy with polarized light (PLSS) and makes it possible to distinguish between single backscattering from epithelial cell nuclei and multiply scattered light. The spectrum of the single backscattering component is further analyzed to provide quantitative histological information about the epithelial cells such as the size distribution, refractive index, and chromatin content of the cell nuclei. The measurement of cell nuclear morphology is crucial for detection and diagnosis of cancerous and precancerous conditions in many human tissues. The method was successfully applied to image precancerous regions of several tissues. Clinical studies in five organs (esophagus, colon, bladder, oral cavity, and uterine cervix) showed the generality and efficacy of the technique.

  16. Probing dynamics at interfaces: resonance enhanced dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Plum, Markus A; Steffen, Werner; Fytas, George; Knoll, Wolfgang; Menges, Bernhard

    2009-06-08

    Experiments addressing supramolecular dynamics at interfaces are of paramount importance for the understanding of the dynamic behaviour of polymers, particles, or cells at interfaces, transport phenomena to and from surfaces, thin films or membranes. However, there are only few reports in the literature due to the paucity of experimental methods that offer the required spatial and time resolution. Evanescent wave dynamic light scattering originally developed to meet these needs has limited sensitivity and is restricted to glass substrates. Here we report the first experimental realization of a dynamic light scattering experiment close to an interface using surface plasmon polaritons as light source offering a strong increase in the signal to noise ratio and allowing for the use of metallic interfaces. As a proof of concept, we consider the diffusion of particles with radii down to 10nm in dilute dispersions close to a gold surface.

  17. A Microbeam Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study on Enamel Crystallites in Subsurface Lesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, N.; Ohta, N.; Matsuo, T.; Tanaka, T.; Terada, Y.; Kamasaka, H.; Kometani, T.

    2010-10-01

    The early caries lesion in bovine tooth enamel was studied by two different X-ray diffraction systems at the SPring-8 third generation synchrotron radiation facility. Both allowed us simultaneous measurement of the small and large angle regions. The beam size was 6μm at BL40XU and 50μm at BL45XU. The small-angle scattering from voids in the hydroxyapatite crystallites and the wide-angle diffraction from the hydroxyapatite crystals were observed simultaneously. At BL40XU an X-ray image intensifier was used for the small-angle and a CMOS flatpanel detector for the large-angle region. At BL45XU, a large-area CCD detector was used to cover both regions. A linear microbeam scan at BL40XU showed a detailed distribution of voids and crystals and made it possible to examine the structural details in the lesion. The two-dimensional scan at BL45XU showed distribution of voids and crystals in a wider region in the enamel. The simultaneous small- and wide-angle measurement with a microbeam is a powerful tool to elucidate the mechanisms of demineralization and remineralization in the early caries lesion.

  18. Propensity of lignin to associate: light scattering photometry study with native lignins.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Sofía; Gaspar, Armindo R; Guerra, Anderson; Lucia, Lucian A; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2008-12-01

    Many studies of lignins in solution invoke association and aggregation phenomena to explain their solution behavior (e.g., reprecipitation onto pulp fibers, condensation, etc.). Following their colloidal (apparent) molecular weights in solution as a function of time allows us to explore observable dissociation phenomena. These measurements were carried out using multiple angle laser light scattering (MALLS) photometry in the static mode. The challenges and opportunities of measuring the specific refractive index increment (dn/dC) of lignin solutions and determining the kinetics of the dissociation process were thus investigated. Hardwood and softwood representative lignins were isolated, and method for their full dissolution in THF was further developed, which then lead to accurate dn/dC values being obtained as a function of time. When coupled to additional work using light scattering static measurements and Zimm plots for the same solutions, this effort offers insight into the aggregation and ensuing dissociative events that operate within the lignin macromolecules.

  19. T-matrix computations of light scattering by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, A M; Alsholm, P; Karlsson, A; Andersson-Engels, S

    1998-05-01

    The electromagnetic far field, as well as the near field, originating from light interaction with a red blood cell (RBC)volume-equivalent spheroid, was analyzed by utilizing theT-matrix theory. This method is a powerful tool thatmakes it possible to study the influence of cell shape on the angulardistribution of scattered light. General observations were that thethree-dimensional shape, as well as the optical thickness apparent tothe incident field, affects the forward scattering. Thebackscattering was influenced by the shape of the surface facing theincident beam. Furthermore sphering as well as elongation of anoblate RBC into a volume-equivalent sphere or a prolate spheroid, respectively, was theoretically modeled to imitate physiologicalphenomena caused, e.g., by heat or the increased shear stress offlowing blood. Both sphering and elongation were shown to decreasethe intensity of the forward-directed scattering, thus yielding lowerg factors. The sphering made the scattering patternindependent of azimuthal scattering angle phi(s), whereas the elongation induced more apparent phi(s)-dependent patterns. The lightscattering by a RBC volume-equivalent spheroid was thus found to behighly influenced by the shape of the scattering object. Anear-field radius r(nf) was evaluated as thedistance to which the maximum intensity of the total near field haddecreased to 2.5 times that of the incident field. It was estimatedto 2-24.5 times the maximum radius of the scattering spheroid, corresponding to 12-69 mum. Because the near-field radiuswas shown to be larger than a simple estimation of the distance betweenthe RBC's in whole blood, the assumption of independent scattering, frequently employed in optical measurements on whole blood, seemsinappropriate. This also indicates that one cannot extrapolate theresults obtained from diluted blood to whole blood by multiplying witha simple concentration factor.

  20. Nonuniformity in natural rubber as revealed by small-angle neutron scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karino, Takeshi; Ikeda, Yuko; Yasuda, Yoritaka; Kohjiya, Shinzo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2007-02-01

    The microscopic structures of natural rubber (NR) and deproteinized NR (DPNR) were investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). They were compared to those of isoprene rubber (IR), which is a synthetic analogue of NR in terms of chemical structure without any non-rubber components like proteins. Comparisons of the structure and mechanical properties of NR, DPNR, and IR lead to the following conclusions. (i) The well-known facts, for example, the outstanding green strength of NR and strain-induced crystallization, are due not much to the presence of proteins but to other components such as the presence of phospholipids and/or the higher stereoregularity of NR. It also became clear the naturally residing proteins accelerate the upturn of stress at low strain. The protein phases work as cross-linking sites and reinforcing fillers in the rubbery matrix. (ii) The microscopic structures of NR were successfully reproduced by SANS intensity functions consisting of squared-Lorentz and Lorentz functions, indicating the presence of inhomogeneities in bulk and thermal concentration fluctuations in swollen state, respectively. On the other hand, IR rubbers were homogeneous in bulk. (iii) The inhomogeneities in NR are assigned to protein aggregates of the order of 200 A or larger. Although these aggregates are larger in size as well as in volume fraction than those of cross-link inhomogeneities introduced by cross-linking, they are removed by deproteinization. (iv) Swelling of both NR and IR networks introduces gel-like concentration fluctuations whose mesh size is of the order of 20 A.

  1. Shape-dependent light scattering properties of subwavelength silicon nanoblocks.

    PubMed

    Ee, Ho-Seok; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L; Seo, Min-Kyo

    2015-03-11

    We explore the shape-dependent light scattering properties of silicon (Si) nanoblocks and their physical origin. These high-refractive-index nanostructures are easily fabricated using planar fabrication technologies and support strong, leaky-mode resonances that enable light manipulation beyond the optical diffraction limit. Dark-field microscopy and a numerical modal analysis show that the nanoblocks can be viewed as truncated Si waveguides, and the waveguide dispersion strongly controls the resonant properties. This explains why the lowest-order transverse magnetic (TM01) mode resonance can be widely tuned over the entire visible wavelength range depending on the nanoblock length, whereas the wavelength-scale TM11 mode resonance does not change greatly. For sufficiently short lengths, the TM01 and TM11 modes can be made to spectrally overlap, and a substantial scattering efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of the scattering cross section to the physical cross section of the nanoblock, of ∼9.95, approaching the theoretical lowest-order single-channel scattering limit, is achievable. Control over the subwavelength-scale leaky-mode resonance allows Si nanoblocks to generate vivid structural color, manipulate forward and backward scattering, and act as excellent photonic artificial atoms for metasurfaces.

  2. A Theoretical Light Scattering Model of Nanoparticle Laser Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Accomplishments this reporting period include: 1. derived, programmed, checked, and tested the Mie light scattering theory formulas for the radiation trapping force for both the on-axis and off-axis geometry of the trapping beam plus trapped spherical particle; 2. verified that the computed radiation trapping force for a freely propagating focused Gaussian laser beam incident on a spherical particle agrees with previous published calculations; 3. compared the small particle size and large particle size limits of the Mie calculation with the results of Rayleigh scattering theory and ray scattering theory, respectively and verified that the comparison is correct for Rayleigh scattering theory but found that ray theory omits an important light scattering effect included in the Mie theory treatment; 4. generalized the calculation of the radiation trapping force on a spherical particle in the on-axis geometry from a freely propagating focused Gaussian laser beam to the realistic situation of a Gaussian beam truncated and focused by a high numerical aperture oil-immersion microscope objective lens and aberrated by the interface between the microscope cover slip and the liquid-filled sample volume; and 5. compared the calculated radiation trapping force for this geometry with the results of previously published experiments and found that the agreement is better than when using previously developed theories.

  3. Surface texture characterization by angular distributions of scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilsinn, D. E.; Vorburger, T. V.; Scire, F. E.; Teague, E. C.; Mclay, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Work at the National Bureau of Standards to develop an on-line optical measurement device and attendant algorithms for automated optical scattering measurements of machined metal surfaces are described. The surfaces could be milled, ground or lapped, and the system is intended to categorize the resulting surface characteristics. The optical device consists of a He-Ne laser which is shone on a surface. The scattered light is captured by a semicircular array of 87 detector elements rotated over the scanned area. The light signals are processed through a digital voltmeter and then an A/D converter. The signals are then stored for later comparisons with optical scattering data obtained by optical instruments used with stylus instruments for characterizing surface topographies. A theoretical model has been defined which relates light scattering and the characteristics of the surface roughness. Initial experimental results with a sinusoidal surface have indicated that although the system can follow the trend of the roughness, the roughness amplitude is as yet uncertainly defined and the computations require excessive time.

  4. Scattering of light by polydisperse, randomly oriented, finite circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, M I; Travis, L D; Macke, A

    1996-08-20

    We use the T-matrix method, as described by Mishchenko [Appl. Opt. 32, 4652 (1993)], to compute rigorously light scattering by finite circular cylinders in random orientation. First we discuss numerical aspects of T -matrix computations specific for finite cylinders and present results of benchmark computations for a simple cylinder model. Then we report results of extensive computations for polydisperse, randomly oriented cylinders with a refractive index of 1.53 + 0.008i, diameter-to-length ratios of 1/2, 1/1.4, 1, 1.4, and 2, and effective size parameters ranging from 0 to 25. These computations parallel our recent study of light scattering by polydisperse, randomly oriented spheroids and are used to compare scattering properties of the two classes of simple convex particles. Despite the significant difference in shape between the two particle types (entirely smooth surface for spheroids and sharp rectangular edges for cylinders), the comparison shows rather small differences in the integral photometric characteristics (total optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter of the phase function) and the phase function. The general patterns of the other elements of the scattering matrix for cylinders and aspect-ratio-equivalent spheroids are also qualitatively similar, although noticeable quantitative differences can be found in some particular cases. In general, cylinders demonstrate much less shape dependence of the elements of the scattering matrix than do spheroids. Our computations show that, like spheroids and bispheres, cylinders with surface-equivalent radii smaller than a wavelength can strongly depolarize backscattered light, thus suggesting that backscattering depolarization for nonspherical particles cannot be universally explained by using only geometric-optics considerations.

  5. Free-form thin lens design with light scattering surfaces for practical LED down light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Raychiy J.; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2016-05-01

    The free-form optical quasilens surface technology was utilized to develop and design a solid transparent plastic optical lens for the LED down light with the narrow angular light distribution requirement in the LED lighting applications. In order to successfully complete the mission, the precise mid-field angular distribution model of the LED light source was established and built. And also the optical scattering surface property of the Harvey BSDF scattering model was designed, measured, and established. Then, the optical simulation for the entire optical system was performed to develop and design this solid transparent plastic optical lens system. Finally, the goals of 40 deg angular light distribution pattern defined at full width half maximum with glare reduced in the areas of interest and the optical performance of nearly 82% light energy transmission optics were achieved for the LED down light illumination.

  6. Using neural networks for dynamic light scattering time series processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicea, Dan

    2017-04-01

    A basic experiment to record dynamic light scattering (DLS) time series was assembled using basic components. The DLS time series processing using the Lorentzian function fit was considered as reference. A Neural Network was designed and trained using simulated frequency spectra for spherical particles in the range 0–350 nm, assumed to be scattering centers, and the neural network design and training procedure are described in detail. The neural network output accuracy was tested both on simulated and on experimental time series. The match with the DLS results, considered as reference, was good serving as a proof of concept for using neural networks in fast DLS time series processing.

  7. RBC aggregation effects on light scattering from blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, Leonid D.; Fine, Ilya

    2000-11-01

    We consider a number of diffusive and transport models of light transmission through whole blood, targeting better understanding of nature of optical transmission pulsations for blood flow modulated by heartbeats. We claim the existence of scattering- associated mechanism rather than the absorption-associated one. Single erythrocytes and their aggregates are considered to be the main centers of scattering in the red- near infrared spectral region. The shape and size of aggregates change in time due to blood flow changes. The corresponding changes of optical transmission are simulated.

  8. Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies of biological macromolecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Boldon, Lauren; Urquhart, Melissa; Wang, Xiangyu

    2013-01-08

    In this paper, Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) analysis of macromolecules is demonstrated through experimentation. SWAXS is a technique where X-rays are elastically scattered by an inhomogeneous sample in the nm-range at small angles (typically 0.1 - 5°) and wide angles (typically > 5°). This technique provides information about the shape, size, and distribution of macromolecules, characteristic distances of partially ordered materials, pore sizes, and surface-to-volume ratio. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is capable of delivering structural information of macromolecules between 1 and 200 nm, whereas Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) can resolve even smaller Bragg spacing of samples between 0.33 nm and 0.49 nm based on the specific system setup and detector. The spacing is determined from Bragg's law and is dependent on the wavelength and incident angle. In a SWAXS experiment, the materials can be solid or liquid and may contain solid, liquid or gaseous domains (so-called particles) of the same or another material in any combination. SWAXS applications are very broad and include colloids of all types: metals, composites, cement, oil, polymers, plastics, proteins, foods, and pharmaceuticals. For solid samples, the thickness is limited to approximately 5 mm. Usage of a lab-based SWAXS instrument is detailed in this paper. With the available software (e.g., GNOM-ATSAS 2.3 package by D. Svergun EMBL-Hamburg and EasySWAXS software) for the SWAXS system, an experiment can be conducted to determine certain parameters of interest for the given sample. One example of a biological macromolecule experiment is the analysis of 2 wt% lysozyme in a water-based aqueous buffer which can be chosen and prepared through numerous methods. The preparation of the sample follows the guidelines below in the Preparation of the Sample section. Through SWAXS experimentation, important structural parameters of lysozyme, e.g. the radius of gyration, can be analyzed.

  9. Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    The flux level of outer-zone relativistic electrons (above 1 MeV) is extremely variable during geomagnetic storms, and controlled by a competition between acceleration and loss. Precipitation of these electrons due to resonant pitch-angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is considered one of the major loss mechanisms. This mechanism was suggested in early theoretical studies more than three decades ago. However, direct experimental evidence of the wave role in relativistic electrons precipitation is difficult to obtain because of lack of concurrent measurements of precipitating electrons at low altitudes and the waves in a magnetically conjugate equatorial region. Recently, the data from balloon-borne X-ray instruments provided indirect but strong evidence on an efficiency of the EMIC wave induced loss for the outer-zone relativistic electrons. These observations stimulated theoretical studies that, particularly, demonstrated that EMIC wave induced pitch-angle diffusion of MeV electrons can operate in the strong diffusion limit and this mechanism can compete with relativistic electron depletion caused by the Dst effect during the initial and main phases of storm. Although an effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves depends strongly on the wave spectral properties, the most favorable assumptions regarding wave characteristics has been made in all previous theoretical studies. Particularly, only quasi field-aligned EMIC waves have been considered as a driver for relativistic electron loss. At the same time, there is growing experimental and theoretical evidence that these waves can be highly oblique; EMIC wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e. the region of small wave normal angles, but also the entire wave normal angle region, and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter can dramatically change he effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves. In the present study, we

  10. Propagating light through a scattering medium with specific amplitude and phase (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Snow H.; Kung, Te-Jen; Yu, Min-Lun

    2016-03-01

    By means of numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations, we model the complex light scattering phenomenon. Light propagation through scattering medium is a deterministic process; with specific amplitude and phase, light can propagate to the target position via multiple scattering. By means of numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations, the complex light scattering phenomenon can be accurately analyzed. The reported simulation enables qualitative and quantitative analyses of the effectiveness of directing light through turbid media to a targeted position

  11. Low Angle X-Ray Scattering Of Chloroplast With CKa Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, Hasko H.

    1982-10-01

    The operational range of low angle x-ray scattering was extended to particles and structures of about 1 to 2µm by using CKa radiation with a wavelength of 44.7 A . For particles of about 1µm in diameter, the central scattering was not observed accurately with characteristic x rays such as CuKa. The size, shape, and hydration of chloroplasts have been measured by using low angle soft x-ray scattering with CKa radia-tion, emitted from a high power x-ray tube and from synchrotron radiation. Chloroplasts were found to have a radius of gyration of 2.15 +/- 0.5 um, corresponding to a particle diameter of 5.8 +/- 0.2 µm. The volume was calculated from Porod's invariant and was found to be 41.0 +/- 12.0 ttm3. Absolute measurements were performed directly, without weakening the primary beam, permitting the calculations of the mass of a chloroplast. The mass of the chloroplast was found to be 40.0 +/- 0.07 pg, containing 0.45 pg H20/pg chloroplast. The maximum enlargement of the chloroplast particle was determined from the pair distribution function and was found to be 5.8 +/- 0.2 Am. The central scattering for the chloroplast with a diameter of 6.0 um was observed within 20' of the scattering angle with CKa radiation. The origin of the difference from the nominal value in the Guinier region can be ascribed to the effect of interparticle interference when changing the density of the solvent to 10% glycerol. It should be pointed out that the use of this radiation and a synchrotron source enables us to obtain scattering of particles of Am size, almost free from the influence of the direct beam and parasitic scattering. Furthermore, by recording the intensity autocorrelation function, from which the weight average and number averaged radii of gyration, size, and size distribution can be obtained, we are enabled to study the relative dispersion from dilute particle dispersion within 0.01 arcsec and the physicochemical changes of whole cells and organelles with respect to

  12. Low Angle X-Ray Scattering Of Chloroplast With CK α-Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, Hasko H.

    1982-03-01

    The operational range of low angle X-ray scattering was extended to particles and structures of about 1-2 μm by using CKα-radiation with a wavelength of 44.7 Å. For particles of about 1 μm in diameter, the central scattering was not observed accurately with characteristic X-rays such as CuKα. The size, shape and hydration of chloroplast have been measured by using low angle soft X-ray scattering with CKα-radiation, emitted from a high power X-ray tube and from synchrotron radiation. Chloroplasts were found to have a radius of gyration of 2.15 ± 0.5 μm, corresponding to a particle diameter of 5.8 ± 0.2 μm. The volume was calculated from Porod's invariant and was found to be 41.0 ± 12.0 μm3. Absolute measurements were performed directly, without weakening the primary beam, permitting the calculation of the mass of a chloroplast. The mass of the chloroplast was found to be 40.0 ± 0.07 pg, containing 0.45 pg H20/pg chloroplast. The maximum enlargement of the chloroplast particle was determined from the pair distribution function and was found to be 5.8 ± 0.2 pm. The central scattering for the chloroplast with a diameter of 6.0 μm was observed with-in 20' of the scattering angle with CKα-radiation. The origin of the difference from the nominal value in the Guinier region can be ascribed to the effect of interparticle interference when changing the density of the solvent to 10% glycerol. It should be pointed out that the use of this radiation and a synchrotron source enables us to obtain scattering of particles of μm size, almost free from the influence of the direct beam and parasitic scattering. Furthermore, by recording the intensity autocorrelation function, from which the weight average and number averaged radii of gyration, size and size distribution can be obtained, we are enabled to study the relative dispersion from dilute particle dispersion within 0.01 arcsec and the physico-chemical changes of whole cells and organelles with respect to aging

  13. Interaction between surfactants and colloidal latexes in nonpolar solvents studied using contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory N; Alexander, Shirin; Brown, Paul; Gillespie, David A J; Grillo, Isabelle; Heenan, Richard K; James, Craig; Kemp, Roger; Rogers, Sarah E; Eastoe, Julian

    2014-04-01

    The interaction between deuterium-labeled Aerosol OT surfactant (AOT-d34) and sterically stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) latex particles dispersed in nonpolar solvents has been studied using contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (CV-SANS). The electrophoretic mobilities (μ) of the latexes have been measured by phase-analysis light scattering, indicating that μ is negative. Two analogues of the stabilizers for the particles have been studied as free polymers in the absence of PMMA latexes: poly(12-hydroxystearic acid) (PHSA) polyester and poly(methyl methacrylate)-graft-poly(12-hydroxystearic acid) (PMMA-graft-PHSA) stabilizer copolymer. The scattering from both PHSA in dodecane and PMMA-graft-PHSA in toluene is consistent with extended polymer chains in good solvents. In dodecane, PMMA-graft-PHSA forms polymer micelles, and SANS is consistent with ellipsoidal aggregates formed of around 50 polymer chains. CV-SANS measurements were performed by measuring SANS from systems of PHSA, PMMA-graft-PHSA, and PMMA latexes with 10 and 100 mM surfactant solutions of AOT-d34 in both polymer/particle and AOT contrast-matched solvent. No excess scattering above the polymer or surfactant was found for PHSA in dodecane or PMMA-graft-PHSA in dodecane and toluene. This indicates that AOT does not significantly interact with the free polymers. Excess scattering was observed for systems with AOT-d34 and PMMA latexes dispersed in particle contrast-matched dodecane, consistent with the penetration of AOT into the PMMA latexes. This indicates that AOT does not interact preferentially with the stabilizing layers but, rather, is present throughout the colloids. Previous research ( Langmuir 2010, 26, 6967-6976 ) suggests that AOT surfactant is located in the latex PHSA-stabilizer layer, but all the results in this study are consistent with AOT poorly interacting with alkyl-stabilizer polymers.

  14. Light scattering from impurity enhanced liquid layers in polycrystalline ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, E. S.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Wilen, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Impurity enhanced grain boundary premelting underlies a wide range of geophysical phenomena throughout the cryosphere. In particular, it is known that when water droplets freeze in the atmosphere they are highly polycrystalline and impurities are rejected into grain boundaries. The predicted character and sensitivity of grain boundaries to impurities close to the melting point precludes the use of standard techniques for imaging the interface. Unlike their larger more macroscopic relatives such as veins (3 grain intersections) and nodes (4 grain intersections), grain boundaries do not submit to optical microscopy. However, using an experimental light scattering method grain boundary changes can be measured as a function of thermodynamic variables. Accurate analysis of the light scattering data generated using this method requires a full theory of light propagation through the grain boundary layer straddled by ice crystals. Here we present a theory for light scattering from such a boundary, experimental data using NaCl as a dopant, and dicsuss atmospheric implications from the troposphere to the stratosphere.

  15. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  16. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  17. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering study of the NIST mAb reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Liu, Yun; Krueger, Susan; Curtis, Joseph

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of great interest to the biopharmaceutical industry because they can be engineered to target specific antigens. Due to their importance, the biomanufacturing initiative at NIST is developing an IgG1 mAb reference material `NIST mAb', which can be used by industry, academia, and regulatory authorities. As part of this collaborative effort, we aim at characterizing the reference material using neutron scattering techniques. We have studied the small-angle scattering profile of the NIST mAb in a histidine buffer at 0 and 150 mM NaCl. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate an ensemble of structures and calculate their theoretical scattering profile, which can be directly compared with experimental data. Moreover, we analyze the structure factor to understand the effect of solution conditions on the protein-protein interactions. Finally, we have measured the solution scattering of the NIST mAb, while simultaneously performing freeze/thaw cycles, in order to investigate if the solution structure was affected upon freezing. The results from neutron scattering not only support the development of the reference material, but also provide insights on its stability and guide efforts for its development under different formulations.

  18. Small angle x-ray scattering study of the porosity in coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P. W.; Kalliat, M.; Kwak, C. Y.

    1981-02-01

    Small-angle scattering curves have bee obtained for some Pennsylvania State University PSOC coal samples and for several other coals. The x-ray scattering data provide information about the porosity in the coals and suggest that there are three classes of pores, which have average dimensions of the order of 1000 A˚, 30 A˚, and less than 5 A˚, corresponding to the macropores, transition pores and micropores discussed by Dubinin. The principal factor determining the form of the scattering curves has been found to be the rank of the coal. In coals of all ranks, the specific surface associated with the macropores is about 1 to 10 m2/gm. The micropores are most highly developed in high-rank coals. Comparison of the x-ray and adsorption results suggests that x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption detect only the specific surface of the macropores and transition pores, while carbon dioxide adsorption measures the total porosity from the micropores. Scattering data have also been recorded for a series of coals which had been tested for their suitability for conversion to liquid fuels. All the coals which were well-suited for producing liquid fuels were found to have a well-developed transition pore structure, while coals which were not especially good for coal liquefaction processes had almost no transition pores.

  19. A Laboratory Scale Critical-Dimension Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Derek L.; Wang Chengqing; Lin, Eric K.; Jones, Ronald L.; Wu Wenli

    2007-09-26

    New methods for critical dimension (CD) measurements may be needed to enable the detailed characterization of nanoscale structures produced in the semiconductor industry and for nanotechnology applications. In earlier work, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements with synchrotron sources have shown promise in meeting several grand challenges for CD metrology. However, it is not practical to depend upon x-ray synchrotron sources, which are large national facilities with limitations in the number of available instruments. To address this problem, a laboratory scale SAXS instrument for critical dimension measurements on periodic nanoscale patterns has been designed, installed, and tested. The system possesses two configurations, SAXS and ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), with a radiation target of either copper or molybdenum. With these configurations, the instrument is capable of accessing scattering angles that probe length scales ranging from ca. 0.5 nm to 2 {mu}m. In this work, we compare CD-SAXS measurements taken from a synchrotron-based SAXS at the Advanced Photon Source of the Argonne National Laboratory with those from the National Institute of Standards and Technology laboratory-scale SAXS instrument. The results from standard line/space gratings possessing periodic line-space patterns with CDs of tens to hundreds of nanometers show that the laboratory-scale system can quantitatively measure parameters, such as the pitch, line width, height, line-width roughness and sidewall angle. These results show that laboratory-scale measurements are feasible and can be used for research and development purposes or to assist calibration of optical scatterometry and CD-scanning electron microscopy instruments. The primary limitation of the measurement is that the data collection rate is unacceptably slow for production metrology because of the significantly lower x-ray beam fluxes currently available.

  20. Simulations of light-light scattering in quantum vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Grismayer, Thomas; Silva, LuíS.; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Facilities such as the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) or the VULCAN 20 PW project, as well as the Petta-Watt SLAC project, coupled with the x-ray LCLSII source will allow to perform the first experiments on the probing of quantum vacuum. In our work, we developed a numerical method to self-consistently solve the nonlinear system of Maxwell's equations including quantum corrections of vacuum polarization. The robustness of our algorithm allied to the ability to integrate this tool within a particle-in-cell (PIC) method, represents an important milestone in modeling future planned experiments to prove the existence of the quantum vacuum. Such experiments aim to measure the induced ellipticity on a x-ray pulse after probing a strong optical pump due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. We present simulation results of both the ellipticity induced and polarization rotation, using realistic laser parameters of the Petta-Watt SLAC project, and the x-ray LCLSII source, whilst taking into account all finite-size multi-dimensional effects. We show how the ellipticity induced varies as a function of the distance to the axis of the beam, proving the importance of taking into account finite-size effects. This work serves as an important tool to complement existing efforts within the community to probe the effects of the quantum vacuum, in the strong field regime, for the first time.

  1. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; Parish, C. M.; Plummer, L. K.

    2015-02-13

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor will be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.

  2. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; ...

    2015-02-13

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distributionmore » of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor will be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.« less

  3. Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering: Powerful Tools for Studying the Structure of Drug-Loaded Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Di Cola, Emanuela; Grillo, Isabelle; Ristori, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nanovectors, such as liposomes, micelles and lipid nanoparticles, are recognized as efficient platforms for delivering therapeutic agents, especially those with low solubility in water. Besides being safe and non-toxic, drug carriers with improved performance should meet the requirements of (i) appropriate size and shape and (ii) cargo upload/release with unmodified properties. Structural issues are of primary importance to control the mechanism of action of loaded vectors. Overall properties, such as mean diameter and surface charge, can be obtained using bench instruments (Dynamic Light Scattering and Zeta potential). However, techniques with higher space and time resolution are needed for in-depth structural characterization. Small-angle X-ray (SAXS) and neutron (SANS) scattering techniques provide information at the nanoscale and have therefore been largely used to investigate nanovectors loaded with drugs or other biologically relevant molecules. Here we revise recent applications of these complementary scattering techniques in the field of drug delivery in pharmaceutics and medicine with a focus to liposomal carriers. In particular, we highlight those aspects that can be more commonly accessed by the interested users. PMID:27043614

  4. Orientation-preserving transfer and directional light scattering from individual light-bending nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Barhoumi, Aoune; Lassiter, J Britt; Halas, Naomi J

    2011-04-13

    A nanocup, or semishell, is an asymmetric plasmonic "Janus" nanoparticle with electric and magnetic plasmon modes; the latter scatters light in a direction controlled by nanoparticle orientation, making it the nanoscale analog of a parabolic antenna. Here we report a method for transferring nanocups from their growth substrate to oxide-terminated substrates that precisely preserves their three-dimensional orientation, enabling their use as nanophotonic components. This enables us to selectively excite and probe the electric and magnetic plasmon modes of individual nanocups, showing how the scattered light depends on the direction of incoming light and the orientation of this nanoparticle antenna.

  5. Orientation-Preserving Transfer and Directional Light Scattering from Individual Light-Bending Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Barhoumi, Aoune; Lassiter, J. Britt; Halas, Naomi J.

    2011-04-13

    A nanocup, or semishell, is an asymmetric plasmonic “Janus” nanoparticle with electric and magnetic plasmon modes; the latter scatters light in a direction controlled by nanoparticle orientation, making it the nanoscale analog of a parabolic antenna. Here we report a method for transferring nanocups from their growth substrate to oxide-terminated substrates that precisely preserves their three-dimensional orientation, enabling their use as nanophotonic components. This enables us to selectively excite and probe the electric and magnetic plasmon modes of individual nanocups, showing how the scattered light depends on the direction of incoming light and the orientation of this nanoparticle antenna.

  6. A new approach to quantification of metamorphism using ultra-small and small angle neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Lynn, Gary W; Cole, David R

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we report the results of a study using small angle and ultra-small angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS and USANS) to examine the evolution of carbonates during contact metamorphism. Data were obtained from samples collected along two transects in the metamorphosed Hueco limestone at the Marble Canyon, Texas, contact aureole. These samples were collected from the igneous contact out to {approx}1700 m. Scattering curves obtained from these samples show mass fractal behavior at low scattering vectors, and surface fractal behavior at high scattering vectors. Significant changes are observed in the surface and mass fractal dimensions as well as the correlation lengths (pore and grain sizes), surface area to volume ratio and surface Gibbs Free energy as a function of distance, including regions of the aureole outside the range of classic metamorphic petrology. A change from mass-fractal to non-fractal behavior is observed at larger scales near the outer boundary of the aureole that implies significant reorganization of pore distributions early in the metamorphic history. Surface fractal results suggest significant smoothing of grain boundaries, coupled with changes in pore sizes. A section of the scattering curve with a slope less than -4 appears at low-Q in metamorphosed samples, which is not present in unmetamorphosed samples. A strong spike in the surface area to volume ratio is observed in rocks near the mapped metamorphic limit, which is associated with reaction of small amounts of organic material to graphite. It may also represent an increase in pore volume or permeability, suggesting that a high permeability zone forms at the boundary of the aureole and moves outwards as metamorphism progresses. Neutron scattering data also correlate well with transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations, which show formation of micro- and nanopores and microfractures during metamorphism. The scattering data are, however, quantifiable for a bulk rock

  7. Paper area density measurement from forward transmitted scattered light

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.

    2001-01-01

    A method whereby the average paper fiber area density (weight per unit area) can be directly calculated from the intensity of transmitted, scattered light at two different wavelengths, one being a non-absorpted wavelength. Also, the method makes it possible to derive the water percentage per fiber area density from a two-wavelength measurement. In the optical measuring technique optical transmitted intensity, for example, at 2.1 microns cellulose absorption line is measured and compared with another scattered, optical transmitted intensity reference in the nearby spectrum region, such as 1.68 microns, where there is no absorption. From the ratio of these two intensities, one can calculate the scattering absorption coefficient at 2.1 microns. This absorption coefficient at this wavelength is, then, experimentally correlated to the paper fiber area density. The water percentage per fiber area density can be derived from this two-wavelength measurement approach.

  8. A recursive regularization algorithm for estimating the particle size distribution from multiangle dynamic light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Wei; Wang, Wanyan; Guo, Wenping; Xia, Min

    2016-07-01

    Conventional regularization methods have been widely used for estimating particle size distribution (PSD) in single-angle dynamic light scattering, but they could not be used directly in multiangle dynamic light scattering (MDLS) measurements for lack of accurate angular weighting coefficients, which greatly affects the PSD determination and none of the regularization methods perform well for both unimodal and multimodal distributions. In this paper, we propose a recursive regularization method-Recursion Nonnegative Tikhonov-Phillips-Twomey (RNNT-PT) algorithm for estimating the weighting coefficients and PSD from MDLS data. This is a self-adaptive algorithm which distinguishes characteristics of PSDs and chooses the optimal inversion method from Nonnegative Tikhonov (NNT) and Nonnegative Phillips-Twomey (NNPT) regularization algorithm efficiently and automatically. In simulations, the proposed algorithm was able to estimate the PSDs more accurately than the classical regularization methods and performed stably against random noise and adaptable to both unimodal and multimodal distributions. Furthermore, we found that the six-angle analysis in the 30-130° range is an optimal angle set for both unimodal and multimodal PSDs.

  9. Light scattering from acoustic vibrational modes in confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandhu, Rudra Shyam

    The acoustic vibrational modes and their light scattering intensities in confined structures such as supported films, double layer free-standing membrane and sub-micron sized wires on a free-standing membrane have been studied using Brillouin Light Scattering (BLS). Standing wave type acoustic phonons were recently observed in supported thin films of silicon oxy-nitride. We build upon this finding to study the acoustic modes in thin zinc selenide (ZnSe) films on gallium arsenide (GaAs). The surprising behaviour of the Brillouin intensities of the standing wave modes in ZnSe are explained in terms of interference of the elasto-optic scattering amplitudes from the film and substrate. Numerical calculations of the scattering cross-section, which takes into account ripple and elasto-optic scattering mechanism, agrees well with the experimental data. Light scattering studies of standing wave type modes in free-standing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) layer on Si3N4 were carried out. In these bilayer structures PMMA is much softer than Si3N 4, a property that leads to confinement of low frequency modes associated with the PMMA layer to within its boundaries. In addition, the flexural and the dilatational modes from the Si3N4 layer are observed and are found to hybridize with the standing wave modes from the PMMA layer. Our study of phonon modes in PMMA wires supported on a free-standing Si3N4 membrane extends our work on free-standing double layer membranes. In recent years there is much interest in the study of phonon modes in nano-scale structures such as wires or dots. Although much theoretical work has been carried out in this direction, no experiments exist that explore the dispersion of the phonon modes in such structures. Brillouin Light scattering is ideally suited for studying phonons in such reduced dimensions and our work represents the first effort in this direction. The spectra reveal modes which are quantized both along the width, as well along the thickness

  10. Cylindrical light pipes for collecting light scattered from a Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, George W.; Simons, Tad D.

    1999-10-01

    An investigation to enhance the efficiency of Raman- scattered light showed that cylindrical light pipes can significantly increase light collection from a Gaussian beam. Further, the enhanced signal from the light pipe retains the image of the laser beam, permitting the use of smaller detectors and resulting in a favorable signal-to- noise ratios. This investigation focussed on real-time measurements of gaseous media in a laser buildup cavity; however, the imaging properties of the light pipe apply to all measurements of molecular scattering. The light pipe matched the constraints of our measurement system: spectral separation and detection with an optical spectrograph, the need to reduce background light, the need to minimize cost, and stimulation by a laser beam in an optical cavity. After initial experiments collecting light from the ends of light pipes, we developed light pipes with a window on the cylindrical surface. Light emitted from these windows is much more intense than the direct image of the laser beam (typically 10X for light pipes 50 - 100 mm long), and the signal retains the image of the beam. Computer ray tracing modeled this side collection using Monte Carlo techniques, which are discussed in detail. We fabricated and tested light pipes using several different coatings.

  11. Early aggregation preceding the nucleation of insulin amyloid fibrils as monitored by small angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Chatani, Eri; Inoue, Rintaro; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Kato, Minoru; Yamamoto, Masahide; Nishida, Koji; Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation event of amyloid fibrils is one of the most crucial processes that dictate the timing and rate of the pathology of diseases; however, information regarding how protein molecules associate to produce fibril nuclei is currently limited. In order to explore this issue in more detail, we performed time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements on insulin fibrillation, in combination with additional multidirectional analyses of thioflavin T fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, light scattering, and light transmittance, during the fibrillation process of bovine insulin. SAXS monitoring revealed that insulin molecules associated into rod-like prefibrillar aggregates in the very early stage of the reaction. After the formation of these early aggregates, they appeared to further coalesce mutually to form larger clusters, and the SAXS profiles subsequently showed the further time evolution of conformational development towards mature amyloid fibrils. Distinct types of structural units in terms of shape in a nano-scale order, cross-β content, and thioflavin T fluorescence intensity were observed in a manner that was dependent on the fibrillation pathways. These results suggest the presence of diverse substructures that characterize various fibrillation pathways, and eventually, manifest polymorphisms in mature amyloid fibrils. PMID:26503463

  12. SASfit: a tool for small-angle scattering data analysis using a library of analytical expressions

    PubMed Central

    Breßler, Ingo; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Thünemann, Andreas F.

    2015-01-01

    SASfit is one of the mature programs for small-angle scattering data analysis and has been available for many years. This article describes the basic data processing and analysis workflow along with recent developments in the SASfit program package (version 0.94.6). They include (i) advanced algorithms for reduction of oversampled data sets, (ii) improved confidence assessment in the optimized model parameters and (iii) a flexible plug-in system for custom user-provided models. A scattering function of a mass fractal model of branched polymers in solution is provided as an example for implementing a plug-in. The new SASfit release is available for major platforms such as Windows, Linux and MacOS. To facilitate usage, it includes comprehensive indexed documentation as well as a web-based wiki for peer collaboration and online videos demonstrating basic usage. The use of SASfit is illustrated by interpretation of the small-angle X-ray scattering curves of monomodal gold nanoparticles (NIST reference material 8011) and bimodal silica nanoparticles (EU reference material ERM-FD-102). PMID:26500467

  13. Structural analysis of Fe–Mn–O nanoparticles in glass ceramics by small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Harizanova, Ruzha; Tatchev, Dragomir; Hoell, Armin; Rüssel, Christian

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic nanocrystals containing Fe and Mn were obtained by annealing of silicate glasses with the composition 13.6Na{sub 2}O–62.9SiO{sub 2}–8.5MnO–15.0Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3−x} (mol%) at 580 °C for different periods of time. Here, we present Small Angle Neutron Scattering using Polarized neutrons (SANSPOL) and Anomalous Small Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS) investigation on these glass ceramic samples. Analysis of scattering data from both methods reveals the formation of spherical core–shell type of nanoparticles with mean sizes between 10 nm and 100 nm. ASAXS investigation shows the particles have higher concentration of iron atoms and the shell like region surrounding the particles is enriched in SiO{sub 2}. SANSPOL investigation shows the particles are found to be magnetic and are surrounded by a non-magnetic shell-like region. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic spherical core–shell nanoparticles in glass ceramics: SANSPOL and ASAXS investigations. - Highlights: • Formation and growth mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles in silicate glass. • SANSPOL and ASAXS methods employed to evaluate quantitative information. • Analyses showed formation of nanoparticles with spherical core–shell structures. • Core of the particle is magnetic and surrounded by weak magnetic shell like region.

  14. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegun, A. K.; Takatsu, J.; Nakaji, T.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Koffeman, E. N.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, should be minimized from 3-5% or higher to less than 1%, to make the treatment plan with proton beams more accurate, and thereby better treatment for the patient. With Geant4 we simulated a proton radiography detection system with two position-sensitive and residual energy detectors. A complex phantom filled with various materials (including tissue surrogates), was placed between the position sensitive detectors. The phantom was irradiated with 150 MeV protons and the energy loss radiograph and scattering angles were studied. Protons passing through different materials in the phantom lose energy, which was used to create a radiography image of the phantom. The multiple Coulomb scattering of a proton traversing different materials causes blurring of the image. To improve image quality and material identification in the phantom, we selected protons with small scattering angles. A good quality proton radiography image, in which various materials can be recognized accurately, and in combination with xCT can lead to more accurate relative stopping powers predictions.

  15. Screen anticancer drug in vitro using resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanguang; Liu, Guoliang; Chen, Meizhen; Xu, Benjie; Peng, Yurui; Chen, Maohuai; Wu, Mingyao

    2009-02-15

    An in vitro screening model using resonance light scattering (RLS) technique with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reagent as the reactive probe to target cancer cell was firstly developed. In this model, MTT was reduced by viable cancer cells to produce a purple formazan. Cell viability was proportional to the number of formazan induced strong light scattering signal. The inhibition rate of anticancer drug was found to vary inversely with the H(22)-MTT system RLS intensity. So it was intuitive to see the sequence of the tumor suppressive activity of six anticancer drugs without data processing by RLS/MTT screening spectra. Compared with the traditional MTT method, this method has high sensitivity, low detection limit and quite intuitive screening results which were identical to those obtained from the MTT colorimetric assay.

  16. Space telescope low scattered light camera - A model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuper, T. G.; Shack, R. V.

    1982-01-01

    A design approach for a camera to be used with the space telescope is given. Camera optics relay the system pupil onto an annular Gaussian ring apodizing mask to control scattered light. One and two dimensional models of ripple on the primary mirror were calculated. Scattered light calculations using ripple amplitudes between wavelength/20 wavelength/200 with spatial correlations of the ripple across the primary mirror between 0.2 and 2.0 centimeters indicate that the detection of an object a billion times fainter than a bright source in the field is possible. Detection of a Jovian type planet in orbit about alpha Centauri with a camera on the space telescope may be possible.

  17. Scattered light in a DMD based multi-object spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourspring, Kenneth D.; Ninkov, Zoran; Kerekes, John P.

    2010-07-01

    The DMD (Digital Micromirror Device) has an important future in both ground and space based multi-object spectrometers. A series of laboratory measurements have been performed to determine the scattered light properties of a DMD. The DMD under test had a 17 μm pitch and 1 μm gap between adjacent mirrors. Prior characterization of this device has focused on its use in DLP (TI Digital Light Processing) projector applications in which a whole pixel is illuminated by a uniform collimated source. The purpose of performing these measurements is to determine the limiting signal to noise ratio when utilizing the DMD as a slit mask in a spectrometer. The DMD pixel was determined to scatter more around the pixel edge and central via, indicating the importance of matching the telescope point spread function to the DMD. Also, the generation of DMD tested here was determined to have a significant mirror curvature. A maximum contrast ratio was determined at several wavelengths. Further measurements are underway on a newer generation DMD device, which has a smaller mirror pitch and likely different scatter characteristics. A previously constructed instrument, RITMOS (RIT Multi-Object Spectrometer) will be used to validate these scatter models and signal to noise ratio predications through imaging a star field.

  18. SCATTERED NEBULAR LIGHT IN THE EXTENDED ORION NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, C. R.; Goss, W. M.

    2009-11-15

    We have combined 327.5 MHz radio observations and optical spectroscopy to study conditions in the Extended Orion Nebula (EON). We see a steady progression of characteristics with increasing distance from the dominant photoionizing star {theta}{sup 1}Ori C. This progression includes a decrease in the F(H{alpha})/F(H{beta}) ratio, an increase in the relative strength of scattered stellar continuum, decrease in electron density determined from the [S II] doublet, and increase in the ratio of emission measures derived from the H{beta} line and the 327.5 MHz radio continuum. We conclude that beyond about 5' south of {theta}{sup 1}Ori C that scattered light from the much brighter central Huygens region of the nebula significantly contaminates local emission. This strengthens earlier arguments that wavelength and model-dependent scattering of emission-line radiation imposes a fundamental limit on our ability to determine the physical conditions and abundances in this and arguably other similar Galactic Nebulae. The implications for the study of extragalactic H II regions are even more severe. We confirm the result of an earlier study that at least the eastern boundary of the EON is dominated by scattered light from the Huygens region.

  19. An investigation into particle shape effects on the light scattering properties of mineral dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meland, Brian Steven

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. The radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere can be affected by mineral dust through both direct and indirect means. Mineral dust can directly scatter or absorb incoming visible solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial IR radiation. Dust particles can also serve as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby increasing albedo, or provide sites for heterogeneous reactions with trace gas species, which are indirect effects. Unfortunately, many of these processes are poorly understood due to incomplete knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the particles including dust concentration and global distribution, as well as aerosol composition, mixing state, and size and shape distributions. Much of the information about mineral dust aerosol loading and spatial distribution is obtained from remote sensing measurements which often rely on measuring the scattering or absorption of light from these particles and are thus subject to errors arising from an incomplete understanding of the scattering processes. The light scattering properties of several key mineral components of atmospheric dust have been measured at three different wavelengths in the visible. In addition, measurements of the scattering were performed for several authentic mineral dust aerosols, including Saharan sand, diatomaceous earth, Iowa loess soil, and palagonite. These samples include particles that are highly irregular in shape. Using known optical constants along with measured size distributions, simulations of the light scattering process were performed using both Mie and T-Matrix theories. Particle shapes were approximated as a distribution of spheroids for the T-Matrix calculations. It was found that the theoretical model simulations differed markedly from experimental measurements of the light scattering, particularly near the mid-range and near backscattering angles. In

  20. Dynamic and static light scattering analysis of DNA ejection from the phage λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löf, David; Schillén, Karin; Jönsson, Bengt; Evilevitch, Alex

    2007-07-01

    With the aid of time-resolved dynamic light scattering (DLS) and static light scattering (SLS), we have analyzed the ejection kinetics from the bacterial virus bacteriophage (or phage) λ , triggered in vitro by its receptor. We have used DLS to investigate the kinetics in such a system. Furthermore, we have shown that both SLS and DLS can be interchangeably used to study the process of phage DNA release. DLS is superior to SLS in that it also allows the change in the light scattering arising from each of the components in the system to be monitored under conditions such that the relaxation times are separable. With help of these two methods we present a model explaining the reason for the observed decrease in the scattering intensity accompanying DNA ejection from phage. We emphasize that ejection from phage capsid occurs through a very long tail (which is nearly three times longer than the capsid diameter), which significantly separates ejected DNA from the scattering volume of the capsid. The scattering intensity recorded during the DNA ejection process is the result of a change in the form factor of the phage particle, i.e., the change in the interference effects between the phage capsid and the DNA confined in the phage particle. When the DNA molecule is completely ejected it remains in the proximity of the phage for some time, thus contributing to the scattering signal as it diffuses away from the phage capsid, into the scattering volume and returns to its unperturbed chain conformation in bulk solution. The free DNA chain does not contribute to the scattered intensity, when measured at a large angle, due to the DNA form factor and the low concentration. Although the final diffusion-controlled step can lead to overestimation of the real ejection time, we can still use both scattering methods to estimate the initial DNA ejection rates, which are mainly dependent on the pressure-driven DNA ejection from the phage, allowing studies of the effects of various