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Sample records for angling sport

  1. Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein

    SciTech Connect

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-05-01

    Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

  2. The First Sports Medicine Books in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Allan J.

    The modern history of sports medicine is chronicled in a discussion of the first writings in English on sports medicine. What may have been the first writing in English is a section on first aid in the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SPORT, published in England in 1898. It describes injuries commonly sustained in angling, boxing, cricket, cycling, football,…

  3. Sports Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubaugh, Karl

    2003-01-01

    Lists the following 10 tips for improved sports writing in high school publications: reporting comes before writing; do not try to do too much; show, do not tell; do not do game stories; avoid cliches; avoid "jock-talk"; use the drama of sports; do not write the obvious story; sports is also news; and read great sports writing. (PM)

  4. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  5. Sports Safety

    MedlinePlus

    Playing sports can be fun, but it can also be dangerous if you are not careful. You can help ... you are healthy before you start playing your sport Wearing the right shoes, gear, and equipment Drinking ...

  6. Sport Biomechanist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2005-01-01

    If you are an athlete or sports enthusiast, you know that every second counts. To find that 1-2% improvement that can make the difference between 1st and 5th place, sport biomechanists use science to investigate sports techniques and equipment, seeking ways to improve athlete performance and reduce injury risk. In essence, they want athletes to…

  7. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process.

  8. [Sport medicine].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram

    2012-02-01

    It is only since the late 20th century that Sport and Exercise Medicine has emerged as a distinct entity in health care. In Israel, sports medicine is regulated by a State Law and a sport physician is certified after graduating a structured program. In the past, sports medicine was related to the diagnosis and treatment of injuries encountered by top athletes. In recent years, the scope of sport medicine has broadened to reflect the awareness of modern society of the dangers of physical inactivity. In this perspective the American College of Sport Medicine (ACSM) recently launched a program--"Exercise is Medicine", to promote physical activity in order to improve health and well-being and prevention of diseases through physical activity prescriptions. This program is from doctors and healthcare providers, adjusted to the patient or trainee. The sport physician does not replace a medical specialist, but having a thorough understanding about the etiology of a sport-related injury enables him to better focus on treatment and prevention. Therefore, Team Physicians in Elite Sport often play a role regarding not only the medical care of athletes, but also in the physiological monitoring of the athlete and correcting aberrations, to achieve peak physical performance. The broad spectrum of issues in sport and exercise medicine cannot be completely covered in one issue of the Journal. Therefore, the few reports that are presented to enhance interest and understanding in the broad spectrum of issues in sports and exercise medicine are only the tip of the iceberg.

  9. Sports dentistry.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajiv

    2011-07-01

    Sports dentistry is one of the most recent and upcoming field in dentistry. It mainly includes the prevention and management of athletics-related orofacial injuries and associated oral diseases. The sports or team dentist assists athletes in the prevention, treatment, and diagnosis of oral injuries. The most significant aspect in preventing sports-related orofacial injuries is wearing basic protective devices such as properly-fitting helmets, face masks and/or mouth guards. Dental injuries are the most common type of orofacial injury sustained during participation in sports. Many athletes are not aware of the health implications of a traumatic injury to the mouth or of the potential for incurring severe head and orofacial injuries while playing. The dentist can play an imperative role in informing athletes, coaches and patients about the importance of preventing orofacial injuries in sports. The aim of this paper is to increase professional awareness and interest for orientation toward sports dentistry. PMID:22639498

  10. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process. PMID:27544982

  11. Teaching Sport as History, History through Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Robert F.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate history course based on two themes: sport as a reflection of society and sport as a socializing agent affecting society. The course focuses on sports and industrialization, traditional and modern sports, political and economic aspects of sport, and inequality and discrimination in sports. (Author/JK)

  12. Sports Physicals

    MedlinePlus

    ... stronger athlete. previous continue When & Where Should I Go for a Sports Physical? Some people go to their own doctor for a sports physical; ... one at school. During school physicals, you may go to half a dozen or so "stations" set ...

  13. Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Health, Jefferson City.

    This guide deals with various aspects of sports and nutrition. Twelve chapters are included: (1) "Sports and Nutrition"; (2) "Eat to Compete"; (3) "Fit Folks Need Fit Food"; (4) "The Food Guide Pyramid"; (5) "Fat Finder's Guide"; (6) "Pre- and Post-Event Meals"; (7) "Tips for the Diabetic Athlete"; (8) "Pinning Down Your Optimal Weight"; (9)…

  14. Sports Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... specialist. The doc will be able to offer alternatives to supplements based on your body and sport. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: January 2015 previous 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Sports Center Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype? A ...

  15. Sport Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkhouse, Bonnie L., Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Traditional teaching and coaching positions have become scarce but the expanding field of sport management has created its own job market, demanding new skills and preparation. Three articles are offered that explore different aspects and possibilities for a sport management career. (DF)

  16. Sports Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... motivator. Physically, you need strength and endurance. Your training will vary with your sport. You would not ... for swimming. You might, however, cross train. Cross training simply means that you include a variety of ...

  17. Sport Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotee, March L.

    1980-01-01

    Sport psychology is defined in terms of human behavior in athletic situations. The psychosocial cross-cultural setting provides a model for studying trait and state psychosocial attributes and suggests issues and concerns for further study. (JMF)

  18. Team Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... played for almost seventy years, originated by World War II vets in rehab on the East and ... with a physical disability. Activities include winter skiing, water sports, summer and winter competitions, fitness and special ...

  19. Sports and Concussions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of all sports, not just contact sports like football and hockey. As long as people play sports, ... sports, such as: helmet-to-helmet tackles in football getting checked against the boards in hockey heading ...

  20. Sport Progressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clumpner, Roy A.

    This book, which is primarily for secondary physical education teachers, presents a sequential approach to teaching skills that are essential to eight sports. The activities and lead-up games included in the book put beginning students directly into game-like situations where they can practice skills. Each chapter begins with a background of the…

  1. Sports Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for sports marketing. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 999 specialty key indicators for evaluating mastery of 113 competencies in…

  2. Racquet Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebas, Carole J., Ed.; Groppel, Jack L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    In six articles on racquet sports, the origins of the games are traced, methods for teaching skills such as footwork, racquetball strategy, and badminton techniques are discussed, and the biomechanics of the one- and two-handed backhand in tennis are reviewed. Information about paddle tennis is included. (PP)

  3. Racket sports.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, Neeru; Esser, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Tennis may be considered a static and dynamic form of exercise with many well-demonstrated health benefits. Tennis has similar rates of injury to other individual recreational sports and junior competitive sports, without the catastrophic risk of contact/collision sports. Classifying tennis players into junior and elite categories versus adult recreational players may help in outlining volume of play recommendations, exposure risk, and types of injuries. Junior and elite players tend to tolerate higher volumes, have more acute and lower extremity injuries, and have more serious overuse stress injuries. Adult recreational players tend to tolerate lower volumes, have more overuse and upper extremity injuries, and more conditions that are degenerative. Many tennis players also develop asymmetric musculoskeletal adaptations, which may increase risk of specific injury. Tennis-specific evaluations may identify these at-risk segments, help guide preventive strategies including technical errors, and assist in developing return-to-play recommendations. Other racket sports such as squash, badminton, and racquetball have less data available but report both acute and traumatic injuries less commonly seen in tennis.

  4. Sports Ballistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This review describes and classifies the trajectories of sports projectiles that have spherical symmetry, cylindrical symmetry, or (almost) no symmetry. This classification allows us to discuss the large diversity observed in the paths of spherical balls, the flip properties of shuttlecocks, and the optimal position and stability of ski jumpers.

  5. Sport-Related Maxillo-Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ruslin, Muhammad; Boffano, Paolo; ten Brincke, Y J D; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Brand, Henk S

    2016-01-01

    Sports and exercise are important causes of maxillofacial injuries. Different types of sports might differ in frequency and type of fractures. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible relation between the types of sport practiced and the frequency and nature of the facial bone fractures of patients presenting in an oral and maxillofacial surgery department of a Dutch university center. This study is based on an analysis of patient records containing maxillofacial fractures sustained between January 1, 2000 and April 1, 2014 at the Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center (VUmc) in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The present study comprised data from 108 patients with 128 maxillofacial fractures. Seventy-nine percent of the patients were male and 21% were female. The patients ranged in age from 10 to 64 years old with a mean age of 30.6 ± 12.0. The highest incidence of sport-related maxillofacial fractures occurred in individuals between the ages of 20 and 29. The most common sport-related fractures were zygoma complex fractures, followed by mandible fractures. Soccer and hockey were the most prominent causes of sport-related maxillofacial trauma in the present study. Coronoid process fractures were only observed in soccer players and not in other sports groups. Mandible angle fractures were relatively more frequent in rugby than in other sports. The results of this study suggest a relation between type of sport and the nature and frequency of the fractures it causes.

  6. Sport-Related Maxillo-Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ruslin, Muhammad; Boffano, Paolo; ten Brincke, Y J D; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Brand, Henk S

    2016-01-01

    Sports and exercise are important causes of maxillofacial injuries. Different types of sports might differ in frequency and type of fractures. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible relation between the types of sport practiced and the frequency and nature of the facial bone fractures of patients presenting in an oral and maxillofacial surgery department of a Dutch university center. This study is based on an analysis of patient records containing maxillofacial fractures sustained between January 1, 2000 and April 1, 2014 at the Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center (VUmc) in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The present study comprised data from 108 patients with 128 maxillofacial fractures. Seventy-nine percent of the patients were male and 21% were female. The patients ranged in age from 10 to 64 years old with a mean age of 30.6 ± 12.0. The highest incidence of sport-related maxillofacial fractures occurred in individuals between the ages of 20 and 29. The most common sport-related fractures were zygoma complex fractures, followed by mandible fractures. Soccer and hockey were the most prominent causes of sport-related maxillofacial trauma in the present study. Coronoid process fractures were only observed in soccer players and not in other sports groups. Mandible angle fractures were relatively more frequent in rugby than in other sports. The results of this study suggest a relation between type of sport and the nature and frequency of the fractures it causes. PMID:26703035

  7. Sports-specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Minnich, J M

    1996-04-01

    Injuries to the upper extremities can happen in any sport. Injury patterns are common to specific sports. Understanding which injuries occur with these sports allows the examiner to diagnose and treat the athlete easily. This article reviews some of the injuries common in sports such as bicycling, golf, gymnastics, martial arts, racquet sports, and weightlifting.

  8. Sports Medicine Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Allan J.

    1978-01-01

    Includes a general discussion of sports medicine including exercise and conditioning techniques, prevention of illness and injury, treatment of and rehabilitation after sports injury, and the future of sports medicine. (BB)

  9. Sports cream overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Sports creams are creams or ointments used to treat aches and pains. Sports cream overdose can occur if someone uses this ... Two ingredients in sports creams that can be poisonous are: Menthol Methyl salicylate

  10. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  11. Sport for All. Low Cost Sports Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This report of the conference on low-cost sports halls, sponsored by the Council of Europe, is divided into two sections: technical studies and conclusions. The introduction to the report provides an overview of the long-term program of the Council of Europe with regard to sport for all and a discussion of multipurpose sports halls. Sociocultural,…

  12. Returning to sports after a back injury

    MedlinePlus

    Back injury - returning to sports; Sciatica - returning to sports; Herniated disc - returning to sports; Herniated disk - returning to sports; Spinal stenosis - returning to sports; Back pain - returning ...

  13. Microforms and Sport History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Explores the importance of sport history as it reflects the social and cultural history of the United States. Discussion covers the various sport history materials that are available in microform, including the Spalding Collection, twentieth-century microfilm sources, and sports and social history (Sports Periodicals microfilm series). (EJS)

  14. Sports Medicine in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

    This report on a visit to the People's Republic of China in April 1985 to explore methodology of sports science research, treatment of injuries, and role of sports in everyday life discusses the following topics: (1) introduction to China; (2) sports and physical culture; (3) sports medicine and rehabilitation; (4) health factors; (5) cost of…

  15. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  16. Building Character through Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Sports are a focus of millions of Americans as they attend, view, and participate in sports. The World Series, Final Four, and Super Bowl often bring back memories of fun-filled parties and celebrations, but there may be several reasons why sports are so popular in the United States. The popularity of sports, however, does not necessarily mean it…

  17. Sports dentistry: A review.

    PubMed

    Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Singamaneni, Vijaya Kumar; Rao, Saketh Rama; Karthikeyan, Jamini

    2014-12-01

    Dental trauma in sports is the major linking channel between sports and dentistry. Sports dentistry is the prevention of oral/facial athletic injuries and related oral diseases and manifestations. In children, sports activities were found to be responsible for 13% of overall oral trauma. It is emphasized that there is a great need for "Team Dentist" from high schools to professional teams. In this review, we discuss the relationship between sports and dentistry, and the importance of educating parents, teachers, and children in prevention of injuries related to the sports.

  18. Sports dentistry: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Singamaneni, Vijaya Kumar; Rao, Saketh Rama; Karthikeyan, Jamini

    2014-01-01

    Dental trauma in sports is the major linking channel between sports and dentistry. Sports dentistry is the prevention of oral/facial athletic injuries and related oral diseases and manifestations. In children, sports activities were found to be responsible for 13% of overall oral trauma. It is emphasized that there is a great need for “Team Dentist” from high schools to professional teams. In this review, we discuss the relationship between sports and dentistry, and the importance of educating parents, teachers, and children in prevention of injuries related to the sports. PMID:25625070

  19. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  20. [Violence in Sports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degelman, Charles, Ed.; Hayes, Bill, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This teaching resource presents articles that draw on young people's natural interest in sports to stimulate their involvement in law-related education. An article on violence in sports explores the causes of this violence--the physical contact inherent in many sports, the desire to win at all costs, the urging of coaches, and the negligence of…

  1. Sport for Older Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    The following papers were prepared for a seminar on sport for older people: (1) "Gerontological Aspects of Physical Exercise" (Eino Heikkinen); (2) "Sporting Activities in the Individual Life from the View of Older Persons" (Henning Allmer); (3) "Reasons Why Decision-Makers Should Urge Old People to Practise Physical and Sporting Activities"…

  2. Sport Education: A Retrospective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedentop, Daryl

    2002-01-01

    Provides a history of the development of a curriculum and instruction model called Sport Education (which provides authentic, educationally rich sport experiences in the context of school physical education), reviewing theoretical and practical connections of Sport Education to other curricular and instructional models and exploring issues related…

  3. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  4. Sport Specialization, Part I

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Jayanthi, Neeru; Difiori, John P.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Logerstedt, David; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: There is increased growth in sports participation across the globe. Sports specialization patterns, which include year-round training, participation on multiple teams of the same sport, and focused participation in a single sport at a young age, are at high levels. The need for this type of early specialized training in young athletes is currently under debate. Evidence Acquisition: Nonsystematic review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Conclusion: Sports specialization is defined as year-round training (greater than 8 months per year), choosing a single main sport, and/or quitting all other sports to focus on 1 sport. Specialized training in young athletes has risks of injury and burnout, while the degree of specialization is positively correlated with increased serious overuse injury risk. Risk factors for injury in young athletes who specialize in a single sport include year-round single-sport training, participation in more competition, decreased age-appropriate play, and involvement in individual sports that require the early development of technical skills. Adults involved in instruction of youth sports may also put young athletes at risk for injury by encouraging increased intensity in organized practices and competition rather than self-directed unstructured free play. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): C. PMID:26502420

  5. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Publications Toggle American Journal of Sports Medicine Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine Journal Apps Sports Medicine Update Other Professional ...

  6. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure.

  7. Sports eyewear protective standards.

    PubMed

    Dain, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Eye injuries sustained during sport comprise up to 20 per cent of all injuries to the eye serious enough for medical attention to be sought. The prevalence of eye injuries in sport is not easily assessed due to lack of authoritative participation rates, so most studies report total numbers in a time period. The evidence on the proportion of all ocular injuries that are from sport is reviewed. The relative frequencies in different sports are compared in a qualitative manner and the sports with greater numbers of ocular injuries are detailed. In common with occupational injuries to the eye, most sports eye injuries are considered preventable. The hierarchy of action for occupational risk is detailed and adapted to use in a sports scenario. All the available international, regional and national standards on sports eye protection are detailed and their provisions compared. The major function of the standards is to provide adequate protection against the hazard of the sport concerned. These are detailed and compared as a function of energy transfer. Eye protection must not introduce additional or secondary hazards (for instance, fracturing into sharp fragments on impact) and not introduce features that would deter the wearing of eye protection (for instance, restricting field of view to impede playing the sport). The provisions of the standards intended to limit secondary hazards are detailed and compared. The need for future work in standards writing and the activities of the International Standardization Organization in sports eye protection are detailed.

  8. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) developed a musculoskeletal ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships in 2010. As the use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound in sports medicine has evolved, it became clear that the curriculum needed to be updated. Furthermore, the name 'musculoskeletal ultrasound' was changed to 'sports ultrasound' (SPORTS US) to reflect the broad range of diagnostic and interventional applications of ultrasound in sports medicine. This document was created to outline the core competencies of SPORTS US and to provide sports medicine fellowship directors and others interested in SPORTS US education with a guide to create a SPORTS US curriculum. By completing this SPORTS US curriculum, sports medicine fellows and physicians can attain proficiency in the core competencies of SPORTS US required for the practice of sports medicine.

  9. Junior Sport and the Evolution of Sport Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedentop, Daryl

    2002-01-01

    Addresses junior sport and sport culture in New Zealand, recommending that it receive serious consideration for its crucial role in the future of New Zealand's sport culture. The paper presents three goals for junior sport programs (educative, public health, and elite development), describes characteristics of junior sport (e.g., youth want to…

  10. Comparison of eSports and Traditional Sports Consumption Motives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Donghun; Schoenstedt, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    With recognition of the need for studying eSports in this interactive digital communication era, this study explored 14 motivational factors affecting the time spent on eSports gaming. Using a sample of 515 college students and athletic event attendees, we further compared eSports game patterns to their non-eSport or traditional sport involvements…

  11. Fun First! Sports for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanters, Michael A.; Tebbutt, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    Outlines the foundation for a new national program, Fun First! Sports for Kids, designed to help grassroots sports leagues work with and get the most out of sport parents, noting that parents have a great impact on a child's sport experience. The article also provides recommendations for actions that sport league administrators can take to…

  12. Ethics in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

    2007-05-01

    Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues.

  13. Olympic Information in the SPORT Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belna, Alison M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Profiles the SPORT database, produced by Sport Information Resource Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, which provides extensive coverage of individual sports including practice, training and equipment, recreation, sports medicine, physical education, sport facilities, and international sport history. Olympic coverage in SPORT, sports sciences, online…

  14. Confidentiality in Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Dominic

    2016-04-01

    This article synthesizes existing literature to provide a summary of the ethical issues concerning patient confidentiality in sport. It outlines the medical principle of confidentiality and identifies cross-cultural ethicolegal variations that shape its implementation. Clinicians' multiple obligations, physical environments, and practice and policy contexts are discussed, and research detailing experiences of maintaining patient confidentiality in sport is reviewed. Policy recommendations for enhancing compliance with this ethical principle are summarized. It is argued that the context of sport exacerbates pressures on clinicians to break patient confidentiality, breaches occur regularly, and interventions are required to enhance ethical compliance in sports medicine.

  15. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels!

  16. Eating Disorders and Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Moriarty, Mary

    Since sports can sometimes lend themselves to eating disorders, coaches and sports administrators must get involved in the detection and treatment of this problem. While no reliable studies or statistics exist on the incidence of anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia among athletes, some research suggests that such disorders occur frequently among…

  17. Being Human in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dorothy J.; Fahey, Brian W.

    The structure of humanness as the unique and essential being of the individual, constantly emerging through experience and the actualization of human potential within the sports environment, is the central theme of this book. Sport is defined broadly to include all forms of physical activity experiences. Each chapter represents an inquiry unique…

  18. Listening to Sports Idioms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirkus, Tom; Bohlken, Bob

    In the book, "Talking from 9 to 5," Deborah Tannen suggests that females have difficulty listening to males in the workplace because of the masculine inclination to talk sports the majority of the time. Men use sports idioms, metaphors, and cliches, making business a "peculiar language" which excludes "naive" listeners, females. To test the…

  19. Sports-related concussions.

    PubMed

    Conder, Robert L; Conder, Alanna A

    2015-04-01

    Concussions are an inherent part of collision sports such as football and soccer. As a subset of traumatic brain injury, concussions are neurometabolic events that cause transient neurologic dysfunction. Following a concussion, some athletes require longer neurologic recovery than others. Education and intervention aimed at prevention and management can minimize the long-term sequelae of sports-related concussions.

  20. Sport Heroes in Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Doris R.

    This paper reports the findings of a study of the role of sports in the lives of U.S. Congressmen and focuses attention on six gifted athletes for whom sports provided preparation for government service. The word "hero" as used in this paper refers to former members of Congress who were admired for their athletic prowess and for their political…

  1. Sport in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals of the Universities of the United Kingdom, London.

    This publication discusses the future of university sport development in the United Kingdom in response to a report of the Department for National Heritage calling for revitalization of British sport at all levels. This report integrates findings and recommendations of a special task force, a government working party, and consultation papers of…

  2. Sports Subsidies Soar. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toma, J. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Doug Lederman's article, "Sports Subsidies Soar," discusses the issue on institutional subsidies for sports program. His article invites an obvious question: why are so many universities willing to subsidize athletics through either a direct transfer of institutional funds, assessing a dedicated student fee, or a combination of these? This…

  3. Mathematics and Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallian, Joseph A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Mathematics and Sports", edited by Joseph A. Gallian, gathers 25 articles that illuminate the power and role of mathematics in the worlds of professional and recreational play. Divided into sections by the kind of sports, the book offers source materials for classroom use and student projects. Readers will encounter mathematical ideas from an…

  4. Superstition in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, C. Jane; Petrie, Brian M.

    The introduction of this investigation into superstitions of athletes reviews past research on the subject. It is stated, though, that general research on superstitions mentions little directly related to sports; so, by necessity, recourse is made to sports stories and newspaper and magazine articles. The main body of this paper presents results…

  5. Sports injuries and society.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Injuries are classified and examples of the ways in which they can arise are given. Treatment, rehabilitation and the value of exercise are considered. A review of the effects of increasing leisure time and sports have been given, the value of legislation, education, protective clothing and close supervision in preventing the occurrence of injuries in sport is discussed. Images p80-a PMID:7248691

  6. Psychological Dynamics of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L.

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the branch of sport and exercise science that focuses on the psychological aspects of human behavior. Part I presents a general orientation to the field, including an introduction and description of sport psychology and a discussion of the history and current status of the field. Individual differences…

  7. Hazards of alpine sport.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M

    1991-07-01

    Alpine sports in Australia include downhill skiing, cross country skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling and tobogganing. Despite a popular impression that the sport is risky the injury rate is low and there has been a large decrease in injuries relative to increased participation in the past 20 years. Nevertheless, more young skiers are sustaining injuries, many of which could be avoided.

  8. Saga of American Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A.; Smith, Ronald A.

    This history of sports and athletic activities in America covers a time span from the close of the sixteenth century to the present time. It is divided into three major sections. The first, "Colonial and Early American Sport," narrates the early moral and ethical attitudes of the Puritans and follows the changes in attitudes and introduction of…

  9. Parents and Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanters, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that parents play a critical role in their children's sports and should not be excluded, despite negative press about some "pushy" parents. The paper recommends that youth administrators encourage positive parental involvement in youth sports by acknowledging the important role that each parent plays and empowering them to do the right…

  10. The Aesthetic in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, David

    This paper examines the relationship between sport and the aesthetic. It traces the logical character of the concept of the aesthetic as it applies to sport. A salient characteristic of the concept of the aesthetic is revealed by examining the aesthetic in relation to works of art, and this is then applied to the consideration of sporting…

  11. Overview of sports vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Linda A.; Ferreira, Jannie T.

    2003-03-01

    Sports vision encompasses the visual assessment and provision of sports-specific visual performance enhancement and ocular protection for athletes of all ages, genders and levels of participation. In recent years, sports vision has been identified as one of the key performance indicators in sport. It is built on four main cornerstones: corrective eyewear, protective eyewear, visual skills enhancement and performance enhancement. Although clinically well established in the US, it is still a relatively new area of optometric specialisation elsewhere in the world and is gaining increasing popularity with eyecare practitioners and researchers. This research is often multi-disciplinary and involves input from a variety of subject disciplines, mainly those of optometry, medicine, physiology, psychology, physics, chemistry, computer science and engineering. Collaborative research projects are currently underway between staff of the Schools of Physics and Computing (DIT) and the Academy of Sports Vision (RAU).

  12. Sports: The Infectious Hazards.

    PubMed

    Minooee, Arezou; Wang, Jeff; Gupta, Geeta K

    2015-10-01

    Although the medical complications of sports are usually traumatic in nature, infectious hazards also arise. While blood-borne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, cause significant illness, the risk of acquiring these agents during sporting activities is minimal. Skin infections are more commonplace, arising from a variety of microbial agents including bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Sports involving water contact can lead to enteric infections, eye infections, or disseminated infections such as leptospirosis. Mumps, measles, and influenza are vaccine-preventable diseases that have been transmitted during sporting events, both in players and in spectators. Prevention is the key to many of these infections. Players should be vaccinated and should not participate in sports if their infection can be spread by contact, airborne, or droplet transmission.

  13. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  14. Examining elite Parasport athletes with sport involvement and sports equipment.

    PubMed

    Hambrick, Marion E; Hums, Mary A; Bower, Glenna G; Wolff, Eli A

    2015-01-01

    Elite athletes require the most advanced sports equipment to maintain their competitive edge, but manufacturers cannot always satisfy these athletes' specific equipment needs. Sport involvement can influence sports-equipment selections and is described as the process by which individuals rely on attitudes and belief systems to make sports-related consumption decisions. This study involved semistructured interviews with 5 elite Parasport athletes to identify and analyze the role of sport involvement in their selection of sports equipment. The results revealed that the athletes identified product limitations, created a collaborative environment, and promoted a culture of innovation to develop new sports products and address existing limitations. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  15. [Sport and health].

    PubMed

    Pène, Pierre; Touitou, Yvan

    2009-02-01

    The report of the National Academy of Medicine named "Sport and Health" underlines the medical, social and educational dimensions of sporting activities. Various kinds of sporting practices are described: they concern the approximately 7,000 high level athletes, around 8,000 professional (licensed) sportsmen, and sporting club members (approximately 15 millions people). A large number of amateurs do not practice in any structure and therefore are neither managed in their activities nor medically followed. Some characteristics of sporting practice at various stages of life have been documented. Around 50% of the teenagers from 12 to 17 years have a sporting practice out-of-school besides the weekly three hours applied at school or college; however, the withdrawal of sporting practice by a high number of teenagers results in a sedentary lifestyle with overweight and obesity, major risks factors for health. Elderly people take a profit from a regular and medically controlled physical activity. Functional capacities are thus improved, cardiovascular risks factors among other, which results in better quality of life of the aged and delays their dependence. The benefit upon public health of sporting practice has been pointed out in the primary prevention of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes, breast and colon cancer, and mood disturbances. It is currently well acknowledged that sporting practice is an important component of public health in both primary and secondary prevention of many diseases. Deleterious effects of which the most serious is the sudden death related to a cardiovascular anomaly, which generally occurs during an important physical effort. An important sport drift is the practice of doping to improve performances through the use of hormones, anabolics, EPO, transfusions, ... When a person exceeds his/her capacities of adaptation, because of a badly adapted or a too intense drive, this overtraining results in a

  16. The Development of Sports Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Ivan

    1996-01-01

    The development of sports medicine was influenced by medicalization and increasing competitiveness in modern sport, with sports physicians helping to develop performance enhancing drugs and techniques. This paper discusses sports medicine and drug use in Eastern European countries, early development of anabolic steroids in the United States, and…

  17. [Sport for pacemaker patients].

    PubMed

    Israel, C W

    2012-06-01

    Sport activity is an important issue in many patients with a pacemaker either because they performed sport activities before pacemaker implantation to reduce the cardiovascular risk or to improve the course of an underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. coronary artery disease, heart failure) by sports. Compared to patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) the risks from underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. ischemia, heart failure), arrhythmia, lead dysfunction or inappropriate therapy are less important or absent. Sport is contraindicated in dyspnea at rest, acute heart failure, new complex arrhythmia, acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction, valvular disease with indications for intervention and surgery and comorbidities which prevent physical activity. Patients with underlying cardiovascular disease (including hypertension) should preferably perform types and levels of physical activity that are aerobic (with dynamic exercise) such as running, swimming, cycling instead of sport with high anaerobic demands and high muscular workload. In heart failure, studies demonstrated advantages of isometric sport that increases the amount of muscle, thereby preventing cardiac cachexia. Sport with a risk of blows to the chest or physical contact (e.g. boxing, rugby, martial arts) should be avoided. Implantation, programming and follow-up should respect specific precautions to allow optimal physical activity with a pacemaker including implantation of bipolar leads on the side contralateral to the dominant hand, individual programming of the upper sensor and tracking rate and regular exercise testing. PMID:22854824

  18. Genetics & sport: bioethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Miah, Andy

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues pertaining to the use of genetic insights and techniques in sport. Initially, it considers a range of scientific findings that have stimulated debate about the ethical issues associated with genetics applied to sport. It also outlines some of the early policy responses to these discoveries from world leading sports organizations, along with knowledge about actual use of gene technologies in sport. Subsequently, it considers the challenges with distinguishing between therapeutic use and human enhancement within genetic science, which is a particularly important issue for the world of sport. Next, particular attention is given to the use of genetic information, which raises questions about the legitimacy and reliability of genetic tests, along with the potential public value of having DNA databanks to economize in health care. Finally, the ethics of gene transfer are considered, inviting questions into the values of sport and humanity. It argues that, while gene modification may seem conceptually similar to other forms of doping, the requirements upon athletes are such that new forms of enhancement become increasingly necessary to discover. Insofar as genetic science is able to create safer, more effective techniques of human modification, then it may be an appealing route through which to modify athletes to safeguard the future of elite sports as enterprises of human excellence. PMID:22830450

  19. Nutrition for winter sports.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Nanna L; Manore, Melinda M; Helle, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Winter sports are played in cold conditions on ice or snow and often at moderate to high altitude. The most important nutritional challenges for winter sport athletes exposed to environmental extremes include increased energy expenditure, accelerated muscle and liver glycogen utilization, exacerbated fluid loss, and increased iron turnover. Winter sports, however, vary greatly regarding their nutritional requirements due to variable physiological and physique characteristics, energy and substrate demands, and environmental training and competition conditions. What most winter sport athletes have in common is a relatively lean physique and high-intensity training periods, thus they require greater energy and nutrient intakes, along with adequate food and fluid before, during, and after training. Event fuelling is most challenging for cross-country skiers competing in long events, ski jumpers aiming to reduce their body weight, and those winter sport athletes incurring repeated qualification rounds and heats. These athletes need to ensure carbohydrate availability throughout competition. Finally, winter sport athletes may benefit from dietary and sport supplements; however, attention should be paid to safety and efficacy if supplementation is considered.

  20. Genetics & sport: bioethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Miah, Andy

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues pertaining to the use of genetic insights and techniques in sport. Initially, it considers a range of scientific findings that have stimulated debate about the ethical issues associated with genetics applied to sport. It also outlines some of the early policy responses to these discoveries from world leading sports organizations, along with knowledge about actual use of gene technologies in sport. Subsequently, it considers the challenges with distinguishing between therapeutic use and human enhancement within genetic science, which is a particularly important issue for the world of sport. Next, particular attention is given to the use of genetic information, which raises questions about the legitimacy and reliability of genetic tests, along with the potential public value of having DNA databanks to economize in health care. Finally, the ethics of gene transfer are considered, inviting questions into the values of sport and humanity. It argues that, while gene modification may seem conceptually similar to other forms of doping, the requirements upon athletes are such that new forms of enhancement become increasingly necessary to discover. Insofar as genetic science is able to create safer, more effective techniques of human modification, then it may be an appealing route through which to modify athletes to safeguard the future of elite sports as enterprises of human excellence.

  1. Sport Nutritionist: A New Sport Education Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Matthew R.; Zimmerman, Ryan; Ciotto, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Considering the challenges associated with adolescent obesity and the need for innovative and meaningful physical education curricula, the authors of this article decided to create a new sport education role to help students learn about the fundamental nutritional concepts and practices that contribute to a healthy and active lifestyle. The new…

  2. Dietary supplements in sport.

    PubMed

    Burke, L M; Read, R S

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the dietary practices of athletes report that nutritional supplements are commonly used. Supplementation practices vary between sports and individual athletes; however, there is evidence that at least some athletes use a large number of supplements concurrently, often in doses that are very high in comparison with normal dietary intakes. In exploring supplementation practices we propose a classification system separating the supplements into dietary supplements and nutritional erogogenic aids. The dietary supplement is characterised as a product which can be used to address physiological or nutritional issues arising in sport. It may provide a convenient or practical means of consuming special nutrient requirements for exercise, or it may be used to prevent/reverse nutritional deficiencies that commonly occur among athletes. The basis of the dietary supplement is an understanding of nutritional requirements and physiological effects of exercise. When the supplement is used to successfully meet a physiological/nutritional goal arising in sport it may be demonstrated to improve sports performance. While there is some interest in refining the composition or formulation of some dietary supplements, the real interest belongs to the use or application of the supplement; i.e. educating athletes to understand and achieve their nutritional needs in a specific sports situation. The sports drink (carbohydrate-electrolyte replacement drink) is a well known example of a dietary supplement. Scientific attitudes towards the sports drink have changed over the past 20 years. Initial caution that carbohydrate-electrolyte fluids compromise gastric emptying during exercise has now been shown to be unjustified. Numerous studies have shown that 5 to 10% solutions of glucose, glucose polymers (maltodextrins) and other simple sugars all have suitable gastric emptying characteristics for the delivery of fluid and moderate amounts of carbohydrate substrate. The optimal

  3. Bone imaging in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Shikare, S; Samsi, A B; Tilve, G H

    1997-01-01

    Increased participation in sports by the general public leads to increase in sports induced injuries including stress fractures, shin splints, arthritis and host of musculotendenous maladies. We have studied twenty patients referred from sports clinic for bone scanning to evaluate clinically difficult problems. It showed stress fracture in twelve patients, bilateral shin splint in five patients and normal bone scan in three patients. Present study highlights the utility of bone imaging for the diagnosis of various sports injuries in sports medicine.

  4. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels! PMID:12119866

  5. Photobiomodulation on sports injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Li, Cheng-Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Yang

    2003-12-01

    Sports injuries healing has long been an important field in sports medicine. The stimulatory effects of Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation have been investigated in several medical fields, such as cultured cell response, wound healing, hormonal or neural stimulation, pain relief and others. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether LIL irradiation can accelerate sports injuries healing. Some experimental and clinical studies have shown the laser stimulation effects on soft tissues and cartilage, however, controversy still exists regarding the role of LIL when used as a therapeutic device. Summarizing the data of cell studies and animal experiments and clinic trials by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation is a valuable treatment for superficial and localized sports injuries and that the injuries healing effects of the therapy depend on the dosage of LIL irradiation.

  6. Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... ups and training sessions before practices and before games. This will help ensure that they have fun ... be allowed periods of rest during practices and games. previous continue Common Types of Sports Injuries Three ...

  7. Youth Sports Safety Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... the rate of concussions in boys, and in basketball the rate of concussions among girls was 293 ... students age 8-19 participating in sports like basketball, soccer and football between 1997 and 2007, even ...

  8. Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pubic bone (adductors) are also stretched or torn. Cause Sports activities that involve planting the feet ... may need to consider surgery to repair the torn tissues. Page ( 2 ) AAOS does not endorse any ...

  9. The shoulder in sports.

    PubMed

    Cofield, R H; Simonet, W T

    1984-03-01

    Many sports activities that involve the upper extremity entail similar patterns of movement. Analysis of these activities, a better understanding of the throwing motion, and an awareness of shoulder diseases or injuries have led to a rational plan for investigation and management of shoulder problems. Evaluation often extends beyond the usual medical boundaries and must be based on information obtained from an analysis of sports mechanics, a review of training methods, and a physical examination directed at determination of flexibility, strength, endurance, and the presence of inflammation. Three common sports injuries are damage to the acromioclavicular joint (shoulder separation), instability of the glenohumeral joint, and a spectrum of pathologic changes in the rotator cuff. Sports that are commonly associated with shoulder problems include swimming, baseball, tennis, football, and gymnastics. Treatment may comprise rest, changes in training methods, an alteration of technique, and a physical rehabilitation program. Surgical treatment has a well-defined role, but it is usually optional.

  10. Sporting Miscues. Part Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adrian, Marlene; House, Gale

    1987-01-01

    Six common sporting miscues are examined and analyzed for their meanings and ramifications. The miscues involve accurate basketball and volleyball shots; overarm patterns; volleyball spikes; softball pitching; and basketball defense moves. (CB)

  11. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  12. Sports related to drowning.

    PubMed

    Szpilman, David; Orlowski, James P

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic sports are included in the top list of risky practices as the environment per se carries a possibility of death by drowning if not rescued in time. Not only are aquatic sports related to a high risk of death, but also all sports practiced on the water, over the water and on ice. Whatever the reason a person is in the water, drowning carries a higher possibility of death if the individual is unable to cope with the water situation, which may simply be caused by an inability to stay afloat and get out of the water or by an injury or disease that may lead to physical inability or unconsciousness. The competitive nature of sports is a common pathway that leads the sports person to exceed their ability to cope with the environment or simply misjudge their physical capability. Drowning involves some principles and medical interventions that are rarely found in other medical situations as it occurs in a deceptively hostile environment that may not seem dangerous. Therefore, it is essential that health professionals are aware of the complete sequence of action in drowning. This article focuses on the pulmonary injury in sports and recreational activities where drowning plays the major role. PMID:27581833

  13. Racquet sports. The future.

    PubMed

    Woods, R B

    1995-01-01

    The future of sports medicine and the affiliated sciences is extremely promising within the world of tennis. Players and coaches have recognized the important role of science in supporting tennis training and development. The USTA has established the sport sciences as a basis for all programs and policies. The challenges for the future appear clear: 1. To promote tennis specific research that specifically addresses the training, development, and competitive needs of coaches and athletes. 2. To access sport science information generated in other countries or by other sports that maybe useful to tennis in the United States. 3. To disseminate sport science information in user-friendly language to the widest possible audience. 4. To support all classifications of tennis players with sport science information relevant to their group including all ages and skill levels. Much has been accomplished in the past 10 years to support athlete development, but the promise of the future is exciting and will require teamwork within the tennis and scientific communities by people who love tennis.

  14. Selected Periodicals in Sport and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crase, Darrell

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one journals pertinent to the physical educator and to the professional in the areas of motor learning, sport philosophy, sport sociology, sport psychology, and sport medicine are listed with a general note on the scope of each. (JMF)

  15. Sports medicine in New Zealand.

    PubMed Central

    Milne, C J

    1992-01-01

    Sports medicine in New Zealand is characterized by a team approach. Experienced professionals work together to the benefit of athletes, be they elite performers or those in sport for purely recreational purposes. A no-fault accident compensation scheme is used to provide speedy access to treatment services for those injured in sport and also for advice on accident prevention. Recent initiatives include a task force on drugs in sport and the creation of regional sports foundations. Sports medical education is a prominent part of the New Zealand scene. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1600449

  16. Knee valgus angle during landing tasks in female volleyball and basketball players.

    PubMed

    Herrington, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Increased knee valgus angles have been associated with an increased risk of a variety of knee injuries. It has yet to be established if knee valgus angles during jump landing tasks differ between jumping sports with relatively higher and lower knee injury rates-namely, basketball and volleyball. Any difference in knee angles on landing may be related to sport-specific differences, which may in turn relate to the different injury risk rates. Fifteen elite female basketball and volleyball players had their knee valgus angles assessed during 2 landing tasks: 1 bilateral (drop jump landing) and 1 unilateral (step landing task). During the drop jump task knee valgus angle was significantly greater in the basketball group (p = 0.017) in the right knee, but there was no significant difference in performance between sports in the left knee (p = 0.67). During the step landing task volleyball players had significantly greater knee valgus angles than basketball players for both the left (p = 0.018) and right (p = 0.025) knees. The basketball group showed superior control of knee valgus during the unilateral task, which may be related to sport-specific skills. The basketball players showed significant asymmetry in knee valgus angle during bilateral drop jump landings; this finding reflects those of previous studies and may be related to the relative increased knee injury risk reported for this population group.

  17. Epilepsy and sports participation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Gregory M; Radloff, Monika; Sevier, Thomas L

    2004-02-01

    Epilepsy is a common disease found in 2% of the population, affecting both young and old. Unfortunately, epileptics have previously been discouraged from participation in physical activity and sports for fear of inducing seizures or increasing seizure frequency. Despite a shift in medical recommendations toward encouraging rather than restricting participation, the stigma remains and epileptics continue to be less active than the general population. This results in increased body mass index, decreased aerobic endurance, poorer self-esteem, and higher levels of anxiety and depression. Although there are rare cases of exercise-induced seizures, studies have shown that physical activity can decrease seizure frequency, as well as lead to improved cardiovascular and psychologic health. The majority of sports are safe for epileptics to participate in with special attention to adequate seizure control, close monitoring of medications, and preparation of family, coaches, or trainers. Contact sports including football, hockey, and soccer have not been shown to induce seizures, and epileptics should not be precluded from participation. Water sports and swimming are felt to be safe if seizures are well controlled and direct supervision is present. Additional care must be taken in sports involving heights such as gymnastics, harnessed rock climbing, or horseback riding. Sports such as hang-gliding, scuba diving, or free climbing are not recommended, given the risk of severe injury or death, if a seizure were to occur during the activity. This article reviews the risks and benefits of physical activity in epileptics, discusses sports in which epileptics may participate, and addresses how to decrease possible risks for injury.

  18. What is a sports injury?

    PubMed

    Timpka, Toomas; Jacobsson, Jenny; Bickenbach, Jerome; Finch, Caroline F; Ekberg, Joakim; Nordenfelt, Lennart

    2014-04-01

    Current sports injury reporting systems lack a common conceptual basis. We propose a conceptual foundation as a basis for the recording of health problems associated with participation in sports, based on the notion of impairment used by the World Health Organization. We provide definitions of sports impairment concepts to represent the perspectives of health services, the participants in sports and physical exercise themselves, and sports institutions. For each perspective, the duration of the causative event is used as the norm for separating concepts into those denoting impairment conditions sustained instantly and those developing gradually over time. Regarding sports impairment sustained in isolated events, 'sports injury' denotes the loss of bodily function or structure that is the object of observations in clinical examinations; 'sports trauma' is defined as an immediate sensation of pain, discomfort or loss of functioning that is the object of athlete self-evaluations; and 'sports incapacity' is the sidelining of an athlete because of a health evaluation made by a legitimate sports authority that is the object of time loss observations. Correspondingly, sports impairment caused by excessive bouts of physical exercise is denoted as 'sports disease' (overuse syndrome) when observed by health service professionals during clinical examinations, 'sports illness' when observed by the athlete in self-evaluations, and 'sports sickness' when recorded as time loss from sports participation by a sports body representative. We propose a concerted development effort in this area that takes advantage of concurrent ontology management resources and involves the international sporting community in building terminology systems that have broad relevance. PMID:24469737

  19. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  20. Sport Psychology: Myths in Sport Education and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Joy

    2008-01-01

    From a sport and exercise psychology viewpoint, this article describes the increasing professionalization of youth sport and how many well-intentioned people are using misconceptions or myths to organize and administer youth sport programs. For example, professionalization has led to specialization and year-round training, while playing multiple…

  1. Sport and Society: An Introduction to Sociology of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Hilmi

    A theoretical framework for the study of sport sociology is provided in this text. It is intended for students of sport, arts and humanities, sociology, and social psychology. Sport and social organization are discussed first. Three models of societies and six theories of social organization are presented which form the basis of the eclectic…

  2. Nutrition in team sports.

    PubMed

    Mujika, Iñigo; Burke, Louise M

    2010-01-01

    Team sports are based on intermittent high-intensity activity patterns, but the exact characteristics vary between and within codes, and from one game to the next. Despite the challenge of predicting exact game demands, performance in team sports is often dependent on nutritional factors. Chronic issues include achieving ideal levels of muscle mass and body fat, and supporting the nutrient needs of the training program. Acute issues, both for training and in games, include strategies that allow the player to be well fuelled and hydrated over the duration of exercise. Each player should develop a plan of consuming fluid and carbohydrate according to the needs of their activity patterns, within the breaks that are provided in their sport. In seasonal fixtures, competition varies from a weekly game in some codes to 2-3 games over a weekend road trip in others, and a tournament fixture usually involves 1-3 days between matches. Recovery between events is a major priority, involving rehydration, refuelling and repair/adaptation activities. Some sports supplements may be of value to the team athlete. Sports drinks, gels and liquid meals may be valuable in allowing nutritional goals to be met, while caffeine, creatine and buffering agents may directly enhance performance.

  3. Cannabis in Sport

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Marilyn A.; Mazzoni, Irene; Rabin, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, when the World Anti-Doping Agency assumed the responsi-bility for establishing and maintaining the list of prohibited substances and methods in sport (i.e. the Prohibited List), cannabinoids have been prohibited in all sports during competition. The basis for this prohibition can be found in the World Anti-Doping Code, which defines the three criteria used to consider banning a substance. In this context, we discuss the potential of can-nabis to enhance sports performance, the risk it poses to the athlete’s health and its violation of the spirit of sport. Although these compounds are prohibited in-competition only, we explain why the pharmacokinetics of their main psychoactive compound, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, may complicate the results management of adverse analytical findings. Passive inhalation does not appear to be a plausible explanation for a positive test. Although the prohibition of cannabinoids in sports is one of the most controversial issues in anti-doping, in this review we stress the reasons behind this prohibition, with strong emphasis on the evolving knowledge of cannabinoid pharmacology. PMID:21985215

  4. Wrist injuries in sport.

    PubMed

    Howse, C

    1994-03-01

    The wrist is a complex joint that biomechanically transmits forces generated at the hand through to the forearm. The radial side of the wrist carries 80% of the axial load and the ulnar side the remaining 20% of the load. The incidence of wrist (and hand) injuries in the sporting population is approximately 25%. This tends to be higher in those sports using the hand and wrist, and when the potential for trauma is present. The injuries are divided into 4 categories: overuse, nerve (and vascular), traumatic, and weight-bearing injuries. Overuse injuries are common in sports involving the hand and wrist, such as racquet sports, netball, basketball and volleyball. Nerve injuries are more commonly compressive neuropathies, and are seen with cyclists who may compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. Vascular injuries are uncommon and usually result from a high velocity impact from balls. Traumatic injuries are the most common and are due to either a fall on to the wrist, a direct blow, or combination of a rotatory and torsional force. The weight-bearing injuries are more specific to gymnastics, and result from repetitive excessive compressive and rotational forces across the wrist. The pommel horse event is associated with a high incidence of wrist pain in male competitors. Arthroscopy of the wrist provides direct inspection of intra-articular structures and diagnosis of conditions that may be unclear with other investigations. As techniques advance, more conditions may be treated arthroscopically and potentially facilitate an earlier return to sport.

  5. Sports Medicine: A Functional Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegerreis, Sam

    1981-01-01

    Sports medicine represents a specific body of knowledge which can be practiced as a subspecialty by numerous members of medical society. Professional and sandlot athletes are equally deserving of competent and expedient sports medical care. (JN)

  6. Sport Management Survey. Employment Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quain, Richard J.; Parks, Janet B.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of sport management positions was designed to determine projected vacancy rates in six sport management career areas. Respondents to the survey were also questioned regarding their awareness of college professional preparation programs. Results are presented. (MT)

  7. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The following sports ultrasound (SPORTS US) curriculum is a revision of the curriculum developed by the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) in 2010. Several changes have been made to the curriculum with the primary aim of providing a pathway by which a sports medicine fellow can obtain sufficient SPORTS US training to become proficient in the core competencies of SPORTS US. The core competencies of SPORTS US are outlined in the learning objectives section of this document. The term "SPORTS US" was purposefully chosen rather than "musculoskeletal ultrasound" (MSK US) because it was recognized by the panel that the evolving field of SPORTS US encompasses non-MSK applications of ultrasound such as the FAST examination (focused assessment with sonography for trauma). Although the SPORTS US core competencies in this curriculum are all MSK in nature, they represent the minimum SPORTS US knowledge a sports medicine fellow should acquire during fellowship. However, additional training in more advanced MSK and non-MSK applications of ultrasound can be provided at the fellowship director's discretion. Completion of this SPORTS US curriculum fulfills the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine's (AIUM) requirements to perform an MSK US examination and the prerequisites for the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography's (ARDMS) MSK sonography certification examination.

  8. Catastrophic spine injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Prior, Chris

    2005-02-01

    Catastrophic spine injuries in sports are rare but tragic events. The sports with the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing and snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and baseball. A common mechanism of injury for all at-risk sports is an axial compression force to the top of the head with the neck slightly flexed. We review common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for spine injuries in the at-risk sports.

  9. [Liver and sport].

    PubMed

    Watelet, J

    2008-11-01

    The liver is a vital organ and plays a central role in energy exchange, protein synthesis as well as the elimination of waste products from the body. Acute and chronic injury may disturb a variety of liver functions to different degrees. Over the last three decades, the effects of physical activity and competitive sport on the liver have been described by various investigators. These include viral hepatitis and drug-induced liver disorders. Herein, we review acute and chronic liver diseases potentially caused by sport. Team physicians, trainers and others, responsible for the health of athletes, should be familiar with the risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of liver diseases that occur in sports.

  10. Selected Problems in Sports Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This publication, covering a broad spectrum of sports safety problems, is designed as a source of information for those who plan, organize, administer, or evaluate various physical education and recreational activities, athletics, or sports. In the first section, the prevention of sports injury is stressed with attention to different age groups…

  11. Sport Art: Spectacle or Sacrament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studer, Ginny L., Ed.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The chief objective of sport art is to capture that actual fleeting moment of excellent performance in a sporting event. In a series of articles, the significance of sport art is shown in its importance in recording historic contests and games, emphasizing social achievement and personal performance goals, and attempting to symbolize the depth of…

  12. The Sport-Stress Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santomier, James

    1983-01-01

    This article explains how and why stress mechanisms operate in students who participate in sports. Students respond to different sport situations with various physical, psychological, and social reactions. When developing and supervising sports, school personnel should take into consideration the physical and psychological development of…

  13. Energy Expenditure of Sport Stacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Steven R.; Udermann, Brian E.; Reineke, David M.; Battista, Rebecca A.

    2009-01-01

    Sport stacking is an activity taught in many physical education programs. The activity, although very popular, has been studied minimally, and the energy expenditure for sport stacking is unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the energy expenditure of sport stacking in elementary school children and to compare that value…

  14. Active Citizenship through Sport Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donovan, Toni M.; MacPhail, Ann; Kirk, David

    2010-01-01

    Sport education (SE) is an instruction model developed amid concerns about the lack of authentic, legitimate opportunities for young people to experience sport through physical education and was designed to facilitate enhanced links between experiences in physical education and those in the wider world of sport. The paper discusses how one UK…

  15. Race in Contemporary American Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry

    1982-01-01

    Racism is seen as the major force blocking Black access to most American sports and to "thinking" and authority roles in accessible sports. The overwhelming majority of Black youths seeking sports stardom are destined to be shuttled back into the Black community as noncontributors or undercontributors. (MLW)

  16. Physics of ball sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C.; Clanet, C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball sports have been part of human history for thousands of years [1]. Nowadays, 13 of them are part of the Olympic games (badminton, basketball, beach volley, football/soccer, golf, handball, hockey, rugby, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo, ice hockey). All these games differ by launcher (hand, club, racket, bat), ball (size, shape and mass), pitch size and number of players. These differences induce different ball velocities. Apart from the velocities and the way to maximize them, we discuss in this article the ball trajectories and their impact on the size of sports fields.

  17. Sports and Child Development.

    PubMed

    Felfe, Christina; Lechner, Michael; Steinmayr, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The role of curricular activities for the formation of education, health and behavioural outcomes has been widely studied. Yet, the role of extra-curricular activities has received little attention. This study analyzes the effect of participation in sports clubs-one of the most popular extra-curricular activities among children. We use alternative datasets and flexible semi-parametric estimation methods with a specific way to use the panel dimension of the data to address selection into sports. We find positive and robust effects on children's school performance and peer relations. Crowding out of passive leisure activities can partially explain the effects.

  18. Indoor racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Silko, G J; Cullen, P T

    1994-08-01

    Family physicians can care for most patients injured while participating in indoor racquet sports. However, patients with injuries to the eye usually require ophthalmologic referral. The most common injuries that occur in persons participating in indoor racquet sports include contusions, sprains and strains, lacerations, eye injuries, bursitis and tendinitis. Musculoskeletal injuries that merit special consideration include lateral epicondylitis, DeQuervain's tenosynovitis, wrist intersection syndrome, patellar pain syndrome, meniscal injuries, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. The family physician plays a critical role in providing patients with information about preventive measures.

  19. Sports and Child Development.

    PubMed

    Felfe, Christina; Lechner, Michael; Steinmayr, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The role of curricular activities for the formation of education, health and behavioural outcomes has been widely studied. Yet, the role of extra-curricular activities has received little attention. This study analyzes the effect of participation in sports clubs-one of the most popular extra-curricular activities among children. We use alternative datasets and flexible semi-parametric estimation methods with a specific way to use the panel dimension of the data to address selection into sports. We find positive and robust effects on children's school performance and peer relations. Crowding out of passive leisure activities can partially explain the effects. PMID:27144474

  20. Sports and Child Development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The role of curricular activities for the formation of education, health and behavioural outcomes has been widely studied. Yet, the role of extra-curricular activities has received little attention. This study analyzes the effect of participation in sports clubs—one of the most popular extra-curricular activities among children. We use alternative datasets and flexible semi-parametric estimation methods with a specific way to use the panel dimension of the data to address selection into sports. We find positive and robust effects on children’s school performance and peer relations. Crowding out of passive leisure activities can partially explain the effects. PMID:27144474

  1. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  2. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  3. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  4. Sports Teams Extend Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

  5. Talking Sport and Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon-Watmough, Rebecca; Keogh, Brenda; Naylor, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    For some time the Association for Science Education (ASE) has been aware that it would be useful to have some resources available to get children talking and thinking about issues related to health, sport and fitness. Some of the questions about pulse, breathing rate and so on are pretty obvious to everyone, and there is a risk of these being…

  6. Simulation in Sport Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drayer, Joris; Rascher, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Simulations have long been used in business schools to give students experience making real-world decisions in a relatively low risk environment. The OAKLAND A'S BASEBALL BUSINESS SIMULATOR takes a traditional business simulation and applies it to the sport industry, in which sales of tangible products are replaced by sales of experiences provided…

  7. Financing the Sport Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Hypes, Michael G.; Hypes, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    This book is intended to provide students in sport management curricula and professional practitioners with the first comprehensive survey coverage of the many traditional and innovative aspects of financial management. The focus of this text is on the basis of financial management including but not limited to diversification of revenue,…

  8. Neurodegeneration and sport.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gavin A; Castellani, Rudolph J; McCrory, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The recent interest in concussion in sport has resulted in significant media focus about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), although a direct causative link(s) between concussion and CTE is not established. Typically, sport-related CTE occurs in a retired athlete with or without a history of concussion(s) who presents with a constellation of cognitive, mood, and/or behavioral symptoms and who has postmortem findings of tau deposition within the brain. There are many confounding variables, however, that can account for brain tau deposition, including genetic mutations, drugs, normal aging, environmental factors, postmortem brain processing, and toxins. To understand the roles of such factors in neurodegenerative diseases that may occur in athletes, this article reviews some neurodegenerative diseases that may present with similar findings in nonathletes. The article also reviews pathological changes identified with normal aging, and reviews the pathological findings of CTE in light of all these factors. While many of these athletes have a history of exposure to head impacts as a part of contact sport, there is insufficient evidence to establish causation between sports concussion and CTE. It is likely that many of the cases with neuropathological findings represent the normal aging process, the effects of opiate abuse, or a variant of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Whether particular genetic causes may place athletes at greater risk of neurodegenerative disease is yet to be determined.

  9. Art and Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, David

    1980-01-01

    The author refutes arguments by S. K. Wertz, based on a definition by Ruth Shaw, that some sports may be classified as art forms. For Wertz's article, see "Journal of Aesthetic Education," v13, n1, p107-09, January, 1979. (SJL)

  10. Women in Sport Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Mary Ann; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The philosophy, purpose, grading procedure, and course requirements for the University of Delaware's "Women in Sports" course are set forth. A course outline is provided, along with tips and a resource materials listing for those interested in initiating similar programs. (LH)

  11. Sport-Related Concussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Don; Brady, Flo

    2011-01-01

    Sport-related concussions (SRC) are not limited to specific age ranges, professional athletes, or gender. The primary focus of much of SRC research pertains to the assessment, management, and return to play (RTP) of the concussed athlete. This article highlights some major issues of SRC along with some controversies that presently exist within the…

  12. Burnout in Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotella, Robert J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Burnout is a condition of withdrawal from participation in sports as a result of stress. The most significant advance in the study of burnout has been a cognitive-affective model that contains situational, cognitive appraisal, physiological, and behavioral components. Suggestions for preventing and treating burnout are presented. (BC)

  13. Sport in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knuttgen, Howard G., Ed.; And Others

    Part 1 of this book, "Evoluation and Organization of Physical Culture," examines the history and current organization of physical education and sport in the People's Republic of China. This part includes chapters on: the evolution and organization of physical culture; physical culture in China today; the organizational structure of physical…

  14. Black Women in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Tina Sloan; And Others

    An overview of the achievements of black women in sports is presented in this collection of essays, biographical sketches, and philosophical investigations. The work is divided into five chapters, the first of which focuses on prejudice (racial and sexual), absence of black women as subjects in the research base, work/home/family pressures, black…

  15. "Emerging" Sports for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Debra E.

    1994-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association has recently introduced nine new sports to intercollegiate athletics: team handball, archery, badminton, bowling, crew, ice hockey, squash, synchronized swimming, and water polo. The initiative is intended to encourage colleges to create more athletic opportunities for women. It sets scholarship limits…

  16. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  17. The Economics of Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, William S., Ed.

    This collection of papers presents a picture of economic principles at work in the dynamic world of big-time sports. Papers were given at the 35th Annual Lecture-Seminar Series presented by the Department of Economics at Western Michigan University during the 1998-99 school year. After an "Introduction" (William S. Kern), the six papers are: (1)…

  18. Defending College Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Debra E.

    1994-01-01

    A philosophy professor who supports college athletics battles to maintain credibility among his academic peers. His interest is in adding balance to criticism of college sports and calling attention to positive aspects such as teamwork and discipline. The professor also teaches a seminar in ethics for first-year athletes. (MSE)

  19. Sports Injuries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Timothy N.

    1991-01-01

    A literature review revealed an absence of well-controlled studies concerning the prevention of sports injuries in children. A checklist outlines some causes of the overuse syndrome, including (1) training errors; (2) the nature of playing surfaces; (3) muscle imbalance; (4) anatomic malalignments; (5) construction of shoes; and (6) various…

  20. [Endurance sports and arythmias].

    PubMed

    Burgan, H; Burri, H

    2013-03-01

    Endurance sports can predispose to the occurrence of certain arrhythmias, making them more frequent in athletes than in the general population. Endurance athletes often exhibit electrocardiographic modifications that are difficult to interpret without specific knowledge of the athlete's ECG. Some of these ECG modifications and arrhythmias are benign, however others can be potentially life threatening.

  1. [Sports in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Spring, H

    1991-06-01

    As therapy of ankylosing spondylarthritis still remains empirical, gymnastics and sports are of particular importance within the treatment of this disease. They aim at the improvement or at least the preservation of mobility, force and endurance. By those means an eventual immobilisation of the axial skeleton or the peripheral joints should take place in a position as favourable to function as possible. Various joint mobilisation techniques as well as muscle stretching are used to improve mobility. The latter thus pointedly prevents muscular disbalances. Various training methods are able to improve muscular performance. Slow dynamic force training can be used in gymnastic lessons as well as in home programmes. Maximal and staying power can thus be increased. Aerobic muscular training favours general efficiency, has a positive influence on risk factors of cardiac and vascular diseases and improves thoracic excursion. Motivation of the patient is correlated with the diversion of exercise, therapies and sport activities. The suitability of these measures are to be judged by expected maximal strain, the control of motion pattern, the effect of external forces as well as by the hazard to fall. Each and every sport activity has to be accompanied by supportive gymnastics. The most important sport disciplines are evaluated.

  2. Competitive Anxiety in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rainer; And Others

    This book is a comprehensive review of competitive anxiety research that has used the Sport Competition Anxiety Test, or SCAT (a trait scale), and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2). The book describes the theoretical basis and development procedures for both scales, including detailed information on reliability and validity. In…

  3. Nutrition in Children's Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nathan J.

    Young athletes need to be aware of the importance of good nutrition to athletic performance. A basic diet plan, worked out with a physician to satisfy energy and weight needs, is essential. The best eating schedule and amount and type of food varies with different sports depending on the intensity and duration of physical activity. Weight control…

  4. Sports, Race, and Ressentiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the problem of college sports corruption and the debate over "the plight of the black athlete," suggesting that this debate is actually not about race or athletics but a code for examining contradictions between education and mass democracy. Calls this the problem of "ressentiment." Examines how athletes have used the "plight of the…

  5. [Knee endoprosthesis: sports orthopedics possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Kuster, M S; Grob, K; Gächter, A

    2000-08-01

    Many patients would like to resume some sport activities after total knee replacement; however, most recommendations are based on subjective opinion rather than scientific evidence. The following paper presents a literature review of sports after total knee replacement and includes recommendations which are based on biomechanical laws. Most total knee designs show increased conformity near full extension. Beyond a certain knee flexion angle, the conformity ratio decreases due to a reduced femoral radius. Therefore, these designs accept higher loads near full extension than in flexion. In order to recommend suitable physical activities after total knee replacement, both the load and the knee flexion angle of the peak load must be considered. It has been shown that power walking and cycling produce the lowest polyethylene inlay stress of a total knee replacement and seem to be the least demanding endurance activities. Jogging and downhill walking show high inlay stress levels and should be avoided. Hence, for mountain hiking, patients are advised to avoid descents or at least use skipoles and walk slowly downhill to reduce the load on the knee joint. It must also be mentioned that any activity represents additional wear, which may affect the long-term results of total knee replacements. Further clinical studies are necessary to validate the biomechanical investigations. PMID:11013918

  6. Language of sport fans: sportugese revisited.

    PubMed

    Wann, D L; Metcalf, L A; Adcock, M L; Choi, C C; Dallas, M B; Slaton, E

    1997-12-01

    In 1959, Tannenbaum and Noah reported that sports writers and readers possessed a better understanding of sport terminology than nonreaders. The current investigation extended Tannenbaum and Noah's research using current sport terms. A positive relationship between understanding sport terminology, extent of team identification, strength of sport fandom, and self-proclaimed sport knowledge was hypothesized. Scores of 57 participants confirmed the predicted pattern. Discussion concerned research examining sport terminology. PMID:9399327

  7. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts.

  8. More on Sports and the Big6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents strategies for relating the Big6 information problem-solving process to sports to gain students' attention, sustain it, and make instruction relevant to their interests. Lectures by coaches, computer-based sports games, sports information sources, the use of technology in sports, and judging sports events are discussed. (LRW)

  9. Sport for tall.

    PubMed

    Khosla, T

    1983-09-10

    Eight new events (handball, basketball, and six rowing events) were introduced for women in the Olympic Games at Montreal in 1976. Of 187 women rowers who competed at Montreal, none was shorter than the mean height (162 cm, 64 in) of women aged 18-24 in the United States. In team events only two out of 250 participants were shorter than the reference mean. Even among the tall, it was the taller participants who won medals. What does the slogan "Sport for All" mean in this context? Moreover, the physical size required of champion rowers and basketball players is not to be found in some Asian, African, and Latin American populations. International contests in many such events therefore seem to be at variance with the first charter of the Olympic Games. An independent reviewing body is urgently needed to examine the merits of man made rules in many sporting contests. PMID:6412804

  10. Sports medicine and ethics.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Daniela; Hornik, Christoph P; Smith, P Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K; McKinney, Ross E

    2013-01-01

    Physicians working in the world of competitive sports face unique ethical challenges, many of which center around conflicts of interest. Team-employed physicians have obligations to act in the club's best interest while caring for the individual athlete. As such, they must balance issues like protecting versus sharing health information, as well as issues regarding autonomous informed consent versus paternalistic decision making in determining whether an athlete may compete safely. Moreover, the physician has to deal with an athlete's decisions about performance enhancement and return to play, pursuit of which may not be in the athlete's long-term best interests but may benefit the athlete and team in the short term. These difficult tasks are complicated by the lack of evidence-based standards in a field influenced by the lure of financial gains for multiple parties involved. In this article, we review ethical issues in sports medicine with specific attention paid to American professional football.

  11. [Healthy children and sports].

    PubMed

    Backx, F J; Erich, W B

    1990-08-01

    Sport can be considered as an excellent alternative for unhealthy consumption habits and can compensate far the outcome of a sedentary lifestyle. The youngster can improve technique, coordination and flexibility in an easy way by training programs. Specific weight training programs are not recommended for those under the age of fifteen years. Regular exercise programs at young ages have positive effects on the general education, and during life habitual exercise training reduce the severity of cardiovascular and other diseases. It promotes the fitness of the body and the mind. Sport, a lifetime, must be part of a healthy lifestyle and must be encouraged younger ages. Health effects in a long term depend on exercise programs lasting years.

  12. [The pediatrician and sports].

    PubMed

    Theintz, G E

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to recreative sports, competition should not be allowed in children without regulations and supervision. Physical handicaps should be carefully looked for through a thorough pre-participation examination and appropriate physical activities should be defined for handicapped children. Hypoactivity, fear of accident and functional deterioration cause more damage to these children than physical training which may include competition provided the underlying disease is adequately treated. Regular physical exercise appears to provide significant physical and psychological benefits which are effective beyond the period of physical activity. Stress and aggressivity linked to competition do not seem to have harmful effects on child mental health, with an exception for elite adolescent athletes for whom more information is needed. These athletes are at risk for orthopaedic lesions by overuse as well as disturbances of cardiac and endocrine functions which may disqualify them temporarily for sport events. Treatments designed to boost performance such as anabolic steroids, amphetamines or blood transfusions should be strictly forbidden.

  13. Sport for tall.

    PubMed

    Khosla, T

    1983-09-10

    Eight new events (handball, basketball, and six rowing events) were introduced for women in the Olympic Games at Montreal in 1976. Of 187 women rowers who competed at Montreal, none was shorter than the mean height (162 cm, 64 in) of women aged 18-24 in the United States. In team events only two out of 250 participants were shorter than the reference mean. Even among the tall, it was the taller participants who won medals. What does the slogan "Sport for All" mean in this context? Moreover, the physical size required of champion rowers and basketball players is not to be found in some Asian, African, and Latin American populations. International contests in many such events therefore seem to be at variance with the first charter of the Olympic Games. An independent reviewing body is urgently needed to examine the merits of man made rules in many sporting contests.

  14. [Sports under the sun].

    PubMed

    Martalo, O; Guiot-Thys, M; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    2001-04-01

    The outdoor sports during summer and winter are often performed under uncontrolled exposure to ultraviolet irradiation from sunlight. Dangers are not small for the skin, the eyes and the immune system. Adequate sun protection is recommended. Caution is important in young children. The daily UV index represents a standardized assessment having a regional predictive value for the intensity of the ultraviolet irradiation reaching the biosphere.

  15. The neuropathology of sport.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  16. The neuropathology of sport

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Stein, Thor D.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  17. The sport diving employee.

    PubMed

    Milroy, W C

    1982-04-01

    As scuba diving becomes an increasingly popular recreational activity, the probability of the occupational health physician seeing diving-related disorders increases. Recognition of many of these disorders is unlikely if not specifically looked for and if any account of diving activities is not forth-coming. Diagnosis and management of diving diseases range from simple ear squeeze to decompression sickness. There are relative and absolute contradictions to sport diving.

  18. The neuropathology of sport.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  19. Sibling dynamics and sport expertise.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, M J; Farrow, D; MacMahon, C; Baker, J

    2015-10-01

    Family members are known to be highly influential in the development of sport expertise. To date, much of the research in this area has focused on parents, with less known about sibling influences on expertise. This investigation explored associations between sport expertise, sibling characteristics, and sibling participation in sport and physical activity. Athletes representing three skill levels provided details of sibling characteristics and participation in sport and physical activity via the Developmental History of Athletes Questionnaire. Elite athletes were more likely to be later-born children, while pre-elite and non-elite athletes were more likely to be first-born. Compared with siblings of non-elite athletes, siblings of elite athletes were more likely to have participated in regular physical activity and were more likely to have participated in sport at the pre-elite and elite levels. These results suggest siblings may play a key role in sport expertise development.

  20. [Sports participation and fair play].

    PubMed

    Cecchini Estrada, José A; González-Mesa, Carmen González; Méndez, Javier Montero

    2007-02-01

    This study examined whether the participation in intermediate contact sports affects the opinions about the behaviors and attitudes of fair play in the sports context and whether these effects are influenced by ego orientation. The participants were high level sportsmen from university and professional basketball and football players (N = 131). They filled in questionnaires to assess their participation in sports, their goal orientations, and their fair play attitudes and behaviors. The analyses of the structural equation model indicated that participation in intermediate contact sports predicted ego orientation; these analyses consecutively predicted low levels of fair play. The direct effects of sports participation in fair play decreased significantly in the presence of ego orientation, indicating that the last construct partially mediates the relation between the first two variables. These discoveries help us to better understand the processes that operate in contact sports. Finally, their implications for eliminating unsportsmanlike behaviors are discussed.

  1. Sports and disability.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Pamela E; Clayton, Gerald H

    2010-03-01

    Participation in recreational and competitive sports at an early age has long been touted as a positive influence on growth and development, and for fostering lifelong healthy lifestyles. The benefits of an active lifestyle include not only fitness, but the promotion of a sense of inclusion and improved self-esteem. These benefits are well documented in all populations, and their importance has been summarized in the recent Healthy People 2010 guidelines. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recently produced a summary statement on the benefits of activity for disabled children. They note that children with disabilities tend to have an overall lower level of fitness and an increased level of obesity. For this population, developing a lifelong desire to be active can be a simple means for limiting illness and much of the morbidity associated with sedentary lifestyles often associated with disability. For disabled youth, participation in disabled sports programs available nationally and internationally can be an effective means to promote such precepts. The goal of this focused review is to improve the learner's knowledge of the positive impact that active lifestyles can have on overall health in the disabled youth population and, as a result, modify their practice by incorporating recreational and competitive sport activities as part of improving overall patient care.

  2. Adrenaline, arousal and sport.

    PubMed

    Krahenbuhl, G S

    1975-01-01

    In general, the literautre review provides theoretical explanations for the popular, common-sense belief that a little stress improves performance, whereas when stress becomes severe, performance declines and ultimately breaks down. In terms of psychological stress (as opposed to physiological) the single most important variable appears to be the subject's interpretation of the stress-producing stimuli. Increases in adrenaline and noradrenaline accompany a variety of emotional responses, but differential proportions are not seen as characterizing the various emotions. Noradrenaline secretion appears to be related to physiological stress, or the amount of work attempted by the organism. Adrenaline secretion seems to be more-directly related to mental stress and emotional response. As emotional involvement increases, adrenal medullary secretion of adrenaline increases. The accompanying physiological and metabolic responses faciltate performance to a point; however, extremely high levels of arousal may adversely affect the athlete's proficiency. This is expecially true of sport skills requiring steadiness, precision, and concentration. Finally, for the sake of perspective, it should be stated that any contribution or complication created by the catecholamines is minimal when the entire ability range of competitors is considered. Whereas near superhuman feats by ordinary individuals caught in life-threatening situations have been reported, variations of great magnitude are unlikely in sport. The average individual is not transformed into a world class athlete merely by "getting the adrenaline flowing." Among athletes of similar physical stature and physiological function, however, adrenaline and arousal may certainly tip the scale of performance in sport.

  3. [Doping and sports].

    PubMed

    Lippi, G; Guidi, G

    1999-09-01

    Doping is widely known as the use of banned substances and practices by athletes in an attempt to improve sporting performances. The term doping likely derives from "dope", an ancient expression referred to a primitive alcoholic drink that was used as a stimulant in South African ceremonial dances; gradually, the term was extended and finally adopted his current significance. There are at least two essential reasons to support the fight against doping: the potential harmful effects on athletes and the depth corruption of the fair competition. An exhaustive list of banned substances and methods has been drawn by the International Olympic Committee and further accepted by other International Sport Authorities and Federations. This list, regularly updated, is basically divided into doping substances (stimulants, narcotic analgesics, anabolic agents, diuretics, peptide and glycoprotein hormones and analogues), doping methods (blood doping, pharmacological, chemical and physical manipulation) and drugs subjected to certain restrictions (alcohol, marijuana, local anesthetics, corticosteroids and beta-blockers). Although there might be some medical conditions, which could legitimate the need of these substances or methods, there is no place for their use in sport. Thus, an athlete's consume of any of these substances or methods will result in disqualification. Aim of the present review is to provide a synthetic description of both the desirable effects and the potentially harmful consequences of the use of some of the major doping substances and methods.

  4. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  5. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  6. Interferometric measurement of angles.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Harris, O

    1970-07-01

    A new interferometric device for measuring small angles or rotations with high accuracy is described. This instrument works by counting fringes formed by the rotation of a flat-parallel plate of glass illuminated with a collimated beam from a gas laser. Some possible applications are given.

  7. Medical Screening of Sports Divers

    PubMed Central

    Suke, R.; Harpur, G. D.

    1982-01-01

    Sports divers encounter heavy physical exertion in a cold, stressful environment. They must also pass rapidly through large, ambient pressure changes. These stresses demand that the diver be emotionally and physically fit, and able to perform maneuvers to equalize internal and external pressures. Medical screening of sports diving candidates requires that the examiner has a knowledge of diving and the stresses encountered by the sports diver. PMID:21286568

  8. Probe into the Elements of Leisure Sports Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Kaixian; Gao, Qun

    2008-01-01

    This paper probes into the basic elements of leisure sports practice by referencing literature materials and logic analyses. Studies show that leisure sports practice consists of six elements, including leisure sports ideas, leisure sports environment, leisure sports time, leisure sports activity, leisure sports skill, and leisure sports state.…

  9. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are medical ...

  10. Return to sport following amputation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D; Sukeik, M; Haddad, F

    2014-08-01

    Amputation in athletes has a substantial impact on lifestyle and sporting activity, as well as self-perception and quality of life. The impact of limb loss on athletic ability will vary depending on the cause of amputation and the anatomical location of the amputation. The use of sporting activity for rehabilitation of amputees was first introduced in 1944 at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. The first international paralympic games were founded in 1960. Following these events the opportunity to participate in sport following limb loss has increased significantly. Sport participation has been aided by the development of sporting prostheses, however multiple factors will determine the exact prosthesis used. These include the nature of the sporting activity as well as the level of the amputation. The biomechanics involved in walking and running are altered following the loss of a limb or part thereof. This can cause subsequent degenerative changes within the remaining joints on the amputated limb as well as the contralateral limb. Factors affecting return to sporting activity are multivariate and inter-related, including patient factors, surgical factors, nature and level of the sporting activity and prosthetic factors. The authors review current literature, detail predictive factors of return to sport and the physical and psychosocial impact on patients following limb amputation.

  11. Return to sport following amputation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D; Sukeik, M; Haddad, F

    2014-08-01

    Amputation in athletes has a substantial impact on lifestyle and sporting activity, as well as self-perception and quality of life. The impact of limb loss on athletic ability will vary depending on the cause of amputation and the anatomical location of the amputation. The use of sporting activity for rehabilitation of amputees was first introduced in 1944 at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. The first international paralympic games were founded in 1960. Following these events the opportunity to participate in sport following limb loss has increased significantly. Sport participation has been aided by the development of sporting prostheses, however multiple factors will determine the exact prosthesis used. These include the nature of the sporting activity as well as the level of the amputation. The biomechanics involved in walking and running are altered following the loss of a limb or part thereof. This can cause subsequent degenerative changes within the remaining joints on the amputated limb as well as the contralateral limb. Factors affecting return to sporting activity are multivariate and inter-related, including patient factors, surgical factors, nature and level of the sporting activity and prosthetic factors. The authors review current literature, detail predictive factors of return to sport and the physical and psychosocial impact on patients following limb amputation. PMID:25034549

  12. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  13. Angle Sense: A Valuable Connector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Rheta N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposes angle sense as a fundamental connector between mathematical concepts for middle grade students. Introduces the use of pattern blocks and a goniometer, a tool to measure angles, to help students develop angle sense. Discusses connections between angle measurement and the concepts of rational numbers, circles, area, number theory,…

  14. "New Ground" in the History of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mark W.

    1979-01-01

    Several areas of sport history and their relationships to the process of society are outlined including transportation and sports participation, mass media, migrant movements, and minority participation. (JMF)

  15. Heads Up to High School Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  16. Transforming Communities through Sport? Critical Pedagogy and Sport for Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaaij, Ramón; Oxford, Sarah; Jeanes, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The value of sport as a vehicle for social development and progressive social change has been much debated, yet what tends to get missed in this debate is the way education may foster, enable or impede the transformative action that underpins the social outcomes to which the "sport for development and peace" (SDP) sector aspires. This…

  17. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  18. Safety in Team Sports. Sports Safety Series, Monograph No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borozne, Joseph, Ed.; And Others

    This monograph examines methods of promoting safe practices in the conduct of selected team sports with the aim of reducing and eliminating the occurrance of injuries. The team sports discussed are baseball and softball, basketball, field hockey, tackle football, touch and flag football, ice hockey, lacrosse, and soccer. (MJB)

  19. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  20. Sport injuries: relations to sex, sport, injured body region.

    PubMed

    Dane, Senol; Can, Süleyman; Gürsoy, Recep; Ezirmik, Naci

    2004-04-01

    The present study evaluated the association among sex, sport, and injured body region of sport injuries. The subjects were 329 men and 127 women, ranging in age from 17 to 28 years, attending classes in the departments of Physical Training and Sport of Atatürk University (Erzurum, Erzincan, and Ağri in Turkey). There were no differences between men and women in percentages of injuries. The difference among various sports in the percentages of injured athletes was statistically significant. Running had the lowest percentage of injuries and basketball had the highest percentage. The most frequently injured body regions were the foot and the ankle in basketball, volleyball, soccer, and running, but in wrestling, the knee. These findings suggest that injury rates are associated with the sport rather than sex of player, and the most frequently injured body regions are the lower extremities. Therefore, the muscles of lower extremity should be strengthened to avoid injuries.

  1. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  2. Growth and sport.

    PubMed

    Cacciari, E; Mazzanti, L; Tassinari, D; Bergamaschi, R; Magnani, C; Ghini, T; Tani, G; Drago, E; Nanni, G; Cobianchi, C

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate sport's influence on growth during puberty, we examined 398 boys 10-16 yr old. 192 of these subjects had been playing football as a competitive sport, and 206 were considered as controls, having never practised sports regularly. Both groups were divided into prepubertal (with testicular volume less than or equal to 2.5 cc) and pubertal, with the latter further divided into the following chronological and bone age groups: 10-11.99, 12-13.99, 14-16 yr. In these subjects we evaluated auxological-anthropometric and biological maturity characteristics and endocrine parameters (cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, testosterone). No significant difference was found between prepubertal athletes and controls concerning anthropometric and biological maturation parameters, whereas testosterone basal levels were significantly lower (p less than 0.05) and DHEAS values were significantly higher (p less than 0.05). Pubertal football players were significantly taller than controls (particularly at 14-16 yr chronological age), with a greater biacromial diameter after 12 yr chronological and bone age and thinner skinfolds at 12-13.99 chronological and bone age. They were more advanced in all biological maturation parameters i.e. pubic hair, testicular volume and bone age, particularly those subjects playing football for the greatest number of years and training time. In pubertal football players the increase in DHEAS (p less than 0.05) already seen in prepubertals is also combined with a significant increase in testosterone (p less than 0.0001) and cortisol (p less than 0.05). Thus football players DHEAS is already higher during prepuberty and this increase chronologically precedes the advance in all the auxological-maturative parameters typical of our pubertal subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2809098

  3. Team Building for Youth Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Gordon A.; Loughead, Todd M.; Newin, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Participation in youth sport generally begins to decline after the age of 12. Among the reasons for this are personal aspects such as lack of desire, and social aspects including negative experiences with coaches. One way that coaches can improve the sporting environment is through group activities that promote team building. The purpose of this…

  4. The Sport Education Tactical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Tony; McCollum, Starla

    2009-01-01

    Two popular instructional models in middle and high school are the sport education model (SEM) and the tactical games model (TGM). The SEM prepares students to become competent, literate, and enthusiastic sportspersons. The TGM prepares students to be able to play games using a tactical approach. Combining the models to form a sport education…

  5. Young Women, Sports, and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Sandra L.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines young women's access to two traditionally male domains, sport and science, from two perspectives. The structural approach suggests that sport and science are stratified by gender and have historically been chilly climates for women. The Critical approach argues that structure and agency are important in understanding sources…

  6. Service-Learning in Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Vincent; Kane, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    This article examines how a graduate sport-marketing class, at an urban university, implemented a sport-related service-learning project (Hoops Against Hunger) that provided relief to victims of Florida's 2004 hurricanes. The article describes the seven components of the project (need, participants, learning, service, publicity, evaluation, and…

  7. Career Paths in Sport Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Keri A.; Legg, Eric; Tanner, Preston; Timmerman, Danielle; Dustin, Daniel; Arthur-Banning, Skye G.

    2015-01-01

    Sport management alumni (N = 268) from five universities that offer undergraduate programs with an emphasis in sport management within departments of parks, recreation, and tourism were sampled via an electronic survey. The survey sought to learn where alumni were working, and how they felt about their career choice and undergraduate professional…

  8. Critical Areas in Sports Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehouse, C. A., Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Four articles examine important aspects of sport safety. Topics include: (1) risks of eye injuries in racquet sports and preventive measures; (2) ways to reduce gymnastics injuries; (3) safety in training areas; and (4) risk-management strategies to avoid legal liability. Guidelines for teachers are given. (PP)

  9. Teaching Combative Sports through Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.; Kozub, Mary L.

    2004-01-01

    Martial arts have become popular in the United States and have transitioned from being spectator sports to avenues for active participation by people of all ages. The purpose of this article is to highlight tactical similarities in selected combative sport activities and to provide martial arts and wrestling instructors with an alternative…

  10. Orienteering for Sport and Pleasure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengtsson, Hans; Atkinson, George

    This text presents the principles of the sport of orienteering (navigating through an unknown area using a map and compass as guide) and is useful to beginners, experienced orienteers, and "armchair" orienteers. Included in the text are: (1) a glossary of key words; (2) a basic introduction to, and history of, the sport; (3) description of the…

  11. The Sprint to Lifetime Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    Describes the trend in high school physical education programs toward lifetime sports, defined by the author as physical activities that will serve the interests of students for a lifetime. Included are a special report on program costs and a model of a performance-based lifetime sports program. (Author/DN)

  12. University Students: Attainment and Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, L. B.; Douglass, L.

    1975-01-01

    The extent to which 230 university students following a one-year psychology course were 'active' (i.e., competitively or recreationally involved) in sport or 'non-participant' was compared with their scores on measures of personality, attitude, social class, sex, previous school involvement in sport, and attainment in university course work.…

  13. Readings in Sports Psychology 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, H. T. A., Ed.

    In this collection of papers the psychology of human behavior and performance is examined as it is revealed by the action and interaction of athletes, coaches, and physical education teachers actively engaged in competitive and noncompetitive sports. The following subjects are discussed: (1) competitive sport and personality development; (2)…

  14. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  15. Sports vision training procedures.

    PubMed

    Kirscher, D W

    1993-01-01

    Eye exercises have been designed to provide an opportunity for athletes to practice the visual skills essential to popular sports activities. These exercises, which may be used at home or in the office, emphasize visual recognition, motor coordination, and concentration. Home exercises that are commonly employed include the Brock string, flip-card exercises, and ball on a string (Marsden ball). Office exercises usually include the use of specialized equipment such as the tachistoscope and the saccadic fixator. Complicators such as plus and minus lenses, yolk prisms, and strobe lights may be employed to enhance concentration while performing the exercise.

  16. [Sports and heat stroke].

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Itsuki; Miyake, Yasufumi; Aruga, Tohru

    2012-06-01

    We described Characteristic of the heat stroke in the sports activity in Japan. It was common in teenage men, and 15 years old had a peak with a man, the woman. Most patients did not need specific treatment. Many happened from the end of July on the outdoors around 3:00 p.m. in mid-August. There are many in order of baseball, football, tennis, and a basketball. Running and cycling had high severity of illness. Probably, grasp of an environmental condition, suitable sportswear, suitable hydration, and condition management are the best things as preventive measures.

  17. Optimum Projection Angle for Attaining Maximum Distance in a Soccer Punt Kick

    PubMed Central

    Linthorne, Nicholas P.; Patel, Dipesh S.

    2011-01-01

    To produce the greatest horizontal distance in a punt kick the ball must be projected at an appropriate angle. Here, we investigated the optimum projection angle that maximises the distance attained in a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper. Two male players performed many maximum-effort kicks using projection angles of between 10° and 90°. The kicks were recorded by a video camera at 100 Hz and a 2 D biomechanical analysis was conducted to obtain measures of the projection velocity, projection angle, projection height, ball spin rate, and foot velocity at impact. The player’s optimum projection angle was calculated by substituting mathematical equations for the relationships between the projection variables into the equations for the aerodynamic flight of a soccer ball. The calculated optimum projection angles were in agreement with the player’s preferred projection angles (40° and 44°). In projectile sports even a small dependence of projection velocity on projection angle is sufficient to produce a substantial shift in the optimum projection angle away from 45°. In the punt kicks studied here, the optimum projection angle was close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball remained almost constant across all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing projection angle and so the optimum projection angle is well below 45°. Key points The optimum projection angle that maximizes the distance of a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper is about 45°. The optimum projection angle is close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball is almost the same at all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the optimum projection angle is well below 45° because the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing

  18. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  19. Sports Information Online: Searching the SPORT Database and Tips for Finding Sports Medicine Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janke, Richard V.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The first article describes SPORT, a database providing international coverage of athletics and physical education, and compares it to other online services in terms of coverage, thesauri, possible search strategies, and actual usage. The second article reviews available online information on sports medicine. (CLB)

  20. Sports-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    Laker, Scott R

    2015-08-01

    Sports-related concussions (SRC) are common in all ages and occur in all sports. The diagnosis based on clinical suspicion after more serious injury is ruled out. Symptoms of concussion are due to a temporary and reversible neurometabolic cascade resulting in blood flow changes, neuronal excitotoxicity, ionic shifts, and mitochondrial changes. Symptoms are nonspecific, and commonly include headache, cognitive complaints, photophobia, and phonophobia. Loss of consciousness is rare in SRC and has limited influence on recovery and prognosis. Imaging has a limited role in the management of concussion and should be used to evaluate for more serious intracranial pathology. Treatment is based on symptoms and an understanding of the typical, rapid (7-10 days) recovery. No athlete should return to play until their symptoms have resolved and they have completed a supervised, step-wise return to play protocol. The article covers the most recent literature on the diagnosis and management of SRC, including evidence-based recommendations and expert-based consensus opinion. The article will also discuss issues regarding medical retirement, legislation, and future concepts in concussion diagnosis and management.

  1. Gene doping in sports.

    PubMed

    Unal, Mehmet; Ozer Unal, Durisehvar

    2004-01-01

    Gene or cell doping is defined by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance". New research in genetics and genomics will be used not only to diagnose and treat disease, but also to attempt to enhance human performance. In recent years, gene therapy has shown progress and positive results that have highlighted the potential misuse of this technology and the debate of 'gene doping'. Gene therapies developed for the treatment of diseases such as anaemia (the gene for erythropoietin), muscular dystrophy (the gene for insulin-like growth factor-1) and peripheral vascular diseases (the gene for vascular endothelial growth factor) are potential doping methods. With progress in gene technology, many other genes with this potential will be discovered. For this reason, it is important to develop timely legal regulations and to research the field of gene doping in order to develop methods of detection. To protect the health of athletes and to ensure equal competitive conditions, the International Olympic Committee, WADA and International Sports Federations have accepted performance-enhancing substances and methods as being doping, and have forbidden them. Nevertheless, the desire to win causes athletes to misuse these drugs and methods. This paper reviews the current status of gene doping and candidate performance enhancement genes, and also the use of gene therapy in sports medicine and ethics of genetic enhancement.

  2. Women and sport.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M; Robertson, A

    2010-05-01

    Women have historically taken part in sports for many centuries. The first recorded female game competitions were the Herean Games in approximately 1,000 BC, named after the Goddess Hera. Held at Olympia in Greece, these games were for women alone and were thought to have originated as part of ancient fertility rights. Historically there is evidence of sporting activities involving women, but nothing of significance until after the 1948 summer Olympic Games, when 385 female athletes participated. Over the last six decades there has been a noted rise in the number of female athletes, reaching its maximum with the 2008 Beijing Olympics, where over 42% of the 11,028 athletes were women. Similarly in 2006, at the Turin Winter Olympics in Italy, 40% of the 2,500 athletes were females. In the 2012 Olympics, the Olympic Committee anticipates that approximately 44% of all athletes participating will be female. Despite there being a significant rise in the number of elite athletes in the UK, there appears to be an overall decrease in the amount and intensity of physical exercise undertaken by teenage girls. This is considered to be due to the fact that physical education is no longer an integral part of the school curriculum in the UK. There is, however, a small but significant group of elite athletes who start to train at a very early age (9-10 years old) especially in gymnastics, skating, swimming and athletics. PMID:20533698

  3. Social neighborhood environment and sports participation among Dutch adults: does sports location matter?

    PubMed

    Kramer, D; Stronks, K; Maas, J; Wingen, M; Kunst, A E

    2015-04-01

    Studies on the relation between the social neighborhood environment and sports participation have produced inconsistent results. Use of generic sports outcomes may have obscured associations only apparent for sports at certain locations. This study aims to assess the association between the social neighborhood environment and three location-specific sports outcomes. Repeated cross-sectional data on sports participation (any type of sports, sports at indoor sports clubs, sports at outdoor sports clubs, sports on streets) were obtained from 20 600 adults using the Dutch national health survey 2006-2009. Data on neighborhood social safety and social capital were obtained using the Dutch Housing Research 2006. Over 40% of Dutch adults participated in any type of sports. Indoor sports clubs were most popular. Multilevel logistic regression analyses revealed that neighborhood social safety was positively associated with sports at indoor sports clubs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.48), but not with the other sports outcomes. Contrary, neighborhood social capital was positively associated with sports on streets only (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.17-2.44). The results suggest that a positive social neighborhood environment enhances sports participation, but that this impact depends on the location of the sports activity. This study highlights the importance of using location-specific sports outcomes when assessing environmental determinants.

  4. The Norelco Sport Fanatics Survey: examining behaviors of sport fans.

    PubMed

    Wann, Daniel L; Friedman, Kim; McHale, Meredith; Jaffe, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    The Norelco Sport Fanatics Survey administered by Impulse Research to over 1,400 avid sport fans online assessed their support of and involvement with their teams, emotional responses prior to and subsequent to team performance, and the effect of their fandom on their family and social relations. Analysis yielded results which replicated past research and indicated that sport fandom was extremely important to the respondents, intensified affective reactions, and was perceived as a highly social activity with very few negative consequences for interpersonal relations. PMID:12841467

  5. An Examination of Conceptualization of Sport Metaphors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dervent, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the metaphors that were used by athletes, coaches, faculty members, and sport managers to describe the concept of "sport". Participants (N = 473) were asked to reveal the single metaphor they had in minds in the sense of the concept of sport by the prompt "Sport is like … because …" 22 valid metaphors were…

  6. More than Play: Three Careers in Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilorio, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Sports are more than fun and games; they also provide work for many people. Sports workers earn wages in leagues across the nation. Organized sports include a variety of individual and team events, which require the efforts of many workers in different occupations. Many people are particularly attracted to the sports occupations that are closest…

  7. Developing Individual and Team Character in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stacey A.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that participation in sport builds character is a long-standing one. Advocates of sport participation believe that sport provides an appropriate context for the learning of social skills such as cooperation and the development of prosocial behavior (Weiss, Smith, & Stuntz, 2008). Research in sport regarding character development has…

  8. The Sporting Past in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borish, Linda J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the role of sports in U.S. history. Describes primary sources and scholarly articles available for use in integrating sports history into history courses. Addresses questions about sport and society in the United States from the Puritans through the present day. Suggests that sports have been used to limit upward mobility and maintain…

  9. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  10. Sport Management Graduate Programs: Characteristics of Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ming; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the characteristics that enable graduate sport management programs to achieve their objectives. Surveys of sport management educators found they agreed on 11 characteristics that indicated a sport management program's effectiveness. Respondents believed an effective program should produce sport managers, not…

  11. Moral Thinking, Sports Rules and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Leo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to resolve "moral conflict" in sport and to present a better approach with respect to right actions for sports participants. While acknowledging that there are many positive values or principles (e.g. Olympism) in sport, some "moral conflict" in sport might still arise and therefore cannot be easily resolved. By…

  12. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  13. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  14. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe.

  15. The evolution of sports medicine in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benedict

    2013-10-01

    Sports medicine is a relatively new subspecialty in Singapore. This commentary chronicles its evolution in Singapore from 1969, through various milestones, to the present day. The first sports medicine clinic in Singapore was established in 1971 at Farrer Park. Notable institutions that followed include the Sports Medicine and Research Centre (1973), Soldier Performance Centre, Changi Sports Medicine Centre (2003), Singapore Sports Medicine Centre (2006), and other multidisciplinary centres of restructured hospitals. Formal groundwork to establish sports medicine as a subspecialty began in 2005, with its first trainee commencing traineeship at the Changi Sports Medicine Centre in 2007, and culminated in the subspecialty register at the beginning of 2011. Also captured in this discussion are the broader scopes of sports medicine, including military sports medicine, the sports sciences, exercise medicine, and event medical coverage.

  16. Sudden death in racquet sports.

    PubMed

    Eichner, E R

    1988-04-01

    The regular playing of racquet sports tends to confer general health and to protect the heart--to produce the athletic heart syndrome. Strenuous play, however, can provoke ventricular arrhythmias and can kill individuals with heart disease. The overall risk for an exercise death from racquet sport play seems to be as low as from distance running. Middle-aged men, however, especially those with known coronary disease or coronary risk factors, should approach racquet sports with caution, and might benefit from timely medical advice.

  17. Sports Medicine: What is a Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... difference between a Sports Medicine Specialist and an Orthopedic Surgeon? Both are well trained in musculoskeletal medicine. ... in the non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. Orthopedic surgeons are also trained in the operative treatment ...

  18. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis.

  19. Modernizing sports facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, R.

    1996-09-01

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team to meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.

  20. Supplements and sports.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, David M; Harbert, Allison J

    2008-11-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from professional athletes to junior high school students. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have serious adverse effects. Anabolic steroids and ephedrine have life-threatening adverse effects and are prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and the National Collegiate Athletic Association for use in competition. Blood transfusions, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone are also prohibited in competition. Caffeine, creatine, and sodium bicarbonate have been shown to enhance performance in certain contexts and have few adverse effects. No performance benefit has been shown with amino acids, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, chromium, human growth hormone, and iron. Carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages have no serious adverse effects and can aid performance when used for fluid replacement. Given the widespread use of performance-enhancing supplements, physicians should be prepared to counsel athletes of all ages about their effectiveness, safety, and legality.

  1. Supplements and sports.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, David M; Harbert, Allison J

    2008-11-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from professional athletes to junior high school students. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have serious adverse effects. Anabolic steroids and ephedrine have life-threatening adverse effects and are prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and the National Collegiate Athletic Association for use in competition. Blood transfusions, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone are also prohibited in competition. Caffeine, creatine, and sodium bicarbonate have been shown to enhance performance in certain contexts and have few adverse effects. No performance benefit has been shown with amino acids, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, chromium, human growth hormone, and iron. Carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages have no serious adverse effects and can aid performance when used for fluid replacement. Given the widespread use of performance-enhancing supplements, physicians should be prepared to counsel athletes of all ages about their effectiveness, safety, and legality. PMID:19007050

  2. [Anabolic steroids and sports].

    PubMed

    Kopera, H

    1986-09-30

    Anabolic steroids are derivatives of androgens with less androgenic and stronger anabolic actions. They should be used for therapeutic indications only. Their misuse to improve physical performance is unethical (doping), illegal and of doubtful pharmacological value. Together with intense muscular exercise and high-protein diet, anabolics due to their anabolic and anti-catabolic actions possibly increase physical performance and enhance recovery in athletes where added strength is a great advantage. In most sport disciplines a beneficial effect has not been demonstrated. Like all active drugs, anabolics can cause side-effects. They depend on structure, dosage and duration of administration. The misuse by athletes of high doses during long periods should be a particular motivation for doctors, teachers and coaches to discourage athletes from using anabolic drugs. The dangers of overdosing and long-term use are emphasized, search for untoward side- and after- effects by regular and careful controls is recommended.

  3. Cerebellopontine Angle Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Martin U.; Lüdemann, Wolf O.; Schreiber, Hartwig; Samii, Madjid

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas in an infratentorial and extra-axial location are extremely rare. The presented case of an extensive lipoma of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represents 0.05% of all CPA tumors operated on in our department from 1978 to 1996. The lipoma constitutes an important differential diagnosis because the clinical management differs significantly from other CPA lesions. The clinical presentation and management of the presented case are analyzed in comparison to all previously described cases of CPA lipomas. The etiology and the radiological features of CPA lipomas are reviewed and discussed. CPA lipomas are maldevelopmental lesions that may cause slowly progressive symptoms. Neuroradiology enables a reliable preoperative diagnosis. Attempts of complete lipoma resection usually result in severe neurological deficits. Therefore, we recommend a conservative approach in managing these patients. Limited surgery is indicated if the patient has an associated vascular compression syndrome or suffers from disabling vertigo. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171031

  4. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  5. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  6. Men at sport: gay men's experiences in the sport workplace.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Elizabeth S

    2011-01-01

    Research on sexual identity and sport has revealed a shifting narrative about the experiences of gay men. While some suggest the atmosphere is hostile, others posit that homophobia and sexual prejudice are playing less of a role in gay men's experiences. This research focuses on the experiences of 10 gay men working in professional, collegiate, and club sport, as part of a larger dataset of 37 male and female employees. Five of the men were overtly and publicly out at work, while five were closeted (to varying degrees). This article focuses on three themes for gay men working in sport: 1) the importance of coming out in the workplace; 2) the role of the locker room as a contested terrain, and 3) the disconnect between their experiences at work and their perceptions of the workplace environment as negative or positive. Men in this study were basing their impressions on their total experience in sport (as current and former players, as employees, and as fans). It also suggests that the public "story" of gay men working in sport represents one of two extremes-either the proverbial "horror story," or the extremely positive representation of gay men's experiences. This research suggests that gay men's experiences in sport are more complex and nuanced than the public narrative implies. PMID:21534074

  7. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    PubMed

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  8. The aging spine in sports.

    PubMed

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Elson, Lauren; Brand, Erik

    2012-07-01

    1. Masters athletes may experience low back pain from multiple sources. Masters athletes with discogenic back pain should avoid or modify sports with combined rotational and compressive forces; individuals with facet-mediated pain should avoid or modify sports with excessive extension and rotation. 2. Optimization of flexibility, strength, endurance, and core control is critical. Sports specific training, realistic goal setting, and counseling are of maximal importance. 3. Overall, the health benefits of continued sports and athletic participation outweigh the potential risks of spinal degeneration in middle-aged athletes. There is little correlation between radiographic appearance of the spine and symptoms; therefore, symptoms should serve as the primary guide when determining activity modifications. Overall, masters athletes should be encouraged to remain active and fit to enhance their quality of life and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Sports medicine: some ethical issues.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, J

    1993-01-01

    The ethical aspects of sports medicine have hitherto received little scrutiny, in contrast to its legal implications, which have recently been subject to much greater discussion. However, the differences that are apparent between sports medicine and 'mainstream' areas of clinical practice can shed new light on a number of the central issues within health-care ethics. By means of hypothetical case studies, this paper seeks to examine some of these issues within a sports medicine context. Specific attention will be paid to the concepts of autonomy and paternalism, issues to do with truthfulness, and the question of conflicting professional loyalties. It is suggested that the ethics of sports medicine warrant further and more detailed examination. PMID:8358592

  10. Sport: A Myth about Consciousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Darlene Z.

    1978-01-01

    Escape from the mundane, the classical Greek search for a higher quality of life, and the expression of the (Jungian) masculine principle are examples of the mythic elements the human psyche creates within sport. (Author/LH)

  11. Sports Injury Prevention Tip Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Finance Human Resources and Administrative Services Information Technology Marketing and Sales Membership Practice Public Affairs Quality Publishing ... Feedback Recent a a a print email share Facebook Twitter 2016 Sports Injury Prevention Tip Sheet 3/ ...

  12. [Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis and sports].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, M; Reuter, I; Freiwald, J; Böhme, T; Halbsguth, A

    1997-09-01

    Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis occur predominantly in the lower lumbar spine. Besides congenital defects such as predisposition of spondylolysis the correlation between competitive sports activities and an increased incidence of spondylolysis is proved. In early stages, complete healing can be achieved by conservative treatment (abstinence from sports activities for 3 months, orthesis). Persistence of pain, neurologic symptoms and progression of vertebral slipping are indications for operative treatment (reconstruction of the isthmus, dorso-ventral spondylodesis). The exercise tolerance depends on the extent of instability, progression of vertebral slipping and clinical symptoms. The limits of exercise tolerance vary among the individual athletes and require the decision of the physician. Backstroke swimming, abdominal and back muscle strengthening exercises, and types of sport involving smooth movements are advisable. Sports education in school is possible without restriction in patients with stable spondylolysis and in those with spondylolisthesis without unfavourable concomitant factors. PMID:9432659

  13. The Physics of Sport Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Walter C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a physics course, Biomechanics, designed for physical education majors, where stroboscopic photography is used to provide student data to calculate average velocities of objects in different sport activities. (GA)

  14. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain Can Be A Pain Page Content If ... speeds, sports hernias are frequently confused with common muscle strain ,” says Michael Sampson, DO, who practices in ...

  15. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs.

  16. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs. PMID:19005358

  17. [Acute myocardial infarction during sport].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M; Asakuma, S; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Yasutomi, N; Iwasaki, T

    1995-10-01

    Thirty patients with acute myocardial infarction which occurred during sport were investigated to identify the type of sport, prodromata, situations at the onset of disease, habit of exercise, preceding medical evaluation, coronary risk factors, and coronary angiographic findings. Infarction occurred during golf in 12 patients, bowling in 4, gateball in 4, jogging or running in 5, baseball in 2, and tennis or table tennis in 3. The majority of the patients were playing ball games. Twenty-seven patients were men (90%) and 3 were women (10%). All patients had played the same kind of sport for several years. Twenty-four patients had one or more coronary risk factors, and especially 18 patients smoked cigarettes. Nine patients had experienced anterior chest pain but only two patients had received medical evaluation. Coronary angiography was performed in 25 patients (83.3%), revealing single-vessel disease in 14, two-vessel disease in 6, three-vessel disease in 4, and disease of all left main coronary trunks in 1. The acute episode of infarction occurred mainly in spring or fall. Many patients with acute myocardial infarction occurring during sport participate in sports of low or moderate dynamic and low static exercises which are generally regarded safe. Many patients had enjoyed their sports regularly for a long time. Though many patients had coronary risk factors, only a few had received a medical check before their heart attack.

  18. [Sport-related maxillofacial fractures].

    PubMed

    Shoshani, Y; Givol, N; Taicher, S

    1999-12-01

    The records of 537 patients with 750 maxillofacial fractures were reviewed and analyzed. 55 (10.2%) had sport-related injuries and the rest were due to other causes. The sport-related group was predominantly male (ratio 9:1) with a mean age of 24.5 years. The mandible was most commonly injured (52.5%), followed by the zygomatic complex (32.8%). The incidence of complicated mid-facial fractures was only 2.8%, and of comminuted fractures 9%. This distribution of injuries is most likely due to the relatively low-energy of trauma associated with many sport activities. The relatively low mean age of the patients, most of whom had full dentition, allowed for conservative treatment of most of the mandibular fractures, using closed reduction. Injuries were caused by 11 different sports. The highest incidence was soccer (45%), followed by skating (15%), basketball (9%) and horse-riding (9%). Contact sports were the cause of injuries in 72.2%, with the highest incidence of trauma due to impact with another player (60%). Better protection of the oral and maxillofacial region is needed, especially during high-contact sport.

  19. Local Positioning Systems in (Game) Sports

    PubMed Central

    Leser, Roland; Baca, Arnold; Ogris, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Position data of players and athletes are widely used in sports performance analysis for measuring the amounts of physical activities as well as for tactical assessments in game sports. However, positioning sensing systems are applied in sports as tools to gain objective information of sports behavior rather than as components of intelligent spaces (IS). The paper outlines the idea of IS for the sports context with special focus to game sports and how intelligent sports feedback systems can benefit from IS. Henceforth, the most common location sensing techniques used in sports and their practical application are reviewed, as location is among the most important enabling techniques for IS. Furthermore, the article exemplifies the idea of IS in sports on two applications. PMID:22163725

  20. Biomechanics: an integral part of sport science and sport medicine.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B

    1999-12-01

    Biomechanics is one of the disciplines in the field of Human Movement and Exercise Science and it can be divided into three broad categories from a research perspective. Clinical biomechanics involves research in the areas of gait, neuromuscular control, tissue mechanics, and movement evaluation during rehabilitation from either injury or disease. Occupational biomechanics typically involves research in the areas of ergonomics and human growth or morphology as they influence movement. While these two categories will briefly be discussed, the primary aim of this paper is to show the role of biomechanics in sports science and sports medicine. Research in sports biomechanics may take the form of describing movement from a performance enhancement (such as matching of impulse curves in rowing) or injury reduction perspective (such as diving in swimming or the assessment of knee joint loading during downhill walking). However, the strength of sports biomechanics research is the ability to establish an understanding of causal mechanisms for selected movements (such as the role of internal rotation of the upper arm in hitting or striking, and the influence of elastic energy and muscle pre-stretch in stretch-shorten-cycle actions). The growth of modelling and computer simulation has further enhanced the potential use of sports biomechanics research (such as quantification of knee joint ligament forces from a dynamic model and optimising gymnastics performance through simulation of in-flight movements). Biomechanics research may also play an integral role in reducing the incidence and severity of sporting injuries (such as identification of the causes of back injuries in cricket, and the causes of knee joint injuries in sport). In the following discussion no attempt will be made to reference all papers published in each of these areas because of the enormity of the task. Published and current work from the biomechanics laboratory at the Department of Human Movement and

  1. Nutrition and sports performance.

    PubMed

    Brotherhood, J R

    1984-01-01

    During the past 20 years there have been great developments in the scientific understanding of the role of nutrition in health and physical performance. Epidemiological and physiological studies have provided evidence that certain forms of dietary behaviour may be linked with an increased risk of developing disorders such as high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and some cancers. This has resulted in dietary recommendations that are intended to reduce the incidence of these disorders in the community. The science of nutrition in relation to sports performance has progressed from empirical studies investigating the effects of dietary manipulations, such as restriction and supplementation, to the direct investigation of the physiological basis of the specific nutritional demands of hard physical exercise. This review is based on the premise that it is "what comes out' rather than "what goes in', which provides the clues to ideal nutrition for athletic performance. Various aspects of the physical demands of athletic exercise are viewed as stresses that induce specific biochemical, and hence nutritional, strains in the athlete. Training is the predominant demand in the athletic lifestyle. This is characterised by acute bouts of high power output. During one hour of hard training an athlete may expend 30% of his or her total 24-hour energy output. These high power outputs have important implications for energy substrate and water requirements. Carbohydrate, specifically muscle glycogen, is an obligatory fuel for the high power outputs demanded by athletic sports. Muscle glycogen is a limiting factor in hard exercise because it is held in limited amounts, utilised rapidly by intense exercise, and fatigue occurs when it is depleted to low levels in the active muscles. Liver glycogen may also be exhausted by hard exercise and low blood glucose contributes to fatigue. High sweat rates are demanded during severe exercise and large water deficits commensurate with

  2. Sport-specific nutrition: practical strategies for team sports.

    PubMed

    Holway, Francis E; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of a nutrition programme for team sports involves application of scientific research together with the social skills necessary to work with a sports medicine and coaching staff. Both field and court team sports are characterized by intermittent activity requiring a heavy reliance on dietary carbohydrate sources to maintain and replenish glycogen. Energy and substrate demands are high during pre-season training and matches, and moderate during training in the competitive season. Dietary planning must include enough carbohydrate on a moderate energy budget, while also meeting protein needs. Strength and power team sports require muscle-building programmes that must be accompanied by adequate nutrition, and simple anthropometric measurements can help the nutrition practitioner monitor and assess body composition periodically. Use of a body mass scale and a urine specific gravity refractometer can help identify athletes prone to dehydration. Sports beverages and caffeine are the most common supplements, while opinion on the practical effectiveness of creatine is divided. Late-maturing adolescent athletes become concerned about gaining size and muscle, and assessment of maturity status can be carried out with anthropometric procedures. An overriding consideration is that an individual approach is needed to meet each athlete's nutritional needs.

  3. Sport medicine and sport science practitioners' experiences of organizational change.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, C R D; Gilmore, S; Thelwell, R C

    2015-10-01

    Despite the emergence of and widespread uptake of a growing range of medical and scientific professions in elite sport, such environs present a volatile professional domain characterized by change and unprecedentedly high turnover of personnel. This study explored sport medicine and science practitioners' experiences of organizational change using a longitudinal design over a 2-year period. Specifically, data were collected in three temporally defined phases via 49 semi-structured interviews with 20 sport medics and scientists employed by three organizations competing in the top tiers of English football and cricket. The findings indicated that change occurred over four distinct stages; anticipation and uncertainty, upheaval and realization, integration and experimentation, normalization and learning. Moreover, these data highlight salient emotional, behavioral, and attitudinal experiences of medics and scientists, the existence of poor employment practices, and direct and indirect implications for on-field performance following organizational change. The findings are discussed in line with advances to extant change theory and applied implications for prospective sport medics and scientists, sport organizations, and professional bodies responsible for the training and development of neophyte practitioners.

  4. Sport medicine and sport science practitioners' experiences of organizational change.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, C R D; Gilmore, S; Thelwell, R C

    2015-10-01

    Despite the emergence of and widespread uptake of a growing range of medical and scientific professions in elite sport, such environs present a volatile professional domain characterized by change and unprecedentedly high turnover of personnel. This study explored sport medicine and science practitioners' experiences of organizational change using a longitudinal design over a 2-year period. Specifically, data were collected in three temporally defined phases via 49 semi-structured interviews with 20 sport medics and scientists employed by three organizations competing in the top tiers of English football and cricket. The findings indicated that change occurred over four distinct stages; anticipation and uncertainty, upheaval and realization, integration and experimentation, normalization and learning. Moreover, these data highlight salient emotional, behavioral, and attitudinal experiences of medics and scientists, the existence of poor employment practices, and direct and indirect implications for on-field performance following organizational change. The findings are discussed in line with advances to extant change theory and applied implications for prospective sport medics and scientists, sport organizations, and professional bodies responsible for the training and development of neophyte practitioners. PMID:25487162

  5. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  6. On sports and genes.

    PubMed

    Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Chen, Jieming; Gerstein, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Our genes influence our athletic ability. However, the causal genetic factors and mechanisms, and the extent of their effects, remain largely elusive. Many studies investigate this association between specific genes and athletic performance. Such studies have increased in number over the past few years, as recent developments and patents in DNA sequencing have made large amounts of sequencing data available for such analysis. In this paper, we consider four of the most intensively studied genes in relation to athletic ability: angiotensin I-converting enzyme, alpha-actinin 3, peroxismose proliferator-activator receptor alpha and nitric oxide synthase 3. We investigate the connection between genotype and athletic phenotype in the context of these four genes in various sport fields and across different ethnicities and genders. We do an extensive literature survey on these genes and the polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms or indels) found to be associated with athletic performance. We also present, for each of these polymorphisms, the allele frequencies in the different ethnicities reported in the pilot phase of the 1000 Genomes Project - arguably the largest human genome-sequencing endeavor to date. We discuss the considerable success, and significant drawbacks, of past research along these lines, and propose interesting directions for future research.

  7. Sulbutiamine in sports.

    PubMed

    Sobolevsky, Tim; Rodchenkov, Grigory

    2010-01-01

    Sulbutiamine (isobutyryl thiamine disulfide) is a lipophilic derivative of thiamine used for the treatment of asthenia and other related pathological conditions. It is available over-the-counter in several countries either as a component of nutritional supplements or as a pharmaceutical preparation. The presence of sulbutiamine in urinary doping control samples was monitored to evaluate the relevance of its use in sports. As one of the sulbutiamine metabolites has very close retention time and the same characteristic ion (m/z 194) as the main boldenone metabolite, the raw data files generated from the screening for anabolic steroids were automatically reprocessed to identify the samples containing sulbutiamine. It was found that of ca. 16 000 samples analyzed in the Russian laboratory during 2009, about 100 samples contained sulbutiamine. It is important to note that most of these samples were collected in-competition, and sulbutiamine concentration was estimated to be greater than 500 ng/ml. This may indicate that sulbutiamine was intentionally administered for its ergogenic and mild stimulating properties. PMID:21204296

  8. Marijuana as doping in sports.

    PubMed

    Campos, Daniel R; Yonamine, Mauricio; de Moraes Moreau, Regina L

    2003-01-01

    A high incidence of positive cases for cannabinoids, in analyses for doping control in sports, has been observed since the International Olympic Committee (IOC) included them in the 1989 list of prohibited drugs under the title of classes of prohibited substances in certain circumstances. Where the rules of sports federations so provide, tests are conducted for marijuana, hashish or any other cannabis product exposure by means of urinalysis of 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (carboxy-THC) the main metabolite of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Concentrations >15 ng/mL (cut-off value) in confirmatory analytical procedures are considered doping. Cannabis is an illicit drug in several countries and has received much attention in the media for its potential therapeutic uses and the efforts to legalise its use. Studies have demonstrated that the use of cannabinoids can reduce anxiety, but it does not have ergogenic potential in sports activities. An increase in heart rate and blood pressure, decline of cardiac output and reduced psychomotor activity are some of the pharmacological effects of THC that will determine a decrease in athletic performance. An ergolytic activity of cannabis products has been observed in athletes of several different sport categories. In Brazil, analyses for doping control in sports, performed in our laboratories, have detected positive cases for carboxy-THC in urine samples of soccer, volleyball, cycling and other athletes. It is our intention to discuss in this article some points that may discourage individuals from using cannabis products during sports activities, even in the so-called permitted circumstances defined by the IOC and some sports federations. PMID:12744713

  9. [Angle-closure chronic glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of chronic angle closure glaucoma is considerably greater than the incidence of the acute type. This type of glaucoma may mimic primary open angle glaucoma with visual field deterioration, optic nerve alteration and intraocular pressure elevation with a quiet painless eye. Its diagnosis is based on indentation gonioscopy showing peripheral anterior synechiae. The mechanisms of angle closure are the pupillary block, the plateau iris configuration and the creeping form. The treatment of chronic angle closure glaucoma is based on laser peripheral iridotomy. PMID:14646832

  10. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  11. Sport in Germany. Basis-Info 3-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitz, Steffen

    This paper explores the importance and impact of sport in Germany from a variety of perspectives. Topics include: (1) the social function of sport; (2) popular sport, focusing on exercise and self-development rather than competition; (3) sport's role in the leisure activities of the handicapped; (4) top sport performers; (5) drugs and sport; (6)…

  12. NCAA Public Relations Manual: Promoting Women's Intercollegiate Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flarup, Tamara J.

    The successful women's sports publicist communicates the legitimacy of women's intercollegiate athletics to the media and to the public. Because the field of women's sports has not had the amount of media exposure compared to that of professional sports, collegiate men's revenue sports, and high school sports, the women's sports publicist must…

  13. [The influence of sports injuries on sport participation and work].

    PubMed

    Nel, D; Smit, P J; Stoker, D J

    1979-03-17

    The incidence and complications of sport injuries in athletics, basketball, gymnastics, hockey, netball, cricket, tennis and soccer were analysed from questionnaire responses of 239 sport participants in Pretoria. Lower limb injuries were most common (73%). Torn tendomuscular organs represented 29,3% of the total number of injuries; sprains, strains and dislocations 35,9%; and fractures 20,5%. Medical treatment was sought by 62,8% of the patients. A total of 60,7% of the subjects was advised to suspend further participation in sport, but 30,6% failed to do so and more than half of these again sustained injuries. Those who were booked off from work totalled 18,0%, but a further 4,5% stayed away from work voluntarily.

  14. Sports Concussion Management: part II.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Thomas R; Cox, Conrad B; Bielak, Ken; Casmus, Robert; Laskowitz, Daniel; Nichols, Gregory

    2014-02-01

    Millions of concussions occur every year in the United States. The public interest in concussion has increased after a number of high-profile deaths in high school athletes from sports-related head trauma and in some professional athletes from chronic traumatic encephalopathy. One of the most active areas of research in sports medicine during the last decade has been the evaluation and management of concussion. In this second article of a two-part series, we provide an overview of the latest scientific advances in concussion research. This overview includes an update on the pathobiological changes that occur during concussion and the results of biomechanical studies. In addition, to aid the practicing clinician, we review the literature on proven and currently studied concussion risk factors, including a history of concussion, fatigue, and age. Genetic polymorphisms and biomarkers may provide risk-prediction capability, but at present the research remains inconclusive. Diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging are promising technologies that reveal more sophisticated data about the impact of concussion on the brain. We review the existing literature on the application of these neuroimaging modalities to sports concussion. An update from the Fourth International Conference on Concussion in Sport, with highlights of new recommendations, and the presentation of the third edition of the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool to evaluate acute concussion, concludes our review.

  15. Preparticipation Evaluation for Climbing Sports.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Aaron D; Davis, Christopher; Paterson, Ryan; Cushing, Tracy A; Ng, Pearlly; Peterson, Charles S; Sedgwick, Peter E; McIntosh, Scott E

    2015-09-01

    Climbing is a popular wilderness sport among a wide variety of professional athletes and amateur enthusiasts, and many styles are performed across many environments. Potential risks confront climbers, including personal health or exacerbation of a chronic condition, in addition to climbing-specific risks or injuries. Although it is not common to perform a preparticipation evaluation (PPE) for climbing, a climber or a guide agency may request such an evaluation before participation. Formats from traditional sports PPEs can be drawn upon, but often do not directly apply. The purpose of this article was to incorporate findings from expert opinion from professional societies in wilderness medicine and in sports medicine, with findings from the literature of both climbing epidemiology and traditional sports PPEs, into a general PPE that would be sufficient for the broad sport of climbing. The emphasis is on low altitude climbing, and an overview of different climbing styles is included. Knowledge of climbing morbidity and mortality, and a standardized approach to the PPE that involves adequate history taking and counseling have the potential for achieving risk reduction and will facilitate further study on the evaluation of the efficacy of PPEs.

  16. Preparticipation Evaluation for Climbing Sports.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Aaron D; Davis, Christopher; Paterson, Ryan; Cushing, Tracy A; Ng, Pearlly; Peterson, Charles S; Sedgwick, Peter E; McIntosh, Scott E

    2015-12-01

    Climbing is a popular wilderness sport among a wide variety of professional athletes and amateur enthusiasts, and many styles are performed across many environments. Potential risks confront climbers, including personal health or exacerbation of a chronic condition, in addition to climbing-specific risks or injuries. Although it is not common to perform a preparticipation evaluation (PPE) for climbing, a climber or a guide agency may request such an evaluation before participation. Formats from traditional sports PPEs can be drawn upon, but often do not directly apply. The purpose of this article was to incorporate findings from expert opinion from professional societies in wilderness medicine and in sports medicine, with findings from the literature of both climbing epidemiology and traditional sports PPEs, into a general PPE that would be sufficient for the broad sport of climbing. The emphasis is on low altitude climbing, and an overview of different climbing styles is included. Knowledge of climbing morbidity and mortality, and a standardized approach to the PPE that involves adequate history taking and counseling have the potential for achieving risk reduction and will facilitate further study on the evaluation of the efficacy of PPEs.

  17. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146. PMID:27607069

  18. [Sport performance with a prosthesis].

    PubMed

    van Keeken, Helco; Bongers, Raoul M; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Luc H V

    2013-01-01

    Technology is a contributory factor to sporting success in many Paralympic sports. This article is about upper and lower limb prostheses that are used in sports. The characteristics of lower limb prosthesis can be modified to respond to predictable leg movements such as with running. Conventional mechanical lower limb prostheses do not respond well to unexpected movements. There are upper limb prostheses that have been adapted for a broad range of sports including fishing, cycling, kayaking, skiing, baseball and even mountain climbing. Techniques are being developed that enable a more natural movement of the prosthesis to occur, such as targeted muscle reinnervation. These techniques are currently still in the experimental stage. The training schedule of the sportsperson must be balanced against his or her tolerance level to avoid mechanical overstrain, not only around the stump but also on the unaffected side. Lower limb prostheses that lead to top sporting successes, such as with running, have resulted in discussions about distorted competition. No upper limb prostheses have led to similar discussions.

  19. The Relationship between University Libraries' Collection for Sports and Their Students' Sports Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagami, Soichiro; Tsuji, Keita

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness of university libraries, we investigated the relationship between university students' sports performances and their libraries collections of sports. By examining approximately 20 university libraries' collections and their sports ranks, as indicated by Waseda Sports 2008, we demonstrated their positive…

  20. Sport Education as a Pedagogical Application for Ethical Development in Physical Education and Youth Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephen; Kirk, David; O'Donovan, Toni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider four pedagogical applications within the Sport Education model to examine the ways in which a young person can become a literate sports person and develop ethical behaviour through engagement in physical education and youth sport. Through a systematic review of the Sport Education research literature we…

  1. The Conventions of Sport Clubs: Enabling and Constraining the Implementation of Social Goods through Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skille, Eivind Asrum

    2011-01-01

    In order to shed light on the possibilities for using sport as a vehicle for the realization of social goods--understood as sport having a wider social role--this paper scrutinizes Norwegian sport clubs. The study is guided by the concept of convention, which refers to individuals' cognitive structures, and to social structure. Three sport clubs…

  2. Sport Governance and Policy Development: An Ethical Approach to Managing Sport in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Bodey, Kimberly J.; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    "Sport Governance and Policy Development" is written with the sport management student in mind. Designed to address the curriculum standards set by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education and the North American Society for Sport Management, this book provides information to meet core and related competency areas required for the…

  3. Promoting Girls' Participation in Sports: Discursive Constructions of Girls in a Sports Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svender, Jenny; Larsson, Hakan; Redelius, Karin

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to promote girls' participation in sports and which girls are seen as needing support? In this article we focus a government-financed sports venture and scrutinize the frames governing what is possible to say about girls and their participation in sports. By analyzing project applications from local sport clubs we investigate how…

  4. The influence of sport goggles on visual target detection in female intercollegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Danielle C; Clark, Joseph F; Smith, J Carson

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of sport goggles on visual target detection in female intercollegiate athletes. Participants were randomly divided into three groups that varied in goggle use (G) or no goggle use (NG) over a total of three 1-min trials during a visual target detection task. The NG-NG-NG group did not wear goggles for any of the trials, whereas the NG-G-NG group wore goggles for the second trial only, and the G-NG-G group wore goggles for the first and third trials. The task consisted of illuminated targets arranged in five concentric rings from central to peripheral visual angles. The effects of sport goggles on response time to detect targets were most evident in the peripheral rings. Those who did not wear sport goggles showed improved performance from the first to second trials. This improvement was impaired, however, in those who wore sport goggles. Moreover, there was a reversal of the performance improvements achieved without goggles in those who wore goggles on the third trial. Together, these findings suggest the sport goggles not only impaired the expected initial performance but also impaired visual target detection after performance improvements were seen. These findings suggest sport goggles may impair detection of peripheral visual stimuli in athletes.

  5. Investigations in the Science of Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammrich, Penny L.; Fadigan, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Sisters in Sport Science (SISS) program which provides equitable access for girls to science and mathematics through sports. Includes a sample SISS activity that integrates track and physical sciences. (YDS)

  6. Role Models and Sports: A Youthful Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Safety, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Research and numerous model programs suggest that sports play an important social role. Particularly among youth, sports and professional athlete role models help deter juvenile delinquency. Several athlete organizations have been established to aid youth. (SI)

  7. Sport Opportunities for Athletes with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This series outlines sport opportunities for athletes with disabilities. Included are articles discussing sports for athletes with cerebral palsy, deaf athletes, blind athletes, wheelchair bound athletes, amputee athletes, as well as a discussion of the Special Olympics. (JMK)

  8. Sports Jobs Shine for Olympic Summer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariani, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Gives information about opportunities, job tasks, and educational requirements of sports-related jobs in high school, college, and professional athletics: coaches, sports medicine specialists, managers, public relations specialists, and trainers. (SK)

  9. Sport Management Interns--Selection Qualifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1993-01-01

    Examines and rates the background qualifications and qualities, identified by sport management practitioners through an examination of paper credentials, that are desired in interviewees vying for selection into sport management internship positions. (GLR)

  10. Measuring Angles in Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeley, Nansee; Offerman, Theresa Reardon

    1997-01-01

    Features articles about physical therapy and its history as related to geometry through measurement of body angles. Includes open-ended worksheets for mathematics activities that introduce students to angle measurement, data analysis, and mathematical tools. Activities include: (1) Making Your Own Goniometer; (2) Range of Motion; (3) Active versus…

  11. Tendinopathy in Sport

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W.; Renström, Per

    2012-01-01

    Context: Tendinopathy is increasing in prevalence and accounts for a substantial part of all sports injuries and occupational disorders. Despite the magnitude of the disorder, high-quality scientific data on etiology and available treatments have been limited. Evidence Acquisition: The authors conducted a MEDLINE search on tendinopathy, or “tendonitis” or “tendinosis” or “epicondylitis” or “jumpers knee” from 1980 to 2011. The emphasis was placed on updates on epidemiology, etiology, and recent patient-oriented Level 1 literature. Results: Repetitive exposure in combination with recently discovered intrinsic factors, such as genetic variants of matrix proteins, and metabolic disorders is a risk factor for the development of tendinopathy. Recent findings demonstrate that tendinosis is characterized by a fibrotic, failed healing response associated with pathological vessel and sensory nerve ingrowth. This aberrant sensory nerve sprouting may partly explain increased pain signaling and partly, by release of neuronal mediators, contribute to the fibrotic alterations observed in tendinopathy. The initial nonoperative treatment should involve eccentric exercise, which should be the cornerstone (basis) of treatment of tendinopathy. Eccentric training combined with extracorporeal shockwave treatment has in some reports shown higher success rates compared to any therapies alone. Injection therapies (cortisone, sclerosing agents, blood products including platelet-rich plasma) may have short-term effects but have no proven long-term treatment effects or meta-analyses to support them. For epicondylitis, cortisone injections have demonstrated poorer long-time results than conservative physiotherapy. Today surgery is less indicated because of successful conservative therapies. New minioperative procedures that, via the endoscope, remove pathologic tissue or abnormal neoinnervation demonstrate promising results but need confirmation by Level 1 studies. Conclusions

  12. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  13. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R. II.

    1989-09-12

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting and accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning magic angle of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position. 2 figs.

  14. Herbs in exercise and sports

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The use of herbs as ergogenic aids in exercise and sport is not novel. Ginseng, caffeine, ma huang (also called 'Chinese ephedra'), ephedrine and a combination of both caffeine and ephedrine are the most popular herbs used in exercise and sports. It is believed that these herbs have an ergogenic effect and thus help to improve physical performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of these herbs on exercise performance. Recently, researchers have also investigated the effects of Eurycoma longifolia Jack on endurance cycling and running performance. These investigators have reported no significant improvement in either cycling or running endurance after supplementation with this herb. As the number of studies in this area is still small, more studies should be conducted to evaluate and substantiate the effects of this herb on sports and exercise performance. For instance, future research on any herbs should take the following factors into consideration: dosage, supplementation period and a larger sample size. PMID:22738233

  15. Sports and the deaf child.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David A; Ellis, M Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    The increasingly sedentary American lifestyle has resulted in a growing number of overweight and out-of-shape school-age children. Deaf children are not exempt from this trend, yet there is little evidence that public school programs for these children are doing anything to counter it. Much can be done to assist deaf students, not only in becoming more active movers but in gaining knowledge of opportunities and benefits associated with Deaf sport. The authors provide an argument for schools that expose deaf children to the role of sports in the Deaf community and for designing programs that will enable these children to become active participants in Deaf sport activities as athletes and organizers, or, later in life, when they no longer have the inclination or ability to compete, as spectators, with all the socialization benefits that form of involvement provides.

  16. Designing Games for Sport Education: Curricular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Brett

    2005-01-01

    Sports Education is becoming a popular alternative curricular model in physical education, opposing the more traditional Multi-activity model. Physical education classes are slowly changing to include sport education. The change comes with the support of the community in the form of Sport Education in Physical Education Program (SEPEP). However,…

  17. Application of Science and Medicine to Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Albert W., Ed.

    Great progress has been made in recent years in the scientific study of exercise and application to sport. This book provides an analysis of the state of physiological and clinical knowledge related to exercise and sports. The three sections--medicine and physical activity, science and exercise, and practical application to sport--cover a variety…

  18. Exploring Commitment to Youth Sports Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickabaugh, Tim

    2009-01-01

    With over 38 million U.S. youth (54% of children between ages 6 to 17) participating in organized sports each year, there is an ever increasing demand for entry-level youth sport leaders. To meet this leadership demand in organized youth sports, over 2.5 million adults volunteer to coach, yet less than 10% of these individuals have any formal…

  19. Teaching Team Sports: A Coeducational Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipp, Joan A.; Wilkerson, Jerry D.

    This manual shows teachers how to analyze and present sport skills by breaking them down into fundamental body movements that can be used in all sports. Complete information is given on how to teach seven team sports effectively in a coeducational setting. Advice is offered on how to organize course material, develop a curriculum, plan teaching…

  20. Why Young Athletes Sign Up for Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Zach; Strasser, Joe; McKenzie, Isaac; Stoll, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students participate in sports because of several reasons. A coach may effectively guide his team if he knows what motivates each player. In this article, the authors investigate the reasons why athletes sign up for sports. They designed a questionnaire with open-ended and close-ended questions which focuses on how students perceived sports, why…

  1. Developing a Personal Philosophy of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Cuneen, Jacquelyn

    2001-01-01

    Suggests five questions to initiate critical reflection, followed by five steps to guide the development of a personal philosophy of sport. The five questions (upon which the five steps are based) include examining the basis for one's values, what one values in sport, and what values are exhibited by others in the sport. Sample ethical dilemmas…

  2. Choosing Sport Management as a College Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Keri A.; Dustin, Daniel; Legg, Eric; Timmerman, Danielle; Wells, Mary Sara; Arthur-Banning, Skye G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand sport management students within departments of parks, recreation, and tourism, and to address the often uneasy fit faculty experience when trying to educate sport and recreation students in the same classes. Researchers sent a 16-item online questionnaire to 1,337 undergraduate sport management…

  3. Gender Equity, Sport Sponsorship, and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiamouyiannis, Athena

    2009-01-01

    As the pressure to win in select collegiate sports escalates, financial pressures mount, and the need to comply with Title IX regulations and gender equity policies continues, athletics administrators are faced with having to make difficult decisions regarding their sport programs. To assist in the decision-making process regarding sport programs,…

  4. Mathematics and Sports. Mathematical World. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadovskii, L. E.; Sadovskii, A. L.

    This volume contains some examples of mathematical applications in sports. Sports discussed include tennis, figure skating, gymnastics, track and field, soccer, skiing, hockey, and swimming. Problems and situations are posed and answers with thorough explanations are provided. Chapters include: (1) Mathematics and Sports; (2) What Is Applied…

  5. Youth Sport Volunteering: Developing Social Capital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Tess; Bradbury, Steven

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the capacity of youth sport volunteering to contribute to the development of social capital. Following a review of the emergence of social capital as a key theme in UK sport policy, the paper focuses on the ability of a structured sports volunteering programme to equip young people with skills for effective volunteering, and…

  6. Sports-related Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Pamela S.; Chandler, Steven B.

    2001-01-01

    Physical educators can incorporate sports-related novels into their curricula to help students explore a variety of sports and to open the door to discussions of the benefits of sport and fitness activities. This article describes how students can take the reading and compositions skills they learned in English and apply them to physical education…

  7. Development of the Sport Injury Anxiety Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rex, Camille C.; Metzler, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a measure of sport injury anxiety (SIA), defined as the tendency to make threat appraisals in sport situations where injury is seen as possible and/or likely. The Sport Injury Anxiety Scale (SIAS) was developed in three stages. In Stage 1, expert raters evaluated items to determine their adequacy. In…

  8. Marketing Sports Facilities: Perspectives from Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohutsana, Basuti; Akpata, Dele

    2013-01-01

    The provision of sports facilities contributes immensely to the growth of sports and leisure activities in the countries where they are provided. In some countries, as was the case in Botswana, the government had to spend millions of dollars to provide new Integrated Sports Facilities (ISF's) as a panacea for the continued poor performance of its…

  9. Crazy-Proofing High School Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufte, John E.

    2012-01-01

    "Crazy-Proofing High School Sports" examines the often troubling high school sports phenomenon in two parts. Part one focuses on the problems facing educators, students, and parents as they struggle to make high school sports worthwhile. Few if any strategies for improvement in education are effective without first knowing what the real reasons…

  10. Comparative Physical Education and Sport. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Bruce L.; And Others

    Educational theories and practice in the field of physical education and sport in various countries are discussed and compared. Chapters address: (1) comparative physical education and sport; (2) history and methodology of comparative education; (3) history and methodolog of comparative physical education and sport; (4) physical education in the…

  11. Chart Notes from a Sports Nutritionist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1986-01-01

    A sports nutritionist/registered dietician on the sports medicine team can provide clients with reliable nutrition information and respond to their interest in healthful, high-energy eating. Three case reports illustrate the usefulness of a nutritionist to practitioners of sports medicine. A chart of healthful foods is provided. (MT)

  12. Controversies in Pediatric Sports Medicine (Commentary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyment, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses controversial issues that have arisen in children's sports, including infant exercise programs, trampolines, amenorrhea in the adolescent athlete, coed contact sports, and sport participation by children with Down Syndrome. Policy statements are included from the American Academy of Pediatrics. (JD)

  13. Specialization or Diversification in Youth Sport?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensch, Lynn Pantuosco

    2006-01-01

    In 1990, Grant Hill published an article in Strategies that raised the issue of the "one sport high school athlete" and the tough decisions that young athletes face in terms of specializing in sport. The contents of that article were based on his study of high school athletic directors' and coaches' perspectives on sport specialization. This…

  14. Sport Psychology--Building a Bright Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunker, Linda K.; McGuire, Richard T.

    There is a need to provide practical applications of psychology to improve the quality of performance and the meaningfulness of participation in sports. The scientific and research-based foundations for sport psychology must be acknowledged and expanded. Sport psychologists should provide to coaches and athletes services that offer sound…

  15. Comparative Sports Psychology: British and American Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Benjamin; Walsh, Joseph

    By the turn of the 20th century, research had begun dealing with the subject of sport psychology in America. In the early 1900's, Coleman Griffin, the father of sport psychology, led the way in researching sport psychology. It was not until the 1960's that research in this field became popular in Great Britain. In 1967, in both America and Great…

  16. Interscholastic Sports: A Character-Building Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Stokowski, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    While interscholastic sports help young athletes enhance sport skills, physical fitness, self-discipline, sportsmanship, teamwork, time-management skills, self-confidence, and mental toughness, their benefits actually surpass even these. Interscholastic sports also promote life skills and lessons and enhance academic performance. The National…

  17. Government and Sport Transformation in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, C. E. S.; Macintosh, Donald

    The increasing commercialism and professionalism of sport through the medium of television has had an impact upon the policy of the Canadian government toward sport. Facing pressure from separatist movements within the country, the government has made athletics a keystone in the drive for national unity. The cultural significance of sport and the…

  18. Corporate Athleticism: A New Sports Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart-Nibbrig, Nand

    A discussion is presented on the commercialization of college team sports. The term "corporate athleticism" is used to refer to the influence of the business ethic on the college sport system, and the introduction of commercial values as the basic organizing principle of competitive college sports. Consideration is given to the consequences of…

  19. Applying the Sport Education Model to Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    The physical education field abounds with theoretically sound curricular approaches such as fitness education, skill theme approach, tactical approach, and sport education. In an era that emphasizes authentic sport experiences, the Sport Education Model includes unique features that sets it apart from other curricular models and can be a valuable…

  20. Orbital blowout fractures in sport.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, N P

    1994-01-01

    One-third of orbital blowout fractures are sustained during sport. Soccer is most commonly involved. Though visual acuity recovery is usually complete, permanent loss of binocular visual field is almost universal. Typically high-energy blows by opponent's finger, fist, elbow, knee or boot are responsible. Injuries to the eye itself may also be sustained and should be looked for. Ocular protection may be feasible in some sports, but the main preventive measure to be addressed is the reduction in aggressive play or deliberate injury. PMID:7894960

  1. Metabolic markers in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Colombini, Alessandra; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lubkowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise induces adaptations in metabolism considered beneficial for health. Athletic performance is linked to adaptations, training, and correct nutrition in individuals with genetic traits that can facilitate such adaptations. Intense and continuous exercise, training, and competitions, however, can induce changes in the serum concentrations of numerous laboratory parameters. When these modifications, especially elevated laboratory levels, result outside the reference range, further examinations are ordered or participation in training and competition is discontinued or sports practice loses its appeal. In order to correctly interpret commonly used laboratory data, laboratory professionals and sport physicians need to know the behavior of laboratory parameters during and after practice and competition. We reviewed the literature on liver, kidney, muscle, heart, energy, and bone parameters in athletes with a view to increase the knowledge about clinical chemistry applied to sport and to stimulate studies in this field. In liver metabolism, the interpretation of serum aminotransferases concentration in athletes should consider the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) from muscle and of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) mainly from the liver, when bilirubin can be elevated because of continuous hemolysis, which is typical of exercise. Muscle metabolism parameters such as creatine kinase (CK) are typically increased after exercise. This parameter can be used to interpret the physiological release of CK from muscle, its altered release due to rhabdomyolysis, or incomplete recovery due to overreaching or trauma. Cardiac markers are released during exercise, and especially endurance training. Increases in these markers should not simply be interpreted as a signal of cardiac damage or wall stress but rather as a sign of regulation of myocardial adaptation. Renal function can be followed in athletes by measuring serum creatinine concentration, but it should

  2. Prevention of pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Demorest, Rebecca A; Landry, Gregory L

    2003-12-01

    With over 30 million children participating in sports each year across the United States, a number of significant injuries are to be expected. Although mild injuries such as strains, sprains, and contusions predominate, catastrophic injuries do occur. Young athletes are at an increased risk for growth plate and apophyseal injuries, overuse injuries, and heat illness. Many of these sports injuries can be prevented. Prevention strategies include protective equipment, rule changes, preseason and season prevention interventions, safety measures, better coaching, education, and a societal awareness of injury and prevention. This article discusses current injury prevention for children participating in baseball, football, soccer, and ice hockey.

  3. Competitive sports for the disabled.

    PubMed

    Clark, M W

    1980-01-01

    A full life experience for people with and without physical disabilities usually includes some form of recreation or sport. Competition adds to enjoyment of sport for many people and can improve morale. This paper reviews some of the competitive opportunities available for people with a physical disability. These include competition within existing "able-bodied" organizations with or without adaptive devices and competition in separate organizations for those with disabilities. The latter include the National Wheelchair Basketball Association and the National Wheelchair Athletic Association.

  4. SPORT IT! Evaluation: A Report to the Australian Sports Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traill, R. D.; And Others

    This report presents results of an evaluation of the SPORT IT! program, a 15-week fundamental motor skill development program for Australian elementary school students. The program is taught by classroom teachers and involves approximately five sessions on each of six skill units: locomotion, ball control, throwing, tracking and trapping, kicking,…

  5. Promoting Sportsmanship in Youth Sports: Perspectives from Sport Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Jay D.; Iso-Ahola, Seppo E.

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces the physical education, recreation, and health practitioner to the relevant practical and theoretical information pertaining to sportsmanship in youth sports. It discusses four key areas related to sportsmanship: (1) constructs, (2) underlying theories, (3) empirical evidence, and (4) application and education. It also…

  6. Sports physicians and the doping crisis in elite sport.

    PubMed

    Hoberman, John

    2002-07-01

    The participation of sports physicians in the "doping" of athletes with banned drugs can be documented as far back as the 1890s. Concern about the ethics and safety of doping elite athletes appeared during the 1920s and 1930s as sport became an increasingly important form of popular culture. While organized medicine has opposed doping as a matter of policy at least since the 1950s, sports physicians have never adequately confronted the conflicts of interest that arise when they choose to work with elite athletes whose first priority is performance rather than with healing in the traditional sense. Confronted with the demands of their athlete-clients, sports physicians have divided into two factions regarding the wisdom and propriety of administering doping drugs to athletes. While most physicians are, in all likelihood, unwilling to violate laws, regulations, and medical standards by doping athletes, a significant minority of doctors has used one or more arguments to justify doping athletes: drugs are necessary to compete effectively; athletes should be free to medicate themselves as they please; drugs do not differ essentially from other performance-enhancing techniques or equipment; and medically supervised doping is safer than self-medication by athletes. Physicians can also rationalize doping as an occupational requirement of some professional athletes. In summary, physicians have played a significant, and largely unacknowledged, role in the doping of many elite athletes over the past 50 years.

  7. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  8. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  9. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  10. Extreme sports: injuries and medical coverage.

    PubMed

    Young, Craig C

    2002-10-01

    Extreme sports (including in-line skating, snowboarding, mountain bicycling, extreme skiing, rock climbing, indoor tackle football, kickboxing, skateboarding, and ultra-endurance racing) are growing in popularity. Often these sports are designed to expose athletes to greater thrills and risks than are found in traditional sporting activities. Despite this increased risk of injury, athletes competing in these sports often have little or no formal medical coverage. This article reviews what is known about this emerging area of sports medicine to assist physicians in preparing for medical coverage of these athletes and their competitions.

  11. Injury Patterns in Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Presents statistics on injury patterns in youth sports, recommending that physicians who care for young athletes understand the kinds of injuries likely to be sustained. Awareness of injury patterns helps medical professionals identify variables associated with injury, anticipate or prevent injuries, plan medical coverage, and compare individual…

  12. Eye protection in racquet sports.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, M

    1988-04-01

    This article summarizes the clinical and experimental data leading to the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) certification of six eyeguards for racquet sports in Canada in November 1986. A parallel approach involving the American Standard of Testing and Materials (ASTM) is discussed and eyeguards meeting specifications are illustrated.

  13. University Liability for Sports Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieder, Robert W.; Woodruff, William B., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes sports injury claims against colleges and universities in recent years to help administrators better understand and minimize liability risks for certain curricular and cocurricular activities. Reviews court cases in areas of duty of care and negligence and proximate cause, and discusses defenses. (Author/NB)

  14. Psychology of Sport. Issues & Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, A. Craig, Ed.

    This book is designed to provide instructors and students in sport psychology courses with a learning instrument that combines the continuity of a textbook with the range of opinion, in-depth treatment of selected issues, and insight into research methods of a book of readings. The subject is divided into four topical categories. Under the heading…

  15. A Sports Franchise Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surdam, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Students in sports economics courses might better learn the basic concepts by running their own franchise. A simple game, based on the card game War, is easy and inexpensive to implement. Students quickly grasp the importance of weighing marginal benefits, both in terms of team record and marginal revenue, against the costs of improving their…

  16. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  17. The World of Sports Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emeagwali, N. Susan

    2008-01-01

    Soon, the best athletes in the world will face each other at the Summer Olympics in Beijing. Many of them will sustain injuries, or seek to prevent them, and will be thankful that among their entourages are some of the best sports medicine professionals in the world. When an athlete collapses from fatigue, or something else, there will be a group…

  18. Research Update. Rethinking Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Georgianna; Rank, Bryan

    1997-01-01

    Youth sports need to defocus competitiveness and aggression and encourage cooperative games that involve cooperative efforts toward a goal and emphasize the process, not the outcome. This paper examines the New Games Movement, describes the benefits of cooperative games, presents examples of cooperative games, and notes the place for cooperative…

  19. Handbook for Youth Sports Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Vern, Ed.

    This handbook was generated by a survey of the specific needs of the coaching community serving young children as athletic coaches. The survey revealed a need for information that addresses the needs of beginning level volunteer coaches. The first section discusses the benefits of competitive sports for children and youth and the role of the youth…

  20. Sports Nutrition for Young Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.; McBee, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional needs for peak athletic performance include sufficient calorie intake, adequate hydration, and attention to timing of meals. Student athletes and their advisors often are misinformed or have misconceptions about sports nutrition. This paper identifies nutritional needs of young athletes, reviews common misconceptions, and examines the…

  1. Perceptions of high risk sports.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, D M

    1997-10-01

    High risk sports were rated as to risk, appeal, and likelihood of participation by 282 men and 162 women. Ascending order of perceived risk was skiing, scuba diving, bungee jumping, rock climbing, motorcycle racing, hang gliding, cliff jumping, and skydiving. Profile analysis showed stated likelihood of participation to be directly related to appeal and inversely related to perceived risk.

  2. The sun and water sports.

    PubMed

    Gentile, D A; Auerbach, P S

    1987-07-01

    Participation in aquatic sports such as sailing, fishing, SCUBA diving, and windsurfing often entails the unavoidable hazard of exposure to high levels of solar radiation. This review discusses what is known about the health hazards of ultraviolet radiation and presents information that allows a rational approach to sun protection.

  3. Weight Training for Wheelchair Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Practical Pointers, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The article examines weight lifting training procedures for persons involved in wheelchair sports. Popular myths about weight training are countered, and guidelines for a safe and sound weight or resistance training program are given. Diagrams and descriptions follow for specific weightlifting activities: regular or standing press, military press,…

  4. College Sports: Revising the Playbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casement, William

    2013-01-01

    The big-time approach to college sports demands an overhaul--for the good of the athletes, the bottom line, and the intellectual atmosphere on campus. The academic and nonacademic purposes within higher education institutions bump up against one another for a result that is increasingly dysfunctional. There is, however, a way out that will give…

  5. Pressures on Youth in Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungerleider, Steven

    2003-01-01

    The pressures on young athletes today, many of them brought on or exacerbated by parents, drive young athletes to attain perfection and win by any means necessary. For the young athlete, the challenges of learning how to balance schoolwork, social life, family time, and sports, not to mention other interests they might have, are far more intense…

  6. Sports injuries of the ear.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  7. Women and Leadership in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFrantz, Anita L.

    1988-01-01

    The history of women's participation in the Olympics is reviewed briefly. Women in positions of leadership of the International Olympic Committee and other sport organizations are mentioned. The lives of Constance Applebee, Eva Auchincloss, Rusty Kanogi, and Wilma Rudolph are highlighted. (MT)

  8. Preventing Infectious Disease in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Warren B.

    2003-01-01

    Preventing infectious disease in sports is fundamental to maintaining team effectiveness and helping athletes avoid the adverse effects of illness. Good hygiene, immunization, minimal exposure to specific diseases, and certain prophylactic measures are essential. Teammates, coaches, trainers, officials, healthcare providers, and community public…

  9. Sports Psychology and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Greta L., Ed.

    This monograph documents the speeches presented at the 1988 Symposium on Sports Psychology and the Coach. Presentations ranged from empirical research studies to anecdotal methodologies for coping with problems of anxiety. The following presentations are included: (1) "The Coach as Psychologist: When and How" (Robert Rotella); (2) "Psychology for…

  10. Injuries to Dutch sport parachutists.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, P J

    1988-01-01

    From 1981 to 1985 193,611 jumps were made by sport parachutists in the Netherlands. Of these 267 (0.14%) resulted in injuries including 4 fatalities. In this report the different types of injuries and their causes are discussed and comments are given in relation to training, selection, precautions and equipment, as well as upon accident registration and possible modifications. PMID:3285942

  11. Pediatric Issues in Sports Concussions

    PubMed Central

    Giza, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Sports-related concussions are receiving increasing attention in both the lay press and medical literature. While most media attention has been on high-profile collegiate or professional athletes, the vast majority of individuals participating in contact and collision sports are adolescents and children. This review provides a practical approach toward youth sports-related concussion with a foundation in the recent guidelines, but including specific considerations when applying these management principles to children and adolescents. Recent Findings: Objective measurement of early signs and symptoms is challenging in younger patients, and many commonly used assessment tools await rigorous validation for younger patients. Excellent evidence-based guidelines exist for CT evaluation of mild traumatic brain injury presenting to the emergency department. Evidence suggests that recovery from sports-related concussion takes longer in high school athletes compared with collegiate or professionals; however, rigorous studies below high school age are still lacking. Summary: Proper care for concussion in youth requires a delicate balance of clinical skills, age-appropriate assessment, and individualized management to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:25470161

  12. Modifications of Team Sports Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    In general, there are two reasons for modifying the rules in sport activities: (1) to meet a specific objective or (2) to solve a perceived problem. The sense of the original game is usually not altered significantly because the number of rule changes is kept to a minimum. Changes in rules may be made for administrative or financial reasons, or to…

  13. A Behavioural Analysis of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, John

    This book explores some of the basic principles of behavior which have been derived from the study of operant conditioning and considers the phenomenon of sport in society in the light of these principles. First, some of the terms used in Skinnerian behavioral analysis are defined and explained. The second section examines the reinforcements…

  14. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  15. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an optical calibration apparatus provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted.

  16. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  17. [Sports cardiology - a general practice oriented update].

    PubMed

    Schmied, Christian

    2014-08-01

    As a sub-speciality, Sports Cardiology focuses on sport and physical training interacting with cardiac issues. Particularly, Sports Cardiology deals with the so-called "Sports Paradox", which implicates the fact the on one side regular physical training leads to a multitude of relevant health benefits. But on the other hand, exercise can also be a trigger for sudden cardiac death, particularly in case of an underlying cardiac disease. However, health benefits by regular training outweigh potential risks by far, but only if an adequate cardiac screening and individual recommendations for sports participation have been provided. This review highlights various aspects of Sports Cardiology like strategies to prevent sudden cardiac death in sports and training recommendations in patients with an underlying cardiovascular disease.

  18. Self-determination in sport commitment.

    PubMed

    Zahariadis, Panayotis; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Alexandris, Konstantinos

    2006-04-01

    The study tested utility of self-determination and sport commitment theories to understanding young athletes' sport commitment. 343 young athletes (M= 13.5 yr., SD= +/- 1.1) from soccer, basketball, volleyball, handball, and water polo teams volunteered to participate. All completed the Sport Motivation Scale and the Sport Commitment Questionnaire. Pearson correlations showed a strong relationship between commitment and intrinsic motivation scores. In contrast, extrinsic motivation scores were not significantly correlated to commitment, whereas amotivation scores showed a negative correlation to commitment. Path analysis resulted in strong positive association of intrinsic motivation and commitment. Amotivation had small negative relation to commitment. According to the model tested, social constraints and involvement opportunities were not significant contributors to sport commitment. An alternative model supported the mediating role of enjoyment to psychological commitment. The results showed that high self-determination is supportive of sport commitment, whereas low self-determination reduces sport commitment.

  19. [Sports in Luxembourg. The role of heart healthy sports].

    PubMed

    Delagardelle, C

    2015-01-01

    30 years of organized ambulatory heart sport in Luxembourg Promoter of health sports. For more than 30 years both mortality and morbidity due to coronary artery disease (CAD) are significantly decreasing (> 70%) in the western world. This achievement is due to multiple interventions in the direct treatment of CAD and, especially, in fighting its risk factors: smoking, high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia and physical inactivity. In 1984 the first ambulatory heart sport group (phase 3 of cardiac reeducation) was founded in Luxembourg City, followed in 1991 by a section in Esch/Alzette and in 2002 by a 3ème section in Ettelbrück. These phase 3 cardiac sport groups (= chronic phase) are organized by some committed patients working on a voluntary basis and performing a professional job. Paradoxically these phase 3 groups preceded the phases 1 and 2 (= "in hospital" and subacute) of cardiac rehabilitation. However, in a parallel way ambulatory phase 2 physical activity (PA) was started in the main hospitals in Luxembourg City (Centrum), Esch/Alzette (South) and Ettelbrück ( North). In 2002 a cornerstone study by Myers et al proved that physical fitness is the most determinant of survival both for healthy people and for cardiac patients: The better the fitness, quantified in METs, the better the prognosis and this fact is the basis for the application of sports therapy in cardiac and most other patients. An important epidemiological study published in 2012 by Lee et al in Lancet analyzed the effects of physical inactivity (PI) all over the world: 4 important diseases were studied: CAD, breast cancer, colon cancer and type 2 diabetes. The effects of PI are most pronounced in colon cancer followed by diabetes 2, breast cancer and then CAD. As a mean about 9% of all deaths -5.9 million in 57 million deaths/year worldwide- are caused by PI and for Luxembourg 12.9%. This cornerstone study can serve as rationale for physical therapy (PT) intervention in oncology

  20. [Sports in Luxembourg. The role of heart healthy sports].

    PubMed

    Delagardelle, C

    2015-01-01

    30 years of organized ambulatory heart sport in Luxembourg Promoter of health sports. For more than 30 years both mortality and morbidity due to coronary artery disease (CAD) are significantly decreasing (> 70%) in the western world. This achievement is due to multiple interventions in the direct treatment of CAD and, especially, in fighting its risk factors: smoking, high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia and physical inactivity. In 1984 the first ambulatory heart sport group (phase 3 of cardiac reeducation) was founded in Luxembourg City, followed in 1991 by a section in Esch/Alzette and in 2002 by a 3ème section in Ettelbrück. These phase 3 cardiac sport groups (= chronic phase) are organized by some committed patients working on a voluntary basis and performing a professional job. Paradoxically these phase 3 groups preceded the phases 1 and 2 (= "in hospital" and subacute) of cardiac rehabilitation. However, in a parallel way ambulatory phase 2 physical activity (PA) was started in the main hospitals in Luxembourg City (Centrum), Esch/Alzette (South) and Ettelbrück ( North). In 2002 a cornerstone study by Myers et al proved that physical fitness is the most determinant of survival both for healthy people and for cardiac patients: The better the fitness, quantified in METs, the better the prognosis and this fact is the basis for the application of sports therapy in cardiac and most other patients. An important epidemiological study published in 2012 by Lee et al in Lancet analyzed the effects of physical inactivity (PI) all over the world: 4 important diseases were studied: CAD, breast cancer, colon cancer and type 2 diabetes. The effects of PI are most pronounced in colon cancer followed by diabetes 2, breast cancer and then CAD. As a mean about 9% of all deaths -5.9 million in 57 million deaths/year worldwide- are caused by PI and for Luxembourg 12.9%. This cornerstone study can serve as rationale for physical therapy (PT) intervention in oncology

  1. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries. PMID:19825746

  2. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries.

  3. The Semiotic and Conceptual Genesis of Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguay, Denis; Venant, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we try to understand how students at the end of primary school conceive of angle: Is an angle a magnitude for them or a geometric figure, and how do they manage to coordinate the two aspects in their understanding of the concepts of angle and of angle measurement? With the aim of better grasping the way "angle" is…

  4. The correlates of sports participation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Downward, Paul; Lera-López, Fernando; Rasciute, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Eurobarometer data from 2009 (N = 26,788), this paper investigates the correlates of sports participation. In addition to examining standard socio-demographic, economic and lifestyle factors, the paper also focuses on the impact of motivational factors, the availability of sports infrastructure and government support, for the first time collectively at the European level. A further contribution of the paper is that it simultaneously investigates both the decision to participate in sport and the frequency of sports participation in this context. This is made possible through the application of a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit estimator. This estimator also takes into account two types of non-participants: those who have never participated in sport and those who did not participate at the time of the survey. The results show that the decision to participate in sports and the frequency of sports participation of males and females are affected by different factors, therefore distinct government policies should be applied to attract new, and retain the existing, participants. For example, women are affected more by a need to improve self-esteem, while the men to produce social integration. The provision of sports facilities is of more importance for males, which may indicate a male-oriented nature of the sports facilities, for example, the gym. However, the number of adults and the number of children in the household reduce the probability of sports participation by females. Therefore, higher provision of childcare may be important if female participation is to be increased.

  5. Differences in Attentional Focus Associated With Recovery From Sports Injury: Does Injury Induce an Internal Focus?

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob

    2015-12-01

    Although it is commonly believed that focusing too much attention on the injured body area impairs recovery in sports, this has not been directly assessed. The present study investigated attentional focus following sports injury. Experienced baseball position players recovering from knee surgery (Expt 1) and baseball pitchers recovering from elbow surgery (Expt 2) performed simulated batting and pitching respectively. They also performed three different secondary tasks: leg angle judgments, arm angle judgments, and judgments about the ball leaving their bat/hand. Injured athletes were compared with expert and novice control groups. Performance on the secondary tasks indicated that the injured batters had an internal focus of attention localized on the area of the injury resulting in significantly poorer batting performance as compared with the expert controls. Injured pitchers had a diffuse, internal attentional focus similar to that of novices resulting in poorer pitching performance as compared with the expert controls.

  6. Differences in Attentional Focus Associated With Recovery From Sports Injury: Does Injury Induce an Internal Focus?

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob

    2015-12-01

    Although it is commonly believed that focusing too much attention on the injured body area impairs recovery in sports, this has not been directly assessed. The present study investigated attentional focus following sports injury. Experienced baseball position players recovering from knee surgery (Expt 1) and baseball pitchers recovering from elbow surgery (Expt 2) performed simulated batting and pitching respectively. They also performed three different secondary tasks: leg angle judgments, arm angle judgments, and judgments about the ball leaving their bat/hand. Injured athletes were compared with expert and novice control groups. Performance on the secondary tasks indicated that the injured batters had an internal focus of attention localized on the area of the injury resulting in significantly poorer batting performance as compared with the expert controls. Injured pitchers had a diffuse, internal attentional focus similar to that of novices resulting in poorer pitching performance as compared with the expert controls. PMID:26866768

  7. 76 FR 45647 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... revision process. Background: Under the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule, 69 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004,...

  8. 47 CFR 76.128 - Application of sports blackout rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application of sports blackout rules. 76.128... Sports Blackout § 76.128 Application of sports blackout rules. The cable and satellite sports blackout rules (§§ 76.111 and 76.127) may apply when the sports event is not available live on any of...

  9. 47 CFR 76.128 - Application of sports blackout rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application of sports blackout rules. 76.128... Sports Blackout § 76.128 Application of sports blackout rules. The cable and satellite sports blackout rules (§§ 76.111 and 76.127) may apply when the sports event is not available live on any of...

  10. 47 CFR 76.128 - Application of sports blackout rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application of sports blackout rules. 76.128... Sports Blackout § 76.128 Application of sports blackout rules. The cable and satellite sports blackout rules (§§ 76.111 and 76.127) may apply when the sports event is not available live on any of...

  11. 47 CFR 76.128 - Application of sports blackout rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application of sports blackout rules. 76.128... Sports Blackout § 76.128 Application of sports blackout rules. The cable and satellite sports blackout rules (§§ 76.111 and 76.127) may apply when the sports event is not available live on any of...

  12. 47 CFR 76.128 - Application of sports blackout rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application of sports blackout rules. 76.128... Sports Blackout § 76.128 Application of sports blackout rules. The cable and satellite sports blackout rules (§§ 76.111 and 76.127) may apply when the sports event is not available live on any of...

  13. Metrology of angles in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    2004-10-01

    In astronomy, measurements of angles play a major role. After defining the units in use in astronomy, three methods of measuring angles are presented, with an application to the transit instrument. The interferometric techniques for measuring large angles are described in optical and radio wavelengths. Due to the atmospheric and mechanical limitation on ground, space astrometry has multiple advantages. The satellite Hipparcos is described and the data reduction procedures and results obtained are sketched. In the future, two new astrometric space missions are approved: GAIA, based on Hipparcos principles and SIM, a space interferometer. They are described and the expected accuracies are presented. To cite this article: J. Kovalevsky, C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  14. Sports injuries and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Axe, M J; Newcomb, W A; Warner, D

    1991-06-01

    A one-year study was undertaken investigating adolescent sports injury experiences at a major sports clinic in the state of Delaware. A total of 619 athletes sustained 870 injuries, for an overall injury rate of 1.4 injuries per athlete. The largest number of injuries was recorded in football (40.2 percent), followed by boys' soccer, wrestling, baseball and girls' basketball. Severity of injury was measured by the number of days lost per injury. Cheerleading had the highest average days lost per injury (28.8), followed by girls' basketball, wrestling, boys' cross-country and girls' tennis. Inflammation, fractures and dislocations comprised 50.6 percent of all the injuries, while 50.5 percent of the injuries were located in the knee, thigh, and shoulder. Twenty-seven of the 870 injuries required surgery. PMID:1874345

  15. Neuromuscular fatigue in racquet sports.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2008-02-01

    This article describes the physiologic and neural mechanisms that cause neuromuscular fatigue in racquet sports: table tennis, tennis, squash, and badminton. In these intermittent and dual activities, performance may be limited as a match progresses because of a reduced central activation, linked to changes in neurotransmitter concentration or in response to afferent sensory feedback. Alternatively, modulation of spinal loop properties may occur because of changes in metabolic or mechanical properties within the muscle. Finally, increased fatigue manifested by mistimed strokes, lower speed, and altered on-court movements may be caused by ionic disturbances and impairments in excitation-contraction coupling properties. These alterations in neuromuscular function contribute to decrease in racquet sports performance observed under fatigue.

  16. Golf and racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jon A; Miller, Bruce S; Morag, Yoav

    2005-12-01

    There are specific injuries that are common in golf and racquet sports. These abnormalities have a predilection for specific structures as well and can be divided into two categories on the basis of etiology as either chronic repetitive injury or acute trauma. With golf injuries, upper extremity abnormalities prevail and include rotator cuff disease, epicondylitis, wrist tenosynovitis, and hamate hook fracture. Thoracolumbar spine pain can also occur. The order of frequency of these ailments is different for professional and recreational athletes. With racquet injuries, as in tennis, lower extremity injuries are more common and include medial gastrocnemius and Achilles tendon abnormalities, although shoulder, elbow, and wrist abnormalities may also occur. Knowledge of the biomechanics behind each sport is also helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of injury and in part explains the findings seen at imaging.

  17. Neuromuscular fatigue in racquet sports.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2009-02-01

    This article describes the physiologic and neural mechanisms that cause neuromuscular fatigue in racquet sports: table tennis, tennis, squash, and badminton. In these intermittent and dual activities, performance may be limited as a match progresses because of a reduced central activation, linked to changes in neurotransmitter concentration or in response to afferent sensory feedback. Alternatively, modulation of spinal loop properties may occur because of changes in metabolic or mechanical properties within the muscle. Finally, increased fatigue manifested by mistimed strokes, lower speed, and altered on-court movements may be caused by ionic disturbances and impairments in excitation-contraction coupling properties. These alterations in neuromuscular function contribute to decrease in racquet sports performance observed under fatigue.

  18. Racket sports. An ocular hazard.

    PubMed

    Vinger, P F; Tolpin, D W

    1978-06-16

    Eighty-two injuries secondary to the racket sports were studied during a 15-month period. Ordinary glasses provided considerable protection in the play of tennis and badminton, but not in the play of squash and racquet ball. Plastic safety lenses (USA Standard Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye ,nd Face Protection, approved Sept 18, 1968 by the USA Standards Institute [ANSI Z87.1-1968]) mounted in a sturdy frame (industrial or athletic) or an eye protector are necessary for squash and racquet ball. Contact lenses provide no ocular protection. Males suffered more serious injuries than females, but injuries were not related to the age or experience of the players. Eye protection is recommended for the racket sports.

  19. Sports injuries and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Axe, M J; Newcomb, W A; Warner, D

    1991-06-01

    A one-year study was undertaken investigating adolescent sports injury experiences at a major sports clinic in the state of Delaware. A total of 619 athletes sustained 870 injuries, for an overall injury rate of 1.4 injuries per athlete. The largest number of injuries was recorded in football (40.2 percent), followed by boys' soccer, wrestling, baseball and girls' basketball. Severity of injury was measured by the number of days lost per injury. Cheerleading had the highest average days lost per injury (28.8), followed by girls' basketball, wrestling, boys' cross-country and girls' tennis. Inflammation, fractures and dislocations comprised 50.6 percent of all the injuries, while 50.5 percent of the injuries were located in the knee, thigh, and shoulder. Twenty-seven of the 870 injuries required surgery.

  20. Sports-related ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Larrison, W I; Hersh, P S; Kunzweiler, T; Shingleton, B J

    1990-10-01

    A prospective evaluation of all patients presenting with a sports-related ocular injury during a 1-year (4-season) period was conducted. Of the 202 patients evaluated, 28 (13.8%) required hospitalization and 11 (5.6%) required intraocular surgery. Twenty-six patients (12.8%) sustained permanent ocular sequelae including seven (3.5%) who suffered visual loss. Basketball accounted for 28.7%, baseball/softball 19.8%, and racquetball 11.4% of all injuries. At the time of injury, 5.1% of patients had worn protective eye wear, whereas on follow-up only 31% had used eye protection. These results indicate that sports trauma remains a significant cause of ocular morbidity.

  1. Moral development and form of participation, type of sport, and sport experience.

    PubMed

    Proios, Miltiadis; Doganis, George; Athanailidis, Ioannis

    2004-10-01

    The present study investigated aspects of moral development in sport, according to the form of participation, type of sport, and sport experience. 510 participants, 14 to 49 years of age (M=24.9, SD=8.3) who came from organized competitive sports included athletes (n=327), referees (n=138), and coaches (n=45) in football (n = 161), handball (n = 198), and basketball (n = 150). Years of sport experience ranged from 1 to 6, 7 to 14, and 15 to 30 years of participation in sports. The Defining Issues Test was given; analysis showed no significant differences in development of moral reasoning among participants across different types of sports, forms of participation, and years of experience in sport.

  2. [Congenital heart diseases and sports].

    PubMed

    Martínez Quintana, E; Agredo Muñoz, J; Rodríguez González, F; Nieto Lago, V

    2008-04-01

    Congenital heart diseases are a frequent cause of cardiology consultation. New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have allowed greater survival and quality of life of patients who wish to participate in sports. What they can do is not always easy to determine. Guidelines are helpful at the time of deciding, although finally is the doctor the one that must determine in each case the situation of the patient and the type of exercise they can do depending on the severity and type of cardiopathy.

  3. Game intelligence in team sports.

    PubMed

    Lennartsson, Jan; Lidström, Nicklas; Lindberg, Carl

    2015-01-01

    We set up a game theoretic framework to analyze a wide range of situations from team sports. A fundamental idea is the concept of potential; the probability of the offense scoring the next goal minus the probability that the next goal is made by the defense. We develop categorical as well as continuous models, and obtain optimal strategies for both offense and defense. A main result is that the optimal defensive strategy is to minimize the maximum potential of all offensive strategies.

  4. Measuring training load in sports.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Michael Ian; Borresen, Jill

    2010-09-01

    The principle of training can be reduced to a simple "dose-response" relationship. The "response" in this relationship can be measured as a change in performance or the adaptation of a physiological system. The "dose" of training, or physiological stress associated with the training load, is more difficult to measure as there is no absolute "gold standard" which can be used in the field, making it difficult to validate procedures. Attempts have been made to use heart rate as a marker of intensity during training, but the theoretical attractiveness of this method is not supported by the accuracy and the practicality of using this method during training or competition. The session RPE, based on the product of training duration and perceived intensity is more practical and can be used in a variety of sports. However, the score depends on a subjective assessment, and the intersubject comparisons may be inaccurate. The demands of different sports vary and therefore the methods of assessing training need to vary accordingly. The time has come to reach consensus on assessing training accurately in different sports. There is a precedent for this consensus approach with scientists having already done so for the assessment of physical activity, and for defining injuries in rugby, football and cricket. Standardizing these methods has resulted in the quality of research in these areas increasing exponentially.

  5. Normative ethics in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Joseph; Perlis, Clifford; Bartolozzi, Arthur R

    2004-03-01

    The relationship between a team physician and an athlete differs significantly from the traditional doctor-patient relationship. To better define the ethical norms and ideals in sports medicine, we surveyed the views of practicing team physicians in the Ivy, National Football, and National Hockey Leagues and compared them with responses offered by professional ethicists. Six hypothetical cases were presented, each representing a distinct area of ethical conflict: advertising, conflicting healthcare goals, confidentiality, innovative treatments, enabling dangerous behavior, and treating children. Thirty-one ethicists and 131 team physicians responded to the surveys. Subjects were asked to rate agreement or disagreement with statements that followed the case description. Responses were converted to scores ranging from 0 to 100. A priori, a difference greater than 20 points was set to represent significant disagreement. By that standard, there was agreement between the physicians and ethicists for 18 of 23 statements. We concluded that team physicians and ethicists share many of the same ethical views on common ethical issues in sports medicine. The high degree of variance in the responses in both groups, however, suggests that many unresolved areas remain in the field of ethics in sports medicine.

  6. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2012-09-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters.

  7. A new era in sports science: the launch of BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Elizabeth C; Horne, Genevieve

    2013-03-28

    This Editorial celebrates the launch of BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation within the BMC series of journals published by BioMed Central. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation incorporates the recently closed Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology (SMARTT) with an expanded scope and Editorial Board. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation will fill its own niche in the BMC series alongside other companion journals including BMC Physiology, BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders and BMC Surgery.

  8. Spatial accessibility to specific sport facilities and corresponding sport practice: the RECORD Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is considered as a major component of a healthy lifestyle. However, few studies have examined the relationships between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and sport practice with a sufficient degree of specificity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the spatial accessibility to specific types of sports facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports after carefully controlling for various individual socio-demographic characteristics and neighborhood socioeconomic variables. Methods Data from the RECORD Study involving 7290 participants recruited in 2007–2008, aged 30–79 years, and residing in the Paris metropolitan area were analyzed. Four categories of sports were studied: team sports, racket sports, swimming and related activities, and fitness. Spatial accessibility to sport facilities was measured with two complementary approaches that both take into account the street network (distance to the nearest facility and count of facilities around the dwelling). Associations between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports were assessed using multilevel logistic regression after adjusting for individual and contextual characteristics. Results High individual education and high household income were associated with the practice of racket sports, swimming or related activities, and fitness over the previous 7 days. The spatial accessibility to swimming pools was associated with swimming and related sports, even after adjustment for individual/contextual factors. The spatial accessibility to facilities was not related to the practice of other sports. High neighborhood income was associated with the practice of a racket sport and fitness. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that integrates educational, financial, and geographical aspects. Our work supports the evidence that strategies to increase participation in sport

  9. Wheelchair propulsion biomechanics: implications for wheelchair sports.

    PubMed

    Vanlandewijck, Y; Theisen, D; Daly, D

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide the reader with a state-of-the-art review on biomechanics in hand rim wheelchair propulsion, with special attention to sport-specific implications. Biomechanical studies in wheelchair sports mainly aim at optimising sport performance or preventing sport injuries. The sports performance optimisation question has been approached from an ergonomic, as well as a skill proficiency perspective. Sports medical issues have been addressed in wheelchair sports mainly because of the extremely high prevalence of repetitive strain injuries such as shoulder impingement and carpal tunnel syndrome. Sports performance as well as sports medical reflections are made throughout the review. Insight in the underlying musculoskeletal mechanisms of hand rim wheelchair propulsion has been achieved through a combination of experimental data collection under realistic conditions, with a more fundamental mathematical modelling approach. Through a synchronised analysis of the movement pattern, force generation pattern and muscular activity pattern, insight has been gained in the hand rim wheelchair propulsion dynamics of people with a disability, varying in level of physical activity and functional potential. The limiting environment of a laboratory, however, has hampered the drawing of sound conclusions. Through mathematical modelling, simulation and optimisation (minimising injury and maximising performance), insight in the underlying musculoskeletal mechanisms during wheelchair propulsion is sought. The surplus value of inverse and forward dynamic simulation of hand rim stroke dynamics is addressed. Implications for hand rim wheelchair sports are discussed. Wheelchair racing, basketball and rugby were chosen because of the significance and differences in sport-specific movement dynamics. Conclusions can easily be transferred to other wheelchair sports where movement dynamics are fundamental. PMID:11347685

  10. Drug misuse in sport: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, David

    2015-12-01

    This editorial draws comparisons between the recent revelations of drug misuse in Russian sport, and the State-sponsored programme of the former German Democratic Republic. While 50 years separates these two regimes, there are commonalities. The history of major incidents involving drug abuse by serious national players in sport suggests a 20-year cycle, with the GDR, China and now Russia employing similar strategies. These events underscore the value placed upon international sporting success by politicians. PMID:26913904

  11. Management of sport-related maxillofacial injuries.

    PubMed

    Roccia, Fabio; Diaspro, Alberto; Nasi, Andrea; Berrone, Sid

    2008-03-01

    By analyzing sports-related maxillofacial fractures, we sought to describe preventive measures and recovery times until sporting activities could be resumed. Between January 2001 and December 2006, 1241 patients were hospitalized as a result of maxillofacial fractures. The patients with sports-related maxillofacial fractures were analyzed based on age, sex, type of sport, injury mechanism, trauma site, presence of associated fractures, hospitalization, treatment method, and recovery time until the resumption of sporting activities. One hundred thirty-eight patients (11.4%) sustained sports-related maxillofacial fractures: 121 males and 17 females (ratio 8:1), aged between 11 and 72 years. The sport producing the greatest number of injuries was soccer (62.3%), followed by skiing (14.5%), and horseback riding (6.5%). The injuries involved mainly the middle third of the face (71.6%), and the mandible was the most affected site (27.2%), followed by the maxillary-zygomatic-orbital complex (25.9%). Treatment was surgery in 93.5% of the patients, with an average hospitalization period of 3.5 days. The protocol created to manage the follow-up of maxillofacial injury patients advised resuming sports activities at least 40 days after the trauma, except in the case of combat sports, when a period of 3 months was required. Although the results of this study indicate a reduction in the total incidence of sports-related maxillofacial injuries, they also show an alarming secondary increase in trauma resulting from the most popular sport in Italy-soccer. Therefore, stricter regulations are needed to discourage violent play, rather than relying on the use of protective equipment. Moreover, patients should be advised when they can resume sports activities, particularly in the case of professionals and semiprofessionals.

  12. Drug misuse in sport: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, David

    2015-12-04

    This editorial draws comparisons between the recent revelations of drug misuse in Russian sport, and the State-sponsored programme of the former German Democratic Republic. While 50 years separates these two regimes, there are commonalities. The history of major incidents involving drug abuse by serious national players in sport suggests a 20-year cycle, with the GDR, China and now Russia employing similar strategies. These events underscore the value placed upon international sporting success by politicians.

  13. Prevention of sports-related eye injury.

    PubMed

    Stock, J G; Cornell, F M

    1991-08-01

    Sports-related eye injury is an important cause of vision loss. Many eye injuries can be prevented through the supervision of play, the enforcement of game rules and the use of eye protective devices. State-of-the-art eye protective devices incorporate highly impact-resistant optical material, usually polycarbonate lenses, in a sturdy frame. Protective devices are available for use in racquet sports, baseball, basketball, football, ice hockey and other sports. PMID:1858609

  14. The evolution of sport psychiatry, circa 2009.

    PubMed

    Glick, Ira D; Kamm, Ronald; Morse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the world of both amateur and professional sports has expanded greatly and become more complex. In part related to these changes - and relatively unknown to sports medicine practitioners - the field of sport psychiatry has steadily evolved and grown. This paper focuses on what these changes have been. A sport psychiatrist is a physician-psychiatrist who diagnoses and treats problems, symptoms and/or disorders associated with an athlete, with their family/significant others, with their team, or with their sport, including spectators/fans. The primary aims of the specialty are to (i) optimize health, (ii) improve athletic performance, and (iii) manage psychiatric symptoms or disorders. The training includes medical training to provide knowledge and skills unique to physicians; psychiatric training to provide knowledge and skills inherent in that field, and training and/or experience in sport psychiatry to provide knowledge and skills about psychiatric aspects of sports. The sport psychiatrist first makes an individual, family-systems and phenomenological diagnosis of the clinical situation. Based on this evaluation, he sets goals for not only the athlete, but also for significant others involved. He delivers treatment based on the psychiatric disorder or problem using a combination of medication, psychotherapy or self-help group interventions plus strategies targeted to specific sport performance issues. Evolution of the International Society of Sport Psychiatry as well as the field, including incorporation into school and professional team sports, is described along with a 'typical day' for a sport psychiatrist. Case examples, a training curriculum and core literature are included.

  15. [Incidence of sports-related eye injuries].

    PubMed

    Pikkel, J; Gelfand, Y; Miller, B

    1995-10-01

    The incidence of sports-related eye injuries was analyzed retrospectively for 1991-1993. It was fairly steady at about 2% of all eye casualties annually. 21% of those with sports-related eye injuries required hospitalization. The commonest pathological findings were corneal erosion (32%), eye lid injuries (27%), hyphema (19%) and macular edema (3%). Most eyes were injured during soccer (37%) and basketball (27%) games, the most popular sports in Israel.

  16. Prevention of sports-related eye injury.

    PubMed

    Stock, J G; Cornell, F M

    1991-08-01

    Sports-related eye injury is an important cause of vision loss. Many eye injuries can be prevented through the supervision of play, the enforcement of game rules and the use of eye protective devices. State-of-the-art eye protective devices incorporate highly impact-resistant optical material, usually polycarbonate lenses, in a sturdy frame. Protective devices are available for use in racquet sports, baseball, basketball, football, ice hockey and other sports.

  17. Wheelchair propulsion biomechanics: implications for wheelchair sports.

    PubMed

    Vanlandewijck, Y; Theisen, D; Daly, D

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide the reader with a state-of-the-art review on biomechanics in hand rim wheelchair propulsion, with special attention to sport-specific implications. Biomechanical studies in wheelchair sports mainly aim at optimising sport performance or preventing sport injuries. The sports performance optimisation question has been approached from an ergonomic, as well as a skill proficiency perspective. Sports medical issues have been addressed in wheelchair sports mainly because of the extremely high prevalence of repetitive strain injuries such as shoulder impingement and carpal tunnel syndrome. Sports performance as well as sports medical reflections are made throughout the review. Insight in the underlying musculoskeletal mechanisms of hand rim wheelchair propulsion has been achieved through a combination of experimental data collection under realistic conditions, with a more fundamental mathematical modelling approach. Through a synchronised analysis of the movement pattern, force generation pattern and muscular activity pattern, insight has been gained in the hand rim wheelchair propulsion dynamics of people with a disability, varying in level of physical activity and functional potential. The limiting environment of a laboratory, however, has hampered the drawing of sound conclusions. Through mathematical modelling, simulation and optimisation (minimising injury and maximising performance), insight in the underlying musculoskeletal mechanisms during wheelchair propulsion is sought. The surplus value of inverse and forward dynamic simulation of hand rim stroke dynamics is addressed. Implications for hand rim wheelchair sports are discussed. Wheelchair racing, basketball and rugby were chosen because of the significance and differences in sport-specific movement dynamics. Conclusions can easily be transferred to other wheelchair sports where movement dynamics are fundamental.

  18. Japanese Government Policies in Education, Science, Sports and Culture, 1998. Mental and Physical Health and Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture, Tokyo (Japan).

    This annual publication introduces Japan's educational policies in education, science, sports, and culture. Part 1, "Trends in Education Reform," discusses fundamental concepts in educational reform. Part 2, "Mental and Physical Health and Sports," includes two chapters. Chapter 1, "Health and Sports into the Future," examines 5 concepts:…

  19. Does Participation in Youth Sport Influence Sport and Physical Activity in Young Adulthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provence, Jeremy E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of Russell and Limle's (2013) study was to determine whether youth-sport specialization and retrospective recall of youth-sport experiences were related to participants' perceptions of and participation in sport and physical activity as young adults. A significant number of participants (76 percent) reported specializing in…

  20. Sport Physiology Research and Governing Gender in Sport--A Power-Knowledge Relation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    This article sets out to show how physiological knowledge about sex/gender relates to power issues within sport. The sport physiology research at the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (Swedish acronym: GIH) during the twentieth century is analysed in relation to the political rationality concerning gender at GIH and within the Swedish…

  1. Safety in Individual and Dual Sports. Sports Safety Series. Monograph No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borozne, Joseph, Ed.; And Others

    The prevention of injuries and control of hazards in individual and dual sports is outlined. A separate chapter is devoted to each of twelve sports: archery, bowling, equitation, golf, gymnastics, marksmanship, track and field, weight training and weight lifting, fencing, racquet sports, judo, and wrestling. (MM)

  2. Administration and Supervision for Safety in Sports. Sports Safety Series: Monograph No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borozne, Joseph, Ed.; And Others

    Examined in this monograph are issues concerned with accident problems in sports. Materials are organized under eight headings, each developed by an expert in the area: (1) the injury problem in sports; (2) philosophy of sports accident prevention and injury control; (3) an introduction to administration and supervision; (4) administration and…

  3. High-Performance Sport, Learning and Culture: New Horizons for Sport Pedagogues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penney, Dawn; McMahon, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research in sport coaching and sport pedagogy including studies published in this special issue bring to the fore the relationship between learning and culture in contexts of high-performance sport. This paper acknowledged that how learning, culture and their relationship are conceptualised is a crucial issue for researchers and…

  4. Availability of sports facilities as moderator of the intention-sports participation relationship among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Prins, Richard G; van Empelen, Pepijn; Te Velde, Saskia J; Timperio, Anna; van Lenthe, Frank J; Tak, Nannah I; Crawford, David; Brug, Johannes; Oenema, Anke

    2010-06-01

    This longitudinal study aimed to identify individual and environmental predictors of adolescents' sports participation and to examine whether availability of sports facilities moderated the intention-behaviour relation. Data were obtained from the ENvironmental Determinants of Obesity in Rotterdam SchoolchildrEn study (2005/2006 to 2007/2008). A total of 247 adolescents (48% boys, mean age at follow-up 15 years) completed the surveys at baseline and follow-up. At baseline, adolescents completed a survey that assessed engagement in sports participation, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and intention towards sports participation. Availability of sports facilities (availability) was assessed using a geographic information system. At follow-up, sports participation was again examined. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to test associations between availability of sports facilities, theory of planned behaviour variables and the interaction of intention by availability of sports facilities, with sports participation at follow-up. Simple slopes analysis was conducted to decompose the interaction effect. A significant availability x intention interaction effect [odds ratio: 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.20] was found. Simple slopes analysis showed that intention was more strongly associated with sports participation when sports facilities were more readily available. The results of this study indicate that the intention-sports participation association appears to be stronger when more facilities are available.

  5. Responsible Middle Level Sports Programs. What Research Says.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaim, John H.; McEwin, C. Kenneth; Irvin, Judith L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the need for developmentally responsive middle level competitive sports programs that include awareness of sports injuries, psychological considerations, attrition in sports, and family pressures for students to become college and professional athletes. (JPB)

  6. 78 FR 53156 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council; Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council; Teleconference AGENCY: Fish... Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership.... App., we announce that Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a...

  7. 5 Ways to Prepare for Your Sports Season

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who Cuts? 5 Ways to Prepare for Your Sports Season KidsHealth > For Teens > 5 Ways to Prepare ... temporada deportiva 5 Ways to Prepare for Your Sports Season If you've ever played competitive sports, ...

  8. Sports Participation and Problem Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Darren; DePadilla, Lara; Thompson, Nancy J.; Kushner, Howard I.; Windle, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Sports participation, though offering numerous developmental benefits for youths, has been associated with adolescent alcohol use. Differences also exist between men/boys and women/girls in both sports participation and patterns of alcohol-related behaviors, but there are few longitudinal investigations of this relationship. Purpose This study investigated the relationship between school-based sports participation and alcohol-related behaviors using data from a multiwave national study of adolescent men/boys and women/girls. Methods Nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, collected between 1994 and 2001, were analyzed in 2009 (n = 8271). Latent growth modeling, accommodating the complex sampling design, was applied to examine whether participation in school-based sports was associated with initial levels and change in problem alcohol use over three waves of data collection. Results After taking into account time-invariant covariates including demographics and other predictors of alcohol use, greater involvement in sports during adolescence was associated with faster average acceleration in problem alcohol use over time among youths who took part in only sports. The findings suggest, however, that the relationship between sports participation and problem alcohol use depends on participation in sports in combination with other activities, but it does not differ between men/boys and women/girls. Conclusions Sports may represent an important and efficient context for selective interventions to prevent problem alcohol use and negative consequences of alcohol use among adolescents. PMID:20409498

  9. Sports for the physically challenged child.

    PubMed

    Wind, William M; Schwend, Richard M; Larson, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Participation in sports is important for the physical and emotional health of the physically challenged child. Sports can improve strength, endurance, and cardiopulmonary fitness while providing companionship, a sense of achievement, and heightened self-esteem. With interest in such participation increasing, it is necessary for the physicians, therapists, and families of children with special needs to understand the preparticipation evaluation, athletic options, specialized equipment, and sport-specific risks. Recommendations that provide guidelines for safe, effective participation in sports are currently available for common congenital and developmental disabilities such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, myelodysplasia, hemophilia, congenital amputations, and arthritic disorders. PMID:15089086

  10. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rory A; De Luigi, Arthur Jason

    2014-08-01

    Wheelchair sports are an important tool in the rehabilitation of people with severe chronic disabilities and have been a driving force for innovation in technology and practice. In this paper, we will present an overview of the adaptive technology used in Paralympic sports with a special focus on wheeled technology and the impact of design on performance (defined as achieving the greatest level of athletic ability and minimizing the risk of injury). Many advances in manual wheelchairs trace their origins to wheelchair sports. Features of wheelchairs that were used for racing and basketball 25 or more years ago have become integral to the manual wheelchairs that people now use every day; moreover, the current components used on ultralight wheelchairs also have benefitted from technological advances developed for sports wheelchairs. For example, the wheels now used on chairs for daily mobility incorporate many of the components first developed for sports chairs. Also, advances in manufacturing and the availability of aerospace materials have driven current wheelchair design and manufacture. Basic principles of sports wheelchair design are universal across sports and include fit; minimizing weight while maintaining high stiffness; minimizing rolling resistance; and optimizing the sports-specific design of the chair. However, a well-designed and fitted wheelchair is not sufficient for optimal sports performance: the athlete must be well trained, skilled, and use effective biomechanics because wheelchair athletes face some unique biomechanical challenges.

  11. Semantic Shot Classification in Sports Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ling-Yu; Xu, Min; Tian, Qi

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a unified framework for semantic shot classification in sports videos. Unlike previous approaches, which focus on clustering by aggregating shots with similar low-level features, the proposed scheme makes use of domain knowledge of a specific sport to perform a top-down video shot classification, including identification of video shot classes for each sport, and supervised learning and classification of the given sports video with low-level and middle-level features extracted from the sports video. It is observed that for each sport we can predefine a small number of semantic shot classes, about 5~10, which covers 90~95% of sports broadcasting video. With the supervised learning method, we can map the low-level features to middle-level semantic video shot attributes such as dominant object motion (a player), camera motion patterns, and court shape, etc. On the basis of the appropriate fusion of those middle-level shot classes, we classify video shots into the predefined video shot classes, each of which has a clear semantic meaning. The proposed method has been tested over 4 types of sports videos: tennis, basketball, volleyball and soccer. Good classification accuracy of 85~95% has been achieved. With correctly classified sports video shots, further structural and temporal analysis, such as event detection, video skimming, table of content, etc, will be greatly facilitated.

  12. Sports eye injuries a preventable disease.

    PubMed

    Vinger, P F

    1981-02-01

    Each year, sports are responsible for over 100.000 preventable eye injuries. A face-protector standard was developed for hockey. Certified protectors effectively eliminated eye and face injuries to 1,200,000 players averting a projected 70,000 injuries and saving over $10,000,000 in medical expenses annually. The principle of absorbing energy in a protective device before the eye is injured is applied to other sports (racket sports, baseball, basketball). Recommendations are made on eye protection for athletes. Better data collection and standards for sports and children's eyewear are encouraged.

  13. Large angle measurement by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Dan; Blanaru, Constantin; Damian, Victor S.; Logofatu, Petre-Catalin; Tumbar, R.; Dobroiu, Adrian

    1995-03-01

    An interferometric set-up able to measure angles as large as +180 degree(s) is presented. The principle of the method is to measure a linear displacement (translation) produced by a crank-gear mechanism which converts the angular movement of a rotating table. The optical scheme and consideration on the accuracy of the method are presented.

  14. Discovering the Inscribed Angle Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Matt B.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to play tennis is difficult. It takes practice, but it also helps to have a coach--someone who gives tips and pointers but allows the freedom to play the game on one's own. Learning to act like a mathematician is a similar process. Students report that the process of proving the inscribed angle theorem is challenging and, at times,…

  15. Strength and conditioning techniques in the rehabilitation of sports injury.

    PubMed

    Werner, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The job of a strength and conditioning coach is to prepare athletes for a successful outcome in their sport. Methods must be grounded in science and proved effective through research and trial and error. A comprehensive sports performance team includes physician, physical therapist, or athletic trainer; strength and conditioning coach; sport coach; and, when possible, sports psychologist and sports nutritionist. This article serves to help members of a sports performance team gain an understanding of the role of a strength and conditioning coach.

  16. Simultaneous beam sampling and aperture shape optimization for SPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Ye, Yinyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital linear accelerators, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle, can be optimized simultaneously. SPORT promises to deliver remarkable radiation dose distributions in an efficient manner, yet there exists no optimization algorithm for its implementation. The purpose of this work is to develop an algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: The authors build a mathematical model with the fundamental station point parameters as the decision variables. To solve the resulting large-scale optimization problem, the authors devise an effective algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques: column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search. Column generation adds the most beneficial stations sequentially until the plan quality improvement saturates and provides a good starting point for the subsequent optimization. It also adds the new stations during the algorithm if beneficial. For each update resulted from column generation, the subgradient method improves the selected stations locally by reshaping the apertures and updating the beam angles toward a descent subgradient direction. The algorithm continues to improve the selected stations locally and globally by a pattern search algorithm to explore the part of search space not reachable by the subgradient method. By combining these three techniques together, all plausible combinations of station parameters are searched efficiently to yield the optimal solution. Results: A SPORT optimization framework with seamlessly integration of three complementary algorithms, column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search, was established. The proposed technique was applied to two previously treated clinical cases: a head and

  17. Sport participation, sport injury, risk factors and sport safety practices in Calgary and area junior high schools

    PubMed Central

    Emery, CA; Tyreman, H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine rates of sport participation, sport injury, risk factors and sport safety practices in young adolescents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Calgary and area junior high schools. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 1466 students (aged 12 to 15 years). OUTCOME MEASURES: Sport injury within one year prior to completing the survey. RESULTS: Ninety-three per cent of students participated in sports in the previous year. The injury rate was 60.85 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 58.29 to 63.35) for students reporting at least one sport injury, 29.4 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 27.08 to 31.81) for medically treated injuries, and 12.28 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 10.64 to 14.07) for injuries presenting to a hospital emergency department. The greatest proportion of injuries occurred in basketball (14%), soccer (12%), hockey (8.6%) and snowboarding/skiing (7.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The rates of participation and injury in sports are high in junior high school students. Future research should focus on prevention strategies in sports with high participation and injury rates to have the greatest population health impact. PMID:20808471

  18. A longitudinal investigation of sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in aesthetic sports.

    PubMed

    Krentz, E M; Warschburger, P

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated a higher risk of disordered eating in certain types of elite sports such as aesthetic sports (e.g., rhythmical gymnastics, figure skating). But even though some studies on risk factors for disordered eating in sports exist, most research on this topic is based on cross-sectional data with limitations on causal inferences. We examined sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in a 1-year longitudinal study with two assessment points. The participants were 65 adolescent athletes from aesthetic sports (mean age 14.0  ±.2.2 years) who completed measures of disordered eating, social pressure from the sports environment, sports-related body dissatisfaction, desire to be leaner to improve sports performance, and emotional distress resulting from missed exercise sessions. All variables were relatively stable in the mean. Individual changes in the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance were associated with individual changes in disordered eating. Furthermore, a cross-lagged partial correlation analysis showed that the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance was predictive of disordered eating and not vice versa. The results of our study indicate that athletes are more at risk for disordered eating if they believe it is possible to enhance their sports performance through weight regulation.

  19. Proximity to Sports Facilities and Sports Participation for Adolescents in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Anne K.; Wagner, Matthias; Alvanides, Seraphim; Steinmayr, Andreas; Reiner, Miriam; Schmidt, Steffen; Woll, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship between proximity to specific sports facilities and participation in the corresponding sports activities for adolescents in Germany. Methods A sample of 1,768 adolescents aged 11–17 years old and living in 161 German communities was examined. Distances to the nearest sports facilities were calculated as an indicator of proximity to sports facilities using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Participation in specific leisure-time sports activities in sports clubs was assessed using a self-report questionnaire and individual-level socio-demographic variables were derived from a parent questionnaire. Community-level socio-demographics as covariates were selected from the INKAR database, in particular from indicators and maps on land development. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between proximity to the nearest sports facilities and participation in the corresponding sports activities. Results The logisitic regression analyses showed that girls residing longer distances from the nearest gym were less likely to engage in indoor sports activities; a significant interaction between distances to gyms and level of urbanization was identified. Decomposition of the interaction term showed that for adolescent girls living in rural areas participation in indoor sports activities was positively associated with gym proximity. Proximity to tennis courts and indoor pools was not associated with participation in tennis or water sports, respectively. Conclusions Improved proximity to gyms is likely to be more important for female adolescents living in rural areas. PMID:24675689

  20. Circadian variation in sports performance.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G; Reilly, T

    1996-04-01

    Chronobiology is the science concerned with investigations of time-dependent changes in physiological variables. Circadian rhythms refer to variations that recur every 24 hours. Many physiological circadian rhythms at rest are endogenously controlled, and persist when an individual is isolated from environmental fluctuations. Unlike physiological variables, human performance cannot be monitored continuously in order to describe circadian rhythmicity. Experimental studies of the effect of circadian rhythms on performance need to be carefully designed in order to control for serial fatigue effects and to minimise disturbances in sleep. The detection of rhythmicity in performance variables is also highly influenced by the degree of test-retest repeatability of the measuring equipment. The majority of components of sports performance, e.g. flexibility, muscle strength, short term high power output, vary with time of day in a sinusoidal manner and peak in the early evening close to the daily maximum in body temperature. Psychological tests of short term memory, heart rate-based tests of physical fitness, and prolonged submaximal exercise performance carried out in hot conditions show peak times in the morning. Heart rate-based tests of work capacity appear to peak in the morning because the heart rate responses to exercise are minimal at this time of day. Post-lunch declines are evident with performance variables such as muscle strength, especially if measured frequently enough and sequentially within a 24-hour period to cause fatigue in individuals. More research work is needed to ascertain whether performance in tasks demanding fine motor control varies with time of day. Metabolic and respiratory rhythms are flattened when exercise becomes strenuous whilst the body temperature rhythm persists during maximal exercise. Higher work-rates are selected spontaneously in the early evening. At present, it is not known whether time of day influences the responses of a set

  1. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them by remachining the reference surfaces.

  2. SEDIMENTATION IN THE ANGLE CENTRIFUGE.

    PubMed

    Pickels, E G

    1943-01-20

    1. Using hemocyanin from Limulus polyphemus as a test material, the process of sedimentation in the angle centrifuge, operating both in vacuum and in the open air, has been investigated. 2. Sedimentation in a given field of force was found less efficient when centrifugation was conducted in the open air, because of thermal convection. 3. Correlations have been made with results obtained in the analytical ultracentrifuge, and a theory of sedimentation in inclined tubes has been presented to explain the experimental results. 4. It has been shown that under proper conditions the angle centrifuge may be used for approximate determinations of particle size. 5. Recommendations, based mostly on experimental evidence, have been made for improving sedimentation and interpreting results. 6. To counteract convective disturbances of either thermal or inertial origin, a satisfactory method has been developed which consists of furnishing the fluid under study with a synthetic density gradient, formed with sucrose or some other non-sedimentable material.

  3. Sport in the Sociocultural Process. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Marie

    This anthology is an introduction to the sociocultural study of sport for those in physical education, sociology, anthropology, or any other study of human behavior in the social process. Part I provides a cultural framework, a series of definitions, and some understandings of the cultural setting of sport in American society as an orientation to…

  4. Hockey: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Olympics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Suggestions for coaching and teaching hockey skills to mentally retarded persons are presented in this guide, one of seven booklets on Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Programs. An introductory section presents an overview of the sport, information on the organization of the training session, and a list of goals, objectives, and…

  5. Sport Psychology Foundations, Organizations, and Related Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaichkowsky, Leonard; Naylor, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce psychologists and counselors who work in schools to the field of applied sport psychology. We begin with a brief history of how applied sport psychology developed in North America and other parts of the world. Landmark events such as the development of conferences, professional organizations and…

  6. Stratification of women's sport in contemporary China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huan

    2011-01-01

    Since economic reform in the 1980s, Chinese sport has undergone an extraordinary transformation. The most distinguishing phenomenon is the rapid growth of mass sport at the grassroots level with increasing demands for physical activities in women's daily lives. The rapid growth of women's sports participation at the grassroots is deeply embedded in the process of social stratification as a result of the urbanisation of Chinese society. The purpose of this paper is to use the socialist, feminist and theoretical framework to explore how Chinese women's different economic, educational, domestic and cultural situations shape their sports values and patterns of participation, marking social boundaries in Chinese urban communities. Semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted with 60 female physical exercisers in sports clubs, parks and neighbourhood playgrounds. Documentary research was also applied as a complement method to the interview. The findings indicate that within different classes (middle class, working class and a group who were unemployed), many different opportunities for and limitations on women to participate in sport are noticed. Chinese women have not fully and equally utilised sports opportunities created by urbanisation. Most Chinese women still live within patriarchal arrangements. Consequently, they do not completely fulfil their ambitions in sport.

  7. Indians in Sports: Looking for New Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisel, Sonja

    1998-01-01

    Describes organizations and programs that support athletics among American Indian youth through various strategies: promoting qualified high school athletes to college coaches, providing training to prospective directors of tribal youth recreation and sports programs, coordinating Indian national championships in men's and women's sports, and…

  8. Sport and Children's Spirituality: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Micheline Wyn

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of sport and physical activity are endorsed by a number of professionals as a means of improving children's health and their sense of well-being, and their unity with the natural world, other people and the Transcendent. For children, sport is a spiritual source of joy and wonder. Using Champagne's "spiritual modes of being", my…

  9. Physical Education and Sport: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Earle F., Ed.

    This book discusses the urgent need for a social relevance perspective for physical education and sport and is designed for students beginning professional preparation in physical education and sport, practitioners, or students wishing to round out their general education. An introductory statement, written by Laura J. Huelster, explores the…

  10. DGWS Research Reports: Women in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Dorothy V., Ed.

    A series of research reports on three aspects of womens sports: the psychosocial, the physiological, and teaching and coaching are presented. Section 1 (psychosocial) mentions such aspects as societal attitudes toward women in sports, sex differences and research, and women and competition. Section 2 (physiological) considers such aspects as work…

  11. The Philosophical Ground of Modern Socialist Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterhoudt, Robert G.

    1985-01-01

    Philosophical accounts of sport's sociopolitical purposes tend either to condemn or promote various political ideologies. This essay gives a synthetic interpretation of the philosophical groundwork of judgments about socialist sport in terms of Hegel's contributions to Marxist thought and the implications of Marxist thought for modern sporting…

  12. Exploring the Motives for Viewing Televised Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantz, Walter

    A total of 286 subjects was presented with a series of motivations and asked to evaluate the relative importance of each in their exposure/avoidance decisions about watching sports programs on television. The 188 sports viewers assessed the importance of each motivation for their viewing of baseball, hockey, football, and tennis. The 98…

  13. Learning in Action and Adventure Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellmer, Eva; Rynne, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The exponential growth in action and adventure sport (e.g. snowboarding, bicycle motorcross (BMX), surfing, parkour) participation over the past two decades has been showcased in world championship events and the inclusion in Olympic programs. Yet, by virtue of their alternative, escapist and/or adventure-based origins, these sports do not fully…

  14. Community Collaboration through Sport: Bringing Schools Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share how sport was used to build relationships between Monash University (Gippsland campus) pre-service education and six rural primary schools during semester one, 2012. Not only was sport used to build partnerships but also to deliver quality Health and Physical Education lessons, offering children sporting…

  15. Interscholastic Sports: A Character-Building Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Stokowski, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    While interscholastic sports help young athletes enhance sport skills, physical fitness, self-discipline, sportsmanship, teamwork, time-management skills, self-confidence, and mental toughness, they also promote life skills and lessons and enhance academic performance as well. Coaches have a tremendous opportunity--and responsibility--to instill…

  16. Sports Coaching, Virtue Ethics and Emulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Alun; Jones, Carwyn; Jones, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Background: The argument in this paper is founded on two related premises. First, we claim that the moral imperative of sport is derived not from specific rules or laws associated with it but from its intrinsic nature. As engaging in sporting practices inevitably require us to be pre-occupied with central principles such as fairness (and therefore…

  17. History of Sport and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Louise, Ed.

    The reports from this conference deal with the sources, manifestations, and influences of sports and physical education over time, geography, and cultures. Written in a non-technical manner, the twenty-eight articles deal with the relationship of sports to (among others) politics, art, dance, mythology, religion, economics, sociology, and…

  18. Teaching Values through Youth and Adolescent Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2008-01-01

    For decades, sport in the United States has been praised for reflecting the values of society and instilling these values in athletes. Some parents believe that values such as cooperation, fair play, learning how to win and lose, self-discipline, and teamwork are instilled in young people through participation in sports. Many coaches of youth and…

  19. John Updike and Norman Mailer: Sport Inferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upshaw, Kathryn Jane

    The phenomenon of writer use of sport inferences in the literary genre of the novel is examined in the works of Updike and Mailer. Novels of both authors were reviewed in order to study the pattern of usage in each novel. From these patterns, concepts which illustrated the sport philosophies of each author were used for general comparisons of the…

  20. The Epistemological Chain: Practical Applications in Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grecic, David; Collins, Dave

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the role of personal epistemology in decision-making and proposes the construct of an epistemological chain (EC) to support this process in the domain of sports coaching. First, the EC is outlined using examples from education and other parallel disciplines. What it looks like to sports coaches is then described, and its…

  1. Sport Injuries for Females: Incidence and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindig, Louise E.

    Comparisons between sport-related injuries for male and female athletes are discussed in relation to statistics gathered by the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) and other sources. Tables display data on: (1) athletic injuries and fatalities in colleges and universities by sport, l975-76; (2) average annual frequency of…

  2. Youth Sports in America: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Vern D.; Ewing, Martha E.

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter issue documents the number of children and adolescents participating in sports and examines gender differences, barriers to participation, and benefits of sports participation. The largest number of participants is enrolled in agency-sponsored programs (45 percent), followed by recreational programs (30 percent). Gender data reveal…

  3. Medical and orthopedic conditions and sports participation.

    PubMed

    Diokno, Eugene; Rowe, Dale

    2010-06-01

    The presence of certain medical or orthopedic conditions need not preclude adolescents from being physically active and participating in sports. The benefits of continued physical activity far outweigh any concerns for potential complications for most such conditions. This article reviews sport participation guidelines for adolescents with conditions that include juvenile chronic arthritis, eye injures, solitary kidney, skin conditions, scoliosis, and spondylolysis.

  4. Thoughts about School and Community Sports Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, John F.

    1983-01-01

    A reasonable, well-balanced high school interscholastic sports program should emphasize involvement, skill development, and carry-over. It should not stress sports for the few gifted or talented participants. Middle school needs and the advantages of coordinated school-community physical education activities are discussed. (PP)

  5. Development of Equipment for Use in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David

    2012-01-01

    No one has ever been able to create a running shoe that can make one run faster, but in other sports the design of equipment has the potential to offer considerable enhancement. Judgement has to be made as to whether such advantage becomes unfair. This article indicates many possible sports in which the equipment plays an important part in the…

  6. The Social Benefits of Intramural Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artinger, Lori; Clapham, Lisa; Hunt, Carla; Meigs, Matthew; Milord, Nadia; Sampson, Bryan; Forrester, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of collegiate student recreational sports complexes is the sense of community that is intentionally introduced in the programs and services that occur within these facilities. Intramural sports programs provide a powerful medium for student interaction (Belch, Gebel, & Mass, 2001). This study was designed to…

  7. Basketball: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Olympics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    One of a series of coaching guides for Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Programs, this booklet focuses on basketball instruction for mentally retarded persons. An initial section introduces the sport and discusses general coaching ideas. Goals, objectives, and benefits are listed along with information on clothing and court…

  8. Really, Bounty Gate in Youth Sports?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Developing a sound coaching philosophy is one of the most important tasks associated with a quality coaching education program. The philosophy must be based on one's own values and beliefs, but it must also be congruent with the values of a particular model of sport. Thus, the processes of sport participation should exceed the product of…

  9. Women and Sport: From Myth to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oglesby, Carole A.; And Others

    This book contains a collection of essays on the subject of women, sport, and society. Literature on this topic is reviewed from the feminist viewpoint. The prologue offers a history of women's participation in sports from ancient Greece to the present. The essential thesis is advanced that, over the centuries, social norms have permitted sport…

  10. Gymnastics: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Olympics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Gymnastics coaching and teaching suggestions for mentally retarded persons are presented in this guide, one of seven booklets about Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Programs. An overview introduces the sport and makes broad suggestions for teaching. A list of goals, objectives, and benefits is followed by information on necessary…

  11. Bowling: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Olympics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The manual, part of a series on Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Programs, presents ideas for coaching and teaching bowling skills to mentally retarded persons. An overview introduces the sport and lists long-term goals, short-term objectives, and benefits. Warm up exercises are followed by two levels of skill instruction for rolling,…

  12. Learning Sports and Entertainment Marketing: "Apprentice" Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidlich, Jon

    2008-01-01

    The sports and entertainment marketing program is a satellite program of Great Oaks Institute of Technology and Career Development in Cincinnati. Held in two area school districts, at Winton Woods High School and North College Hill High School, sports and entertainment marketing has been a popular choice for students for more than a decade. The…

  13. Teaching Competition in Professional Sports Leagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been some dispute over the appropriate way to model decision making in professional sports leagues. In particular, Szymanski and Kesenne (2004) argue that formulating the decision-making problem in a noncooperative game leads to radically different conclusions about the nature of competition in sports leagues. The author…

  14. Decision Making in Online Fantasy Sports Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brian; Sharma, Priya; Hooper, Paula

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the forms of knowledge used by players of fantasy sports, games where players create ideal sports teams and compete to accumulate points based on professional athletes' statistical performances. Messages from a discussion forum associated with a popular fantasy basketball game were analyzed to understand how players described…

  15. Weightlifting and How Weightlifting Benefits Other Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoessel-Ross, Lynne

    This paper begins with a discussion of terminology and of the distinctions between bodybuilding, powerlifting, and weightlifting. Weightlifting is presented as the only weight training-associated sport in the Olympic Games. The overhead movements and bodyweight classes involved in the sport are described, and advantages of free weight training are…

  16. First Annual Sports Conference. Proceedings, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Federation of School Athletic Associations.

    This document presents summaries of eleven speeches, a workshop, and one panel discussion presented at the First Annual High School Sports Conference sponsored by the British Columbia Federation of School Athletic Associations during 1976. Topics discussed in the speeches include: (1) the role of competition in extra-mural sports; (2) Title IX and…

  17. Rules for Coeducational Activities and Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    Suggestions and guidelines for establishing rules for co-recreational intramural activities are presented. These rules are not intended as a precedent or a national standard--they are ideas for adapting standardized rules for men's and women's sports to meet the needs, demands, and characteristics of co-recreational sports. Eleven different…

  18. Program and Curriculum Trends in Sport Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Bob; And Others

    A study assessed the present status of professional preparation programs in sport management at 134 four-year colleges and universities throughout the United States. The study survey attempted to find answers to four questions: (1) Has the number of professional preparation programs in sport management increased during the past three years? (2) Is…

  19. Adapted Sport Programs for Veterans with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    The Paralympic games began as a way for World War II veterans to take part in elite-level competition. Thanks to various disability-sport organizations, men and women who have served in the military are still using sport as a form of rehabilitation and a way to transition into their new life.

  20. Why sports medicine is not medicine.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Steven D; McNamee, Mike

    2006-06-01

    Sports Medicine as an apparent sub-class of medicine has developed apace over the past 30 years. Its recent trajectory has been evidenced by the emergence of specialist international research journals, standard texts, annual conferences, academic appointments and postgraduate courses. Although this field of enquiry and practice lays claim to the title 'sports medicine' this paper queries the legitimacy of that claim. Depending upon how 'sports medicine' and 'medicine' are defined, a plausible-sounding case can be made to show that sports medicine is not in fact a branch of medicine. Rather, it is sometimes closer to practices such as non-therapeutic cosmetic surgery. The argument of the paper is as follows. It begins with a brief statement concerning methodology. We then identify and subscribe to a plausible defining goal of medicine taken from a recognised authority in the field. Then two representative, authoritative, definitions of sports medicine are discussed. It is then shown that acceptance of these definitions of sports medicine generates a problem in that if they are accepted, no necessary commitment to the defining goal of medicine is present within sports medicine. It seems to follow that sports medicine is not medicine. In the final part of the paper a critical response to that conclusion is presented and rebutted. The response is one which rejects the identification of the defining goal of medicine upon which our argument rests.

  1. University-based sports pharmacy program.

    PubMed

    Price, K O; Huff, P S; Isetts, B J; Goldwire, M A

    1995-02-01

    Ways for pharmacists to become involved in sports pharmacy are discussed, and a university-based sports pharmacy program is described. Sports pharmacy encompasses treating athletic injuries, distributing drugs and sports-related supplies, counseling patients, and monitoring therapeutic outcomes, along with educating athletes, trainers, and others about drug use and abuse. Pharmacists can contribute their expertise by presenting information at schools, health clubs, and other exercise-related organizations. They can serve on drug-testing crews at collegiate athletic events. Pharmacists can also provide supplies and services to schools or athletic facilities; ideally, this could be a contractual arrangement to provide comprehensive pharmaceutical care. A sports pharmacy program was implemented at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1980. Pharmacists provide drug therapy monitoring and patient education to all patients at the school; patients' level of athletic activity is taken into consideration. Pharmacists also ensure proper use, storage, and distribution of drugs kept in clinics, training rooms, and sports medicine travel bags, as well as identifying and providing drugs and supplies that might be needed at an off-campus event. They provide inservice education to athletic trainers and physicians. The program has improved patient outcomes and helped to ensure adequate drug supplies and minimum waste. There are numerous opportunities for practitioners to become involved in sports pharmacy. A university-based sports pharmacy program improved the care of student athletes and helped contain drug costs. PMID:7749959

  2. Softball: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Olympics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    One of seven instructional units on Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Programs, this guide presents suggestions for coaching softball for mentally retarded persons. An overview section provides information on teaching suggestions, followed by a list of program goals, objectives, and benefits. Sports skill assessments measure athletes'…

  3. Coaching Development: Methods for Youth Sport Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Brad; Schoenstedt, Linda

    2011-01-01

    There are increasing demands and requirements in the coaching profession, and as a result, coaching education programs worldwide have seen an increase in overall participation. In addition, many schools and sport programs in the United States have begun to require a minimum standard of certification. This, in turn, has created sport-specific…

  4. Workplace Learning of High Performance Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Clifford J.; Tinning, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Australian coaching workplace (to be referred to as the State Institute of Sport; SIS) under consideration in this study employs significant numbers of full-time performance sport coaches and can be accurately characterized as a genuine workplace. Through a consideration of the interaction between what the workplace (SIS) affords the…

  5. "Safeguarding" Sports Coaching: Foucault, Genealogy and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a genealogical account of safeguarding in sport. Drawing specifically on Foucault's work, it examines the "politics of touch" in relation to the social and historical formation of child protection policy in sports coaching. While the analysis has some resonance with the context of coaching as a whole, for…

  6. She Got Game! Women in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffle, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on library collection development in the area of women in sports. Discusses Title IX, selecting titles, and prominent publishers in the field; and includes an annotated bibliography that includes encyclopedias, history, athletes, how-to books, coaching, general sports, magazines, and Web sites. (LRW)

  7. Intra-Audience Effects at Sporting Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, John E.

    The phenomenon of crowd behavior at sports events is examined in this paper. Previous treatments of why spectators enjoy watching sports events are examined, showing that these studies have largely ignored the potential role of intraaudience influence processes. A brief literature review notes the role of feedback between the communication event…

  8. Sports vision care: the eyes have it!

    PubMed

    Teig, D S

    1980-07-01

    A team approach directed at a total evaluation of an athlete's visual needs is essential to proper sports vision care. Consideration of the visual requirements of the athlete through observation of on-the-field performance enables the sports vision specialist to adapt specific therapy procedures that are pertinent to the player's overall athletic success.

  9. Sport specificity of mental disorders: the issue of sport psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Markser, Valentin Z

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric conditions among elite athletes is still under debate. More and more evidence has accumulated that high-performance athletes are not protected from mental disorders as previously thought. The authors discuss the issue of the sport specificity of selected mental diseases in elite athletes. Specific aspects of eating disorders, exercise addiction, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and mood disorders in the context of overtraining syndrome are examined. In particular, the interrelationship between life and work characteristics unique to elite athletes and the development of mental disorders are reviewed. Differences of clinical presentation and some therapeutic consequences are discussed. The authors suggest that the physical and mental strains endured by elite athletes might influence the onset and severity of their psychiatric disorder. Beside the existing research strategies dealing with the amount of exercise, its intensity and lack of recreation experienced by athletes, further research on psycho-social factors is needed to better understand the sport-specific aetiology of mental disorders in high-performance athletes.

  10. What is the economic burden of sports injuries?

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Selcen; Kılıç, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Despite the health benefits of sports activities, sports injury and fear of injury are important barriers to participation in sport. The incidence, prevalence and type of sports injuries vary among men and women as well as age groups. It is usually difficult to examine these different aspects of sports injuries due to insufficient data. This study argues that sport injuries can be considered as an important economic burden in terms of the direct and indirect costs it bears. As a result, strong and effective strategies are needed to prevent sports injuries. Sports medicine has also been attracted increasing attention in recent years, particularly. In this article, the importance of sports injuries and their economic costs as well as the role of sport medicine as a prevention method for sports injuries were discussed.

  11. Spinal injuries in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joseph B; Zarzour, Robert; Moorman, Claude T

    2006-02-01

    Contact and collision sports such as American football expose the athlete to a wide array of potential injuries. Knee injuries garner much of the attention, but spinal injuries are potentially catastrophic and all levels of medical coverage of football must be knowledgeable and prepared to attend to an athlete with a neck injury. Of the other possible spinal conditions, some resolve on their own, others might require conservative therapy, and still others might require surgical intervention. The spectrum of potential injury is wide, yet the medical team must practice and prepare to treat the possible catastrophic neck injury.

  12. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    PubMed

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality.

  13. Rollover of Sport Utility Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Desmond N.

    2004-02-01

    Recently, the PBS program "Frontline" examined the history of the development of the sport utility vehicle (SUV) and the efforts to force car makers to design SUVs that are less prone to rollover. The dangers of SUV rollovers were spotlighted in the fall of 2000, when the Ford-Firestone scandal prompted Congress to launch a series of hearings focusing on deaths and injuries related to faulty Firestone tires mounted on Ford Explorers. However, during the same 10-year period in which Ford-Firestone rollover crashes caused some 300 deaths, more than 12,000 people — 40 times as many — died in SUV rollovers unrelated to tire failure.

  14. Game Intelligence in Team Sports

    PubMed Central

    Lennartsson, Jan; Lidström, Nicklas; Lindberg, Carl

    2015-01-01

    We set up a game theoretic framework to analyze a wide range of situations from team sports. A fundamental idea is the concept of potential; the probability of the offense scoring the next goal minus the probability that the next goal is made by the defense. We develop categorical as well as continuous models, and obtain optimal strategies for both offense and defense. A main result is that the optimal defensive strategy is to minimize the maximum potential of all offensive strategies. PMID:25970581

  15. Chemical Warfare: Drugs in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Percy, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A number of substances have been used by athletes in an attempt to improve performance in sports. The use of these substances, which are referred to as ergogenic aids, has become widespread; some pose serious health hazards. Ergogenic aids are divided into five broad classifications: physiological, physical, psychological, nutritional and chemical. It is possible, although conclusive proof is lacking, that some substances may give an athlete who takes them an advantage over one who does not. However, the health hazards posed in general by these materials far outweigh any possible advantage. PMID:6110283

  16. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    PubMed

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality. PMID:27544991

  17. Concussion Ethics and Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Michael J; Partridge, Bradley; Anderson, Lynley

    2016-04-01

    Despite considerable scientific dispute the science of concussion, there has been a proliferation of position statements and professional guidelines published on sports concussion management over the last 15 years. A number of ethical and clinical problems associated with concussion management protocols remain concerning, (i) diagnosis and management; (ii) conflicts of interest and coercion; (iii) same day return to play; and (iv) reporting, auditing and confidentiality. These issues are critically discussed in the light of recent Consensus Statements. It is argued that the use of independent match day doctors may ameliorate some of these concerns. PMID:26832975

  18. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Mekking, J.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.; Monteiro, D.

    2013-09-01

    The Gaia mission1 will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft2, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the `Basic Angle', at an operational temperature of 100 K. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability at cryogenic conditions, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system3 for this mission, measuring the relative motion of Gaia's telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to detect Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction on Gaia and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material this paper addresses the specific challenges towards the cryogenic application of the Gaia BAM including design, integration and verification/qualification by testing.

  19. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  20. Sports and health: equivalence or contrariety.

    PubMed

    Radić, Borislav; Radić, Petra; Duraković, Din

    2014-12-01

    Playing sports is a widely known method of health promotion. Balanced exercise and diet are keys to healthy life. However, sports activities can cause different injuries, from joint to head injuries. Although head injuries cause a variety of acute and chronic disorders, they are often undertreated. There are 1.6 million injured people examined at emergency departments throughout Europe every year. In sports like boxing, football, soccer, hockey, handball, basketball and bicycling, head injuries occur at a frequency of 4% to 22%. Particularly significant are chronic difficulties that occur after recurrent head injuries, i.e. cognitive deficits and changes in electroencephalogram. Qualifications of professional personnel are insufficient for professional evaluation and treatment of head injuries. The best way for sports to become an important link in health and disease prevention is to go back to sports basics while using acquired scientific knowledge. PMID:25868311

  1. Attributions of athletes on collegiate sports teams.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Darhl M; Manning, Craig L

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated the patterns of attributions for success made by intercollegiate athletes in three categories: more versus less successful teams, men versus women athletes, and individual versus group sport participants. 74 men and 83 women on 17 varsity teams across a number of sports took the Sports Attribution Style Scale, measuring internal, stable, controllable, intentional, and global attributions. It was hypothesized that (a) the athletes on more successful teams would have higher internal, stable, controllable, and intentional attributions, (b) that athletes in individual sports would have lower internal, stable, and controllable attributions, and (c) that women would score higher on all five attributions. Profile analyses of the attributions led to the confirmation of the first hypothesis. For the second hypothesis, the pattern of sport attributions did not differ for individual and team athletes. The third hypothesis was not confirmed. Women athletes scored higher on the attributional dimensions (except globality).

  2. Sport participation motives of young Brazilian athletes.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Dartagnan P; Netto, Jose Evaristo S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the motives for sport participation in a sample of young Brazilian athletes according to sex, age, and training history. A total of 1,517 participants (714 girls, 803 boys) ages 12 to 18 years were included in the study. The Portuguese version of the Participation Motivation Questionnaire was used to identify motives for sport participation. The most important motives were Skill Development and Fitness, whereas the least important were Fun and Achievement/Status. Sex, age, type of sport, onset of training, duration of training, training volume, and competitive experience significantly influenced the motives for sport participation reported by the athletes. These results will contribute to establish intervention programs designed to reduce sport dropout rates among young athletes.

  3. AOSSM Early Sport Specialization Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    LaPrade, Robert F.; Agel, Julie; Baker, Joseph; Brenner, Joel S.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Côté, Jean; Engebretsen, Lars; Feeley, Brian T.; Gould, Daniel; Hainline, Brian; Hewett, Timothy E.; Jayanthi, Neeru; Kocher, Mininder S.; Myer, Gregory D.; Nissen, Carl W.; Philippon, Marc J.; Provencher, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early sport specialization is not a requirement for success at the highest levels of competition and is believed to be unhealthy physically and mentally for young athletes. It also discourages unstructured free play, which has many benefits. Purpose: To review the available evidence on early sports specialization and identify areas where scientific data are lacking. Study Design: Think tank, roundtable discussion. Results: The primary outcome of this think tank was that there is no evidence that young children will benefit from early sport specialization in the majority of sports. They are subject to overuse injury and burnout from concentrated activity. Early multisport participation will not deter young athletes from long-term competitive athletic success. Conclusion: Youth advocates, parents, clinicians, and coaches need to work together with the sport governing bodies to ensure healthy environments for play and competition that do not create long-term health issues yet support athletic competition at the highest level desired. PMID:27169132

  4. Equipment innovations and rules changes in sports.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Michael D

    2004-10-01

    Participation in competitive athletics carries an inherent risk for injury. The acceptable level of risk in certain sports is often a topic of considerable debate. The National Collegiate Athletic Association, and other sports governing bodies, use injury surveillance and input from coaches, administrators, officials, athletes, and sports medicine experts in considering rules and equipment changes. Equipment innovations and/or equipment rules changes may decrease the risk of injury. However, equipment and rules changes can alter the essence or style of play of a particular sport, thus possibly increasing the risk of injury. This article discusses recent changes in equipment in various sports. The reasons for change, controversy, and relevant research related to those changes are also reviewed.

  5. Sports and health: equivalence or contrariety.

    PubMed

    Radić, Borislav; Radić, Petra; Duraković, Din

    2014-12-01

    Playing sports is a widely known method of health promotion. Balanced exercise and diet are keys to healthy life. However, sports activities can cause different injuries, from joint to head injuries. Although head injuries cause a variety of acute and chronic disorders, they are often undertreated. There are 1.6 million injured people examined at emergency departments throughout Europe every year. In sports like boxing, football, soccer, hockey, handball, basketball and bicycling, head injuries occur at a frequency of 4% to 22%. Particularly significant are chronic difficulties that occur after recurrent head injuries, i.e. cognitive deficits and changes in electroencephalogram. Qualifications of professional personnel are insufficient for professional evaluation and treatment of head injuries. The best way for sports to become an important link in health and disease prevention is to go back to sports basics while using acquired scientific knowledge.

  6. The correlates of sports participation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Downward, Paul; Lera-López, Fernando; Rasciute, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Eurobarometer data from 2009 (N = 26,788), this paper investigates the correlates of sports participation. In addition to examining standard socio-demographic, economic and lifestyle factors, the paper also focuses on the impact of motivational factors, the availability of sports infrastructure and government support, for the first time collectively at the European level. A further contribution of the paper is that it simultaneously investigates both the decision to participate in sport and the frequency of sports participation in this context. This is made possible through the application of a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit estimator. This estimator also takes into account two types of non-participants: those who have never participated in sport and those who did not participate at the time of the survey. The results show that the decision to participate in sports and the frequency of sports participation of males and females are affected by different factors, therefore distinct government policies should be applied to attract new, and retain the existing, participants. For example, women are affected more by a need to improve self-esteem, while the men to produce social integration. The provision of sports facilities is of more importance for males, which may indicate a male-oriented nature of the sports facilities, for example, the gym. However, the number of adults and the number of children in the household reduce the probability of sports participation by females. Therefore, higher provision of childcare may be important if female participation is to be increased. PMID:24498937

  7. Mortality of Palmetto bass following catch-and-release angling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.J.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2013-01-01

    Palmetto bass (Striped Bass Morone saxatilis x White Bass M. chrysops) have been stocked into reservoirs in the southeastern USA since the late 1960s and have gained widespread acceptance as a sport fish. These fisheries are growing in popularity and catch-and-release (CR) fishing is commonplace; however, there is a dearth of information on CR mortality of palmetto bass. We experimentally angled palmetto bass (n = 56; >373-mm TL) in a Tennessee reservoir using traditional angling gear in water temperatures ranging from 13 °C to 32 °C. Ultrasonic transmitters equipped with floats were externally attached to fish, which were released immediately and tracked multiple times within 10 d of release. Mortality was negligible (3.6%) in fall and spring at cool water temperatures but was high (39.3%) in summer when water temperatures exceeded 26 °C. The best logistic regression model based on Akaike's information criterion for small sample sizes scores relied on water temperature alone to predict CR mortality of palmetto bass; there was little support for other models that included all possible combinations of the six other predictor variables we tested. Palmetto bass in our study experienced lower CR mortality than Striped Bass in other systems, but CR mortality rates for palmetto bass that approach or exceed 40% during summer are still problematic if the goal is to maintain fishing quality.

  8. Informational constraints on the emergence of passing direction in the team sport of futsal.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Umberto Cesar; Vilar, Luís; Davids, Keith; Renshaw, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated compound spatial and temporal measures of interpersonal interactions purported to constrain the emergence of affordances for passing direction in the team sport of futsal. For this purpose, attacker-defender interactions in 37 sequences of play from a futsal competition in which 24 male professional players participated (M=30.04 years, SD=4.10) were filmed and analysed using TACTO software. Relative angle data were used as measures to study coordination tendencies that emerged between players during performance. Results showed that the direction for a pass emerged from relative angles between: (1) the vector from a ball carrier to ball receiver and the vector from the ball carrier to the nearest defender (70°) (p<0.01) and (2) the vector from a ball carrier to ball receiver and the vector from the ball carrier to a ball receiver's nearest defender (31°) (p < 0.01). Furthermore, passing direction was also constrained by temporal information from the emergence of both angles, since the pass was performed to attacker-defender dyads with the highest velocities of these angles (p < 0.05). Results suggested that decisions on selecting the direction of a pass in the team sport of futsal emerged at critical values of these key compound motion measures.

  9. Sports and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Y; Sakakida, K

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is one of the serious complications of athletic injuries; however, they have rarely been reported. According to the report by Takazawa et al., there were only 28 cases of peripheral nerve injury among 9,550 cases of sports injuries which had been treated in the previous 5 years at the clinic of the Japanese Athletic Association. The authors have encountered 1,167 cases of peripheral nerve injury during the past 18 years. Sixty-six of these cases were related to sports (5.7%). The nerves most frequently involved were: brachial plexus, radial nerve, ulnar, peroneal, and axillary nerves (in their order of frequency). The most common causes of such injuries were mountain climbing, gymnastics, and baseball. More often, peripheral nerve injury seemed to be caused by continuous compression and repeated trauma to the involved nerve. Usually it appeared as an entrapment neuropathy and the symptoms could be improved by conservative treatment. Some of the cases were complicated by fractures and surgical exploration became necessary. Results of treatment produced excellent to good improvement in 87.9% of the cases. With regard to compartment syndrome, the authors stress the importance of early and precise diagnosis and a fasciotomy.

  10. Doping and thrombosis in sports.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Historically, humans have long sought to enhance their "athletic" performance to increase body weight, aggressiveness, mental concentration and physical strength, contextually reducing fatigue, pain, and improving recovery. Although regular training is the mainstay for achieving these targets, the ancillary use of ergogenic aids has become commonplace in all sports. The demarcation between ergogenic aids and doping substances or practices is continuously challenging and mostly based on perceptions regarding the corruption of the fairness of competition and the potential side effects or adverse events arising from the use of otherwise unnecessary ergogenic substances. A kaleidoscope of side effects has been associated with the use of doping agents, including behavioral, skeletal, endocrinologic, metabolic, hemodynamic, and cardiovascular imbalances. Among the various doping substances, the most striking association with thrombotic complications has been reported for androgenic anabolic steroids (i.e., cardiomyopathy, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, myocardial infarction [MI], intracardiac thrombosis, stroke, venous thromboembolism [VTE], limb arterial thrombosis, branch retinal vein occlusion, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis) and blood boosting (i.e., VTE and MI, especially for epoetin and analogs). The potential thrombotic complication arising from misuse of other doping agents such as the administration of cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, cocaine, and platelet-derived preparations is instead speculative or anecdotal at best. The present article provides an overview on the epidemiological association as well as the underlying biochemical and biological mechanisms linking the practice of doping in sports with the development of thrombosis.

  11. Should nutritional supplements and sports drinks companies sponsor sport? A short review of the ethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Outram, Simon M; Stewart, Bob

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposes that the sponsorship of sport by nutritional supplements and sport drinks companies should be re-examined in the light of ethical concerns about the closeness of this relationship. A short overview is provided of the sponsorship of sport, arguing that ethical concerns about its appropriateness remain despite the imposition of severe restrictions on tobacco sponsorship. Further, the paper examines the main concerns about supplement use and sports drinks with respect to efficacy, health and the risks of doping. Particular consideration is given to the health implications of these concerns. It is suggested that they, of themselves, do not warrant the restriction of sponsorship by companies producing supplements and sports drinks. Nevertheless, it is argued that sports sponsorship does warrant further ethical examination--above and beyond that afforded to other sponsors of sport--as sport sponsorship is integral to the perceived need for such products. In conclusion, it is argued that sport may have found itself lending unwarranted credibility to products which would otherwise not necessarily be seen as beneficial for participation in sports and exercise or as inherently healthy products. PMID:25246641

  12. Can genotype determine the sports phenotype? A paradigm shift in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Mahajan, Preetam B

    2016-06-01

    In last two decades, there has been an evolution in sports medicine. Several researchers have worked on different domains of sports medicine, like strength, endurance, sports injury, and psychology. Besides this, several groups have explored the changes at cellular and molecular levels during exercise, which has led to the development of the new domain in sports science known as genetic medicine. Genetic medicine deals with the genotypic basis of sports phenotype. In this article, we try to provide an up-to-date review on genetic determinants of sports performance, which will be like a journey from the nostalgic past towards the traditional present and the romantic future of sports medicine. Endurance and power performance are two important domains of athletes. They vary in individuals, even among trained athletes. Researches indicate that the genetic makeup of sportsmen play a vital role in their performance. Several genetic factors are reported to be responsible for endurance, power, susceptibility to injury, and even psychology of the individual. Besides this, proper training, nutrition, and environment are also important in shaping their potential. The aim of this discussion is to understand the influence of the environment and the genetic makeup on the performance of the athletes. There is sufficient evidence to suggest that genotype determines the sports phenotype in an athlete. Choosing the right sports activity based on genetic endowment is the key for achieving excellence in sports.

  13. Should nutritional supplements and sports drinks companies sponsor sport? A short review of the ethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Outram, Simon M; Stewart, Bob

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposes that the sponsorship of sport by nutritional supplements and sport drinks companies should be re-examined in the light of ethical concerns about the closeness of this relationship. A short overview is provided of the sponsorship of sport, arguing that ethical concerns about its appropriateness remain despite the imposition of severe restrictions on tobacco sponsorship. Further, the paper examines the main concerns about supplement use and sports drinks with respect to efficacy, health and the risks of doping. Particular consideration is given to the health implications of these concerns. It is suggested that they, of themselves, do not warrant the restriction of sponsorship by companies producing supplements and sports drinks. Nevertheless, it is argued that sports sponsorship does warrant further ethical examination--above and beyond that afforded to other sponsors of sport--as sport sponsorship is integral to the perceived need for such products. In conclusion, it is argued that sport may have found itself lending unwarranted credibility to products which would otherwise not necessarily be seen as beneficial for participation in sports and exercise or as inherently healthy products.

  14. Can genotype determine the sports phenotype? A paradigm shift in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Mahajan, Preetam B

    2016-06-01

    In last two decades, there has been an evolution in sports medicine. Several researchers have worked on different domains of sports medicine, like strength, endurance, sports injury, and psychology. Besides this, several groups have explored the changes at cellular and molecular levels during exercise, which has led to the development of the new domain in sports science known as genetic medicine. Genetic medicine deals with the genotypic basis of sports phenotype. In this article, we try to provide an up-to-date review on genetic determinants of sports performance, which will be like a journey from the nostalgic past towards the traditional present and the romantic future of sports medicine. Endurance and power performance are two important domains of athletes. They vary in individuals, even among trained athletes. Researches indicate that the genetic makeup of sportsmen play a vital role in their performance. Several genetic factors are reported to be responsible for endurance, power, susceptibility to injury, and even psychology of the individual. Besides this, proper training, nutrition, and environment are also important in shaping their potential. The aim of this discussion is to understand the influence of the environment and the genetic makeup on the performance of the athletes. There is sufficient evidence to suggest that genotype determines the sports phenotype in an athlete. Choosing the right sports activity based on genetic endowment is the key for achieving excellence in sports. PMID:26812785

  15. Injury surveillance in community sport: Can we obtain valid data from sports trainers?

    PubMed

    Ekegren, C L; Gabbe, B J; Finch, C F

    2015-06-01

    A lack of available injury data on community sports participants has hampered the development of informed preventive strategies for the broad-base of sports participation. In community sports settings, sports trainers or first-aiders are well-placed to carry out injury surveillance, but few studies have evaluated their ability to do so. The aim of this study was to investigate the reporting rate and completeness of sports trainers' injury records and agreement between sports trainers' and players' reports of injury in community Australian football. Throughout the football season, one sports trainer from each of four clubs recorded players' injuries. To validate these data, we collected self-reported injury data from players via short message service (SMS). In total, 210 discrete injuries were recorded for 139 players, 21% by sports trainers only, 59% by players via SMS only, and 21% by both. Completeness of injury records ranged from 95% to 100%. Agreement between sports trainers and players ranged from K = 0.32 (95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.37) for date of return to football to K = 1.00 for activity when injured. Injury data collected by sports trainers may be of adequate quality for providing an understanding of the profile of injuries. However, data are likely to underestimate injury rates and should be interpreted with caution.

  16. Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the Sport Interference Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Brad; Silver, N. Clayton; Dickens, Yani; Covassin, Tracey; Lancer, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The Sport Interference Checklist (SIC) was developed in 141 athletes to assist in the concurrent assessment of cognitive and behavioral problems experienced by athletes in both training (Problems in Sports Training Scale, PSTS) and competition (Problems in Sports Competition Scale, PSCS). An additional scale (Desire for Sport Psychology Scale,…

  17. Social Sciences of Sport: Bibliographies on Educational Topics No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education, Washington, DC.

    This publication is one of a series of annotated bibliographies in physical education. There are four sections--sport history, sport psychology, sport sociology, and sport philosophy. Each section consists of a brief introduction, the annotated bibliographic entries arranged alphabetically by author, and a list of cross references for documents…

  18. Together, yet Still Not Equal? Sex Integration in Equestrian Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dashper, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Sex segregation is a core organising principle of most modern sports and is a key element in the marginalisation and subordination of girls and women in sport and beyond. In this article I explore the only Olympic-level sport which is not organised around sex segregation--equestrian sport--in order to consider the implications of sex integration…

  19. 47 CFR 76.127 - Satellite sports blackout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Satellite sports blackout. 76.127 Section 76... Sports Blackout § 76.127 Satellite sports blackout. (a) Upon the request of the holder of the broadcast rights to a sports event, or its agent, no satellite carrier shall retransmit to subscribers within...

  20. 47 CFR 76.127 - Satellite sports blackout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Satellite sports blackout. 76.127 Section 76... Sports Blackout § 76.127 Satellite sports blackout. (a) Upon the request of the holder of the broadcast rights to a sports event, or its agent, no satellite carrier shall retransmit to subscribers within...

  1. 47 CFR 76.127 - Satellite sports blackout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Satellite sports blackout. 76.127 Section 76... Sports Blackout § 76.127 Satellite sports blackout. (a) Upon the request of the holder of the broadcast rights to a sports event, or its agent, no satellite carrier shall retransmit to subscribers within...

  2. 47 CFR 76.127 - Satellite sports blackout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Satellite sports blackout. 76.127 Section 76... Sports Blackout § 76.127 Satellite sports blackout. (a) Upon the request of the holder of the broadcast rights to a sports event, or its agent, no satellite carrier shall retransmit to subscribers within...

  3. 47 CFR 76.127 - Satellite sports blackout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Satellite sports blackout. 76.127 Section 76... Sports Blackout § 76.127 Satellite sports blackout. (a) Upon the request of the holder of the broadcast rights to a sports event, or its agent, no satellite carrier shall retransmit to subscribers within...

  4. 75 FR 70074 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM International Committee F37 on Light Sport Aircraft developed the revised standards...

  5. Who's Playing College Sports? Money, Race and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheslock, John

    2008-01-01

    This research is the most accurate description of college sports' participation patterns to date, shows that both men's and women's sports participation have increased over the past 25 years. It examines factors, including Title IX and athletic expenditure growth, impacting today's college sports participation trends, which vary widely by sport.…

  6. Sport Specialization: A Coach's Role in Being Honest with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig; Shroyer, Josh

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of sport specialization in youth sport is a source of parental confusion and potential conflicts of interest with coaches. Sport specialization is the exclusive participation in one sport in the belief that it will increase the chances of receiving an athletic college scholarship and/or being able to pursue a career as a professional…

  7. Current Sports: Medicine Issues. Annual Safety Education Review--1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Timothy T., Ed.

    This document is a collection of papers whose theme is sports safety. Section one, "Government Interest in Sports Safety," includes an article on Washington, D.C.'s focus on sports safety. Section two, "Medical Aspects of Safety in Sports," includes articles regarding the medical basis of restriction from athletics, orthopaedic restrictions, and…

  8. Character Development. Does Sport Affect Character Development in Athletes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, George

    1998-01-01

    Examines the impact of sport on character development, noting that historically British and American schools have valued sports for helping develop social character and citizenship. The paper discusses research on sport as a character builder, suggesting that the effect of sport on character depends on the positive or negative social contextual…

  9. Sports Club Development--The '70'S Community Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juncker, D. F.

    A large-scale movement toward sports clubs is evolving in colleges and universities in response to widespread professionalism in varsity sports, limited sports opportunities available to highly skilled student athletes, and most importantly, substantial increases in the desire for sports participation by students in general, as a supplement to…

  10. CDC's Approach to Educating Coaches about Sports-Related Concussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchko, Jane; Huitric, Michele; Sarmiento, Kelly; Hayes, Gail; Pruzan, Marcia; Sawyer, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Sports-related concussions can happen to any athlete in any sport. Each year in the United States, an estimated 1.6-3.8 million sports and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur, most of which can be classified as concussions. To help coaches prevent, recognize, and better manage sports-related concussions, the Centers for…

  11. Recreation and Sport Planning and Design. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Jim

    This book offers guidelines for planning and designing cost-effective community recreation and sports facilities and open spaces in Australia. Seven chapters include: (1) "Benefits of Recreation and Sport" (e.g., quality of life, and diversity of recreation and sport); (2) "Provision of Recreation and Sport Open Spaces" (e.g., overview of…

  12. Participating and Performing: Sport and Higher Education in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mike, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This report highlights the contribution that higher education institutions make to sport in the UK. It draws out key findings from the Sport England and sportscotland audits of sports provision in higher education institutions. The role of sport ranges from world-class excellence to community access and healthy living. (Contains 22 notes.)

  13. Exploration on the Experiences Obtained by the Student in Sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Chen

    Through using the method of literature, logical speculation, this paper studied the sports experience. The result shows that the sports itself is a type of experience. The characteristics in the sports experience are innovational, emotional, personal, generating and individual. Through the sports experience, the student could improve their technical performance, cultivate the abundant emotion, form the independent character and produce the moral integrity.

  14. The Council of Europe's Work on Sport in 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This publication contains documents from the official work of the Council on Europe and some of its committees on issues in sport, particularly spectator violence at sporting events, drug use among athletes, and sport and education policy. The first main section contains documents on the establishment of sporting event policies. The first of two…

  15. The Council of Europe's Work on Sport, 1994-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This document presents a collection of official texts from the Council of Europe regarding European sports cooperation. Part 1 presents two Recommendations and Resolutions on Sport adopted by the Committee of Ministers concerning young people and sport and the significance of sport for society. Part 2, covering the works of the Anti-Doping…

  16. The Council of Europe's Work on Sport in 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This collection of official texts is the result of the European sports cooperation in 1995 and the fourth in a series of publications by this organization. Part 1 reprints the Recommendations and Resolutions on Sport as adopted by the Committee of Ministers in 1995 dealing with young people and sport and the significance of sport for society. Part…

  17. Sport & Fitness Management: Career Strategies and Professional Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Janet B., Ed.; Zanger, Beverly R. K., Ed.

    This textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of sport management. An introductory chapter gives the definition and direction of sport and fitness management. Part 1 describes sport and fitness management careers. The 12 chapters deal with the professional options: intercollegiate athletics, professional sport, facility…

  18. Sport Management Curriculums: The Need for a Business Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Stephen

    The college level sport management curriculum must go beyond the level of providing technical competencies--it must also orient graduates to using competencies in the fulfillment of management tasks. The sport management curriculum should also emphasize the unusual and sometimes unique aspects of managing a sport organization. Sport should be…

  19. Sports therapy for attention, cognitions and sociality.

    PubMed

    Kang, K D; Choi, J W; Kang, S G; Han, D H

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand if sport improves attention symptoms, social competency, and cognitive functions in children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study was designed as a 6-week, prospective trial, including 12 sessions of education/sports therapy. 13 ADHD children participated in a 90-min athletic activity (sports-cADHD) twice a week, while 15 ADHD children received education on behavior control (edu-cADHD). During the 6-week treatment period, the sports-cADHD group showed greater improvements in DuPaul's ADHD Rating Scale scores, parent and teacher version (K-ARS-PT), compared to those of the edu-sADHD group. The cognitive functions assessed with the digit symbol and Trail-Making Test part B (TMT B) were improved in the sports-cADHD group, while the cognitive functions observed in the edu-sADHD group were not significantly changed. The cooperativeness scores in the sports-cADHD group were greatly increased compared to those of the edu-sADHD group. The results demonstrated a positive correlation with sports and improvement in attention symptoms, cognitive symptoms and social skills. The results of the present study suggest that therapy in the form of athletic activity may increase social competency in children with ADHD, as demonstrated by improved cognitive functions.

  20. Sports injury of the pediatric musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Rosendahl, Karen; Strouse, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Sports related injuries are common in children and adolescents, with a reported incidence of around one in ten children each year. Boys incur more and severer sports injuries than girls, and chance for injury is greater with contact or jumping sports. Sports injuries seen in children under 10-years of age are non-specific, including contusions, mild sprains, and extremity fractures, usually Salter fractures of the physes (growth plate) or plastic fractures. In the very young athlete, sports injury of the ligaments or muscle is rare as are spine or head injuries. With growth and adolescence, the intensity of sports involvement increases. Pre-pubertal children still have open physes that are prone to injury, both acute or due to stress from a repetitive activity. In addition to injury of the physes of the long bones, injuries to the physes of apophyses are common. Ligamentous injury is uncommon before physeal closure, but can occur. After the physes fuse, ligamentous injury is seen with patterns similar to adults. This review will include a description of sports related injuries seen in children and adolescents. We will concentrate on injuries that are specific for the growing skeleton, with a brief mention of those seen after fusion of the physes.