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Sample records for angle scattering techniques

  1. Multiple small angle neutron scattering: A new two-dimensional ultrasmall angle neutron scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenzweig, C.; Hils, T.; Muehlbauer, S.; Ay, M.; Lorenz, K.; Georgii, R.; Gaehler, R.; Boeni, P.

    2007-11-12

    We report on the demonstration experiment of the multiple small angle neutron scattering (MSANS) technique at a 5.6 m long neutron beam line, leading to a q resolution of 3x10{sup -4} A{sup -1}. The MSANS technique is based on two two-dimensional multihole apertures placed at the front end of the collimator and close to the sample, respectively. By choosing the proper MSANS geometry, individual diffraction patterns are superimposed leading to a large gain in intensity. Using MSANS as an option for standard small angle neutron scattering beam lines, the q resolution could be increased to 10{sup -5} A{sup -1} without dramatically sacrificing intensity.

  2. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  3. Development and prospects of Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuo, Tai-Sen; Cheng, He; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) is an upgrade of the traditional Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique which can cover three orders of magnitude of length scale from one nanometer to one micrometer. It is a powerful tool for structure calibration in polymer science, biology, material science and condensed matter physics. Since the first VSANS instrument, D11 in Grenoble, was built in 1972, new collimation techniques, focusing optics (multi-beam converging apertures, material or magnetic lenses, and focusing mirrors) and higher resolution detectors combined with the long flight paths and long incident neutron wavelengths have been developed. In this paper, a detailed review is given of the development, principles and application conditions of various VSANS techniques. Then, beam current gain factors are calculated to evaluate those techniques. A VSANS design for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is thereby presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474119, 11305191)

  4. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  5. Characterization of Nanocellulose Using Small-Angle Neutron, X-ray, and Dynamic Light Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yimin; Liu, Kai; Zhan, Chengbo; Geng, Lihong; Chu, Benjamin; Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2017-02-16

    Nanocellulose extracted from wood pulps using TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and sulfuric acid hydrolysis methods was characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The dimensions of this nanocellulose (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber (TOCN) and sulfuric acid hydrolyzed cellulose nanocrystal (SACN)) revealed by the different scattering methods were compared with those characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SANS and SAXS data were analyzed using a parallelepiped-based form factor. The width and thickness of the nanocellulose cross section were ∼8 and ∼2 nm for TOCN and ∼20 and ∼3 nm for SACN, respectively, where the fitting results from SANS and SAXS profiles were consistent with each other. DLS was carried out under both the VV mode with the polarizer and analyzer parallel to each other and the HV mode having them perpendicular to each other. Using rotational and translational diffusion coefficients obtained under the HV mode yielded a nanocellulose length qualitatively consistent with that observed by TEM, whereas the length derived by the translational diffusion coefficient under the VV mode appeared to be overestimated.

  6. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  7. Using Small-Angle Scattering Techniques to Understand Mechanical Properties of Biopolymer-Based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Laura L.; Taraban, Marc B.

    2013-01-01

    The design and engineering of innovative biopolymer-based biomaterials for a variety of biomedical applications should be based on the understanding of the relationship between their nanoscale structure and mechanical properties. Down the road, such understanding could be fundamental to tune the properties of engineered tissues, extracellular matrices for cell delivery and proliferation/differentiation, etc. In this tutorial review, we attempt to show in what way biomaterial structural data can help to understand the bulk material properties. We begin with some background on common types of biopolymers used in biomaterials research, discuss some typical mechanical testing techniques and then review how others in the field of biomaterials have utilized small-angle scattering for material characterization. Detailed examples are then used to show the full range of possible characterization techniques available for biopolymer-based biomaterials. Future developments in the area of material characterization by small-angle scattering will undoubtedly facilitate the use of structural data to control the kinetics of assembly and final properties of prospective biomaterials. PMID:24273590

  8. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2014-09-24

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  9. Ultra Low-{kappa} Metrology Using X-Ray Reflectivity And Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Plantier, L.; Gonchond, J.-P.; Pernot, F.; Peled, A.; Yokhin, B.; Wyon, C.; Royer, J.-C.

    2007-09-26

    The automated metrology tool, combining X-ray reflectivity XRR and small-angle X-ray scattering SAXS has been demonstrated as a capable equipment to assess standard porous Ultra low-{kappa} (ULK) metrology. Therefore those techniques have enabled characterizations of several ULK used in sub-65 nm nodes integration. Standard ULK material for 65 nm node technology has been monitored through the whole C065 integration steps using those combined techniques.

  10. An overview of resid characterization by mass spectrometry and small angle scattering techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J. E.; Winans, R. E.

    1999-07-14

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss what is known about the molecular structures found in petroleum resid from mass spectrometry and small angle neutron and X-ray scattering methods. The question about molecular size distributions and the occurrence of aggregation in the asphaltene fraction will be examined. Our understanding of this problem has evolved with the application of new analytical methods. Also, correlations with results from other approaches will be discussed. In addition, the issue of the nature of the heteroatom-containing molecules will be examined and the challenges that remain in this area.

  11. Strain induced directional coarsening in nickel based superalloys: Investigation on kinetics using the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, M.; Bastie, P.

    1997-08-01

    Using the small angle neutron scattering technique, the authors have observed rafting in nickel based single crystal superalloys. Kinetics of morphological evolution of the precipitates have been studied in situ. Therefore the authors used a special furnace designed for the ageing of prestrained specimens under a neutron beam. The evolution of both the precipitate aspect ratio and the distance between precipitates confirms the importance of strain in the directional coarsening process. Results are presented and discussed regarding kinetics and microstructural aspects. In such conditions, rafts seem to be different from those obtained after a creep test.

  12. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering and quasi-elastic light scattering for characterization of polymersomes: comparison with classical techniques.

    PubMed

    Till, Ugo; Gaucher-Delmas, Mireille; Saint-Aguet, Pascale; Hamon, Glenn; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Chassenieux, Christophe; Payré, Bruno; Goudounèche, Dominique; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise; Violleau, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Polymersomes formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, such as poly(ethyleneoxide-b-ε-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) or poly(ethyleneoxide-b-methylmethacrylate), were characterized by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), multi-angle light scattering (MALS), and refractive index detection, leading to the determination of their size, shape, and molecular weight. The method was cross-examined with more classical ones, like batch dynamic and static light scattering, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results show good complementarities between all the techniques; asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation being the most pertinent one when the sample exhibits several different types of population.

  13. VecDec4SAS program for analyzing the dynamic processes observed by the small-angle scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodenskii, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    A VecDec4SAS program has been developed to provide a fast and easy description of the dynamics of any process occurring in a nanoparticle solution observed by the small-angle scattering technique. The process should be characterized by the some conditional initial and final stages, in fractions of which all intermediate data are expanded. The program makes it possible to estimate the adequacy of two-basis approximation and indicate the presence of an additional process introducing a systematic error into the initial data. Scattering curves for human serum albumin protein in solutions with pH 7.4 and 3.0 and a concentration of 20 mg/mL, obtained on the DICSY station at the National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute" in the solution temperature range from 25 to 70°C, were taken to be initial data to illustrate the potential of the program.

  14. Angle resolved scatter measurement of bulk scattering in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Miller, J. Keith; Shori, Ramesh K.; Goorsky, Mark S.

    2015-02-01

    Bulk scattering in polycrystalline laser materials (PLM), due to non-uniform refractive index across the bulk, is regarded as the primary loss mechanism leading to degradation of laser performance with higher threshold and lower output power. The need for characterization techniques towards identifying bulk scatter and assessing the quality. Assessment of optical quality and the identification of bulk scatter have been by simple visual inspection of thin samples of PLMs, thus making the measurements highly subjective and inaccurate. Angle Resolved Scatter (ARS) measurement allows for the spatial mapping of scattered light at all possible angles about a sample, mapping the intensity for both forward scatter and back-scatter regions. The cumulative scattered light intensity, in the forward scatter direction, away from the specular beam is used for the comparison of bulk scattering between samples. This technique employ the detection of scattered light at all angles away from the specular beam directions and represented as a 2-D polar map. The high sensitivity of the ARS technique allows us to compare bulk scattering in different PLM samples which otherwise had similar transmitted beam wavefront distortions.

  15. Beyond simple small-angle X-ray scattering: developments in online complementary techniques and sample environments

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Wim; Koizumi, Satoshi; Terrill, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS) are standard tools in materials research. The simultaneous measurement of SAXS and WAXS data in time-resolved studies has gained popularity due to the complementary information obtained. Furthermore, the combination of these data with non X-ray based techniques, via either simultaneous or independent measurements, has advanced understanding of the driving forces that lead to the structures and morphologies of materials, which in turn give rise to their properties. The simultaneous measurement of different data regimes and types, using either X-rays or neutrons, and the desire to control parameters that initiate and control structural changes have led to greater demands on sample environments. Examples of developments in technique combinations and sample environment design are discussed, together with a brief speculation about promising future developments. PMID:25485128

  16. Asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in a highly curved bilayer revealed by a small angle neutron scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Y; Urakami, N; Taniguchi, T; Imai, M

    2011-07-20

    We have investigated the lipid sorting in a binary small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of cone-shaped (1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DHPC) and cylinder-shaped (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DPPC) lipids. In order to reveal the lipid sorting we adopted a contrast matching technique of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), which extracts the distribution of deuterated lipids in the bilayer quantitatively without steric modification of lipids as in fluorescence probe techniques. First the SANS profile of protonated SUVs at a film contrast condition showed that SUVs have a spherical shape with an inner radius of 190 Å and a bilayer thickness of 40 Å. The SANS profile of deuterated SUVs at a contrast matching condition showed a characteristic scattering profile, indicating an asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer. The characteristic profile was described well by a spherical bilayer model. The fitting revealed that most DHPC molecules are localized in the outer leaflet. Thus the shape of the lipid is strongly coupled with the membrane curvature. We compared the obtained asymmetric distribution of the cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer with the theoretical prediction based on the curvature energy model.

  17. Asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in a highly curved bilayer revealed by a small angle neutron scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Y.; Urakami, N.; Taniguchi, T.; Imai, M.

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated the lipid sorting in a binary small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of cone-shaped (1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DHPC) and cylinder-shaped (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DPPC) lipids. In order to reveal the lipid sorting we adopted a contrast matching technique of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), which extracts the distribution of deuterated lipids in the bilayer quantitatively without steric modification of lipids as in fluorescence probe techniques. First the SANS profile of protonated SUVs at a film contrast condition showed that SUVs have a spherical shape with an inner radius of 190 Å and a bilayer thickness of 40 Å. The SANS profile of deuterated SUVs at a contrast matching condition showed a characteristic scattering profile, indicating an asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer. The characteristic profile was described well by a spherical bilayer model. The fitting revealed that most DHPC molecules are localized in the outer leaflet. Thus the shape of the lipid is strongly coupled with the membrane curvature. We compared the obtained asymmetric distribution of the cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer with the theoretical prediction based on the curvature energy model.

  18. Small‐angle X‐ray scattering as a useful supplementary technique to determine molecular masses of polyelectrolytes in solution

    PubMed Central

    Plazzotta, Beatrice; Diget, Jakob Stensgaard; Zhu, Kaizheng; Nyström, Bo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determination of molecular masses of charged polymers is often nontrivial and most methods have their drawbacks. For polyelectrolytes, a new possibility for the determination of number‐average molecular masses is represented by small‐angle X‐ray scattering (SAXS) which allows fast determinations with a 10% accuracy. This is done by relating the mass to the position of a characteristic peak feature which arises in SAXS due to the local ordering caused by charge‐repulsions between polyelectrolytes. Advantages of the technique are the simplicity of data analysis, the independency from polymer architecture, and the low sample and time consumption. The method was tested on polyelectrolytes of various structures and chemical compositions, and the results were compared with those obtained from more conventional techniques, such as asymmetric flow field‐flow fractionation, gel permeation chromatography, and classical SAXS data analysis, showing that the accuracy of the suggested method is similar to that of the other techniques. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1913–1917 PMID:27840558

  19. Small-angle X-ray scattering as a useful supplementary technique to determine molecular masses of polyelectrolytes in solution.

    PubMed

    Plazzotta, Beatrice; Diget, Jakob Stensgaard; Zhu, Kaizheng; Nyström, Bo; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2016-10-01

    Determination of molecular masses of charged polymers is often nontrivial and most methods have their drawbacks. For polyelectrolytes, a new possibility for the determination of number-average molecular masses is represented by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) which allows fast determinations with a 10% accuracy. This is done by relating the mass to the position of a characteristic peak feature which arises in SAXS due to the local ordering caused by charge-repulsions between polyelectrolytes. Advantages of the technique are the simplicity of data analysis, the independency from polymer architecture, and the low sample and time consumption. The method was tested on polyelectrolytes of various structures and chemical compositions, and the results were compared with those obtained from more conventional techniques, such as asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation, gel permeation chromatography, and classical SAXS data analysis, showing that the accuracy of the suggested method is similar to that of the other techniques. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1913-1917.

  20. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  1. Monitoring phase behavior of hydrogen confined in carbon nanopores by in-situ small angle neutron scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongxin; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2012-01-01

    We report on the use of in-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique to study the phase behavior of hydrogen confined in narrow pores of ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with a very large surface area (2630 m2/g) and pore volume (1.3 cm3/g). The effect of pore size and pressure on hydrogen adsorbed on UMC at room temperature and pressures up to ~200 bar were investigated. In a previous experiment, we have measured the density of adsorbed H2 gas in the nanopores and mesopores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) by SANS techniques. Here, a comparative SANS study between the UMC and PFAC was conducted in order to further investigate the densification of H2 as a function of pore size and pressure. Initial results suggest that the density of confined H2 in both UMC and PFAC is considerably higher than that of the bulk hydrogen gas. The density is systematically higher in the narrow pores and decreases with increasing pore size. These results clearly demonstrate the advantage of adsorptive storage over compressed gas storage and emphasize the greater efficiency of micropores over mesopores in the adsorption process, which can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum H2 storage capacities at near-ambient temperatures.

  2. Application of X-ray and neutron small angle scattering techniques to study the hierarchical structure of plant cell walls: a review.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Elliot P

    2015-07-10

    Plant cell walls present an extremely complex structure of hierarchically assembled cellulose microfibrils embedded in a multi-component matrix. The biosynthesis process determines the mechanism of cellulose crystallisation and assembly, as well as the interaction of cellulose with other cell wall components. Thus, a knowledge of cellulose microfibril and bundle architecture, and the structural role of matrix components, is crucial for understanding cell wall functional and technological roles. Small angle scattering techniques, combined with complementary methods, provide an efficient approach to characterise plant cell walls, covering a broad and relevant size range while minimising experimental artefacts derived from sample treatment. Given the system complexity, approaches such as component extraction and the use of plant cell wall analogues are typically employed to enable the interpretation of experimental results. This review summarises the current research status on the characterisation of the hierarchical structure of plant cell walls using small angle scattering techniques.

  3. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 54 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs.

  5. Studies of structural dynamics in polymer blends using rheology and small-angle x-ray scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinker, Kristin Leigh

    Structural dynamics in three polymer blend systems, differing largely with respect to morphology, have been investigated. The first system, composed of two immiscible homopolymers, exhibits a microstructure of micron-sized droplets dispersed in a matrix phase. We have examined small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) as a new approach for conducting in situ studies of flow-induced structural changes in these types of blends. This approach relies on Porod scattering, which is related to the interfacial properties in two-phase systems. Indeed, we have successfully performed in situ SAXS measurements of an immiscible blend in response to applied shear, allowing for the observation of deformation and relaxation of interface with time. The second blend system, a bicontinuous microemulsion (BmuE), consists of two cocontinuous domains of immiscible homopolymers compatibilized by diblock copolymer at the interface. The equilibrium dynamics were characterized via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. These measurements were used to test rheological predictions for bicontinuous microemulsions by Patzold and Dawson. Although the predictions describe the shape of the relaxation spectrum fairly well, the theory fails to predict absolute values of the rheological properties. These results highlight a need for the development of more sophisticated theory to describe the dynamics of bicontinuous microemulsions. The shear-induced dynamics of the BmE microstructure were interrogated using rheology, in situ SAXS, and optical microscopy. Optical microscopy revealed micron-sized phase-separated structures coexisting with the nano-scale BmuE phase at equilibrium. Direct comparison of this multi-phase system to a previously documented BmuE system by Bates, Lodge, and coworkers strongly indicates that the microemulsion morphology dominates the rheology and scattering behavior at linear to moderately non-linear shear conditions, whereas the phase-separated structures govern the response under

  6. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  7. Ferromagnetic correlations in Yb2Ti2O7 as revealed by small angle neutron scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhariwalla, Connor; Ma, Qianli; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa; Dabkowska, Hanna; Gaulin, Bruce

    We report low temperature SANS measurements on frustrated Seff=1/2 XY pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The ground state of this material has been proposed as a realization of a quantum spin ice; however, the low temperature phase behaviour has been complicated by sample dependencies believed to be related to weak ``stuffing''. Our SANS study focuses on the low Q structure of elastic ``rods'' of magnetic scattering which extend from Q=0 along the 111 direction. Using a single crystal sample, we characterize the low Q (<0.2Å-1) temperature dependence of this structured diffuse scattering intensity to T=30mK, passing through the enigmatic heat capacity anomaly near Tc=200mK. The temperature dependence of this diffuse scattering near Q=0 is largely consistent with that measured previously near 111.

  8. Particle chaos and pitch angle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Speiser, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    Pitch angle scattering is a factor that helps determine the dawn-to-dusk current, controls particle energization, and it has also been used as a remote probe of the current sheet structure. Previous studies have interpreted their results under the exception that randomization will be greatest when the ratio of the two timescales of motion (gyration parallel to and perpendicular to the current sheet) is closet to one. Recently, the average expotential divergence rate (AEDR) has been calculated for particle motion in a hyperbolic current sheet (Chen, 1992). It is claimed that this AEDR measures the degree of chaos and therefore may be thought to measure the randomization. In contrast to previous expectations, the AEDR is not maximized when Kappa is approximately equal to 1 but instead increases with decreasing Kappa. Also contrary to previous expectations, the AEDR is dependent upon the parameter b(sub z). In response to the challenge to previous expectations that has been raised by this calculation of the AEDR, we have investigated the dependence of a measure of particle pitch angle scattering on both the parameters Kappa and b(sub z). We find that, as was previously expected, particle pitch angle scattering is maximized near Kappa = 1 provided that Kappa/b(sub z) greater than 1. In the opposite regime, Kappa/b(sub z) less than 1, we find that particle pitch angle scattering is still largest when the two timescales are equal, but the ratio of the timescales is proportional to b(sub z). In this second regime, particle pitch angle scattering is not due to randomization, but is instead due to a systematic pitch angle change. This result shows that particle pitch angle scattering need not be due to randomization and indicates how a measure of pitch angle scattering can exhibit a different behavior than a measure of chaos.

  9. Application of the small-angle X-ray scattering technique for the study of two-step equilibrium enzyme-substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Tuzikov, F V; Zinoviev, V V; Vavilin, V I; Malygin, E G

    1996-02-01

    The small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique is used for the investigation of two-stage equilibrium macromolecular interactions of the enzyme-substrate type in solution. Experimental procedures and methods of analyzing the data obtained from SAXS have been elaborated. The algorithm for the data analysis allows one to determine the stoichiometric, equilibrium, and structural parameters of the enzyme-substrate complexes obtained. The thermodynamic characteristics for the formation of complexes of double-stranded oligonucleotide with Eco dam methyltransferase (MTase) have been determined and demonstrate a high cooperativity of MTase binding when the ternary complex containing the dimeric enzyme is formed. The structural parameters (Rg, Rc, semiaxes) have been determined for free enzyme and polynucleotides and of enzyme-substrate complexes, indicating structural rearrangements of the enzyme in the interaction with substrates.

  10. Combination of acoustic levitation with small angle scattering techniques and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism. Application to the study of protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Cristiglio, Viviana; Grillo, Isabelle; Fomina, Margarita; Wien, Frank; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Novikov, Alexey; Brassamin, Séverine; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pérez, Javier; Hennet, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic levitation technique is a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquids samples, suspended in air by means of an ultrasonic field. This method was previously used at synchrotron sources for studying pharmaceutical liquids and protein solutions using x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In this work we combined for the first time this containerless method with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) to study the structural behavior of proteins in solutions during the water evaporation. SANS results are also compared with SAXS experiments. The aggregation behavior of 45μl droplets of lysozyme protein diluted in water was followed during the continuous increase of the sample concentration by evaporating the solvent. The evaporation kinetics was followed at different drying stage by SANS and SAXS with a good data quality. In a prospective work using SRCD, we also studied the evolution of the secondary structure of the myoglobin protein in water solution in the same evaporation conditions. Acoustic levitation was applied for the first time with SANS and the high performances of the used neutron instruments made it possible to monitor fast container-less reactions in situ. A preliminary work using SRCD shows the potentiality of its combination with acoustic levitation for studying the evolution of the protein structure with time. This multi-techniques approach could give novel insights into crystallization and self-assembly phenomena of biological compound with promising potential applications in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phase Doppler droplet sizing: Scattering angle effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ceman, D.L.; O'Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The phase Doppler technique is an LDV-based method for the nonintrusive, simultaneous measurement of particle size, velocity, and concentration. It is becoming a standard device for measurement of spray droplets in air as well as cavitation nuclei bubbles in water. The Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) is a commercial phase Doppler instrument. Previous calibrations of the PDPA using well-characterized liquid droplets have revealed nonlinearity of the instrument response for droplet diameters less than 20 {mu}m. For many applications, droplet sizing accuracy in the small diameter range is critical. Light scattering calculations performed by the instrument manufacturer suggest two theoretical approaches to improving the instrument response in this size range: optimizing the collection angle and increasing the collection area. The first approach has been tested experimentally. This paper presents size calibrations of the PDPA with the receiver configured at two angles: 30{degree} (the standard configuration) and 70{degree} off-forward axis. The calibration was performed with monodisperse oleic acid droplets in the diameter range 3.7 to 32 {mu}m. As in earlier calibration studies, the 30{degree} configuration resulted in marked nonlinearity in instrument response below 20 {mu}m. Oscillations were still apparent for the 70{degree} configuration, which showed only a modest improvement compared to the response at 30{degree}. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  13. Small-Angle Scattering on Magnetoferritin Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balejčíková Petrenko, L., VI; Avdeev, MV; Garamus, VM; Almásy, L.; Kopčanský, P.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetoferritin is a synthetically prepared magnetic bio-complex, consisting of apoferritin shell and iron-based nanoparticles. Superparamagnetic behaviour, nanoscale size (about 12 nm) and biological origin allow to use magnetoferritin in various applications. In this report, we present a general overview about basic physicochemical properties of magnetoferritin, as determined by small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering experiments and some interesting references on their potential bio-applications.

  14. Multiple scattering technique lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissonnette, Luc R.

    1992-01-01

    The Bernouilli-Ricatti equation is based on the single scattering description of the lidar backscatter return. In practice, especially in low visibility conditions, the effects of multiple scattering can be significant. Instead of considering these multiple scattering effects as a nuisance, we propose here to use them to help resolve the problems of having to assume a backscatter-to-extinction relation and specifying a boundary value for a position far remote from the lidar station. To this end, we have built a four-field-of-view lidar receiver to measure the multiple scattering contributions. The system has been described in a number of publications that also discuss preliminary results illustrating the multiple scattering effects for various environmental conditions. Reported here are recent advances made in the development of a method of inverting the multiple scattering data for the determination of the aerosol scattering coefficient.

  15. Structure of Fucoidan from Brown Seaweed Turbinaria ornata as Studied by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESIMS) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thanh, Thuy Thi Thu; Tran, Van Thi Thanh; Yuguchi, Yoshiaki; Bui, Ly Minh; Nguyen, Tai Tien

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate both the chemical and conformational structure of an unfractionated fucoidan extracted from brown seaweed Turbinaria ornata collected at Nha-trang bay, Vietnam. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used for determining the chemical structure and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provided conformational of the structure at the molecular level. The results showed that the fucoidan has a sulfate content of 25.6% and is mainly composed of fucose and galactose residues (Fuc:Gal ≈ 3:1). ESIMS analysis suggested that the fucoidan has a backbone of 3-linked α-l-Fucp residues with branches, →4)-Galp(1→ at C-4 of the fucan chain. Sulfate groups are attached mostly at C-2 and sometimes at C-4 of both fucose and galactose residues. A molecular model of the fucoidan was built based on obtained chemical structure and scattering curves estimated from molecular model and observed SAXS measurement were fitted. The results indicated that fucoidan under study has a rod-like bulky chain conformation. PMID:23857110

  16. Investigating hard sphere interactions through spin echo scattering angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Adam

    Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) allows neutron scattering instruments to perform real space measurements on large micron scale samples by encoding the scattering angle into the neutron's spin state via Larmor precession. I have built a SESAME instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source. I have also assisted in the construction of a modular SESAME instrument on the ASTERIX beamline at Los Alamos National lab. The ability to tune these instruments has been proved mathematically and optimized and automated experimentally. Practical limits of the SESAME technique with respect to polarization analyzers, neutron spectra, Larmor elements, and data analysis were investigated. The SESAME technique was used to examine the interaction of hard spheres under depletion. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres suspended in decalin had previously been studied as a hard sphere solution. The interparticle correlations between the spheres were found to match the Percus-Yevick closure, as had been previously seen in dynamical light scattering experiments. To expand beyond pure hard spheres, 900kDa polystyrene was added to the solution in concentrations of less than 1% by mass. The steric effects of the polystyrene were expected to produce a short-range, attractive, "sticky" potential. Experiment showed, however, that the "sticky" potential was not a stable state and that the spheres would eventually form long range aggregates.

  17. Structural analysis and characterization of synthesized ordered mesoporous silicate (MCM-41) using small angle X-rays scattering and complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinlalu, Ademola V.

    Mesoporous silicate have widespread potential applications, such as drug delivery, supports for catalysis, selective adsorption and host to guest molecules. Most important in the area of scientific research and industrial applications is their demand due to its extremely high surface areas (> 800m 2g-1) and larger pores with well defined structures. Mesoporous silicate (MCM-41) samples were prepared by hydrothermal method under various chemo-physical conditions and various experimental methods such as small angle X-rays scattering (SAXS), Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis at 77 K, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the changes in the structural morphology and subtle lattice parameter changes. With regards to the subtle changes in the structural characteristics of the synthesized mesoporous silicate, we seek to understand the electron density function changes as the synthesis parameter are varied from low molar concentration of ATAB/Si to higher concentration, the system becoming more acidity due to increase in the hydrolysis time of pH regulator as a result of increased production of ethanol and acetic acid and the changes due to extended reaction time. This Ph.D. research tries to understand the influence of various parameters like surfactant-Si molar ratio, reaction time, and the hydrolysis of the pH regulator on the orderliness/disorderliness of the lattice order, lattice spacing and electron density function. The stages during synthesis are carefully selected to better understand where the greater influence on the overall structural morphology exist so as to be able to ne tune this parameter for any desired specification and application. The SAXS measurement were conducted on a HECUS S3-Micro X-ray system at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. while the data evaluation and visualization were carried in 3DView 4.2 and EasySWAXS software. The electron density functions

  18. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10°. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 Å -1, where x=sin( θ⧸2)⧸ λ. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  19. Small angle neutron scattering using a triple axis spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmend, F.U.; Kamal, I.; Yunus, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    SANS technique has been developed on a triple axis neutron spectrometer at TRIGA Mark II (3 MW) research reactor, AERE, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Double crystal (with very small mosaic spread {approximately} 1 min.) diffraction known as Bonse and Hart`s method has been employed in this technique. Such a device is a useful tool for small angle scattering in the Q range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -1} {Angstrom}{sup -1} and for real time experiments at short time scales. Therefore, large objects and large distance interparticle correlations can be investigated easily by this method. Test measurements using alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) sample has been carried out to exploit this method. The radius of gyration has been determined and the data has been fitted to the scattering function of a sphere.

  20. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-24

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  1. Small-angle electron scattering from magnetic artificial lattice.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Kazuya; Koyama, Tsukasa; Mori, Shigeo; Harada, Ken; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    In this study, quantitative reciprocal-space analyses of magnetic domain structures in magnetic artificial lattices of patterned elements were performed by means of the small-angle electron scattering (SAES) technique. Using a conventional transmission electron microscope with a LaB(6) thermal-emission electron gun, Lorentz deflection due to magnetic moments in patterned elements and Bragg diffraction due to the lattice periodicity are simultaneously recorded at an angle of the order of less than 1 10(-)(6) rad when using electron waves with high spatial coherency and large camera length. The present SAES technique together with TEM real-space imaging methods such as Lorentz microscopy will be useful in analyzing electromagnetic fields in nano-scaled materials.

  2. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  3. Coincidence measurements of electron-impact coherence parameters for e-He scattering in the full range of scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Dziczek, Dariusz; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    Electron impact coherence parameters for inelastic e-He scattering have been measured for the excitation to the 2 {sup 1}P{sub 1} state at collision energy of 100 eV. The experiment was conducted using angular correlation electron-photon coincidence technique with a magnetic angle changer allowing measurements in full range of scattering angles. The results are compared with other experimental data and theoretical predictions available for this collisional system.

  4. Spectral angle resolved scattering of thin film coatings.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sven; Unglaub, David; Trost, Marcus; Cheng, Xinbin; Zhang, Jinlong; Duparré, Angela

    2014-02-01

    The light scattering of interference coatings is strongly dependent on the wavelength. In addition to the general strong increase of scattering as the wavelengths get shorter, dramatic scatter effects in and around the resonance regions can occur. This is discussed in detail for highly reflective and chirped mirrors. A new instrument is presented which enables spectral angle resolved scatter measurements of high-quality optical components to be performed between 250 and 1500 nm.

  5. Disordered porous solids : from chord distributions to small angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, P.; Tchoubar, D.

    1992-06-01

    Disordered biphasic porous solids are examples of complex interfacial media. Small angle scattering strongly depends on the geometrical properties of the internal surface partitioning a porous system. Properties of the second derivative of the bulk autocorrelation function quantitatively defines the level of connection between the small angle scattering and the statistical properties of this interface. A tractable expression of this second derivative, involving the pore and the mass chord distribution functions, was proposed by Mering and Tchoubar (MT). Based on the present possibility to make a quantitative connection between imaging techniques and the small angle scattering, this paper tries to complete and to extend the MT approach. We first discuss how chord distribution functions can be used as fingerprints of the structural disorder. An explicit relation between the small angle scattering and these chord distributions is then proposed. In a third part, the application to different types of disorder is critically discussed and predictions are compared to available experimental data. Using image processing, we will consider three types of disorder : the long-range Debye randomness, the “ correlated " disorder with a special emphasis on the structure of a porous glass (the vycor), and, finally, complex structures where length scale invariance properties can be observed. Les solides poreux biphasiques sont des exemples de milieux interfaciaux complexes. La diffusion aux petits angles (SAS) dépend fortement des propriétés géométriques de l'interface partitionant le milieu poreux. Les propriétés de la dérivée seconde de la fonction d'autocorrélation de densité définit quantitativement le niveau de connection entre la diffusion aux petits angles et les caractéristiques statistiques de cette interface. Une expression utilisable de cette seconde dérivée, impliquant les distributions de cordes associées à la phase massique et au réseau de pores, fut

  6. Crystal structure analysis in solution-processed uniaxially oriented polycrystalline thin film of non-peripheral octahexyl phthalocyanine by grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Masashi; Uno, Takashi; Nakatani, Mitsuhiro; Nakano, Chika; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-10-01

    Uniaxially oriented thin films of metal-free non-peripherally octahexyl-substituted phthalocyanine (C6PcH2), which exhibits high carrier mobility, have been fabricated by the bar-coating technique, which is a simple solution process. The molecular orientation and molecular steps in the thin film were observed by the polarized spectroscopy and the atomic force microscopy, respectively. The three-dimensional molecular packing structure in the thin film was investigated by the grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering technique with an in-plane sample rotation. The crystal orientation was clarified, and the three-dimensional molecular packing structure of the thin film was found to match the single crystal structure. Moreover, the X-ray diffraction patterns of the oriented thin films were simulated by using the lattice parameters of C6PcH2 single crystal to reproduce the observed X-ray diffraction patterns.

  7. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; ...

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using themore » chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.« less

  8. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Furmann, Agnieszka; Clarkson, Chris R.

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using the chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.

  9. Collisionless pitch-angle scattering of runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is discovered that the tokamak field geometry generates a toroidicity induced broadening of the pitch-angle distribution of runaway electrons. This collisionless pitch-angle scattering is much stronger than the collisional scattering and invalidates the gyro-center model for runaway electrons. As a result, the energy limit of runaway electrons is found to be larger than the prediction of the gyro-center model and to depend heavily on the background magnetic field.

  10. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Smith, Charles W.; Matthaeus, William H.

    1988-01-01

    A dissipation range is incorporated in the turbulence model to reconcile the divergent conclusions from studies of cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic magnetic turbulence. The Fokker-Planck coefficient for pitch-angle scattering is calculated. It is shown that the slab form of the Fokker-Plank coefficient (Jokipii, 1966) is valid at very low energies, while the nonslab form (Fisk, 1974) is valid at intermediate energies.

  11. Multi-angle Light Scattering Device for Aerosol Particle Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    currently measuring scattering from Arizona road dust, various sizes of abrasive grits and planning soot studies, some cloud processed. The project...sizes of alumina abrasives . With our small angles (and unlike all previous scattering work), we are able to obtain Guinier regimes for these systems

  12. Application of the small-angle X-ray scattering technique for the study of equilibrium enzyme-substrate interactions of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli with tRNAPhe.

    PubMed

    Tuzikov, F V; Zinoviev, V V; Vavilin, V I; Maligin, E G; Ankilova, V N; Moor, N A; Lavrik, O I

    1988-05-09

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique (SAXS) is proposed for the investigation of equilibrium macromolecular interactions of the enzyme-substrate type in solution. Experimental procedures and methods of analysing the data obtained from SAXS have been elaborated. The algorithm for the data analysis allows one to determine the stoichiometric, equilibrium and structural parameters of the enzyme-substrate complexes obtained. The thermodynamic characteristics for the formation of complexes of tRNAPhe with phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase have been determined and demonstrate negative cooperativity for binding of the two tRNAPhe molecules. The structural parameters (Rg, Rc, semi-axes) have been determined for free phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNAPhe from E. coli MRE-600 and of enzyme complexes possessing one and two tRNAPhe molecules, indicating structural rearrangements of the enzyme in the interaction with tRNAPhe.

  13. Radiation damage study using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétfalvi, E.; Török, Gy; Rosta, L.

    2000-03-01

    Nuclear radiation provides important changes in the microstructure of metallic components of nuclear power plant and research reactors, influencing their mechanical properties. The investigation of this problem has primary interest for the safety and life-time of such nuclear installations. For the characterization of this kind of nanostructures small angle neutron scattering technique is a very useful tool. We have carried out experiments on samples of irradiated reactor vessel material and welded components of VVER-440-type reactors on the SANS instrument at the Budapest Research Reactor. In our measurements irradiated as well as non-irradiated samples were compared and magnetic field was applied for viewing the magnetic structure effects of the materials. A clear modification of the structure due to irradiation was obtained. Our data were analyzed by the ITP92 code, the inverse Fourier transform program of O. Glatter [1].

  14. Limits of applicability of the concept of scattering amplitude in small-angle scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.; Lvov, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of the concept of scattering amplitude to the description of small-angle scattering experiments has been considered. An expression has been obtained for a scattered radiation flux on a detector under much milder conditions than the condition of Fraunhofer diffraction. The influence of incoherence of the source on the results has been evaluated.

  15. Scattering-angle based filtering of the waveform inversion gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach to maneuver the complex non-linearity associated with the problem of velocity update. In anisotropic media, the non-linearity becomes far more complex with the potential trade-off between the multiparameter description of the model. A gradient filter helps us in accessing the parts of the gradient that are suitable to combat the potential non-linearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which the low scattering angle of the gradient update is initially muted out in the FWI implementation, in what we may refer to as a scattering angle continuation process. The result is a low wavelength update dominated by the transmission part of the update gradient. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce vertically near-zero wavenumber updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Relaxing the filtering at a later stage in the FWI implementation allows for smaller scattering angles to contribute higher-resolution information to the model. The benefits of the extended domain based filtering of the gradient is not only it's ability in providing low wavenumber gradients guided by the scattering angle, but also in its potential to provide gradients free of unphysical energy that may correspond to unrealistic scattering angles.

  16. Emerging applications of small angle solution scattering in structural biology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2015-03-01

    Small angle solution X-ray and neutron scattering recently resurfaced as powerful tools to address an array of biological problems including folding, intrinsic disorder, conformational transitions, macromolecular crowding, and self or hetero-assembling of biomacromolecules. In addition, small angle solution scattering complements crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and other structural methods to aid in the structure determinations of multidomain or multicomponent proteins or nucleoprotein assemblies. Neutron scattering with hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation, or X-ray scattering with sucrose contrast variation to a certain extent, is a convenient tool for characterizing the organizations of two-component systems such as a nucleoprotein or a lipid-protein assembly. Time-resolved small and wide-angle solution scattering to study biological processes in real time, and the use of localized heavy-atom labeling and anomalous solution scattering for applications as FRET-like molecular rulers, are amongst promising newer developments. Despite the challenges in data analysis and interpretation, these X-ray/neutron solution scattering based approaches hold great promise for understanding a wide variety of complex processes prevalent in the biological milieu.

  17. Emerging applications of small angle solution scattering in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2015-01-01

    Small angle solution X-ray and neutron scattering recently resurfaced as powerful tools to address an array of biological problems including folding, intrinsic disorder, conformational transitions, macromolecular crowding, and self or hetero-assembling of biomacromolecules. In addition, small angle solution scattering complements crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and other structural methods to aid in the structure determinations of multidomain or multicomponent proteins or nucleoprotein assemblies. Neutron scattering with hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation, or X-ray scattering with sucrose contrast variation to a certain extent, is a convenient tool for characterizing the organizations of two-component systems such as a nucleoprotein or a lipid-protein assembly. Time-resolved small and wide-angle solution scattering to study biological processes in real time, and the use of localized heavy-atom labeling and anomalous solution scattering for applications as FRET-like molecular rulers, are amongst promising newer developments. Despite the challenges in data analysis and interpretation, these X-ray/neutron solution scattering based approaches hold great promise for understanding a wide variety of complex processes prevalent in the biological milieu. PMID:25516491

  18. Small-angle neutron scattering from samples of expanded carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, S. G. Valiev, E. Z.; Dorofeev, Yu. A.; Pirogov, A. N.; Skryabin, Yu. N.; Makotchenko, V. G.; Nazarov, A. S.; Fedorov, V. E.

    2006-12-15

    The subatomic structure of expanded graphite has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. Samples were synthesized during quick thermal decomposition of intercalated compounds based on oxidized graphite. They had a low bulk density (up to 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}) and were characterized by considerable small-angle scattering. It has been established that majority of the volume of expanded graphite samples is occupied by participles with characteristic sizes in two ranges: from 6 to 8 nm and from 20 to 30 nm. Small particles have properties of a surface fractal with the dimension D{sub s} = 2.4-2.6, whereas the larger particles are mainly smooth and have the dimension D{sub s} = 2.0-2.1. The specific surface of the samples studied was determined from the small-angle scattering data.

  19. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Youngju; Jung, Jaehwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, Hyunjoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, Yongkeun

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from -70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth.

  20. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    PubMed Central

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, HyunJoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from −70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth. PMID:24867385

  1. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering.

    PubMed

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, HyunJoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2014-05-28

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from -70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth.

  2. Small Angle Neutron Scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hammouda, B.; Krueger, S.; Glinka, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The small angle neutron scattering technique is a valuable method for the characterization of morphology of various materials. It can probe inhomogeneities in the sample (whether occurring naturally or introduced through isotopic substitution) at a length scale from the atomic size (nanometers) to the macroscopic (micrometers) size. This work provides an overview of the small angle neutron scattering facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and a review of the technique as it has been applied to polymer systems, biological macromolecules, ceramic, and metallic materials. Specific examples have been included. PMID:28053456

  3. Characterization of cationic polymers by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering-A comparison with traditional techniques.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael; Pietsch, Christian; Tauhardt, Lutz; Schallon, Anja; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2014-01-17

    In the field of nanomedicine, cationic polymers are the subject of intensive research and represent promising carriers for genetic material. The detailed characterization of these carriers is essential since the efficiency of gene delivery strongly depends on the properties of the used polymer. Common characterization methods such as size exclusion chromatography (SEC) or mass spectrometry (MS) suffer from problems, e.g. missing standards, or even failed for cationic polymers. As an alternative, asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) was investigated. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, as well-established techniques, were applied to evaluate the results obtained by AF4. In this study, different polymers of molar masses between 10 and 120kgmol(-1) with varying amine functionalities in the side chain or in the polymer backbone were investigated. To this end, some of the most successful gene delivery agents, namely linear poly(ethylene imine) (LPEI) (only secondary amines in the backbone), branched poly(ethylene imine) (B-PEI) (secondary and tertiary amino groups in the backbone, primary amine end groups), and poly(l-lysine) (amide backbone and primary amine side chains), were characterized. Moreover, poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA), poly(2-(amino)ethyl methacrylate) (PAEMA), and poly(2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PtBAEMA) as polymers with primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the side chain, have been investigated. Reliable results were obtained for all investigated polymers by AF4. In addition, important factors for all methods were evaluated, e.g. the influence of different elution buffers and AF4 membranes. Besides this, the correct determination of the partial specific volume and the suppression of the polyelectrolyte effect are the most critical issues for AUC investigations.

  4. Small-angle and surface scattering from porous and fractal materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.

    1998-09-18

    We review the basic theoretical methods used to treat small-angle scattering from porous materials, treated as general two-phase systems, and also the basic experimental techniques for carrying out such experiments. We discuss the special forms of the scattering when the materials exhibit mass or surface fractal behavior, and review the results of recent experiments on several types of porous media and also SANS experiments probing the phase behavior of binary fluid mixtures or polymer solutions confined in porous materials. Finally, we discuss the analogous technique of off-specular scattering from surfaces and interfaces which is used to study surface roughness of various kinds.

  5. SASBDB, a repository for biological small-angle scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Erica; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Previtali, Gianpietro; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) are fundamental tools used to study the global shapes of proteins, nucleic acids, macromolecular complexes and assemblies in solution. Due to recent advances in instrumentation and computational methods, the quantity of experimental scattering data and subsequent publications is increasing dramatically. The need for a global repository allowing investigators to locate and access experimental scattering data and associated models was recently emphasized by the wwPDB small-angle scattering task force (SAStf). The small-angle scattering biological data bank (SASBDB) www.sasbdb.org has been designed in accordance with the plans of the SAStf as part of a future federated system of databases for biological SAXS and SANS. SASBDB is a comprehensive repository of freely accessible and fully searchable SAS experimental data and models that are deposited together with the relevant experimental conditions, sample details and instrument characteristics. At present the quality of deposited experimental data and the accuracy of models are manually curated, with future plans to integrate automated systems as the database expands. PMID:25352555

  6. Low frequency seabed scattering at low grazing angles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Low-frequency (LF) seabed scattering at low grazing angles (LGA) is almost impossible to directly measure in shallow water (SW), except through inversion from reverberation. The energy flux method for SW reverberation is briefly introduced in this paper. The closed-form expressions of reverberation in an isovelocity waveguide, derived from this method, indicate that in the three-halves law range interval multimode/ray sea bottom scattering with different incident and scattering angles in forming the reverberation may equivalently be represented by the bottom backscattering at a single range-dependent angle. This equivalent relationship is used to derive the bottom backscattering strength (BBS) as a function of angle and frequency. The LF&LGA BBS is derived in a frequency band of 200-2500 Hz and in a grazing angle range of 1.1°-14.0° from reverberation measurements at three sites with sandy bottoms. This is based on three previous works: (1) The closed-form expressions of SW reverberation [Zhou, (Chinese) Acta Acustica 5, 86-99 (1980)]; (2) the effective geo-acoustic model of sandy bottoms that follows the Biot model [Zhou et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2847-2866 (2009)] and (3) A quality database of wideband reverberation level normalized to source level [Zhou and Zhang, IEEE J. Oceanic Eng. 30, 832-842 (2005)].

  7. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P.; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd–Fe–B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters. PMID:27321149

  8. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-06-20

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd-Fe-B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters.

  9. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P.; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd-Fe-B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters.

  10. Stabilization of asphaltenes in aliphatic solvents using alkylbenzene-derived amphiphiles. 2. Study of the asphaltene-amphiphile interactions and structures using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.L.; Fogler, H.S. )

    1994-06-01

    In the preceding paper in this issue, the influence of the chemical structure of a series of alkylbenzene-derived amphiphiles on the stabilization of asphaltenes was described. In this paper, we present the results of using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to study the interaction between asphaltenes and two alkylbenzene-derived amphiphiles, p-alkylphenol and p-alkylbenzenesulfonic acid. FTIR spectroscopy was used to characterize and quantify the acid-base interactions between asphaltenes and amphiphiles. It was found that asphaltenes could hydrogen-bond to p-dodecylphenol amphiphiles. The hydrogen-bonding capacity of asphaltenes was estimated to be 1.6-2.0 mmol/g of asphaltene. On the other hand, the FTIR spectroscopic study indicated that asphaltenes had a complicated acid-base interaction with p-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) amphiphiles with a stoichiometry of about 1.8 mmol of DBSA/g of asphaltene. The UV/vis spectroscopic study suggested that asphaltenes and DBSA could associate into large electronic conjugated complexes. Physical evidence of the association between asphaltenes and amphiphiles was obtained by SAXS measurements. 27 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Angle- and Spectral-Dependent Light Scattering from Plasmonic Nanocups

    SciTech Connect

    King, Nicholas S.; Li, Yang; Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Brannan, Travis; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2011-09-27

    As optical frequency nanoantennas, reduced-symmetry plasmonic nanoparticles have light-scattering properties that depend strongly on geometry, orientation, and variations in dielectric environment. Here we investigate how these factors influence the spectral and angular dependence of light scattered by Au nanocups. A simple dielectric substrate causes the axial, electric dipole mode of the nanocup to deviate substantially from its characteristic cos² θ free space scattering profile, while the transverse, magnetic dipole mode remains remarkably insensitive to the presence of the substrate. Nanoscale irregularities of the nanocup rim and the local substrate permittivity have a surprisingly large effect on the spectral- and angle-dependent light-scattering properties of these structures.

  12. Windows for small-angle X-ray scattering cryostats.

    PubMed

    Lurio, Laurence; Mulders, Norbert; Paetkau, Mark; Jemian, Pete R; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec

    2007-11-01

    To determine the suitability of commonly used windows for small-angle X-ray scattering, a range of materials, including Kapton, (aluminized) Mylar, beryllium, high-purity aluminium foil, mica and silicon nitride have been studied. At small wavevector transfers, Q, in the range 2 x 10(-3) to 0.2 nm(-1), the scattering from Kapton, mica and beryllium is reasonably well described by power laws in Q with exponents of -3.25, -3.6 and -3.9, respectively. There are large variations in the scattering from mica, but a freshly cleaved natural mica window was by far the weakest scatterer. For applications where radiation in the infrared or visible range should be blocked, aluminized Mylar is the most suitable material. Both Mylar and Kapton can be used to make very simple demountable superfluid-tight windows using indium O-ring seals.

  13. Branch Content in Hybrid Materials using Small-Angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Greg

    2005-03-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrid materials often display ramified mass- fractal structures characterized by primary particle size, aggregate size, and mass-fractal dimension. Physical properties, such as mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties and electrical conductivity (in carbon composites for instance), can not be predicted using only these structural features since such properties are intimately tied to the degree and type of branching as shown by Witten [1]. Witten suggested the use of the minimum dimension, or the related connectivity dimension, to calculate mechanical response in these hybrid systems. A viable technique to quantify the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension in hybrid materials has, until recently, been absent from the literature. This presentation will discuss the use of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to describe branch content in hybrid materials [2] and will outline an approach to use the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension to predict static and dynamic mechanical properties for hybrid materials based on structure [1, 3]. 1. Witten TA, Rubinstein M, Colby RH Reinforcement of Rubber by Fractal Aggregates J Phys II 3 (3): 367-383 (1993). 2. Beaucage G Determination of branch fraction and minimum dimension of mass-fractal aggregates Phys Rev E 70 (3): art. no. 031401 Part 1 (2004). 3. Kohls DJ, Beaucage G Rational design of reinforced rubber Curr Opin Solid St M 6 (3): 183-194 (2002).

  14. A Discrete Scatterer Technique for Evaluating Electromagnetic Scattering from Trees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Trees by DaHan Liao Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES Disclaimers The findings...for Evaluating Electromagnetic Scattering from Trees by DaHan Liao Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...Technique for Evaluating Electromagnetic Scattering from Trees 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  15. Small-angle scattering and 3D structure interpretation.

    PubMed

    Trewhella, Jill

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on advances in the application of solution small-angle scattering (SAS) in structural analysis of biomolecules and the complexes they form. Examples highlighted illustrate the unique contribution of SAS, using both X-rays and neutrons, in hybrid or integrative modelling methods. The increased information content when neutron scattering with contrast variation is used is a particular focus. Finally, progress toward an agreed reporting framework, the development of open data and model archives, and the importance of these initiatives is covered.

  16. Pulsed Laser Ablation-Induced Green Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles and Application of Novel Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Technique for Nanoparticle Size and Size Distribution Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Vihinen, Jorma; Frankberg, Erkka; Hyvärinen, Leo; Honkanen, Mari; Levänen, Erkki

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to introduce small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as a promising technique for measuring size and size distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles. In this manuscript, pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) has been demonstrated as a quick and simple technique for synthesizing TiO2 nanoparticles directly into deionized water as a suspension from titanium targets. Spherical TiO2 nanoparticles with diameters in the range 4-35 nm were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed highly crystalline nanoparticles that comprised of two main photoactive phases of TiO2: anatase and rutile. However, presence of minor amounts of brookite was also reported. The traditional methods for nanoparticle size and size distribution analysis such as electron microscopy-based methods are time-consuming. In this study, we have proposed and validated SAXS as a promising method for characterization of laser-ablated TiO2 nanoparticles for their size and size distribution by comparing SAXS- and TEM-measured nanoparticle size and size distribution. SAXS- and TEM-measured size distributions closely followed each other for each sample, and size distributions in both showed maxima at the same nanoparticle size. The SAXS-measured nanoparticle diameters were slightly larger than the respective diameters measured by TEM. This was because SAXS measures an agglomerate consisting of several particles as one big particle which slightly increased the mean diameter. TEM- and SAXS-measured mean diameters when plotted together showed similar trend in the variation in the size as the laser power was changed which along with extremely similar size distributions for TEM and SAXS validated the application of SAXS for size distribution measurement of the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles.

  17. Pulsed Laser Ablation-Induced Green Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles and Application of Novel Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Technique for Nanoparticle Size and Size Distribution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amandeep; Vihinen, Jorma; Frankberg, Erkka; Hyvärinen, Leo; Honkanen, Mari; Levänen, Erkki

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to introduce small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as a promising technique for measuring size and size distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles. In this manuscript, pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) has been demonstrated as a quick and simple technique for synthesizing TiO2 nanoparticles directly into deionized water as a suspension from titanium targets. Spherical TiO2 nanoparticles with diameters in the range 4-35 nm were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed highly crystalline nanoparticles that comprised of two main photoactive phases of TiO2: anatase and rutile. However, presence of minor amounts of brookite was also reported. The traditional methods for nanoparticle size and size distribution analysis such as electron microscopy-based methods are time-consuming. In this study, we have proposed and validated SAXS as a promising method for characterization of laser-ablated TiO2 nanoparticles for their size and size distribution by comparing SAXS- and TEM-measured nanoparticle size and size distribution. SAXS- and TEM-measured size distributions closely followed each other for each sample, and size distributions in both showed maxima at the same nanoparticle size. The SAXS-measured nanoparticle diameters were slightly larger than the respective diameters measured by TEM. This was because SAXS measures an agglomerate consisting of several particles as one big particle which slightly increased the mean diameter. TEM- and SAXS-measured mean diameters when plotted together showed similar trend in the variation in the size as the laser power was changed which along with extremely similar size distributions for TEM and SAXS validated the application of SAXS for size distribution measurement of the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles.

  18. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  19. Inverse near-critical-angle scattering as a tool to characterize bubble clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, Fabrice R. A.; Krzysiek, Mariusz; Barbosa, Séverine; Wozniak, Mariusz; Mroczka, Janusz; Yuan, Yijia; Ren, Kuan-Fang

    2010-02-01

    Under real flow conditions, the critical-angle scattering of a spherical bubble is too noisy to obtain directly the bubble diameter and refractive index. To solve this problem and to limit the drawback of any counting technique, the critical angle refractometry and sizing (CARS) technique has been extended as a collective ensemble technique. As an inverse method it allows to get the size distribution and composition of a cloud of bubbles. In this paper we review the principle, the advantages and limits of this new optical particle characterization method.

  20. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering) from polymers and colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been remarkably successful in providing detailed quantitative structural information on complex everyday materials, such as polymers and colloids, which are often of considerable industrial as well as academic interest. This paper reviews some recent SANS experiments on polymers and colloids, including ferrofluids, and discusses the use of these apparently complex systems as general physical models of the liquid or solid state.

  1. Large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, Wim; Passarino, Giampiero

    1998-04-01

    A critical assessment is given of the theoretical uncertainty in the predicted cross-sections for large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1, with or without t-channel subtraction. To this end a detailed comparison is presented of the results obtained with the programs ALIBABA and TOPAZ0. Differences in the implementation of the radiative corrections and the effect of missing higher-order terms are critically discussed. © 1998

  2. Wide-angle light scattering (WALS) for soot aggregate characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Oltmann, Hergen; Reimann, Joerg; Will, Stefan

    2010-03-15

    A novel set-up for the experimental determination of aggregate morphology in combustion processes based on elastic light scattering has been designed and realized. A key feature of this wide-angle light scattering (WALS) approach is an ellipsoidal mirror which is used to collect scattered light over a wide angular range of about 10-170 . The set-up employs a cw solid-state laser as light source and an intensified CCD-camera as detector. By means of the mirror the scattered light is imaged onto the detector allowing for a simultaneous acquisition of a full scattering diagram with a high angular resolution of about 0.6 . To demonstrate the performance of the approach, measurements for various sooting flames produced by premixed combustion in a flat flame burner were carried out, where the burner was operated with different equivalence ratios and fuels. It is shown that radii of gyration of soot particles may efficiently be obtained from an analysis of the scattering diagrams. (author)

  3. Development of wide-angle 2D light scattering static cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Linyan; Liu, Qiao; Shao, Changshun; Su, Xuantao

    2016-10-01

    We have recently developed a 2D light scattering static cytometer for cellular analysis in a label-free manner, which measures side scatter (SSC) light in the polar angular range from 79 to 101 degrees. Compared with conventional flow cytometry, our cytometric technique requires no fluorescent labeling of the cells, and static cytometry measurements can be performed without flow control. In this paper we present an improved label-free static cytometer that can obtain 2D light scattering patterns in a wider angular range. By illuminating the static microspheres on chip with a scanning optical fiber, wide-angle 2D light scattering patterns of single standard microspheres with a mean diameter of 3.87 μm are obtained. The 2D patterns of 3.87 μm microspheres contain both large-angle forward scatter (FSC) and SSC light in the polar angular range from 40 to 100 degrees, approximately. Experimental 2D patterns of 3.87 μm microspheres are in good agreement with Mie theory simulated ones. The wide-angle light scattering measurements may provide a better resolution for particle analysis as compared with the SSC measurements. Two dimensional light scattering patterns of HL-60 human acute leukemia cells are obtained by using our static cytometer. Compared with SSC 2D light scattering patterns, wide-angle 2D patterns contain richer information of the HL-60 cells. The obtaining of 2D light scattering patterns in a wide angular range could help to enhance the capabilities of our label-free static cytometry for cell analysis.

  4. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  5. Small-Angle Scattering from Nanoscale Fat Fractals.

    PubMed

    Anitas, E M; Slyamov, A; Todoran, R; Szakacs, Z

    2017-12-01

    Small-angle scattering (of neutrons, x-ray, or light; SAS) is considered to describe the structural characteristics of deterministic nanoscale fat fractals. We show that in the case of a polydisperse fractal system, with equal probability for any orientation, one obtains the fractal dimensions and scaling factors at each structural level. This is in agreement with general results deduced in the context of small-angle scattering analysis of a system of randomly oriented, non-interacting, nano-/micro-fractals. We apply our results to a two-dimensional fat Cantor-like fractal, calculating analytic expressions for the scattering intensities and structure factors. We explain how the structural properties can be computed from experimental data and show their correlation to the variation of the scaling factor with the iteration number. The model can be used to interpret recorded experimental SAS data in the framework of fat fractals and can reveal structural properties of materials characterized by a regular law of changing of the fractal dimensions. It can describe successions of power-law decays, with arbitrary decreasing values of the scattering exponents, and interleaved by regions of constant intensity.

  6. Small-Angle Scattering from Nanoscale Fat Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.; Slyamov, A.; Todoran, R.; Szakacs, Z.

    2017-06-01

    Small-angle scattering (of neutrons, x-ray, or light; SAS) is considered to describe the structural characteristics of deterministic nanoscale fat fractals. We show that in the case of a polydisperse fractal system, with equal probability for any orientation, one obtains the fractal dimensions and scaling factors at each structural level. This is in agreement with general results deduced in the context of small-angle scattering analysis of a system of randomly oriented, non-interacting, nano-/micro-fractals. We apply our results to a two-dimensional fat Cantor-like fractal, calculating analytic expressions for the scattering intensities and structure factors. We explain how the structural properties can be computed from experimental data and show their correlation to the variation of the scaling factor with the iteration number. The model can be used to interpret recorded experimental SAS data in the framework of fat fractals and can reveal structural properties of materials characterized by a regular law of changing of the fractal dimensions. It can describe successions of power-law decays, with arbitrary decreasing values of the scattering exponents, and interleaved by regions of constant intensity.

  7. Limiting cases of the small-angle scattering approximation solutions for the propagation of laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of photons in a medium with strongly anisotropic scattering is a problem with a considerable history. Like the propagation of electrons in metal foils, it may be solved in the small-angle scattering approximation by the use of Fourier-transform techniques. In certain limiting cases, one may even obtain analytic expressions. This paper presents some of these results in a model-independent form and also illustrates them by the use of four different phase-function models. Sample calculations are provided for comparison purposes

  8. Orienting rigid and flexible biological assemblies in ferrofluids for small-angle neutron scattering studies

    PubMed Central

    Sosnick, T.; Charles, S.; Stubbs, G.; Yau, P.; Bradbury, E. M.; Timmins, P.; Trewhella, J.

    1991-01-01

    Small-angle scattering from macromolecules in solution is widely used to study their structures, but the information content is limited because the molecules are generally randomly oriented and hence the data are spherically averaged. The use of oriented rodlike structures for scattering, as in fiber diffraction, greatly increases the amount of structural detail that can be obtained. A new technique using a ferromagnetic fluid has been developed to align elongated structures independent of their intrinsic magnetic properties. This technique is ideal for small-angle neutron scattering because the scattering from the ferrofluid particles can be reduced significantly by matching the neutron scattering length density of the particles to a D2O solvent (“contrast matching”). The net result is scattering primarily from the ordered biological assembly in a solution environment that can be adjusted to physiological pH and ionic strength. Scattering results from ordered tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco rattle virus, and chromain fibers are presented. ImagesFIGURE 4FIGURE 4 PMID:19431809

  9. Characteristics of low-angle x-ray scattering from some biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.; El-Lakkani, Ali

    1999-12-01

    Design of medical imaging devices based on the detection of low-angle coherent scattering is a subject of increasing interest. The technique is based on the differences in the distribution of photons coherently scattered from different body tissues. Coherent scattering is also useful in monitoring changes that may occur in a healthy tissue (e.g. carcinoma). In this work, low-angle scattering properties of some tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are studied. Special care is given to the possibility of distinguishing between tissues of similar water content (e.g. muscle and blood). For this purpose, a Monte Carlo simulation is updated, introducing molecular form factor data, which include molecular interference effects. This program is used to simulate the angular distribution of scattered photons from two tissue-equivalent materials (lucite and water) and three biological samples (muscle, fat and blood). Simulation results agree well with previously measured angular distributions of scattered photons at 59.54 keV. Scattering from water and lucite is also measured at 8.047 keV. The effects of scattering geometry, sample thickness, incident photon energy and tissue type on the angular distribution of scattered photons are investigated. Results reveal the potential of measuring the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the scattered photon distribution for tissue characterization. Energies up to 13 keV and sample thickness of 0.3 cm reported maximum differences between investigated samples. These conditions are expected to maximize the potential of using coherent scattering set-ups to monitor changes in biological samples even if their water contents are similar. Present results may act as a guide for the optimization of coherent scattering imaging systems.

  10. The effect of pressure, isotopic (H/D) substitution, and other variables on miscibility in polymer-solvent systems. The nature of the demixing process; dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A research program examining the effects of pressure, isotope substitution and other variables on miscibility in polymer solvent systems is described. The techniques employed included phase equilibrium measurements and dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering.

  11. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byeongdu; Senesi-Good, Andrew J.; Li, Tao

    2016-09-28

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and ångström length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle’s size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchal structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X ray characterization tools. We conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-rays scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and in operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  12. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J.; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-04-07

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and ångström length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle’s size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchal structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X ray characterization tools. Furthermore, we conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-rays scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and in operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  13. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J.; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-04-07

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and ångström length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle’s size, size distribution,more » shape, and organization into hierarchal structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X ray characterization tools. Furthermore, we conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-rays scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and in operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.« less

  14. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-09-28

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and angstrom length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle's size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchical structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well as the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X-ray characterization tools. We conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-ray scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  15. Measuring the distribution of cellulose microfibril angles in primary cell walls by small angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-ray scattering is a well-established method for measuring cellulose microfibril angles in secondary cell walls. However, little data is available on the much thinner primary cell walls. Here, we show that microfibril orientation distributions can be determined by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) even in primary cell walls. The technique offers a number of advantages: samples can be analyzed in the native hydrated state without any preparation which minimizes the risk of artifacts and allows for fast data acquisition. The method provides data averaged over a specimen region, determined by the size of the used X-ray beam and, thus, yields the microfibril orientation distribution within this region. Results Cellulose microfibril orientation distributions were obtained for single cells of the alga Chara corallina, as well as for the multicellular hypocotyl of Arabidopsis thaliana. In both, Chara and Arabidopsis, distributions with a broad scattering around mean microfibril angles of approximately 0° and 90° towards the longitudinal axis of the cells were found. Conclusions With SAXS, the structure of primary cell walls can be analysed in their native state and new insights into the cellulose microfibril orientation of primary cell walls can be gained. The data shows that SAXS can serve as a valuable tool for the analysis of cellulose microfibril orientation in primary cell walls and, in consequence, add to the understanding of its mechanical behaviour and the intriguing mechanisms behind cell growth. PMID:25170343

  16. Accounting for thermodynamic non-ideality in the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data of proteins.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J

    2016-12-01

    Hydrodynamic studies of the solution properties of proteins and other biological macromolecules are often hard to interpret when the sample is present at a reasonably concentrated solution. The reason for this is that solutions exhibit deviations from ideal behaviour which is manifested as thermodynamic non-ideality. The range of concentrations at which this behaviour typically is exhibited is as low as 1-2 mg/ml, well within the range of concentrations used for their analysis by techniques such as small-angle scattering. Here we discuss thermodynamic non-ideality used previously used in the context of light scattering and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation and apply it to the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data. The results show that there is a complementarity between the radially averaged structure factor derived from small-angle X-ray scattering/small-angle neutron scattering studies and the second virial coefficient derived from sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation experiments.

  17. Analysis of PKR Structure by Small-Angle Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    VanOudenhove, Jennifer; Anderson, Eric; Krueger, Susan; Cole, James L.

    2009-04-27

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is a key component of the interferon antiviral defense pathway. Upon binding double-stranded RNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation reactions that activate the kinase. PKR contains an N-terminal double-stranded RNA binding domain, which consists of two tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs, and a C-terminal kinase domain. We have used small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering to define the conformation of latent PKR in solution. Guinier analysis indicates a radius of gyration of about 35 {angstrom}. The p(r) distance distribution function exhibits a peak near 30 {angstrom}, with a broad shoulder extending to longer distances. Good fits to the scattering data require models that incorporate multiple compact and extended conformations of the two interdomain linker regions. Thus, PKR belongs to the growing family of proteins that contain intrinsically unstructured regions. We propose that the flexible linkers may allow PKR to productively dimerize upon interaction with RNA activators that have diverse structures.

  18. Survey of background scattering from materials found in small-angle neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J. G.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of beam attenuation and background scattering for common materials placed in a neutron beam are presented over the temperature range of 300–700 K. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements have also been made, to determine the fraction of the background that is either inelastic or quasi-elastic scattering as measured with a 3He detector. Other background sources considered include double Bragg diffraction from windows or samples, scattering from gases, and phonon scattering from solids. Background from the residual air in detector vacuum vessels and scattering from the 3He detector dome are presented. The thickness dependence of the multiple scattering correction for forward scattering from water is calculated. Inelastic phonon background scattering at small angles for crystalline solids is both modeled and compared with measurements. Methods of maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio by material selection, choice of sample thickness and wavelength, removal of inelastic background by TOF or Be filters, and removal of spin-flip scattering with polarized beam analysis are discussed. PMID:26306088

  19. Survey of background scattering from materials found in small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Barker, J G; Mildner, D F R

    2015-08-01

    Measurements and calculations of beam attenuation and background scattering for common materials placed in a neutron beam are presented over the temperature range of 300-700 K. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements have also been made, to determine the fraction of the background that is either inelastic or quasi-elastic scattering as measured with a (3)He detector. Other background sources considered include double Bragg diffraction from windows or samples, scattering from gases, and phonon scattering from solids. Background from the residual air in detector vacuum vessels and scattering from the (3)He detector dome are presented. The thickness dependence of the multiple scattering correction for forward scattering from water is calculated. Inelastic phonon background scattering at small angles for crystalline solids is both modeled and compared with measurements. Methods of maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio by material selection, choice of sample thickness and wavelength, removal of inelastic background by TOF or Be filters, and removal of spin-flip scattering with polarized beam analysis are discussed.

  20. Monte Carlo calculation of large and small-angle electron scattering in air

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, B. I.; Higginson, D. P.; Eng, C. D.; ...

    2017-08-12

    A Monte Carlo method for angle scattering of electrons in air that accommodates the small-angle multiple scattering and larger-angle single scattering limits is introduced. In this work, the algorithm is designed for use in a particle-in-cell simulation of electron transport and electromagnetic wave effects in air. The method is illustrated in example calculations.

  1. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  2. Small angle scattering from protein/sugar conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andrew; White, John

    2006-11-01

    The Maillard reaction between free amine groups on proteins and sugars is well known. We have examined the effect of the reaction of the casein group of milk proteins with sugars on their nanoscale structure and aggregation. The small angle neutron scattering from beta casein and sodium caseinate and their sugar conjugates have been studied as a function of solution concentration. At high conjugate concentration (greater than ca. 5 mg/ml) the addition of sugar reduces supra-micellar aggregation of the protein whilst at lower concentration, where the protein is expected to be deaggregated already, little effect is seen. Guinier analysis of the scattering data show a radius of gyration of around 75 A˚ for beta casein in solution and around 80 A˚ for the sucrose conjugate.

  3. Small-angle neutron scattering study of polymeric micellar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Chu, B. ); Schneider, D.K. )

    1994-11-17

    Polymeric micellar structures formed by a PEO-PPO-PEO copolymer in o-xylene in the presence of water were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. In order to reveal the detailed micellar structure, different contrasts among the micellar core, the micellar shell, and the dispersing medium (background) were constructed by selectively changing the protonated/deuterated combination of water and xylene. The micellar structure could be well described by a core-shell structure with the scattering behavior of the micellar shell being very similar to that of a star polymer. The solubilized water existed not only in the micellar core but also in the micellar shell. The volume fraction of a copolymer segments in the micellar shell was rather low, being of the order of 0.2. There seemed to be no sharp interface between the micellar core and the micellar shell. 25 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. E. Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-15

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  5. Characterization of photosynthetic supramolecular assemblies using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Marone, P.; Wagner, A.M.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1995-12-31

    We are using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to resolve structural features of supramolecular assemblies of photosynthetic proteins in liquid and frozen solutions. SANS resolves the size, shape, and structural homogeneity of macromolecular assemblies in samples identical to those used for spectroscopic assays of photosynthetic function. Likely molecular structures of the supramolecular assemblies can be identified by comparing experimental scattering data with scattering profiles calculated for model supramolecular assemblies built from crystal structures of the individual proteins. SANS studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, RC, presented here, show that the detergent solubilized RC exists in a variety of monomeric and aggregation states. The distribution between monomer and aggregate was found to depend strongly upon detergent, temperature and nature of additives, such as ethylene glycol used for low temperature spectroscopy and polyethylene glycol used for crystallization. Likely aggregate structures are being identified by fitting the experimental scattering profiles with those calculated for model aggregates built-up using the RC crystal structure. This work establishes the foundation for using SANS to identify intermediates in the RC crystallization pathways, and for determining likely structures of complexes formed between the RC and its physiological reaction partners, cytochrome c, and the LHI antenna complex.

  6. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Mildner, D F R

    2016-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.

  7. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry. PMID:27275140

  8. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-05-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. Furthermore, the aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.

  9. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-05-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding tomore » the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. Furthermore, the aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry.« less

  10. Large Solid Angle Spectrometer for Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gelebart, F.; Morand, M.; Dermigny, Q.; Giura, P.; Shukla, A.; Rueff, J.-P.

    2007-01-19

    We have designed a large solid angle spectrometer mostly devoted to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of materials under extreme conditions (high pressure / temperature) in the hard x-ray range. The new IXS spectrometer is designed to optimize the photon throughput while preserving an excellent resolving power of {approx}10000 in the considered energy range. The spectrometer consists of an array of up to 4 spherically bent 0.5 m radius analyzer crystals and a solid-state detector positioned on the Rowland circle. The four analyzers can cover a solid angle more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional spectrometers. The spectrometer is to be installed on the GALAXIES beamline at SOLEIL in the near future.

  11. Small-angle electron scattering of magnetic fine structures.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic structures in magnetic artificial lattices and chiral magnetic orders in chiral magnets have been quantitatively analyzed in the reciprocal space by means of small-angle electron scattering (SAES) method. Lorentz deflection due to magnetic moments and Bragg diffraction due to periodicity are simultaneously recorded at an angle of the order of or less than 1 × 10(-6) rad, using a camera length of more than 100 m. The present SAES method, together with TEM real-space imaging methods such as in-situ Lorentz microscopy, is very powerful in analyzing magnetic fine structures in magnetic materials. Indeed, the existence of both a chiral helimagnetic structure and a chiral magnetic soliton lattice in a chiral magnet CrNb3S6 has been successfully verified for the first time using the present complementary methods.

  12. ASIC for Small Angle Neutron Scattering Experiments at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Smith, Graham C.; Yu, Bo; Vernon, Emerson; Britton, Charles L.; Bryan, William L.; Clonts, Lloyd G.; Frank, Shane S.

    2007-06-01

    We present an ASIC for a 3He gas detector to be used in small angle neutron scattering experiments at the spallation neutron source in oak ridge. The ASIC is composed of 64 channels with low noise charge amplification, filtering, timing and amplitude measurement circuits, where an innovative current-mode peak-detector and digitizer (PDAD) is adopted. The proposed PDAD provides at the same time peak detection and A/D conversion in real time, at low power, and without requiring a clock signal. The channels share an efficient data sparsification and derandomization scheme, a 30-bit 256 deep FIFO, and low voltage differential signaling.

  13. The potential for studying the effects of microgravity on connective tissue by small angle light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, K.; Bellare, A.; Shortkroff, S.; Dahlgren, E.

    In order to address the effects of microgravity on living tissue, we must examine and understand tissue response on a molecular level. Doing so requires the development of quantitative techniques for characterizing tissue behavior on the micrometer scale under both normal and reduced gravitational fields. It has been demonstrated that small angle light scattering holds great promise in this regard. Small angle light scattering (SALS) has been used to probe tissue microstructure on the micron and sub-micron length scales. Quantitative information on feature geometry, dimension and orientation was obtained. Here, we discuss the application of small angle light scattering techniques to the study of connective tissue. Two terrestrial situations relevant to future microgravity studies were considered: the anisotropic behavior of collagen fibers in rabbit tendon in response to increasing load; and, the variation in collagen structure in healthy and arthritic human cartilage. SALS allowed quantitative determination of both fiber diameter and degree of orientation, providing a level of information beyond that obtainable by light and electron microscopies. The primary advantages of SALS over these techniques lies in its quantitative nature and reduced sample preparation requirements. SALS requires neither vacuum or the use of dyes, eliminating important potential sources of artifacts. Results from these studies compare favorably with microscopy studies and demonstrate the importance of the quantitative nature of the technique. In addition, these results also demonstrate the potential of SALS for providing quantitative analysis of effects of microgravity on structural and connective tissue.

  14. Dual-angle, self-calibrating Thomson scattering measurements in RFX-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Fassina, A.

    2014-11-01

    In the multipoint Thomson scattering (TS) system of the RFX-MOD experiment the signals from a few spatial positions can be observed simultaneously under two different scattering angles. In addition the detection system uses optical multiplexing by signal delays in fiber optic cables of different length so that the two sets of TS signals can be observed by the same polychromator. Owing to the dependence of the TS spectrum on the scattering angle, it was then possible to implement self-calibrating TS measurements in which the electron temperature Te, the electron density ne and the relative calibration coefficients of spectral channels sensitivity Ci were simultaneously determined by a suitable analysis of the two sets of TS data collected at the two angles. The analysis has shown that, in spite of the small difference in the spectra obtained at the two angles, reliable values of the relative calibration coefficients can be determined by the analysis of good S/N dual-angle spectra recorded in a few tens of plasma shots. This analysis suggests that in RFX-MOD the calibration of the entire set of TS polychromators by means of the similar, dual-laser (Nd:YAG/Nd:YLF) TS technique, should be feasible.

  15. Dual-angle, self-calibrating Thomson scattering measurements in RFX-MOD

    SciTech Connect

    Giudicotti, L.

    2014-11-15

    In the multipoint Thomson scattering (TS) system of the RFX-MOD experiment the signals from a few spatial positions can be observed simultaneously under two different scattering angles. In addition the detection system uses optical multiplexing by signal delays in fiber optic cables of different length so that the two sets of TS signals can be observed by the same polychromator. Owing to the dependence of the TS spectrum on the scattering angle, it was then possible to implement self-calibrating TS measurements in which the electron temperature T{sub e}, the electron density n{sub e} and the relative calibration coefficients of spectral channels sensitivity C{sub i} were simultaneously determined by a suitable analysis of the two sets of TS data collected at the two angles. The analysis has shown that, in spite of the small difference in the spectra obtained at the two angles, reliable values of the relative calibration coefficients can be determined by the analysis of good S/N dual‑angle spectra recorded in a few tens of plasma shots. This analysis suggests that in RFX-MOD the calibration of the entire set of TS polychromators by means of the similar, dual-laser (Nd:YAG/Nd:YLF) TS technique, should be feasible.

  16. Molecular shapes from small-angle X-ray scattering: extension of the theory to higher scattering angles.

    PubMed

    Shneerson, V L; Saldin, D K

    2009-03-01

    A low-resolution shape of a molecule in solution may be deduced from measured small-angle X-ray scattering I(q) data by exploiting a Hankel transform relation between the coefficients of a multipole expansion of the scattered amplitude and corresponding coefficients of the electron density. In the past, the radial part of the Hankel transform has been evaluated with the aid of a truncated series expansion of a spherical Bessel function. It is shown that series truncation may be avoided by analytically performing the radial integral over an entire Bessel function. The angular part of the integral involving a spherical harmonic kernel is performed by quadrature. Such a calculation also allows a convenient incorporation of a molecular hydration shell of constant density intermediate between that of the protein and the solvent. Within this framework, we determine the multipole coefficients of the shape function by optimization of the agreement with experimental data by simulated annealing.

  17. Structural characterization of chaos game fractals using small-angle scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Anitas, Eugen Mircea; Slyamov, Azat

    2017-01-01

    Small-angle scattering (SAS) technique is applied to study the nano and microstructural properties of spatial patterns generated from chaos game representation (CGR). Using a simplified version of Debye formula, we calculate and analyze in momentum space, the monodisperse scattering structure factor from a system of randomly oriented and non-interacting 2D Sierpinski gaskets (SG). We show that within CGR approach, the main geometrical and fractal properties, such as the overall size, scaling factor, minimal distance between scattering units, fractal dimension and the number of units composing the SG, can be recovered. We confirm the numerical results, by developing a theoretical model which describes analytically the structure factor of SG. We apply our findings to scattering from single scale mass fractals, and respectively to a multiscale fractal representing DNA sequences, and for which an analytic description of the structure factor is not known a priori.

  18. Structural characterization of chaos game fractals using small-angle scattering analysis

    PubMed Central

    Slyamov, Azat

    2017-01-01

    Small-angle scattering (SAS) technique is applied to study the nano and microstructural properties of spatial patterns generated from chaos game representation (CGR). Using a simplified version of Debye formula, we calculate and analyze in momentum space, the monodisperse scattering structure factor from a system of randomly oriented and non-interacting 2D Sierpinski gaskets (SG). We show that within CGR approach, the main geometrical and fractal properties, such as the overall size, scaling factor, minimal distance between scattering units, fractal dimension and the number of units composing the SG, can be recovered. We confirm the numerical results, by developing a theoretical model which describes analytically the structure factor of SG. We apply our findings to scattering from single scale mass fractals, and respectively to a multiscale fractal representing DNA sequences, and for which an analytic description of the structure factor is not known a priori. PMID:28704515

  19. Single-shot measurement of soot aggregate sizes by wide-angle light scattering (WALS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmann, H.; Reimann, J.; Will, S.

    2012-01-01

    The wide-angle light scattering (WALS) approach has been utilized for the measurement of soot aggregate sizes (radii of gyration) in flames on a single-shot basis. Key elements are a pulsed laser and an ellipsoidal mirror, which images the light scattered within a plane onto an intensified CCD camera, thus allowing for an instantaneous acquisition of a full scattering diagram with high resolution. Results for a laminar premixed flame exhibit good agreement with averaged data and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. The applicability of the technique to unsteady combustion processes is demonstrated by measuring aggregate sizes in a weakly turbulent jet-diffusion flame. In both cases light scattering results are verified by data obtained from electron microscopy analysis of sampled soot.

  20. Small-angle scattering model for multilamellar vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Frielinghaus, Henrich

    2007-11-15

    A small-angle neutron-x-ray-light-scattering model for multilamellar vesicles is developed on the basis of a simple geometry. N spherical shells with radii of an arithmetic series are allowed for displacements {delta}R which are limited by {delta}Rscattering angles. Then the important bilayer spacing is larger. The predictive power of the model lies in the connection of the compactness with N and in the maximum correlation peak sharpness. This model considers many length scales at a time while existing theories focus on length scales of the bilayer spacing and the bilayer itself.

  1. Small angle x-ray scattering with edge-illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modregger, Peter; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Benarafa, Charaf; Schittny, Johannes C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Endrizzi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Sensitivity to sub-pixel sample features has been demonstrated as a valuable capability of phase contrast x-ray imaging. Here, we report on a method to obtain angular-resolved small angle x-ray scattering distributions with edge-illumination- based imaging utilizing incoherent illumination from an x-ray tube. Our approach provides both the three established image modalities (absorption, differential phase and scatter strength), plus a number of additional contrasts related to unresolved sample features. The complementarity of these contrasts is experimentally validated by using different materials in powder form. As a significant application example we show that the extended complementary contrasts could allow the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema in a murine model. In support of this, we demonstrate that the properties of the retrieved scattering distributions are consistent with the expectation of increased feature sizes related to pulmonary emphysema. Combined with the simplicity of implementation of edge-illumination, these findings suggest a high potential for exploiting extended sub-pixel contrasts in the diagnosis of lung diseases and beyond.

  2. NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew J; Zhang, Fan; Kline, R Joseph; Guthrie, William F; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The certification of a new standard reference material for small-angle scattering [NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)], based on glassy carbon, is presented. Creation of this SRM relies on the intrinsic primary calibration capabilities of the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering technique. This article describes how the intensity calibration has been achieved and validated in the certified Q range, Q = 0.008-0.25 Å(-1), together with the purpose, use and availability of the SRM. The intensity calibration afforded by this robust and stable SRM should be applicable universally to all SAXS instruments that employ a transmission measurement geometry, working with a wide range of X-ray energies or wavelengths. The validation of the SRM SAXS intensity calibration using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is discussed, together with the prospects for including SANS in a future renewal certification.

  3. A polarization-based Thomson scattering technique for burning plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, E.; Mirnov, V. V.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    The traditional Thomson scattering diagnostic is based on measurement of the wavelength spectrum of scattered light, where electron temperature measurements are inferred from thermal broadening of the spectrum. At sufficiently high temperatures, especially those predicted for ITER and other burning plasmas, relativistic effects cause a change in the degree of polarization (P) of the scattered light; for fully polarized incident laser light, the scattered light becomes partially polarized. The resulting reduction of polarization is temperature dependent and has been proposed by other authors as a potential alternative to the traditional spectral decomposition technique. Following the previously developed Stokes vector approach, we analytically calculate the degree of polarization for incoherent Thomson scattering. For the first time, we obtain exact results valid for the full range of incident laser polarization states, scattering angles, and electron temperatures. While previous work focused only on linear polarization, we show that circularly polarized incident light optimizes the degree of depolarization for a wide range of temperatures relevant to burning plasmas. We discuss the feasibility of a polarization based Thomson scattering diagnostic for ITER-like plasmas with both linearly and circularly polarized light and compare to the traditional technique.

  4. LIGHT SCATTERING: Fast path-integration technique in simulation of light propagation through highly scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, Aleksandr V.; Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    2004-06-01

    Based on the path-integration technique and the Metropolis method, the original calculation scheme is developed for solving the problem of light propagation through highly scattering objects. The elimination of calculations of 'unnecessary' realisations and the phenomenological description of processes of multiple small-angle scattering provided a drastic increase (by nine and more orders of magnitude) in the calculation rate, retaining the specific features of the problem (consideration of spatial inhomogeneities, boundary conditions, etc.). The scheme allows one to verify other fast calculation algorithms and to obtain information required to reconstruct the internal structure of highly scattering objects (of size ~1000 scattered lengths and more) by the method of diffusion optical tomography.

  5. Small angle neutron scattering studies of vesicle stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.

    1997-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate the structure of mixed colloids of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) with the bile salt, cholylglycine (CG), in D{sub 2}O as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). At atmospheric pressure, the system forms an isotropic phase of mixed, single bilayer vesicles (SLV`s). Increasing the external hydrostatic pressure brought about significant changes in particle morphology. At T = 25 C, application of a pressure of 3.5 MPa resulted in the collapse of the SLV`s. Further increase of P, up to 51.8 MPa, resulted in a transition from a phase of ordered (stacked), collapsed vesicles to one of stacked, ribbon-like particles. A similar collapse of the vesicles was observed at higher temperature (T = 37 C) with increasing P, but at this temperature, no ribbon phase was found at the highest pressure explored.

  6. Small Angle Elastic Scattering of Protons off of Spinless Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Alan Graham

    1988-12-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 800 MeV protons incident on ^ {12}C, ^{40} Ca, and ^{208}Pb in the momentum transfer range 20 MeV/c < q < 130 MeV/c have been measured. The data was taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Special delay -line drift chambers with dead regions for the beam to pass through them were used to obtain the data. Through the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear contributions to the differential cross section in the small angle region, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude alpha_{rm n}(0) = Ref_{rm n}(0)/Imf_{rm n }(0) is extracted. The importance of knowing this quantity at lower energies in order to study the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering theories is discussed.

  7. A novel small-angle neutron scattering detector geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Jackson, Andrew; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Piscitelli, Francesco; Kirstein, Oliver; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel 2π detector geometry for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) applications is presented and its theoretical performance evaluated. Such a novel geometry is ideally suited for a SANS instrument at the European Spallation Source (ESS). Motivated by the low availability and high price of 3He, the new concept utilizes gaseous detectors with 10B as the neutron converter. The shape of the detector is inspired by an optimization process based on the properties of the conversion material. Advantages over the detector geometry traditionally used on SANS instruments are discussed. The angular and time resolutions of the proposed detector concept are shown to satisfy the requirements of the particular SANS instrument. PMID:24046504

  8. Reconstruction of three-dimensional anisotropic structure from small-angle scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guan-Rong; Wang, Yangyang; Wu, Bin; Wang, Zhe; Do, Changwoo; Smith, Gregory S.; Bras, Wim; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Péter; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2017-08-01

    When subjected to flow, the structures of many soft-matter systems become anisotropic due to the symmetry breaking of the spatial arrangements of constituent particles at the microscopic level. At present, it is common practice to use various small-angle scattering techniques to explore flow-induced microstructural distortion. However, there has not been a thorough discussion in the literature on how a three-dimensional anisotropic structure can be faithfully reconstructed from two-dimensional small-angle scattering spectra. In this work, we address this issue rigorously from a mathematical perspective by using real spherical harmonic expansion analysis. We first show that, except for cases in which mechanical perturbation is sufficiently small, the existing small-angle scattering techniques generally do not provide complete information on structural distortion. This limitation is caused by the linear dependence of certain real spherical harmonic basis vectors on the flow-vorticity and flow-velocity gradient planes in the Couette shear cell. To circumvent the constraint imposed by this geometry, an alternative approach is proposed in which a parallel sliding plate shear cell is used with a central rotary axis along the flow direction. From the calculation of rotation of the reference frame, we demonstrate the feasibility of this experimental implementation for a fully resolved three-dimensional anisotropic structure via a case study of sheared polymers.

  9. Reflective small angle electron scattering to characterize nanostructures on opaque substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Wu, Wen-Li; Fu, Wei-En; Chien, Yunsan

    2017-09-01

    Feature sizes in integrated circuits (ICs) are often at the scale of 10 nm and are ever shrinking. ICs appearing in today's computers and hand held devices are perhaps the most prominent examples. These smaller feature sizes demand equivalent advances in fast and accurate dimensional metrology for both development and manufacturing. Techniques in use and continuing to be developed include X-ray based techniques, optical scattering, and of course the electron and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Each of these techniques has their advantages and limitations. Here, the use of small angle electron beam scattering measurements in a reflection mode (RSAES) to characterize the dimensions and the shape of nanostructures on flat and opaque substrates is demonstrated using both experimental and theoretical evidence. In RSAES, focused electrons are scattered at angles smaller than 1 ° with the assistance of electron optics typically used in transmission electron microscopy. A proof-of-concept experiment is combined with rigorous electron reflection simulations to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of RSAES as a method of non-destructive measurement of shapes of features less than 10 nm in size on flat and opaque substrates.

  10. Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R.

    2012-07-15

    The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

  11. Small-angle X-ray scattering method to characterize molecular interactions: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Allec, Nicholas; Choi, Mina; Yesupriya, Nikhil; Szychowski, Brian; White, Michael R; Kann, Maricel G; Garcin, Elsa D; Daniel, Marie-Christine; Badano, Aldo

    2015-07-10

    Characterizing biomolecular interactions is crucial to the understanding of biological processes. Existing characterization methods have low spatial resolution, poor specificity, and some lack the capability for deep tissue imaging. We describe a novel technique that relies on small-angle X-ray scattering signatures from high-contrast molecular probes that correlate with the presence of biomolecular interactions. We describe a proof-of-concept study that uses a model system consisting of mixtures of monomer solutions of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as the non-interacting species and solutions of GNP dimers linked with an organic molecule (dimethyl suberimidate) as the interacting species. We report estimates of the interaction fraction obtained with the proposed small-angle X-ray scattering characterization method exhibiting strong correlation with the known relative concentration of interacting and non-interacting species.

  12. Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R.; Müller-Buschbaum, P.

    2012-07-01

    The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

  13. Dual wavelength multiple-angle light scattering system for cryptosporidium detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buaprathoom, S.; Pedley, S.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple, dual wavelength, multiple-angle, light scattering system has been developed for detecting cryptosporidium suspended in water. Cryptosporidium is a coccidial protozoan parasite causing cryptosporidiosis; a diarrheal disease of varying severity. The parasite is transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water, particularly drinking-water, but also accidental ingestion of bathing-water, including swimming pools. It is therefore important to be able to detect these parasites quickly, so that remedial action can be taken to reduce the risk of infection. The proposed system combines multiple-angle scattering detection of a single and two wavelengths, to collect relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering phase functions from tested suspension, and multivariate data analysis techniques to obtain characterizing information of samples under investigation. The system was designed to be simple, portable and inexpensive. It employs two diode lasers (violet InGaN-based and red AlGaInP-based) as light sources and silicon photodiodes as detectors and optical components, all of which are readily available. The measured scattering patterns using the dual wavelength system showed that the relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering pattern of cryptosporidium oocysts was significantly different from other particles (e.g. polystyrene latex sphere, E.coli). The single wavelength set up was applied for cryptosporidium oocysts'size and relative refractive index measurement and differential measurement of the concentration of cryptosporidium oocysts suspended in water and mixed polystyrene latex sphere suspension. The measurement results showed good agreement with the control reference values. These results indicate that the proposed method could potentially be applied to online detection in a water quality control system.

  14. Small angle scattering methods to study porous materials under high uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Sylvie; Balima, Félix; Pischedda, Vittoria; Legrand, Franck; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    We developed a high pressure cell for the in situ study of the porosity of solids under high uniaxial strain using neutron small angle scattering. The cell comprises a hydraulically actioned piston and a main body equipped with two single-crystal sapphire windows allowing for the neutron scattering of the sample. The sample cavity is designed to allow for a large volume variation as expected when compressing highly porous materials. We also implemented a loading protocol to adapt an existing diamond anvil cell for the study of porous materials by X-ray small angle scattering under high pressure. The two techniques are complementary as the radiation beam and the applied pressure are in one case perpendicular to each other (neutron cell) and in the other case parallel (X-ray cell). We will illustrate the use of these two techniques in the study of lamellar porous systems up to a maximum pressure of 0.1 GPa and 0.3 GPa for the neutron and X-ray cells, respectively. These devices allow obtaining information on the evolution of porosity with pressure in the pore dimension subdomain defined by the wave-numbers explored in the scattering process. The evolution with the applied load of such parameters as the fractal dimension of the pore-matrix interface or the apparent specific surface in expanded graphite and in expanded vermiculite is used to illustrate the use of the high pressure cells.

  15. Small angle scattering methods to study porous materials under high uniaxial strain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sylvie Balima, Félix; Pischedda, Vittoria; Legrand, Franck; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2015-02-15

    We developed a high pressure cell for the in situ study of the porosity of solids under high uniaxial strain using neutron small angle scattering. The cell comprises a hydraulically actioned piston and a main body equipped with two single-crystal sapphire windows allowing for the neutron scattering of the sample. The sample cavity is designed to allow for a large volume variation as expected when compressing highly porous materials. We also implemented a loading protocol to adapt an existing diamond anvil cell for the study of porous materials by X-ray small angle scattering under high pressure. The two techniques are complementary as the radiation beam and the applied pressure are in one case perpendicular to each other (neutron cell) and in the other case parallel (X-ray cell). We will illustrate the use of these two techniques in the study of lamellar porous systems up to a maximum pressure of 0.1 GPa and 0.3 GPa for the neutron and X-ray cells, respectively. These devices allow obtaining information on the evolution of porosity with pressure in the pore dimension subdomain defined by the wave-numbers explored in the scattering process. The evolution with the applied load of such parameters as the fractal dimension of the pore-matrix interface or the apparent specific surface in expanded graphite and in expanded vermiculite is used to illustrate the use of the high pressure cells.

  16. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2016-03-01

    Wide-angle Compton scattering (WACS) belongs to the family of exclusive processes, with large values of s, - t , and - u , that can reveal nucleon structure. In the pQCD version of WACS, three active quarks and two hard gluons are required to share the momentum. pQCD predictions for the WACS disagree with the cross sections currently available. In contrast, handbag mechanism calculations involving a single quark coupled to the spectator through GPDs, are compatible with the cross sections. Measurements of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL have been found to be inconsistent with the predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the handbag mechanism, at least at very large angles. There are handbag calculations, including quark and hadron helicity flip, which contradicts pQCD by finding that KLL ≠ALL . A measurement of ALL has been approved to run at Jefferson Lab and which has the potential to clarify the nature of the reaction mechanism in WACS and illuminate the role of quark orbital angular momentum. It will utilize a pure untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target. After an introduction, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  17. Three dimensional scattering center imaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Burnside, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods to image scattering centers in 3-D are presented. The first method uses 2-D images generated from Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) measurements taken by two vertically offset antennas. This technique is shown to provide accurate 3-D imaging capability which can be added to an existing ISAR measurement system, requiring only the addition of a second antenna. The second technique uses target impulse responses generated from wideband radar measurements from three slightly different offset antennas. This technique is shown to identify the dominant scattering centers on a target in nearly real time. The number of measurements required to image a target using this technique is very small relative to traditional imaging techniques.

  18. Low-angle X-ray scattering properties of irradiated spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. P. G.; Braz, D.; Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    The scattering of X-rays at low angles (LAXS) is a technique dominated by the coherent scattering process. One characteristic observation of low-angle coherent scattering is the so-called molecular interference effect, being characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. In the present study, LAXS profiles from five different spices are carefully measured in order to establish characteristic scattering signatures. Samples of Ceylon cinnamon, cumin, nutmeg, paprika and black pepper were bought in local market in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The LAXS patterns were obtained using a Shimadzu DRX 6000 diffractometer in reflection geometry. Coherent scattering patterns are measured for the samples for θ=5-35°. The data were collected in 0.05° increments every 3 s. In order to evaluate the possible molecular structure changes caused to the irradiation procedure, the signatures obtained for control (non-irradiated) spices were compared with spice samples irradiated with different doses varying from 3 to 40 kGy. The LAXS patterns of all samples were obtained after 30, 60, 90, 120 days to evaluate the effect of storage period. Scattering profiles from spices irradiated with different irradiation doses were obtained and the results compared. For each spice, there is no considerable deviation in shape in function of the irradiation dose. It indicates that the molecular structure of each analyzed spices is preserved considering the dose range chosen. The results show that the molecular structure was found to be stable during storage at the ambient temperature for up to 4 months.

  19. Numerical Techniques for Scattering from Submerged Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werby, M. F.; Tango, G. J.; Gaunaurd, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    To represent the final results in terms of matrices, one expands all appropriate physical quantities in terms of partial wave basis states. This includes expansions for the incident and scattered fields and the surface quantities. The method then utilizes the Huygen-Poincare integral representation for both the exterior and interior solutions, leading to the required matrix equations. One thus deals with matrix equations, the complexity of which depends on the nature of the problem. It is shown that in general a transition matrix T can be obtained relating the incident field A with the scattered field f having the form T = PQ(-1), where f = TA. The structure of Q can be quite complicated and can itself be composed of other matrix inversions such as arise from layered objects. Recent improvements in this method appropriate for a variety of physical problems are focused on, and on their implementation. Results are outlined from scattering simulations for very elongated submerged objects and resonance scattering from elastic solids and shells. The final improvement concerns eigenfunction expansions of surface terms, arising from solution of the interior problem, obtained via a preconditioning technique. This effectively reduces the problem to that of obtaining eigenvalues of a Hermitian operator. This formalism is reviewed for scattering from targets that are rigid, sound-soft, acoustic, elastic solids, elastic shells, and elastic layered objects. Two sets of the more interesting results are presented. The first concerns scattering from elongated objects, and the second to thin elastic spheroids.

  20. Grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering at the wiggler beamline BW4 of HASYLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Perlich, J.; Rubeck, J.; Botta, S.; Gehrke, R.; Roth, S. V.; Ruderer, M. A.; Prams, S. M.; Rawolle, M.; Zhong, Q.; Koerstgens, V.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.

    2010-10-15

    We present an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) to grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS). GIWAXS refers to an x-ray diffraction method, which, based on the measurement geometry, is perfectly suited for the investigation of the material crystallinity of surfaces and thin films. It is shown that the overall experimental GIWAXS setup employing a movable CCD-detector provides the capability of reliable and reproducible diffraction measurements in grazing incidence geometry. Furthermore, the potential usage of an additional detector enables the simultaneous or successive measurement of GIWAXS and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). The new capability is illustrated by the microbeam GIWAXS measurement of a thin film of the conjugated polymer poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT). The investigation reveals the semicrystalline nature of the P3OT film by a clear identification of the wide angle scattering reflexes up to the third order in the [100]-direction as well as the first order in the [010]-direction. The corresponding microbeam GISAXS measurement on the present morphology complements the characterization yielding the complete sample informa-tion from subnanometer up to micrometer length scales.

  1. Small-angle scattering and morphologies of ultra-flexible microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Prevost, Sylvain; Lopian, Tobias; Pleines, Maximilian; Diat, Olivier; Zemb, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    The phase diagrams of ternary mixtures of partly miscible solvents containing a hydrotropic co-solvent exhibit a variable miscibility gap and one critical point. This work investigates the entire monophasic region far from and near to the miscibility gap in octan-1-ol/ethanol/water, for which ultra-flexible micro-emulsions (UFMEs) are observed by small-angle scattering techniques. SWAXS (combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering) allows the elucidation of these types of structure. Three distinct areas can be identified in the phase diagram, with scattering data resembling those from direct, bicontinuous and reverse local structures. These UFMEs are far more polydisperse than their surfactant-based counterparts. Water-rich and solvent-rich domains are only delimited by a small excess of hydrotrope, instead of a well defined surfactant layer of fixed area per molecule. It is shown that all scattering spectra obtained for the nanostructured compositions can be modelled by a simple unified analytical model composed of two uncorrelated contributions. The main one is the Ornstein-Zernike formula for composition fluctuations which gives information about the pseudo-phase domain size. The second is a Lorentzian that captures the structure of at least one of the coexisting pseudo-phases. No Porod law can be measured in the SAXS domain. The proposed expression gives access to two characteristic sizes as well as one inter-aggregate distance.

  2. Small-angle scattering and morphologies of ultra-flexible microemulsions1

    PubMed Central

    Prevost, Sylvain; Lopian, Tobias; Pleines, Maximilian; Diat, Olivier; Zemb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The phase diagrams of ternary mixtures of partly miscible solvents containing a hydrotropic co-solvent exhibit a variable miscibility gap and one critical point. This work investigates the entire monophasic region far from and near to the miscibility gap in octan-1-ol/ethanol/water, for which ultra-flexible micro­emulsions (UFMEs) are observed by small-angle scattering techniques. SWAXS (combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering) allows the elucidation of these types of structure. Three distinct areas can be identified in the phase diagram, with scattering data resembling those from direct, bicontinuous and reverse local structures. These UFMEs are far more polydisperse than their surfactant-based counterparts. Water-rich and solvent-rich domains are only delimited by a small excess of hydrotrope, instead of a well defined surfactant layer of fixed area per molecule. It is shown that all scattering spectra obtained for the nanostructured compositions can be modelled by a simple unified analytical model composed of two uncorrelated contributions. The main one is the Ornstein–Zernike formula for composition fluctuations which gives information about the pseudo-phase domain size. The second is a Lorentzian that captures the structure of at least one of the coexisting pseudo-phases. No Porod law can be measured in the SAXS domain. The proposed expression gives access to two characteristic sizes as well as one inter-aggregate distance. PMID:27980512

  3. Sizing aerosolized fractal nanoparticle aggregates through Bayesian analysis of wide-angle light scattering (WALS) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Franz J. T.; Will, Stefan; Daun, Kyle J.

    2016-11-01

    Inferring the size distribution of aerosolized fractal aggregates from the angular distribution of elastically scattered light is a mathematically ill-posed problem. This paper presents a procedure for analyzing Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS) data using Bayesian inference. The outcome is probability densities for the recovered size distribution and aggregate morphology parameters. This technique is applied to both synthetic data and experimental data collected on soot-laden aerosols, using a measurement equation derived from Rayleigh-Debye-Gans fractal aggregate (RDG-FA) theory. In the case of experimental data, the recovered aggregate size distribution parameters are generally consistent with TEM-derived values, but the accuracy is impaired by the well-known limited accuracy of RDG-FA theory. Finally, we show how this bias could potentially be avoided using the approximation error technique.

  4. Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Klejda, B.

    2005-01-28

    scattering. This value corresponds to a weak mixing angle at Q{sup 2} = 0.026 (GeV/c){sup 2} of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w{ovr MS}} = 0.2379 {+-} 0.0016 (stat.) {+-} 0.0013 (syst.), which is -0.3 standard deviations away from the Standard Model prediction: sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w{ovr MS}}{sup predicted} = 0.2385 {+-} 0.0006 (theory). The E158 measurement of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} at a precision of {delta}(sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}) = 0.0020 provides new physics sensitivity at the TeV scale.

  5. New Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Every, E.; Deyhim, A.; Kulesza, J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of a new Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument for use in National Institute of Standards And Technology (NIST) will be discussed. This instrument is similar to a shorter instrument we designed and delivered to ANSTO in Australia called the Bilby SANS instrument. The NIST VSANS and the ANSTO Bilby SANS instruments have very similar dimensions for length and diameter and have similar requirements for internal detector motion, top access port, walkway supports, and ports; however, the Bilby SANS instrument vacuum requirement was lower (7.5×10-5 Torr) and the entire (60,000 pound) vessel was required to move 1.5 meters on external rails with a repeatability of 100 um, which ADC achieved. The NIST VSANS length is 24 meter, internal diameter 2.3 meter with three internal carriages. The NIST VSANS instrument, which covers the usual SANS range will also allow configuration to cover the range between q ∼⃒ 10-4 A-1 to 10-3 A-1 with a sample beam current of (104 neutrons/s). The key requirements are a second position-sensitive detector system having a 1 mm pixel size and a longer sample-detector flight path of 20 m (i.e., a 40 m instrument).

  6. Heparin's solution structure determined by small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Chen, Yin; Cress, Brady F; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Heparin is a linear, anionic polysaccharide that is widely used as a clinical anticoagulant. Despite its discovery 100 years ago in 1916, the solution structure of heparin remains unknown. The solution shape of heparin has not previously been examined in water under a range of concentrations, and here is done so in D2 O solution using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Solutions of 10 kDa heparin-in the millimolar concentration range-were probed with SANS. Our results show that when sodium concentrations are equivalent to the polyelectrolyte's charge or up to a few hundred millimoles higher, the molecular structure of heparin is compact and the shape could be well modeled by a cylinder with a length three to four times its diameter. In the presence of molar concentrations of sodium, the molecule becomes extended to nearly its full length estimated from reported X-ray measurements on stretched fibers. This stretched form is not found in the presence of molar concentrations of potassium ions. In this high-potassium environment, the heparin molecules have the same shape as when its charges were mostly protonated at pD ≈ 0.5, that is, they are compact and approximately half the length of the extended molecules.

  7. Small angle elastic scattering of protons off of spinless nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, A.G.

    1988-07-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 800 MeV protons incident on /sup 12/C, /sup 40/Ca, and /sup 208/Pb in the momentum transfer range 20 MeV/c < q < 130 MeV/c have been measured. The data was taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Special delay-line drift chambers with dead regions for the beam to pass through them were used to obtain the data. Through the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear contributions to the differential cross section in the small angle region, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude ..cap alpha../sub n/(0) = Ref/sub n/(0)/Imf/sub n/(0) is extracted. The importance of knowing this quantity at lower energies in order to study the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering theories is discussed. 130 refs., 60 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies of biological macromolecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Boldon, Lauren; Urquhart, Melissa; Wang, Xiangyu

    2013-01-08

    In this paper, Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) analysis of macromolecules is demonstrated through experimentation. SWAXS is a technique where X-rays are elastically scattered by an inhomogeneous sample in the nm-range at small angles (typically 0.1 - 5°) and wide angles (typically > 5°). This technique provides information about the shape, size, and distribution of macromolecules, characteristic distances of partially ordered materials, pore sizes, and surface-to-volume ratio. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is capable of delivering structural information of macromolecules between 1 and 200 nm, whereas Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) can resolve even smaller Bragg spacing of samples between 0.33 nm and 0.49 nm based on the specific system setup and detector. The spacing is determined from Bragg's law and is dependent on the wavelength and incident angle. In a SWAXS experiment, the materials can be solid or liquid and may contain solid, liquid or gaseous domains (so-called particles) of the same or another material in any combination. SWAXS applications are very broad and include colloids of all types: metals, composites, cement, oil, polymers, plastics, proteins, foods, and pharmaceuticals. For solid samples, the thickness is limited to approximately 5 mm. Usage of a lab-based SWAXS instrument is detailed in this paper. With the available software (e.g., GNOM-ATSAS 2.3 package by D. Svergun EMBL-Hamburg and EasySWAXS software) for the SWAXS system, an experiment can be conducted to determine certain parameters of interest for the given sample. One example of a biological macromolecule experiment is the analysis of 2 wt% lysozyme in a water-based aqueous buffer which can be chosen and prepared through numerous methods. The preparation of the sample follows the guidelines below in the Preparation of the Sample section. Through SWAXS experimentation, important structural parameters of lysozyme, e.g. the radius of gyration, can be analyzed.

  9. Application of small-angle X-ray scattering for differentiation among breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Changizi, V.; Kheradmand, A. Arab; Oghabian, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an X-ray diffraction-based technique where a narrow collimated beam of X-rays is focused onto a sample and the scattered X-rays recorded by a detector. The pattern of the scattered X-rays carries information on the molecular structure of the material. As breast cancer is the most widespread cancer in women and differentiation among its tumors is important, this project compared the results of coherent X-ray scattering measurements obtained from benign and malignant breast tissues. The energy-dispersive method with a setup including X-ray tube, primary collimator, sample holder, secondary collimator and high-purity germanium (HpGe) detector was used. One hundred thirty-one breast-tissue samples, including normal, fibrocystic changes and carcinoma, were studied at the 6° scattering angle. Diffraction profiles (corrected scattered intensity versus momentum transfer) of normal, fibrocystic changes and carcinoma were obtained. These profiles showed a few peak positions for adipose (1.15 ± 0.06 nm−1), mixed normal (1.15 ± 0.06 nm−1 and 1.4 ± 0.04 nm−1), fibrocystic changes (1.46 ± 0.05 nm−1 and 1.74 ± 0.04 nm−1) and carcinoma (1.55 ± 0.04 nm−1, 1.73 ± 0.06 nm−1, 1.85 ± 0.05 nm−1). We were able to differentiate between normal, fibrocystic changes (benign) and carcinoma (malignant) breast tissues by SAXS. However, we were unable to differentiate between different types of carcinoma. PMID:20041048

  10. Recent applications of small-angle neutron scattering in strongly interacting soft condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignall, G. D.; Melnichenko, Y. B.

    2005-08-01

    Before the application of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to the study of polymer structure, chain conformation studies were limited to light and small-angle x-ray scattering techniques, usually conducted in dilute solution owing to the difficulties of separating the inter- and intrachain contributions to the structure. The unique role of neutron scattering in soft condensed matter arises from the difference in the coherent scattering length between deuterium (bD = 0.67 × 10-12 cm) and hydrogen (bH = -0.37 × 10-12 cm), which results in a marked difference in scattering power (contrast) between molecules synthesized from normal (hydrogeneous) and deuterated monomer units. Thus, deuterium labelling techniques may be used to 'stain' molecules and make them 'visible' in the condensed state and other crowded environments, such as concentrated solutions of overlapping chains. For over two decades, SANS has proved to be a powerful tool for studies of structure-property relationships in polymeric systems and has made it possible to extract unique information about their size, shape, conformational changes and molecular associations. These applications are now so numerous that an exhaustive review of the field is no longer practical, so the authors propose to focus on the use of SANS for studies of strongly interacting soft matter systems. This paper will therefore discuss basic theory and practical aspects of the technique and will attempt to explain the physics of scattering with the minimum of unnecessary detail and mathematical rigour. Examples will be given to demonstrate the power of SANS and to show how it has helped to unveil universal aspects of the behaviour of macromolecules in such apparently diverse systems as polymer solutions, blends, polyelectrolytes and supercritical mixtures. The aim of the authors is to aid potential users who have a general scientific background, but no specialist knowledge of scattering, to understand the potential of the

  11. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering study of the NIST mAb reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Liu, Yun; Krueger, Susan; Curtis, Joseph

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of great interest to the biopharmaceutical industry because they can be engineered to target specific antigens. Due to their importance, the biomanufacturing initiative at NIST is developing an IgG1 mAb reference material `NIST mAb', which can be used by industry, academia, and regulatory authorities. As part of this collaborative effort, we aim at characterizing the reference material using neutron scattering techniques. We have studied the small-angle scattering profile of the NIST mAb in a histidine buffer at 0 and 150 mM NaCl. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate an ensemble of structures and calculate their theoretical scattering profile, which can be directly compared with experimental data. Moreover, we analyze the structure factor to understand the effect of solution conditions on the protein-protein interactions. Finally, we have measured the solution scattering of the NIST mAb, while simultaneously performing freeze/thaw cycles, in order to investigate if the solution structure was affected upon freezing. The results from neutron scattering not only support the development of the reference material, but also provide insights on its stability and guide efforts for its development under different formulations.

  12. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES...Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Weapons and Materials...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles 5a. CONTRACT

  13. Small Angle X ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES...Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Weapons and Materials...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles 5a. CONTRACT

  14. Grazing exit small angle X-ray scattering on grain formation in polycrystalline metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-09-25

    We recently proposed a new grazing exit geometry for measuring the small-angle scattering from thin film materials, which we call GESAXS, to contrast with the successful grazing incidence version, GISAXS. The technique is particularly useful for probing nanostructured thin film materials, especially when the coherence properties of the beam are employed. Here we demonstrate the application of GESAXS to evaporated metal films, prepared using an in-situ diffraction chamber, to investigate how their structure evolves upon annealing. Contrasting behavior is seen for Au, which preserves a roughly exponential distribution of domain sizes, and Fe for which the size distribution narrows by an Ostwald ripening process.

  15. Correlation between fractal dimension and surface characterization by small angle X-ray scattering in marble.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Nolasco, Manlio Favio; Méndez-Vivar, Juan

    2010-03-16

    Among several analysis techniques applied to the study of surface passivation using dicarboxylic acids, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has proved to be relevant in the physicochemical interpretation of the surface association resulting between calcium carbonate and the molecular structure of malonic acid. It is possible to establish chemical affinity principles through bidimensional geometric analysis in terms of the fractal dimension obtained experimentally by SAXS. In this Article, we present results about the adsorption of malonic acid on calcite, using theoretical and mathematical principles of the fractal dimension.

  16. A new approach to quantification of metamorphism using ultra-small and small angle neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Lynn, Gary W; Cole, David R

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we report the results of a study using small angle and ultra-small angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS and USANS) to examine the evolution of carbonates during contact metamorphism. Data were obtained from samples collected along two transects in the metamorphosed Hueco limestone at the Marble Canyon, Texas, contact aureole. These samples were collected from the igneous contact out to {approx}1700 m. Scattering curves obtained from these samples show mass fractal behavior at low scattering vectors, and surface fractal behavior at high scattering vectors. Significant changes are observed in the surface and mass fractal dimensions as well as the correlation lengths (pore and grain sizes), surface area to volume ratio and surface Gibbs Free energy as a function of distance, including regions of the aureole outside the range of classic metamorphic petrology. A change from mass-fractal to non-fractal behavior is observed at larger scales near the outer boundary of the aureole that implies significant reorganization of pore distributions early in the metamorphic history. Surface fractal results suggest significant smoothing of grain boundaries, coupled with changes in pore sizes. A section of the scattering curve with a slope less than -4 appears at low-Q in metamorphosed samples, which is not present in unmetamorphosed samples. A strong spike in the surface area to volume ratio is observed in rocks near the mapped metamorphic limit, which is associated with reaction of small amounts of organic material to graphite. It may also represent an increase in pore volume or permeability, suggesting that a high permeability zone forms at the boundary of the aureole and moves outwards as metamorphism progresses. Neutron scattering data also correlate well with transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations, which show formation of micro- and nanopores and microfractures during metamorphism. The scattering data are, however, quantifiable for a bulk rock

  17. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  18. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  19. Preparing monodisperse macromolecular samples for successful biological small-angle X-ray and neutron-scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Cy M; Graewert, Melissa A; Blanchet, Clément E; Langley, David B; Whitten, Andrew E; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2016-11-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are techniques used to extract structural parameters and determine the overall structures and shapes of biological macromolecules, complexes and assemblies in solution. The scattering intensities measured from a sample contain contributions from all atoms within the illuminated sample volume, including the solvent and buffer components, as well as the macromolecules of interest. To obtain structural information, it is essential to prepare an exactly matched solvent blank so that background scattering contributions can be accurately subtracted from the sample scattering to obtain the net scattering from the macromolecules in the sample. In addition, sample heterogeneity caused by contaminants, aggregates, mismatched solvents, radiation damage or other factors can severely influence and complicate data analysis, so it is essential that the samples be pure and monodisperse for the duration of the experiment. This protocol outlines the basic physics of SAXS and SANS, and it reveals how the underlying conceptual principles of the techniques ultimately 'translate' into practical laboratory guidance for the production of samples of sufficiently high quality for scattering experiments. The procedure describes how to prepare and characterize protein and nucleic acid samples for both SAXS and SANS using gel electrophoresis, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and light scattering. Also included are procedures that are specific to X-rays (in-line SEC-SAXS) and neutrons, specifically preparing samples for contrast matching or variation experiments and deuterium labeling of proteins.

  20. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  1. Aerosol particle analysis by Raman scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.; Tang, I.N.

    1992-10-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy is a very versatile tool for chemical characterization of micron-sized particles. Such particles are abundant in nature, and in numerous energy-related processes. In order to elucidate the formation mechanisms and understand the subsequent chemical transformation under a variety of reaction conditions, it is imperative to develop analytical measurement techniques for in situ monitoring of these suspended particles. In this report, we outline our recent work on spontaneous Raman, resonance Raman and non-linear Raman scattering as a novel technique for chemical analysis of aerosol particles as well as supersaturated solution droplets.

  2. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Investigation of angle-resolved scattering from solid explosives residues on a car door for non-contact sensing geometries. Illumination with a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser tuning between 7 and 8 microns was detected both with a sensitive single point detector and a hyperspectral imaging camera. Spectral scattering phenomena were discussed and possibilities for hyperspectral imaging at large scattering angles were outlined.

  3. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, Jan; Doniach, Sebastian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-09-18

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. Although still a low-resolution technique, the advent of high-flux synchrotron sources and the development of algorithms for the reconstruction of 3-D electron density maps from 1-D scattering profiles have made possible the generation of useful low-resolution molecular models from SAXS data. Furthermore, SAXS is well suited for the study of unfolded or partially folded conformational ensembles as a function of time or solution conditions. Here, we review recently developed algorithms for 3-D structure modeling and applications to protein complexes. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging use of SAXS as a tool to study membrane protein-detergent complexes. SAXS is proving useful to study the folding of functional RNA molecules, and finally we discuss uses of SAXS to study ensembles of denatured proteins.

  4. Data reduction for time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering with virtual neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Rong; Tian, Haolai; Zuo, Taisen; Tang, Ming; Yan, Lili; Zhang, Junrong

    2017-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is an experimental technique to detect material structures in the nanometer to micrometer range. The solution of the structural model constructed from SANS strongly depends on the accuracy of the reduced data. The time-of-flight (TOF) SANS data are dependent on the wavelength of the pulsed neutron source. Therefore, data reduction must be handled very carefully to transform measured neutron events into neutron scattering intensity. In this study, reduction algorithms for TOF SANS data are developed and optimized using simulated data from a virtual neutron experiment. Each possible effect on the measured data is studied systematically, and suitable corrections are performed to obtain high-quality data. This work will facilitate scientific research and the instrument design at China Spallation Neutron Source.

  5. Structural Analysis of the Flagellar Component Proteins in Solution by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lawrence K

    2017-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering is an increasingly utilized method for characterizing the shape and structural properties of proteins in solution. The technique is amenable to very large protein complexes and to dynamic particles with different conformational states. It is therefore ideally suited to the analysis of some flagellar motor components. Indeed, we recently used the method to analyze the solution structure of the flagellar motor protein FliG, which when combined with high-resolution snapshots of conformational states from crystal structures, led to insights into conformational transitions that are important in mediating the self-assembly of the bacterial flagellar motor. Here, we describe procedures for X-ray scattering data collection of flagellar motor components, data analysis, and interpretation.

  6. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of the diffuse scatter of mid-infrared (MIR) laser light from explosives residues on surfaces. Experiments were performed using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) tunable between 7 and 8 μm (1270 to 1400 cm-1) for surface illumination. A mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector was used to detect backscattered spectra as a function of surface angle at a 2 meter standoff. A ferroelectric focal plane array was used to build hyperspectral images at a 0.5 meter standoff. Residues of RDX, tetryl, and TNT were investigated on surfaces including a painted car door for angles between zero (specular) and 50 degrees. We observe spectral signatures of the explosives in the diffuse scattering geometry which differ significantly from those observed in transmission geometries. Characterization of the scattered light spectra of explosives on surfaces will be essential for understanding the performance of standoff explosives detection instruments and developing robust spectral analysis techniques.

  7. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegun, A. K.; Takatsu, J.; Nakaji, T.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Koffeman, E. N.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, should be minimized from 3-5% or higher to less than 1%, to make the treatment plan with proton beams more accurate, and thereby better treatment for the patient. With Geant4 we simulated a proton radiography detection system with two position-sensitive and residual energy detectors. A complex phantom filled with various materials (including tissue surrogates), was placed between the position sensitive detectors. The phantom was irradiated with 150 MeV protons and the energy loss radiograph and scattering angles were studied. Protons passing through different materials in the phantom lose energy, which was used to create a radiography image of the phantom. The multiple Coulomb scattering of a proton traversing different materials causes blurring of the image. To improve image quality and material identification in the phantom, we selected protons with small scattering angles. A good quality proton radiography image, in which various materials can be recognized accurately, and in combination with xCT can lead to more accurate relative stopping powers predictions.

  8. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett N.; James, Robert H.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Calogero, Don

    2015-09-15

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  9. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Walker, Bennett N; James, Robert H; Calogero, Don; Ilev, Ilko K

    2015-09-01

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  10. Upgrade of small angle x-ray scattering beamline BL-6A at the photon factory

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H. Igarashi, N.; Mori, T.; Saijo, S.; Nagatani, Y.; Kosuge, T.; Shimizu, N.; Ohta, H.

    2016-07-27

    BL-6A has been operational since 2011 as a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) beamline at the Photon Factory (PF), and beginning in 2013 its old components and systems, which were mainly inside the experimental hutch, have been extensively updated. Both the vacuum-passes located between the sample stage and the detector and the fixed surface plate have been replaced by a new semi-automatic diffractometer. These upgrades allow simultaneous SAXS/WAXS experiments and grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements to be conducted. The hybrid pixel detector PILATUS3 1M is installed for SAXS, and PILATUS 100K is available as a WAXS detector. Additionally, a pinhole equipped with a micro-ion chamber is available to realize a lower-background and higher-resolution of low angles. Moreover, in a simultaneous SAXS/WAXS experiment, we developed a new beam stop with an embedded photodiode. Thus, BL-6A has evolved into a multipurpose beamline capable of dealing with various types of samples and experimental techniques.

  11. Elevation angle alignment of quasi optical receiver mirrors of collective Thomson scattering diagnostic by sawtooth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moseev, D.; Meo, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Stejner, M.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Kantor, M.

    2012-10-15

    Localized measurements of the fast ion velocity distribution function and the plasma composition measurements are of significant interest for the fusion community. Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics allow such measurements with spatial and temporal resolution. Localized measurements require a good alignment of the optical path in the transmission line. Monitoring the alignment during the experiment greatly benefits the confidence in the CTS measurements. An in situ technique for the assessment of the elevation angle alignment of the receiver is developed. Using the CTS diagnostic on TEXTOR without a source of probing radiation in discharges with sawtooth oscillations, an elevation angle misalignment of 0.9 Degree-Sign was found with an accuracy of 0.25 Degree-Sign .

  12. Elevation angle alignment of quasi optical receiver mirrors of collective Thomson scattering diagnostic by sawtooth measurementsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseev, D.; Meo, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Kantor, M.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Stejner, M.

    2012-10-01

    Localized measurements of the fast ion velocity distribution function and the plasma composition measurements are of significant interest for the fusion community. Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics allow such measurements with spatial and temporal resolution. Localized measurements require a good alignment of the optical path in the transmission line. Monitoring the alignment during the experiment greatly benefits the confidence in the CTS measurements. An in situ technique for the assessment of the elevation angle alignment of the receiver is developed. Using the CTS diagnostic on TEXTOR without a source of probing radiation in discharges with sawtooth oscillations, an elevation angle misalignment of 0.9° was found with an accuracy of 0.25°.

  13. Planar small-angle x-ray scattering imaging of phantoms and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M.; Badano, A.

    2017-04-01

    Coherent small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) provides molecular and nanometer-scale structural information. By capturing SAXS data at multiple locations across a sample, we obtained planar images and observed improved contrast given by the difference in the material scattering cross sections. We use phantoms made with 3D printing techniques, with tissue-mimicking plastic (PMMA), and with a highly scattering reference material (AgBe), which were chosen because of their well characterized scattering cross section to demonstrate and characterize the planar imaging of a laboratory SAXS system. We measure 1.07 and 2.14 nm-1 angular intensity maps for AgBe, 9.5 nm-1 for PMMA, and 12.3 nm-1 for Veroclear. The planar SAXS images show material discrimination based on their cross sectional features. The image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each q image was dependent on exposure time and x-ray flux. We observed a lower SNR (91 ± 48) at q angles where no characteristic peaks for either material exist. To improve the visualization of the acquired data by utilizing all q-binned data, we describe a weighted-sum presentation method with a priori knowledge of relevant cross sections to improve the SNR (10 000 ± 6400) over the SNR from a single q-image at 1.07 nm-1 (1100 ± 620). In addition, we describe planar SAXS imaging of a mouse brain slice showing differentiation of tissue types as compared to a conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging technique.

  14. Small-Angle and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS/USANS) Study of New Albany Shale: A Treatise on Microporosity

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Radlinski, Andrzej P.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2014-12-17

    We applied small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) techniques to study the microstructure of several New Albany shales of different maturity. It has been established that the total porosity decreases with maturity and increases somewhat for post-mature samples. A new method of SANS data analysis was developed, which allows the extraction of information about the size range and number density of micropores from the relatively flat scattering intensity observed in the limit of the large scattering vector Q. Macropores and significant number of mesopores are surface fractals, and their structure can be described in terms of the polydisperse spheres (PDSP) model. The model-independent Porod invariant method was employed to estimate total porosity, and the results were compared with the PDSP model results. It has been demonstrated that independent evaluation of incoherent background is crucial for accurate interpretation of the scattering data in the limit of large Q-values. Moreover, pore volumes estimated by the N2 and CO2 adsorption, as well as via the mercury intrusion technique, have been compared with those measured by SANS/USANS, and possible reasons for the observed discrepancies are discussed.

  15. Small-Angle and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS/USANS) Study of New Albany Shale: A Treatise on Microporosity

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Radlinski, Andrzej P.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; ...

    2014-12-17

    We applied small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) techniques to study the microstructure of several New Albany shales of different maturity. It has been established that the total porosity decreases with maturity and increases somewhat for post-mature samples. A new method of SANS data analysis was developed, which allows the extraction of information about the size range and number density of micropores from the relatively flat scattering intensity observed in the limit of the large scattering vector Q. Macropores and significant number of mesopores are surface fractals, and their structure can be described in terms of themore » polydisperse spheres (PDSP) model. The model-independent Porod invariant method was employed to estimate total porosity, and the results were compared with the PDSP model results. It has been demonstrated that independent evaluation of incoherent background is crucial for accurate interpretation of the scattering data in the limit of large Q-values. Moreover, pore volumes estimated by the N2 and CO2 adsorption, as well as via the mercury intrusion technique, have been compared with those measured by SANS/USANS, and possible reasons for the observed discrepancies are discussed.« less

  16. Versatile wide angle diffraction setup for simultaneous wide and small angle x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rueda, D.R.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.C.; Nogales, A.; Capitan, M.J.; Ezquerra, T.A.; Labrador, A.; Fraga, E.; Beltran, D.; Juanhuix, J.; Herranz, J.F.; Bordas, J.

    2006-03-15

    Here we present a novel, simple, and versatile experimental setup aimed to perform wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements alone or in simultaneous combination with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The design of the WAXS goniometer allows one to obtain high resolution diffraction patterns in a broad angular range. The setup can incorporate a hot stage in order to evaluate temperature resolved experiments. The performance of the equipment has been verified in the BM16 beam line of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility with different well known samples such as alumina, isotropic film of high density polyethylene (HDPE), and oriented HPDE fiber.

  17. Challenges in the separation and analysis of scattered waves in angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2015-03-31

    The measurement of ultrasonic signals on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, referred to as wavefield imaging, is a powerful tool for visualizing wave propagation and scattering. Wavefield imaging provides a more complete picture of wave propagation than conventional single-point measurements, but creates more challenges for analysis. This work considers the development of wavefield-based methods for analyzing angle-beam wave propagation and scattering in plates. Methods of analysis focus on the separation of scattered waves from the total wavefield with the eventual goal of quantitative scatterer characterization in a laboratory environment. Two methods for wave separation are considered: frequency-wavenumber filtering and wavefield baseline subtraction. Frequency-wavenumber filtering is applied to wavefield data that are finely sampled in both space and time, whereas baseline subtraction is a technique that has typically been applied to individual signals recorded from fixed transducers rather than to full wavefield data. Baseline subtraction of wavefields, particularly for the frequency range considered here, is sensitive to both specimen alignment and temperature variations, whereas frequency-wavenumber methods are limited in their ability to separate waves traveling in the same direction. Results are shown for both methods with a focus on investigating and overcoming the challenges to full wavefield baseline subtraction.

  18. Contact angle and contact angle hysteresis measurements using the capillary bridge technique.

    PubMed

    Restagno, Frédéric; Poulard, Christophe; Cohen, Céline; Vagharchakian, Laurianne; Léger, Liliane

    2009-09-15

    A new experimental technique is proposed to easily measure both advancing and receding contact angles of a liquid on a solid surface, with unprecedented accuracy. The technique is based on the analysis of the evolution of a capillary bridge formed between a liquid bath and a solid surface (which needs to be spherical) when the distance between the surface and the liquid bath is slowly varied. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated using a low-energy perfluorinated surface with two different test liquids (water and hexadecane). A detailed description of both experimental procedures and computational modeling are given, allowing one to determine contact angle values. It is shown that the origin of the high accuracy of this technique relies on the fact that the contact angles are automatically averaged over the whole periphery of the contact. This method appears to be particularly adapted to the characterization of surfaces with very low contact angle hysteresis.

  19. SCT: a suite of programs for comparing atomistic models with small-angle scattering data.

    PubMed

    Wright, David W; Perkins, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques characterize proteins in solution and complement high-resolution structural studies. They are of particular utility when large proteins cannot be crystallized or when the structure is altered by solution conditions. Atomistic models of the averaged structure can be generated through constrained modelling, a technique in which known domain or subunit structures are combined with linker models to produce candidate global conformations. By randomizing the configuration adopted by the different elements of the model, thousands of candidate structures are produced. Next, theoretical scattering curves are generated for each model for trial-and-error fits to the experimental data. From these, a small family of best-fit models is identified. In order to facilitate both the computation of theoretical scattering curves from atomistic models and their comparison with experiment, the SCT suite of tools was developed. SCT also includes programs that provide sequence-based estimates of protein volume (either incorporating hydration or not) and add a hydration layer to models for X-ray scattering modelling. The original SCT software, written in Fortran, resulted in the first atomistic scattering structures to be deposited in the Protein Data Bank, and 77 structures for antibodies, complement proteins and anionic oligosaccharides were determined between 1998 and 2014. For the first time, this software is publicly available, alongside an easier-to-use reimplementation of the same algorithms in Python. Both versions of SCT have been released as open-source software under the Apache 2 license and are available for download from https://github.com/dww100/sct.

  20. Development of remaining wall thickness measurement system for boiler wall tube using gamma scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durongsak, K.; Yenjai, C.; Rassame, S.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the General Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP5) simulation of the measuring system for the remaining thickness of the wall tube using gamma scattering technique is performed to investigate the applicability of this technique and to find the optimum geometrical setup for the experimental setup. The numerical results show that the optimal geometry condition to provide the highest ratio between the gamma flux changes per thickness variation, namely, the measurement sensitivity, is the alignment of the source incidence angle of 30 degree and detector scattering angle of 30 degrees. Sequentially, the preliminary experiment of thickness measurement system for the tube using the gamma scattering technique is conducted based on the selected geometrical test setup by the simulation. It is found that the experimental results have generally a good agreement with the calculated results. Conclusively, it is suggested that the gamma scattering technique has a potential method to measure the remaining wall thickness in the boiler wall tube.

  1. How Random are Intrinsically Disordered Proteins? A Small Angle Scattering Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Durand, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    While the crucial role of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) in the cell cycle is now recognized, deciphering their molecular mode of action at the structural level still remains highly challenging and requires a combination of many biophysical approaches. Among them, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has been extremely successful in the last decade and has become an indispensable technique for addressing many of the fundamental questions regarding the activities of IDPs. After introducing some experimental issues specific to IDPs and in relation to the latest technical developments, this article presents the interest of the theory of polymer physics to evaluate the flexibility of fully disordered proteins. The different strategies to obtain 3-dimensional models of IDPs, free in solution and associated in a complex, are then reviewed. Indeed, recent computational advances have made it possible to readily extract maximum information from the scattering curve with a special emphasis on highly flexible systems, such as multidomain proteins and IDPs. Furthermore, integrated computational approaches now enable the generation of ensembles of conformers to translate the unique flexible characteristics of IDPs by taking into consideration the constraints of more and more various complementary experiment. In particular, a combination of SAXS with high-resolution techniques, such as x-ray crystallography and NMR, allows us to provide reliable models and to gain unique structural insights about the protein over multiple structural scales. The latest neutron scattering experiments also promise new advances in the study of the conformational changes of macromolecules involving more complex systems. PMID:22044150

  2. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering of nanoporous two-phase atomistic models for amorphous silicon–germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chehaidar, A.

    2015-09-15

    The present work deals with a detailed analysis of the anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering in amorphous silicon–germanium alloy using the simulation technique. We envisage the nanoporous two-phase alloy model consisting in a mixture of Ge-rich and Ge-poor domains and voids at the nanoscale. By substituting Ge atoms for Si atoms in nanoporous amorphous silicon network, compositionally heterogeneous alloys are generated with various composition-contrasts between the two phases. After relaxing the as-generated structure, we compute its radial distribution function, and then we deduce by the Fourier transform technique its anomalous X-ray scattering pattern. Using a smoothing procedure, the computed X-ray scattering patterns are corrected for the termination errors due to the finite size of the model, allowing so a rigorous quantitative analysis of the anomalous small-angle scattering. Our simulation shows that, as expected, the anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering technique is a tool of choice for characterizing compositional heterogeneities coexisting with structural inhomogeneities in an amorphous alloy. Furthermore, the sizes of the compositional nanoheterogeneities, as measured by anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering technique, are X-ray energy independent. A quantitative analysis of the separated reduced anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering, as defined in this work, provided a good estimate of their size.

  3. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering reveal conformational changes in rhodopsin activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Perera, Suchitrhanga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey V.; Graziono, Vito; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation plays a crucial role in the development of novel improved molecular drugs. During photo-activation, the retinal chromophore of the visual GPCR rhodopsin isomerizes from 11-cis to all-trans conformation, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. The principal goals of this work are to address whether the activation of rhodopsin leads to a single state or a conformational ensemble, and how protein organizational structure changes with detergent environment in solution. We use both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to answer the above questions. For the first time we observe the change in protein conformational ensemble upon photo-activation by SANS with contrast variation, which enables the separate study of the protein structure within the detergent assembly. In addition, SAXS study of protein structure within detergent assembly suggests that the detergent molecules form a belt of monolayer (micelle) around protein with different geometrical shapes to keep the protein in folded state.

  4. Wavelength-independent constant period spin-echo modulated small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim; Habicht, Klaus; Tremsin, Anton; Strobl, Markus

    2016-06-15

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SEMSANS) in Time-of-Flight (ToF) mode has been shown to be a promising technique for measuring (very) small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signals and performing quantitative Dark-Field Imaging (DFI), i.e., SANS with 2D spatial resolution. However, the wavelength dependence of the modulation period in the ToF spin-echo mode has so far limited the useful modulation periods to those resolvable with the limited spatial resolution of the detectors available. Here we present our results of an approach to keep the period of the induced modulation constant for the wavelengths utilised in ToF. This is achieved by ramping the magnetic fields in the coils responsible for creating the spatially modulated beam in synchronisation with the neutron pulse, thus keeping the modulation period constant for all wavelengths. Such a setup enables the decoupling of the spatial detector resolution from the resolution of the modulation period by the use of slits or gratings in analogy to the approach in grating-based neutron DFI.

  5. Morphological characterization of carbon-nanofiber-reinforced epoxy nanocomposites using ultra-small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, R.S.; Anderson, D.P.; Brown, J.M.; Arlen, M.J.; Colleary, A.J.; Lafdi, K.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2010-07-01

    Studies of the properties of nanocomposites reinforced with vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (VGCFs) can be found throughout the literature. Electrical, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties are just a few of the characteristics that have been well discussed. Although these properties depend on morphology, morphological characterization is rare. Due to its 2-dimensional nature, microscopy is of limited value when analyzing network morphologies. This work will show how the characterization of the three-dimensional geometry and network formation of VGCFs can be determined using ultra-small angle scattering techniques. Ultra-small angle x-ray and neutron scattering (USAXS and USANS) were used to characterize the morphology of carbon nanofibers suspended in epoxy. Using a simplified tube model, we estimate the dimensions of suspended fibers. The assumption of tubular fibers accounts for the increased surface area observed with USAXS that is not accounted for using a solid rod model. Furthermore, USANS was used to search for a structural signature associated with the electrical percolation threshold. USANS extends to longer dimensional scales than USAXS, which measures a smaller range of momentum transfer. To determine the electrical percolation threshold, AC impedance spectroscopy was employed to verify that an electrically conductive, percolated network forms at VGCNF loadings of 0.8% < CNF wt% < 1.2%. These values correlate with the USANS data, where a morphological transition is seen at {approx}1.2% loading.

  6. Fine Particle Sensor Based on Multi-Angle Light Scattering and Data Fusion.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenjia; Zhang, Hongjian; Zhou, Hongliang

    2017-05-04

    Meteorological parameters such as relative humidity have a significant impact on the precision of PM2.5 measurement instruments based on light scattering. Instead of adding meteorological sensors or dehumidification devices used widely in commercial PM2.5 measurement instruments, a novel particle sensor based on multi-angle light scattering and data fusion is proposed to eliminate the effect of meteorological factors. Three photodiodes are employed to collect the scattered light flux at three distinct angles. Weather index is defined as the ratio of scattered light fluxes collected at the 40° and 55° angles, which can be used to distinguish the mass median diameter variation caused by different meteorological parameters. Simulations based on Lorenz-Mie theory and field experiments establish the feasibility of this scheme. Experimental results indicate that mass median diameter has less effect on the photodiode at the 55° angle in comparison with photodiodes at the 40° angle and 140° angle. After correction using the weather index, the photodiode at the 40° angle yielded the best results followed by photodiodes at the 55° angle and the 140° angle.

  7. Fine Particle Sensor Based on Multi-Angle Light Scattering and Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wenjia; Zhang, Hongjian; Zhou, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Meteorological parameters such as relative humidity have a significant impact on the precision of PM2.5 measurement instruments based on light scattering. Instead of adding meteorological sensors or dehumidification devices used widely in commercial PM2.5 measurement instruments, a novel particle sensor based on multi-angle light scattering and data fusion is proposed to eliminate the effect of meteorological factors. Three photodiodes are employed to collect the scattered light flux at three distinct angles. Weather index is defined as the ratio of scattered light fluxes collected at the 40° and 55° angles, which can be used to distinguish the mass median diameter variation caused by different meteorological parameters. Simulations based on Lorenz-Mie theory and field experiments establish the feasibility of this scheme. Experimental results indicate that mass median diameter has less effect on the photodiode at the 55° angle in comparison with photodiodes at the 40° angle and 140° angle. After correction using the weather index, the photodiode at the 40° angle yielded the best results followed by photodiodes at the 55° angle and the 140° angle. PMID:28471406

  8. Six-dimensional real and reciprocal space small-angle X-ray scattering tomography.

    PubMed

    Schaff, Florian; Bech, Martin; Zaslansky, Paul; Jud, Christoph; Liebi, Marianne; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-11-19

    When used in combination with raster scanning, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has proven to be a valuable imaging technique of the nanoscale, for example of bone, teeth and brain matter. Although two-dimensional projection imaging has been used to characterize various materials successfully, its three-dimensional extension, SAXS computed tomography, poses substantial challenges, which have yet to be overcome. Previous work using SAXS computed tomography was unable to preserve oriented SAXS signals during reconstruction. Here we present a solution to this problem and obtain a complete SAXS computed tomography, which preserves oriented scattering information. By introducing virtual tomography axes, we take advantage of the two-dimensional SAXS information recorded on an area detector and use it to reconstruct the full three-dimensional scattering distribution in reciprocal space for each voxel of the three-dimensional object in real space. The presented method could be of interest for a combined six-dimensional real and reciprocal space characterization of mesoscopic materials with hierarchically structured features with length scales ranging from a few nanometres to a few millimetres--for example, biomaterials such as bone or teeth, or functional materials such as fuel-cell or battery components.

  9. Six-dimensional real and reciprocal space small-angle X-ray scattering tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaff, Florian; Bech, Martin; Zaslansky, Paul; Jud, Christoph; Liebi, Marianne; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-11-01

    When used in combination with raster scanning, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has proven to be a valuable imaging technique of the nanoscale, for example of bone, teeth and brain matter. Although two-dimensional projection imaging has been used to characterize various materials successfully, its three-dimensional extension, SAXS computed tomography, poses substantial challenges, which have yet to be overcome. Previous work using SAXS computed tomography was unable to preserve oriented SAXS signals during reconstruction. Here we present a solution to this problem and obtain a complete SAXS computed tomography, which preserves oriented scattering information. By introducing virtual tomography axes, we take advantage of the two-dimensional SAXS information recorded on an area detector and use it to reconstruct the full three-dimensional scattering distribution in reciprocal space for each voxel of the three-dimensional object in real space. The presented method could be of interest for a combined six-dimensional real and reciprocal space characterization of mesoscopic materials with hierarchically structured features with length scales ranging from a few nanometres to a few millimetres—for example, biomaterials such as bone or teeth, or functional materials such as fuel-cell or battery components.

  10. NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Kline, R. Joseph; Guthrie, William F.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The certification of a new standard reference material for small-angle scattering [NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)], based on glassy carbon, is presented. Creation of this SRM relies on the intrinsic primary calibration capabilities of the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering technique. This article describes how the intensity calibration has been achieved and validated in the certified Q range, Q = 0.008–0.25 Å−1, together with the purpose, use and availability of the SRM. The intensity calibration afforded by this robust and stable SRM should be applicable universally to all SAXS instruments that employ a transmission measurement geometry, working with a wide range of X-ray energies or wavelengths. The validation of the SRM SAXS intensity calibration using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is discussed, together with the prospects for including SANS in a future renewal certification. PMID:28381972

  11. NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, Andrew J.; Zhang, Fan; Kline, R. Joseph; ...

    2017-03-07

    The certification of a new standard reference material for small-angle scattering [NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)], based on glassy carbon, is presented. Creation of this SRM relies on the intrinsic primary calibration capabilities of the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering technique. This article describes how the intensity calibration has been achieved and validated in the certified Q range, Q = 0.008–0.25 Å–1, together with the purpose, use and availability of the SRM. The intensity calibration afforded by this robust and stable SRM should be applicable universally to all SAXS instruments that employmore » a transmission measurement geometry, working with a wide range of X-ray energies or wavelengths. As a result, the validation of the SRM SAXS intensity calibration using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is discussed, together with the prospects for including SANS in a future renewal certification.« less

  12. Role of Molecular Flexibility and Colloidal Descriptions of Proteins in Crowded Environments from Small-Angle Scattering.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Clark, Nicholas J; Watson, Max C; Krueger, Susan; McAuley, Arnold; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-15

    Small-angle scattering is a powerful technique to study molecular conformation and interactions of proteins in solution and in amorphous solids. We have investigated the role of multiple protein configurations in the interaction parameters derived from small-angle scattering for proteins in concentrated solutions. In order to account for the wide configurational space sampled by proteins, we generate ensembles of atomistic structures for lysozyme and monoclonal antibodies, representing globular and flexible proteins, respectively. While recent work has argued that a colloidal approach is inadequate to model proteins, because of the large configurational space that they sample in solution, we find a range of length scales where colloidal models can be used to describe solution scattering data while simultaneously accounting for structural flexibility. We provide insights to determine the length scales where isotropic colloidal models can be used, and find smoothly varying sets of interaction parameters that encompass ensembles of structures. This approach may play an important role in the definition of long-range interactions in coarse-grained models of flexible proteins with experimental scattering constraints. Additionally, we apply the decoupling approximation to ensembles of lysozyme structures with atomistic detail and observe remarkably different results when using geometric solids, such as ellipsoids. The insights from this study provide guidelines for the analysis of small-angle scattering profiles of proteins in crowded environments.

  13. Broadband and Broad-Angle Low-Scattering Metasurface Based on Hybrid Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Zhao, Jie; Cheng, Qiang; Dong, Di Sha; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-01-01

    A broadband and broad-angle low-scattering metasurface is designed, fabricated, and characterized. Based on the optimization algorithm and far-field scattering pattern analysis, we propose a rapid and efficient method to design metasurfaces, which avoids the large amount of time-consuming electromagnetic simulations. Full-wave simulation and measurement results show that the proposed metasurface is insensitive to the polarization of incident waves, and presents good scattering-reduction properties for oblique incident waves. PMID:25089367

  14. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  15. Resonant scattering and resultant pitch angle evolution of relativistic electrons by plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Chen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Adopting several realistic models for the wave distribution and ambient plasmaspheric density, we perform a comprehensive analysis to evaluate hiss-induced scattering coefficients, the relative role of each resonant harmonic, and the overall effect of hiss scattering on the pitch angle evolution and associated decay (loss) processes of relativistic electrons. The results show that scattering by the equatorial, highly oblique component of the hiss emission is negligible. A quasi-parallel propagating wave model of hiss emissions provides a good approximation for evaluation of scattering rates of ≤ 2 MeV electrons. However, realistic wave propagation angles as a function of latitude along the field line must be taken into account to accurately quantify the rates of hiss scattering above 2 MeV. Ambient plasma density is also a critical parameter that can influence hiss scattering rates and resultant pitch angle evolution of electron flux. While the first order cyclotron and the Landau resonances are dominant for hiss-induced scattering of less than 2 MeV electrons, higher order resonances become important and even dominant at intermediate equatorial pitch angles for ultra-relativistic (≥ 3 MeV) electrons. Hiss induced electron pitch angle evolution consistently shows a relatively rapid initial transport of electrons from high to lower pitch angles, with a gradual approach towards an equilibrium shape, and a final state where the entire distribution decays exponentially with time. Although hiss scattering rates near the loss cone control the pitch angle evolution and the ultimate loss of ultra-relativistic electrons, the presence of a scattering bottleneck (a pronounced drop in diffusion rate at intermediate pitch angles) significantly affects the loss rate and leads to characteristic top hat shaped pitch angle distributions at energies below ~1 MeV. Decay timescales are determined to be on the order of a few days, tens of days, and > 100 days for 500 keV, 2 Me

  16. Angle-resolved molecular beam scattering of NO at the gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutz, Amelia; Nesbitt, David J.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents first results on angle-resolved, inelastic collision dynamics of thermal and hyperthermal molecular beams of NO at gas-liquid interfaces. Specifically, a collimated incident beam of supersonically cooled NO (2 Π 1/2, J = 0.5) is directed toward a series of low vapor pressure liquid surfaces ([bmim][Tf2N], squalane, and PFPE) at θinc = 45(1)°, with the scattered molecules detected with quantum state resolution over a series of final angles (θs = -60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°) via spatially filtered laser induced fluorescence. At low collision energies [Einc = 2.7(9) kcal/mol], the angle-resolved quantum state distributions reveal (i) cos(θs) probabilities for the scattered NO and (ii) electronic/rotational temperatures independent of final angle (θs), in support of a simple physical picture of angle independent sticking coefficients and all incident NO thermally accommodating on the surface. However, the observed electronic/rotational temperatures for NO scattering reveal cooling below the surface temperature (Telec < Trot < TS) for all three liquids, indicating a significant dependence of the sticking coefficient on NO internal quantum state. Angle-resolved scattering at high collision energies [Einc = 20(2) kcal/mol] has also been explored, for which the NO scattering populations reveal angle-dependent dynamical branching between thermal desorption and impulsive scattering (IS) pathways that depend strongly on θs. Characterization of the data in terms of the final angle, rotational state, spin-orbit electronic state, collision energy, and liquid permit new correlations to be revealed and investigated in detail. For example, the IS rotational distributions reveal an enhanced propensity for higher J/spin-orbit excited states scattered into near specular angles and thus hotter rotational/electronic distributions measured in the forward scattering direction. Even more surprisingly, the average NO scattering angle (

  17. Phospholipid Membrane Protection by Sugar Molecules during Dehydration-Insights into Molecular Mechanisms Using Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Lenné, Thomas; Koster, Karen L.; Kent, Ben; Bryant, Gary

    2014-09-24

    Scattering techniques have played a key role in our understanding of the structure and function of phospholipid membranes. These techniques have been applied widely to study how different molecules (e.g., cholesterol) can affect phospholipid membrane structure. However, there has been much less attention paid to the effects of molecules that remain in the aqueous phase. One important example is the role played by small solutes, particularly sugars, in protecting phospholipid membranes during drying or slow freezing. In this paper, we present new results and a general methodology, which illustrate how contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (small angle (SAXS) and wide angle (WAXS)) can be used to quantitatively understand the interactions between solutes and phospholipids. Specifically, we show the assignment of lipid phases with synchrotron SAXS and explain how SANS reveals the exclusion of sugars from the aqueous region in the particular example of hexagonal II phases formed by phospholipids.

  18. Phospholipid Membrane Protection by Sugar Molecules during Dehydration—Insights into Molecular Mechanisms Using Scattering Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Lenné, Thomas; Koster, Karen L.; Kent, Ben; Bryant, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Scattering techniques have played a key role in our understanding of the structure and function of phospholipid membranes. These techniques have been applied widely to study how different molecules (e.g., cholesterol) can affect phospholipid membrane structure. However, there has been much less attention paid to the effects of molecules that remain in the aqueous phase. One important example is the role played by small solutes, particularly sugars, in protecting phospholipid membranes during drying or slow freezing. In this paper, we present new results and a general methodology, which illustrate how contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (small angle (SAXS) and wide angle (WAXS)) can be used to quantitatively understand the interactions between solutes and phospholipids. Specifically, we show the assignment of lipid phases with synchrotron SAXS and explain how SANS reveals the exclusion of sugars from the aqueous region in the particular example of hexagonal II phases formed by phospholipids. PMID:23584028

  19. Preparing Monodisperse Macromolecular Samples for Successful Biological Small-Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Cy M.; Graewert, Melissa A.; Blanchet, Clément E.; Langley, David B.; Whitten, Andrew E.; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2017-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) are techniques used to extract structural parameters and determine the overall structures and shapes of biological macromolecules, complexes and assemblies in solution. The scattering intensities measured from a sample contain contributions from all atoms within the illuminated sample volume including the solvent and buffer components as well as the macromolecules of interest. In order to obtain structural information, it is essential to prepare an exactly matched solvent blank so that background scattering contributions can be accurately subtracted from the sample scattering to obtain the net scattering from the macromolecules in the sample. In addition, sample heterogeneity caused by contaminants, aggregates, mismatched solvents, radiation damage or other factors can severely influence and complicate data analysis so it is essential that the samples are pure and monodisperse for the duration of the experiment. This Protocol outlines the basic physics of SAXS and SANS and reveals how the underlying conceptual principles of the techniques ultimately ‘translate’ into practical laboratory guidance for the production of samples of sufficiently high quality for scattering experiments. The procedure describes how to prepare and characterize protein and nucleic acid samples for both SAXS and SANS using gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography and light scattering. Also included are procedures specific to X-rays (in-line size exclusion chromatography SAXS) and neutrons, specifically preparing samples for contrast matching/variation experiments and deuterium labeling of proteins. PMID:27711050

  20. Counterion Distribution Around Protein-SNAs probed by Small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Kurinji; Bedzyk, Michael; Kewalramani, Sumit; Moreau, Liane; Mirkin, Chad

    Protein-DNA conjugates couple the advanced cell transfection capabilities of spherical DNA architecture and the biocompatible enzymatic activity of a protein core to potentially create therapeutic agents with dual functionality. An understanding of their stabilizing ionic environment is crucial to better understand and predict their properties. Here, we use Small-angle X-ray scattering techniques to decipher the structure of the counterion cloud surrounding these DNA coated nanoparticles. Through the use of anomalous scattering techniques we have mapped the local concentrations of Rb+ ions in the region around the Protein-DNA constructs. These results are further corroborated with simulations using a geometric model for the excess charge density as function of radial distance from the protein core. Further, we investigate the influence of solution ionic strength on the structure of the DNA corona and demonstrate a reduction in the extension of the DNA corona with increasing concentration of NaCl in solution for the case of both single and double stranded DNA shells. Our work reveals the distribution of counterions in the vicinity of Protein-DNA conjugates and decouples the effect of solution ionic strength on the thickness of the DNA layer.

  1. Micelle structural studies on oil solubilization by a small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman; Seong, Baek Seok; Ikram, Abarrul

    2009-02-01

    A small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique was applied to reveal the micelle structural changes. The micelle structural changes of 0.3 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration by addition of various oil, i.e. n-hexane, n-octane, and n-decane up to 60% (v/v) have been investigated. It was found that the size, aggregation number and the structures of the micelles changed exhibiting that the effective charge on the micelle decreases with an addition of oil. There was a small increase in minor axis of micelle while the correlation peak shifted to a lower momentum transfer Q and then to higher Q by a further oil addition.

  2. The crystallization of hectorite clays as monitored by small angle X-ray scattering and NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Xu, L.; Seifert, S.; Gregory, D.; Song, K.; Botto, R. E.

    1999-12-13

    The authors have probed the 48-hr crystallization of a magnesium silicate clay called hectorite. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Photon Source using aliquots ex situ has revealed that data is consistent with ex situ XRD, TGA, AFM, and IR data in that all these techniques see clay crystallite beginning to form in the first few hours of reaction. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) ions are used to aid crystallization and become incorporated as the exchange cations within the interlayers. {sup 13}C NMR shows that 80% of the final TEA loading is accomplished in the first 10 hrs. {sup 29}Si NMR displays a visible clay silicate peak after just 1 hr. In addition, the first in situ study of clay crystallization of any kind was performed by in situ SAXS. Results are consistent with the ex situ data as well as showing the sensitivity of SAXS to sol gel reactions occurring on the order of minutes.

  3. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  4. Multiple size scale structures in silica/siloxane composites studied by small-angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beaucage, G.; Schaefer, D.W.; Ulibarri, T.; Black, E.

    1993-12-31

    The physical properties of in-situ produced composites, such as the TEOS-polysiloxane based systems, are directly related to the complex interaction of structural features from the nano- to macro-scopic scales. The nature of these structural interactions are a key element in understanding and controlling mechanical properties in these systems. We believe that the smallest scale structures, in the nanometer range, correlate with properties such as the modulus while large-scale structures on the micron scale effect failure in these materials. This paper discusses techniques for analysis of structural features and interrelation of structural features over these wide ranges of size using small-angle light, x-ray and neutron scattering. Combination of data from different instruments allows for characterization of the interaction between these different size scale features.

  5. Structure of nanocrystalline palladium and copper studied by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Barker, J.G.

    1996-12-01

    The structure of nanocrystalline palladium and copper, made by inert gas condensation and compaction, was studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of annealing and warm compaction were also examined with these techniques. The SANS results were interpreted using a maximum entropy routine, combined with knowledge of the Archimedes density and hydrogen concentration determined by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). Similar hydrogen concentrations were detected by SANS and PGAA. This hydrogen content, which was approximately 5 at.{percent} in samples compacted at room temperature, was reduced by both annealing and warm compaction. Defects in several size classes were observed, including missing grain pores ({approx_equal}1{endash}50 nm diameter) and defects of micrometer size. Warm compaction produced a lower number density of pores in nanocrystalline palladium, which led to increased density. The observed structure was correlated with Vickers microhardness and fracture surface morphology. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  6. Toward a Taxonomy of the Denatured State: Small Angle Scattering Studies of Unfolded Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, I.S.; Doniach, S.; Plaxco, K.W.

    2005-02-15

    Despite the critical role the unfolded state plays in defining protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics (Berg et al., 2002; Dunker, 2002; Shortle, 2002; Wright and Dyson, 2002), our understanding of its detailed structure remains rather rudimentary; the heterogeneity of the unfolded ensemble renders difficult or impossible its study by traditional, atomic-level structural methods. Consequently, recent years have seen a significant expansion of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS, respectively) techniques that provide direct, albeit rotationally and time-averaged, measures of the geometric properties of the unfolded ensemble. These studies have reached a critical mass, allowing us for the first time to define general observations regarding the nature of the geometry - and possibly the chemistry and physics - of unfolded proteins.

  7. Study of the enzyme ascorbate oxidase by small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritano, S.; Carsughi, F.; Fontana, M. P.; Marchesini, A.

    1996-09-01

    We report a study of the large scale structure of the "blue" copper enzyme ascorbate oxidase by small angle neutron scattering. The enzyme has been extracted from zucchini and studied in solutions of two different preparations. Contrast variation method was used by performing the measurements in water, heavy water and mixtures of H 2OD 2O. Our data show that, at least at the concentrations used here, the gyration radius of the enzyme is about 34 Å; with such a value our analysis is most consistent with a value of 70 KDa for the molecular weight of ascorbate oxidase in the conditions of our experiment. This is in contrast to the generally accepted value of 140 KDa, obtained by other techniques at high concentrations (e.g. greater than 2 mg ml -1). The possible origins of such a discrepancy are discussed.

  8. Membrane Structure Studies by Means of Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R. B.

    2008-03-17

    summary of membrane structure will be followed by an outline of the neutron scattering techniques used to understand membrane structure and dynamics. The emphasis will be on the small angle neutron scattering technique since there is a very powerful instrument at Serpong, however brief mention of other techniques will be included to demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach is usually required.

  9. Measurement of energy spectra of small-angle scattering and distribution of optical microinhomogeneities in laser ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Tverdokhleb, P E; Shepetkin, Yu A; Steinberg, I Sh; Belikov, A Yu; Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F

    2014-06-30

    The energy spectra of small-angle light scattering from the samples of Nd:YAG ceramics and the spatial distributions of optical microinhomogeneities in them are measured. The spatial profiles of microinhomogeneities are found using the collinear heterodyne microprobe technique. Based on the obtained data, the comparison of noise and lasing characteristics of foreign and domestic samples of laser ceramics is carried out. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  10. Thermal degradation of M41S-class mesoporous sieves as revealed by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J. E.; Xu, L.; Winans, R. E.; Seifert, S.

    2000-02-16

    The authors have studied the temperature stability of M41S class siliceous mesoporous materials loaded with carbonaceous material by temperature programmed small-angle X-ray scattering (TPSAXS) techniques. Results show the thermal structural instability of large pore pure silica sieve material with carbonaceous material (such as coal extracts) occluded within the pores of mesoporous 31 {angstrom} M41S materials. Unfilled pore M41S materials do not show thermal-related structural instability.

  11. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  12. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, C; Cisbani, E; Hamilton, D J; Salmé, G; Wojtsekhowski, B; Ahmidouch, A; Annand, J R M; Baghdasaryan, H; Beaufait, J; Bosted, P; Brash, E J; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Christy, E; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Fowler, M; Frlez, E; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Horn, T; Huber, G M; de Jager, C W; Jensen, E; Jones, M K; Kelleher, A; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; Kohl, M; Kumbartzki, G; Lassiter, S; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Lovelace, H; Luo, W; Mack, D; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Mulholland, J; Nelyubin, V; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Slifer, K; Smith, G; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zheng, X

    2015-10-09

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θ_{cm}^{p}=70°. The longitudinal transfer K_{LL}, measured to be 0.645±0.059±0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  13. Small-angle approximation to the transfer of narrow laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The broadening and the signal power detected of a laser beam traversing an anisotropic scattering medium were examined using the small-angle approximation to the radiative transfer equation in which photons suffering large-angle deflections are neglected. To obtain tractable answers, simple Gaussian and non-Gaussian functions for the scattering phase functions are assumed. Two other approximate approaches employed in the field to further simplify the small-angle approximation solutions are described, and the results obtained by one of them are compared with those obtained using small-angle approximation. An exact method for obtaining the contribution of each higher order scattering to the radiance field is examined but no results are presented.

  14. Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering with cone collimation using X-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-09-01

    Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering (ED-SAXS) with an innovative design of cone collimation based on an ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) had been explored. Using this new cone collimation system, scattering angle 2θ has a theoretical minimum angle related to the mean half-opening angle of the hollow cone beam of 1.42 mrad, and with the usable X-ray energy ranging from 4 to 30 keV, the resulting observable scattering vector q is down to a minimum value of about 0.003 Å-1 (or a Bragg spacing of about 2100 Å). However, the absorption of lower energies by X-ray capillary optics, sample transmission, and detector response function limits the application range to lower energy. Cone collimation ED-SAXS experiments carried out on pure water, Lupolen, and in situ temperature-dependent measurement of diacetylenic acid/melamine micelle solid were presented at three different scattering angles 2θ of 0.18°, 0.70° and 1.18° to illustrate the new opportunities offered by this technique as well as its limitations. Also, a comparison has been made by replacing the PPXRL with a pinhole, and the result shows that cone collimation ED-SAXS based on ESBC with PPXRL was helpful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (i.e., reducing the parasitic background scattering) than ESBC with a pinhole. The cone collimation instrument based on X-ray capillary optics could be considered as a promising tool to perform SAXS experiments, especially cone collimation ED-SAXS has potential application for the in situ temperature-dependent studying on the kinetics of phase transitions.

  15. Application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and anomalous small angle scattering to RNA polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, L.; Wu, F. Y.-H.; Phillips, J. C.; Huang, W.-J.; Sinclair, R. B.

    1990-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is ideally suited for the investigation of the electronic structure and the local environment (≤ ˜ 5 Å) of specific atoms in biomolecules. While the edge region provides information about the valence state of the absorbing atom, the chemical identity of neighboring atoms, and the coordination geometry, the EXAFS region contains information about the number and average distance of neighboring atoms and their relative disorder. The development of sensitive detection methods has allowed studies using near-physiological concentrations (as low as ˜ 100 μM). With careful choice of model compounds, judicious use of fitting procedures, and consideration of the results of biochemical and other spectroscopic results, this data has provided pivotal information about the structures of these active sites which store energy in their conformation changes or ligand exchanges. Although the application of anomalous small angle scattering to biomolecules has occurred more recently, it clearly provides a method of determining distances between active sites that are outside the range of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The wavelength dependence of the X-ray scattering power varies rapidly near the edge of the absorbing atom in both amplitude and phase. This behavior selectively alters the contribution of the absorbing atom to the scattering pattern. The structure-function relationship of the intermediate states provide the key to understanding the mechanisms of these complex molecules. It is this precise structural information about the active sites that is not obtainable by other spectroscopic techniques. Combination of these techniques offers a unique approach to the determination of the organization of active sites in biomolecules, especially metalloenzymes. Application of these methods to the substrate and template binding sites of RNA polymerase which contain zinc atoms demonstrates the versatility of this approach.

  16. Analyzing angle crashes at unsignalized intersections using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Haleem, Kirolos

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed machine learning technique, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), is introduced in this study to predict vehicles' angle crashes. MARS has a promising prediction power, and does not suffer from interpretation complexity. Negative Binomial (NB) and MARS models were fitted and compared using extensive data collected on unsignalized intersections in Florida. Two models were estimated for angle crash frequency at 3- and 4-legged unsignalized intersections. Treating crash frequency as a continuous response variable for fitting a MARS model was also examined by considering the natural logarithm of the crash frequency. Finally, combining MARS with another machine learning technique (random forest) was explored and discussed. The fitted NB angle crash models showed several significant factors that contribute to angle crash occurrence at unsignalized intersections such as, traffic volume on the major road, the upstream distance to the nearest signalized intersection, the distance between successive unsignalized intersections, median type on the major approach, percentage of trucks on the major approach, size of the intersection and the geographic location within the state. Based on the mean square prediction error (MSPE) assessment criterion, MARS outperformed the corresponding NB models. Also, using MARS for predicting continuous response variables yielded more favorable results than predicting discrete response variables. The generated MARS models showed the most promising results after screening the covariates using random forest. Based on the results of this study, MARS is recommended as an efficient technique for predicting crashes at unsignalized intersections (angle crashes in this study). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-03

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  18. Numerical analysis of the Fokker-Planck equation with adiabatic focusing: Realistic pitch-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasuik, J.; Fiege, J. D.; Shalchi, A.

    2017-01-01

    We solve the focused transport equation of cosmic rays numerically to investigate non-isotropic models of the pitch-angle scattering coefficient. In previous work, the Fokker-Planck equation was solved either analytically by using approximations, or by using a numerical approach together with simple models for the pitch-angle scattering coefficient. It is the purpose of the current article so compute particle distribution functions as well as the parallel diffusion coefficient by solving numerically the focused transport equation for a more realistic Fokker-Planck coefficient of pitch-angle scattering. Our analytical form for the scattering parameter is based on non-linear diffusion theory that takes into account realistic scattering at pitch-angles close to 90 ° . This general form contains the isotropic form as well as the quasi-linear limit as special cases. We show that the ratio of the diffusion coefficients with and without focusing sensitively depends on the ratio of the turbulent magnetic field and the mean field. The assumed form of the pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficient has an influence on the parallel diffusion coefficient. In all considered cases we found a reduction of the ratio of the diffusion coefficients if the ratio of magnetic fields is reduced.

  19. Particle acceleration with anomalous pitch angle scattering in 2D magnetohydrodynamic reconnection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, A.; Kontar, E. P.; Threlfall, J.; Neukirch, T.

    2017-09-01

    The conversion of magnetic energy into other forms (such as plasma heating, bulk plasma flows, and non-thermal particles) during solar flares is one of the outstanding open problems in solar physics. It is generally accepted that magnetic reconnection plays a crucial role in these conversion processes. In order to achieve the rapid energy release required in solar flares, an anomalous resistivity, which is orders of magnitude higher than the Spitzer resistivity, is often used in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of reconnection in the corona. The origin of Spitzer resistivity is based on Coulomb scattering, which becomes negligible at the high energies achieved by accelerated particles. As a result, simulations of particle acceleration in reconnection events are often performed in the absence of any interaction between accelerated particles and any background plasma. This need not be the case for scattering associated with anomalous resistivity caused by turbulence within solar flares, as the higher resistivity implies an elevated scattering rate. We present results of test particle calculations, with and without pitch angle scattering, subject to fields derived from MHD simulations of two-dimensional (2D) X-point reconnection. Scattering rates proportional to the ratio of the anomalous resistivity to the local Spitzer resistivity, as well as at fixed values, are considered. Pitch angle scattering, which is independent of the anomalous resistivity, causes higher maximum energies in comparison to those obtained without scattering. Scattering rates which are dependent on the local anomalous resistivity tend to produce fewer highly energised particles due to weaker scattering in the separatrices, even though scattering in the current sheet may be stronger when compared to resistivity-independent scattering. Strong scattering also causes an increase in the number of particles exiting the computational box in the reconnection outflow region, as opposed to along the

  20. Using Small Angle Neutron Scattering on Glucose Oxidase immobilized on Single Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh; Gurusaran, M.; Qian, S.; Weiss, K.; Urban, V.; Li, P.; Ma, L.; Ajayan, P.; Narayanan, T.; Sekar, K.; Viswanathan, S.; Renugopalakrishanan, V.

    2015-03-01

    Reliable blood glucose monitoring using biosensors is valuable for health evaluations and medication in wake of chronic diabetic issues accompanying deviations from evolutionary human lifestyle. Glucose oxidase (GOx) is an ideal enzyme because of its specificity and the ability to electrochemically transduce from the enzymatic reaction. We use graphene-based electrode with GOx sensor matrix so that the emitted electrons from sensor matrix can flow across graphene nearly without scattering; crucial for constructing ultrasensitive-sensors. Thereafter, establishing a structure-property based relationships to tune the sensor topology with electrochemically output forms the main focus of the device development process. We have developed a methodology to obtain low-resolution hierarchical models of the aggregate matrix using Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique. A Unified Fit model is used in tandem with GNOM, DAMMIN and DAMAVER to construct low-resolution models for GOx matrices. A detailed explanation of a general methodology for obtaining quantitative details aggregate structures along with qualitative models will be presented.

  1. Synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of proteins in solution

    PubMed Central

    Skou, Soren; Gillilan, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Summary With recent advances in data analysis algorithms, X-ray detectors, and synchrotron sources, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has become much more accessible to the structural biology community than ever before. Although limited to ~10 Å resolution, SAXS can provide a wealth of structural information on biomolecules in solution and is compatible with a wide range of experimental conditions. SAXS is thus an attractive alternative when crystallography is not possible. Moreover, advanced usage of SAXS can provide unique insight into biomolecular behavior that can only be observed in solution, such as large conformational changes and transient protein-protein interactions. Unlike crystal diffraction data, however, solution scattering data are subtle in appearance, highly sensitive to sample quality and experimental errors, and easily misinterpreted. In addition, synchrotron beamlines that are dedicated to SAXS are often unfamiliar to the non-specialist. Here, we present a series of procedures that can be used for SAXS data collection and basic cross-checks designed to detect and avoid aggregation, concentration effects, radiation damage, buffer mismatch, and other common problems. The protein, human serum albumin (HSA), serves as a convenient and easily replicated example of just how subtle these problems can sometimes be, but also of how proper technique can yield pristine data even in problematic cases. Because typical data collection times at a synchrotron are only one to several days, we recommend that the sample purity, homogeneity, and solubility be extensively optimized prior to the experiment. PMID:24967622

  2. Synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering of proteins in solution.

    PubMed

    Skou, Soren; Gillilan, Richard E; Ando, Nozomi

    2014-07-01

    With recent advances in data analysis algorithms, X-ray detectors and synchrotron sources, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has become much more accessible to the structural biology community. Although limited to ∼10 Å resolution, SAXS can provide a wealth of structural information on biomolecules in solution and is compatible with a wide range of experimental conditions. SAXS is thus an attractive alternative when crystallography is not possible. Moreover, advanced use of SAXS can provide unique insight into biomolecular behavior that can only be observed in solution, such as large conformational changes and transient protein-protein interactions. Unlike crystal diffraction data, however, solution scattering data are subtle in appearance, highly sensitive to sample quality and experimental errors and easily misinterpreted. In addition, synchrotron beamlines that are dedicated to SAXS are often unfamiliar to the nonspecialist. Here we present a series of procedures that can be used for SAXS data collection and basic cross-checks designed to detect and avoid aggregation, concentration effects, radiation damage, buffer mismatch and other common problems. Human serum albumin (HSA) serves as a convenient and easily replicated example of just how subtle these problems can sometimes be, but also of how proper technique can yield pristine data even in problematic cases. Because typical data collection times at a synchrotron are only one to several days, we recommend that the sample purity, homogeneity and solubility be extensively optimized before the experiment.

  3. The dynamic duo: Combining NMR and small angle scattering in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Janosch; Sattler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Structural biology provides essential information for elucidating molecular mechanisms that underlie biological function. Advances in hardware, sample preparation, experimental methods, and computational approaches now enable structural analysis of protein complexes with increasing complexity that more closely represent biologically entities in the cellular environment. Integrated multidisciplinary approaches are required to overcome limitations of individual methods and take advantage of complementary aspects provided by different structural biology techniques. Although X-ray crystallography remains the method of choice for structural analysis of large complexes, crystallization of flexible systems is often difficult and does typically not provide insights into conformational dynamics present in solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is well-suited to study dynamics at picosecond to second time scales, and to map binding interfaces even of large systems at residue resolution but suffers from poor sensitivity with increasing molecular weight. Small angle scattering (SAS) methods provide low resolution information in solution and can characterize dynamics and conformational equilibria complementary to crystallography and NMR. The combination of NMR, crystallography, and SAS is, thus, very useful for analysis of the structure and conformational dynamics of (large) protein complexes in solution. In high molecular weight systems, where NMR data are often sparse, SAS provides additional structural information and can differentiate between NMR-derived models. Scattering data can also validate the solution conformation of a crystal structure and indicate the presence of conformational equilibria. Here, we review current state-of-the-art approaches for combining NMR, crystallography, and SAS data to characterize protein complexes in solution. PMID:24687405

  4. Structural evaluation of an amyloid fibril model using small-angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Eshan; Choi, Mina; Alam, Nadia; Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A.; Beaucage, Serge L.; Badano, Aldo

    2017-08-01

    Amyloid fibrils are highly structured protein aggregates associated with a wide range of diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. We report a structural investigation of an amyloid fibril model prepared from a commonly used plasma protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) using small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique. As a reference, the size estimates from SAXS are compared to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and the presence of amyloid-like fibrils is confirmed using Congo red absorbance assay. Our SAXS results consistently show the structural transformation of BSA from spheroid to rod-like elongated structures during the fibril formation process. We observe the elongation of fibrils over two months with fibril length growing from 35.9  ±  3.0 nm to 51.5  ±  2.1 nm. Structurally metastable fibrils with distinct SAXS profiles have been identified. As proof of concept, we demonstrate the use of such distinct SAXS profiles to detect fibrils in the mixture solutions of two species by estimating their volume fractions. This easily detectable and well-characterized amyloid fibril model from BSA can be readily used as a control or standard reference to further investigate SAXS applications in the detection of structurally diverse amyloid fibrils associated with protein aggregation diseases.

  5. Scanning of Adsorption Hysteresis In Situ with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Athanasios Ch.; Favvas, Evangelos P.; Stefanopoulos, Konstantinos L.; Vansant, Etienne F.

    2016-01-01

    Everett’s theorem-6 of the domain theory was examined by conducting adsorption in situ with small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) supplemented by the contrast matching technique. The study focuses on the spectrum differences of a point to which the system arrives from different scanning paths. It is noted that according to this theorem at a common point the system has similar macroscopic properties. Furthermore it was examined the memory string of the system. We concluded that opposite to theorem-6: a) at a common point the system can reach in a finite (not an infinite) number of ways, b) a correction for the thickness of the adsorbed film prior to capillary condensation is necessary, and c) the scattering curves although at high-Q values coincide, at low-Q values are different indicating different microscopic states. That is, at a common point the system holds different metastable states sustained by hysteresis effects. These metastable states are the ones which highlight the way of a system back to a return point memory (RPM). Entering the hysteresis loop from different RPMs different histories are implanted to the paths toward the common point. Although in general the memory points refer to relaxation phenomena, they also constitute a characteristic feature of capillary condensation. Analogies of the no-passing rule and the adiabaticity assumption in the frame of adsorption hysteresis are discussed. PMID:27741263

  6. Modeling detergent organization around aquaporin-0 using small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Berthaud, Alice; Manzi, John; Pérez, Javier; Mangenot, Stéphanie

    2012-06-20

    Solubilization of integral membrane proteins in aqueous solutions requires the presence of amphiphilic molecules like detergents. The transmembrane region of the proteins is then surrounded by a corona formed by these molecules, ensuring a hydrophilic outer surface. The presence of this corona has strongly hampered structural studies of solubilized membrane proteins by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), a technique frequently used to monitor conformational changes of soluble proteins. Through the online combination of size exclusion chromatography, SAXS, and refractometry, we have determined a precise geometrical model of the n-dodecyl β-d-maltopyranoside corona surrounding aquaporin-0, the most abundant membrane protein of the eye lens. The SAXS data were well-fitted by a detergent corona shaped in an elliptical toroid around the crystal structure of the protein, similar to the elliptical shape recently reported for nanodiscs (Skar-Gislinge et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 13713-13722). The torus thickness determined from the curve-fitting protocol is in excellent agreement with the thickness of a lipid bilayer, while the number of detergent molecules deduced from the volume of the torus compares well with those obtained on the same sample from refractometry and mass analysis based on SAXS forward scattering. For the first time, the partial specific volume of the detergent surrounding a protein was measured. The present protocol is a crucial step toward future conformational studies of membrane proteins in solution.

  7. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikfeldt, K. T.; Huang, C.; Nilsson, A.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2011-06-01

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P/2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (TW) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3495974 are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing TW, consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P/2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P/2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching TW. Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  8. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Wikfeldt, K T; Huang, C; Nilsson, A; Pettersson, L G M

    2011-06-07

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P∕2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (T(W)) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)] are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing T(W), consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P∕2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P∕2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching T(W). Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  9. Vortex lattice structure in BaFe2(As0.67P0.33)2 by the small-angle neutron scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Morisaki-Ishii, Rieko; Kawano-Furukawa, H.; Cameron, Alistair S.; Lemberger, L; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Holmes, Alexander T.; Forgan, E. M.; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M.; Littrell, Ken; Nakajima, M.; Kihou, K.; Lee, C. H.; Iyo, Akira; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, S.; White, Jonathon; Dewhurst, C. D.; Gavilano, Jorge; Zolliker, Marcus

    2014-09-09

    We have observed a magnetic vortex lattice (VL) inBaFe2(As0.67P0.33)2 single crystals by smallangle neutron scattering. With the field along the c-axis, a nearly isotropic hexagonal VL was formed in the field range from 1 to 16 T, and no symmetry changes in the VL were observed. The temperature-dependence of the VL signal was measured and confirms the presence of (non d-wave) nodes in the superconducting gap structure for measurements at 5 T and below. The nodal effects were suppressed at high fields. At low fields, a VL reorientation transition was observed between 1 T and 3 T, with the VL orientation changing by 45 . Below 1 T, the VL structure was strongly affected by pinning and the diffraction pattern had a fourfold symmetry. We suggest that this (and possibly also the VL reorientation) is due to pinning to defects aligned with the crystal structure, rather than being intrinsic. The temperature dependence of the scaled intensity suggest that BFAP possesses at least one full gap and one nodal gap with circular symmetry. Judging from the symmetry, the node structure should take the form of an accidental circular line node, which is consistent with recent ARPES results1.

  10. A forward-angle-scattering method for the determination of optical constants and particle size distribution by collimated laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Yu, Xiaoying; Ruan, Liming

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using a secondary optimization technique and forward-angle-scattering method to retrieve optical constants (or complex refractive indices) and particle size distribution (PSD) simultaneously. In this work, two continuous wave lasers of different wavelengths were applied to irradiate the participating samples, and the scattered light of samples with different acceptance angles was obtained. First, the scattered signals within different acceptance angles were calculated by solving the radiative transfer equation. Then, the complex refractive index and PSD were retrieved simultaneously by applying quantum particle swarm optimization. However, the estimated results of PSD were inaccurate. Thus, a secondary optimization, which using the directional radiative intensity as input, was performed to improve the accuracy of PSD based on the first optimization process. Four commonly used kinds of monomodal PSD functions, i.e., the Rosin-Rammler, standard Normal, Logarithmic Normal, and Junge distribution, were retrieved. All results showed that the proposed technique can estimate the complex refractive index and PSD accurately.

  11. Small-angle scattering gives direct structural information about a membrane protein inside a lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Kynde, Søren A R; Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Simonsen, Jens Baek; Schweins, Ralf; Mortensen, Kell; Arleth, Lise

    2014-02-01

    Monomeric bacteriorhodopsin (bR) reconstituted into POPC/POPG-containing nanodiscs was investigated by combined small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering. A novel hybrid approach to small-angle scattering data analysis was developed. In combination, these provided direct structural insight into membrane-protein localization in the nanodisc and into the protein-lipid interactions. It was found that bR is laterally decentred in the plane of the disc and is slightly tilted in the phospholipid bilayer. The thickness of the bilayer is reduced in response to the incorporation of bR. The observed tilt of bR is in good accordance with previously performed theoretical predictions and computer simulations based on the bR crystal structure. The result is a significant and essential step on the way to developing a general small-angle scattering-based method for determining the low-resolution structures of membrane proteins in physiologically relevant environments.

  12. Noctilucent cloud polarimetry: Twilight measurements in a wide range of scattering angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Maslov, Igor A.; Kozelov, Boris V.; Dlugach, Janna M.

    2016-06-01

    Wide-field polarization measurements of the twilight sky background during several nights with bright and extended noctilucent clouds in central and northern Russia in 2014 and 2015 are used to build the phase dependence of the degree of polarization of sunlight scattered by cloud particles in a wide range of scattering angles (from 40° to 130°). This range covers the linear polarization maximum near 90° and large-angle slope of the curve. The polarization in this angle range is most sensitive to the particle size. The method of separation of scattering on cloud particles from the twilight background is presented. Results are compared with T-matrix simulations for different sizes and shapes of ice particles; the best-fit model radius of particles (0.06 μm) and maximum radius (about 0.1 μm) are estimated.

  13. High-resolution wide-angle X-ray scattering of protein solutions: effect of beam dose on protein integrity.

    PubMed

    Fischetti, Robert F; Rodi, Diane J; Mirza, Ahmed; Irving, Thomas C; Kondrashkina, Elena; Makowski, Lee

    2003-09-01

    Wide-angle X-ray scattering patterns from proteins in solution contain information relevant to the determination of protein fold. At relevant scattering angles, however, these data are weak, and the degree to which they might be used to categorize the fold of a protein is unknown. Preliminary work has been performed at the BioCAT insertion-device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source which demonstrates that one can collect X-ray scattering data from proteins in solution to spacings of at least 2.2 A (q = 2.8 A(-1)). These data are sensitive to protein conformational states, and are in good agreement with the scattering predicted by the program CRYSOL using the known three-dimensional atomic coordinates of the protein. An important issue in the exploitation of this technique as a tool for structural genomics is the extent to which the high intensity of X-rays available at third-generation synchrotron sources chemically or structurally damage proteins. Various data-collection protocols have been investigated demonstrating conditions under which structural degradation of even sensitive proteins can be minimized, making this technique a viable tool for protein fold categorization, the study of protein folding, unfolding, protein-ligand interactions and domain movement.

  14. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Rondon, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    The applicability of pQCD to exclusive reactions at medium energies is a subject of considerable interest. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. In pQCD, three active quarks and two hard gluons are involved when describing RCS. But the cross sections do not agree with the pQCD predictions. In contrast, a handbag dominance model, involving only one single quark coupling to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs) does a good job of matching the cross section data. A measurement of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL was found inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the hand-bag mechanism. Further Miller's handbag approach, which including quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD and others which demands that KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL has been proposed to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. This experiment will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  15. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2015-04-01

    Whether pQCD can describe exclusive reactions at medium energies remains an area of active study. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. A pQCD description of RCS requires the participation of three quarks and two hard gluons. However its predictions for the RCS cross sections disagree with data while calculations based on the handbag mechanism, involving a single quark coupled to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs), match the data well. The measured longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL is inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations of the handbag mechanism. Furthermore, Miller's approach, which includes quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD where KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL (E12-14-006) has been approved to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C and will be able to discriminate between the various models. E12-14-006 will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  16. Magnetic scattering in the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering and Bragg edge transmission from steel.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yojiro; Morooka, Satoshi; Ohishi, Kazuki; Sato, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Rintaro; Adachi, Nozomu; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Gilbert, Elliot Paul; Sugiyama, Masaaki

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed neutron sources enable the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and Bragg edge transmission. This simultaneous measurement is useful for microstructural characterization in steel. Since most steels are ferromagnetic, magnetic scattering contributions should be considered in both SANS and Bragg edge transmission analyses. An expression for the magnetic scattering contribution to Bragg edge transmission analysis has been derived. The analysis using this expression was applied to Cu steel. The ferrite crystallite size estimated from this Bragg edge transmission analysis with the magnetic scattering contribution was larger than that estimated using conventional expressions. This result indicates that magnetic scattering has to be taken into account for quantitative Bragg edge transmission analysis. In the SANS analysis, the ratio of magnetic to nuclear scattering contributions revealed that the precipitates consist of body-centered cubic Cu0.7Fe0.3 and pure Cu, which probably has 9R structure including elastic strain and vacancies. These results show that effective use of the magnetic scattering contribution allows detailed analyses of steel microstructure.

  17. Magnetic scattering in the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering and Bragg edge transmission from steel1

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Yojiro; Morooka, Satoshi; Ohishi, Kazuki; Sato, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Rintaro; Adachi, Nozomu; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Gilbert, Elliot Paul; Sugiyama, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed neutron sources enable the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and Bragg edge transmission. This simultaneous measurement is useful for microstructural characterization in steel. Since most steels are ferromagnetic, magnetic scattering contributions should be considered in both SANS and Bragg edge transmission analyses. An expression for the magnetic scattering contribution to Bragg edge transmission analysis has been derived. The analysis using this expression was applied to Cu steel. The ferrite crystallite size estimated from this Bragg edge transmission analysis with the magnetic scattering contribution was larger than that estimated using conventional expressions. This result indicates that magnetic scattering has to be taken into account for quantitative Bragg edge transmission analysis. In the SANS analysis, the ratio of magnetic to nuclear scattering contributions revealed that the precipitates consist of body-centered cubic Cu0.7Fe0.3 and pure Cu, which probably has 9R structure including elastic strain and vacancies. These results show that effective use of the magnetic scattering contribution allows detailed analyses of steel microstructure. PMID:27738416

  18. Using small angle solution scattering data in Xplor-NIH structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Schwieters, Charles D; Clore, G Marius

    2014-07-01

    This contribution describes the use of small and wide angle X-ray and small angle neutron scattering for biomolecular structure calculation using the program Xplor-NIH, both with and without NMR data. The current algorithms used for calculating scattering curves are described, and the use of scattering data as a structural restraint is given concrete form as a fragment of an Xplor-NIH structure calculation script. We review five examples of the use of scattering data in structure calculation, including the treatment of single domain proteins, nucleic acids, structure determination of large proteins, and the use of ensemble representations to characterize small and large amplitude motions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Characterization of polymer adsorption onto drug nanoparticles using depletion measurements and small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Daniel J; Sepassi, Shadi; King, Stephen M; Holland, Simon J; Martini, Luigi G; Lawrence, M Jayne

    2013-11-04

    Production of polymer and/or surfactant-coated crystalline nanoparticles of water-insoluble drugs (nanosuspensions) using wet bead milling is an important formulation approach to improve the bioavailability of said compounds. Despite the fact that there are a number of nanosuspensions on the market, there is still a deficiency in the characterization of these nanoparticles where further understanding may lead to the rational selection of polymer/surfactant. To this end small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on drug nanoparticles milled in the presence of a range of polymers of varying molecular weight. Isotopic substitution of the aqueous solvent to match the scattering length density of the drug nanoparticles (i.e., the technique of contrast matching) meant that neutron scattering resulted only from the adsorbed polymer layer. The layer thickness and amount of hydroxypropylcellulose adsorbed on nabumetone nanoparticles derived from fitting the SANS data to both model-independent and model dependent volume fraction profiles were insensitive to polymer molecular weight over the range Mv = 47-112 kg/mol, indicating that the adsorbed layer is relatively flat but with tails extending up to approximately 23 nm. The constancy of the absorbed amount is in agreement with the adsorption isotherm determined by measuring polymer depletion from solution in the presence of the nanoparticles. Insensitivity to polymer molecular weight was similarly determined using SANS measurements of nabumetone or halofantrine nanoparticles stabilized with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose or poly(vinylpyrrolidone). Additionally SANS studies revealed the amount adsorbed, and the thickness of the polymer layer was dependent on both the nature of the polymer and drug particle surface. The insensitivity of the adsorbed polymer layer to polymer molecular weight has important implications for the production of nanoparticles, suggesting that lower molecular weight polymers

  20. X-ray small-angle scattering from sputtered CeO{sub 2}/C bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Haviar, S.; Dubau, M.; Khalakhan, I.; Vorokhta, M.; Matolinova, I.; Matolin, V.; Vales, V.; Endres, J.; Holy, V.; Buljan, M.; Bernstorff, S.

    2013-01-14

    Surface and interface morphology of cerium oxide/carbon bilayers used as thin-film catalysts is studied by grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy, and the dependence of the structural parameters on the thicknesses of the constituting layers is investigated. The applicability of x-ray scattering and its advantages over standard analytical methods are discussed.

  1. COSMIC-RAY PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING IN IMBALANCED MHD TURBULENCE SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Weidl, Martin S.; Jenko, Frank; Teaca, Bogdan; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2015-09-20

    Pitch-angle scattering rates for cosmic-ray particles in MHD simulations with imbalanced turbulence are calculated for fully evolving electromagnetic turbulence. We compare with theoretical predictions derived from the quasilinear theory of cosmic-ray diffusion for an idealized slab spectrum and demonstrate how cross helicity affects the shape of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient. Additional simulations in evolving magnetic fields or static field configurations provide evidence that the scattering anisotropy in imbalanced turbulence is not primarily due to coherence with propagating Alfvén waves, but an effect of the spatial structure of electric fields in cross-helical MHD turbulence.

  2. Analysis of photopolarimetric data of comets at small phase angles by rough surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Mukai, T.

    1990-07-01

    A comparison of cometary rough surface scattering model calculation results with observations has indicated that negative polarization is produced, over a phase-angle range of less than 20 deg, by the variation of polarization angle of reflected light due to a contribution from (1) different sites on large, rough particles, and/or (2) multiple internal reflection within small dielectric particles. The opposition effect in cometary comas is caused by large, rough particle reflection. The mixing model for cometary grains, encompassing small particles and large rough ones composed in both cases of slightly absorbing material, is seen as explaining the photopolarimetric data of comets in the backward-scattering region.

  3. Finite-size effect in light transmission through highly forward scattering media at grazing angles.

    PubMed

    Marinyuk, V V; Sheberstov, S V

    2016-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of light transmission through a disordered medium with large (compared to the light wavelength) inhomogeneities. Both numerical integration and analytic treatments of the radiative transfer equation are performed. An effect of the single-scattering phase function on the total transmittance is found in a subdiffusion thickness range. The effect reveals itself at grazing angles of incidence and originates from small-angle multiple scattering of light. A simple analytic formula for the total transmittance is derived. Our results are in good agreement with data of independent numerical calculations.

  4. Two-atom model in enhanced ion backscattering near 180/sup 0/ scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Oen, O.S.

    1981-06-01

    The recent discovery by Pronko, Appleton, Holland, and Wilson of an unusual enhancement of the yield of ions backscattered through angles close to 180/sup 0/ from the near surface regions of solids is investigated using a two-atom scattering model. The model predicts an enhancement effect in amorphous solids whose physical origin arises from the tolerance of path for those ions whose inward and outward trajectories lie in the vicinity of the critical impact parameter. Predictions are given of the dependence of the yield enhancement on the following parameters: ion energy, backscattering depth, exit angle, scattering potential, atomic numbers of projectile and target, and atomic density of target.

  5. Pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons from stationary magnetic waves: Continuous Markov process and quasilinear theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, Don S.

    2012-01-15

    We develop a Markov process theory of charged particle scattering from stationary, transverse, magnetic waves. We examine approximations that lead to quasilinear theory, in particular the resonant diffusion approximation. We find that, when appropriate, the resonant diffusion approximation simplifies the result of the weak turbulence approximation without significant further restricting the regime of applicability. We also explore a theory generated by expanding drift and diffusion rates in terms of a presumed small correlation time. This small correlation time expansion leads to results valid for relatively small pitch angle and large wave energy density - a regime that may govern pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons into the geomagnetic loss cone.

  6. The generation of Ganymede's diffuse aurora through pitch angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Arvind K.; Singhal, Rajendra P.; Singh, Onkar N., II

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse auroral intensities of neutral atomic oxygen OI λ1356 Å emission on Ganymede due to whistler mode waves are estimated. Pitch angle diffusion of magnetospheric electrons into the loss cone due to resonant wave-particle interaction of whistler mode waves is considered, and the resulting electron precipitation flux is calculated. The analytical yield spectrum approach is used for determining the energy deposition of electrons precipitating into the atmosphere of Ganymede. It is found that the intensities (4-30 R) calculated from the precipitation of magnetospheric electrons observed near Ganymede are inadequate to account for the observational intensities (≤ 100 R). This is in agreement with the conclusions reached in previous works. Some acceleration mechanism is required to energize the magnetospheric electrons. In the present work we consider the heating and acceleration of magnetospheric electrons by electrostatic waves. Two particle distribution functions (Maxwellian and kappa distribution) are used to simulate heating and acceleration of electrons. Precipitation of a Maxwellian distribution of electrons can produce about 70 R intensities of OI λ1356 Å emission for electron temperature of 150 eV. A kappa distribution can also yield a diffuse auroral intensity of similar magnitude for a characteristic energy of about 100 eV. The maximum contribution to the estimated intensity results from the dissociative excitation of O2. Contributions from the direct excitation of atomic oxygen and cascading in atomic oxygen are estimated to be only about 1 and 2 % of the total calculated intensity, respectively. The findings of this work are relevant for the present JUNO and future JUICE missions to Jupiter. These missions will provide new data on electron densities, electron temperature and whistler mode wave amplitudes in the magnetosphere of Jupiter near Ganymede.

  7. Do angles of obliquity apply to 30 degrees scattered radiation from megavoltage beams?

    PubMed

    Biggs, Peter J; Styczynski, John R

    2008-10-01

    The angle of obliquity is used in radiation shielding calculations to account for the longer path length x rays will see when obliquely incident on the protective barrier. According to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), use of the angle of obliquity is explicitly assumed for primary radiation, so that an angle of obliquity for secondary radiation is never addressed. However, in the example section of the latest report, it specifically recommends against using an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation. To check this assumption, the existence or not of an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation has been investigated for bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV and for barriers consisting of concrete, lead, and steel using a Monte Carlo approach. The MCNP Monte Carlo code, v4.2C, has been used to generate scattered radiation at 30 degrees from a water phantom and incident on a secondary barrier at the same angle relative to the normal to the barrier. The barrier thickness was increased from zero to a thickness sufficient to reduce the fluence (f4 tally) to <10(-3). A transmission curve was created for each energy-barrier material combination by normalizing to zero thickness. The results for the first tenth-value layer (TVL) in concrete (5 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 21.7 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 29.7 degrees +/- 3.9 degrees . The results for the first TVL in lead (3 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 27.7 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 20.5 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees . There are no data in the NCRP reports for 30 degrees scattered radiation attenuated by steel with which to make a comparison.

  8. Ultrasmall Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS) and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) Studies on the Complex Metal Hydride NaAlH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, Tabbetha; Bennett, Christopher; Torres, James; Ilavsky, Jan

    This research seeks to understand the role of ScCl , ZrCl , and VCl catalysts in NaAlH. We have examined these hydrides at multiple length scales using an X-ray scattering instrument which is capable of measuring scattering wave vector, Q, of 0.0001Å to 6.0 Å . The ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) instrument sector 9ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) simultaneously collects using USAXS, SAXS, and WAXS detectors. Studies were performed during in-situ heating up to 170C (just below the H desorption temperature for uncatalyzed NaAlH). Results showed that NaAlH has a surface fractal (highly porous) morphology. Isothermal studies performed at 30C, 65C, 100C, 135C, and 170C reveals changes at low Q (Q~0.001 Å to 0.01 Å) associated with highly interconnected intraparticle porosity which is suitably described by a power-law slope for a Gaussian polymer chain structure of p~2. At high scattering wave vector, Q~0.03 Å , the presence of a pore population which obeys Porod scattering and appears to have a size at 21nm is present. These fine pores increase in their population density as temperature is elevated. The WAXS data reveals thermal expansion to occur, but no solid state phase transformation to the product phase. Currently at NASA-Goddard.

  9. Exploitation of the UV Aerosol Index scattering angle dependence: Properties of Siberian smoke plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Sihler, Holger; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) is a simple measure of aerosols from satellite that is particularly sensitive to elevated layers of absorbing particles. It has been determined from a range of instruments including TOMS, GOME-2, and OMI, for almost four decades and will be continued in the upcoming Sentinel missions S5-precursor, S4, and S5. Despite its apparent simplicity, the interpretation of UVAI is not straightforward, as it depends on aerosol abundance, absorption, and altitude in a non-linear way. In addition, UVAI depends on the geometry of the measurement (viewing angle, solar zenith and relative azimuth angles), particularly if viewing angles exceed 45 degrees, as is the case for OMI and TROPOMI (on S5-precursor). The dependence on scattering angle complicates the interpretation and further processing (e.g., averaging) of UVAI. In certain favorable cases, however, independent information on aerosol altitude and absorption may become available. We present a detailed study of the scatter angle dependence using SCIATRAN radiative transfer calculations. The model results were compared to observations of an extensive Siberian smoke plume, of which parts reached 10-12 km altitude. Due to its large extent and the high latitude, OMI observed the complete plume in five consecutive orbits under a wide range of scattering angles. This allowed us to deduce aerosol characteristics (absorption and layer height) that were compared with collocated CALIOP lidar measurements.

  10. Application of electrically invisible antennas to the Modulated Scatterer Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, Dylan A.; Donnell, Kristen M.

    2015-09-16

    The modulated scatterer technique (MST) has shown promise for applications in microwave imaging, electric field mapping, and materials characterization. Traditionally, MST scatterers are dipoles centrally loaded with an element capable of modulation (e.g., a p-i-n diode). By modulating the load element, signals scattered from the MST scatterer are also modulated. However, due to the small size of such scatterers, it can be difficult to reliably detect the modulated signal. Increasing the modulation depth (MD; a parameter related to how well the scatterer modulates the scattered signal) may improve the detectability of the scattered signal. In an effort to improve the MD, the concept of electrically invisible antennas is applied to the design of MST scatterers. Our paper presents simulations and measurements of MST scatterers that have been designed to be electrically invisible during the reverse bias state of the modulated element (a p-i-n diode in this case), while producing detectable scattering during the forward bias state (i.e., operate in an electrically visible state). Furthermore, the results using the new design show significant improvement to the MD of the scattered signal as compared with a traditional MST scatterer (i.e., dipole centrally loaded with a p-i-n diode).

  11. Application of electrically invisible antennas to the Modulated Scatterer Technique

    DOE PAGES

    Crocker, Dylan A.; Donnell, Kristen M.

    2015-09-16

    The modulated scatterer technique (MST) has shown promise for applications in microwave imaging, electric field mapping, and materials characterization. Traditionally, MST scatterers are dipoles centrally loaded with an element capable of modulation (e.g., a p-i-n diode). By modulating the load element, signals scattered from the MST scatterer are also modulated. However, due to the small size of such scatterers, it can be difficult to reliably detect the modulated signal. Increasing the modulation depth (MD; a parameter related to how well the scatterer modulates the scattered signal) may improve the detectability of the scattered signal. In an effort to improve themore » MD, the concept of electrically invisible antennas is applied to the design of MST scatterers. Our paper presents simulations and measurements of MST scatterers that have been designed to be electrically invisible during the reverse bias state of the modulated element (a p-i-n diode in this case), while producing detectable scattering during the forward bias state (i.e., operate in an electrically visible state). Furthermore, the results using the new design show significant improvement to the MD of the scattered signal as compared with a traditional MST scatterer (i.e., dipole centrally loaded with a p-i-n diode).« less

  12. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.; Bentley, P. M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N. L.; Al-Shammary, H. A. O.; Wood, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100Å scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  13. Application of small-angle neutron scattering to the study of forces between magnetically chained monodisperse ferrofluid emulsion droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Dr Nirmesh; Liu, Dr C K; Hawkett, Dr B. S.; Warr, G. G.; Hamilton, William A

    2014-01-01

    The optical magnetic chaining technique (MCT) developed by Leal-Calderon, Bibette and co-workers in the 1990 s allows precise measurements of force profiles between droplets in monodisperse ferrofluid emulsions. However, the method lacks an in-situ determination of droplet size and therefore requires the combination of separately acquired measurements of droplet chain periodicity versus an applied magnetic field from optical Bragg scattering and droplet diameter inferred from dynamic light scattering (DLS) to recover surface force-distance profiles between the colloidal particles. Compound refractive lens (CRL) focussed small-angle scattering (SANS) MCT should result in more consistent measurements of droplet size (form factor measurements in the absence of field) and droplet chaining period (from structure factor peaks when the magnetic field is applied); and, with access to shorter length scales, extend force measurements to closer approaches than possible by optical measurements. We report on CRL-SANS measurements of monodisperse ferrofluid emulsion droplets aligned in straight chains by an applied field perpendicular to the incident beam direction. Analysis of the scattering from the closely spaced droplets required algorithms that carefully treated resolution and its effect on mean scattering vector magnitudes in order to determine droplet size and chain periods to sufficient accuracy. At lower applied fields scattering patterns indicate structural correlations transverse to the magnetic field direction due to the formation of intermediate structures in early chain growth.

  14. Structured water in polyelectrolyte dendrimers: Understanding small angle neutron scattering results through atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Egami, Takeshi; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Wang, Yongmei; Porcar, Lionel; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Sean C.; Liu, Emily L.; Smith, Gregory S.; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2012-04-01

    Based on atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) intensity behavior of a single generation-4 polyelectrolyte polyamidoamine starburst dendrimer is investigated at different levels of molecular protonation. The SANS form factor, P(Q), and Debye autocorrelation function, γ(r), are calculated from the equilibrium MD trajectory based on a mathematical approach proposed in this work. The consistency found in comparison against previously published experimental findings (W.-R. Chen, L. Porcar, Y. Liu, P. D. Butler, and L. J. Magid, Macromolecules 40, 5887 (2007)) leads to a link between the neutron scattering experiment and MD computation, and fresh perspectives. The simulations enable scattering calculations of not only the hydrocarbons but also the contribution from the scattering length density fluctuations caused by structured, confined water within the dendrimer. Based on our computational results, we explore the validity of using radius of gyration RG for microstructure characterization of a polyelectrolyte dendrimer from the scattering perspective.

  15. The accurate assessment of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Thomas D.; Luft, Joseph R.; Carter, Lester G.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Martel, Anne; Snell, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    A set of quantitative techniques is suggested for assessing SAXS data quality. These are applied in the form of a script, SAXStats, to a test set of 27 proteins, showing that these techniques are more sensitive than manual assessment of data quality. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has grown in popularity in recent times with the advent of bright synchrotron X-ray sources, powerful computational resources and algorithms enabling the calculation of increasingly complex models. However, the lack of standardized data-quality metrics presents difficulties for the growing user community in accurately assessing the quality of experimental SAXS data. Here, a series of metrics to quantitatively describe SAXS data in an objective manner using statistical evaluations are defined. These metrics are applied to identify the effects of radiation damage, concentration dependence and interparticle interactions on SAXS data from a set of 27 previously described targets for which high-resolution structures have been determined via X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The studies show that these metrics are sufficient to characterize SAXS data quality on a small sample set with statistical rigor and sensitivity similar to or better than manual analysis. The development of data-quality analysis strategies such as these initial efforts is needed to enable the accurate and unbiased assessment of SAXS data quality.

  16. Quantifying radiation damage in biomolecular small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Jesse B; Thorne, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an increasingly popular technique that provides low-resolution structural information about biological macromolecules in solution. Many of the practical limitations of the technique, such as minimum required sample volume, and of experimental design, such as sample flow cells, are necessary because the biological samples are sensitive to damage from the X-rays. Radiation damage typically manifests as aggregation of the sample, which makes the collected data unreliable. However, there has been little systematic investigation of the most effective methods to reduce damage rates, and results from previous damage studies are not easily compared with results from other beamlines. Here a methodology is provided for quantifying radiation damage in SAXS to provide consistent results between different experiments, experimenters and beamlines. These methods are demonstrated on radiation damage data collected from lysozyme, glucose isomerase and xylanase, and it is found that no single metric is sufficient to describe radiation damage in SAXS for all samples. The radius of gyration, molecular weight and integrated SAXS profile intensity constitute a minimal set of parameters that capture all types of observed behavior. Radiation sensitivities derived from these parameters show a large protein dependence, varying by up to six orders of magnitude between the different proteins tested. This work should enable consistent reporting of radiation damage effects, allowing more systematic studies of the most effective minimization strategies.

  17. Analysis of the arriving-angle structure of the forward scattered wave on a vertical array in shallow water.

    PubMed

    He, Chuanlin; Yang, Kunde; Ma, Yuanliang; Lei, Bo

    2016-09-01

    The arriving-angle structure for the forward scattered wave on a vertical line array is obtained upon a modified scattering model in the Pekeris waveguide. The structure is investigated and interpreted by the array invariant theory combined with target induced modal coupling effect. Compared with that of the direct blast, the arriving-angle structure of the forward scattering wave owns multi-striations as well as an increased vertical array invariant. The forward scattered angle structure is dependent on the target position on the source-receiver line. Simulations indicate a potential separation for the forward scattered wave overwhelmed by the direct blast.

  18. Determining Angle of Humeral Torsion Using Image Software Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Madhu; Vasudeva, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several researches have been done on the measurement of angles of humeral torsion in different parts of the world. Previously described methods were more complicated, not much accurate, cumbersome or required sophisticated instruments. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to determine the angles of humeral torsion with a newer simple technique using digital images and image tool software. Materials and Methods A total of 250 dry normal adult human humeri were obtained from the bone bank of Department of Anatomy. The length and mid-shaft circumference of each bone was measured with the help of measuring tape. The angle of humeral torsion was measured directly from the digital images by the image analysis using Image Tool 3.0 software program. The data was analysed statistically with SPSS version 17 using unpaired t-test and Spearman’s rank order correlation coefficient. Results The mean angle of torsion was 64.57°±7.56°. On the right side it was 66.84°±9.69°, whereas, on the left side it was found to be 63.31±9.50°. The mean humeral length was 31.6 cm on right side and 30.33 cm on left side. Mid shaft circumference was 5.79 on right side and 5.63 cm on left side. No statistical differences were seen in angles between right and left humeri (p>0.001). Conclusion From our study, it was concluded that circumference of shaft is inversely proportional to angle of humeral torsion. The length and side of humerus has no relation with the humeral torsion. With advancement of digital technology, it is better to use new image softwares for anatomical studies. PMID:27891326

  19. On techniques for angle compensation in nonideal iris recognition.

    PubMed

    Schuckers, Stephanie A C; Schmid, Natalia A; Abhyankar, Aditya; Dorairaj, Vivekanand; Boyce, Christopher K; Hornak, Lawrence A

    2007-10-01

    The popularity of the iris biometric has grown considerably over the past two to three years. Most research has been focused on the development of new iris processing and recognition algorithms for frontal view iris images. However, a few challenging directions in iris research have been identified, including processing of a nonideal iris and iris at a distance. In this paper, we describe two nonideal iris recognition systems and analyze their performance. The word "nonideal" is used in the sense of compensating for off-angle occluded iris images. The system is designed to process nonideal iris images in two steps: 1) compensation for off-angle gaze direction and 2) processing and encoding of the rotated iris image. Two approaches are presented to account for angular variations in the iris images. In the first approach, we use Daugman's integrodifferential operator as an objective function to estimate the gaze direction. After the angle is estimated, the off-angle iris image undergoes geometric transformations involving the estimated angle and is further processed as if it were a frontal view image. The encoding technique developed for a frontal image is based on the application of the global independent component analysis. The second approach uses an angular deformation calibration model. The angular deformations are modeled, and calibration parameters are calculated. The proposed method consists of a closed-form solution, followed by an iterative optimization procedure. The images are projected on the plane closest to the base calibrated plane. Biorthogonal wavelets are used for encoding to perform iris recognition. We use a special dataset of the off-angle iris images to quantify the performance of the designed systems. A series of receiver operating characteristics demonstrate various effects on the performance of the nonideal-iris-based recognition system.

  20. An upgrade beamline for combined wide, small and ultra small-angle x-ray scattering at the ESRF

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vaerenbergh, Pierre; Léonardon, Joachim; Sztucki, Michael; Boesecke, Peter; Gorini, Jacques; Claustre, Laurent; Sever, Franc; Morse, John; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2016-07-27

    This contribution presents the main design features of the upgraded beamline ID02 (TRUSAXS). The beamline combines different small-angle X-ray scattering techniques in one unique instrument. The key component of this instrument is an evacuated (5×10{sup −3} mbar) stainless steel detector tube of length 34 m and diameter 2 m. Three different detectors (Rayonix MX170, Pilatus 300 K and FReLoN 4M) are housed inside a motorized wagon which travels along a rail system with very low parasitic lateral movements (± 0.3 mm). This system allows automatically changing the sample-to-detector distance from about 1 m to 31 m and selecting the desired detector. In addition, a wide angle detector (Rayonix LX170) is installed just above the entrance cone of the tube for optional wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements. The beamstop system enables monitoring of the X-ray beam intensity in addition to blocking the primary beam, and automated insertion of selected masks behind the primary beamstop. The focusing optics and collimation system permit to cover a scattering vector (q) range of 0.002 nm{sup −1} ≤ q ≤ 50 nm{sup −1} with one unique setting using 0.1 nm X-ray wavelength for moderate flux (5×10{sup 12} photons/sec). However, for higher flux (6x10{sup 13} photons/sec) or higher resolution (minimum q < 0.001 nm{sup −1}), focusing and collimation, respectively need to be varied. For a sample-to-detector distance of 31 m and 0.1 nm wavelength, two dimensional ultra small-angle X-ray scattering patterns can be recorded down to q≈0.001 nm{sup −1} with far superior quality as compared to one dimensional profiles obtained with a Bonse-Hart instrument.

  1. Studying fractal geometry on submicron length scales by small-angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; Lin, J.

    1988-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that internal surfaces of porous geological materials, such as rocks and lignite coals, can be described by fractals down to atomic length scales. In this paper, the basic properties of self-similar and self-affine fractals are reviewed and how fractal dimensions can be measured by small-angle scattering experiments are discussed.

  2. Informing the improvement of forest products durability using small angle neutron scattering

    Treesearch

    Nayomi Plaza-Rodriguez; Sai Venkatesh Pingali; Shuo Qian; William T. Heller; Joseph E. Jakes

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of how wood nanostructure swells with moisture is needed to accelerate the development of forest products with enhanced moisture durability. Despite its suitability to study nanostructures, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) remains an underutilized tool in forest products research. Nanoscale moisture-induced structural changes in intact and...

  3. Depth profiling of polymer films with grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Marsha A; Groves, Michael N

    2009-05-01

    A model-free method of reconstructing depth-specific lateral scattering from incident-angle-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) data is proposed. The information on the material which is available through variation of the X-ray penetration depth with incident angle is accessed through reference to the reflected branch of the GISAXS process. Reconstruction of the scattering from lateral density fluctuations is achieved by solving the resulting Fredholm integral equation with minimal a priori information about the experimental system. Results from simulated data generated for hypothetical multilayer polymer systems with constant absorption coefficient are used to verify that the method can be applied to cases with large X-ray penetration depths, as typically seen with polymer materials. Experimental tests on a spin-coated thick film of a blend of diblock copolymers demonstrate that the approach is capable of reconstruction of the scattering from a multilayer structure with the identification of lateral scattering profiles as a function of sample depth.

  4. Probing helium nano-bubble formation in tungsten with grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Kluth, P.; Doerner, R. P.; Kirby, N.; Corr, C.

    2015-04-01

    Helium nano-bubble formation in plasma facing materials has emerged as a major concern for the next-step fusion experiment ITER, where helium plasmas will be used during the tokamak's start-up phase. Here, we demonstrate that grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering is a powerful technique for the analysis of helium nano-bubble formation in tungsten. We measured helium bubbles with sizes between 1.5-2.5 nm in tungsten exposed to helium plasma at 700 °C, where a smaller number of larger bubbles were also observed. Depth distributions can be estimated by taking successive measurements across a range of x-ray incidence angles. Compared with traditional approaches in the field, such as transmission electron microscopy, this technique provides information across a much larger volume with high statistical precision, whilst also being non-destructive.

  5. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE PAGES

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more » However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  6. Scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by impedance barriers: Dependence on angle of incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu.; Brucoli, G.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2008-05-01

    This paper studies theoretically surface plasmon polariton scattering by one-dimensional defects of metal surface impedance at oblique incidence. Surface impedance boundary conditions are used to formulate an integral equation which can be solved both analytically and numerically to yield the transmission, reflection, and out-of-plane cross section as a function of angle of incidence and other parameters. Numerical calculations, as well as analytical expressions, obtained within the Born approximation are presented. Green’s tensor approach is also applied so as to expand such analysis to region in which the surface impedance boundary conditions are not appropriate. We show that the angular dependencies for surface plasmon polariton scattering by impedance defects and by surface relief defects are essentially different. The angular dependency of surface plasmon polariton scattering by an impedance defect features an analog to Brewster’s angle that is explained in terms of dipole polarization of the defect.

  7. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  8. BIOISIS: Biological Macromolecules by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tainer, John [Scripps Research Institute; Hura, Greg [LBNL; Rambo, Robert P. [LBNL

    BIOISIS is an open access database dedicated to the study of biological macromolecules by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). BIOISIS aims to become the complete source for the deposition, distribution and maintenance of small angle X-ray scattering data and technologies. The database is designed around the concept of an ôexperimentö and relates a specific experiment to a set of genes, organisms, computational models and experimental data. As of May 2012, BIOSIS contains 7,118 genes covering four different organisms. Forty-two modeled structures are available. Clicking on a structures reveals scattering curves, experimental conditions, and experimental values. The data are collected at Beamline 12.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS).[Copied with editing from http://www.bioisis.net/about

  9. Quantitative characterization of the contrast mechanisms of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Long, G. G.; Levine, L.E.; Ilavsky, J.; Jemain, P.R.; NIST

    2008-04-01

    A general treatment of X-ray imaging contrast for ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) imaging is presented; this approach makes use of phase propagation and dynamical diffraction theory to account quantitatively for the intensity distribution at the detector plane. Simulated results from a model system of micrometer-sized spherical SiO{sub 2} particles embedded in a polypropylene matrix show good agreement with experimental measurements. Simulations by means of a separate geometrical ray-tracing method also account for the features in the USAXS images and offer a complementary view of small-angle X-ray scattering as a contrast mechanism. The ray-tracing analysis indicates that refraction, in the form of Porod scattering, and, to a much lesser extent, X-ray reflection account for the USAXS imaging contrast.

  10. Grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering from structures below an interface

    PubMed Central

    Nouhi, Shirin; Hellsing, Maja S.; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Rennie, Adrian R.

    2017-01-01

    Changes of scattering are observed as the grazing angle of incidence of an incoming beam increases and probes different depths in samples. A model has been developed to describe the observed intensity in grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering (GISANS) experiments. This includes the significant effects of instrument resolution, the sample transmission, which depends on both absorption and scattering, and the sample structure. The calculations are tested with self-organized structures of two colloidal samples with different size particles that were measured on two different instruments. The model allows calculations for various instruments with defined resolution and can be used to design future improved experiments. The possibilities and limits of GISANS for different studies are discussed using the model calculations. PMID:28808432

  11. Grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering from structures below an interface.

    PubMed

    Nouhi, Shirin; Hellsing, Maja S; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Rennie, Adrian R

    2017-08-01

    Changes of scattering are observed as the grazing angle of incidence of an incoming beam increases and probes different depths in samples. A model has been developed to describe the observed intensity in grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering (GISANS) experiments. This includes the significant effects of instrument resolution, the sample transmission, which depends on both absorption and scattering, and the sample structure. The calculations are tested with self-organized structures of two colloidal samples with different size particles that were measured on two different instruments. The model allows calculations for various instruments with defined resolution and can be used to design future improved experiments. The possibilities and limits of GISANS for different studies are discussed using the model calculations.

  12. Small-angle neutron scattering studies from solutions of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Stivala, S.S.; Damle, S.P.; Gregory, J.D.; Bunick, G.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering, SANS, of the proteoglycan subunit of bovine nasal cartilage in 0.15N LiCl at 25/sup 0/C yielded the radius of gyration, R/sub g/, radius of gyration of the cross-section, R/sub q/, persistence length, a, and the molecular weight, M. The following values were obtained: M = 3.9 x 10/sup 6/, R/sub g/ = 745 A, R/sub q/ = 34.6 A and a = 35.2 A. These values compare favorably with those that were obtained from small angle x-ray scattering, SAXS, of a similar extract. The scattering curve of the proteoglycan subunit in D/sub 2/O showed a characteristic broad peak in the specified angular range similar to that observed from SAXS, thus confirming the polyelectrolyte nature of the proteoglycan. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (DT)

  13. The 40m General Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, George D; Bailey, Katherine M; Buchanan, Michelle V; Butler, Paul D; Heller, William T; Littrell, Ken; Lynn, Gary W; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Myles, Dean A A; Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    A high-flux, 40m long small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument has been constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The facility utilizes a mechanical velocity selector, pinhole collimation and a high count-rate (> 105 Hz), large-area (1m2) two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The incident wavelength ( ), resolution ( / ), incident collimation and sample-detector distance are independently variable under computer control. The detector can translate 45cm off axis to increase the overall Q-range (< 0.001 < Q = 4 -1sin < 1 -1), where 2 is the angle of scatter. The design and characteristics of this instrument are described along with examples of scattering data to illustrate the performance.

  14. Scattering of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with azimuthal angle difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Po-Chen; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2016-11-01

    Coherent scatterings of surface plasmons coupled to quantun dots have attracted great attention in plasmonics. Recently, an experiment has shown that the quantum dots located nearby a nanowire can be separated not only in distance, but also an angle ϕ along the cylindrical direction. Here, by using the real-space Hamiltonian and the transfer matrix method, we analytically obtain the transmission/reflection spectra of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with an azimuthal angle difference. We find that the scattering spectra can show completely different features due to different positions and azimuthal angles of the quantum dots. When additionally coupling a cavity to the dots, we obtain the Fano-like line shape in the transmission and reflection spectra due to the interference between the localized and delocalized modes.

  15. Scattering of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with azimuthal angle difference

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Chen; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Coherent scatterings of surface plasmons coupled to quantun dots have attracted great attention in plasmonics. Recently, an experiment has shown that the quantum dots located nearby a nanowire can be separated not only in distance, but also an angle ϕ along the cylindrical direction. Here, by using the real-space Hamiltonian and the transfer matrix method, we analytically obtain the transmission/reflection spectra of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with an azimuthal angle difference. We find that the scattering spectra can show completely different features due to different positions and azimuthal angles of the quantum dots. When additionally coupling a cavity to the dots, we obtain the Fano-like line shape in the transmission and reflection spectra due to the interference between the localized and delocalized modes. PMID:27892942

  16. Scattering of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with azimuthal angle difference.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Po-Chen; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2016-11-28

    Coherent scatterings of surface plasmons coupled to quantun dots have attracted great attention in plasmonics. Recently, an experiment has shown that the quantum dots located nearby a nanowire can be separated not only in distance, but also an angle ϕ along the cylindrical direction. Here, by using the real-space Hamiltonian and the transfer matrix method, we analytically obtain the transmission/reflection spectra of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots with an azimuthal angle difference. We find that the scattering spectra can show completely different features due to different positions and azimuthal angles of the quantum dots. When additionally coupling a cavity to the dots, we obtain the Fano-like line shape in the transmission and reflection spectra due to the interference between the localized and delocalized modes.

  17. Pitch angle scattering of an energetic magnetized particle by a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, P. M.

    2013-04-15

    The interaction between a circularly polarized wave and an energetic gyrating particle is described using a relativistic pseudo-potential that is a function of the frequency mismatch. Analysis of the pseudo-potential provides a means for interpreting numerical results. The pseudo-potential profile depends on the initial mismatch, the normalized wave amplitude, and the initial angle between the wave magnetic field and the particle perpendicular velocity. For zero initial mismatch, the pseudo-potential consists of only one valley, but for finite mismatch, there can be two valleys separated by a hill. A large pitch angle scattering of the energetic electron can occur in the two-valley situation but fast scattering can also occur in a single valley. Examples relevant to magnetospheric whistler waves show that the energetic electron pitch angle can be deflected 5 Degree-Sign towards the loss cone when transiting a 10 ms long coherent wave packet having realistic parameters.

  18. Stochastic analysis of pitch angle scattering of charged particles by transverse magnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, Don S.; Liu Kaijun; Winske, Dan; Gary, S. Peter

    2009-11-15

    This paper describes a theory of the velocity space scattering of charged particles in a static magnetic field composed of a uniform background field and a sum of transverse, circularly polarized, magnetic waves. When that sum has many terms the autocorrelation time required for particle orbits to become effectively randomized is small compared with the time required for the particle velocity distribution to change significantly. In this regime the deterministic equations of motion can be transformed into stochastic differential equations of motion. The resulting stochastic velocity space scattering is described, in part, by a pitch angle diffusion rate that is a function of initial pitch angle and properties of the wave spectrum. Numerical solutions of the deterministic equations of motion agree with the theory at all pitch angles, for wave energy densities up to and above the energy density of the uniform field, and for different wave spectral shapes.

  19. Nonlinear pitch angle scattering of energetic electrons near the loss cone by whistler mode chorus emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Chorus emissions are coherent whistler mode waves observed in the inner magnetosphere and scatter the pitch angle of energetic electrons, while the precipitation of energetic electrons into the atmosphere contributes to diffuse and pulsating aurora. Conventionally, it has been considered that particles that satisfy the cyclotron resonance condition in the energy range from a few keV to tens of keV are scattered toward the loss cone by whistler mode waves. While the nonlinear motion of resonant particles encountering a coherent wave has been studied more than 40 years (cf. Omura et al., 1991), in the derivation of the equations, previous studies assumed small wave amplitude compared to the ambient magnetic field B0 (Dysthe, 1971) and large pitch angle of energetic electrons (Nunn, 1974). In this study, we derive the equations without both of the assumptions, and theoretically evaluate the additional term related to the Lorentz force caused by the wave magnetic field and the parallel velocity of particles. Furthermore, we carry out a test particle simulation and reproduce that the additional term plays a role of the pitch angle scattering away from the loss cone. In the simulation results of parallel propagating coherent waves with constant frequency, diffusion-like scattering of resonant electrons is observed in the case of waves with weak amplitude (0.1 % of B0). On the contrary, all of resonant electrons are scattered in the pitch angle away from the loss cone in the case of waves with larger amplitude (more than 0.5 % of B0). We also carry out simulations for the case of waves with frequency sweeping and find that particles near the loss cone are more effectively scattered away from the loss cone by the wave with large amplitude (more than 0.7 % of B0). These results suggest that the relation between chorus wave intensity and the flux of auroral electron precipitation is not straightforward and should be investigated by considering the nonlinear effects.

  20. Methods for analysis of size-exclusion chromatography-small-angle X-ray scattering and reconstruction of protein scattering.

    PubMed

    Malaby, Andrew W; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Irving, Thomas C; Kathuria, Sagar V; Bilsel, Osman; Lambright, David G

    2015-08-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography in line with small-angle X-ray scattering (SEC-SAXS) has emerged as an important method for investigation of heterogeneous and self-associating systems, but presents specific challenges for data processing including buffer subtraction and analysis of overlapping peaks. This paper presents novel methods based on singular value decomposition (SVD) and Guinier-optimized linear combination (LC) to facilitate analysis of SEC-SAXS data sets and high-quality reconstruction of protein scattering directly from peak regions. It is shown that Guinier-optimized buffer subtraction can reduce common subtraction artifacts and that Guinier-optimized linear combination of significant SVD basis components improves signal-to-noise and allows reconstruction of protein scattering, even in the absence of matching buffer regions. In test cases with conventional SAXS data sets for cytochrome c and SEC-SAXS data sets for the small GTPase Arf6 and the Arf GTPase exchange factors Grp1 and cytohesin-1, SVD-LC consistently provided higher quality reconstruction of protein scattering than either direct or Guinier-optimized buffer subtraction. These methods have been implemented in the context of a Python-extensible Mac OS X application known as Data Evaluation and Likelihood Analysis (DELA), which provides convenient tools for data-set selection, beam intensity normalization, SVD, and other relevant processing and analytical procedures, as well as automated Python scripts for common SAXS analyses and Guinier-optimized reconstruction of protein scattering.

  1. Glassy carbon as an absolute intensity calibration standard for small-angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Ilavsky, J.; Long, G.; Allen, A.; Quintana, J.; Jemian, P.; NIST

    2010-05-01

    Absolute calibration of small-angle scattering (SAS) intensity data (measured in terms of the differential scattering cross section per unit sample volume per unit solid angle) is essential for many important aspects of quantitative SAS analysis, such as obtaining the number density, volume fraction, and specific surface area of the scatterers. It also enables scattering data from different instruments (light, X-ray, or neutron scattering) to be combined, and it can even be useful to detect the existence of artifacts in the experimental data. Different primary or secondary calibration methods are available. In the latter case, absolute intensity calibration requires a stable artifact with the necessary scattering profile. Glassy carbon has sometimes been selected as this intensity calibration standard. Here we review the spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of one type of commercially available glassy carbon that is being used as an intensity calibration standard at a number of SAS facilities. We demonstrate that glassy carbon is sufficiently homogeneous and stable during routine use to be relied upon as a suitable standard for absolute intensity calibration of SAS data.

  2. Nano-Scale Morphology of Melanosomes Revealed by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Gorniak, Thomas; Haraszti, Tamas; Garamus, Vasyl M.; Buck, Andreas R.; Senkbeil, Tobias; Priebe, Marius; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Koehn, Demelza; Salditt, Tim; Grunze, Michael; Anderson, Michael G.; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Melanosomes are highly specialized organelles that produce and store the pigment melanin, thereby fulfilling essential functions within their host organism. Besides having obvious cosmetic consequences – determining the color of skin, hair and the iris – they contribute to photochemical protection from ultraviolet radiation, as well as to vision (by defining how much light enters the eye). Though melanosomes can be beneficial for health, abnormalities in their structure can lead to adverse effects. Knowledge of their ultrastructure will be crucial to gaining insight into the mechanisms that ultimately lead to melanosome-related diseases. However, due to their small size and electron-dense content, physiologically intact melanosomes are recalcitrant to study by common imaging techniques such as light and transmission electron microscopy. In contrast, X-ray-based methodologies offer both high spatial resolution and powerful penetrating capabilities, and thus are well suited to study the ultrastructure of electron-dense organelles in their natural, hydrated form. Here, we report on the application of small-angle X-ray scattering – a method effective in determining the three-dimensional structures of biomolecules – to whole, hydrated murine melanosomes. The use of complementary information from the scattering signal of a large ensemble of suspended organelles and from single, vitrified specimens revealed a melanosomal sub-structure whose surface and bulk properties differ in two commonly used inbred strains of laboratory mice. Whereas melanosomes in C57BL/6J mice have a well-defined surface and are densely packed with 40-nm units, their counterparts in DBA/2J mice feature a rough surface, are more granular and consist of 60-nm building blocks. The fact that these strains have different coat colors and distinct susceptibilities to pigment-related eye disease suggest that these differences in size and packing are of biological significance. PMID:24621581

  3. Parameterization of structures in HE composites using surrogate materials: A small angle neutron scattering investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.; Skidmore, C.B.; Howe, P.M.

    1996-07-01

    High explosive materials used in the nuclear stockpile are composites of crystalline high explosives (HE) with binder materials, such as Estane. In such materials, there are naturally occurring density fluctuations (defects) due to cracks, internal (in the HE) and external (in the binder) voids and other artifacts of preparation. Changes in such defects due to material aging can affect the response of explosives due to shock, impact and thermal loading. Modeling efforts are attempting to provide quantitative descriptions of explosive response from the lowest ignition thresholds to the development of full blown detonations and explosions, however, adequate descriptions of these processes require accurate measurements of a number of structural parameters of the HE composite. Since different defects are believed to affect explosive sensitivity in different ways it is necessary to quantitatively differentiate between defect types. The authors report here preliminary results of SANS measurements on surrogates for HE materials. The objective of these measurements was to develop methodologies using SANS techniques to parameterize internal void size distributions in a surrogate material, sugar, to simulate an HE used in the stockpile, HMX. Sugar is a natural choice as a surrogate material, as it has the same crystal structure, has similar intragranular voids and has similar mechanical properties as HMX. It is used extensively as a mock material for explosives. Samples were used with two void size distributions: one with a sufficiently small mean particle size that only small occluded voids are present in significant concentrations, and one where the void sizes could be larger. By using methods in small-angle neutron scattering, they were able to isolate the scattering arising from particle-liquid interfaces and internal voids.

  4. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS).

    PubMed

    Perkins, Stephen J; Wright, David W; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J; Edler, Karen J; Scott, David J; Terrill, Nicholas J; King, Stephen M; Butler, Paul D; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web, and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic 'bottlebrush' polymers.

  5. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS)1

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Stephen J.; Wright, David W.; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H.; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C.; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J.; Edler, Karen J.; Scott, David J.; Terrill, Nicholas J.; King, Stephen M.; Butler, Paul D.; Curtis, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web, and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic ‘bottlebrush’ polymers. PMID:27980506

  6. Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering in Outer RB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    We present the equatorial and bounce average pitch angle diffusion coefficients for scattering of relativistic electrons by the H+ mode of EMIC waves. Both the model (prescribed) and self consistent distributions over the wave normal angle are considered. The main results of our calculation can be summarized as follows: First, in comparison with field aligned waves, the intermediate and highly oblique waves reduce the pitch angle range subject to diffusion, and strongly suppress the scattering rate for low energy electrons (E less than 2 MeV). Second, for electron energies greater than 5 MeV, the |n| = 1 resonances operate only in a narrow region at large pitch-angles, and despite their greatest contribution in case of field aligned waves, cannot cause electron diffusion into the loss cone. For those energies, oblique waves at |n| greater than 1 resonances are more effective, extending the range of pitch angle diffusion down to the loss cone boundary, and increasing diffusion at small pitch angles by orders of magnitude.

  7. PREFACE Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen; Terrill, Nicholas

    2010-10-01

    The XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009, was held in Oxford UK, 13-18 September 2009, and was jointly organised under the auspices of the International Union of Crystallography Commission on SAS by a team from the Diamond Light Source and the ISIS Pulsed Neutron Source - their first such joint venture - with help from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council. It was the first time that this long running and successful series of conferences on the application, science and technology of small-angle scattering techniques had been staged in the UK. The UK has a proud heritage in small-angle scattering: as home to one of the world's first SANS instruments (at AERE Harwell), as the site of the world's first 2nd generation X-ray Synchrotron (the SRS at Daresbury with its suite of SAXS beamlines), and latterly as the location of the world's most successful pulsed source SANS instrument. Indeed, 2009 also marked the 25th Anniversary of neutron operations at ISIS and the opening of a Second Target Station. Whilst the SRS ceased operations in 2008, its mantle has been inherited by the Diamond synchrotron. Many delegates took the opportunity to visit both Diamond and ISIS during a conference excursion. Despite the prevailing global economic downturn, we were delighted that 434 delegates from 32 different countries were able to attend SAS-2009; two-thirds were drawn from the UK, Germany, Japan, the USA and France, but there were also sizeable contingents from Australia, Korea, Taiwan and South America. In many ways this geographical spread reflects the present and emerging distribution, respectively, of 3rd generation X-ray synchrotrons and high-flux neutron sources, although the scope of the conference was not solely limited to these probes. Financial support from the IUCr enabled us to grant bursaries to attend SAS-2009 to 12 delegates from emerging countries (Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, India, Nepal, Romania, Russia and the Ukraine). The

  8. Characterization of Nanocomposite filler Morphology using Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, Ryan S.; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2010-10-22

    Loading polymer matrices with nanoscale fillers is widely believed to have the potential to push polymer properties to extreme values. Realization of anticipated properties, however, has proven elusive. Recent nanocomposite research suggests better characterization of the large-scale morphology will provide insight explaining these shortfalls. This work will present ultra-small angle X-ray scattering as a viable tool for elucidating the hierarchical filler morphology that exists within polymer nanocomposites. Scattering analysis tools developed by our group will be applied to scattering data from nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes, layered silicates, and colloidal silica. The relationship between imaging data and scattering data will be discussed in the context of filler dispersion. Finally, the impact of large-scale filler morphology on mechanical and electrical properties will be discussed.

  9. Structural modeling of proteins by integrating small-angle x-ray scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Hui; Peng, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Yong

    2015-12-01

    Elucidating the structure of large biomolecules such as multi-domain proteins or protein complexes is challenging due to their high flexibility in solution. Recently, an “integrative structural biology” approach has been proposed, which aims to determine the protein structure and characterize protein flexibility by combining complementary high- and low-resolution experimental data using computer simulations. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is an efficient technique that can yield low-resolution structural information, including protein size and shape. Here, we review computational methods that integrate SAXS with other experimental datasets for structural modeling. Finally, we provide a case study of determination of the structure of a protein complex formed between the tandem SH3 domains in c-Cb1-associated protein and the proline-rich loop in human vinculin. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB910203 and 2011CB911104), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31270760), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB08030102), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20113402120013).

  10. The kinetics of water sorption in Nafion membranes: a small-angle neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Gebel, Gérard; Lyonnard, Sandrine; Mendil-Jakani, Hakima; Morin, Arnaud

    2011-06-15

    The optimization of the water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells is a major issue for the large-scale development of this technology. In addition to the operating conditions, the membrane water sorption and transport processes obviously control the water management. The main objective of this work is to provide new experimental evidence based on the use of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique in order to allow a better understanding of water sorption processes. SANS spectra were recorded for membranes equilibrated with either water vapor or liquid. Sorption kinetics data were determined and the SANS spectra were analyzed using the method developed for extracting water concentration profiles across the membrane in operating fuel cells. The water concentration profiles across the membrane are completely flat, which indicates that the water diffusion within the membrane is not the limiting process. This result provides new insight into the numerous data published on these properties. For the first time, the swelling kinetics of a Nafion membrane immersed in liquid water is studied and a complete swelling is obtained in less than 1 min.

  11. Alzheimer's disease imaging biomarkers using small-angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Mina; Alam, Nadia; Dahal, Eshan; Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badano, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    There is a need for novel imaging techniques for the earlier detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two hallmarks of AD are amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and tau tangles that are formed in the brain. Well-characterized x-ray cross sections of Aβ and tau proteins in a variety of structural states could potentially be used as AD biomarkers for small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) imaging without the need for injectable probes or contrast agents. First, however, the protein structures must be controlled and measured to determine accurate biomarkers for SAXS imaging. Here we report SAXS measurements of Aβ42 and tau352 in a 50% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution in which these proteins are believed to remain monomeric because of the stabilizing interaction of DMSO solution. Our SAXS analysis showed the aggregation of both proteins. In particular, we found that the aggregation of Aβ42 slowly progresses with time in comparison to tau352 that aggregates at a faster rate and reaches a steady-state. Furthermore, the measured signals were compared to the theoretical SAXS profiles of Aβ42 monomer, Aβ42 fibril, and tau352 that were computed from their respective protein data bank structures. We have begun the work to systematically control the structural states of these proteins in vitro using various solvent conditions. Our future work is to utilize the distinct SAXS profiles of various structural states of Aβ and tau to build a library of signals of interest for SAXS imaging in brain tissue.

  12. Scattering angle resolved optical coherence tomography for in vivo murine retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Michael R.; Katta, Nitesh; McElroy, Austin; Baruah, Vikram; Rylander, H. G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal imaging contributes to understanding central nervous system (CNS) diseases because the eye is an anatomical "window to the brain" with direct optical access to nonmylenated retinal ganglion cells. However, many CNS diseases are associated with neuronal changes beyond the resolution of standard OCT retinal imaging systems. Though studies have shown the utility of scattering angle resolved (SAR) OCT for particle sizing and detecting disease states ex vivo, a compact SAR-OCT system for in vivo rodent retinal imaging has not previously been reported. We report a fiber-based SAR-OCT system (swept source at 1310 nm +/- 65 nm, 100 kHz scan rate) for mouse retinal imaging with a partial glass window (center aperture) for angular discrimination of backscattered light. This design incorporates a dual-axis MEMS mirror conjugate to the ocular pupil plane and a high collection efficiency objective. A muring retina is imaged during euthanasia, and the proposed SAR-index is examined versus time. Results show a positive correlation between the SAR-index and the sub-cellular hypoxic response of neurons to isoflurane overdose during euthanasia. The proposed SAR-OCT design and image process technique offer a contrast mechanism able to detect sub-resolution neuronal changes for murine retinal imaging.

  13. The active layer morphology of organic solar cells probed with grazing incidence scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2014-12-10

    Grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) provides unique insights into the morphology of active materials and thin film layers used in organic photovoltaic devices. With grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) the molecular arrangement of the material is probed. GIWAXS is sensitive to the crystalline parts and allows for the determination of the crystal structure and the orientation of the crystalline regions with respect to the electrodes. With grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) the nano-scale structure inside the films is probed. As GISAXS is sensitive to length scales from nanometers to several hundred nanometers, all relevant length scales of organic solar cells are detectable. After an introduction to GISAXS and GIWAXS, selected examples for application of both techniques to active layer materials are reviewed. The particular focus is on conjugated polymers, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT).

  14. Coherent Detector for Near-Angle Scattering and Polarization Characterization of Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven A.; Chipman, Russell A.; Daugherty, Brian J.; McClain, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses the difficulty of measuring scattering properties of coated mirrors extremely close to the specular reflection peak. A prototype Optical Hetero dyne Near-angle Scatterometer (OHNS) was developed. Light from a long-coherence-length (>150 m) 532-nm laser is split into two arms. Acousto-optic modulators frequency shift the sample and reference beams, establishing a fixed beat frequency between the beams. The sample beam is directed at very high f/# onto a mirror sample, and the point spread function (PSF) formed after the mirror sample is scanned with a pinhole. This light is recombined by a non-polarizing beam splitter and measured through heterodyne detection with a spectrum analyzer. Polarizers control the illuminated and analyzed polarization states, allowing the polarization dependent scatter to be measured. The bidirectional reflective or scattering distribution function is normally measured through use of a scattering goniometer instrument. The instrumental beam width (collection angle span) over which the scatterometer responds is typically many degrees. The OHNS enables measurement at angles as small as the first Airy disk diameter.

  15. Analysis of low-angle x-ray scattering peaks from lyophilized biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Elshemey, Wael M.; Selim, Nabila S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.

    2001-08-01

    Low-angle x-ray scattering (LAXS) from lyophilized blood and its constituents is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The present work aims to explore the nature of LAXS from a variety of lyophilized biological samples. It also aims to investigate the possibility that a certain biological macromolecule is responsible of the production of LAXS peaks. This is carried out through measurements of LAXS from complex biological samples and their basic constituents. Among the measured samples are haemoglobin (Hb), globin, haem, packed red blood cells, bovine albumin, egg albumin, milk, casein, glutamine, alanine, fat, muscle and DNA. A table containing some characteristic parameters of the LAXS profiles of these samples is also presented. Analysis of measured profiles shows that all lyophilized samples produce at least one relatively broad peak at a scattering angle around 10.35°. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak varies considerably among the measured samples. Except for milk and casein, one additional peak at a scattering angle around 4.65° is observed only in the LAXS profiles of proteins or protein-rich samples. This fact strongly suggests protein to be the biological macromolecule from which this characteristic peak originates. The same idea is further strengthened through discussion of some previous observations.

  16. Quantitative analysis of angle-resolved scattering properties of ovarian tissue using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Brewer, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Angle-resolved optical scattering properties of ovarian tissue, on different optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging planes, were quantitatively measured by fitting the compounded OCT A-lines into a single scattering model. Higher cross correlation value of angle-resolved scattering coefficients between different OCT imaging planes was found in normal ovaries than was present in malignant ovaries. The mean cross correlation coefficient (MCC) was introduced in this pilot study to characterize and differentiate normal, n=6, and malignant, n=4, ovaries. A specificity of 100 percent and a sensitivity of 100 percent were achieved by setting MCC threshold at 0.6. Collagen properties, within the OCT imaging penetration depth, were also qualitatively studied in terms of their content, structure and directivity. The homogeneous three-dimensional collagen fiber network, observed in the normal ovary, effectively explains the stronger cross correlation of angle-resolved scattering properties on different imaging planes while the heterogeneity, observed in the malignant ovary, suggests a weaker correlation. PMID:23085900

  17. Solution structure and excitation energy transfer in phycobiliproteins of Acaryochloris marina investigated by small angle scattering.

    PubMed

    Golub, M; Combet, S; Wieland, D C F; Soloviov, D; Kuklin, A; Lokstein, H; Schmitt, F-J; Olliges, R; Hecht, M; Eckert, H-J; Pieper, J

    2017-04-01

    The structure of phycobiliproteins of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina was investigated in buffer solution at physiological temperatures, i.e. under the same conditions applied in spectroscopic experiments, using small angle neutron scattering. The scattering data of intact phycobiliproteins in buffer solution containing phosphate can be well described using a cylindrical shape with a length of about 225Å and a diameter of approximately 100Å. This finding is qualitatively consistent with earlier electron microscopy studies reporting a rod-like shape of the phycobiliproteins with a length of about 250 (M. Chen et al., FEBS Letters 583, 2009, 2535) or 300Å (J. Marquart et al., FEBS Letters 410, 1997, 428). In contrast, phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer lacking phosphate revealed a splitting of the rods into cylindrical subunits with a height of 28Å only, but also a pronounced sample aggregation. Complementary small angle neutron and X-ray scattering experiments on phycocyanin suggest that the cylindrical subunits may represent either trimeric phycocyanin or trimeric allophycocyanin. Our findings are in agreement with the assumption that a phycobiliprotein rod with a total height of about 225Å can accommodate seven trimeric phycocyanin subunits and one trimeric allophycocyanin subunit, each of which having a height of about 28Å. The structural information obtained by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering can be used to interpret variations in the low-energy region of the 4.5K absorption spectra of phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer solutions containing and lacking phosphate, respectively.

  18. X-ray Scattering Techniques for Characterization of Nanosystems in Lifescience

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K

    2005-04-11

    The intent of this chapter is to provide the basics of using x-ray diffraction techniques in order to obtain information on the structure and morphology of the nanosystems, and also to point out some of its strengths and weaknesses when compare to other characterization techniques. X-ray scattering examines over a wide range of density domains from a tenth to a thousandth angstrom. Essentially, this covers a whole range of condensed matter, including the structure and morphology of nanosystems, particularly useful for examining nanostructures in lifescience. This range of domain size requires both the wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and small-angle (SAXS) x-ray scattering techniques. Roughly WAXS covers from 2 nm down, and SAXS covers from .5 nm to 100 nm and possibly 1,000 nm for a finely tuned instrument. Brief theoretical description of both WAXS and SAXS will be given in this chapter. WAXS, by itself is a powerful technique in providing information on the crystallographic structure or lack of structure, atomic positions and sizes in a unit cell, to some extend, chemical compositions and as well as chemical stoichiometry. Examples of such experiments will also be given. In order to be able to describe the technique of x-ray scattering, some historical and theoretical background will be given in the hope of making this subject interesting and simple.

  19. Probing the Complex Architecture of Multimodular Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes Using a Combination of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and X-Ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Czjzek, Mirjam; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The various modules in multimodular carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) may function in catalysis, carbohydrate binding, protein-protein interactions or as linkers. Here, we describe how combining the biophysical techniques of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and macromolecular X-ray crystallography (XRC) provides a powerful tool for examination into questions related to overall structural organization of ultra multimodular CAZymes.

  20. Retrieving the Ultrasmall-Angle X-Ray Scattering Signal with Polychromatic Radiation in Speckle-Tracking and Beam-Tracking Phase-Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria, Fabio A.; Endrizzi, Marco; Olivo, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    We present an experimental comparison between two x-ray phase-contrast imaging techniques currently under development, speckle tracking and beam tracking. The comparison is centered on the absorption and ultrasmall-angle scattering signals retrieved with polychromatic radiation from homogeneous and inhomogeneous samples of different thicknesses. Our analysis shows that the ultrasmall-angle scattering signal retrieved with speckle tracking does not increase linearly with the thickness for the inhomogeneous sample, and is different from zero for the homogeneous sample. The results obtained from beam tracking, instead, are in good agreement with the expectation.

  1. Large-angle x-ray scatter in Talbot-Lau interferometry for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to investigate large-angle x-ray scatter at design energy of 25 keV during small field of view (9.6 cm × 5 cm) differential phase contrast imaging of the breast using Talbot-Lau interferometry. Homogenous, adipose and fibroglandular breasts of uniform thickness ranging from 2 to 8 cm encompassing the field of view were modeled. Theoretically determined transmission efficiencies of the gratings were used to validate the Monte Carlo simulations, followed by simulations to determine the x-ray scatter reaching the detector. The recorded x-ray scatter was classified into x-ray photons that underwent at least one Compton interaction (incoherent scatter) and Rayleigh interaction alone (coherent scatter) for further analysis. Monte Carlo based estimates of transmission efficiencies showed good correspondence (r2 > 0.99) with theoretical estimates. Scatter-to-primary ratio increased with increasing breast thickness, ranging from 0.11 to 0.22 for 2 to 8 cm thick adipose breasts and from 0.12 to 0.28 for 2 to 8 cm thick fibroglandular breasts. The analyzer grating reduced incoherent scatter by ~18% for 2 cm thick adipose breast and by ~35% for 8 cm thick fibroglandular breast. Coherent scatter was the dominant contributor to the total scatter. Coherent-to-incoherent scatter ratio ranged from 2.2 to 3.1 for 2 to 8 cm thick adipose breasts and from 2.7 to 3.4 for 2 to 8 cm thick fibroglandular breasts. PMID:25295630

  2. Small angle neutron scattering modeling of copper-rich precipitates in steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.

    1997-11-01

    The magnetic to nuclear scattering intensity ratio observed in the scattering from copper rich precipitates in irradiated pressure vessel steels is much smaller than the value of 11.4 expected for a pure copper precipitate in iron. A model for precipitates in pressure vessel steels which matches the observed scattering typically incorporates manganese, nickel, silicon and other elements and it is assumed that the precipitate is non-magnetic. In the present work consideration is given to the effect of composition gradients and ferromagnetic penetration into the precipitate on the small angle scattering cross section for copper rich clusters as distinguished from conventional precipitates. The calculation is an extension of a scattering model for micelles which consist of shells of varying scattering density. A discrepancy between recent SANS scattering experiments on pressure vessel steels was found to be related to applied magnetic field strength. The assumption of cluster structure and its relation to atom probe FIM findings as well as the effects of insufficient field for magnetic saturation is discussed.

  3. Small angle neutron scattering modeling of copper-rich precipitates in steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.

    1997-11-01

    The magnetic-to-nuclear scattering intensity ratio observed in the scattering from copper-rich precipitates in irradiated pressure vessel steels is much smaller than the value of 11.4 expected for a pure copper precipitate in iron. A model for precipitates in pressure vessel steels which matches the observed scattering typically incorporates manganese, nickel, silicon and other elements and it is assumed that the precipitate is non-magnetic. In the present work consideration is given to the effect of composition gradients and ferromagnetic penetration into the precipitate on the small angle scattering cross section for copper-rich clusters as distinguished from conventional precipitates. The calculation is an extension of a scattering model for micelles which consist of shells of varying scattering density. A discrepancy between recent SANS scattering experiments on pressure vessel shells was found to be related to applied magnetic field strength. The assumption of cluster structure and its relation to atom probe FIM findings as well as the effects of insufficient field for magnetic saturation is discussed.

  4. Effect of incidence angle and panel size on the phase of scattered energy from panel arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsam, Jonathan; Wang, Lily M.; Torres, Rendell R.

    2005-04-01

    This investigation focuses on factors that influence scattering from different ceiling panel arrays (e.g., incidence angle, and array size and density) by examining the scattered phase. A previous study by the third author [Torres and Vorländer, Acta Acust. (in press)] measured impulse responses using the maximum length sequence method at various receiver positions from scale model panel arrays of different sizes and densities. One interesting conclusion was that for multi-element arrays with panel dimensions and separation on the order of a wavelength, the reflected amplitude decreased, apparently due to destructive interference from inter-panel scattering. Analysis focused on the magnitude of the frequency response but the author noted that the phase curves could also contain information about scattered energy and the hypothesized inter-panel scattering. What the phase curves reveal is the subject of this study. It is expected that noticeable deviations from smoothness observed in the phase curves indicate non-specular scattering from the panels. The frequencies at which these deviations occur are examined to give insight into how the geometrical conditions of the panel array affect scattering.

  5. Small-angle x-ray scattering studies of the manganese stabilizing subunit in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, B.; Tiede, D. M.; Barry, B. A.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2002-08-29

    Small-angle X-ray scattering studies (SAXS) were used to determine the size, shape, and oligomeric composition of the manganese stabilizing protein (MSP) of photosystem II. This extrinsic protein subunit plays an important role in photosynthetic oxygen evolution. As its name implies, MSP stabilizes the tetranuclear Mn cluster of the water oxidation complex. Removal of MSP lowers activity and decreases the stability of active-site manganese. Reconstitution of MSP reverses these effects. In this study, MSP was extracted from spinach PSII membranes using CaCl{sub 2} or urea. Through the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of MSP was determined to be 26.53 kDa. X-ray scattering results show that both samples display a monodisperse scattering pattern; this pattern is consistent with a homogeneous protein solution. The CaCl{sub 2} extracted and urea extracted MSP samples have radii of gyration of 25.9 {+-} 0.4 and 27.0 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, respectively. MSP is shown to be monomeric in solution. This was determined using a cytochrome c standard and the scattering intensity, extrapolated to zero scattering angle, which is proportional to the molecular weight. This SAXS study suggests that, in solution, MSP is a monomeric, elongated prolate ellipsoid with dimensions, 112 x 23 x 23 {angstrom}{sup 3} and an axial ratio of 4.8.

  6. Small angle X-ray scattering study of coal soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Parker, J. T.; Seifert, S.; Fletcher, T. H.

    2000-02-14

    The objective of this study is to examine, by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the formation of soot from individual coal particle combustion in a methane flat flame burner. The SAXS instrument at the Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can be used to observe both the formation of spherules and clusters since it can access length scales of 6--6000 {angstrom}. The high X-ray flux enables rapid acquisition of scattering data of various regions of the flame. SAXS data reveal particle size, shape, surface areas, and surface roughness.

  7. Characterising density fluctuations in liquid yttria aluminates with small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Wilding, Martin C.; Vu Van, Quang; Majerus, Odile; Hennet, Louis

    2009-01-29

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been measured in the wavevector range 0.01scatter from longer range fluctuating volumes.

  8. Equilibrium polymerization of liquid sulphur from small angle neutron scattering of sulphur solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, F.; Ambroise, J. P.; Bellissent, R.; Pfeuty, P.

    1992-06-01

    The reversible singular anomaly which shows up in liquid sulphur at 159°C and is also present in sulphur solutions has been clearly detected for the first time by small angle neutron scattering in solutions of sulphur with deuterated naphtalene and of sulphur with deuterated biphenyl. The observed sudden rise of the small q limit of the scattering intensity is interpreted as the signature of an equilibrium polymerization transition with formation of long sulphur chains. Experimental meausrements are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on the mean field approximation of a lattice model.

  9. Chaotic scattering of pitch angles in the current sheet of the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Chen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The modified Harris field model is used to investigate the process of pitch angle scattering by a current sheet. The relationship between the incoming asymptotic pitch angle alpha(in) and the outgoing asymptotic pitch angle alpha(out) is studied from first principles by numerically integrating the equation of motion. Evidence that charged particles undergo chaotic scattering by the current sheet is found. For fixed alpha(in), it is shown that alpha(out) exhibits sensitive dependence on the energy parameter in certain energy ranges. For a fixed energy parameter value in the same energy ranges, alpha(out) sensitively depends on alpha(in). For other energy values, alpha(out) does not show sensitive dependence on alpha(in) for most phase angles. A distribution of alpha(in) is mapped from the asymptotic region to the midplane, and it is found that the resulting particle distribution should have beam structures with well-collimated pitch angles near each resonance energy value. Implications for the particle distribution functions in the earth's magnetotail are discussed.

  10. The atomic scale structure of CXV carbon: wide-angle x-ray scattering and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawelek, L.; Brodka, A.; Dore, J. C.; Honkimaki, V.; Burian, A.

    2013-11-01

    The disordered structure of commercially available CXV activated carbon produced from finely powdered wood-based carbon has been studied using the wide-angle x-ray scattering technique, molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations. The x-ray scattering data has been converted to the real space representation in the form of the pair correlation function via the Fourier transform. Geometry optimizations using classical molecular dynamics based on the reactive empirical bond order potential and density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31g* level have been performed to generate nanoscale models of CXV carbon consistent with the experimental data. The final model of the structure comprises four chain-like and buckled graphitic layers containing a small percentage of four-fold coordinated atoms (sp3 defects) in each layer. The presence of non-hexagonal rings in the atomic arrangement has been also considered.

  11. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering from alkaline phosphatase immobilized in atmospheric plasmapolymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortore, M. G.; Sinibaldi, R.; Heyse, P.; Paulussen, S.; Bernstorff, S.; Sels, B.; Mariani, P.; Rustichelli, F.; Spinozzi, F.

    2008-06-01

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) has been used to study proteins embedded in thin polymer films obtained by a new cold, atmospheric-pressure plasma technique. In order to test the efficiency of the technology, four samples of alkaline phosphatase incorporated in organic polymer coatings in different plasma conditions have been investigated. Data have been analysed in the framework of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), by using a new method for the simultaneous fitting of the two-dimensional diffuse scattering from each sample. As a result, protein film concentration and aggregation state as well as a set of parameters describing the polymer coatings have been obtained.

  12. Radiographic measurements of hallux angles: a review of current techniques.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Subodh; Chockalingam, N; El Fakhri, Tarek

    2010-03-01

    Radiographic angles are commonly used in patients with hallux valgus deformity to assess the severity, plan surgery, assess outcome and compare results. Many different manual methods have been used, but are prone to error. More recently computer-assisted methods using software have become available. To review the different methods that have been used to measure radiographic angles in hallux valgus. A general literature search using relevant key words was undertaken using databases such as Medline, Embase, Cinahl and Cochrane Library. REVIEW FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION: The manual methods used are prone to errors. The reliability can be improved by using standardised radiographic technique and measurement technique using specific reference points. Computer-assisted methods using software, might improve reliability of measurements. Further studies are needed to assess if these methods are easy to use, and to compare different software's that are available. Specifically designed software for the foot might further improve the reliability of radiographic measurements in hallux valgus. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Angle-beam shear wave scattering from buried crack-like defects in bonded specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Carson T.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Weng, Yu; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic wavefield imaging, which refers to the measurement of wave motion on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, has been previously applied to angle-beam shear wave propagation in simple plates with through-holes and far-surface notches. In this prior work, scattered waves were analyzed using baseline subtraction of wavefields acquired before and after a notch was introduced. In practice, however, defects of interest often occur between bonded layers and it is generally not possible to record data from the same specimen in both the undamaged and damaged states, even in the laboratory. Direct baseline subtraction of wavefields thus becomes impractical as a tool for analyzing scattering. This present work considers measurement and analysis of angle-beam waves in bonded specimens with and without buried defects originating from fastener holes. Data from fastener holes with and without simulated damage in the form of notches are compared, and it is shown that wavefield baseline subtraction, even after correcting for misalignment between scans, is ineffective for isolating scattering from the notch. A combination of frequency-wavenumber filtering and spatial windowing is proposed and implemented as an alternative approach to quantify scattering from damage. Despite unavoidable deviations from specimen-to-specimen caused by factors such as variations in bonding, transducer mounting, and fastener hole machining, it is shown that scattering from buried notches can be clearly visualized in recorded wavefield data of bonded plates containing a buried defect as opposed to "baseline" wavefield data taken from a nominally similar specimen with no defect present. Backscattering is further quantified in the form of scattering patterns at different scattering frames to quantify the effect of the notch on the total backscattered wavefield.

  14. Kaon-nucleon scattering in three-dimensional technique

    SciTech Connect

    Salam, Agus Fachruddin, Imam

    2016-03-11

    Kaon-nucleon (KN) scattering is formulated in the three-dimensional (3D) momentum space, in which the basis state is not expanded into partial waves. Based on this basis the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the T-matrix is evaluated. We obtain as final equation for the T-matrix elements a set of two coupled integral equations in two variables, which are the momentum’s magnitude and the scattering angle. Calculations for the differential cross section and some spin observables are shown, for which we employ a hadrons exchange model with the second order contributions only.

  15. Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering: Powerful Tools for Studying the Structure of Drug-Loaded Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Di Cola, Emanuela; Grillo, Isabelle; Ristori, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nanovectors, such as liposomes, micelles and lipid nanoparticles, are recognized as efficient platforms for delivering therapeutic agents, especially those with low solubility in water. Besides being safe and non-toxic, drug carriers with improved performance should meet the requirements of (i) appropriate size and shape and (ii) cargo upload/release with unmodified properties. Structural issues are of primary importance to control the mechanism of action of loaded vectors. Overall properties, such as mean diameter and surface charge, can be obtained using bench instruments (Dynamic Light Scattering and Zeta potential). However, techniques with higher space and time resolution are needed for in-depth structural characterization. Small-angle X-ray (SAXS) and neutron (SANS) scattering techniques provide information at the nanoscale and have therefore been largely used to investigate nanovectors loaded with drugs or other biologically relevant molecules. Here we revise recent applications of these complementary scattering techniques in the field of drug delivery in pharmaceutics and medicine with a focus to liposomal carriers. In particular, we highlight those aspects that can be more commonly accessed by the interested users. PMID:27043614

  16. Failure of the multiple peaking approximation for fast capture processes at milliradian scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Houamer, Salim; Popov, Yuri V.; Dal Cappello, Claude

    2010-03-15

    The first Born approximation is examined for different fast capture processes for the p+He system at incident energies of about 1 MeV. Calculations have been performed for the singly differential cross section (SDCS) for scattering angles 0-0.5 mrad in the laboratory frame. In the case of transfer ionization, we observe that the two-step-2 mechanism has a dominant contribution to the SDCS for the kinematics considered in this work. The present investigation demonstrates that the multiple peaking approximation is a very crude method which fails to describe the SDCS even at scattering angles below 0.5 mrad. We have also presented a doubly differential cross section for the fixed emission energy of 600 eV and compared our results with other theoretical calculations and experiments.

  17. Quaternary structure built from subunits combining NMR and small-angle x-ray scattering data.

    PubMed Central

    Mattinen, Maija-Liisa; Pääkkönen, Kimmo; Ikonen, Teemu; Craven, Jeremy; Drakenberg, Torbjörn; Serimaa, Ritva; Waltho, Jonathan; Annila, Arto

    2002-01-01

    A new principle in constructing molecular complexes from the known high-resolution domain structures joining data from NMR and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements is described. Structure of calmodulin in complex with trifluoperazine was built from N- and C-terminal domains oriented based on residual dipolar couplings measured by NMR in a dilute liquid crystal, and the overall shape of the complex was derived from SAXS data. The residual dipolar coupling data serves to reduce angular degrees of freedom, and the small-angle scattering data serves to confine the translational degrees of freedom. The complex built by this method was found to be consistent with the known crystal structure. The study demonstrates how approximate tertiary structures of modular proteins or quaternary structures composed of subunits can be assembled from high-resolution structures of domains or subunits using mutually complementary NMR and SAXS data. PMID:12124297

  18. Solution properties of a CO{sub 2}-soluble fluoropolymer via small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, J.B.; Combes, J.R.; Romack, T.J.; Canelas, D.A.; Betts, D.E.; Samulski, E.T.; DeSimone, J.M.; Londono, D.; Wignall, G.D.

    1996-01-31

    In this communication, we report the first characterization of solutions of a high molecular weight polymer in supercritical CO{sub 2} by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is shown that small-angle neutron scattering gives key molecular parameters of an amorphous fluoropolymer in supercritical CO{sub 2}, i.e., the molecular weight, radius of gyration, and second virial coefficient, and thereby gives insights into a polymer chain`s behavior in this unique solvent. The positive sign of the second virial coefficients indicate that this medium is a good solvent - there is no evidence of a collapsed chain conformation. In fact, we conclude from the SANS data that, in CO{sub 2}, the poly(FOA) chain dimensions are expanded relative to those characteristic of its melt. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Large-Angle Scattering of Multi-GeV Muons on Thin Lead Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhin, A.; Paoloni, A.; Pupilli, F.

    2015-10-01

    The probability of large-angle scattering for multi-GeV muons in lead targets with a thickness of O(10 - 1) radiation lengths is studied. The new estimates presented here are based both on simulation programs (GEANT4 libraries) and theoretical calculations. In order to validate the results provided by simulation, a comparison is drawn with experimental data from the literature. This study is particularly relevant when applied to muons originating from νμ CC interactions of CNGS beam neutrinos. In that circumstance the process under study represents the dominant background for the νμ → ντ search in the τ→ μ channel for the OPERA experiment at LNGS. Finally we also investigate, in the CNGS context, possible contributions from the muon photo-nuclear process which might in principle also produce a large-angle muon scattering signature in the detector.

  20. Photon spectra calculation for an Elekta linac beam using experimental scatter measurements and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Campayo, J M; Diez, S; Verdu, G

    2008-01-01

    The present work is centered in reconstructing by means of a scatter analysis method the primary beam photon spectrum of a linear accelerator. This technique is based on irradiating the isocenter of a rectangular block made of methacrylate placed at 100 cm distance from surface and measuring scattered particles around the plastic at several specific positions with different scatter angles. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate the particles transport of mono-energetic beams to register the scatter measurement after contact the attenuator. Measured ionization values allow calculating the spectrum as the sum of mono-energetic individual energy bins using the Schiff Bremsstrahlung model. The measurements have been made in an Elekta Precise linac using a 6 MeV photon beam. Relative depth and profile dose curves calculated in a water phantom using the reconstructed spectrum agree with experimentally measured dose data to within 3%.

  1. SFF analysis of the small angle scattering data for investigation of a vesicle systems structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Kiselev, M. A.; Zhabitskaya, E. I.; Gruzinov, A. Yu.; Aksenov, V. L.; Ipatova, O. M.; Druzhilovskaya, O. S.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental data on the small angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (SAXS) are analyzed on a basis of Separated form factors method (SFF) for a study of the drug delivery Phospholipid Transport Nano System (PTNS). Basic parameters of polydispersed population of PTNS nanoparticles (average radius of PTNS-particles, polydispersity of radius, thickness of membrane) have been determined. The results are discussed in comparison with the SFF results for the “classical” vesicular system of dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC).

  2. Grazing Angle Proton Scattering: Effects on Chandra and XMM-Newton X-Ray Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    these scattering models calculation . As expected the MCNPX results have broad, low are valid for moderately large angles of incidence, or cases energy...the incident particle will enter into the bulk MCNPX calculated values show a much larger energy losses material, if the particle trajectory is not...properties - Flmov FormuIa Calculation [ and will not change significantly for the mirror materials. SJ Oinc 0.20 MCNPX and Geant4 calculations

  3. Two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors for small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McElhaney, S.A.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, various detectors available for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are discussed, along with some current developments being actively pursued. A section has been included to outline the various methodologies of position encoding/decoding with discussions on trends and limitations. Computer software/hardware vary greatly from institute and experiment and only a general discussion is given to this area. 85 refs., 33 figs.

  4. Angle-resolved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on metallic nanostructured plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Baumberg, Jeremy J; Kelf, Timothy A; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Cintra, Suzanne; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh E; Bartlett, Phillip N; Russell, Andrea E

    2005-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is an ideal tool for identifying molecules from the "fingerprint" of their molecular bonds; unfortunately, this process lacks a full microscopic understanding and, practically, is plagued with irreproducibility. Using nanostructured metal surfaces, we demonstrate strong correlations between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements. Evidence for simultaneous ingoing and outgoing resonances in wavelength and angle sheds new light on the Raman enhancement process, allowing optimization of a new generation of reproducible Raman substrates.

  5. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering by the Magnetic Microstructure of Nanocrystalline Ferromagnets Near Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Weissmüller, J.; McMichael, R. D.; Michels, A.; Shull, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical analysis of elastic magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) due to the nonuniform magnetic microstructure in nanocrystalline ferromagnets. The reaction of the magnetization to the magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropy fields is derived using the theory of micromagnetics. In the limit where the scattering volume is a single magnetic domain, and the magnetization is nearly aligned with the direction of the magnetic field, closed form solutions are given for the differential scattering cross-section as a function of the scattering vector and of the magnetic field. These expressions involve an anisotropy field scattering function, that depends only on the Fourier components of the anisotropy field microstructure, not on the applied field, and a micromagnetic response function for SANS, that can be computed from tabulated values of the materials parameters saturation magnetization and exchange stiffness constant or spin wave stiffness constant. Based on these results, it is suggested that the anisotropy field scattering function SH can be extracted from experimental SANS data. A sum rule for SH suggests measurement of the volumetric mean square anisotropy field. When magnetocrystalline anisotropy is dominant, then a mean grain size or the grain size distribution may be determined by analysis of SH.

  6. Note: A gel based imaging technique of the iridocorneal angle for evaluation of angle-closure glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Baskaran, M.; Aung, T.

    2014-06-01

    Noninvasive medical imaging techniques have high potential in the field of ocular imaging research. Angle closure glaucoma is a major disease causing blindness and a possible way of detection is the examination of the anterior chamber angle in eyes. Here, a simple optical method for the evaluation of angle-closure glaucoma is proposed and illustrated. The light propagation from the region associated with the iridocorneal angle to the exterior of eye is considered analytically. The design of the gel assisted probe prototype is carried out and the imaging of iridocorneal angle is performed on an eye model.

  7. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Near-Angle Scattering of Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A. (Inventor); Daugherty, Brian J. (Inventor); McClain, Stephen C. (Inventor); Macenka, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining the near angle scattering of a sample reflective surface comprising the steps of: a) splitting a beam of light having a coherence length of greater than or equal to about 2 meters into a sample beam and a reference beam; b) frequency shifting both the sample beam and the reference beam to produce a fixed beat frequency between the sample beam and the reference beam; c) directing the sample beam through a focusing lens and onto the sample reflective surface, d) reflecting the sample beam from the sample reflective surface through a detection restriction disposed on a movable stage; e) recombining the sample beam with the reference beam to form a recombined beam, followed by f) directing the recombined beam to a detector and performing heterodyne analysis on the recombined beam to measure the near-angle scattering of the sample reflective surface, wherein the position of the detection restriction relative to the sample beam is varied to occlude at least a portion of the sample beam to measure the near-angle scattering of the sample reflective surface. An apparatus according to the above method is also disclosed.

  8. Small-angle scatter tomography with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Zhu, Zheyuan; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle x-ray scatter imaging has a high intrinsic contrast in cancer research and other applications, and provides information on molecular composition and micro-structure of the tissue. In general, the implementations of small-angle coherent scatter imaging can be divided into two main categories: direct tomography and angular dispersive computerized tomography. Based on the recent development of energy-discriminative photon-counting detector array, here we propose a computerized tomography setup based on energy-dispersive measurement with a photon-counting detector array. To show merits of the energy-dispersive approach, we have performed numerical tests with a phantom containing various tissue types, in comparison with the existing imaging approaches. The results show that with an energy resolution of ~6 keV, the energy dispersive tomography system with a broadband tabletop x-ray would outperform the angular dispersive system, which makes the x-ray small-angle scatter tomography promising for high-specificity tissue imaging.

  9. Pitch angle scattering by triggered emissions from the Siple Station wave injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harid, V.; Golkowski, M.; Bell, T. F.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear amplification of whistler mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere , due to gyroresonance with energetic electrons, also known as the phenomena of VLF triggered emissions, has been investigated extensively with analytical formulations, experimental observations and computer simulations. However, the pitch angle scattering of typical triggered emission waveforms has not been specifically considered. Most authors consider particle scattering either in the presence of a monochromatic constant amplitude wave or a broadband incoherent but time-frequency homogenous emission. Although investigation of these two limiting cases has provided valuable insight into radiation belt dynamics, a large class of waves including triggered emissions and chorus do not fall under either of the two descriptions. The inherent symmetry of a constant amplitude monochromatic wave around the equator results in non-cumulative pitch angle change for a large population of electrons. Wave amplification generated during linear and nonlinear growth result in wave gradients that can have a more significant effect on particle pitch angle and energy. In addition, coherent frequency changing signals are capable of shifting the cyclotron resonance condition and significantly perturbing particle trajectories from their adiabatic motion. The wave-injection experiment at Siple Station, Antarctica was designed to study wave growth and triggering processes in the magnetosphere. Amplified signals from Siple Station often show both wave gradients as well advances in phase and frequency. Using a numerical test-particle simulation, we model the effect of typical Siple Station signals on pitch angle scattering and particle precipitation. Results show that triggered emission type wave forms are more efficient in producing large pitch angle changes in resonant particles.

  10. Convex and concave successions of power-law decays in small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The small-angle scattering (SAS) structure factor from a new model of a 3D deterministic fractal in which the relative positions and the number of structural units vary with fractal iteration number is calculated. It is shown that, depending on the relative positions of scattering units inside the fractal, we can obtain various types of power-law successions, such as: convex/concave - when the absolute value of the scattering exponent of the first power-law decay is higher/smaller than that of the subsequent power- law decay, or any combination of them (i.e. convex-concave or concave-convex). The obtained results can explain experimental SAS (neutron or X-rays) data which are characterized by a succession of power-law decays of arbitrary length.

  11. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at small angles, measured at ANKE-COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarian, Z.

    2016-03-01

    The most accepted approach to describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is the partial wave analysis (PWA), which translates various experimental observables to the common language of the partial waves. The reliable analysis relies not only on the quality experimental data, but also on the measurements of scattering observables over preferably the full angular range. Small angle scattering has been measured for six beam energies between 0.8 and 2.4 GeV using polarized proton beam incident on both proton and deuteron unpolarized targets at COSY-ANKE. This proceeding will report on the published and preliminary results for both pp and pn scattering from this and other recent experiments at ANKE. This study aims to provide the valuable observables to the SAID group in order to improve the phenomenological understanding of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  12. Anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering of a femtosecond irradiated germano silicate fibre preform.

    SciTech Connect

    Hindle, F.; Fertein, E.; Seifert, S.; Przygodski, C.S.; Bocquet, R.; Douay, M.; Bychkov, E.; Experimental Facilities Division; LPCA, CNRS; PhLAM; Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille

    2005-01-01

    RADIATION is shown to induce significant mesoscopic structure. The scattering intensity for irradiated glasses is close to two orders of magnitude greater than that of unexposed material. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS) around the germanium K-edge for the silica and germanium doped silica regions of a fiber preform is used to demonstrate that identical structures are induced in both glass materials, with germanium displaying a capacity to isomorphically replace silicon in the case of the germanium doped silica. Analysis of measured scattering indicates that photo-inscribed features are produced at two distinct scales with typical radii of R {approx} 20 Angstroms and R{sub min} {approx} 200 Angstroms.

  13. Bilayer thickness in unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles: small-angle neutron scattering using contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerka, N.; Uhríková, D.; Teixeira, J.; Balgavý, P.

    2004-07-01

    The thickness of the lipid bilayer in extruded unilamellar vesicles prepared from synthetic 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholines with monounsaturated acyl chains (diCn:1PC, n=14-22) was studied at 30°C in the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. Several contrasts of the neutron scattering length density between the aqueous phase and phospholipid bilayer of vesicles were used. The experimental data were evaluated using the small-angle form of the Kratky-Porod approximation ln[I(q)q2] vs. q2 of the SANS intensity I(q) in the appropriate range of scattering vector values q to obtain the bilayer radius of gyration Rg and its extrapolated value at infinite scattering contrast Rginf. The bilayer thickness parameter evaluated from a linear approximation of dependence of gyration radius on the inverse contrast was then obtained without using any bilayer structure model. The dependence of the thickness parameter dg≅120.5Rginf on the number n of acyl chain carbons was found to be linear with a slope of 1.8+/-0.2Å per one acyl chain carbon. This slope can be used in bilayer-protein interaction studies.

  14. MAGNETIC VARIANCES AND PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING TIMES UPSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano E-mail: gaetano.zimbardo@fis.unical.it

    2012-07-20

    Recent observations of power-law time profiles of energetic particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks have shown the possibility of anomalous, superdiffusive transport for energetic particles throughout the heliosphere. Those findings call for an accurate investigation of the magnetic field fluctuation properties at the resonance frequencies upstream of the shock's fronts. Normalized magnetic field variances, indeed, play a crucial role in the determination of the pitch-angle scattering times and then of the transport regime. The present analysis investigates the time behavior of the normalized variances of the magnetic field fluctuations, measured by the Ulysses spacecraft upstream of corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks, for those events which exhibit superdiffusion for energetic electrons. We find a quasi-constant value for the normalized magnetic field variances from about 10 hr to 100 hr from the shock front. This rules out the presence of a varying diffusion coefficient and confirms the possibility of superdiffusion for energetic electrons. A statistical analysis of the scattering times obtained from the magnetic fluctuations upstream of the CIR events has also been performed; the resulting power-law distributions of scattering times imply long range correlations and weak pitch-angle scattering, and the power-law slopes are in qualitative agreement with superdiffusive processes described by a Levy random walk.

  15. Electromagnetic Scattered Field Evaluation and Data Compression Using Imaging Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report on Project #727625 between The Ohio State University and NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. Under this project, a data compression technique for scattered field data of electrically large targets is developed. The technique was applied to the scattered fields of two targets of interest. The backscattered fields of the scale models of these targets were measured in a ra compact range. For one of the targets, the backscattered fields were also calculated using XPATCH computer code. Using the technique all scattered field data sets were compressed successfully. A compression ratio of the order 40 was achieved. In this report, the technique is described briefly and some sample results are included.

  16. A Microbeam Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study on Enamel Crystallites in Subsurface Lesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, N.; Ohta, N.; Matsuo, T.; Tanaka, T.; Terada, Y.; Kamasaka, H.; Kometani, T.

    2010-10-01

    The early caries lesion in bovine tooth enamel was studied by two different X-ray diffraction systems at the SPring-8 third generation synchrotron radiation facility. Both allowed us simultaneous measurement of the small and large angle regions. The beam size was 6μm at BL40XU and 50μm at BL45XU. The small-angle scattering from voids in the hydroxyapatite crystallites and the wide-angle diffraction from the hydroxyapatite crystals were observed simultaneously. At BL40XU an X-ray image intensifier was used for the small-angle and a CMOS flatpanel detector for the large-angle region. At BL45XU, a large-area CCD detector was used to cover both regions. A linear microbeam scan at BL40XU showed a detailed distribution of voids and crystals and made it possible to examine the structural details in the lesion. The two-dimensional scan at BL45XU showed distribution of voids and crystals in a wider region in the enamel. The simultaneous small- and wide-angle measurement with a microbeam is a powerful tool to elucidate the mechanisms of demineralization and remineralization in the early caries lesion.

  17. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Demonstrates Similar Nanostructure in Cortical Bone from Young Adult Animals of Different Species.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Turunen, Mikael Juhani; Mathavan, Neashan; Lages, Sebastian; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Olsson, Ulf; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Despite the vast amount of studies focusing on bone nanostructure that have been performed for several decades, doubts regarding the detailed structure of the constituting hydroxyapatite crystal still exist. Different experimental techniques report somewhat different sizes and locations, possibly due to different requirements for the sample preparation. In this study, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the nanostructure of femur samples from young adult ovine, bovine, porcine, and murine cortical bone, including three different orthogonal directions relative to the long axis of the bone. The radially averaged scattering from all samples reveals a remarkable similarity in the entire q range, which indicates that the nanostructure is essentially the same in all species. Small differences in the data from different directions confirm that the crystals are elongated in the [001] direction and that this direction is parallel to the long axis of the bone. A model consisting of thin plates is successfully employed to describe the scattering and extract the plate thicknesses, which are found to be in the range of 20-40 Å for most samples but 40-60 Å for the cow samples. It is demonstrated that the mineral plates have a large degree of polydispersity in plate thickness. Additionally, and equally importantly, the scattering data and the model are critically evaluated in terms of model uncertainties and overall information content.

  18. Thorough small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the instability of liquid micro-jets in air.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Benedetta; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Pérez, Javier; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Liquid jets are of interest, both for their industrial relevance and for scientific applications (more important, in particular for X-rays, after the advent of free-electron lasers that require liquid jets as sample carrier). Instability mechanisms have been described theoretically and by numerical simulation, but confirmed by few experimental techniques. In fact, these are mainly based on cameras, which is limited by the imaging resolution, and on light scattering, which is hindered by absorption, reflection, Mie scattering and multiple scattering due to complex air/liquid interfaces during jet break-up. In this communication it is demonstrated that synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can give quantitative information on liquid jet dynamics at the nanoscale, by detecting time-dependent morphology and break-up length. Jets ejected from circular tubes of different diameters (100-450 µm) and speeds (0.7-21 m s(-1)) have been explored to cover the Rayleigh and first wind-induced regimes. Various solvents (water, ethanol, 2-propanol) and their mixtures have been examined. The determination of the liquid jet behaviour becomes essential, as it provides background data in subsequent studies of chemical and biological reactions using SAXS or X-ray diffraction based on synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers.

  19. Generalized ISAR--part II: interferometric techniques for three-dimensional location of scatterers.

    PubMed

    Given, James A; Schmidt, William R

    2005-11-01

    This paper is the second part of a study dedicated to optimizing diagnostic inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) studies of large naval vessels. The method developed here provides accurate determination of the position of important radio-frequency scatterers by combining accurate knowledge of ship position and orientation with specialized signal processing. The method allows for the simultaneous presence of substantial Doppler returns from both change of roll angle and change of aspect angle by introducing generalized ISAR ates. The first paper provides two modes of interpreting ISAR plots, one valid when roll Doppler is dominant, the other valid when the aspect angle Doppler is dominant. Here, we provide, for each type of ISAR plot technique, a corresponding interferometric ISAR (InSAR) technique. The former, aspect-angle dominated InSAR, is a generalization of standard InSAR; the latter, roll-angle dominated InSAR, seems to be new to this work. Both methods are shown to be efficient at identifying localized scatterers under simulation conditions.

  20. Nonuniformity in natural rubber as revealed by small-angle neutron scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karino, Takeshi; Ikeda, Yuko; Yasuda, Yoritaka; Kohjiya, Shinzo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2007-02-01

    The microscopic structures of natural rubber (NR) and deproteinized NR (DPNR) were investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). They were compared to those of isoprene rubber (IR), which is a synthetic analogue of NR in terms of chemical structure without any non-rubber components like proteins. Comparisons of the structure and mechanical properties of NR, DPNR, and IR lead to the following conclusions. (i) The well-known facts, for example, the outstanding green strength of NR and strain-induced crystallization, are due not much to the presence of proteins but to other components such as the presence of phospholipids and/or the higher stereoregularity of NR. It also became clear the naturally residing proteins accelerate the upturn of stress at low strain. The protein phases work as cross-linking sites and reinforcing fillers in the rubbery matrix. (ii) The microscopic structures of NR were successfully reproduced by SANS intensity functions consisting of squared-Lorentz and Lorentz functions, indicating the presence of inhomogeneities in bulk and thermal concentration fluctuations in swollen state, respectively. On the other hand, IR rubbers were homogeneous in bulk. (iii) The inhomogeneities in NR are assigned to protein aggregates of the order of 200 A or larger. Although these aggregates are larger in size as well as in volume fraction than those of cross-link inhomogeneities introduced by cross-linking, they are removed by deproteinization. (iv) Swelling of both NR and IR networks introduces gel-like concentration fluctuations whose mesh size is of the order of 20 A.

  1. Digital 3D holographic display using scattering layers for enhanced viewing angle and image size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Lee, KyeoReh; Park, Jongchan; Park, YongKeun

    2017-05-01

    In digital 3D holographic displays, the generation of realistic 3D images has been hindered by limited viewing angle and image size. Here we demonstrate a digital 3D holographic display using volume speckle fields produced by scattering layers in which both the viewing angle and the image size are greatly enhanced. Although volume speckle fields exhibit random distributions, the transmitted speckle fields have a linear and deterministic relationship with the input field. By modulating the incident wavefront with a digital micro-mirror device, volume speckle patterns are controlled to generate 3D images of micrometer-size optical foci with 35° viewing angle in a volume of 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm.

  2. EDITORIAL Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, Goran; Heenan, Richard

    2010-10-01

    There are 52 papers in these Proceedings. The papers are divided into 10 thematic sections and a section for invited papers and reviews. The sections and the respective section editors are given below. Section Editor(s) Invited Papers and Reviews Peter Griffiths, Wim Bras, Rudolf Winter Beamlines and Instrumentation Elliot Gilbert, Wim Bras, Nigel Rhodes Theory, Data processing and Modelling Jan Skov Pedersen, Carlo Knupp Biological Systems and Membranes Richard Heenan, Cameron Neylon Ceramics, Glasses and Porous Materials Rudolf Winter Colloids and Solutions Peter Griffiths Hierarchical Structures and Fibres Steve Eichhorn, Karen Edler Metallic and Magnetic Systems Armin Hoell Polymers Patrick Fairclough Time resolved Diffraction, Kinetic and Dynamical Studies João Cabral, Christoph Rau We are grateful to all section editors and the many anonymous referees for their invaluable effort which made the publication of the Proceedings possible. The refereeing process was strict and thorough, some papers were rejected and most were improved. The resulting compendium gives a good overview of recent developments in small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering theory, application, methods of analysis and instrumentation. Thus it should be a useful source of reference for a number of years to come. The papers are a good reflection of the material presented at the meeting. Because of the general high quality of the articles, it was difficult to decide which to highlight and be fair to all contributors. The following in particular have caught the attention of the editors. Highlighted papers A statistical survey of publications reporting the application of SAXS and SANS by Aldo Craievich (paper 012003) is recommended reading for anyone needing convincing about the vibrancy of this scientific field and the ever expanding use of these techniques. Two aspects of coherent X-ray scattering, made available by the advent of the 3rd generation synchrotron sources, are discussed in the

  3. Comparing the techniques of defining the synchronous machine load angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, P. Y.; Moiseichenkov, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    The low-frequency oscillations are natural for power systems and may arise due to both small variations of load and large disturbance. The effect of slight load changes may significantly differ for cases of low-magnitude permanent oscillations, which may be considered acceptable, and unstable oscillations, which may lead to a major system emergency. The existing trend of increasing the capacity of long-range power transmission has led to the situation where inter-area oscillations may appear underdamped or even rising in terms of magnitude. Effective oscillations detection with the corresponding countermeasures along with eliminating the prerequisites leading to the oscillations is a guarantee of minimizing their negative consequences. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to perform continuous monitoring which is to provide the information on the “source” of oscillations - a generator or a group of generators, which do not contribute to the oscillations damping or even support their development. The algorithm of quantitative estimation of synchronous generators participation in low-frequency oscillations damping based on synchronized phasor measurements has been proposed previously. It implies utilizing the concept of synchronizing power as a measure of the capability of the machine to maintain synchronous operation. The load angle of the generator is necessary to define the value of the synchronizing power and since the direct measurement of the load angle is generally not available the techniques of its derivation have been developed. The comparison of these techniques is presented with the estimation of the adopted assumptions effect on the synchronizing power evaluation results.

  4. Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    The flux level of outer-zone relativistic electrons (above 1 MeV) is extremely variable during geomagnetic storms, and controlled by a competition between acceleration and loss. Precipitation of these electrons due to resonant pitch-angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is considered one of the major loss mechanisms. This mechanism was suggested in early theoretical studies more than three decades ago. However, direct experimental evidence of the wave role in relativistic electrons precipitation is difficult to obtain because of lack of concurrent measurements of precipitating electrons at low altitudes and the waves in a magnetically conjugate equatorial region. Recently, the data from balloon-borne X-ray instruments provided indirect but strong evidence on an efficiency of the EMIC wave induced loss for the outer-zone relativistic electrons. These observations stimulated theoretical studies that, particularly, demonstrated that EMIC wave induced pitch-angle diffusion of MeV electrons can operate in the strong diffusion limit and this mechanism can compete with relativistic electron depletion caused by the Dst effect during the initial and main phases of storm. Although an effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves depends strongly on the wave spectral properties, the most favorable assumptions regarding wave characteristics has been made in all previous theoretical studies. Particularly, only quasi field-aligned EMIC waves have been considered as a driver for relativistic electron loss. At the same time, there is growing experimental and theoretical evidence that these waves can be highly oblique; EMIC wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e. the region of small wave normal angles, but also the entire wave normal angle region, and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter can dramatically change he effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves. In the present study, we

  5. Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    The flux level of outer-zone relativistic electrons (above 1 MeV) is extremely variable during geomagnetic storms, and controlled by a competition between acceleration and loss. Precipitation of these electrons due to resonant pitch-angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is considered one of the major loss mechanisms. This mechanism was suggested in early theoretical studies more than three decades ago. However, direct experimental evidence of the wave role in relativistic electrons precipitation is difficult to obtain because of lack of concurrent measurements of precipitating electrons at low altitudes and the waves in a magnetically conjugate equatorial region. Recently, the data from balloon-borne X-ray instruments provided indirect but strong evidence on an efficiency of the EMIC wave induced loss for the outer-zone relativistic electrons. These observations stimulated theoretical studies that, particularly, demonstrated that EMIC wave induced pitch-angle diffusion of MeV electrons can operate in the strong diffusion limit and this mechanism can compete with relativistic electron depletion caused by the Dst effect during the initial and main phases of storm. Although an effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves depends strongly on the wave spectral properties, the most favorable assumptions regarding wave characteristics has been made in all previous theoretical studies. Particularly, only quasi field-aligned EMIC waves have been considered as a driver for relativistic electron loss. At the same time, there is growing experimental and theoretical evidence that these waves can be highly oblique; EMIC wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e. the region of small wave normal angles, but also the entire wave normal angle region, and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter can dramatically change he effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves. In the present study, we

  6. Ternary systems of nonionic surfactant Brij 35, water and various simple alcohols: Structural investigations by small-angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Matija; Bester-Rogac, Marija; Jamnik, Andrej; Kunz, Werner; Touraud, Didier; Bergmann, Alexander; Glatter, Otto

    2006-02-01

    Structural properties of ternary systems composed of nonionic surfactant dodecyl-poly(ethylene oxide-23) ether (C12E23, commercial name: Brij 35), water and various alcohols from ethanol to 1-decanol have been investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. All measurements were performed at the temperature 25 degrees C. SAXS experimental data were put on absolute scale using water as a secondary standard. The data of water-rich mixtures at low to moderate surfactant concentrations were evaluated using the generalized indirect Fourier transformation method (GIFT), which is based on the simultaneous determination of the intra- and inter-particle scattering contributions. In this way, the size and the shape of interacting scattering particles in real space could be deduced. The systems with a relatively low surfactant concentration (5 mass%) were studied most extensively. In these cases, the water-rich regions of the phase diagrams could be investigated into more detail, since in the alcohol-rich regions problems with the GIFT evaluation of the SAXS data were encountered. The presented results demonstrate the level of structural details that can be obtained on the basis of scattering methods and point out the specific stages of data evaluation and interpretation where one must be extremely precautious. As such they reveal the inner structuration of the complex ternary systems of our present interest. In parallel, they also indicate that the longer chain alcohols actually behave as real oil phases in the studied systems, as one might expect, and also confirm the well-known properties of different short to medium chain alcohols that act as co-solvents and/or co-surfactants in microemulsion systems depending on their chain length.

  7. Monitoring simultaneously the growth of nanoparticles and aggregates by in situ ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kammler, Hendrik K.; Beaucage, Gregory; Kohls, Douglas J.; Agashe, Nikhil; Ilavsky, Jan

    2005-03-01

    Ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering can provide information about primary particles and aggregates from a single scattering experiment. This technique is applied in situ to flame aerosol reactors for monitoring simultaneously the primary particle and aggregate growth dynamics of oxide nanoparticles in a flame. This was enabled through the use of a third generation synchrotron source (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne IL, USA) using specialized scattering instrumentation at the UNICAT facility which is capable of simultaneously measuring nanoscales to microscales (1 nm to 1 {mu}m). More specifically, the evolution of primary-particle diameter, mass-fractal dimension, geometric standard deviation, silica volume fraction, number concentration, radius of gyration of the aggregate, and number of primary particles per aggregate are measured along the flame axis for two different premixed flames. All these particle characteristics were derived from a single and nonintrusive measurement technique. Flame temperature profiles were measured in the presence of particles by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermophoretic sampling was used to visualize particle growth with height above the burner as well as in the radial direction.

  8. Low Angle X-Ray Scattering Of Chloroplast With CK α-Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, Hasko H.

    1982-03-01

    The operational range of low angle X-ray scattering was extended to particles and structures of about 1-2 μm by using CKα-radiation with a wavelength of 44.7 Å. For particles of about 1 μm in diameter, the central scattering was not observed accurately with characteristic X-rays such as CuKα. The size, shape and hydration of chloroplast have been measured by using low angle soft X-ray scattering with CKα-radiation, emitted from a high power X-ray tube and from synchrotron radiation. Chloroplasts were found to have a radius of gyration of 2.15 ± 0.5 μm, corresponding to a particle diameter of 5.8 ± 0.2 μm. The volume was calculated from Porod's invariant and was found to be 41.0 ± 12.0 μm3. Absolute measurements were performed directly, without weakening the primary beam, permitting the calculation of the mass of a chloroplast. The mass of the chloroplast was found to be 40.0 ± 0.07 pg, containing 0.45 pg H20/pg chloroplast. The maximum enlargement of the chloroplast particle was determined from the pair distribution function and was found to be 5.8 ± 0.2 pm. The central scattering for the chloroplast with a diameter of 6.0 μm was observed with-in 20' of the scattering angle with CKα-radiation. The origin of the difference from the nominal value in the Guinier region can be ascribed to the effect of interparticle interference when changing the density of the solvent to 10% glycerol. It should be pointed out that the use of this radiation and a synchrotron source enables us to obtain scattering of particles of μm size, almost free from the influence of the direct beam and parasitic scattering. Furthermore, by recording the intensity autocorrelation function, from which the weight average and number averaged radii of gyration, size and size distribution can be obtained, we are enabled to study the relative dispersion from dilute particle dispersion within 0.01 arcsec and the physico-chemical changes of whole cells and organelles with respect to aging

  9. Low Angle X-Ray Scattering Of Chloroplast With CKa Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, Hasko H.

    1982-10-01

    The operational range of low angle x-ray scattering was extended to particles and structures of about 1 to 2µm by using CKa radiation with a wavelength of 44.7 A . For particles of about 1µm in diameter, the central scattering was not observed accurately with characteristic x rays such as CuKa. The size, shape, and hydration of chloroplasts have been measured by using low angle soft x-ray scattering with CKa radia-tion, emitted from a high power x-ray tube and from synchrotron radiation. Chloroplasts were found to have a radius of gyration of 2.15 +/- 0.5 um, corresponding to a particle diameter of 5.8 +/- 0.2 µm. The volume was calculated from Porod's invariant and was found to be 41.0 +/- 12.0 ttm3. Absolute measurements were performed directly, without weakening the primary beam, permitting the calculations of the mass of a chloroplast. The mass of the chloroplast was found to be 40.0 +/- 0.07 pg, containing 0.45 pg H20/pg chloroplast. The maximum enlargement of the chloroplast particle was determined from the pair distribution function and was found to be 5.8 +/- 0.2 Am. The central scattering for the chloroplast with a diameter of 6.0 um was observed within 20' of the scattering angle with CKa radiation. The origin of the difference from the nominal value in the Guinier region can be ascribed to the effect of interparticle interference when changing the density of the solvent to 10% glycerol. It should be pointed out that the use of this radiation and a synchrotron source enables us to obtain scattering of particles of Am size, almost free from the influence of the direct beam and parasitic scattering. Furthermore, by recording the intensity autocorrelation function, from which the weight average and number averaged radii of gyration, size, and size distribution can be obtained, we are enabled to study the relative dispersion from dilute particle dispersion within 0.01 arcsec and the physicochemical changes of whole cells and organelles with respect to

  10. Tensile Properties and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Stereoblock Elastomeric Polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A

    2002-08-06

    Elastomeric polypropylene (ePP) produced from unbridged 2-arylindene metallocene catalysts was studied by uniaxial tensile and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. The ePP can be separated into three fractions by successive boiling-solvent fractionation method to yield: a low-tacticity fraction soluble in ether (ES), an intermediate-tacticity fraction soluble in heptane (HS), and a high-tacticity fraction insoluble in heptane (HI). Tensile properties of ePP were compared to its solvent fractions, and the role of each solvent fraction residing within ePP was investigated by blending 5 weight % deuterated fraction with ePP. The tensile properties of each fraction vary considerably, exhibiting properties from a weak gum elastomer for ES, to a semi-crystalline thermoplastic for HI. The intermediate-tacticity HS fraction exhibits elastic properties similar to the parent elastomer (ePP). In the melt at 160 C, SANS shows that all deuterated fractions are homogeneously mixed with ePP in a one-phase system. At 25 C upon a slow cooling from the melt, the low-tacticity fraction is preferentially segregated in the amorphous domains induced by different crystallization temperatures and kinetics of the deuterated ES and high-tacticity components. The high-tacticity component within ePP (dHI-ePP) retains its plastic properties in the blend. Despite its low crystallinity ({le} 2%), the low-tacticity fraction can co-crystallize with the crystalline matrix. The dES-ePP shows little or no relaxation when held under strain and recovers readily upon the release of stress.

  11. Small angle light scattering characterization of single micrometric particles in microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannhauser, David; Romeo, Giovanni; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2013-04-01

    A CCD-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus has been used to characterize single micrometric particles flowing in a micro-channel. The measured scattering vector spans the range 2x10-2 - 6:8x101μm-1. The incident laser light is collimated to a spot of about 50 μm in diameter at the sample position with a divergence lower than 0.045 rad. Such small collimated laser beam opens the possibility to perform on-line SALS of micron-sized particles flowing in micro-channels. By properly designing the micro-channel and using a viscoelastic liquid as suspending medium we are able to realize a precise 3D focusing of the target particles. The forward scattering emitted from the particle is collected by a lens with high numerical aperture. At the focal point of that lens a homemade beam stop is blocking the incident light. Finally, a second lens maps the scattered light on the CCD sensor, allowing to obtain far field images on short distances. Measurements with mono-disperse polystyrene particles, both in quiescent and in-flow conditions have been realized. Experiments in-flow allow to measure the single particle scattering. Results are validated by comparison with calculations based on the Lorenz-Mie theory. The quality of the measured intensity profiles confirms the possibility to use our apparatus in real multiplex applications, with particles down to 1 μm in radius.

  12. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  13. Small angle x-ray scattering study of the porosity in coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P. W.; Kalliat, M.; Kwak, C. Y.

    1981-02-01

    Small-angle scattering curves have bee obtained for some Pennsylvania State University PSOC coal samples and for several other coals. The x-ray scattering data provide information about the porosity in the coals and suggest that there are three classes of pores, which have average dimensions of the order of 1000 A˚, 30 A˚, and less than 5 A˚, corresponding to the macropores, transition pores and micropores discussed by Dubinin. The principal factor determining the form of the scattering curves has been found to be the rank of the coal. In coals of all ranks, the specific surface associated with the macropores is about 1 to 10 m2/gm. The micropores are most highly developed in high-rank coals. Comparison of the x-ray and adsorption results suggests that x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption detect only the specific surface of the macropores and transition pores, while carbon dioxide adsorption measures the total porosity from the micropores. Scattering data have also been recorded for a series of coals which had been tested for their suitability for conversion to liquid fuels. All the coals which were well-suited for producing liquid fuels were found to have a well-developed transition pore structure, while coals which were not especially good for coal liquefaction processes had almost no transition pores.

  14. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  15. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-19

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  16. Small-angle X-ray scattering from salt-free solutions of star-branched polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, M.; Rawiso, M.; Zilliox, J. G.; Lesieur, P.; Simon, J. P.

    2001-02-01

    The dispersion state of sodium-sulphonated polystyrene (ensuremathNaPSS) star-branched polyelectrolytes was investigated in salt-free aqueous solutions, by use of the small-angle X-ray scattering technique. With respect to polystyrene (PS) star-branched polymers of identical functionality, the ordering phenomenon occurring in the neighborhood of the overlap concentration c^* is reinforced and observed in a larger range of concentrations. Moreover, the degree of order is no longer maximum at c^* and is improved as the concentration decreases. The dispersion state is then mainly controlled by the electrostatic interaction. A crystalline order should therefore be achieved with stars of lower functionality, provided the electrostatic interaction is added to the osmotic repulsion. On the other hand, unusual scattering patterns are measured for aqueous solutions of ensuremathNaPSS star polyelectrolytes. Indeed, a diffuse scattering is revealed at high angles, in addition to the regular diffraction rings related to preferred interstar distances. It is similar to the broad scattering peak produced by semidilute solutions of ensuremathNaPSS linear polyelectrolytes and associated to the electrostatic correlation hole within the isotropic model. In the dilute regime (c< c^*), it is just an intramolecular characteristic and represents the electrostatic repulsion between arms belonging to the same star. In the semidilute regime (c> c^*), it also reflects the electrostatic repulsion between arms of distinct stars. So, as the concentration increases, it is mainly caused by the interpenetration of ensuremathNaPSS stars. Such an observation is in agreement with the composite structure earlier proposed by Daoud and Cotton for star semidilute solutions. For c> c^*, ensuremathNaPSS star aqueous solutions can therefore be pictured as effective stars immersed in a matrix formed by the overlap of the arm ends. With respect to the dilute regime, the effective stars are smaller; the higher

  17. A Laboratory Scale Critical-Dimension Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Derek L.; Wang Chengqing; Lin, Eric K.; Jones, Ronald L.; Wu Wenli

    2007-09-26

    New methods for critical dimension (CD) measurements may be needed to enable the detailed characterization of nanoscale structures produced in the semiconductor industry and for nanotechnology applications. In earlier work, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements with synchrotron sources have shown promise in meeting several grand challenges for CD metrology. However, it is not practical to depend upon x-ray synchrotron sources, which are large national facilities with limitations in the number of available instruments. To address this problem, a laboratory scale SAXS instrument for critical dimension measurements on periodic nanoscale patterns has been designed, installed, and tested. The system possesses two configurations, SAXS and ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), with a radiation target of either copper or molybdenum. With these configurations, the instrument is capable of accessing scattering angles that probe length scales ranging from ca. 0.5 nm to 2 {mu}m. In this work, we compare CD-SAXS measurements taken from a synchrotron-based SAXS at the Advanced Photon Source of the Argonne National Laboratory with those from the National Institute of Standards and Technology laboratory-scale SAXS instrument. The results from standard line/space gratings possessing periodic line-space patterns with CDs of tens to hundreds of nanometers show that the laboratory-scale system can quantitatively measure parameters, such as the pitch, line width, height, line-width roughness and sidewall angle. These results show that laboratory-scale measurements are feasible and can be used for research and development purposes or to assist calibration of optical scatterometry and CD-scanning electron microscopy instruments. The primary limitation of the measurement is that the data collection rate is unacceptably slow for production metrology because of the significantly lower x-ray beam fluxes currently available.

  18. Rupture and regeneration of colloidal crystals as studied by two-dimensional ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Toshiki; Ise, Norio

    2006-11-21

    The structure of colloidal crystals of silica particles in water was studied by using the two-dimensional (2D) ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) technique. By violent shaking of the dispersion, large (body-centered cubic, bcc) crystals were broken into microcrystals while the lattice structure and lattice constant were preserved. The 2D-USAXS profiles revealed that the [111] direction of bcc microcrystals was parallel to the capillary axis and their orientational distribution with respect to the capillary axis was random. While a prepeak was observed in the one-dimensional USAXS measurements, no such peak was detected by the 2D-USAXS technique. The prepeak was concluded to be due to {110} being rotated by 54.7 degrees (the angle between [001] and [111]) from the capillary axis. The diffraction from the plane was out of the horizontal plane and was observed at a lower angle as a prepeak by detector scanning in the horizontal direction.

  19. A practical guide to small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of flexible and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Kikhney, Alexey G; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-09-14

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a biophysical method to study the overall shape and structural transitions of biological macromolecules in solution. SAXS provides low resolution information on the shape, conformation and assembly state of proteins, nucleic acids and various macromolecular complexes. The technique also offers powerful means for the quantitative analysis of flexible systems, including intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Here, the basic principles of SAXS are presented, and profits and pitfalls of the characterization of multidomain flexible proteins and IDPs using SAXS are discussed from the practical point of view. Examples of the synergistic use of SAXS with high resolution methods like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as other experimental and in silico techniques to characterize completely, or partially unstructured proteins, are presented.

  20. Porosity of microporous zeolites A, X and ZSM-5 studied by small angle X-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaoming; Wu, Erdong

    2007-09-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) using synchrotron radiation and nitrogen adsorption have been applied to characterizations of porosities and microporous structures for the zeolites of NaA, KA, CaA, NaX and ZSM-5. Besides the information on the external morphology of the particles of the zeolites, the complementation of the two techniques has revealed rich and consistent structural and surface information on the molecular scale crystalline pores of these zeolites. Analyses of the data suggest that the determined sizes of the micropores imply the pore spaces occupied by the probe molecules of water in the SAXS and nitrogen in adsorption techniques, respectively. The microporous information of NaA and KA are difficult to obtain from nitrogen adsorption, due to the blocking of nitrogen by their narrow channels, but have been satisfactorily measured by SAXS. The factors causing variations of the measured values of the parameters in different analysis methods have been discussed.

  1. Exploring the structure of biological macromolecules in solution using Quokka, the small angle neutron scattering instrument, at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kathleen; Jeffries, Cy M.; Knott, Robert B.; Sokolova, Anna; Jacques, David A.; Duff, Anthony P.

    2015-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is widely used to extract structural parameters, shape and other types of information from a vast array of materials. The technique is applied to biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution to reveal information often not accessible by other techniques. SANS measurements on biomolecules present some particular challenges however, one of which is suitable instrumentation. This review details SANS experiments performed on two well-characterised globular proteins (lysozyme and glucose isomerase) using Quokka, the recently commissioned SANS instrument at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The instrument configuration as well as data collection and reduction strategies for biological investigations are discussed and act as a general reference for structural biologists who use the instrument. Both model independent analysis of the two proteins and ab initio modelling illustrate that Quokka-SANS data can be used to successfully model the overall shapes of proteins in solution, providing a benchmark for users.

  2. Structural analysis of Fe–Mn–O nanoparticles in glass ceramics by small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Harizanova, Ruzha; Tatchev, Dragomir; Hoell, Armin; Rüssel, Christian

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic nanocrystals containing Fe and Mn were obtained by annealing of silicate glasses with the composition 13.6Na{sub 2}O–62.9SiO{sub 2}–8.5MnO–15.0Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3−x} (mol%) at 580 °C for different periods of time. Here, we present Small Angle Neutron Scattering using Polarized neutrons (SANSPOL) and Anomalous Small Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS) investigation on these glass ceramic samples. Analysis of scattering data from both methods reveals the formation of spherical core–shell type of nanoparticles with mean sizes between 10 nm and 100 nm. ASAXS investigation shows the particles have higher concentration of iron atoms and the shell like region surrounding the particles is enriched in SiO{sub 2}. SANSPOL investigation shows the particles are found to be magnetic and are surrounded by a non-magnetic shell-like region. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic spherical core–shell nanoparticles in glass ceramics: SANSPOL and ASAXS investigations. - Highlights: • Formation and growth mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles in silicate glass. • SANSPOL and ASAXS methods employed to evaluate quantitative information. • Analyses showed formation of nanoparticles with spherical core–shell structures. • Core of the particle is magnetic and surrounded by weak magnetic shell like region.

  3. SASfit: a tool for small-angle scattering data analysis using a library of analytical expressions

    PubMed Central

    Breßler, Ingo; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Thünemann, Andreas F.

    2015-01-01

    SASfit is one of the mature programs for small-angle scattering data analysis and has been available for many years. This article describes the basic data processing and analysis workflow along with recent developments in the SASfit program package (version 0.94.6). They include (i) advanced algorithms for reduction of oversampled data sets, (ii) improved confidence assessment in the optimized model parameters and (iii) a flexible plug-in system for custom user-provided models. A scattering function of a mass fractal model of branched polymers in solution is provided as an example for implementing a plug-in. The new SASfit release is available for major platforms such as Windows, Linux and MacOS. To facilitate usage, it includes comprehensive indexed documentation as well as a web-based wiki for peer collaboration and online videos demonstrating basic usage. The use of SASfit is illustrated by interpretation of the small-angle X-ray scattering curves of monomodal gold nanoparticles (NIST reference material 8011) and bimodal silica nanoparticles (EU reference material ERM-FD-102). PMID:26500467

  4. A Precision Low-Energy Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mastromarino, P.

    2005-01-26

    The E-158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measures the parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in electron-electron (Moeller) scattering at low Q{sup 2}. This asymmetry, whose Standard Model prediction is roughly -150 parts per billion (ppb), is directly proportional to (1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}), where {theta}{sub W} is the weak mixing angle. Measuring this asymmetry to within 10% provides an important test of the Standard Model at the quantum loop level and probes for new physics at the TeV scale. The experiment employs the SLAC 50 GeV electron beam, scattering it off a liquid hydrogen target. A system of magnets and collimators is used to isolate and focus the Moeller scattering events into an integrating calorimeter. The electron beam is generated at the source using a strained, gradient-doped GaAs photocathode, which produces roughly 5 x 10{sup 11} electrons/pulse (at a beam rate of 120 Hz) with {approx} 80% longitudinal polarization. The helicity of the beam can be rapidly switched, eliminating problems associated with slow drifts. Helicity-correlations in the beam parameters (charge, position, angle and energy) are minimized at the source and corrected for using precision beam monitoring devices.

  5. Small-angle neutron and dynamic light scattering study of gelatin coacervates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, B.; Aswal, V. K.; Goyal, P. S.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2004-08-01

    The state of intermolecular aggregates and that of folded gelatin molecules could be characterized by dynamic laser light and small-angle neutron scattering experiments, which implied spontaneous segregation of particle sizes preceding coacervation, which is a liquid-liquid phase transition phenomenon. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) data analysis revealed two particle sizes until precipitation was reached. The smaller particles having a diameter of 50 nm (stable nanoparticles prepared by coacervation method) were detected in the supernatant, whereas the inter-molecular aggregates having a diameter of 400 nm gave rise to coacervation. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments revealed that typical mesh size of the networks exist in polymer dense phase (coacervates) [1]. Analysis of the SANS structure factor showed the presence of two length scales associated with this system that were identified as the correlation length or mesh size, xi = 10.6 Å of the network and the other is the size of inhomogeneities = 21.4 Å. Observations were discussed based on the results obtained from SANS experiments performed in 5% (w/v) gelatin solution at 60oC (xi = 50 Å, zeta = 113 Å) and 5% (w/v) gel at 28oC (xi = 47 Å, zeta = 115 Å) in aqueous phase [2] indicating smaller length scales in coacervate as compared to sol and gel.

  6. Mirroring within the Fokker-Planck formulation of cosmic ray pitch angle scattering in homogeneous magnetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Klimas, A. J.; Sandri, G.

    1974-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck coefficient for pitch angle scattering, appropriate for cosmic rays in homogeneous, stationary, magnetic turbulence, is computed from first principles. No assumptions are made concerning any special statistical symmetries the random field may have. This result can be used to compute the parallel diffusion coefficient for high energy cosmic rays moving in strong turbulence, or low energy cosmic rays moving in weak turbulence. Becuase of the generality of the magnetic turbulence which is allowed in this calculation, special interplanetary magnetic field features such as discontinuities, or particular wave modes, can be included rigorously. The reduction of this results to previously available expressions for the pitch angle scattering coefficient in random field models with special symmetries is discussed. The general existance of a Dirac delta function in the pitch angle scattering coefficient is demonstrated. It is proved that this delta function is the Fokker-Planck prediction for pitch angle scattering due to mirroring in the magnetic field.

  7. A three-dimensional ray-driven attenuation, scatter and geometric response correction technique for SPECT in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Laurette, I; Zeng, G L; Welch, A; Christian, P E; Gullberg, G T

    2000-11-01

    The qualitative and quantitative accuracy of SPECT images is degraded by physical factors of attenuation, Compton scatter and spatially varying collimator geometric response. This paper presents a 3D ray-tracing technique for modelling attenuation, scatter and geometric response for SPECT imaging in an inhomogeneous attenuating medium. The model is incorporated into a three-dimensional projector-backprojector and used with the maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm for reconstruction of parallel-beam data. A transmission map is used to define the inhomogeneous attenuating and scattering object being imaged. The attenuation map defines the probability of photon attenuation between the source and the scattering site, the scattering angle at the scattering site and the probability of attenuation of the scattered photon between the scattering site and the detector. The probability of a photon being scattered through a given angle and being detected in the emission energy window is approximated using a Gaussian function. The parameters of this Gaussian function are determined using physical measurements of parallel-beam scatter line spread functions from a non-uniformly attenuating phantom. The 3D ray-tracing scatter projector-backprojector produces the scatter and primary components. Then, a 3D ray-tracing projector-backprojector is used to model the geometric response of the collimator. From Monte Carlo and physical phantom experiments, it is shown that the best results are obtained by simultaneously correcting attenuation, scatter and geometric response, compared with results obtained with only one or two of the three corrections. It is also shown that a 3D scatter model is more accurate than a 2D model. A transmission map is useful for obtaining measurements of attenuation and scatter in SPECT data, which can be used together with a model of the geometric response of the collimator to obtain corrected images with quantitative and diagnostically

  8. Self crowding of globular proteins studied by small-angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, David P; Argyle, Brian

    2014-02-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to study the behavior of equine metmyoglobin (Mb) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) at concentrations up to 0.4 and 0.15 g/mL, respectively, in solutions also containing 50% D2O and 1 M urea. For both proteins, significant effects because of interference between x-rays scattered by different molecules (interparticle interference) were observed, indicating nonideal behavior at high concentrations. The experimental data were analyzed by comparison of the observed scattering profiles with those predicted by crystal structures of the proteins and a hard-sphere fluid model used to represent steric exclusion effects. The Mb scattering data were well fit by the hard-sphere model using a sphere radius of 18 Å, only slightly smaller than that estimated from the three-dimensional structure (20 Å). In contrast, the scattering profiles for BPTI in phosphate buffer displayed substantially less pronounced interparticle interference than predicted by the hard-sphere model and the radius estimated from the known structure of the protein (15 Å). Replacing the phosphate buffer with 3-(N-morpolino)propane sulfonic acid (MOPS) led to increased interparticle interference, consistent with a larger effective radius and suggesting that phosphate ions may mediate attractive intermolecular interactions, as observed in some BPTI crystal structures, without the formation of stable oligomers. The scattering data were also used to estimate second virial coefficients for the two proteins: 2.0 ×10(-4) cm(3)mol/g(2) for Mb in phosphate buffer, 1.6 ×10(-4) cm(3)mol/g(2) for BPTI in phosphate buffer and 9.2 ×10(-4) cm(3)mol/g(2) for BPTI in MOPS. The results indicate that the behavior of Mb, which is nearly isoelectric under the conditions used, is well described by the hard-sphere model, but that of BPTI is considerably more complex and is likely influenced by both repulsive and attractive electrostatic interactions. The hard

  9. Self Crowding of Globular Proteins Studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, David P.; Argyle, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to study the behavior of equine metmyoglobin (Mb) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) at concentrations up to 0.4 and 0.15 g/mL, respectively, in solutions also containing 50% D2O and 1 M urea. For both proteins, significant effects because of interference between x-rays scattered by different molecules (interparticle interference) were observed, indicating nonideal behavior at high concentrations. The experimental data were analyzed by comparison of the observed scattering profiles with those predicted by crystal structures of the proteins and a hard-sphere fluid model used to represent steric exclusion effects. The Mb scattering data were well fit by the hard-sphere model using a sphere radius of 18 Å, only slightly smaller than that estimated from the three-dimensional structure (20 Å). In contrast, the scattering profiles for BPTI in phosphate buffer displayed substantially less pronounced interparticle interference than predicted by the hard-sphere model and the radius estimated from the known structure of the protein (15 Å). Replacing the phosphate buffer with 3-(N-morpolino)propane sulfonic acid (MOPS) led to increased interparticle interference, consistent with a larger effective radius and suggesting that phosphate ions may mediate attractive intermolecular interactions, as observed in some BPTI crystal structures, without the formation of stable oligomers. The scattering data were also used to estimate second virial coefficients for the two proteins: 2.0 ×10-4 cm3mol/g2 for Mb in phosphate buffer, 1.6 ×10-4 cm3mol/g2 for BPTI in phosphate buffer and 9.2 ×10-4 cm3mol/g2 for BPTI in MOPS. The results indicate that the behavior of Mb, which is nearly isoelectric under the conditions used, is well described by the hard-sphere model, but that of BPTI is considerably more complex and is likely influenced by both repulsive and attractive electrostatic interactions. The hard-sphere model may be

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering study of organic-phase aggregation in the TALSPEAK process.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Travis S; Jensen, Mark P; Debeer-Schmidt, Lisa; Littrell, Ken; Nash, Kenneth L

    2012-11-26

    The Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) process is a solvent extraction based method for separating trivalent lanthanides (Ln(3+)) from trivalent actinide cations in used nuclear fuel reprocessing. In conventional TALSPEAK, the extractant solution is di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in 1,4-diisopropylbenzene (DIPB). The aqueous medium is diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) in a concentrated lactic acid (HL) buffer. Lanthanides are extracted by HDEHP/DIPB, while the actinides remain in the aqueous phase as DTPA complexes. Lactic acid is extracted both independently of the lanthanides and as Ln/HL/HDEHP mixed complex(es). Previous results indicate that lanthanides are extracted both as the mixed complex and as a binary Ln(DEHP·HDEHP)(3) species. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been applied to study the self-organization properties of solute molecules in xylene solutions containing HDEHP, HL, selected lanthanide ions, and water. The scattering results demonstrate that the dominant HDEHP species is the hydrogen bonded dimer, (HDEHP)(2). Absent lanthanides, lactic acid is extracted as the 1:3 complex (HL·(HDEHP)(3)). Scattering in samples containing up to 0.005 M lanthanides (prepared by extracting lanthanides from aqueous media containing 1.0 M buffered lactic acid) indicates that the dominant metal complex is Ln(DEHP·HDEHP)(3). At 0.013 M extracted lanthanide, the scattering results indicate lower Ln:DEHP stoichiometry and larger scattering particles. At higher metal concentrations, the SANS results indicate large aggregates, the largest aggregates achieving a size equivalent to 20 HDEHP monomers as the primary scattering entity. Analysis of particle shapes indicates best fits with a uniform oblate spheroid particle. These results are discussed in connection with the results of a number of complementary observations that have been made on this system.

  11. Characterization of nanoparticles of lidocaine in w/o microemulsions using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A.; Kiselev, M. A.; Hoell, A.; Neubert, R. H. H.

    2004-08-01

    Microemulsions (MEs) are of special interest because a variety of Reactants can be introduced into the nanometer-sized aqueous domains, leading to materials with controlled size and shape [1,2]. In the past few years, significant research has been conducted in the reverse ME-mediated synthesis of organic nanoparticles [3,4]. In this study, a w/o ME medium was employed for the synthesis of lidocaine by direct precipitation in w/o microemulsion systems: water/isopropylpalmitat/Tween80/Span80. The particle size as well as the location of nanoparticles in the ME droplet were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that lidocaine precipitated in the aqueous cores because of its insolubility in water. Hydrodynamic radius and gyration radius of microemulsion droplets were estimated as ~15 nm and ~4.50 nm from DLS and SANS respectively. Furthermore, different size parameters obtained by DLS and SANS experiments were compared

  12. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering Studies of Polymer Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Xiaolei

    In order to understand the structural properties of semiflexible polymer liquid crystals, small angle X -ray scattering data from the synthetic polypeptide poly -gamma-benzyl glutamate (PBG) in the nematic phase are presented. The important features of the data are discussed in terms of the current understanding of the nature of nematic ordering in main chain polymer systems. This includes analysis of the angular distribution function for the polymer segments, long wavelength fluctuations dictated by elastic phenomena, the effects of finite chain lengths, and the effects due to the short range interactions and packing of the chains. The rigid rod-like biological macromolecule, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), in the nematic and the smectic A phases is studied by quasi-elastic light scattering in order to understand the hydrodynamic properties of rigid rod-like lyotropic liquid crystals. A nonlocal behavior of the elasticity in the nematic phase is observed and discussed in terms of a recent developed nonlocal theory. The relative diffusion and undulation modes in the smectic A phase are observed. The results are compared with theory.

  13. Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels by light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering and rheology.

    PubMed

    Santinath Singh, S; Aswal, V K; Bohidar, H B

    2011-06-01

    Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were investigated as a function of their volumetric mixing ratio, [Formula: see text] , 1.0 and 2.0 using dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and rheology. The degree of non-ergodicity ( X = 0.2 ± 0.02) , which was extracted as a heterodyne contribution from the measured dynamic structure factor data remained less than that of homogeneous solutions where ergodicity is expected (X = 10. The static structure factor, I(q) , results obtained from SANS were interpreted in the Guinier regime (low-q , which implied the existence of ≈ 250 nm long rod-like structures (double-helix bundles), and the power law (intermediate-q regions) yielded I (q) ~ q(−α) with α = 2.3 , 1.8 and 1.6 for r = 0.5 , 1.0 and 2.0. This is indicative of the presence of Gaussian chains at low r , while at r = 2 there was a propensity of rod-shaped structures. The gel strength and transition temperatures measured from frequency sweep and temperature ramp studies were suggestive of the presence of a stronger association between the two biopolymer networks at higher r . The results indicate that the internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were highly dependent on the volumetric mixing ratio.

  14. Effects of the scatter in sunspot group tilt angles on the large-scale magnetic field at the solar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-08-10

    The tilt angles of sunspot groups represent the poloidal field source in Babcock-Leighton-type models of the solar dynamo and are crucial for the build-up and reversals of the polar fields in surface flux transport (SFT) simulations. The evolution of the polar field is a consequence of Hale's polarity rules, together with the tilt angle distribution which has a systematic component (Joy's law) and a random component (tilt-angle scatter). We determine the scatter using the observed tilt angle data and study the effects of this scatter on the evolution of the solar surface field using SFT simulations with flux input based upon the recorded sunspot groups. The tilt angle scatter is described in our simulations by a random component according to the observed distributions for different ranges of sunspot group size (total umbral area). By performing simulations with a number of different realizations of the scatter we study the effect of the tilt angle scatter on the global magnetic field, especially on the evolution of the axial dipole moment. The average axial dipole moment at the end of cycle 17 (a medium-amplitude cycle) from our simulations was 2.73 G. The tilt angle scatter leads to an uncertainty of 0.78 G (standard deviation). We also considered cycle 14 (a weak cycle) and cycle 19 (a strong cycle) and show that the standard deviation of the axial dipole moment is similar for all three cycles. The uncertainty mainly results from the big sunspot groups which emerge near the equator. In the framework of Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, the tilt angle scatter therefore constitutes a significant random factor in the cycle-to-cycle amplitude variability, which strongly limits the predictability of solar activity.

  15. Triple energy window scatter correction technique in PET.

    PubMed

    Shao, L; Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1994-01-01

    A practical triple energy window technique (TEW) is proposed, which is based on using the information in two lower energy windows and one single calibration, to estimate the scatter within the photopeak window. The technique is basically a conventional dual-window technique plus a modification factor, which can partially compensate object-distribution dependent scatters. The modification factor is a function of two lower scatter windows of both the calibration phantom and the actual object. In order to evaluate the technique, a Monte Carlo simulation program, which simulates the PENN-PET scanner geometry, was used. Different phantom activity distributions and phantom sizes were tested to simulate brain studies, including uniform and nonuniform distributions. The results indicate that the TEW technique works well for a wide range of activity distributions and object sizes. The comparisons between the TEW and dual window techniques show better quantitative accuracy for the TEW, especially for different phantom sizes. The technique is also applied to experimental data from a PENN-PET scanner to test its practicality.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of statistical errors in small-angle X-ray scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Sedlak, Steffen M; Bruetzel, Linda K; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A new model is proposed for the measurement errors incurred in typical small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, which takes into account the setup geometry and physics of the measurement process. The model accurately captures the experimentally determined errors from a large range of synchrotron and in-house anode-based measurements. Its most general formulation gives for the variance of the buffer-subtracted SAXS intensity σ(2)(q) = [I(q) + const.]/(kq), where I(q) is the scattering intensity as a function of the momentum transfer q; k and const. are fitting parameters that are characteristic of the experimental setup. The model gives a concrete procedure for calculating realistic measurement errors for simulated SAXS profiles. In addition, the results provide guidelines for optimizing SAXS measurements, which are in line with established procedures for SAXS experiments, and enable a quantitative evaluation of measurement errors.

  17. Small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Castanon, J.; Bomboi, F.; Rovigatti, L.; Zanatta, M.; Paciaroni, A.; Comez, L.; Porcar, L.; Jafta, C. J.; Fadda, G. C.; Bellini, T.; Sciortino, F.

    2016-08-01

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed of 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nanostar concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor numerically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature-independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  18. Solution structures of calcium regulating proteins: A small-angle scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Heidorn, D.B.; Seeger, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments have shown that the solution structures of two calcium-binding regulatory proteins, calmodulin and troponin C, are significantly different from their crystal structure forms. The structural differences occur in a region of calmodulin that is thought to bind to target enzymes;the calmodulin-enzyme complex is an initiator for many important biochemical processes. Calcium binding to calmodulin induces a conformational change that is a prerequisite for calmodulin binding to a target enzyme. SAXS data can characterize this conformational change and give insight into the mechanism of enzyme binding. Neutron resonance scattering promises to determine accurately the distances between calcium binding sites, thus providing important constraints on the structure of calmodulin in solution. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Sample holder for small-angle x-ray scattering static and flow cell measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, Jan; Millett, Ian S.; Seifert, Soenke; Doniach, Sebastian

    2006-04-15

    We present the design of a sample holder for small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) that can be used for both static and flow cell measurements, allowing to switch between these two types of measurement without having to realign the detector and camera geometry. The device makes possible high signal-to-noise experiments with sample volumes as small as 16 {mu}l and can be thermocontrolled using a standard circulating water bath. The setup has been used successfully for a range of biological SAXS measurements, including peptides, detergent micelles, membrane proteins, and nucleic acids. As a performance test, we present scattering data for horse heart cytochrome c, collected at the BESSRC CAT beam line 12-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. The design drawings are provided in the supplementary material.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of statistical errors in small-angle X-ray scattering measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sedlak, Steffen M.; Bruetzel, Linda K.; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-01-01

    A new model is proposed for the measurement errors incurred in typical small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, which takes into account the setup geometry and physics of the measurement process. The model accurately captures the experimentally determined errors from a large range of synchrotron and in-house anode-based measurements. Its most general formulation gives for the variance of the buffer-subtracted SAXS intensity σ2(q) = [I(q) + const.]/(kq), where I(q) is the scattering intensity as a function of the momentum transfer q; k and const. are fitting parameters that are characteristic of the experimental setup. The model gives a concrete procedure for calculating realistic measurement errors for simulated SAXS profiles. In addition, the results provide guidelines for optimizing SAXS measurements, which are in line with established procedures for SAXS experiments, and enable a quantitative evaluation of measurement errors. PMID:28381982

  1. Microstructural investigations on Russian reactor pressure vessel steels by small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, A.; Boehmert, J.; Strunz, P.; Dewhurst, C.; Mathon, M.-H.

    The effect of radiation embrittlement has a high safety significance for Russian VVER reactor pressure vessel steels. Heats of base and weld metals of the as-received state, irradiated state and post-irradiation annealed state were investigated using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to obtain insight about the microstructural features caused by fast neutron irradiation. The SANS intensities increase in the momentum transfer range between 0.8 and 3 nm-1 for all the material compositions in the irradiated state. The size distribution function of the irradiation-induced defect clusters has a pronounced maximum at 1 nm in radius. Their content varies between 0.1 and 0.7 vol.% dependent on material composition and increases with the neutron fluence. The comparison of nuclear and magnetic scattering indicates that the defects differ in their composition. Thermal annealing reduces the volume fraction of irradiation defect clusters.

  2. SEC-SANS: size exclusion chromatography combined in situ with small-angle neutron scattering1

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Ashley; Jacques, Mark; Merrick, Catherine; Devos, Juliette; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Porcar, Lionel; Martel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The first implementation and use of an in situ size exclusion chromatography (SEC) system on a small-angle neutron scattering instrument (SANS) is described. The possibility of deploying such a system for biological solution scattering at the Institut Laue–Langevin (ILL) has arisen from the fact that current day SANS instruments at ILL now allow datasets to be acquired using small sample volumes with exposure times that are often shorter than a minute. This capability is of particular importance for the study of unstable biological macromolecules where aggregation or denaturation issues are a major problem. The first use of SEC-SANS on ILL’s instrument D22 is described for a variety of proteins including one particularly aggregation-prone system. PMID:27980509

  3. Polyhydroxyalkanoate-based natural synthetic hybrid copolymer films: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, L. John R.; Knott, Robert; Sanguanchaipaiwong, Vorapat; Holden, Peter J.

    2006-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates have attracted attention as biodegradable alternatives to conventional thermoplastics and as biomaterials. Through modification of their biosynthesis using Pseudomonas oleovorans, we have manipulated the material properties of these biopolyesters and produced a natural-synthetic hybrid copolymer of polyhydroxyoctanoate- block-diethylene glycol (PHO- b-DEG). A mixture of PHO and PHO-DEG were solvent cast from analytical grade chloroform and analysed using small-angle neutron scattering. A scattering pattern, easily distinguished above the background, was displayed by the films with a diffraction ring at q∼0.12 Å -1. This narrow ring of intensity is suggestive of a highly ordered system. Analysis of the diffraction pattern supported this concept and showed a d-spacing of approximately 50 Å. In addition, conformation of the hybrid polymer chains can be manipulated to support their self-assembly into ordered microporous films.

  4. Spin echo small angle neutron scattering using a continuously pumped {sup 3}He neutron polarisation analyser

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, S. R.; Li, K.; Yan, H.; Stonaha, P.; Li, F.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Snow, W. M.; Washington, A. L.; Walsh, A.; Chen, W. C.; Parnell, A. J.; Fairclough, J. P. A.; Pynn, R.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new instrument for spin echo small angle neutron scattering (SESANS) developed at the Low Energy Neutron Source at Indiana University. A description of the various instrument components is given along with the performance of these components. At the heart of the instrument are a series of resistive coils to encode the neutron trajectory into the neutron polarisation. These are shown to work well over a broad range of neutron wavelengths. Neutron polarisation analysis is accomplished using a continuously operating neutron spin filter polarised by Rb spin-exchange optical pumping of {sup 3}He. We describe the performance of the analyser along with a study of the {sup 3}He polarisation stability and its implications for SESANS measurements. Scattering from silica Stöber particles is investigated and agrees with samples run on similar instruments.

  5. Solar Cycle Variability Induced by Tilt Angle Scatter in a Babcock–Leighton Solar Dynamo Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark

    2017-09-01

    We present results from a three-dimensional Babcock–Leighton (BL) dynamo model that is sustained by the emergence and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). On average, each BMR has a systematic tilt given by Joy’s law. Randomness and nonlinearity in the BMR emergence of our model produce variable magnetic cycles. However, when we allow for a random scatter in the tilt angle to mimic the observed departures from Joy’s law, we find more variability in the magnetic cycles. We find that the observed standard deviation in Joy’s law of {σ }δ =15^\\circ produces a variability comparable to the observed solar cycle variability of ∼32%, as quantified by the sunspot number maxima between 1755 and 2008. We also find that tilt angle scatter can promote grand minima and grand maxima. The time spent in grand minima for {σ }δ =15^\\circ is somewhat less than that inferred for the Sun from cosmogenic isotopes (about 9% compared to 17%). However, when we double the tilt scatter to {σ }δ =30^\\circ , the simulation statistics are comparable to the Sun (∼18% of the time in grand minima and ∼10% in grand maxima). Though the BL mechanism is the only source of poloidal field, we find that our simulations always maintain magnetic cycles even at large fluctuations in the tilt angle. We also demonstrate that tilt quenching is a viable and efficient mechanism for dynamo saturation; a suppression of the tilt by only 1°–2° is sufficient to limit the dynamo growth. Thus, any potential observational signatures of tilt quenching in the Sun may be subtle.

  6. Small-angle x-ray scattering investigation of the solution structure of troponin C

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, S.R.; Hodgson, K.O.; Doniach, S.

    1988-03-25

    X-ray crystallographic studies of troponin C have revealed a novel protein structure consisting of two globular domains, each containing two Ca/sup 2 +/-binding sites, connected via a nine-turn alpha-helix, three turns of which are fully exposed to solvent. Since the crystals were grown at pH approximately 5, it is of interest to determine whether this structure is applicable to the protein in solution under physiological conditions. We have used small-angle x-ray scattering to examine the solution structure of troponin C at pH 6.8 and the effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on the structure. The scattering data are consistent with an elongated structure in solution with a radius of gyration of approximately 23.0 A, which is quite comparable to that computed for the crystal structure. The experimental scattering profile and the scattering profile computed from the crystal structure coordinates do, however, exhibit differences at the 40-A level. A weak Ca/sup 2 +/-facilitated dimerization of troponin C was observed. The data rule out large Ca/sup 2 +/-induced structural changes, indicating rather that the molecule with Ca/sup 2 +/ bound is only slightly more compact than the Ca/sup 2 +/-free molecule.

  7. Joint small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data analysis of asymmetric lipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Barbara; Heberle, Frederick A.; Marquardt, Drew; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Katsaras, John

    2017-01-01

    Low- and high-resolution models describing the internal transbilayer structure of asymmetric lipid vesicles have been developed. These models can be used for the joint analysis of small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. The models describe the underlying scattering length density/electron density profiles either in terms of slabs or through the so-called scattering density profile, previously applied to symmetric lipid vesicles. Both models yield structural details of asymmetric membranes, such as the individual area per lipid, and the hydrocarbon thickness of the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. The scattering density profile model, however, comes at a cost of increased computational effort but results in greater structural resolution, showing a slightly lower packing of lipids in the outer bilayer leaflet of ∼120 nm diameter palmitoyl­oleoyl phosphatidyl­choline (POPC) vesicles, compared to the inner leaflet. Analysis of asymmetric dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine/POPC vesicles did not reveal evidence of transbilayer coupling between the inner and outer leaflets at 323 K, i.e. above the melting transition temperature of the two lipids. PMID:28381971

  8. Structural Studies of Bleached Melanin by Synchrotron Small-angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Littrell, Kenneth C.; Gallas, James M.; Zajac, Gerry W.; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to measure the effects of chemical bleaching on the size and morphology of tyrosine-derived synthetic melanin dispersed in aqueous media. The average size as measured by the radius of gyration of the melanin particles in solution, at neutral to mildly basic pH, decreases from 16.5 to 12.5 angstroms with increased bleaching. The melanin particles exhibit scattering characteristic of sheet-like structures with a thickness of approximately 11 angstroms at all but the highest levels of bleaching. The scattering data are well described by the form factor for scattering from a pancake-like circular cylinder. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that unbleached melanin, at neutral to mildly basic pH, is a planar aggregate of 6- to 10-nm-sized melanin protomolecules, hydrogen bonded through their quinone and phenolic perimeters. The observed decrease in melanin particle size with increased bleaching is interpreted as evidence for deaggregation, most probably the result of oxidative disruption of hydrogen bonds and an increase in the number of charged, carboxylic acid groups, whereby the melanin aggregates disassociate into units composed of decreasing numbers of protomolecules.

  9. Deterministic fractals: extracting additional information from small-angle scattering data.

    PubMed

    Cherny, A Yu; Anitas, E M; Osipov, V A; Kuklin, A I

    2011-09-01

    The small-angle scattering curves of deterministic mass fractals are studied and analyzed in momentum space. In the fractal region, the curve I(q)q(D) is found to be log-periodic with good accuracy, and the period is equal to the scaling factor of the fractal. Here, D and I(q) are the fractal dimension and the scattering intensity, respectively. The number of periods of this curve coincides with the number of fractal iterations. We show that the log-periodicity of I(q)q(D) in the momentum space is related to the log-periodicity of the quantity g(r)r(3-D) in the real space, where g(r) is the pair distribution function. The minima and maxima positions of the scattering intensity are estimated explicitly by relating them to the pair distance distribution in real space. It is shown that the minima and maxima are damped with increasing polydispersity of the fractal sets; however, they remain quite pronounced even at sufficiently large values of polydispersity. A generalized self-similar Vicsek fractal with controllable fractal dimension is introduced, and its scattering properties are studied to illustrate the above findings. In contrast with the usual methods, the present analysis allows us to obtain not only the fractal dimension and the edges of the fractal region, but also the fractal iteration number, the scaling factor, and the number of structural units from which the fractal is composed.

  10. Precision Beam Parameter Monitoring in a Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moeller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, M.S.

    2005-04-11

    A precision measurement of the parity nonconserving left-right asymmetry, A{sub LR}, in Moeller scattering (e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}) is currently in progress at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This experiment, labeled SLAC-E158, scatters longitudinally polarized electrons off atomic electrons in an unpolarized hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.03 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The asymmetry, which is the fractional difference in the scattering cross-sections, measures the effective pseudo-scalar weak neutral current coupling, g{sub ee}, governing Moeller scattering. This quantity is in turn proportional to (1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}), where {theta}{sub w} is the electroweak mixing angle. The goal is to measure the asymmetry to a precision of 1 x 10{sup -8} which corresponds to {delta}(sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}) {approx} 0.0007. Since A{sub LR} is a function of the cross-sections, and the cross-sections depend on the beam parameters, the desired precision of A{sub LR} places stringent requirements on the beam parameters. This paper investigates the requirements on the beam parameters and discusses the means by which they are monitored and accounted for.

  11. A time dependent kinetic small angle neutron scattering study of a novel YFe phase.

    PubMed

    Simmons, L M; Bentley, P M; Al-Jawad, M; Kilcoyne, S H

    2013-06-26

    Crystallization of amorphous Y67Fe33 into the YFe2 C15 Laves phase via a novel 'YFe' intermediate phase has been observed through to completion using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The nucleation and growth kinetics of the phase transformations have been studied at annealing temperatures below the crystallization temperatures for both the 'YFe' phase and the YFe2 phase. The SANS results agree with previously reported neutron diffraction and SANS data. At the annealing temperatures of 360, 370 and 380 °C, changes in the scattering intensity I(Q) occur as a result of the contrast between the amorphous matrix and the nucleating and growing Y and 'YFe' phases. Critical scattering occurs during each of the isotherms, relating to the full crystallization of Y67Fe33, and extrapolation gives a crystallization temperature of 382 °C. Beyond critical scattering, isotherms at 435, 450, and 465 °C reveal the details of the continuing transformation of the 'YFe' intermediate phase into the YFe2 C15 Laves phase.

  12. Characterization of coal morphology by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M.; Jensen, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of the present small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies are: (1) to measure the specific surface area of the sample; and (2) to infer a pore size distribution. In pursuing these objectives three types of samples are used; a model microporous carbon, Carbosieve-S, three coals, and a porous ..gamma..-alumina. Changes in the porous structure with conversion are clearly evident in scattering data from both the model carbon and anthracite coal. Growth of the micropores in Carbosieve and of both micro- and mesopores in the coal is seen in the increasing intensity at intermediate values of h. Also, the intensity drop-off at high values of h moves in toward the mesopore scattering. The Voronoi and Fully Penetrable Polydisperse Spheres (FPPS) models are better for analyzing SAXS than traditional discrete models since they correspond to interconnected, random porous structures with irregular pore sizes and shapes. The Voronoi model can be used with the model carbon which appears to have a bimodal distribution with pore sizes closely grouped about the modes. However, the FPPS model, which allows for broad distributions, is more widely applicable. The FPPS model closely approximates the scattering from a characterized sample with polydisperse porosity. However, there is a marked difference betwe

  13. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering from Lipid-Bound Myelin Basic Protein in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Haas, H.; Oliveira, C. L. P.; Torriani, I. L.; Polverini, E.; Fasano, A.; Carlone, G.; Cavatorta, P.; Riccio, P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of myelin basic protein (MBP), purified from the myelin sheath in both lipid-free (LF-MBP) and lipid-bound (LB-MBP) forms, was investigated in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. The water-soluble LF-MBP, extracted at pH < 3.0 from defatted brain, is the classical preparation of MBP, commonly regarded as an intrinsically unfolded protein. LB-MBP is a lipoprotein-detergent complex extracted from myelin with its native lipidic environment at pH > 7.0. Under all conditions, the scattering from the two protein forms was different, indicating different molecular shapes. For the LB-MBP, well-defined scattering curves were obtained, suggesting that the protein had a unique, compact (but not globular) structure. Furthermore, these data were compatible with earlier results from molecular modeling calculations on the MBP structure which have been refined by us. In contrast, the LF-MBP data were in accordance with the expected open-coil conformation. The results represent the first direct structural information from x-ray scattering measurements on MBP in its native lipidic environment in solution. PMID:14695288

  14. Joint small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data analysis of asymmetric lipid vesicles

    DOE PAGES

    Eicher, Barbara; Heberle, Frederick A.; Marquardt, Drew T.; ...

    2017-02-28

    Low- and high-resolution models describing the internal transbilayer structure of asymmetric lipid vesicles have been developed. These models can be used for the joint analysis of small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. The models describe the underlying scattering length density/electron density profiles either in terms of slabs or through the so-called scattering density profile, previously applied to symmetric lipid vesicles. Both models yield structural details of asymmetric membranes, such as the individual area per lipid, and the hydrocarbon thickness of the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. The scattering density profile model, however, comes at a cost of increased computational effortmore » but results in greater structural resolution, showing a slightly lower packing of lipids in the outer bilayer leaflet of ~120 nm diameter palmitoyloleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) vesicles, compared to the inner leaflet. Here, analysis of asymmetric dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine/POPC vesicles did not reveal evidence of transbilayer coupling between the inner and outer leaflets at 323 K,i.e.above the melting transition temperature of the two lipids.« less

  15. Structural characterization of a polymer substituted fullerene (flagellene) by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Affholter, K.A.; Bunick, G.J.; Wignall, G.D.; Desimone, J.M.; Hunt, M.O. Jr.; Menceloglu, Y.Z.; Samulski, E.T.

    1994-12-31

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) can structurally characterize fullerenes in solvents with strong SANS contrast (e.g. CS{sub 2}). Deuterated solvents (e.g. toluene-d{sub 8}) have a high scattering length density (SLD), which is close to that of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} moieties. Hence, there is virtually no SANS contrast with the solvent and these particles are practically ``invisible`` in such media. On the other hand, the negative scattering length of hydrogen means that the SLD of H{sup 1}-containing materials is much lower, so they have strong contrast with toluene-d{sub 8}. Thus, SANS makes it possible to study the size and shapes of modified buckyballs such as the polymer-substituted fullerenes, or flagellenes. These consist of C{sub 60} cores to which 1-4 polystryene chains (with a molecular weight, MW {approx_equal} 2000) are attached. The extrapolated cross section at zero angle of scatter [d{Sigma}/d{Omega}(0)] is a function of the number of pendant chains, so SANS can be used to assess the number of ``arms`` which are covalently attached to the fullerene ``sphere.`` Close agreement ({plus_minus}4%) between measured and calculated values of d{Sigma}/d{Omega}(0) along with independent estimates of the radius of gyration (R{sub g}) and second virial coefficient (A{sub 2}) for a calibration linear polystyrene sample serves as a cross check on the validity of this methodology.

  16. Morphological and structural characterization of PHBV/organoclay nanocomposites by small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Carli, Larissa N; Bianchi, Otávio; Machado, Giovanna; Crespo, Janaina S; Mauler, Raquel S

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the morphological and structural behaviors of poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) nanocomposites were investigated using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanocomposites with 1, 3 and 5 wt.% of organically modified montmorillonite Cloisite® 30B (OMMT) were prepared by melt processing in a twin screw extruder using two different processing conditions (low and high shear intensity). The lamellar long period of the polymer was lower for the nanocomposites, with high polydispersity values. However, the crystalline thickness increased with the clay content and was independent of the processing conditions. This behavior resulted in a high linear crystallinity of the nanocomposites with 3 and 5 wt.% OMMT. The disruption factor (β) was in agreement with the WAXD and TEM findings, indicating a good dispersion of the nanoparticles in the PHBV matrix with 3 wt.% of OMMT during the high shear intensity of melt processing.

  17. Characterization of Proteins with Wide-angle X-ray Solution Scattering (WAXS)

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Lee

    2011-01-01

    X-ray solution scattering in both the small-angle (SAXS) and wide-angle (WAXS) regimes is making an increasing impact on our understanding of biomolecular complexes. The accurate calculation of WAXS patterns from atomic coordinates has positioned the approach for rapid growth and integration with existing Structural Genomics efforts. WAXS data are sensitive to small structural changes in proteins; useful for calculation of the pair-distribution function at relatively high resolution; provides a means to characterize the breadth of the structural ensemble in solution; and can be used to identify proteins with similar folds. WAXS data are often used to test structural models, identify structural similarities and characterize structural changes. WAXS is highly complementary to crystallography and NMR. It holds great potential for the testing of structural models of proteins; identification of proteins that may exhibit novel folds; characterization of unfolded or natively disordered proteins; and detection of structural changes associated with protein function. PMID:20049539

  18. Small Angle Neutron Scattering experiments on ``side-on fixed"" liquid crystal polyacrylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, N.; Keller, P.; Achard, M. F.; Noirez, L.; Hardouin, F.

    1993-08-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering experiments were carried out on liquid crystalline “side-on fixed” polyacrylates : we observe that the polymer backbone adopts a prolate conformation in the nematic phase. Such anisotropy of the global backbone is larger for smaller spacer length. In every case we measure at low temperatures a large chain extension as previously described in polysiloxanes. Par diffusion des neutrons aux petits angles nous observons que la chaîne de polyacrylates “en haltère” adopte une conformation type prolate en phase nématique. Son anisotropie est d'autant plus grande que l'espaceur est plus court. Dans tous les cas, nous retrouvons à basse température la forte extension de la chaîne polymère qui fut d'abord révélée dans les polysiloxanes.

  19. Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Møller Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, P. L.; Arnold, R. G.; Arroyo, C.; Bega, K.; Biesiada, J.; Bosted, P. E.; Bower, G.; Cahoon, J.; Carr, R.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cooke, M.; Decowski, P.; Deur, A.; Emam, W.; Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Field, C.; Gao, J.; Gary, M.; Gustafsson, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holmes, R.; Hughes, E. W.; Humensky, T. B.; Jones, G. M.; Kaufman, L. J.; Keller, L.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kumar, K. S.; Laviolette, P.; Lhuillier, D.; Lombard-Nelsen, R. M.; Marshall, Z.; Mastromarino, P.; McKeown, R. D.; Michaels, R.; Niedziela, J.; Olson, M.; Paschke, K. D.; Peterson, G. A.; Pitthan, R.; Relyea, D.; Rock, S. E.; Saxton, O.; Singh, J.; Souder, P. A.; Szalata, Z. M.; Turner, J.; Tweedie, B.; Vacheret, A.; Walz, D.; Weber, T.; Weisend, J.; Woods, M.; Younus, I.

    2005-08-01

    We report on a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in fixed target electron-electron (Møller) scattering: APV=[-131±14(stat)±10(syst)]×10-9, leading to the determination of the weak mixing angle sin⁡2θWeff=0.2397±0.0010(stat)±0.0008(syst), evaluated at Q2=0.026GeV2. Combining this result with the measurements of sin⁡2θWeff at the Z0 pole, the running of the weak mixing angle is observed with over 6σ significance. The measurement sets constraints on new physics effects at the TeV scale.

  20. Characterization of two new stable block copolymer mesophases by synchrotron small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, C.; Micha, M. A.; Oestreich, S.; Förster, S.; Antonietti, M.

    1998-05-01

    Block copolymers made of polystyrene and fluorinated blocks represent a new class of polymers with a very strong incompatibility between the two blocks. They exhibit new stable block copolymer mesophases which are not considered in the phase diagrams of diblock copolymers in the strong and super-strong segregation regime. The solid-state structures of two polymers with different compositions are characterized by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, thus proving the existence of a quadratically perforated layer phase and a 2D phase of sanidically degenerated cylinders.

  1. Clustering of water molecules in ultramicroporous carbon: In-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Contescu, Cristian I.; Rai, Durgesh K.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.

    2016-10-19

    The adsorption of water is central to most of the applications of microporous carbon as adsorbent material. We report early kinetics of water adsorption in the microporous carbon using in-situ small-angle neutron scattering. It is observed that adsorption of water occurs via cluster formation of molecules. Interestingly, the cluster size remains constant throughout the adsorption process whereas number density of clusters increases with time. The role of surface chemistry of microporous carbon on the early kinetics of adsorption process was also investigated. Lastly, the present study provides direct experimental evidence for cluster assisted adsorption of water molecules in microporous carbon (Do-Do model).

  2. Cylindrical aggregates of chlorophylls studied by small-angle neutron scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, D.L.; Katz, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron small-angle scattering has demonstrated tubular chlorophyll aggregates formed by self-assembly of a variety of chlorophyll types in nonpolar solvents. The size and other properties of the tubular aggregates can be accounted for by stereochemical properties of the chlorophyll molecules. Features of some of the structures are remarkably similar to light harvesting chlorophyll complexes in vivo, particularly for photosynthetic bacteria. These nanotube chlorophyll structures may have applications as light harvesting biomaterials where efficient energy transfer occurs from an excited state which is highly delocalized.

  3. Small angle scattering polarization biopsy: a comparative analysis of various skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Yermolenko, S. B.; Ivashko, P. V.; Reshetnikova, E. M.; Galkina, E. M.; Utz, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    An approach to differentiation of the morphological features of normal and pathological human epidermis on the base of statistical analysis of the local polarization states of laser light forward scattered by in-vitro tissue samples is discussed. The eccentricity and the azimuth angle of local polarization ellipses retrieved for various positions of the focused laser beam on the tissue surface, and the coefficient of collimated transmittance are considered as the diagnostic parameters for differentiation. The experimental data obtained with the psoriasis, discoid lupus erythematosus, alopecia, lichen planus, scabies, demodex, and normal skin samples are presented.

  4. [Evaluation of molecular weights of hyaluronate preparations by multi-angle laser light scattering].

    PubMed

    Yomota, Chikako

    2003-01-01

    Hyaluronate (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polysaccharide, has been used for osteoarthritis, periartritis of the shoulder and rheumatoid arthritis by intraarticular administration, and in ophthalmic surgery such as anterior segment surgery, and eye lotion. In this study, the molecular weight (Mw) of HA preparations were estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) system consisted of a refractometer (RI) and a multi-angle laser light scattering (MALS). From the results, it has been clarified that a successful characterization of HA samples with Mw up to 2 - 3 x 10(6) g/mol was possible by multidetector system.

  5. Study of structural irregularities of smectite clay systems by small-angle neutron scattering and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stefanis, A.; Tomlinson, A. A. G.; Steriotis, Th. A.; Charalambopoulou, G. Ch.; Keiderling, U.

    2007-04-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and its contrast-matching variant are employed in order to determine structural properties (inter-pillar distances and mass/surface fractal dimensions of the clay layers and pillars) of a series of smectite natural clays (montmorillonite, beidellite, and bentonite) and their pillared and pillared/ion-exchanged analogues. Moreover, a comparative analysis with the adsorption data is carried out on the basis of a systematic study of the structural changes induced by a particular treatment or modification (e.g. pillaring) of the clay systems.

  6. Imaging method based on attenuation, refraction and ultra-small-angle-scattering of x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Wernick, Miles N.; Chapman, Leroy Dean; Oltulu, Oral; Zhong, Zhong

    2005-09-20

    A method for detecting an image of an object by measuring the intensity at a plurality of positions of a transmitted beam of x-ray radiation emitted from the object as a function of angle within the transmitted beam. The intensity measurements of the transmitted beam are obtained by a crystal analyzer positioned at a plurality of angular positions. The plurality of intensity measurements are used to determine the angular intensity spectrum of the transmitted beam. One or more parameters, such as an attenuation property, a refraction property and a scatter property, can be obtained from the angular intensity spectrum and used to display an image of the object.

  7. Integrative structural modeling with small angle X-ray scattering profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological advances enabled high-throughput collection of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) profiles of biological macromolecules. Thus, computational methods for integrating SAXS profiles into structural modeling are needed more than ever. Here, we review specifically the use of SAXS profiles for the structural modeling of proteins, nucleic acids, and their complexes. First, the approaches for computing theoretical SAXS profiles from structures are presented. Second, computational methods for predicting protein structures, dynamics of proteins in solution, and assembly structures are covered. Third, we discuss the use of SAXS profiles in integrative structure modeling approaches that depend simultaneously on several data types. PMID:22800408

  8. Measurement of protein size in concentrated solutions by small angle X‐ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wei, Yanru; Wang, Wenjia; Wang, Bing; Liang, Hongli; Gao, Yuxi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract By simulations on the distance distribution function (DDF) derived from small angle X‐ray scattering (SAXS) theoretical data of a dense monodisperse system, we found a quantitative mathematical correlation between the apparent size of a spherically symmetric (or nearly spherically symmetric) homogenous particle and the concentration of the solution. SAXS experiments on protein solutions of human hemoglobin and horse myoglobin validated the correlation. This gives a new method to determine, from the SAXS DDF, the size of spherically symmetric (or nearly spherically symmetric) particles of a dense monodisperse system, specifically for protein solutions with interference effects. PMID:27241796

  9. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Yu. V.; Rempel, A. A.; Meyer, M.; Pipich, V.; Gerth, S.; Magerl, A.

    2016-08-01

    Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on Cd and S doped glass annealed at 600 °C shows after the first 12 h nucleation and growth of spherical CdS nanoparticles with a radius of up to 34±4 Å. After the nucleation is completed after 24 h, further growth in this amorphous environment is governed by oriented particle attachment mechanism as found for a liquid medium. Towards 48 h the particle shape has changed into spheroidal with short and long axis of 40±2 Å and 120±2 Å, respectively.

  10. Application of small angle neutron scattering on the analysis of Korean compact jaw bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong; Shin, E. J.; Seong, B. S.; Paik, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was applied to analyze the nano-structure of normal and osteoporosis compact bones of Korean jaw-bones. The SANS profiles revealed the directional and regular distributions of plate-like bone crystals, lacuna rough surface and nano-sized canliculi in the compact bones. A smaller amount of bone crystals, lacuna and canliculi were present in the osteoporosis bone than in normal human bone. Microstructure observation by transmission electron microscopy and density measurement by bone densitometry supported the SANS evaluation.

  11. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Measurements of Magnetic Cluster Sizes in Magnetic Recording Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-17

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  12. Small-angle X-ray scattering probe of intermolecular interaction in red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guan-Fen; Wang, We-Jia; Xu, Jia-Hua; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2015-03-01

    With high concentrations of hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells, self-interactions among these molecules could increase the propensities of their polymerization and aggregation. In the present work, high concentration Hb in solution and red blood cells were analyzed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Calculation of the effective structure factor indicates that the interaction of Hb molecules is the same when they are crowded together in both the cell and physiological saline. The Hb molecules stay individual without the formation of aggregates and clusters in cells. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2009CB918600) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (10979005)

  13. Modeling and measurement of angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Wavefield imaging has been shown to be a powerful tool for improving the understanding and characterization of wave propagation and scattering in plates. The complete measurement of surface displacement over a 2-D grid provided by wavefield imaging has the potential to serve as a useful means of validating ultrasonic models. Here, a preliminary study of ultrasonic angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate using a combination of wavefield measurements and 2-D finite element models is described. Both wavefield imaging and finite element analysis are used to study the propagation of waves at a refracted angle of 56.8° propagating in a 6.35 mm thick aluminum plate. Wavefield imaging is performed using a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. The commercial finite element software package, PZFlex, which is specifically designed to handle large, complex ultrasonic problems, is used to create a 2-D cross-sectional model of the transducer and plate. For model validation, vertical surface displacements from both the wavefield measurements and the PZFlex finite element model are compared and found to be in excellent agreement. The validated PZFlex model is then used to explain the mechanism of Rayleigh wave generation by the angle-beam wedge. Since the wavefield measurements are restricted to the specimen surface, the cross-sectional PZFlex model is able to provide insights the wavefield data cannot. This study illustrates how information obtained from ultrasonic experiments and modeling results can be combined to improve understanding of angle-beam wave generation and propagation.

  14. Porosity and structural parameters of Karelian shungites according to the data of small-angle synchrotron radiation scattering and microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, Ye. A. Ulyashev, V. V.; Veligzhanin, A. A.

    2016-01-15

    The nanoporosity and structure of natural carbons has been investigated on the example of Karelian carbon-rich shungites by comparing the data of small-angle synchrotron radiation scattering and highresolution microscopy. The analysis of small-angle scattering data is based on the model of scattering spheres with lognormal size distribution. It is found that the structure of samples from the Maksovo and Zazhogino deposits subjected to high temperatures in the geological medium and (also to a lesser extent) a sample from the Shunga deposit can be described as an aggregation of polydisperse scattering spheres with lognormal size distribution; the characteristic scatterer size is determined for them. A comparison with microscopy data shows that these scatterers are mainly associated with pores, and the character of their size distribution is similar to that previously established for nanoglobules in schungites.

  15. Critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering measurements of FinFET and 3D memory structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settens, Charles; Bunday, Benjamin; Thiel, Brad; Kline, R. Joseph; Sunday, Daniel; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Wen-li; Matyi, Richard

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated that transmission critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) provides high accuracy and precision CD measurements on advanced 3D microelectronic architectures. The competitive advantage of CD-SAXS over current 3D metrology methods such as optical scatterometry is that CD-SAXS is able to decouple and fit cross-section parameters without any significant parameter cross-correlations. As the industry aggressively scales beyond the 22 nm node, CD-SAXS can be used to quantitatively measure nanoscale deviations in the average crosssections of FinFETs and high-aspect ratio (HAR) memory devices. Fitting the average cross-section of 18:1 isolated HAR contact holes with an effective trapezoid model yielded an average pitch of 796.9 +/- 0.4 nm, top diameter of 70.3 +/- 0.9 nm, height of 1088 +/- 4 nm, and sidewall angle below 0.1°. Simulations of dense 40:1 HAR contact holes and FinFET fin-gate crossbar structures have been analyzed using CD-SAXS to inquire the theoretical precision of the technique to measure important process parameters such as fin CD, height, and sidewall angle; BOX etch recess, thickness of hafnium oxide and titanium nitride layers; gate CD, height, and sidewall angle; and hafnium oxide and titanium nitride etch recess. The simulations of HAR and FinFET structures mimic the characteristics of experimental data collected at a synchrotron x-ray source. Using the CD-SAXS simulator, we estimate the measurement capabilities for smaller similar structures expected at future nodes to predict the applicability of this technique to fulfill important CD metrology needs.

  16. Coronary left main and non-left main bifurcation angles: how are the angles modified by different bifurcation stenting techniques?

    PubMed

    Godino, Cosmo; Al-Lamee, Rasha; La Rosa, Claudio; Morici, Nuccia; Latib, Azeem; Ielasi, Alfonso; Di Mario, Carlo; Sangiorgi, Giuseppe M; Colombo, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    Investigation of the correlation between bifurcation angles and outcomes is limited with discordant results. The aim of this study is to investigate left main (LM) and non-left main (N-LM) bifurcation angles and their modification after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Measurement of all three angles adds to our understanding of bifurcation anatomy and the resultant effect of different stenting techniques. All three bifurcation angles were described according to the European Bifurcation Club definition: the A (proximal bifurcation angle), the B (distal bifurcation angle) and the C (main branch angle). Measurements were performed in 75 LM and 140 N-LM bifurcations. In LM bifurcations baseline mean values of C, A, and B were 151 degrees +/- 28 degrees, 131 degrees +/- 32 degrees, and 78 +/- 28 degrees, respectively. In bifurcations with 2 stents the B significantly decreased by a mean of 10 degrees (P = 0.003) and A increased by 10 degrees (P = 0.006). Crush stenting significantly decreased B (A - 14 degrees ; P = 0.020) and increased A (A + 21 degrees; P = 0.005), particularly non-true bifurcations. In N-LM bifurcations mean values for C, A, and B were 156 degrees +/- 19 degrees , 144 degrees +/- 22 degrees, and 60 degrees +/- 20 degrees, respectively. Similar to LM bifurcations, the B became narrower mainly at the expense of the A, which became wider. In both types of bifurcations the greatest variation in A and B was found following 2-stent techniques performed in T-shaped (> or =70 degrees) bifurcations. In both LM and N-LM bifurcations we found a significant difference in A and B pre- and post-PCI. This difference was driven by the 2-stent technique and was most evident with a baseline bifurcation angle > or =70 degrees. The Crush technique caused the largest angle variation post-procedure, particularly in non-true LM bifurcations.

  17. Grazing angle scattering of electromagnetic waves based on an improved two-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjad, Naheed; Khenchaf, Ali; Mushtaq, Sajjad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing applications require developing accurate models to predict radar bistatic scattering from random rough surfaces. In this context, an improved two-scale model (TSM) is developed. The simplest TSM (TSM1) combines the first order small perturbation method (SPM1) with geometrical optics (GO) to be able to cope with both the small- and large-scale components of the surface. To get improved results at grazing angles and better depolarization estimation, we include the effects of multiscattering due to the target surface by adding the second order SPM (SPM2) contribution to SPM1 at small scale and develop an improved TSM (TSM2). The applications of TSM2 are presented for sea surface by assuming the surface-height spectrum of Elfouhaily et al., at grazing angles. In the backscattering configuration the numerical results are compared with the published experimental data and other approximate analytical models. Finally, we use the TSM2 to predict the sea scattering in the bistatic configuration and compare the results with TSM1.

  18. A small-angle x-ray scattering system with a vertical layout

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xiaowei; Meng, Lingpu; Cui, Kunpeng; Wu, Lihui; Li, Liangbin

    2014-12-15

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) system with a vertical layout (V-SAXS) has been designed and constructed for in situ detection on nanostructures, which is well suitable for in situ study on self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid interface and polymer processing. A steel-tower frame on a reinforced basement is built as the supporting skeleton for scattering beam path and detector platform, ensuring the system a high working stability and a high operating accuracy. A micro-focus x-ray source combining parabolic three-dimensional multi-layer mirror and scatteringless collimation system provides a highly parallel beam, which allows us to detect the very small angle range. With a sample-to-detector distance of 7 m, the largest measurable length scale is 420 nm in real space. With a large sample zone, it is possible to install different experimental setups such as film stretching machine, which makes the system perfect to follow the microstructures evolution of materials during processing. The capability of the V-SAXS on in situ study is tested with a drying experiment of a free latex droplet, which confirms our initial design.

  19. The solution structure of stilbenoid dendrimers: a small-angle scattering study.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Karpuk, Elena; Lehmann, Matthias; Meier, Herbert; Lindner, Peter; Harnau, Ludger; Ballauff, Matthias

    2006-10-13

    The spatial structure of a stilbenoid dendrimer is investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in dilute solution. All measurements are performed in toluene. The dendrimer consists of a stilbenoid scaffold with appended hexyloxy chains. SAXS is mainly sensitive to the dendrimer scaffold whereas SANS intensity, measured in fully deuterated toluene, derives from the solute molecules. The resulting SAXS and SANS intensities are analyzed by comparison with various models. It is found that the model of a circular disk gives the best description of the data. SAXS data demonstrate that the stilbenoid scaffold is flat as expected for benzene rings conjugated through vinylene units. Thus, it can be described by a circular disk with a radius of 1.6 nm and a thickness of 0.7 nm. SANS, on the other hand, shows that the hexyloxy chains are not confined in the plane defined by the core. This is derived from modeling the SANS data with a much thicker circular disk (radius: 2.4 nm, thickness: 1.8 nm). The structure factor S(q), describing the interaction of the dendrimers at higher concentrations, is modeled quantitatively with the "polymer reference interaction site model" (PRISM) integral equation formalism for hard plates such as particles. Here the structural data obtained from the analysis of the SANS data are used so that no new adjustable parameter is necessary for this description.

  20. A small-angle x-ray scattering system with a vertical layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xiaowei; Meng, Lingpu; Cui, Kunpeng; Wu, Lihui; Li, Liangbin

    2014-12-01

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) system with a vertical layout (V-SAXS) has been designed and constructed for in situ detection on nanostructures, which is well suitable for in situ study on self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid interface and polymer processing. A steel-tower frame on a reinforced basement is built as the supporting skeleton for scattering beam path and detector platform, ensuring the system a high working stability and a high operating accuracy. A micro-focus x-ray source combining parabolic three-dimensional multi-layer mirror and scatteringless collimation system provides a highly parallel beam, which allows us to detect the very small angle range. With a sample-to-detector distance of 7 m, the largest measurable length scale is 420 nm in real space. With a large sample zone, it is possible to install different experimental setups such as film stretching machine, which makes the system perfect to follow the microstructures evolution of materials during processing. The capability of the V-SAXS on in situ study is tested with a drying experiment of a free latex droplet, which confirms our initial design.

  1. Small-angle x-ray scattering study on the structure of microcrystalline and nanofibrillated cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppänen, Kirsi; Pirkkalainen, Kari; Penttilä, Paavo; Sievänen, Jenni; Kotelnikova, Nina; Serimaa, Ritva

    2010-10-01

    The effects of different solvents on the structure of microcrystalline and nanofibrillated cellulose (MCC, NFC) were studied using small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). MCC was immersed in water, ethanol, and acetone, and NFC was immersed only in water and ethanol, but studied also in the form of foam-like water-NFC-gel in wet, air-dried and re-wet states. The solvent affected the average chord length, which reveals the typical length scale of the structure of the sample: 2.4 ± 0.1 nm was obtained for MCC-water, 2.5 ± 0.1 nm for re-wet NFC-gel, 1.6 ± 0.1 nm for MCC-ethanol, 1.2 ± 0.1 nm for NFC-ethanol, and 1.3 ± 0.1 nm for MCC-acetone. The specific surface of cellulose increased strongly when MCC and NFC were immersed in the solvents compared to dry cellulose. The specific surface of cellulose was determined to be larger for NFC-water than MCC-water, and slightly larger for dry NFC powder than for dry MCC, which can be explained by the fact that the width of cellulose crystallites perpendicular to the cellulose chain direction was slightly larger in MCC than in NFC on the basis of wide-angle x-ray scattering results.

  2. A small-angle x-ray scattering system with a vertical layout.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xiaowei; Meng, Lingpu; Cui, Kunpeng; Wu, Lihui; Li, Liangbin

    2014-12-01

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) system with a vertical layout (V-SAXS) has been designed and constructed for in situ detection on nanostructures, which is well suitable for in situ study on self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid interface and polymer processing. A steel-tower frame on a reinforced basement is built as the supporting skeleton for scattering beam path and detector platform, ensuring the system a high working stability and a high operating accuracy. A micro-focus x-ray source combining parabolic three-dimensional multi-layer mirror and scatteringless collimation system provides a highly parallel beam, which allows us to detect the very small angle range. With a sample-to-detector distance of 7 m, the largest measurable length scale is 420 nm in real space. With a large sample zone, it is possible to install different experimental setups such as film stretching machine, which makes the system perfect to follow the microstructures evolution of materials during processing. The capability of the V-SAXS on in situ study is tested with a drying experiment of a free latex droplet, which confirms our initial design.

  3. Magnetic-field-dependent small-angle neutron scattering on random anisotropy ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Andreas; Weissmüller, Jörg

    2008-06-01

    We report on the recently developed technique of magnetic-field-dependent small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with attention to bulk ferromagnets exhibiting random magnetic anisotropy. In these materials, the various magnetic anisotropy fields (magnetocrystalline, magnetoelastic, and/or magnetostatic in origin) perturb the perfectly parallel spin alignment of the idealized ferromagnetic state. By varying the applied magnetic field, one can control one of the ordering terms which competes with the above-mentioned perturbing fields. Experiments which explore the ensuing reaction of the magnetization will therefore provide information not only on the field-dependent spin structure but, importantly, on the underlying magnetic interaction terms. This strategy, which underlies conventional studies of hysteresis loops in magnetometry, is here combined with magnetic SANS. While magnetometry generally records only a single scalar quantity, the integral magnetization, SANS provides access to a vastly richer data set, the Fourier spectrum of the response of the spin system as a function of the magnitude and orientation of the wave vector. The required data-analysis procedures have recently been established, and experiments on a number of magnetic materials, mostly nanocrystalline or nanocomposite metals, have been reported. Here, we summarize the theory of magnetic-field-dependent SANS along with the underlying description of random anisotropy magnets by micromagnetic theory. We review experiments which have explored the magnetic interaction parameters, the value of the exchange-stiffness constant as well as the Fourier components of the magnetic anisotropy field and of the magnetostatic stray field. A model-independent approach, based on the experimental autocorrelation function of the spin misalignment, provides access to the characteristic length of the spin misalignment. The field dependence of this quantity is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of

  4. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, V. V.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Murugova, T. N.; Vasin, A. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Kiselev, O. I.

    2016-01-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551–560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  5. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, V. V.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Murugova, T. N.; Vasin, A. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Kiselev, O. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551-560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  6. Molecular characterization of multivalent bioconjugates by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALS)

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Jacob F.; Ashton, Randolph S.; Rode, Nikhil A.; Schaffer, David V.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    The degree of substitution and valency of bioconjugate reaction products are often poorly judged or require multiple time- and product- consuming chemical characterization methods. These aspects become critical when analyzing and optimizing the potency of costly polyvalent bioactive conjugates. In this study, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser light scattering was paired with refractive index detection and ultraviolet spectroscopy (SEC-MALS-RI-UV) to characterize the reaction efficiency, degree of substitution, and valency of the products of conjugation of either peptides or proteins to a biopolymer scaffold, i.e., hyaluronic acid (HyA). Molecular characterization was more complete compared to estimates from a protein quantification assay, and exploitation of this method led to more accurate deduction of the molecular structures of polymer bioconjugates. Information obtained using this technique can improve macromolecular engineering design principles and better understand multivalent macromolecular interactions in biological systems. PMID:22794081

  7. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure organization of the chromatin in biological cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iashina, E. G.; Bouwman, W. G.; Duif, C. P.; Filatov, M. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    Spin-echo small-angle scattering (SESANS) technique is a method to measure the structure of materials from nano- to micrmeter length scales. This method could be important for studying the packaging of DNA in the eukaryotic cell. We measured the SESANS function from chicken erythrocyte nuclei which is well fitted by the exponential function G(z) = exp(-z/ξ), where ξ is the correlation length of a nucleus (in experimental data ξ = 3, 3 μm). The exponential decay of G(z) corresponds to the logarithmic pair correlation function γ(r) = ln(ξ/r). As the sensitivity of the SESANS signal depends on the neutron wavelength, we propose the SESANS setup with the changeable wavelength in the range from 2 to 12 Å. Such option allows one to study in great detail the internal structure of the biological cell in the length scale from 10-2 μm to 10 μm.

  8. Morphology of crystalline-amorphous olefin block copolymers in solution characterized by small-angle neutron scattering and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Aurel; Goerigk, Günter; Fetters, Lewis; Richter, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    The single-chain properties and self-assembly behavior in dilute solution of olefin block copolymers obtained by chain-shuttling technology and consisting of alternating crystallizable and amorphous ethylene/1-octene blocks were investigated by pinhole and focusing small-angle neutron scattering techniques, optical microscopy in bright-field and crossed-polarizer modes, and differential scanning calorimetry. The complex hydrocarbon soluble (precipitant free) macro-aggregates formed with decreasing temperature are characterized by spherulitic textures. The spherulites yield, on one hand, a morphology that depends on the chain structure properties and, on the other hand, multiple structural levels with a hierarchical organization that ranges from 10 Å up to tens of micrometres. This morphology displays peculiarities dictated by the polydisperse character of these materials.

  9. Morphology of crystalline–amorphous olefin block copolymers in solution characterized by small-angle neutron scattering and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Aurel; Goerigk, Günter; Fetters, Lewis; Richter, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The single-chain properties and self-assembly behavior in dilute solution of olefin block copolymers obtained by chain-shuttling technology and consisting of alternating crystallizable and amorphous ethylene/1-octene blocks were investigated by pinhole and focusing small-angle neutron scattering techniques, optical microscopy in bright-field and crossed-polarizer modes, and differential scanning calorimetry. The complex hydrocarbon soluble (precipitant free) macro-aggregates formed with decreasing temperature are characterized by spherulitic textures. The spherulites yield, on one hand, a morphology that depends on the chain structure properties and, on the other hand, multiple structural levels with a hierarchical organization that ranges from 10 Å up to tens of micrometres. This morphology displays peculiarities dictated by the polydisperse character of these materials. PMID:26664344

  10. Preliminary experiments on apparatus for in situ studies of microwave-driven reactions by small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, A. G.; Harrison, A.; Oakley, G. S.; Youngson, I. D.; Heenan, R. K.; King, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    In this article we describe apparatus for the study of the microwave-driven growth of particles in solution by in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS). This apparatus has enabled the first preliminary experiments using microwave-activated in situ diffraction. We take iron oxide as the prototype system, but the technique may be extended to a wide variety of chemical reactions that deposit solids from solution. The key features of the apparatus are a microwave cavity with a modular construction that may be adapted to the geometric constraints of the diffractometer, and a computer-controlled microwave generator that may be set to maintain either constant pressure or temperature in the reaction vessel. In this particular piece of equipment the reaction vessel is adapted so that part of the sample fills a cell of identical construction to those commonly used in SANS measurements for optimal transmission of the neutron beam.

  11. From Non-equilibrium to Equilibrium: Micellar Kinetics seen by Time-resolved Small-angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Reidar

    The kinetic pathways of self-assembled nanostructures are not fully understood. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray/neutron scattering (TR-SAXS/SANS) is powerful technique1 that allows kinetics processes such as nucleation processes2,3 and morphological transitions4,5 to be followed with structural resolution over time scales starting from milliseconds. Neutrons offer the additional advantage of facile contrast variation through H/D substitution schemes, which also allow equilibrium processes such as molecular exchange and diffusion to be studied1 , 6 , 7. Here we will highlight the current capabilities of TR-SAS and show results on the kinetics of polymeric micelles. We will address how the understanding of kinetic pathways can be used control the nanostructure.

  12. Characterization of Protein Flexibility Using Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering and Amplified Collective Motion Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bin; Peng, Junhui; Zuo, Xiaobing; Gong, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale flexibility within a multidomain protein often plays an important role in its biological function. Despite its inherent low resolution, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is well suited to investigate protein flexibility and determine, with the help of computational modeling, what kinds of protein conformations would coexist in solution. In this article, we develop a tool that combines SAXS data with a previously developed sampling technique called amplified collective motions (ACM) to elucidate structures of highly dynamic multidomain proteins in solution. We demonstrate the use of this tool in two proteins, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme and tandem WW domains of the formin-binding protein 21. The ACM simulations can sample the conformational space of proteins much more extensively than standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Therefore, conformations generated by ACM are significantly better at reproducing the SAXS data than are those from MD simulations. PMID:25140431

  13. Magnetic design evolution in perpendicular magnetic recording media as revealed by resonant small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianhan; Mehta, Virat; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Do, Hoa; Takano, Kentaro; Florez, Sylvia; Terris, Bruce D.; Wu, Benny; Graves, Catherine; Shu, Michael; Rick, Ramon; Scherz, Andreas; Stöhr, Joachim; Hellwig, Olav

    2013-09-01

    We analyze the magnetic design for different generations of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media using resonant soft x-ray small angle x-ray scattering. This technique allows us to simultaneously extract in a single experiment the key structural and magnetic parameters, i.e., lateral structural grain and magnetic cluster sizes as well as their distributions. We find that earlier PMR media generations relied on an initial reduction in the magnetic cluster size down to the grain level of the high anisotropy granular base layer, while very recent media designs introduce more exchange decoupling also within the softer laterally continuous cap layer. We highlight that this recent development allows optimizing magnetic cluster size and magnetic cluster size distribution within the composite media system for maximum achievable area density, while keeping the structural grain size roughly constant.

  14. Anomalous Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Simulations: Proof of Concept for Distance Measurements for Nanoparticle-Labelled Biomacromolecules in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Pinfield, Valerie J.; Scott, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous small angle X-ray scattering can in principle be used to determine distances between metal label species on biological molecules. Previous experimental studies in the past were unable to distinguish the label-label scattering contribution from that of the molecule, because of the use of atomic labels; these labels contribute only a small proportion of the total scattering signal. However, with the development of nanocrystal labels (of 50–100 atoms) there is the possibility for a renewed attempt at applying anomalous small angle X-ray scattering for distance measurement. This is because the contribution to the scattered signal is necessarily considerably stronger than for atomic labels. Here we demonstrate through simulations, the feasibility of the technique to determine the end-to-end distances of labelled nucleic acid molecules as well as other internal distances mimicking a labelled DNA binding protein if the labels are dissimilar metal nanocrystals. Of crucial importance is the ratio of mass of the nanocrystals to that of the labelled macromolecule, as well as the level of statistical errors in the scattering intensity measurements. The mathematics behind the distance determination process is presented, along with a fitting routine than incorporates maximum entropy regularisation. PMID:24759797

  15. Nuclear effects on ion heating within the small-angle charged-particle elastic-scattering regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, A.; Hale, G. M.

    1984-10-01

    The effects of nuclear forces (in contrast to pure Coulomb interaction) on the ion heating rate which results from small-angle scattering processes between charged particles in plasmas are investigated within the framework of Fokker-Planck theory. These effects are included through the addition of analytic Coulomb-nuclear interference and nuclear elastic cross sections in the scattering integrals of the dynamical friction coefficient and dispersion tensor. It is found that corrections to traditional Fokker-Planck predictions of the ion-ion energy exchange rate can be calculated and that these corrections are sensitive to the choice of the maximum scattering angle defining the cutoff between small- and large-angle scattering.

  16. The measurement capabilities of cross-sectional profile of Nanoimprint template pattern using small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Eiji; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Itoh, Masamitsu; Omote, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Ogata, Kiyoshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2016-05-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is one of the most potential candidates for the next generation lithography for semiconductor. It will achieve the lithography with high resolution and low cost. High resolution of NIL will be determined by a high definition template. Nanoimprint lithography will faithfully transfer the pattern of NIL template to the wafer. Cross-sectional profile of the template pattern will greatly affect the resist profile on the wafer. Therefore, the management of the cross-sectional profile is essential. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GI-SAXS) technique has been proposed as one of the method for measuring cross-sectional profile of periodic nanostructure pattern. Incident x-rays are irradiated to the sample surface with very low glancing angle. It is close to the critical angle of the total reflection of the x-ray. The scattered x-rays from the surface structure are detected on a two-dimensional detector. The observed intensity is discrete in the horizontal (2θ) direction. It is due to the periodicity of the structure, and diffraction is observed only when the diffraction condition is satisfied. In the vertical (β) direction, the diffraction intensity pattern shows interference fringes reflected to height and shape of the structure. Features of the measurement using x-ray are that the optical constant for the materials are well known, and it is possible to calculate a specific diffraction intensity pattern based on a certain model of the cross-sectional profile. The surface structure is estimated by to collate the calculated diffraction intensity pattern that sequentially while changing the model parameters with the measured diffraction intensity pattern. Furthermore, GI-SAXS technique can be measured an object in a non-destructive. It suggests the potential to be an effective tool for product quality assurance. We have developed a cross-sectional profile measurement of quartz template pattern using GI-SAXS technique. In this

  17. Fast computation of high energy elastic collision scattering angle for electric propulsion plume simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Samuel J.

    2016-11-01

    In the plumes of Hall thrusters and ion thrusters, high energy ions experience elastic collisions with slow neutral atoms. These collisions involve a process of momentum exchange, altering the initial velocity vectors of the collision pair. In addition to the momentum exchange process, ions and atoms can exchange electrons, resulting in slow charge-exchange ions and fast atoms. In these simulations, it is particularly important to accurately perform computations of ion-atom elastic collisions in determining the plume current profile and assessing the integration of spacecraft components. The existing models are currently capable of accurate calculation but are not fast enough such that the calculation can be a bottleneck of plume simulations. This study investigates methods to accelerate an ion-atom elastic collision calculation that includes both momentum- and charge-exchange processes. The scattering angles are pre-computed through a classical approach with ab initio spin-orbit free potential and are stored in a two-dimensional array as functions of impact parameter and energy. When performing a collision calculation for an ion-atom pair, the scattering angle is computed by a table lookup and multiple linear interpolations, given the relative energy and randomly determined impact parameter. In order to further accelerate the calculations, the number of collision calculations is reduced by properly defining two cut-off cross-sections for the elastic scattering. In the MCC method, the target atom needs to be sampled; however, it is confirmed that initial target atom velocity does not play a significant role in typical electric propulsion plume simulations such that the sampling process is unnecessary. With these implementations, the computational run-time to perform a collision calculation is reduced significantly compared to previous methods, while retaining the accuracy of the high fidelity models.

  18. Relativistic electron loss process by pitch angle scattering due to field curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.; Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Min, K.; Kim, H.; Park, J.; Hwang, J.

    2006-12-01

    Relativistic electron dropout (RED) events are characterized by fast electron flux decrease at the geostationary orbit. It is known that the main loss process is non adiabatic and more effective for the high energy particles. RED events generally start to occur at midnight sector and propagate to noon sector and are correlated with magnetic field stretching. We discuss this kind of event can be caused from pitch angle diffusion induced when the gyro radius of the electrons is comparable to the radius of curvature of the magnetic field and the magnetic moment is not conserved any more. While this process has been studied theoretically, the question is whether electron precipitation could be explained with this process for the real field configuration. This paper will show that this process can successfully explain the precipitation that occurred on June 14, 2004 observed by the low-altitude (680 km) polar orbiting Korean satellite, STSAT-1. In this precipitation event, the energy dispersion showed higher energy electron precipitation occurred at lower L values. This feature is a good indicator that precipitation was caused by the magnetic moment scattering in the geomagnetic tail. This interpretation is supported by the geosynchronous satellite GOES observations that showed significant magnetic field distortion occurred on the night side accompanying the electron flux depletion. Tsyganenko-01 model also shows the magnetic moment scattering could occur under the geomagnetic conditions existing at that time. We suggest the pitch angle scattering by field curvature violating the first adiabatic invariant as a possible candidate for loss mechanism of relativistic electrons in radiation belt.

  19. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering of Carbon and Kevlar Fibers Under Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effler, Lawrence Joseph, Jr.

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used as the primary tool for investigating the microporous structure of Kevlar and mesophase pitch based carbon fibers. The orientation present in the scattering entities was determined by extending Porod's invariant into a pseudo-invariant for one-dimensional data slices. By comparing the pseudo -invariants at different aximuthal angles the extent of the orientation present in the scattering system was determined. The orientation of the microvoids was found to correlate best with the modulus of the carbon fibers. Distance distribution functions were also determined for the fibers. For the carbon fibers the average size of the voids and the breadth of the distribution was found to increase with both fiber modulus and strength. In addition, the distance distribution curves were able to distinguish between fibers spun under different conditions. These results were found to mirror the enhancement of crystalline orientation and the development of graphitic phases in the fibers. Studies were also conducted to determine the response of the microvoids to an applied tensile load. Both Kevlar and the carbon fibers indicated a loss of outer fiber surface, with the most dramatic loss being seen for Kevlar. Experiments were conducted which compared both as received fibers to those which had been strained to failure. Additional experiments were done with the fibers being strained while in the SAXS camera. For the Kevlar fibers the loss of its skin layer was indicated by less anisotropic scattering patterns of the fractured fibers. The dynamic studies indicated that initially void orientation increases accompanied by the formation of newer, smaller voids. However these trends are reversed as the fiber tow approaches and reaches fracture. The loss of the skin region was confirmed by both laser backscattering and optical microscopy. The response of the microvoid phase of Kevlar to loading is interpreted in light of Morgan's chain end model

  20. Measuring Material Microstructure Under Flow Using 1-2 Plane Flow-Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Gurnon, A. Kate; Godfrin, P. Douglas; Wagner, Norman J.; Eberle, Aaron P. R.; Butler, Paul; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environment optimized for studying the microstructure of complex fluids under simple shear flow is presented. The SANS shear cell consists of a concentric cylinder Couette geometry that is sealed and rotating about a horizontal axis so that the vorticity direction of the flow field is aligned with the neutron beam enabling scattering from the 1-2 plane of shear (velocity-velocity gradient, respectively). This approach is an advance over previous shear cell sample environments as there is a strong coupling between the bulk rheology and microstructural features in the 1-2 plane of shear. Flow-instabilities, such as shear banding, can also be studied by spatially resolved measurements. This is accomplished in this sample environment by using a narrow aperture for the neutron beam and scanning along the velocity gradient direction. Time resolved experiments, such as flow start-ups and large amplitude oscillatory shear flow are also possible by synchronization of the shear motion and time-resolved detection of scattered neutrons. Representative results using the methods outlined here demonstrate the useful nature of spatial resolution for measuring the microstructure of a wormlike micelle solution that exhibits shear banding, a phenomenon that can only be investigated by resolving the structure along the velocity gradient direction. Finally, potential improvements to the current design are discussed along with suggestions for supplementary experiments as motivation for future experiments on a broad range of complex fluids in a variety of shear motions. PMID:24561395

  1. Small-angle scattering of dense, polydisperse granular porous media: Computation free of size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisard, Sébastien; Levitz, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray and neutrons scattering is a widespread experimental tool for the investigation of the microstructure of random heterogeneous materials. Validation of (computer-generated) model microstructures often requires the numerical computation of the scattering intensity, which must be carried out with great care due to finite size effects. In this paper, a new method for this computation is presented. It is superior to previously existing methods for three reasons: First, it applies to any type of microstructure (not necessarily granular). Second, closed-form expressions of the size effects inherent to the proposed method can be rigorously derived and removed (in this sense, our method is free of size effects). Third, the complexity of the new algorithm is linear and the computation can easily be updated to account for local changes of the microstructure, while most existing algorithms are quadratic and any change of the microstructure requires a full recomputation. The present paper provides full derivation and validation of this method. Application to the computation of the scattering intensity of dense, polydisperse assemblies of spheres is then presented. A new, simple algorithm for the generation of these dense configurations is introduced. Finally, the results are critically reviewed in the perspective of hardened cement pastes.

  2. Small angle neutron scattering studies of the structure of nucleosome cores at low ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Kazuei; Zama, Mitsuo; Ichimura, Sachiko; Niimura, Nobuo; Kaji, Keisuke; Hirai, Mitsuhiro; Ishikawa, Yoshikazu

    1983-05-01

    The structure of the nucleosome core particle at low ionic strenth (10-0.04 mM Na +) has been studied by small angle neutron scattering in various H 2O/D 2O mixtures. At 0.04 mM Na +,the radius of gyration obtained at 39% D 2O where scattering from the DNA dominates was 32 Å, and at 65% D 2O where scattering from the histones dominates, 40 Å. An abrupt increase in the radius of gyration from 35 to 40 Å was observed at about 1 mM ionic strength at 65% D 2O, with decreasing the ionic strength from 10 mM. No loss of the histone secondary structure was detected by circular dichroism over the range of the ionic strength examined. These results suggest that at low ionic strength (⪅1 mM) the histones are located outside of the nucleosome core particle accompanied by an alteration of the tertiary and/or quaternary structure of the histone octamer, with the DNA in a folded conformation.

  3. The contribution of small angle and quasi-elastic scattering to the physics of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, José

    2017-05-01

    Many properties of liquid water at low temperature show anomalous behaviour. For example, density, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity pass by maxima or minima and transport properties show a super-Arrhenius behaviour. Extrapolations performed beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature are at the origin of models that predict critical points, liquid-liquid transitions or dynamic cross-overs in the large domain of temperature and pressure not accessible to experiments because of ice nucleation. A careful analysis of existing data can be used to test some of these models. Small angle X-ray or neutron scattering data are incompatible with models where two liquids or heterogeneities are present. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering, taking advantage and combining both coherent and incoherent scattering show that two relaxation times are present in liquid water and that one of them, related to hydrogen bond dynamics, has an Arrhenian behaviour, suggesting that the associated dynamics of the bonds, similar to the β relaxation of polymers, determines the glass transition temperature of water.

  4. Estimation and modeling of coal pore accessibility using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shimin; Bahadur, Jitendra; Elsworth, Derek; Melnichenko, Yuri; He, Lilin; Wang, Yi

    2015-09-04

    Gas diffusion in coal is controlled by nano-structure of the pores. The interconnectivity of pores not only determines the dynamics of gas transport in the coal matrix but also influences the mechanical strength. In this study, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to quantify pore accessibility for two coal samples, one of sub-bituminous rank and the other of anthracite rank. Moreover, a theoretical pore accessibility model was proposed based on scattering intensities under both vacuum and zero average contrast (ZAC) conditions. Our results show that scattering intensity decreases with increasing gas pressure using deuterated methane (CD4) at low Q values for both coals. Pores smaller than 40 nm in radius are less accessible for anthracite than sub-bituminous coal. On the contrary, when the pore radius is larger than 40 nm, the pore accessibility of anthracite becomes larger than that of sub-bituminous coal. Only 20% of pores are accessible to CD4 for anthracite and 37% for sub-bituminous coal, where the pore radius is 16 nm. For these two coals, pore accessibility and pore radius follows a power-law relationship.

  5. Estimation and modeling of coal pore accessibility using small angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shimin; Bahadur, Jitendra; ...

    2015-09-04

    Gas diffusion in coal is controlled by nano-structure of the pores. The interconnectivity of pores not only determines the dynamics of gas transport in the coal matrix but also influences the mechanical strength. In this study, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to quantify pore accessibility for two coal samples, one of sub-bituminous rank and the other of anthracite rank. Moreover, a theoretical pore accessibility model was proposed based on scattering intensities under both vacuum and zero average contrast (ZAC) conditions. Our results show that scattering intensity decreases with increasing gas pressure using deuterated methane (CD4) at low Qmore » values for both coals. Pores smaller than 40 nm in radius are less accessible for anthracite than sub-bituminous coal. On the contrary, when the pore radius is larger than 40 nm, the pore accessibility of anthracite becomes larger than that of sub-bituminous coal. Only 20% of pores are accessible to CD4 for anthracite and 37% for sub-bituminous coal, where the pore radius is 16 nm. For these two coals, pore accessibility and pore radius follows a power-law relationship.« less

  6. Large-area proportional counter camera for the US National Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Abele, R.K.; Allin, G.W.; Clay, W.T.; Fowler, C.E.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    An engineering model of a multiwire position-sensitive proportional-counter (PSPC) was developed, tested, and installed at the US National Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Facility at ORNL. The PSPC is based on the RC-encoding and time-difference decoding method to measure the spatial coordinates of the interaction loci of individual scattered neutrons. The active area of the PSPC is 65 cm x 65 cm, and the active depth is 3.6 cm. The spatial uncertainty in both coordinates is approx. 1.0 cm (fwhm) for thermal neutrons; thus, a matrix of 64 x 64 picture elements is resolved. The count rate capability for randomly detected neutrons is 10/sup 4/ counts per second, with < 3% coincidence loss. The PSPC gas composition is 63% /sup 3/He, 32% Xe, and 5% CO/sub 2/ at an absolute pressure of approx. 3 x 10/sup 5/ Pa (3 atm). The detection efficiency is approx. 90% for the 0.475-nm (4.75-A) neutrons used in the scattering experiments.

  7. Small-Angle Scattering of X-Rays from Extragalactic Sources by Dust in Intervening Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralda-Escudé, Jordi

    1999-02-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are now known to be a cosmological population of objects, which are often accompanied by X-ray and optical afterglows. The total energy emitted in the afterglow can be similar to the energy radiated in the gamma-ray burst itself. If a galaxy containing a large column density of dust is near the line of sight to a gamma-ray burst, small-angle scattering of the X-rays due to diffraction by the dust grains will give rise to an X-ray echo of the afterglow. A measurement of the angular size of the echo at a certain time after the afterglow is observed yields a combination of the angular diameter distances to the scattering galaxy and the gamma-ray burst that can be used to constrain cosmological models in the same way as a time delay in a gravitational lens. The scattering galaxy will generally cause gravitational lensing as well, and this should modify the shape of the X-ray echo from a circular ring. The main difficulty in detecting this phenomenon is the very low flux expected for the echo. The flux can be increased when the gamma-ray burst is highly magnified by gravitational lensing, or when the deflecting galaxy is at low redshift. X-ray echoes of continuous (but variable) sources, such as quasars, may also be detectable with high-resolution instruments and would allow similar measurements.

  8. Measuring material microstructure under flow using 1-2 plane flow-small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Gurnon, A Kate; Godfrin, P Douglas; Wagner, Norman J; Eberle, Aaron P R; Butler, Paul; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-02-06

    A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environment optimized for studying the microstructure of complex fluids under simple shear flow is presented. The SANS shear cell consists of a concentric cylinder Couette geometry that is sealed and rotating about a horizontal axis so that the vorticity direction of the flow field is aligned with the neutron beam enabling scattering from the 1-2 plane of shear (velocity-velocity gradient, respectively). This approach is an advance over previous shear cell sample environments as there is a strong coupling between the bulk rheology and microstructural features in the 1-2 plane of shear. Flow-instabilities, such as shear banding, can also be studied by spatially resolved measurements. This is accomplished in this sample environment by using a narrow aperture for the neutron beam and scanning along the velocity gradient direction. Time resolved experiments, such as flow start-ups and large amplitude oscillatory shear flow are also possible by synchronization of the shear motion and time-resolved detection of scattered neutrons. Representative results using the methods outlined here demonstrate the useful nature of spatial resolution for measuring the microstructure of a wormlike micelle solution that exhibits shear banding, a phenomenon that can only be investigated by resolving the structure along the velocity gradient direction. Finally, potential improvements to the current design are discussed along with suggestions for supplementary experiments as motivation for future experiments on a broad range of complex fluids in a variety of shear motions.

  9. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Water's behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (αp) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated αp peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  10. Preliminary analysis of the distribution of water in human hair by small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Yash; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Ramaprasad, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion and distribution of water in hair can reveal the internal structure of hair that determines the penetration of various products used to treat hair. The distribution of water into different morphological components in unmodified hair, cuticle-free hair, and hair saturated with oil at various levels of humidity was examined using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) by substituting water with deuterium oxide (D(2)O). Infrared spectroscopy was used to follow hydrogen-deuterium exchange. Water present in hair gives basically two types of responses in SANS: (i) interference patterns, and (ii) central diffuse scattering (CDS) around the beam stop. The amount of water in the matrix between the intermediate filaments that gives rise to interference patterns remained essentially constant over the 50-98% humidity range without swelling this region of the fiber extensively. This observation suggests that a significant fraction of water in the hair, which contributes to the CDS, is likely located in a different morphological region of hair that is more like pores in a fibrous structure, which leads to significant additional swelling of the fiber. Comparison of the scattering of hair treated with oil shows that soybean oil, which diffuses less into hair, allows more water into hair than coconut oil. These preliminary results illustrate the utility of SANS for evaluating and understanding the diffusion of deuterated liquids into different morphological structures in hair.

  11. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    Water’s behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub p}) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated α{sub p} peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  12. BACKWARD ANGLE STRUCTURE IN THE 20Ne+28Si QUASIELASTIC SCATTERING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Pakou, A.; Patronis, N.; Zerva, K.; Keeley, N.; Strojek, I.; Trzcińska, A.; Piasecki, E.; Rusek, K.; Stiliaris, E.; Mazzocco, M.

    2013-10-01

    New data for the quasielastic scattering of 20Ne from a 28Si target at incident energies of 42.5 MeV and 52.3 MeV and for the 28Si(20Ne, 24Mg)24Mg, 28Si(20Ne, 16O)32S and 28Si(20Ne, 12C)36Ar transfer reactions at 52.3 MeV are reported. Oscillations are observed in the backward angle quasielastic scattering data at 52.3 MeV and the 28Si(20Ne, 12C)36Ar transfer cross-sections are of the same magnitude as those for single-α stripping. Coupled reaction channels (CRC) calculations are unable to describe either the quasielastic or the 28Si(20Ne, 12C)36Ar transfer data assuming a sequential α transfer process with α-particle form factors from the literature. The addition of direct 8Be cluster transfer can provide a reasonable description of both data sets, but only with much larger spectroscopic factors than suggested by simple structure calculations or the large 8Be emission thresholds of 20Ne, 28Si and 36Ar, suggesting that the observed structure is of resonance-like origin. An optical model analysis of the quasielastic scattering data is also reported.

  13. Small-angle neutron scattering reveals the assembly mode and oligomeric architecture of TET, a large, dodecameric aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Appolaire, Alexandre; Girard, Eric; Colombo, Matteo; Durá, M. Asunción; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Franzetti, Bruno; Gabel, Frank

    2014-11-01

    The present work illustrates that small-angle neutron scattering, deuteration and contrast variation, combined with in vitro particle reconstruction, constitutes a very efficient approach to determine subunit architectures in large, symmetric protein complexes. In the case of the 468 kDa heterododecameric TET peptidase machine, it was demonstrated that the assembly of the 12 subunits is a highly controlled process and represents a way to optimize the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The specific self-association of proteins into oligomeric complexes is a common phenomenon in biological systems to optimize and regulate their function. However, de novo structure determination of these important complexes is often very challenging for atomic-resolution techniques. Furthermore, in the case of homo-oligomeric complexes, or complexes with very similar building blocks, the respective positions of subunits and their assembly pathways are difficult to determine using many structural biology techniques. Here, an elegant and powerful approach based on small-angle neutron scattering is applied, in combination with deuterium labelling and contrast variation, to elucidate the oligomeric organization of the quaternary structure and the assembly pathways of 468 kDa, hetero-oligomeric and symmetric Pyrococcus horikoshii TET2–TET3 aminopeptidase complexes. The results reveal that the topology of the PhTET2 and PhTET3 dimeric building blocks within the complexes is not casual but rather suggests that their quaternary arrangement optimizes the catalytic efficiency towards peptide substrates. This approach bears important potential for the determination of quaternary structures and assembly pathways of large oligomeric and symmetric complexes in biological systems.

  14. Workshop on Research Techniques in Wave Propagation and Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, V. V.; Varadan, V. K.

    1983-05-01

    A Workshop/Symposium on Research Techniques in Wave Propagation and Scattering was held at the Ohio State University October 18-21, 1982. This workshop was co-sponsored with the generous financial support of the U.S. Army Research Office, U.S. Office of Naval Research, the Center for Welding Research, O.S.U., and the Department of Engineering Mechanics, O.S.U. The workshop format consisted of a core of a general lectures of fifty minutes duration each and several shorter contributions that were of twenty minutes duration each. In addition, there were three panel discussions. The general lectures were of an expository nature on fundamental concepts and basic analytical/numerical techniques for the solution of wave scattering and propagation problems. The speakers were noted for their contribution to these techniques and in many cases have pioneered the techniques that they elaborated upon. These lectures were invaluable to the participants since they were of a pedagogical nature and easily understood by even those not very familiar with the particular method. The written version of many of these lectures will appear in a four volume Handbook on Acoustic, Electromagnetic and Elastic Wave Scattering to be published by North Holland as a separate project.

  15. Signal, noise, and resolution in correlated fluctuations from snapshot small-angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Kirian, Richard A; Schmidt, Kevin E; Wang, Xiaoyu; Doak, R Bruce; Spence, John C H

    2011-07-01

    It has been suggested that the three-dimensional structure of one particle may be reconstructed using the scattering from many identical, randomly oriented copies ab initio, without modeling or a priori information. This may be possible if these particles are frozen in either space or time, so that the conventional two-dimensional small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) distribution contains fluctuations and is no longer isotropic. We consider the magnitude of the correlated fluctuation SAXS (CFSAXS) signal for typical x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) beam conditions and compare this against the errors derived with the inclusion of Poisson photon counting statistics. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is found to rapidly approach a limit independent of the number of particles contributing to each diffraction pattern, so that the addition of more particles to a "single-particle-per-shot" experiment may be of little value, apart from reducing solvent background. When the scattering power is significantly less than one photon per particle per Shannon pixel, the SNR grows in proportion to incident flux. We provide simulations for protein molecules in support of these analytical results, and discuss the effects of solvent background scatter. We consider the SNR dependence on resolution and particle size, and discuss the application of the method to glasses and liquids, and the implications of more powerful XFELs, smaller focused beams, and higher pulse repetition rates for this approach. We find that an accurate CFSAXS measurement may be acquired to subnanometer resolution for protein molecules if a 9-keV beam containing 10(13) photons is focused to a ~100-nm spot diameter, provided that the effects of solvent background can be reduced sufficiently.

  16. Application of GPC/LALLS to cellulose research. [Gel permeation chromatography/low-angle laser light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cael, J.J.; Cietek, D.J.; Kolpak, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of gel permeation chromatography and low-angle laser light scattering (GPC/LALLS) have been combined for absolute determination of cellulose molecular weights and molecular weight distributions (MWD). The GPC/LALLS technique has been applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) solutions of cellulose tricarbanilate (CTC) derivatives prepared from celluloses having a wide range of molecular weights. The molecular weight data obtained are consistent with values determined by intrinsic viscosity methods; and as a consequence of the absolute nature of this technique, Mark-Houswink coefficients can be predicted from a single, broad-distribution, linear homopolymer without recourse to tedious and time-consuming fractional precipitation methods. A unique application of the technique has been in correlating GPC/LALLS molecular weight data with the viscosity of nonderivatized celluloses dissolved in 0.5 M cupiethylenediamine hydroxide (CuEn). The procedure yields an absolute viscosity-molecular weight relationship which is comparable with a similar relationship originally derived from cellulose nitrates. The results indicate that the weight-average degree of polymerization (DP/sub w/) for CTC preparations is considerably greater than that obtained from cellulose nitrates, and this discrepancy, in DP/sub w/ has been attributed to errors in the Mark-Houwink coefficients for the cellulose nitrate-acetone system. 25 references, 9 figures, 7 tables.

  17. Initial characterization of mudstone nanoporosity with small angle neutron scattering using caprocks from carbon sequestration sites.

    SciTech Connect

    McCray, John; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Mouzakis, Katherine; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot

    2010-11-01

    Geological carbon sequestration relies on the principle that CO{sub 2} injected deep into the subsurface is unable to leak to the atmosphere. Structural trapping by a relatively impermeable caprock (often mudstone such as a shale) is the main trapping mechanism that is currently relied on for the first hundreds of years. Many of the pores of the caprock are of micrometer to nanometer scale. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of porosity at these scales are poorly characterized. Differences in pore shape and size can cause variation in capillary properties and fluid transport resulting in fluid pathways with different capillary entry pressures in the same sample. Prediction of pore network properties for distinct geologic environments would result in significant advancement in our ability to model subsurface fluid flow. Specifically, prediction of fluid flow through caprocks of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs is a critical step in evaluating the risk of leakage to overlying aquifers. The micro- and nanoporosity was analyzed in four mudstones using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). These mudstones are caprocks of formations that are currently under study or being used for carbon sequestration projects and include the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Total organic carbon varies from <0.3% to 4% by weight. Expandable clay contents range from 10% to {approx}40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. Neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e. minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume of pores and their arrangement in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of

  18. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; ...

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach producesmore » robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).« less

  19. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-01-01

    We review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). From model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.). PMID:26402708

  20. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).

  1. NEUTRON SPECTROSCOPY BY DOUBLE SCATTER AND ASSOCIATED PARTICLE TECHNIQUES.

    SciTech Connect

    DIOSZEGI,I.

    2007-10-28

    Multiple detectors can provide [1,2] both directional and spectroscopic information. Neutron spectra may be obtained by neutron double scatter (DSNS), or the spontaneous fission associated particle (AP) technique. Spontaneous fission results in the creation of fission fragments and the release of gamma rays and neutrons. As these occur at the same instant, they are correlated in time. Thus gamma ray detection can start a timing sequence relative to a neutron detector where the time difference is dominated by neutron time-of-flight. In this paper we describe these techniques and compare experimental results with Monte Carlo calculations.

  2. Quantitative impact of small angle forward scatter on whole blood oximetry using a Beer-Lambert absorbance model.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Serge Emile; Atanya, Monica; Burns, Kevin; Munger, Rejean

    2011-04-21

    It is well known that red blood cell scattering has an impact on whole blood oximetry as well as in vivo retinal oxygen saturation measurements. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of small angle forward scatter on whole blood oximetry for scattering angles found in retinal oximetry light paths. Transmittance spectra of whole blood were measured in two different experimental setups: one that included small angle scatter in the transmitted signal and one that measured the transmitted signal only, at absorbance path lengths of 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 µm. Oxygen saturation was determined by multiple linear regression in the 520-600 nm wavelength range and compared between path lengths and experimental setups. Mean calculated oxygen saturation differences between setups were greater than 10% at every absorbance path length. The deviations to the Beer-Lambert absorbance model had different spectral dependences between experimental setups, with the highest deviations found in the 520-540 nm range when scatter was added to the transmitted signal. These results are consistent with other models of forward scatter that predict different spectral dependences of the red blood cell scattering cross-section and haemoglobin extinction coefficients in this wavelength range.

  3. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Nano Sized Precipitates in Ferrous Alloys.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Soo; Park, Duck-Gun; Kobayashi, Satoru

    2015-11-01

    Nano-sized precipitates in a Fe-1 wt% Cu alloy were studied by SANS (Small Angle Neutron Scattering). The SANS experiments were performed with the 40 m SANS instrument at HANARO. Due to the ferromagnetic nature of the ferrous alloys, a horizontal magnetic field of 1 Tesla was applied during the SANS experiment. The nano-sized Cu precipitates were quantitatively analyzed by SANS in the Fe-1 wt% Cu alloy. The size of the precipitates increased from 2 nm to 4 nm with increasing aging time from 20 min. to 1800 min. at 753 K. The measured A-ratio obtained from SANS data increased from 2.2 to 6.6 with increasing aging time. It is surmised that Cu clusters containing a large amount of Fe are initiated at the early stage of aging and the Fe content in the Cu precipitate decreases with increasing aging time and eventually an almost pure BCC Cu precipitate is formed.

  4. Study of (Cyclic Peptide)-Polymer Conjugate Assemblies by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Liang; FitzGerald, Paul A; Warr, Gregory G; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Perrier, Sébastien

    2016-12-19

    We present a fundamental study into the self-assembly of (cyclic peptide)-polymer conjugates as a versatile supramolecular motif to engineer nanotubes with defined structure and dimensions, as characterised in solution using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). This work demonstrates the ability of the grafted polymer to stabilise and/or promote the formation of unaggregated nanotubes by the direct comparison to the unconjugated cyclic peptide precursor. This ideal case permitted a further study into the growth mechanism of self-assembling cyclic peptides, allowing an estimation of the cooperativity. Furthermore, we show the dependency of the nanostructure on the polymer and peptide chemical functionality in solvent mixtures that vary in the ability to compete with the intermolecular associations between cyclic peptides and ability to solvate the polymer shell. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Riboswitch Conformations Revealed by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Riboswitches are functional RNA molecules that control gene expression through conformational changes in response to small-molecule ligand binding. In addition, riboswitch 3D structure, like that of other RNA molecules, is dependent on cation–RNA interactions as the RNA backbone is highly negatively charged. Here, we show how small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can be used to probe RNA conformations as a function of ligand and ion concentration. In a recent study of a glycine-binding tandem aptamer from Vibrio cholerae, we have used SAXS data and thermodynamic modeling to investigate how Mg2+-dependent folding and glycine binding are energetically coupled. In addition, we have employed ab initio shape reconstruction algorithms to obtain low-resolution models of the riboswitch structure from SAXS data under different solution conditions. PMID:19381558

  6. Direct detection of resonant electron pitch angle scattering by whistler waves in a laboratory plasma.

    PubMed

    Van Compernolle, B; Bortnik, J; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W; Nakamoto, M; Tao, X; Thorne, R M

    2014-04-11

    Resonant interactions between energetic electrons and whistler mode waves are an essential ingredient in the space environment, and in particular in controlling the dynamic variability of Earth's natural radiation belts, which is a topic of extreme interest at the moment. Although the theory describing resonant wave-particle interaction has been present for several decades, it has not been hitherto tested in a controlled laboratory setting. In the present Letter we report on the first laboratory experiment to directly detect resonant pitch angle scattering of energetic (∼keV) electrons due to whistler mode waves. We show that the whistler mode wave deflects energetic electrons at precisely the predicted resonant energy, and that varying both the maximum beam energy, and the wave frequency, alters the energetic electron beam very close to the resonant energy.

  7. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  8. Small angle neutron scattering as fingerprinting of ancient potteries from Sicily (Southern Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, G.; Mazzoleni, P.; Crupi, V.; Majolino, D.; Venuti, V.; Teixeira, J.

    2009-09-01

    Small angle neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in order to investigate, in microdestructive way, the mesoscopic structure of a variety of potteries of relevance to cultural heritage coming from different Sicilian (Southern Italy) archeological sites belonging to the 'Strait of Messina' area and dated back to 7th-3rd century B.C. Data have been compared with the mesoscopic parameters extracted for two series of clayey sediments typical of the Strait of Messina area and fired under controlled conditions. The observed agreement between the features of reference and archeological samples allowed us to estimate the maximum firing temperature of the latter. Information on the pore sizes was obtained by the use of the concept of fractal surface, and compared with porosimetry results.

  9. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Barsov, S.; Gebel, R.; Gou, B.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Macharashvili, G.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Schroer, D.; Shmakova, V.; Stassen, R.; Stein, H. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stroher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Taschner, A.; Trusov, S.; Tsirkov, D.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Workman, R. L.; Wustner, P.

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis. Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering from polymer hydrogels with memory effect for medicine immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvelis, Yu. V. Lebedev, V. T.; Trunov, V. A.; Pavlyuchenko, V. N.; Ivanchev, S. S.; Primachenko, O. N.; Khaikin, S. Ya.

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogels synthesized based on cross-linked copolymers of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and functional monomers (acrylic acid or dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate), having a memory effect with respect to target medicine (cefazolin), have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. The hydrogels are found to have a two-level structural organization: large (up to 100 nm) aggregates filled with network cells (4-7 nm in size). The structural differences in the anionic, cationic, and amphiphilic hydrogels and the relationship between their structure and the ability of hydrogels to absorb moisture are shown. A relationship between the memory effect during cefazolin immobilization and the internal structure of hydrogels, depending on their composition and type of functional groups, is established.

  11. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FOKKER-PLANCK EQUATION WITH ADIABATIC FOCUSING: ISOTROPIC PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Fiege, Jason D.; Shalchi, Andreas E-mail: fiege@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical solutions to both the standard and modified two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equations with adiabatic focusing and isotropic pitch-angle scattering. With the numerical solution of the particle distribution function, we then discuss the related numerical issues, calculate the parallel diffusion coefficient using several different methods, and compare our numerical solutions for the parallel diffusion coefficient to the analytical forms derived earlier. We find the numerical solution to the diffusion coefficient for both the standard and modified Fokker-Planck equations agrees with that of Shalchi for the mean squared displacement method of computing the diffusion coefficient. However, we also show the numerical solution agrees with that of Litvinenko and Shalchi and Danos when calculating the diffusion coefficient via the velocity correlation function.

  12. Structure of phase-inversion membranes from small-angle neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kul'velis, Yu. V.; Kononova, S. V.; Romashkova, K. A.; Lebedev, V. T.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of gradient-porous (asymmetric) membranes based on polyamide imide at different conditions of their formation has been investigated using small-angle neutron scattering. It has been shown that the membranes consist of rigid porous networks with well-defined interfaces between the polymer and the pores. It has been found that there are differences in the packings of structural elements of porous membranes-spherical pores with radii from 4 to 100 nm—depending on the membrane preformation time, drying regime, and the presence of fullerene C60 for modifying the mechanical and selective properties of membranes. The membranes also contain larger pores of micrometer sizes. Differences in the rates of saturation of membranes with water and their limiting swelling ratios are found, which can be explained by the structure of the dense layers of membranes (skin layer) and their different hydrophilities (depending on the fullerene content).

  13. Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2000-01-01

    A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

  14. Small-angle neutron scattering of nanocrystalline gadolinium and holmium with random paramagnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döbrich, Frank; Bick, Jens-Peter; Birringer, Rainer; Wolff, Matthias; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Michels, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    A neutron study of nanocrystalline terbium (Balaji G et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 227202) has shown that the randomly oriented anisotropy of the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor may lead to strongly correlated nanoscale spin disorder in the paramagnetic state which can be probed very effectively by magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In principle, this scenario is also applicable to other rare-earth metals and the size of the effect is expected to scale with the strength of the anisotropy in the paramagnetic state. Here, we report SANS results (in the paramagnetic state) on nanocrystalline inert-gas condensed samples of Gd and Ho, which represent the cases of low and high anisotropy, respectively.

  15. Aggregates structure analysis of petroleum asphaltenes with small-angle neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, R.; Hunt, J. E.; Winans, R. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Sato, S.; Takanohashi, T.; Idemitsu Kosan Co.; National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine changes in the structures of petroleum asphaltene aggregates in situ with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Asphaltenes were isolated from three different crude oils: Maya, Khafji, and Iranian Light. An aliquot of the 5 wt % asphaltene solution in deuterated Decalin, 1-methylnaphthalene, or quinoline was loaded in a special stainless steel cell for SANS measurements. SANS data measured at various temperatures from 25 to 350 {sup o}C showed various topological features different with asphaltene or solvent species. A fractal network was formed only with asphaltene of Maya in Decalin, and it remained even at 350 {sup o}C. In all of the solvents, asphaltenes aggregate in the form of a prolate ellipsoid with a high aspect ratio at 25 {sup o}C and got smaller with increasing temperature. That became a compact sphere with the size of around 25 {angstrom} in radius at 350 {sup o}C.

  16. New developments in the ATSAS program package for small-angle scattering data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Franke, Daniel; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Tria, Giancarlo; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Gajda, Michal; Gorba, Christian; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Konarev, Petr V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2012-01-01

    New developments in the program package ATSAS (version 2.4) for the processing and analysis of isotropic small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data are described. They include (i) multiplatform data manipulation and display tools, (ii) programs for automated data processing and calculation of overall parameters, (iii) improved usage of high- and low-resolution models from other structural methods, (iv) new algorithms to build three-dimensional models from weakly interacting oligomeric systems and complexes, and (v) enhanced tools to analyse data from mixtures and flexible systems. The new ATSAS release includes installers for current major platforms (Windows, Linux and Mac OSX) and provides improved indexed user documentation. The web-related developments, including a user discussion forum and a widened online access to run ATSAS programs, are also presented. PMID:25484842

  17. Small angle x-ray scattering studies of carbon anodes used in lithium rechargeable batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.; Carrado, K. A.; Winans, R. E.; Seifert, S.; Johnson, C. S.

    1999-11-16

    In ANL laboratories, disordered carbons with predictable surface area and porosity properties have been prepared using inorganic templates containing well defined pore sizes. The carbons have been tested in electrochemical cells as anodes in lithium secondary batteries. They deliver high specific capacity and display excellent performance in terms of the number of cycles run. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) during electrochemical cycling was carried out at the Advanced Photon Source, at ANL. In order to monitor the carbon electrode structural changes upon cycling, an electrochemical cell was specially designed to allow for the application of electrical current and the collection of SAXS data at the same time. Results show that upon cycling the structure of the carbon remains unchanged, which is desirable in reversible systems.

  18. Elucidating the Molecular Deformation Mechanism of Entangled Polymers in Fast Flow by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangyang; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis; Cheng, Shiwang; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren; Liu, Jianning; Lin, Panpan; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Understanding the viscoelastic properties of polymers is of fundamental and practical importance because of the vast and ever expanding demand of polymeric materials in daily life. Our current theoretical framework for describing the nonlinear flow behavior of entangled polymers is built upon the tube model pioneered by de Gennes, Doi, and Edwards. In this work, we critically examine the central hypothesis of the tube model for nonlinear rheology using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). While the tube model envisions a unique non-affine elastic deformation mechanism for entangled polymers, our SANS measurements show that the evolution of chain conformation of a well-entangled polystyrene melt closely follows the affine deformation mechanism in uniaxial extension, even when the Rouse Weissenberg number is much smaller than unity. This result provides a key clue for understanding the molecular deformation mechanism of entangled polymers in fast flow. Several implications from our analysis will be discussed in this talk.

  19. Clustering of water molecules in ultramicroporous carbon: In-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Contescu, Cristian I.; Rai, Durgesh K.; ...

    2016-10-19

    The adsorption of water is central to most of the applications of microporous carbon as adsorbent material. We report early kinetics of water adsorption in the microporous carbon using in-situ small-angle neutron scattering. It is observed that adsorption of water occurs via cluster formation of molecules. Interestingly, the cluster size remains constant throughout the adsorption process whereas number density of clusters increases with time. The role of surface chemistry of microporous carbon on the early kinetics of adsorption process was also investigated. Lastly, the present study provides direct experimental evidence for cluster assisted adsorption of water molecules in microporous carbonmore » (Do-Do model).« less

  20. Titanium sample holder for small-angle x-ray scattering measurements of supercritical aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Takeshi; Kusano, Kouhei; Nishikawa, Keiko; Miyagi, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Yuji; Matsuo, Hitoshi

    2001-07-01

    A titanium high-temperature sample holder for small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was newly constructed. It is applicable to aqueous solutions in the supercritical state up to 750 K and 50 MPa. The use of high-tension titanium for assemblies and high-purity titanium for gaskets enables us to apply the holder to fluids in extreme conditions such as supercritical water, supercritical aqueous solutions, and other corrosive hydrothermal aqueous solutions. Details are presented for the diamond window sealed by a flange set made of titanium. The seal is superior to the conventional unsupported-area-seal by a screw cap and plug for the titanium high-temperature sample holder. As a test of the instrument, the SAXS experiments for supercritical water were made at the isothermal condition of T=662 K with pressures from 22.8 to 29.3 MPa. The first SAXS measurements for supercritical aqueous solution were also carried out.

  1. Protein structure and interactions in the solid state studied by small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Joseph E; McAuley, Arnold; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is uniquely qualified to study the structure of proteins in liquid and solid phases that are relevant to food science and biotechnological applications. We have used SANS to study a model protein, lysozyme, in both the liquid and water ice phases to determine its gross-structure, interparticle interactions and other properties. These properties have been examined under a variety of solution conditions before, during, and after freezing. Results for lysozyme at concentrations of 50 mg mL(-1) and 100 mg mL(-1), with NaCl concentrations of 0.4 M and 0 M, respectively, both in the liquid and frozen states, are presented and implications for food science are discussed.

  2. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    DOE PAGES

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; ...

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis.more » Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.« less

  3. Small-angle Scattering Study of Mesoscopic Structures in Charged Gel and Their Evolution in Dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, M.; Annaka, M.; Hara, K.; Vigild, M. E.; Wignall, George D

    2003-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures, with length scales {approx}10{sup 2} {angstrom}, were investigated by small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) in several N-isopropylacrylamide-sodium acrylate (NIPA-SA) copolymeric hydrogels with varying [NIPA]/[SA] ratios and water contents. The SAXS experiments reveal that, depending upon the [NIPA]/[SA] ratio, the dehydrated NIPA-SA gel shows two mesoscopic structures: one consists of randomly distributed SA-rich islands in NIPA matrix, while the other is a microphase-separated structure, composed of NIPA-rich and SA-rich domains. In addition, the SANS experiments reveal the mesoscopic structural features during the dehydration process. As the concentration of the network polymers increases, NIPA-rich and water-rich domains segregate in the gel. Then, an electrostatic interaction between the segregated domains induces a microphase-separated structure in the limit of the dehydrated NIPA-SA gel.

  4. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS and V-SANS) study of asphaltene aggregates in crude oil.

    PubMed

    Headen, Thomas F; Boek, Edo S; Stellbrink, Jörg; Scheven, Ulrich M

    2009-01-06

    We report small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on two crude oils. Analysis of the high-Q SANS region has probed the asphaltene aggregates in the nanometer length scale. We find that the radius of gyration decreases with increasing temperature. We show that SANS measurements on crude oils give similar aggregate sizes to those found from SANS measurements of asphaltenes redispersed in deuterated toluene. The combined use of SANS and V-SANS on crude oil samples has allowed the determination of the radius of gyration of large scale asphaltene aggregates of approximately 0.45 microm. This has been achieved by the fitting of Beaucage functions over two size regimes. Analysis of the fitted Beaucage functions at very low-Q has shown that the large scale aggregates are not simply made by aggregation of all the smaller nanoaggregates. Instead, they are two different aggregates coexisting.

  5. Use of anomalous small angle x-ray scattering to investigate microstructural features in complex alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Weertman, J.R.

    1988-08-01

    This report covers the last 5 months of the second year of this grant and the first 8 months of the third year. The research thrust of this grant has been directed into two areas. The principal effort has been spent in an investigation of the use of anomalous small angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS) to observe changes in the microstructure of a relatively complex alloy produced by high temperature deformation or aging. The second effort involves a study of the high temperature behavior of several ferritic steels. During this past year we have been examining the effect of environment (air vs vacuum) on the high temperature strength of Fe9Cr1Mo modified by the addition of small amounts of V and Nb.

  6. Pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons near electromagnetic ion cyclotron resonances in diverging magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2017-10-01

    A theoretical study of the propagation of left-hand polarized shear Alfvén waves in spatially decreasing magnetic field geometries near the EMIC resonance, including the spectrum and amplitude of the mode converted EMIC waves and the pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons transiting the resonant region, is presented. The objective of the paper is to motivate an experimental study of the subject using the UCLA LAPD chamber. The results are relevant in exploring the possibility that shear Alfvén waves strategically injected into the radiation belts using either ionospheric heating from ground based RF transmitters or injected by transmitters based on space platforms can enhance the precipitation rate of trapped relativistic electrons. Effects of multi-ionic composition are also investigated.

  7. Scattering angle dependence of electron impact excitation: Intensity variation within a vibrational progression

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M.; Kimura, M. ); Buenker, R.J.; Hirsch, G.; Li, Y.; Chantranupong, L. )

    1995-01-22

    Intensity distributions of electronic transitions in O[sub 2] and CO within a vibrational progression resulting from electron impact excitation are studied theoretically and experimentally. The [ital multireference] [ital single]- [ital and] [ital double]-[ital excitation] [ital configuration] [ital interaction] (MRD-CI) method is used to elucidate details of selected electronic transitions. In particular, the adiabatic MRD-CI approach can account for the variation of the Franck--Condon envelope with scattering angle that has been reported for the [ital B] [sup 1][Sigma][sup +][l arrow][ital X] [sup 1][Sigma][sup +] transition in CO and also was recently observed in the [ital B][prime] [sup 3][Sigma][sup [minus

  8. A precise measurement of the weak mixing angle in neutrino-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Geralyn P.

    This dissertation reports a precise determination of the weak mixing angle, sin2 thetaW, from measurement of the ratios of neutral current to charged current neutrino deep inelastic cross sections. High statistics samples of separately collected neutrino and antineutrino events, resulting from exposure to the Fermilab neutrino beam during the period from 1996 to 1997, allowed the reduction of systematic errors associated with charm production and other sources. The final value, sin 2 thetaW(on shell) = 0.2277 +/- 0.0013 (stat) +/- 0.0009 (syst), lies three standard deviations above the standard model prediction. The measurement is currently the most precise determination of sin2 theta W in neutrino-nucleon scattering, surpassing its predecessors by a factor of two in precision. A model independent analysis recasts the same data into a measurement of effective left and right handed neutral current quark couplings.

  9. Small angle x-ray scattering and electron microscopy of nanoparticles formed in an electrical arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvou, E.; Garrec, J. L. Le; Pérez, J.; Praquin, J.; Djeddi, M.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    2013-03-01

    Small Angle X-ray Scattering has been used to characterize nanoparticles generated by electrical arcing between metallic (AgSnO2) electrodes. The particles are found to have diameters between 30 and 40 nm and display smooth surfaces suggesting that they are either in liquid form or have solidified from the liquid state. Particles collected around the electrodes were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and were seen to be much larger than those seen in the SAXS measurement, to be spherical in form and composed of silver metal with irregular tin oxide particles deposited on their surface. Mixed metal nanoparticles can have important practical applications and the use of mixed sintered electrodes may be a direct method for their production.

  10. Ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering analysis of photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abramova, V. V.; Sinitskii, A. S.; Grigor'eva, N. A.; Grigor'ev, S. V.; Belov, D. V.; Petukhov, A. V.; Mistonov, A. A.; Vasil'eva, A. V.; Tret'yakov, Yu. D.

    2009-07-15

    The results of an ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering study of iron(III) oxide inverse opal thin films are presented. The photonic crystals examined are shown to have fcc structure with amount of stacking faults varying among the samples. The method used in this study makes it possible to easily distinguish between samples with predominantly twinned fcc structure and nearly perfect fcc stacking. The difference observed between samples fabricated under identical conditions is attributed to random layer stacking in the self-assembled colloidal crystals used as templates for fabricating the inverse opals. The present method provides a versatile tool for analyzing photonic crystal structure in studies of inverse opals made of various materials, colloidal crystals, and three-dimensional photonic crystals of other types.

  11. Small-angle scattering as a tool to study the thermal denaturation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kathleen; Knott, Robert; Tonchev, Ognyan; Angelov, Dimitar; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos; Peyrard, Michel

    2014-10-01

    DNA thermal denaturation is the breaking of the base pairs, leading to a splitting of the two strands of the double helix. While it is easy to measure the fraction of open base pairs (f) vs. temperature, determining the fraction (p) of fully open molecules is much harder. Previously, the simultaneous recording of f and p could only be achieved for special sequences. We show that small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons allows the measurement of p for any sequence. We illustrate the method with a SAXS investigation of two sequences designed to exhibit different melting profiles and compare the SAXS data with nano-calorimetric measurements of the melting curve.

  12. Small-angle x-ray scattering study of polymer structure: Carbosilane dendrimers in hexane solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtykova, E. V.; Feigin, L. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Malakhova, Yu. N.; Streltsov, D. R.; Buzin, A. I.; Chvalun, S. N.; Katarzhanova, E. Yu.; Ignatieva, G. M.; Muzafarov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The three-dimensional organization of monodisperse hyper-branched macromolecules of regular structure—carbosilane dendrimers of zero, third, and sixth generations—has been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in solution. The use of modern methods of SAXS data interpretation, including ab initio modeling, has made it possible to determine the internal architecture of the dendrimers in dependence of the generation number and the number of cyclosiloxane end groups (forming the shell of dendritic macromolecules) and show dendrimers to be spherical. The structural results give grounds to consider carbosilane dendrimers promising objects for forming crystals with subsequent structural analysis and determining their structure with high resolution, as well as for designing new materials to be used in various dendrimer-based technological applications.

  13. Brain tumor imaging using small-angle x-ray scattering tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Torben H.; Bech, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; Thomsen, Maria; Menzel, Andreas; Bouchet, Audrey; Le Duc, Géraldine; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution small-angle x-ray scattering computed tomography (SAXS-CT) of soft matter and soft tissue samples. Complete SAXS patterns over extended ranges of momentum transfer are reconstructed spatially resolved from volumes inside an extended sample. Several SAXS standard samples are used to quantitatively validate the method and demonstrate its performance. Further results on biomedical tissue samples (rat brains) are presented that demonstrate the advantages of the method compared to existing biomedical x-ray imaging approaches. Functional areas of the brains as well as tumor morphology are imaged. By providing insights into the structural organization at the nano-level, SAXS-CT complements and extends results obtainable with standard methods such as x-ray absorption tomography and histology.

  14. Small angle neutron scattering study to determine the structure of high strength hydrogels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Taiki; Tirumala, Vijay R.; Lin, Eric K.; Wu, Wen-Li; Gong, Jian Ping; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Osada, Yoshihito

    2006-03-01

    Hydrogels are swollen polymer networks containing more than 90% water. Most hydrogels, however, are mechanically too weak to be used as load bearing devices. Gong et al. have overcome this problem by synthesizing hydrogels with a double network (DN) structure. Modifying the polyelectrolyte network structure by polymerization of high molecular weight uncharged polymer in situ, resulted in orders of magnitude increase in their load bearing ability. Despite 90% water, these tough gels exhibit a fracture stress of 170 kg/cm^2, similar to that of articular cartilage found in the bone-joints of human body. In this work, we determined the structure of DN-gels using small angle neutron scattering. Structural origins for high toughness found in DN-gels were then examined by comparing the structure of DN-gels with that of pure polyelectrolyte network and polyacrylamide solution.

  15. A stress-controlled shear cell for small-angle light scattering and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, S.; Ramos, L.; Fromental, J. M.; Prévot, G.; Jelinek, R.; Cipelletti, L.

    2016-12-01

    We develop and test a stress-controlled, parallel plates shear cell that can be coupled to an optical microscope or a small angle light scattering setup, for simultaneous investigation of the rheological response and the microscopic structure of soft materials under an imposed shear stress. In order to minimize friction, the cell is based on an air bearing linear stage, the stress is applied through a contactless magnetic actuator, and the strain is measured through optical sensors. We discuss the contributions of inertia and of the small residual friction to the measured signal and demonstrate the performance of our device in both oscillating and step stress experiments on a variety of viscoelastic materials.

  16. NOTE: Characterization of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma using low-angle x-ray scattering signatures of serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Desouky, Omar S.; Mohammed, Mohammed S.; Elsayed, Anwar A.; El-houseini, Motawa E.

    2003-09-01

    The diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually occurs at late stages in the disease when there are few effective treatment options. The measurement of the concentration of tumour markers in the serum of patients is a complementary tool frequently used for the interpretation of diagnostic imaging results. It is also used as a prognostic tool for the detection of cancer. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of tumour markers is still low and many times it yields normal results for cirrhotic and HCC patients. In the current work, the detection possibility of the structural changes in serum proteins accompanying cirrhosis and HCC is investigated using a low-angle x-ray scattering (LAXS) technique. The results show that there are significant differences in the LAXS profiles of cirrhosis and HCC lyophilized serum samples compared to normal. The changes in shape, total counts and position of the first scattering peak at 4.8°, which was previously reported to be sensitive to the structural changes in protein, showed the most characteristic deviations from normal serum. The present results are promising and would offer a potentially helpful complementary tool for monitoring cirrhosis and HCC.

  17. The structure of Sindbis virus produced from vertebrate and invertabrate hosts determined by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lilin; Piper, Amanda; Meilleur, Flora; Myles, Dean A A; Hernandez, Raquel; Brown, Dennis; Heller, William T

    2010-01-01

    The complex natural cycle of vectored viruses that transition between host species, such as between insects and mammals, makes understanding the full life cycle of the virus an incredibly complex problem. Sindbis virus, an arbovirus and prototypic alphavirus having an inner protein shell and an outer glycoprotein coat separated by a lipid membrane, is one example of a vectored virus that transitions between vertebrate and insect hosts. While evidence of host-specific differences in Sindbis virus has been observed, no work has been performed to characterize the impact of the host species on the structure of the virus. Here, we report the first study of the structural differences between Sindbis viruses grown in mammalian and insect cells, which were determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), a nondestructive technique that did not decrease the infectivity of the Sindbis virus particles studied. The scattering data and modeling showed that, while the radial position of the lipid bilayer did not change significantly, it was possible to conclude that it did have significantly more cholesterol when the virus was grown in mammalian cells. Additionally, the outer protein coat was found to be more extended in the mammalian Sindbis virus. The SANS data also demonstrated that the RNA and nucleocapsid protein share a closer interaction in the mammalian-cell-grown virus than in the virus from insect cells.

  18. Spatial distribution of intra-molecular water and polymeric components in polyelectrolyte dendrimers revealed by small angle scattering investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Chen, Wei-Ren; Herwig, Kenneth W; Hong, Kunlun; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily; Liu, Yun; Smith, Gregory Scott; Wu, Bin; Yang, Jun; Do, Changwoo

    2011-01-01

    An experimental scheme using contrast variation small angle neutron scattering technique (SANS), is developed to investigate the structural characteristics of amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM) solutions. The focus is placed on understanding the dependence of intra-dendrimer water and polymer distribution on molecular protonation, which can be precisely adjusted by tuning the pH value of solution. Assuming the spherical symmetry in the spatial arrangement of the constituent component of dendrimer, and the atomic ratio of hydrogen-to-deuterium for the solvent residing within the cavities of dendrimer is identical to that for the solvent outside dendrimer, the intra-dendrimer water distribution along the radial direction can be determined based on the model of coherent scattering cross section developed in this work. Moreover, our result clearly reveals an outward relocation of the peripheral groups, as well as the enhanced intra-dendrimer hydration, upon increasing the molecular protonation and therefore allows the determination of segmental backfolding in a quantitative manner. The connection between these charge-induced structural changes and our recently observed progressively active segmental dynamics is also discussed.

  19. Investigation on the structure of water/AOT/IPM/alcohols reverse micelles by conductivity, dynamic light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Chen, Yingjun; Liu, Jiexiang; Zhao, Chuanzhuang; Zhang, Haijiao

    2012-03-29

    We have systematically investigated the effect of alcohols (ethanol, propanol, butanol, and pentanol) on the structure of the water/AOT/IPM system using conductivity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The results show that no percolation phenomenon is observed in the water/AOT/IPM system, whereas the addition of ethanol (propanol and butanol) induces apparently percolation. The threshold water content (W(p)) depends closely on the alcohol type and concentration. The effect of alcohols on the conductance behavior is discussed from the physical properties of alcohols, the interfacial flexibility, and the attractive interactions between droplets. The hydrodynamic diameter of droplets (d(H)) obtained from DLS increases markedly with the increase in water content (W(0)); however, it decreases gradually with increasing alcohol chain length and concentration. SAXS measurements display distinctly the shoulder, the low hump peaks, and the heavy tail phenomenon in the pair distance distribution function p(r) profile, which rely strongly on the alcohol species and its concentration. The gyration radius (R(g)) increases with increasing W(0), and decreases with the increase of alcohol chain length and concentration. Schematic diagram of the conductance mechanism of water/AOT/IPM/alcohol systems is primarily depicted. Three different phases of the discrete droplets, the oligomers, and the isolated ellipsoidal droplets existed in the different W(0) ranges correspond to three different stages in the conductivity-W(0) curve. Coupling the structure characteristics of reverse micelles obtained from DLS and SAXS techniques with conductivity could be greatly helpful to deeply understand the percolation mechanism of water/AOT/IPM/alcohols systems.

  20. A triple axis double crystal multiple reflection camera for ultra small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambard, Jacques; Lesieur, Pierre; Zemb, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    To extend the domain of small angle X-ray scattering requires multiple reflection crystals to collimate the beam. A double crystal, triple axis X-ray camera using multiple reflection channel cut crystals is described. Procedures for measuring the desmeared scattering cross-section on absolute scale are described as well as the measurement from several typical samples : fibrils of collagen, 0.3 μm diameter silica spheres, 0.16 μm diameter interacting latex spheres, porous lignite coal, liquid crystals in a surfactant-water system, colloidal crystal of 0.32 μm diameter silica spheres. L'extension du domaine de diffusion des rayons-X vers les petits angles demande l'emploi de cristaux à réflexions multiples pour collimater le faisceau. Nous décrivons une caméra à rayons-X à trois axes où les réflexions multiples sont réalisées dans deux cristaux à gorge. Nous donnons ensuite les procédures de déconvolution pour obtenir la section efficace de diffusion en échelle absolue, ainsi que les résultats des mesures effectuées avec plusieurs échantillons typiques : fibres de collagène, sphères de silice de 0,3 μm de diamètre, sphères de latex de 0,16 μm de diamètre en interaction, charbon lignite poreux, cristaux liquides formés dans un système eau-tensioactif, solution colloïdale de sphères de silice de 0,32 μm de diamètre.