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Sample records for angra ii nuclear

  1. Front-end Design and Characterization for the ν-Angra Nuclear Reactor Monitoring Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornelas, T. I.; Araújo, F. T. H.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Costa, J. A.; Nóbrega, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutrinos Angra (ν-Angra) Experiment aims to construct an antineutrinos detection device capable of monitoring the Angra dos Reis nuclear reactor activity. Nuclear reactors are intense sources of antineutrinos, and the thermal power released in the fission process is directly related to the flow rate of these particles. The antineutrinos energy spectrum also provides valuable information on the nuclear source isotopic composition. The proposed detector will be equipped with photomultipliers tubes (PMT) which will be readout by a custom Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator circuit designed to condition its output signals to the acquisition modules to be digitized and processed by an FPGA. The readout circuit should be sensitive to single photoelectron signals, process fast signals, with a full-width-half-amplitude of about 5 ns, have a narrow enough output pulse width to detect both particles coming out from the inverse beta decay (bar nue+p → n + e+), and its output amplitude should be linear to the number of photoelectrons generated inside the PMT, used for energy estimation. In this work, some of the main PMT characteristics are measured and a new readout circuit is proposed, described and characterized.

  2. The behavior of ANGRA 2 nuclear power plant core for a small break LOCA simulated with RELAP5 code

    SciTech Connect

    Sabundjian, Gaiane; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Belchior, Antonio Jr.; Silva Rocha, Marcelo da; Conti, Thadeu N.; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Mesquita, Roberto N.; Masotti, Paulo H. F.; Souza Lima, Ana Cecilia de

    2013-05-06

    This work discusses the behavior of Angra 2 nuclear power plant core, for a postulate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the primary circuit for Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). A pipe break of the hot leg Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) was simulated with RELAP 5 code. The considered rupture area is 380 cm{sup 2}, which represents 100% of the ECCS pipe flow area. Results showed that the cooling is enough to guarantee the integrity of the reactor core.

  3. The Angra Neutrino Project: precise measurement of {theta}{sub 13} and safeguards applications of neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro, E.; Anjos, J. C.

    2009-04-20

    We present an introduction to the Angra Neutrino Project. The goal of the project is to explore the use of neutrino detectors to monitor the reactor activity. The Angra Project, willl employ as neutrino sources the reactors of the nuclear power complex in Brazil, located in Angra dos Reis, some 150 Km south from the city of Rio de Janeiro. The Angra collaboration will develop and operate a low-mass neutrino detector to monitor the nuclear reactor activity, in particular to measure the reactor thermal power and the reactor fuel isotopic composition.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of risk-reduction measures from a national viewpoint: a case study of the Angra nuclear plant in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, L F; Barros, E B; Fleming, P V; Rosa, L P

    1987-09-01

    In this paper a systemic or national approach to cost-effectiveness analysis of risk-reduction measures is reviewed, and its advantages and limitations are discussed. The method is applied to the problem of the cost-effectiveness of increasing the Angra 3 NPP containment wall thickness from the present 60 cm to 180 cm thick in order to prevent damage to the reactor core in case of a direct commercial aircraft crash on it. It is concluded that this measure is not cost-effective if the referred approach is considered.

  5. Tritium ((3)H) as a tracer for monitoring the dispersion of conservative radionuclides discharged by the Angra dos Reis nuclear power plants in the Piraquara de Fora Bay, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Gomes, Franciane; Godoy, José Marcus; de Carvalho, Zenildo Lara; de Souza, Elder Magalhães; Rodrigues Silva, José Ivan; Tadeu Lopes, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    Presently, two nuclear power plants operate in Brazil. Both are located at Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis, approximately 133 km from Rio de Janeiro city. The reactor cooling circuits require the input of seawater, which is later discharged through a pipeline into the adjacent Piraquara de Fora Cove. The radioactive effluents undergo ion-exchange treatment prior to their release in batches, causing the enrichment of (3)H relative to other radionuclides in the discharged waters. Under steady state conditions, the (3)H gradient in the Piraquara de Fora waters can be used to determine the dependence of the dilution factor on the distance from the discharge point. The present work describes experiments carried out at the reactor site during batch release episodes, including time series sampling at the discharge point and surface seawater sampling every 250 m to a distance of 1250 m, after a double distillation, the (3)H concentration was measured by liquid scintillation counting applying a Quantulus liquid scintillation spectrometer. The obtained results showed a linear relationship between the (3)H concentration and distance from the discharge point. At 1250 m from the discharge point a dilution index of 1:15 was measured which fits the expected value based on modeling.

  6. Readout electronics validation and target detector assessment for the Neutrinos Angra experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarenga, T. A.; Anjos, J. C.; Azzi, G.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Chimenti, P.; Costa, J. A.; Dornelas, T. I.; Farias, P. C. M. A.; Guedes, G. P.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Kemp, E.; Lima, H. P.; Machado, R.; Nóbrega, R. A.; Pepe, I. M.; Ribeiro, D. B. S.; Simas Filho, E. F.; Valdiviesso, G. A.; Wagner, S.

    2016-09-01

    A compact surface detector designed to identify the inverse beta decay interaction produced by anti-neutrinos coming from near operating nuclear reactors is being developed by the Neutrinos Angra Collaboration. In this document we describe and test the detector and its readout system by means of cosmic rays acquisition. In this measurement campaign, the target detector has been equipped with 16 8-in PMTs and two scintillator paddles have been used to trigger cosmic ray events. The achieved results disclosed the main operational characteristics of the Neutrinos Angra system and have been used to assess the detector and to validate its readout system.

  7. Nuclear pumped laser II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Lee, J. H.; Pinkston, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The first direct nuclear pumped laser using the He-2-(n,p) H-3 reaction is reported. Lasing took place on the 1.79 microns Ar I transition in a mixture of He-3-Ar at approximately 600 Torr total pressure. It was found that the electrically pulsed afterglow He-Ar laser had the same concentration profile as the nuclear pumped laser. As a result, nuclear lasing was also achieved in He-3-Xe (2.027 micron) and He-3-Kr (2.52 micron). Scaling of laser output with both thermal flux and total pressure as well as minority concentration has been completed. A peak output (He-3-Ar) of 3.7 watts has been achieved at a total pressure of 4 atm. Direct nuclear pumping of He-3-Ne has also been achieved. Nuclear pumping of a He-3-NF3 mixture was attempted, lasing in FI at approximately 7000 A, without success, although the potential lasing transitions appeared in spontaneous emission. Both NF3 and 238UF6 appear to quench spontaneous emission when they constitute more than 1% of the gas mixture.

  8. Isotopic and chemical investigations on Angra dos Reis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Tera, F.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Huneke, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Isotope ratios and chemical abundance measurements for a variety of elements are reported for total meteorite and mineral separates of the Angra dos Reis achondrite. U-Pb, Th-Pb, and Pb-Pb ages are concordant at 4.54 eons for the total meteorite and for high-purity whitlockite, which indicates that Angra dos Reis is an early planetary differentiate that has not been disturbed for these systems since 4.54 eons ago. The implications of different ratios of Sr-87 and Sr-86 found in different components are discussed. Xe isotopic measurements show that Pu-244 was enriched in the whitlockite relative to the pyroxene by a factor of about 18. Chemical enrichment factors between the whitlockite and the fassaitic pyroxene in Angra dos Reis are presented

  9. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  10. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; Parilla, Megan; Cruz, Christina M.; Laster, Kyle; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin–RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II. PMID:27505898

  11. Nuclear War Media and Firebreaks II: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    Ground Zero is an organization whose intent is to provide factual information on nuclear war issues. Ground Zero has published a simulation called "Firebreaks II: A War-Peace Game" about the ways nuclear war might be prevented. The impact of Firebreaks II on college students' attitudes was assessed in 79 student volunteers of whom 40…

  12. Nuclear instrumentation system operating experience and nuclear instrument testing in the EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Yingling, G. E.; Curran, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    In March of 1972 three wide range nuclear channels were purchased from Gulf Atomics Corporation and installed in EBR-II as a test. The three channels were operated as a test until April 1975 when they became a permanent part of the reactor shutdown system. Also described are the activities involved in evaluating and qualifying neutron detectors for LMFBR applications. Included are descriptions of the ANL Components Technology Division Test Program and the EBR-II Nuclear Instrument Test Facilities (NITF) used for the in-reactor testing and a summary of program test results from EBR-II.

  13. Open Questions in Stellar Nuclear Physics: II

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2004-09-13

    No doubt, among the most exciting discoveries of the third millennium thus far are oscillations of massive neutrinos and dark energy that leads to an accelerated expansion of the Universe. Accordingly, Nuclear Physics is presented with two extraordinary challenges: the need for precise (5% or better) prediction of solar neutrino fluxes within the Standard Solar Model, and the need for an accurate (5% or better) understanding of stellar evolution and in particular of Type Ia super nova that are used as cosmological standard candle. In contrast, much confusion is found in the field with contradicting data and strong statements of accuracy that can not be supported by current data. We discuss an experimental program to address these challenges and disagreements.

  14. Trace Element Distribution Between Olivine and Kirschsteinite in Angra Dos Reis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittipaldo, M. M.; Jones, R. H.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    The angrites are a small and enigmatic group of basaltic achondrites that possess unique mineralogical and chemical properties. The dominant mineralogy of the seven angrite members (Angra dos Reis, LEW 86010, LEW 87051, Asuka 881371, Sahara 99555, D Orbigny, and a new Moroccan member) is fassaite, olivine, and plagioclase. Angrites display a wide range of thermal histories, with Angra dos Reis (AdoR) exhibiting a cooling history different from that of the rapidly cooled members and from LEW86010, a more slowly cooled member. AdoR could represent either a cumulate or a porphyritic igneous rock that was later altered by metamorphism. We are re-examining the thermal history of AdoR in light of the more recently described angrite members. Our emphasis is a trace element study of low-Ca olivine, which we refer to as olivine, and high-Ca olivine, which we refer to as kirschsteinite, in AdoR.

  15. Deployment of the Topaz-II space nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Standley, V.H.; Wyant, F.J.; Polansky, G.F. )

    1993-01-01

    The Topaz-II is a 5-kW(electric) Russian space nuclear power plant. The power plant resembles a shuttlecock standing 3.9 m high and is 1.4 m in diameter at the base. The reactor is at the top, the radiation shield is in the middle, and the radiator is at the bottom. The whole system weighs 1 tonne. The reactor core is 37.5 cm long and 26 cm in diameter. It contains 37 core-length, single-cell thermionic fuel elements embedded in a ZrH moderator. Each thermionic fuel cell is a cylindrical emitter inside a cylindrical collector. Nuclear fuel inside the emitter raises the emitter's temperature.

  16. Time series analysis of nuclear instrumentation in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    Results of a time series analysis of the scaler count data from the 3 wide range nuclear detectors in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II are presented. One of the channels was replaced, and it was desired to determine if there was any statistically significant change (ie, improvement) in the channel`s response after the replacement. Data were collected from all 3 channels for 16-day periods before and after detector replacement. Time series analysis and statistical tests showed that there was no significant change after the detector replacement. Also, there were no statistically significant differences among the 3 channels, either before or after the replacement. Finally, it was determined that errors in the reactivity change inferred from subcritical count monitoring during fuel handling would be on the other of 20-30 cents for single count intervals.

  17. Studies of Brazilian meteorites. III - Origin and history of the Angra dos Reis achondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, M.; Keil, K.; Hlava, P. F.; Berkley, J. L.; Gomes, C. B.; Curvello, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    The mineral composition of the Angra dos Reis meteorite, which fell in 1869, is described. This achondrite contains phases reported in a meteorite for the first time. Petrofabric analysis shows that fassaite has a preferred orientation and lineation, which is interpreted as being due to cumulus processes, possibly the effect of post-depositional magmatic current flow or laminar flow of a crystalline mush. The mineral chemistry indicates crystallization from a highly silica-undersaturated melt at low pressure. Several aspects of the mineral composition are discussed with reference to the implications of crystallization conditions.

  18. Age and isotopic relationships among the angrites Lewis Cliff 86010 and Angra dos Reis

    SciTech Connect

    Lugmair, G.W. ); Galer, S.J.G. Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Chemie, Mainz )

    1992-04-01

    Results of a wide-ranging isotopic investigation of the unique Antarctican angrite LEW-86010 (LEW) are presented, together with a reassessment of the type angrite Angra dos Reis (ADOR). The principal objectives of this study are to obtain precise radiometric ages, initial Sr isotopic compositions, and to search for the erstwhile presence of the short-lived nuclei {sup 146}Sm and {sup 26}Al via their daughter products. The isotopic compositions of Sm, U, Ca, and Ti were also measured. This allows a detailed appraisal to be made of the relations between, and the genealogy of, these two angrites.

  19. 10 CFR 76.115 - Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II. 76.115 Section 76.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.115 Special nuclear material of...

  20. 10 CFR 76.115 - Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II. 76.115 Section 76.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.115 Special nuclear material of moderate...

  1. 10 CFR 76.115 - Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II. 76.115 Section 76.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.115 Special nuclear material of moderate...

  2. 10 CFR 76.115 - Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II. 76.115 Section 76.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.115 Special nuclear material of moderate...

  3. 10 CFR 76.115 - Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance-Category II. 76.115 Section 76.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.115 Special nuclear material of moderate...

  4. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 34: Control Systems II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  8. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  9. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 34: Control Systems II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  10. Independent Qualification of the CIAU Tool Based on the Uncertainty Estimate in the Prediction of Angra 1 NPP Inadvertent Load Rejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, Ronaldo C.; Alvim, Antonio Carlos M.

    2002-07-01

    The Code with - the capability of - Internal Assessment of Uncertainty (CIAU) is a tool proposed by the 'Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione (DIMNP)' of the University of Pisa. Other Institutions including the nuclear regulatory body from Brazil, 'Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear', contributed to the development of the tool. The CIAU aims at providing the currently available Relap5/Mod3.2 system code with the integrated capability of performing not only relevant transient calculations but also the related estimates of uncertainty bands. The Uncertainty Methodology based on Accuracy Extrapolation (UMAE) is used to characterize the uncertainty in the prediction of system code calculations for light water reactors and is internally coupled with the above system code. Following an overview of the CIAU development, the present paper deals with the independent qualification of the tool. The qualification test is performed by estimating the uncertainty bands that should envelope the prediction of the Angra 1 NPP transient RES-11. 99 originated by an inadvertent complete load rejection that caused the reactor scram when the unit was operating at 99% of nominal power. The current limitation of the 'error' database, implemented into the CIAU prevented a final demonstration of the qualification. However, all the steps for the qualification process are demonstrated. (authors)

  11. PML isoform II plays a critical role in nuclear lipid droplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Ohsaki, Yuki; Kawai, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Yukichika; Cheng, Jinglei; Jokitalo, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) in the nucleus of hepatocyte-derived cell lines were found to be associated with premyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) and type I nucleoplasmic reticulum (NR) or the extension of the inner nuclear membrane. Knockdown of PML isoform II (PML-II) caused a significant decrease in both nuclear LDs and type I NR, whereas overexpression of PML-II increased both. Notably, these effects were evident only in limited types of cells, in which a moderate number of nuclear LDs exist intrinsically, and PML-II was targeted not only at PML NBs, but also at the nuclear envelope, excluding lamins and SUN proteins. Knockdown of SUN proteins induced a significant increase in the type I NR and nuclear LDs, but these effects were cancelled by simultaneous knockdown of PML-II. Nuclear LDs harbored diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α and incorporated newly synthesized lipid esters. These results corroborated that PML-II plays a critical role in generating nuclear LDs in specific cell types. PMID:26728854

  12. Pokhran II and Beyond (Emerging Indian Nuclear Posture)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    14 1945 to Pokhran-I India’s independent research in the field of nuclear physics started as early as 1945. Homi J Bhabha , an Indian physicist...of nuclear physics.’15 After independence, the first Indian Prime Minister, Jawahar Lal Nehru, was in turn duly convinced by Bhabha to continue...the wanton destructiveness of nuclear weapons’17 but on the other he granted Bhabha ‘a free hand in the development of India’s nuclear

  13. Nuclear import of RNA polymerase II is coupled with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the RNA polymerase II-associated protein 2.

    PubMed

    Forget, Diane; Lacombe, Andrée-Anne; Cloutier, Philippe; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Blanchette, Mathieu; Coulombe, Benoit

    2013-08-01

    The RNA polymerase II (RNAP II)-associated protein (RPAP) 2 has been discovered through its association with various subunits of RNAP II in affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry experiments. Here, we show that RPAP2 is a mainly cytoplasmic protein that shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. RPAP2 shuttling is tightly coupled with nuclear import of RNAP II, as RPAP2 silencing provokes abnormal accumulation of RNAP II in the cytoplasmic space. Most notably, RPAP4/GPN1 silencing provokes the retention of RPAP2 in the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RPAP2 enters the nucleus in association with RNAP II and returns to the cytoplasm in association with the GTPase GPN1/RPAP4. Although binding of RNAP II to RPAP2 is mediated by an N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-170) that contains a nuclear retention domain, and binding of RPAP4/GPN1 to RPAP2 occurs through a C-terminal domain (amino acids 156-612) that has a dominant cytoplasmic localization domain. In conjunction with previously published data, our results have important implications, as they indicate that RPAP2 controls gene expression by two distinct mechanisms, one that targets RNAP II activity during transcription and the other that controls availability of RNAP II in the nucleus.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mod5p-II contains sequences antagonistic for nuclear and cytosolic locations.

    PubMed Central

    Tolerico, L H; Benko, A L; Aris, J P; Stanford, D R; Martin, N C; Hopper, A K

    1999-01-01

    MOD5 encodes a tRNA modification activity located in three subcellular compartments. Alternative translation initiation generates Mod5p-I, located in the mitochondria and the cytosol, and Mod5p-II, located in the cytosol and nucleus. Here we study the nucleus/cytosol distribution of overexpressed Mod5p-II. Nuclear Mod5p-II appears concentrated in the nucleolus, perhaps indicating that the nuclear pool may have a different biological role than the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial pools. Mod5p contains three motifs resembling bipartite-like nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), but only one is sufficient to locate a passenger protein to the nucleus. Mutations of basic residues of this motif cumulatively contribute to a cytosolic location for the fusion proteins. These alterations also cause decreased nuclear pools of endogenous Mod5p-II. Depletion of nuclear Mod5p-II does not affect tRNATyr function. Despite the NLS, most Mod5p is cytosolic. We assessed whether Mod5p sequences cause a karyophilic reporter to be located in the cytosol. By this assay, Mod5p may contain more than one region that functions as cytoplasmic retention and/or nuclear export sequences. Thus, distribution of Mod5p results from the presence/absence of mitochondrial targeting information and sequences antagonistic for nuclear and cytosolic locations. Mod5p is highly conserved; sequences responsible for subcellular distribution appear to reside in "accessory" motifs missing from prokaryotic counterparts. PMID:9872948

  15. Age and isotopic relationships among the angrites Lewis Cliff 86010 and Angra dos Reis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Galer, S. J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents results of a wide-ranging isotopic investigation of the the Antarctic angrite LEW-86010 (LEW), and reassesses the type angrite Angra dos Reis (ADOR) in order to obtain precise radiometric ages and initial Sr isotopic compositions, and to search for the erstwhile presence of the short-lived nuclei Sm-146 and Al-26 via their daughter products. The isotopic compositions of Sm, U, Ca, and Ti were measured to allow a detailed appraisal to be made of the relations between, and the geneology of, these two angrites. LEW proves to be severely contaminated with modern terrestrial Pb, which is shown to result from terrestrial weathering. Concordant Pb-Pb model ages of pyroxene separates are obtained; uranium isotopic compositions are normal within error. Overall, striking age and isotopic similarities between LEW and ADOR were found, suggesting almost simultaneous production on the same asteroid, even though recent experimental studies imply that the two are not comagmatic.

  16. Age and isotopic relationships among the angrites Lewis Cliff 86010 and Angra dos Reis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Galer, S. J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents results of a wide-ranging isotopic investigation of the the Antarctic angrite LEW-86010 (LEW), and reassesses the type angrite Angra dos Reis (ADOR) in order to obtain precise radiometric ages and initial Sr isotopic compositions, and to search for the erstwhile presence of the short-lived nuclei Sm-146 and Al-26 via their daughter products. The isotopic compositions of Sm, U, Ca, and Ti were measured to allow a detailed appraisal to be made of the relations between, and the geneology of, these two angrites. LEW proves to be severely contaminated with modern terrestrial Pb, which is shown to result from terrestrial weathering. Concordant Pb-Pb model ages of pyroxene separates are obtained; uranium isotopic compositions are normal within error. Overall, striking age and isotopic similarities between LEW and ADOR were found, suggesting almost simultaneous production on the same asteroid, even though recent experimental studies imply that the two are not comagmatic.

  17. Measured oxygen fugacities of the Angra dos Reis achondrite as a function of temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.; Stephen, Huebner J.; Sato, M.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the oxygen fugacity (f{hook}O2) as a function of temperature (T) were made on an interior bulk sample of the cumulate achondrite, Angra dos Reis. Data clustered between the f{hook}O2-T relationship of the iron-wu??stite assemblage and 1.2 log atm units above iron-wu??stite. Interpretation of the data indicates that, throughout most of the cooling history of the meteorite, f{hook}O2 values were defined by equilibria involving iron-bearing species at values close to the f{hook}O2 of the assemblage iron-wu??stite. Measured f{hook}O2 data are compatible with crystallization and cooling at pressures greater than 50 bars. ?? 1977.

  18. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of nuclear urotensin-II binding sites in rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Doan, ND; Nguyen, TTM; Létourneau, M; Turcotte, K; Fournier, A; Chatenet, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE During the past decade, a few GPCRs have been characterized at the nuclear membrane where they exert complementary physiological functions. In this study, we investigated (1) the presence of a functional urotensin-II (U-II) receptor (UT) in rat heart nuclear extracts and (2) the propensity of U-II and U-II-related peptide (URP) to cross the plasma membrane in a receptor-independent manner. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Biochemical and pharmacological methods including competitive binding assays, photoaffinity labelling, immunoblotting as well as de novo RNA synthesis were used to characterize the presence of functional UT receptors in rat heart nuclei. In addition, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to investigate the cellular uptake of fluorescent U-II and URP derivatives. KEY RESULTS The presence of specific U-II binding sites was demonstrated in rat heart nuclear extracts. Moreover, such subcellular localization was also observed in monkey heart extracts. In vitro transcription initiation assays on rat, freshly isolated, heart nuclei suggested that nuclear UT receptors are functional, and that U-II, but not URP, participates in nuclear UT-associated gene expression. Surprisingly, hU-II and URP efficiently crossed the plasma membrane in a receptor-independent mechanism involving endocytosis through caveolin-coated pits; this uptake of hU-II, but not that of URP, was dependent on extracellular pH. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that (1) U-II and URP can differentially modulate nuclear UT functions such as gene expression, and (2) both ligands can reach the internal cellular space through a receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:22044114

  19. Nuclear DNA helicase II/RNA helicase A binds to filamentous actin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suisheng; Buder, Katrin; Burkhardt, Carmen; Schlott, Bernhard; Görlach, Matthias; Grosse, Frank

    2002-01-04

    Nuclear DNA helicase II (NDH II), also designated RNA helicase A, is a multifunctional protein involved in transcription, RNA processing, and transport. Here we report that NDH II binds to F-actin. NDH II was partially purified from HeLa nuclear extracts by ion-exchange chromatography on Bio-Rex 70 and DEAE-Sepharose. Upon gel-filtration chromatography on Sepharose 4B, partially purified NDH II resolved into two distinct peaks. The first NDH II peak, corresponding to the void volume of Sepharose 4B, displayed coelution with an abundant 42-kDa protein that was subsequently identified as actin. Several nuclear proteins such as RNA polymerase II, the U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-associated WD40 protein, and heterogeneous nuclear RNPs (hnRNPs) copurified with NDH II. However, only hnRNPs A1 and C were found together with NDH II and actin polymers during gel filtration. NDH II and hnRNP C from the HeLa nuclear extract coeluted with F-actin on Sepharose 4B in an RNase-resistant manner, whereas hnRNP A1 was nearly completely removed from F-actin-associated hnRNP complexes following RNA digestion. The association of NDH II and hnRNP C with F-actin was abolished by gelsolin, an F-actin-depolymerizing protein that fragments actin polymers into oligomers or monomers. Furthermore, NDH II co-immunoprecipitated with F-actin and hnRNP C, respectively. In vitro translated NDH II coeluted with F-actin on Sepharose 4B, whereas no coelution with F-actin was observed for in vitro translated hnRNP A1 or C1. Binding to F-actin requires an intact C terminus of NDH II and most likely a native protein conformation. Electron microscopy indicated a close spatial proximity among NDH II, hnRNP C, and F-actin within the HeLa nucleus. These results suggest an important function of NDH II in mediating the attachment of hnRNP-mRPP RNP complexes to the actin nucleoskeleton for RNA processing, transport, or other actin-related processes.

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and spectrophotometric studies of nickel(II)-iron(II) hybrid hemoglobins

    SciTech Connect

    Shibayama, N.; Inubushi, T.; Morimoto, H.; Yonetani, T.

    1987-04-21

    Ni(II)-Fe(II) hybrid hemoglobins, ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/ and ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe)/sub 2/, have been characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance with Ni(II) protoporphyrin IX (Ni-PP) incorporated in apoprotein, which serves as a permanent deoxyheme. ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/, ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe)/sub 2/, and NiHb commonly show exchangeable proton resonances at 11 and 14 ppm, due to hydrogen-bonded protons in a deoxy-like structure. Upon binding of carbon monoxide (CO) to ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/, these resonances disappear at pH 6.5 to pH 8.5. On the other hand, the complementary hybrid ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe-CO)/sub 2/ showed the 11 and 14 ppm resonances at low pH. Upon raising pH, the intensities of both resonances are reduced, although these changes are not synchronized. Electronic absorption spectra and hyperfine-shifted proton resonances indicate that the ligation of CO in the ..beta..(Fe) subunits induced changes in the coordination and spin states of Ni-PP in the ..cap alpha.. subunits. In a deoxy-like structure, the coordination of Ni-PP in the ..cap alpha.. subunits is predominantly in a low-spin (S = 0) four-coordination state, whereas in an oxy-like structure the contribution of a high-spin (S = 1) five-coordination state markedly increased. Ni-PP in the ..beta.. subunits always takes a high-spin five-coordination state regardless of solution conditions and the state of ligation in the partner ..cap alpha..(Fe) subunits. In the ..beta..(Ni) subunits, a significant downfield shift of the proximal histidyl N/sub delta/H resonance and a change in the absorption spectrum of Ni-PP were detected, upon changing the quaternary structure of the hybrid. The chemical shifts were analyzed in terms of the E11-Val methyls vs. the porphyrin rings in hybrid Hbs.

  1. Commercial Nuclear Steam-Electric Power Plants, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Ferdinand J.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the pros and cons of nuclear power systems. Includes a discussion of the institutional status of the AEC, AEC regulatory record, routine low-level radiation hazards, transport of radioactive materials, storage of wastes, and uranium resources and economics of supply. (GS)

  2. Commercial Nuclear Steam-Electric Power Plants, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Ferdinand J.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the pros and cons of nuclear power systems. Includes a discussion of the institutional status of the AEC, AEC regulatory record, routine low-level radiation hazards, transport of radioactive materials, storage of wastes, and uranium resources and economics of supply. (GS)

  3. Team effort: the nuclear medicine decision making process. Part II.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, S

    1991-06-01

    This two part article examines the nuclear medicine purchase of Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, the largest private hospital in the nation. Part I (May 1991) focused on what their needs were. This concluding installment looks at the committee mechanism itself and the reasoning that went behind their decisions.

  4. Different pathways for the nuclear import of yeast RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Navarro, Natalia; Estruch, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has to be fully assembled before being imported into the nucleus, while other reports indicate a distinct mechanism to import large and small subunits. In yeast, Iwr1 binds to the holoenzyme assembled in the cytoplasm and directs its nuclear entry. However, as IWR1 is not an essential gene, Iwr1-independent pathway(s) for the nuclear import of Pol II must exist. In this paper, we investigate the transport into the nucleus of several large and small Pol II subunits in the mutants of genes involved in Pol II biogenesis. We also analyse subcellular localization in the presence of drugs that can potentially affect Pol II nuclear import. Our results show differences in the cellular distribution between large and small subunits when Pol II biogenesis was impaired. Our data suggest that, in addition to the fully assembled holoenzyme, Pol II subunits can be imported to the nucleus, either independently or as partial assemblies, through different pathways, including passive diffusion for the small subunits.

  5. Innovative Aircraft Design Study. Task II. Nuclear Aircraft Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    Laminar flow control (LFC) was applied to the aircraft wing and vertical surfaces , as an additional technology feature. The results from these...Supercritical Wing o Nuclear Propulsion o Laminar Flow Control o High Bypass-Ratio Engines o Upper Surface Blowing o Dual Cycle Engines o Externally Blown Flaps...8217Advanced Transport Aircraft, Chemical-Fueled Aircraft, Advanced Technology Aircraft, _NuERA 11 Reactor Systems, Composite Materials, Laminar Flow

  6. "Sloppy" nuclear energy density functionals. II. Finite nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikšić, T.; Imbrišak, M.; Vretenar, D.

    2017-05-01

    A study of parameter sensitivity of nuclear energy density functionals, initiated in the first part of this work [Nikšić and Vretenar, Phys. Rev. C 94, 024333 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.94.024333], is extended by the inclusion of data on ground-state properties of finite nuclei in the application of the manifold boundary approximation method (MBAM). Density functionals used in self-consistent mean-field calculations, and nuclear structure models based on them, are generally "sloppy" and exhibit an exponential range of sensitivity to parameter variations. Concepts of information geometry are used to identify the presence of effective functionals of lower dimension in parameter space associated with parameter combinations that can be tightly constrained by data. The MBAM is used in an iterative procedure that systematically reduces the complexity and dimension of parameter space of a sloppy functional, with properties of nuclear matter and data on finite nuclei determining not only the values of model parameters but also the optimal functional form of the density dependence.

  7. Startup control of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Astrin, C.D.

    1996-09-01

    The Russian designed and manufactured TOPAZ-II Thermionic Nuclear Space Reactor has been supplied to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization for study as part of the TOPAZ International Program. A Preliminary Nuclear Safety Assessment investigated the readiness to use the TOPAZ-II in support of a Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Mission (NEPSTP). Among the anticipated system modifications required for launching the TOPAZ-II system within safety goals is for a U.S. designed Automatic Control System. The requirements and desired features of such a control system are developed based upon U.S. safety standards. System theory and design are presented in order to establish the basis for development of a hybrid control model from available simulations. The model is verified and then used in exploration of various control schemes and casualty analysis providing groundwork for future Automatic Control System design.

  8. Cofilin Regulates Nuclear Architecture through a Myosin-II Dependent Mechanotransduction Module.

    PubMed

    Wiggan, O'Neil; Schroder, Bryce; Krapf, Diego; Bamburg, James R; DeLuca, Jennifer G

    2017-01-19

    Structural features of the nucleus including shape, size and deformability impact its function affecting normal cellular processes such as cell differentiation and pathological conditions such as tumor cell migration. Despite the fact that abnormal nuclear morphology has long been a defining characteristic for diseases such as cancer relatively little is known about the mechanisms that control normal nuclear architecture. Mounting evidence suggests close coupling between F-actin cytoskeletal organization and nuclear morphology however, mechanisms regulating this coupling are lacking. Here we identify that Cofilin/ADF-family F-actin remodeling proteins are essential for normal nuclear structure in different cell types. siRNA mediated silencing of Cofilin/ADF provokes striking nuclear defects including aberrant shapes, nuclear lamina disruption and reductions to peripheral heterochromatin. We provide evidence that these anomalies are primarily due to Rho kinase (ROCK) controlled excessive contractile myosin-II activity and not to elevated F-actin polymerization. Furthermore, we demonstrate a requirement for nuclear envelope LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex proteins together with lamin A/C for nuclear aberrations induced by Cofilin/ADF loss. Our study elucidates a pivotal regulatory mechanism responsible for normal nuclear structure and which is expected to fundamentally influence nuclear function.

  9. Cofilin Regulates Nuclear Architecture through a Myosin-II Dependent Mechanotransduction Module

    PubMed Central

    Wiggan, O’Neil; Schroder, Bryce; Krapf, Diego; Bamburg, James R.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2017-01-01

    Structural features of the nucleus including shape, size and deformability impact its function affecting normal cellular processes such as cell differentiation and pathological conditions such as tumor cell migration. Despite the fact that abnormal nuclear morphology has long been a defining characteristic for diseases such as cancer relatively little is known about the mechanisms that control normal nuclear architecture. Mounting evidence suggests close coupling between F-actin cytoskeletal organization and nuclear morphology however, mechanisms regulating this coupling are lacking. Here we identify that Cofilin/ADF-family F-actin remodeling proteins are essential for normal nuclear structure in different cell types. siRNA mediated silencing of Cofilin/ADF provokes striking nuclear defects including aberrant shapes, nuclear lamina disruption and reductions to peripheral heterochromatin. We provide evidence that these anomalies are primarily due to Rho kinase (ROCK) controlled excessive contractile myosin-II activity and not to elevated F-actin polymerization. Furthermore, we demonstrate a requirement for nuclear envelope LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex proteins together with lamin A/C for nuclear aberrations induced by Cofilin/ADF loss. Our study elucidates a pivotal regulatory mechanism responsible for normal nuclear structure and which is expected to fundamentally influence nuclear function. PMID:28102353

  10. Accurate and efficient RNA polymerase II transcription with a soluble nuclear fraction derived from Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Kamakaka, R T; Tyree, C M; Kadonaga, J T

    1991-01-01

    We describe the preparation and biochemical properties of a soluble nuclear fraction derived from Drosophila embryos. This extract, which can be easily prepared in 2.5 hr, is capable of accurate and efficient RNA polymerase II transcription of a variety of diverse genes from both Drosophila and mammals. With the relatively strong promoter of the Drosophila Krüppel gene, it is possible to achieve 20% template usage in a single round of transcription, which is considerably higher than the template usage of approximately 3% seen with standard nuclear extracts. Further, although U small nuclear RNA genes are refractory to transcription with HeLa transcription extracts, the soluble nuclear fraction transcribes a U1 small nuclear RNA gene from Drosophila. Moreover, transcriptional activation by sequence-specific activators can be attained in vitro with the soluble nuclear fraction. The overall transcriptional efficiency appears limited to 0.45 transcript per template of DNA per 30 min, but the mechanism of limitation is not known. The soluble nuclear fraction, which was developed to recreate the environment within the nucleus, should be useful when high efficiencies of RNA polymerase II transcription are desired. Images PMID:1992453

  11. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  12. Multiparticle Production in Particle and Nuclear Collisions. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, T.; Kinoshita, K.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Takagi, F.

    The dominant phenomenon in high-energy particle and nuclear collisions is multiple production of hadrons. This had attracted may physicists in 1950's, the period of the first remarkable development of particle physics. Multiparticle production was already observed in cosmic-ray experiments and expected to be explained as a natural consequence of the strong Yukawa interaction. Statistical and hydrodynamical models were then proposed by Fermi, Landau and others. These theories are still surviving even today as a prototype of modern ``fire-ball'' models. After twenty years, a golden age came in this field of physics. It was closely related to the rapid development of accelerator facilities, especially, the invention of colliding-beam machines which yield high enough center-of-mass energies for studying reactions with high multiplicity. Abundant data on final states of multiparticle production have been accumulated mainly by measuring inclusive cross sections and multiplicity distributions. In super high-energy bar{p}p collisions at CERN S pmacr pS Collider, we confirmed the increasing total cross section and found violations of many scaling laws which seemed to be valid at lower energies. This suggests a fundamental complexity of the multiparticle phenomena and offers new materials for further development of theoretical investigations. In the same period, studies of constituent (quark-gluon) structure of hadrons had also been develped. Nowadays, pysicists believe that the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental law of the hadronic world. Multiparticle dynamics should also be described by QCD. We have known that the hard-jet phenomena are well explained by the perturbative QCD. On the other hand, the soft processes are considered to be non-perturbative phenomena which have not yet been solved, and related to the mechanism of the color confinement and formation of strings or color-flux tubes. Multiparticle production would offer useful information on this

  13. Optical spectrophotometry of the nuclear region of M51. II - Further evidence for nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J. A.; Cecil, G.

    1983-03-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of the spiral galaxy M51 conducted by Rose and Searle (1982) have revealed that the ionized gas within the central region exhibits a peculiar emission-line spectrum and is undergoing large chaotic motions. These phenomena appear to result from low-level nuclear activity qualitatively similar to that seen in Seyfert galaxy nuclei and QSOs. It has been proposed that the gas is photoionized by a central nonstellar ultraviolet continuum. The present study is concerned with a further investigation of the ionization source in the nuclear region of M51, taking into account high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with an intensified Reticon detector on the 2.24 m telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory. It is found that photoionization by a central nonstellar ionizing continuum source provides the most consistent explanation for the observed anomalous emission-line spectrum.

  14. Rare earth elements in Angra dos Reis and Lewis Cliff 86010, two meteorites with similar but distinct magma evolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozaz, Ghislaine; Mckay, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    Data are presented on ion microprobe measurements of REE and selected trace element abundances in individual grains of merrillite, fassaite, olivine, kirschsteinite, and plagioclase of Lewis Cliff 86010 (LEW 86010) meteorite and in merrillite and fassaite grains of Angra dos Reis (ADOR). Results show a close relationship between the two meteorites and support a magmatic origin for LEW 86010. However, the measurements indicate that, despite numerous common characteristics, the two meteorites must have been produced in separate magmatic events involving similar but distinct processes and parent melts.

  15. Independent Safety Assessment of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The Independent Safety Assessment described in this study report was performed to assess the safety of the design and launch plans anticipated by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in 1993 for a Russian-built, U.S.-modified, TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system. Its conclusions, and the bases for them, were intended to provide guidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) management in the event that the DOD requested authorization under section 91b. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, for possession and use (including ground testing and launch) of a nuclear-fueled, modified TOPAZ-II. The scientists and engineers who were engaged to perform this assessment are nationally-known nuclear safety experts in various disciplines. They met with participants in the TOPAZ-II program during the spring and summer of 1993 and produced a report based on their analysis of the proposed TOPAZ-II mission. Their conclusions were confined to the potential impact on public safety and did not include budgetary, reliability, or risk-benefit analyses.

  16. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  17. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as 12C and 16O . All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the 12C (α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  18. Sliding mode control of the space nuclear reactor system TOPAZ II

    SciTech Connect

    Shtessel, Y.B.; Wyant, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The Automatic Control System (ACS) of the space nuclear reactor power system TOPAZ II that generates electricity from nuclear heat using in-core thermionic converters is considered. Sliding Mode Control Technique was applied to the reactor system controller design in order to provide the robust high accuracy following of a neutron (thermal) power reference profile in a start up regime and a payload electric power (current) reference profile following in an operation regime. Extensive simulations of the TOPAZ II reactor system with the designed sliding mode controllers showed improved accuracy and robustness of the reactor system performances in a start up regime and in an electric power supply regime as well. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

    1951-05-01

    In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

  20. Nuclear Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Type II Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videla, Liza; Lira, Paulina; Andrews, Heather; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-01

    We present near- and mid-IR observations of a sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 μm Galaxy sample. The sample was observed in the J, H, K, L, M and N bands. Galaxy surface brightness profiles are modeled using nuclear, bulge, bar (when necessary), and disk components. To check the reliability of our findings, the procedure was tested using Spitzer observations of M 31. Nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are determined for 34 objects, and optical spectra are presented for 38, including analysis of their stellar populations using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. Emission line diagnostic diagrams are used to discriminate between genuine active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and H II nuclei. Combining our observations with those found in the literature, we have a total of 40 SEDs. It is found that about 40% of the SEDs are characterized by an upturn in the near-IR, which we have quantified as a NIR slope α < 1 for an SED characterized as λf λvpropλα. The three objects with an H II nucleus and two Seyfert nuclei with strong contamination from a circumnuclear also show an upturn. For genuine AGNs, this component could be explained as emission from the accretion disk, a jet, or from a very hot dust component leaking from the central region through a clumpy obscuring structure. The presence of a very compact nuclear starburst as the origin for this NIR excess emission is not favored by our spectroscopic data for these objects.

  1. Preliminary nuclear safety assessment of the NEPST (Topaz II) space reactor program

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    The United States (US) Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary nuclear safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary nuclear safety assessment included a number of deterministic analyses, such as; neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, an analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment to date, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the US with a modification to preclude water flooded criticality. A full scale safety program is now underway.

  2. Nuclear structure and the fate of core collapse (Type II) supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2014-08-01

    For a long time Gerry Brown and his collaborator Hans Bethe considered the question of the final fate of a core collapse (Type II) supernova. Recalling ideas from nuclear structure on Kaon condensate and a soft equation of state of the dense nuclear matter they concluded that progenitor stars with mass as low as 17-18M⊙ (including supernova 1987A) could collapse to a small mass black hole with a mass just beyond 1.5M⊙, the upper bound they derive for a neutron star. We discuss another nuclear structure effect that determines the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O) at the end of helium burning. This ratio also determines the fate of a Type II supernova with a carbon rich progenitor star producing a neutron star and oxygen rich collapsing to a black hole. While the C/O ratio is one of the most important nuclear inputs to stellar evolution it is still not known with sufficient accuracy. We discuss future efforts to measure with gamma-beam and TPC detector of the C12(α,γ)O16 reaction that determines the C/O ratio in stellar helium burning.

  3. RNA-RNA interactions and pre-mRNA mislocalization as drivers of group II intron loss from nuclear genomes.

    PubMed

    Qu, Guosheng; Dong, Xiaolong; Piazza, Carol Lyn; Chalamcharla, Venkata R; Lutz, Sheila; Curcio, M Joan; Belfort, Marlene

    2014-05-06

    Group II introns are commonly believed to be the progenitors of spliceosomal introns, but they are notably absent from nuclear genomes. Barriers to group II intron function in nuclear genomes therefore beg examination. A previous study showed that nuclear expression of a group II intron in yeast results in nonsense-mediated decay and translational repression of mRNA, and that these roadblocks to expression are group II intron-specific. To determine the molecular basis for repression of gene expression, we investigated cellular dynamics of processed group II intron RNAs, from transcription to cellular localization. Our data show pre-mRNA mislocalization to the cytoplasm, where the RNAs are targeted to foci. Furthermore, tenacious mRNA-pre-mRNA interactions, based on intron-exon binding sequences, result in reduced abundance of spliced mRNAs. Nuclear retention of pre-mRNA prevents this interaction and relieves these expression blocks. In addition to providing a mechanistic rationale for group II intron-specific repression, our data support the hypothesis that RNA silencing of the host gene contributed to expulsion of group II introns from nuclear genomes and drove the evolution of spliceosomal introns.

  4. Random vibration analysis of the Topaz-II nuclear reactor power system. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.E.

    1995-06-01

    The TOPAZ-II Ya-21U is one of six Russian made space nuclear power systems which is based on theomionic power conversion. The U.S. is presently analyzing TOPAZ-II to determine the reliability and feasibility of using this system. A structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit in May 1993 to provide data from which modal parameters could be identified. This test showed the fundamental frequency to be 10.5 Hz, yet the test results that the Russians conducted identified a fundamental frequency of 5 Hz. Another finite element model was created incorporating new developments in TOPAZ-II and modifications to the finite element model to better simulate the mass properties of the TOPAZ-II2. A second structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit 06-09 September 1994. This thesis focuses on the random vibration analysis of the TOPAZ-II Ya-2lU utilizing the most recent test results and the Master Series (updated version) I-DEAS software. The modal respose of the model and simulated random vibration tests were within 8.33%. This model is a feasible tool which can be used to analyze the TOPAZ unit without testing the unit to fatigue.

  5. American Physicists, Nuclear Weapons in World War II, and Social Responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badash, Lawrence

    2005-06-01

    Social responsibility in science has a centuries-long history, but it was such a minor thread that most scientists were unaware of the concept. Even toward the conclusion of the Manhattan Project, which produced the first nuclear weapons, only a handful of its participants had some reservations about use of a weapon of mass destruction. But the explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki not only made society more aware of the importance of science, they made scientists more aware of their responsibility to society. I describe the development of the concept of social responsibility and its appearance among American scientists both before and after the end of World War II.

  6. Association of topoisomerase II with the hepatoma cell nuclear matrix: the role of intermolecular disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S H; Shaper, J H

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies have resulted in conflicting data regarding the recovery of the nuclear enzymes topoisomerase (topo) II and topo I in the nuclear matrix fraction. In the present study we have assessed the effect of systematically altering a single extraction procedure on the distribution of these enzymes during the subfractionation of nuclei from HTC hepatoma tissue culture cells. When nuclear monolayers (prepared by treating attached cells in situ with the neutral detergent Nonidet-P40 at 4 degrees C) were isolated in the presence of the irreversible sulfhydryl blocking reagent iodoacetamide, subsequent treatment with DNase I and RNase A followed by 1.6 M NaCl resulted in structures which were extensively depleted of intranuclear components as assessed by phase contrast microscopy and conventional transmission electron microscopy. These structures contained 12 +/- 4% of the total protein present in the original nuclear monolayers. The lamins and polypeptides with molecular weights comparable to those of actin and vimentin were the predominant polypeptides present on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Western blotting revealed that less than 5% of the total nuclear topo II molecules were present in these structures. In contrast, when the sulfhydryl cross-linking reagent sodium tetrathionate (NaTT) was substituted for iodoacetamide, the same extraction procedure yielded structures containing components of the nucleolus and an extensive intranuclear network. These structures contained a wide variety of nonlamin, nonhistone nuclear polypeptides including 23 +/- 4% of the total nuclear topo II. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis performed under nonreducing conditions revealed that topo II in these nuclear matrices was present as part of a large disulfide cross-linked complex. Treatment of these structures with reducing agents in 1.6 M NaCl released the topo II. In contrast, topo I did not form disulfide cross-linked oligomers and was not detectable in any of these nuclease

  7. Optical Spectroscopy of Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Analysis of the Nuclear and Long-Slit Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, S.; Kim, D.-C.; Sanders, D. B.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Soifer, B. T.

    1995-05-01

    A spectroscopic survey of a sample of 200 luminous IRAS galaxies (LIGs: L_ir_^7^ > 3 x 10^10^ L_sun_; H_0_ = 75 km s^-1^ Mpc^-1^) was carried out using the Palomar 5 meter and University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescopes. Kim et al. (1995) described the data-taking and data-reduction procedures and presented line and continuum measurements extracted from the nucleus of these objects. In this paper, the nuclear data are combined with circumnuclear measurements on 23 of these galaxies to investigate the properties of the line-emitting gas and underlying stellar population in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear spectra of these galaxies were classified as H II region-like" or "AGN-like" using a large number of line-ratio diagnostics corrected for the underlying stellar absorption features. This correction is an important source of errors in some previous studies. The emission-line spectra of many AGNs were found to-be of relatively low ionization level and were therefore classified as LINER. We confirm that both the fraction of LIGs with AGN spectra and the fraction of Seyferts among the AGN increase with infrared luminosity, reaching values of 62% and 54% at the highest observed luminosities, respectively. The fraction of LINERs, on the other hand, is relatively constant at ~27%. The source of the ionization of the emission-line gas often is a function of the distance from the nucleus. Based on the emission-line ratios and the strengths of the stellar absorption features, circumnuclear starburst activity is a common feature of LIGs, regardless of their nuclear spectral types. The emission-line, absorption-line, continuum, radio, and IRAS properties of the LINERs suggest that most of the LINER emission in these infrared-selected galaxies is produced through shock ionization rather than photoionization by a genuine active nucleus. The nuclear region of Seyfert LIGs is found to be slightly less reddened than that of the LINERs and H II galaxies. The dust distribution generally

  8. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  9. Human GTPases associate with RNA polymerase II to mediate its nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Carré, Clément; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    Small GTPases share a biochemical mechanism and act as binary molecular switches. One important function of small GTPases in the cell is nucleocytoplasmic transport of both proteins and RNA. Here, we show the stable association of human GPN1 and GPN3, small GTPases related to Ran, with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) isolated from either the cytoplasmic or nuclear fraction. GPN1 and GPN3 directly interact with RNAPII subunit 7 (RPB7)/RPB4 and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII. Depletion of GPN1 or GPN3 using small interfering RNAs led to decreased RNAPII levels in the nucleus and an accumulation of this enzyme in the cytoplasm of human cells. Furthermore, isolation of a GPN1/GPN3/RNAPII complex from stable cell lines expressing a dominant negative GPN1 harboring mutations in the GTP-binding pocket demonstrated a role for these proteins in nuclear import of RNAPII. Thus, GPN1/GPN3 define a new family of small GTPases that are specialized for the transport of RNA polymerase II into the nucleus.

  10. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  11. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kriz, M.; Hunter, D.; Riley, T.

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  12. Civilian nuclear power on the drawing board: the development of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, C.

    2003-02-20

    On September 28, 2001 a symposium was held at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the festivities to mark the 100th birthday of Enrico Fermi. The symposium celebrated Fermi's ''contribution to the development of nuclear power'' and focused on one particular ''line of development'' resulting from Fermi's interest in power reactors: Argonne's fast reactor program. Symposium participants made many references to the ways in which the program was linked to Fermi, who led the team which created the world's first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. For example, one presentation featured an April, 1944 memo that described a meeting attended by Fermi and others. The memo came from the time when research on plutonium and the nuclear chain reaction at Chicago's WWII Metallurgical Laboratory was nearing its end. Even as other parts of the Manhattan Engineering Project were building on this effort to create the bombs that would end the war, Fermi and his colleagues were taking the first steps to plan the use of nuclear energy in the postwar era. After noting that Fermi ''viewed the use of [nuclear] power for the heating of cities with sympathy,'' the group outlined several power reactor designs. In the course of discussion, Fermi and his colleagues took the first steps in conjuring the vision that would later be brought to life with Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), the celebrated achievements of the Argonne fast reactor program. Group members considered various schemes for a breeder reactor in which the relatively abundant U-238 would be placed near a core of fissionable material. The reactor would be a fast reactor; that is, neutrons would not be moderated, as were most wartime reactors. Thus, the large number of neutrons emitted in fast neutron fission would hit the U-238 and create ''extra'' fissionable material, that is, more than ''invested,'' and at the same time produce power. The group identified the problem of

  13. Localization of a Bacterial Group II Intron-Encoded Protein in Eukaryotic Nuclear Splicing-Related Cell Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Laporte, Philippe; Jiménez-Zurdo, José Ignacio; Frugier, Florian; Crespi, Martin; Toro, Nicolás

    2013-01-01

    Some bacterial group II introns are widely used for genetic engineering in bacteria, because they can be reprogrammed to insert into the desired DNA target sites. There is considerable interest in developing this group II intron gene targeting technology for use in eukaryotes, but nuclear genomes present several obstacles to the use of this approach. The nuclear genomes of eukaryotes do not contain group II introns, but these introns are thought to have been the progenitors of nuclear spliceosomal introns. We investigated the expression and subcellular localization of the bacterial RmInt1 group II intron-encoded protein (IEP) in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. Following the expression of translational fusions of the wild-type protein and several mutant variants with EGFP, the full-length IEP was found exclusively in the nucleolus, whereas the maturase domain alone targeted EGFP to nuclear speckles. The distribution of the bacterial RmInt1 IEP in plant cell protoplasts suggests that the compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells into nucleus and cytoplasm does not prevent group II introns from invading the host genome. Furthermore, the trafficking of the IEP between the nucleolus and the speckles upon maturase inactivation is consistent with the hypothesis that the spliceosomal machinery evolved from group II introns. PMID:24391881

  14. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in eukaryotic nuclear splicing-related cell compartments.

    PubMed

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Laporte, Philippe; Jiménez-Zurdo, José Ignacio; Frugier, Florian; Crespi, Martin; Toro, Nicolás

    2013-01-01

    Some bacterial group II introns are widely used for genetic engineering in bacteria, because they can be reprogrammed to insert into the desired DNA target sites. There is considerable interest in developing this group II intron gene targeting technology for use in eukaryotes, but nuclear genomes present several obstacles to the use of this approach. The nuclear genomes of eukaryotes do not contain group II introns, but these introns are thought to have been the progenitors of nuclear spliceosomal introns. We investigated the expression and subcellular localization of the bacterial RmInt1 group II intron-encoded protein (IEP) in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. Following the expression of translational fusions of the wild-type protein and several mutant variants with EGFP, the full-length IEP was found exclusively in the nucleolus, whereas the maturase domain alone targeted EGFP to nuclear speckles. The distribution of the bacterial RmInt1 IEP in plant cell protoplasts suggests that the compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells into nucleus and cytoplasm does not prevent group II introns from invading the host genome. Furthermore, the trafficking of the IEP between the nucleolus and the speckles upon maturase inactivation is consistent with the hypothesis that the spliceosomal machinery evolved from group II introns.

  15. The rate of nuclear cytoplasmic protein transport is determined by the casein kinase II site flanking the nuclear localization sequence of the SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rihs, H P; Jans, D A; Fan, H; Peters, R

    1991-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated [Rihs, H.-P. and Peters, R. (1989) EMBO J., 8, 1479-1484] that the nuclear transport of recombinant proteins in which short fragments of the SV40 T-antigen are fused to the amino terminus of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase is dependent on both the nuclear localization sequence (NLS, T-antigen residues 126-132) and a phosphorylation-site-containing sequence (T-antigen residues 111-125). While the NLS determines the specificity, the rate of transport is controlled by the phosphorylation-site-containing sequence. The present study furthers this observation and examines the role of the various phosphorylation sites. Purified, fluorescently labeled recombinant proteins were injected into the cytoplasm of Vero or hepatoma (HTC) cells and the kinetics of nuclear transport measured by laser microfluorimetry. By replacing serine and threonine residues known to be phosphorylated in vivo, we identified the casein kinase II (CK-II) site S111/S112 to be the determining factor in the enhancement of the transport. Either of the residues 111 or 112 was sufficient to elicit the maximum transport enhancement. The other phosphorylation sites (S120, S123, T124) had no influence on the transport rate. Examination of the literature suggested that many proteins harboring a nuclear localization sequence also contain putative CK-II sites at a distance of approximately 10-30 amino acid residues from the NLS. CK-II has been previously implicated in the transmission of growth signals to the nucleus. Our results suggest that CK-II may exert this role by controlling the rate of nuclear protein transport. Images PMID:1848177

  16. The Effect of Measurement Bias on Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations for WIPP TRUPACT-II Shipments

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Harker, Yale D.

    2000-12-15

    Current nuclear criticality safety limit requirements for transporting TRUPACT-II waste containers to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) specify that the {sup 239}Pu fissile gram equivalent (FGE) plus two times its measurement error must be {<=}325 g for a payload of fourteen 55-gal drums. The authorized method for calculating a TRUPACT-II FGE measurement error value is to take the square root of the sum of the squared error values for the individual containers (often called root-sum-squares or simply RSS). However, to the extent that the individual drum measurements contain common bias effects (e.g., due to common calibration or other adjustment factors), the corresponding measurement errors are correlated, and simple RSS calculations will underestimate the true error in the TRUPACT-II FGE value.The RSS calculations assume independence, while common bias effects can induce strong correlations between the errors in measurements. Significant bias effects can occur when the matrix characteristics for a particular waste type are not fully accounted for in the measurement process. Depending on the relative size of the bias error compared to precision error, the true measurement error can be greater than twice that calculated by RSS. In such cases, the FGE shipping requirement may not be met. To avoid underestimating the error, bias components should be estimated and propagated separately (combined only at the final step in the TRUPACT-II FGE calculation), or the effect of bias on covariance between measurements must be calculated. These covariance terms then need to be included in the final uncertainty calculations.

  17. Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectra of Five-Coordinate Imidazole-ligated Iron(II) Porphyrinates

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chuanjiang; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Ellison, Mary K.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zgierski, Marek Z.; Sage, J. Timothy; Scheidt, W. Robert

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear resonance vibrational spectra have been obtained for six five-coordinate imidazole-ligated iron(II) porphyrinates, [Fe(Por)(L)] (Por = tetraphenylporphyrinate, octaethylporphyrinate, tetratolylporphyrinate or protoporphyrinate IX and L = 2-methylimidazole or 1,2-dimethylimidazole). Measurements have been made on both powder and oriented crystal samples. The spectra are dominated by strong signals around 200–300 cm−1. Although the in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations are seriously overlapped, oriented crystal spectra allow their deconvolution. Thus, oriented crystal experimental data, along with DFT calculations, enable the assignment of key vibrations in the spectra. Molecular dynamics are also discussed. The nature of the Fe–NIm vibrations has been elaborated further than was possible from resonance Raman studies. Our study suggests that the Fe motions are coupled with the porphyrin core and peripheral groups motions. Both peripheral groups and their conformations have significant influence on the vibrational spectra (position and shape). PMID:22243131

  18. Constrained molecular dynamics II: An N-body approach to nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Papa, M. . E-mail: massimo.papa@ct.infn.it; Giuliani, G.; Bonasera, A.

    2005-09-20

    In this work, we illustrate the basic development of the constrained molecular dynamics applied to the N-body problem in nuclear physics. The heavy computational tasks related to quantum effects, to the Fermionic nature of the system have been resolved out by defining a set of transformations based on the concept of impulsive forces. In particular, in the implemented version II of the constrained molecular dynamics model the problem related to the non-conservation of the total angular momentum has been solved. This problem affects other semi-classical microscopic approaches due to the 'hard core' repulsive interaction and, more generally, to the usage of random forces. The effect of the restored conservation law on the fusion cross-section for the {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca system is also briefly discussed.

  19. Spectroscopic, thermal characterization and cytotoxic activity of bi-, tri- and tetra-nuclear Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes with diSchiff base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Wael Hussein

    2014-10-01

    In this paper; new di-, tri-, and tetra-nuclear Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of N,N‧-bis(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)ethan-1,2-diamine (EDH4), N,N‧-bis(3,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-benzene-1,2-diamine (PDH4) and N,N‧-bis-(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)-4,5-dimethyl-1,2-diamine (MPDH4) ligands were synthesized by two different methods. The first method involve the synthesis of the three ligands from condensation reaction of 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (L‧H2) with ethylenediamine (en), o-phenylenediamine (o-PD), or 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (DMPD) in a mole ratio of 2:1 followed by the reaction of the resulting Schiff bases ligands with Pd(II) or Pt(II) ions in the presence of 2,2‧-dipyridyl (L) to form the di- and tri-nuclear metal complexes. The second method involve the condensation of the Pd complex LPd(II)L‧, (L = 2,2‧-dipyridyl, L‧ = 4-formylbenzene-1,2-bis(olate)) with en, o-PD, or DMPD in a mole ratio of 2:1, respectively, followed by reaction with PdCl2 to form di-, tri-, and tetra-nuclear palladium(II) complexes, respectively. Structures of ligands and metal complexes are characterized by physical properties, FT-IR spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance. The geometries of metal complexes are suggested according to elemental analysis, electronic absorption spectra, thermal analysis, atomic absorption, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance. Cytotoxic activity against lung large cell carcinoma (H460), prostate carcinoma (DU145), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), amelanotic melanoma (M-14), colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) is also reported.

  20. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  1. SNMSP II: A system to fully automate special nuclear materials accountability reporting for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pareto, V.; Venegas, R.

    1987-07-01

    The USNRC requires each licensee who is authorized to possess Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) to prepare and submit reports concerning SNM received, produced, possessed, transferred, consumed, disposed of, or lost. These SNM accountability reports, which need to be submitted twice a year, contain detailed information on the origin, quantity, and type of SNM for several locations. The amount of detail required makes these reports very time consuming and error prone when prepared manually. Yankee Atomic is developing an IBM PC-based computer code that fully automates the process of generating SNM accountability reports. The program, called SNMSP II, prints a number of summaries including facsimiles of the NRC/DOE-741, 742, 742C, and RW-859 reports in a format that can be submitted directly to the NRC/DOE. SNMSP II is menu-driven and is especially designed for people with little or no computer training. Input can be either from a mainframe-based corporate data base or manually through user-friendly screens. In addition, extensive quality assurance features are available to ensure the security and accuracy of the data. This paper discusses the major features of the code and describes its implementation at Yankee.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization system for the SANS-J-II spectrometer at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, Takayuki; Noda, Yohei; Hashimoto, Takeji; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) system for the SANS-J-II spectrometer at the JRR-3 atomic research reactor of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The DNP system is composed of a split-type horizontal superconducting magnet (3.3 T), a Gunn oscillator as a microwave source (94 GHz), and a cryostat (1.2 K). In particular, a sample cell with ∅40 in inner diameter and the magnet with a field homogeneity of 5×10 -5 in a volume of ∅25 mm×8 mm were employed to polarize samples with a diameter of ∅20 mm for the ultra small-angle scattering experiment using the magnetic lens installed at the SANS-J-II spectrometer [S. Koizumi, H. Iwase, J. Suzuki, T. Oku, R. Motokawa, H. Sasao, H. Tanaka, D. Yamaguchi, H.M. Shimizu, T. Hashimoto, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 40 (2007) s474]. We obtained the proton polarization | P|=32% in the polyethylene doped with 2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO).

  3. The Gpn3 Q279* cancer-associated mutant inhibits Gpn1 nuclear export and is deficient in RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Camacho, Angel A; Méndez-Hernández, Lucía E; Lara Chacón, Bárbara; Peña-Gómez, Sonia G; Romero, Violeta; González-González, Rogelio; Guerra-Moreno, José A; Robledo-Rivera, Angélica Y; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto; Calera, Mónica R

    2017-09-23

    Gpn3 is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) nuclear targeting. Here, we investigated the effect of a cancer-associated Q279* nonsense mutation in Gpn3 cellular function. Employing RNAi, we replaced endogenous Gpn3 by wt or Q279* RNAi-resistant Gpn3R in epithelial model cells. RNAPII nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity are markedly decreased in cells expressing only Gpn3R Q279*. Wild-type Gpn3R localizes to the cytoplasm but a fraction of Gpn3R Q279* enters the cell nucleus and inhibits Gpn1-EYFP nuclear export. This property and the transcriptional deficit in Gpn3R Q279*-expressing cells requires a PDZ-binding motif generated by the Q279* mutation. We conclude that this PDZ-binding motif resulting from the Q279* mutation causes Gpn3 nuclear entry, inhibits Gpn1 nuclear export and Gpn3-mediated RNAPII nuclear targeting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Tri- and tetra-nuclear polypyridyl ruthenium(II) complexes as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Gorle, Anil K; Feterl, Marshall; Warner, Jeffrey M; Wallace, Lynne; Keene, F Richard; Collins, J Grant

    2014-11-28

    A series of inert tri- and tetra-nuclear polypyridylruthenium(II) complexes that are linked by the bis[4(4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridyl)]-1,n-alkane ligand ("bb(n)" for n = 10, 12 and 16) have been synthesised and their potential as antimicrobial agents examined. Due to the modular nature of the synthesis of the oligonuclear complexes, it was possible to make both linear and non-linear tetranuclear ruthenium species. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the ruthenium(II) complexes were determined against four strains of bacteria--Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). In order to gain an understanding of the relative antimicrobial activities, the cellular uptake and water-octanol partition coefficients (log P) were determined for a selection of the ruthenium complexes. Although the trinuclear complexes were the most lipophilic based upon log P values and showed the greatest cellular uptake, the linear tetranuclear complexes were generally more active, with MIC values <1 μM against the Gram positive bacteria. Similarly, although the non-linear tetranuclear complexes were slightly more lipophilic and were taken up to a greater extent by the bacteria, they were consistently less active than their linear counterparts. Of particular note, the cellular accumulation of the oligonuclear ruthenium complexes was greater in the Gram negative strains compared to that in the Gram positive S. aureus and MRSA. The results demonstrate that the lower antimicrobial activity of polypyridylruthenium(II) complexes towards Gram negative bacteria, particularly P. aeruginosa, is not strongly correlated to the cellular accumulation but rather to a lower intrinsic ability to kill the Gram negative cells.

  5. Cinnamaldehyde enhances Nrf2 nuclear translocation to upregulate phase II detoxifying enzyme expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Yu-Ling; Wu, Mei-Li; Chuang, Show-Mei

    2011-05-11

    Cinnamaldehyde has been demonstrated to stimulate glutathione production and the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes in HepG2 cells. The mechanism underlying this cinnamaldehyde-mediated gene expression relies on Nrf2 transcriptional activity. Therefore, the molecular signaling events in cinnamaldehyde-mediated detoxifying enzyme expression were further investigated in this study. Cinnamaldehyde activated ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK signaling pathways, but not the p38 MAP kinase pathway, subsequently leading to Nrf2 nuclear translocation and eventually increasing phase II enzyme expression. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt, or JNK pathways attenuated Nrf2 nuclear translocation and phase II enzyme expression. Depletion of Nrf2 by small RNA interference (si-RNA) showed that the protein levels of phase II enzymes were no longer induced by cinnamaldehyde. A luciferase reporter assay and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) also demonstrated that cinnamaldehyde-activated signaling resulted in the increased transcriptional activity of Nrf2 through binding to the ARE4 enhancer sequence. Altogether, these data suggest that ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK pathways activated by cinnamaldehyde collectively control Nrf2 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, leading to the increase of phase II enzyme expression. Application of an appropriate chemopreventive agent such as cinnamaldehyde could potentially be an alternative strategy for cancer chemoprevention.

  6. Nuclear heating, radiation damage, and waste management options for the HYLIFE-II final focus magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Moir, R W; House, P A

    1999-08-09

    Heavy-ion fusion (HIF) designs for inertial fusion energy (XFE) power plants typically require final focusing magnets just outside the reaction chamber and blanket. Due to penetrations within the chamber and blanket, the magnets are exposed to a radiation environment. Although the magnet bores would be sized to avoid line-of-sight irradiation, the magnets still would be susceptible to nuclear heating and radiation damage from neutrons and y-rays. Additionally, the magnets must be included in waste management considerations due to neutron activation. Modified versions of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant featuring two-sided illumination by arrays of 32 or 96 beams from each side are presented. A simple, point-of-departure quadrupole magnet design is assumed, and a three-dimensional neutronics model is created for the Flibe pocket, first wall, blanket, shield, and final two focusing magnets. This work details state-of-the-art neutronics calculations and shows that the final focus system needs to be included in the economic and environmental considerations for the driver-chamber interface of any HIF IFE power plant design.

  7. IFU spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - II. Nuclear emission line properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    Although it is well known that massive galaxies have central black holes, most of them accreting at low Eddington ratios, many important questions still remain open. Among them are the nature of the ionizing source, the characteristics and frequencies of the broad-line region and of the dusty torus. We report observations of 10 early-type galactic nuclei, observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph in integral field unit mode, installed on the Gemini South telescope, analysed with standard techniques for spectral treatment and compared with results obtained with principal component analysis Tomography (Paper I). We performed spectral synthesis of each spaxel of the data cubes and subtracted the stellar component from the original cube, leaving a data cube with emission lines only. The emission lines were decomposed in multi-Gaussian components. We show here that, for eight galaxies previously known to have emission lines, the narrow-line region can be decomposed in two components with distinct line widths. In addition to this, broad Hα emission was detected in six galaxies. The two galaxies not previously known to have emission lines show weak Hα+[N II] lines. All 10 galaxies may be classified as low-ionization nuclear emission regions in diagnostic diagrams and seven of them have bona fide active galactic nuclei with luminosities between 1040 and 1043 erg s-1. Eddington ratios are always <10-3.

  8. Analysis of Radionuclide Releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achim, Pascal; Monfort, Marguerite; Le Petit, Gilbert; Gross, Philippe; Douysset, Guilhem; Taffary, Thomas; Blanchard, Xavier; Moulin, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The present part of the publication (Part II) deals with long range dispersion of radionuclides emitted into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident that occurred after the March 11, 2011 tsunami. The first part (Part I) is dedicated to the accident features relying on radionuclide detections performed by monitoring stations of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network. In this study, the emissions of the three fission products Cs-137, I-131 and Xe-133 are investigated. Regarding Xe-133, the total release is estimated to be of the order of 6 × 1018 Bq emitted during the explosions of units 1, 2 and 3. The total source term estimated gives a fraction of core inventory of about 8 × 1018 Bq at the time of reactors shutdown. This result suggests that at least 80 % of the core inventory has been released into the atmosphere and indicates a broad meltdown of reactor cores. Total atmospheric releases of Cs-137 and I-131 aerosols are estimated to be 1016 and 1017 Bq, respectively. By neglecting gas/particulate conversion phenomena, the total release of I-131 (gas + aerosol) could be estimated to be 4 × 1017 Bq. Atmospheric transport simulations suggest that the main air emissions have occurred during the events of March 14, 2011 (UTC) and that no major release occurred after March 23. The radioactivity emitted into the atmosphere could represent 10 % of the Chernobyl accident releases for I-131 and Cs-137.

  9. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  10. INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Removal of Categories I and II Special Nuclear Material from Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico"

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico (Sandia) develops science-based technologies in support of national security in areas such as nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, military technologies, and homeland security. Sandia's primary mission is ensuring that the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Part of this mission includes systems engineering of nuclear weapons; research, design, and development of non-nuclear components; manufacturing of non-nuclear weapons components; the provision of safety, security, and reliability assessments of stockpile weapons; and the conduct of high-explosives research and development and environmental testing. Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates Sandia for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). On May 7, 2004, the Secretary announced that the Department would evaluate missions at DOE sites to consolidate Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the most secure environments possible. The Administrator of the NNSA said that this effort was a key part of an overall plan to transform the nuclear weapons complex into a smaller, safer, more secure, and more efficient national security enterprise. In February 2008, Sandia was the first site to report it had reduced its on-site inventory of nuclear material below 'Categories I and II' levels, which require the highest level of security to protect material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine if Sandia made appropriate adjustments to its security posture in response to the removal of the Categories I and II SNM. We found that Sandia adjusted its security posture in response to the removal of Categories I and II SNM. For example, security posts were closed; unneeded protective force weapons and equipment were excessed from the site; and, Sandia's Site Safeguards and

  11. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nur77 Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Vascular Remodeling via Downregulation of β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingli; Cai, Zhaohua; Chu, Shichun; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Liuhua; Yi, Jing; Shen, Linghong; He, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the predominant effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system. Ang II contributes to vascular remodeling in many cardiovascular diseases (eg, hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, and aneurysm). Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 has a crucial role in the functional regulation of vascular cells. The objective of this study was to define the specific role of Nur77 in Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. Nur77 expression was initially found to be elevated in medial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of thoracic aortas from mice continuously infused with Ang II for 2 weeks using a subcutaneous osmotic minipump. Cellular studies revealed that Nur77 expression was upregulated by Ang II via the MAPK/PKA-CREB signaling pathway. Ang II-induced proliferation, migration, and phenotypic switching were significantly enhanced in VSMCs isolated from Nur77(-/-) mice compared with wild-type VSMCs. Consistent with the role in VSMCs, we found that compared with wild-type mice, Nur77(-/-) mice had elevated aortic medial areas and luminal diameters, more severe elastin disruption and collagen deposition, increased VSMC proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase production, and decreased VSMC-specific genes SM-22α and α-actin expression, after 2 weeks of exogenous Ang II administration. The results of additional experiments suggested that Nur77 suppressed Ang II-induced β-catenin signaling pathway activation by promoting β-catenin degradation and inhibiting its transcriptional activity. Our findings indicated that Nur77 is a critical negative regulator of Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation, migration, and phenotypic switching via the downregulation of β-catenin activity. Nur77 may reduce Ang II-induced vascular remodeling involved in many cardiovascular diseases. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. A laboratory study of the influence of iron(II) bearing minerals on the nuclear magnetic resonance measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation is a geophysical technique which can be used to measure water content and estimate hydraulic conductivity in the top 100 m of Earth's surface. We conducted a laboratory study to measure the effect of the concentration of iron(II) minerals on NMR relaxation rates of water-saturated sand mixtures. We measured mixtures of quartz sand (diameter < 420μm) and four different iron(II) minerals in granular form (diameters ranging from 45 to 53μm): troilite (FeS), pyrite (FeS2), siderite (Fe(II)CO3), and vivianite (Fe(II)PO4+nH2O). The iron(II) minerals were mixed with quartz to concentrations of 1 and 2% by weight iron. The NMR response of the water-saturated samples was measured and used to calculate four averaged relaxation rates for each iron(II) mineral mixture: the total mean log, bulk fluid, surface, and diffusion relaxation rates. The surface area of the samples was also measured and used to calculate the surface relaxivity. The results of this study are: 1) The mean log and surface relaxation rates of all the samples increase with iron(II) concentration. 2) For the troilite, pyrite and siderite mixtures the surface relaxivity increased with concentration of iron(II); for the vivianite mixtures the surface relaxivity remained constant for iron(II) concentrations of 1 and 2%. 3) The diffusion relaxation rate was non-zero and was slower than the surface relaxation rate for the troilite and vivianite mixtures; the diffusion relaxation rate was zero for the siderite and pyrite mixtures. The results of this study allow us to correct for the presence of iron(II) minerals in the interpretation of NMR data.

  13. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza; Wu, Yanling; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  14. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a main feedwater turbopump trip transient in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-12-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos (ANV) have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); a load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); a load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); and, a feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the feedwater turbopump trip transient simulation. This transient actually occurred in the plant on June 19, 1989.

  15. Comparison between Ag (I) and Ni (II) removal from synthetic nuclear power plant coolant water by iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Salmani, Mohammad Hossein; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Aboueian-Jahromi, Mohaddeseh; Askarishahi, Mohsen

    2013-07-25

    The impact of effective parameters such as iron oxide nanoparticles dosage, contact time and solution pH was optimized for removal of Ag(I) and Ni(II) in the nuclear cooling system and the best conditions were compared. Nearly complete removal (97%) of Ni(II) and Ag(I) were obtained at adsorbent dosage of 40 and 20 g/L, respectively. Experiments showed that 4 hours was a good choice as optimum contact time for two ions removal. The effective parameter was pH, so that maximum removal efficiency was obtained for Ag(I) in acidic pH=3 and for Ni(II) in basic pH=10. It seems that removal of Ag(I) was controlled by adsorption-reduction mechanism, but Ni(II) could place only adsorption. Langmuir and Freundlich model was more suitable for nickel and silver removal by this adsorbent, respectively. Ag(I) and Ni(II) removal efficiency trend by this adsorbent is similar at periods but different in the concentrations, pHs and equilibrium model. The obtained results were very promising, as both Ag(I) and Ni(II) were effectively removed from synthetic wastewater and there was a possibility to remove Ag(I) very fast. Hence, the idea of using nanoparticles for application of metal ions removal from wastewaters seems to be very efficient and quite promising.

  16. Comparison between Ag (I) and Ni (II) removal from synthetic nuclear power plant coolant water by iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The impact of effective parameters such as iron oxide nanoparticles dosage, contact time and solution pH was optimized for removal of Ag(I) and Ni(II) in the nuclear cooling system and the best conditions were compared. Nearly complete removal (97%) of Ni(II) and Ag(I) were obtained at adsorbent dosage of 40 and 20 g/L, respectively. Experiments showed that 4 hours was a good choice as optimum contact time for two ions removal. The effective parameter was pH, so that maximum removal efficiency was obtained for Ag(I) in acidic pH=3 and for Ni(II) in basic pH=10. It seems that removal of Ag(I) was controlled by adsorption-reduction mechanism, but Ni(II) could place only adsorption. Langmuir and Freundlich model was more suitable for nickel and silver removal by this adsorbent, respectively. Ag(I) and Ni(II) removal efficiency trend by this adsorbent is similar at periods but different in the concentrations, pHs and equilibrium model. The obtained results were very promising, as both Ag(I) and Ni(II) were effectively removed from synthetic wastewater and there was a possibility to remove Ag(I) very fast. Hence, the idea of using nanoparticles for application of metal ions removal from wastewaters seems to be very efficient and quite promising. PMID:24499654

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin N; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N; Horwath, Julie A; Clark, Catharine G; Davisson, Robin L

    2015-05-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Young, Colin N.; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N.; Horwath, Julie A.; Clark, Catharine G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. PMID:25980014

  19. Comparison of codes and neutron IC data used in US and Russia for the Topaz-II nuclear reactor assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, Y.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Gomin, Y.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Polyakov, D.N.; Sapir, J.; Streetman, J.R.

    1993-11-01

    Topaz-II is a heterogeneous, epithermal reactor, fueled with highly enriched uranium-dioxide, cooled with NaK, and moderated with zirconium-hydride. The reactor core contains 37 single-cell thermionic fuel elements, and is surrounded by a radial beryllium reflector that contains 12 rotatable control drums with poison segments. For the physics analysis of TOPAZ II it is necessary to use the Monte Carlo method. The United States (US) and Russia used two different Monte Carlo codes, namely MCNP and MCU-2, respectively. The work described in this paper was aimed at comparing the codes and neutronic data used in the US and Russia for verification of Topaz-II nuclear safety. For this purpose, the US and Russia developed a joint benchmark model of the Topaz-II reactor. The American and Russian teams performed independent computations for a series of variants representing potential water immersion accidents. Comparison of the MCNP and MCU-2 codes showed somewhat different results both for the absolute values of k{sub eff} and for reactivity effects. Future calculations will be performed to obtain a detailed understanding of the reasons for such discrepancies. For these analyses it will be necessary for the US and Russian teams to exchange neutronic data on Topaz-II physics calculations.

  20. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for the TOPAZ II and SPACE-R nuclear power systems. Due to computer code limitations inherent in the TDS model, only the TOPAZ II system model ran successfully. Several parameter studies were conducted on the TOPAZ II model. These studies determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) the coolant flow inlet temperatures; (2) the rate of coolant temperature change; (3) the power profile of the core; and (4) the cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of the results indicate that the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow parameter studies indicate that raising coolant flow temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by put to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in total system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates that the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and that system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  1. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    PubMed

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons.

  2. Rubisco in marine symbiotic dinoflagellates: form II enzymes in eukaryotic oxygenic phototrophs encoded by a nuclear multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, R; Whitney, S M; Fowler, A; Yellowlees, D

    1996-01-01

    Genes encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were cloned from dinoflagellate symbionts (Symbiodinium spp) of the giant clam Tridacna gigas and characterized. Strikingly, Symbiodinium Rubisco is completely different from other eukaryotic (form I) Rubiscos: it is a form II enzyme that is approximately 65% identical to Rubisco from Rhodospirillum rubrum (Rubisco forms I and II are approximately 25 to 30% identical); it is nuclear encoded by a multigene family; and the predominantly expressed Rubisco is encoded as a precursor polyprotein. One clone appears to contain a predominantly expressed Rubisco locus (rbcA), as determined by RNA gel blot analysis of Symbiodinium RNA and sequencing of purified Rubisco protein. Another contains an enigmatic locus (rbcG) that exhibits an unprecedented pattern of amino acid replacement but does not appear to be a pseudogene. The expression of rbcG has not been analyzed; it was detected only in the minor of two taxa of Symbiodinium that occur together in T. gigas. This study confirms and describes a previously unrecognized branch of Rubisco's evolution: a eukaryotic form II enzyme that participates in oxygenic photosynthesis and is encoded by a diverse, nuclear multigene family. PMID:8721755

  3. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  4. Localization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II Tax protein is dependent upon a nuclear localization determinant in the N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Turci, Marco; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lorenzi, Pamela; Righi, Paola; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2006-01-03

    Human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) types I and II are closely related oncogenic retroviruses that have been associated with lymphoproliferative and neurological disorders. The proviral genome encodes a trans-regulatory Tax protein that activates viral genes and upregulates various cellular genes involved in both cell growth and transformation. Tax proteins of HTLV-I (Tax-I) and HTLV-II (Tax-II) exhibit more than 77% aa homology and expression of either Tax-I or Tax-II is sufficient for immortalization of cultured T lymphocytes. Tax-I shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and accumulates within the nucleus, whereas Tax-II is found mainly in the cytoplasm. In the present study we have used recombinant vectors to analyze the size and structure of the nuclear localization domain within the Tax-II protein sequence. The Tax-II protein was expressed in HeLa cells either as the complete protein, or regions thereof, that were individually fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Immunoblot analysis of the fused Tax-II products confirmed their expression and size. Fluorescence microscopy studies indicated that the complete Tax-II as well as N-truncated forms presented a punctuate cytoplasmic distribution and that a nuclear localization determinant is confined to within the first 60 aa of Tax-II. Accordingly, site directed mutagenesis and deletion of specific sequences within the first 60 aa showed that the nuclear determinant lies within the first 41 residues of Tax-II. These results point to a direct involvement of the amino-terminal residues of Tax-II protein in determining its nuclear functionality.

  5. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for TOPAZ II and SPACER nuclear power systems. Several parameter studies were conducted with the TOPAZ II model. These determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) Coolant flow inlet temperatures. (2) Rate of coolant temperature change. (3) Power profile of the core. (4) Cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of results indicate the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow studies indicate that raising coolant temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by up to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  6. A role for nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in reactive oxygen species-dependent DNA damage responses

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Glas, Rickard

    2009-11-27

    Responses to DNA damage are influenced by cellular metabolism through the continuous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), of which most are by-products of mitochondrial respiration. ROS have a strong influence on signaling pathways during responses to DNA damage, by relatively unclear mechanisms. Previous reports have shown conflicting data on a possible role for tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII), a large cytosolic peptidase, within the DNA damage response. Here we show that TPPII translocated into the nucleus in a p160-ROCK-dependent fashion in response to {gamma}-irradiation, and that nuclear expression of TPPII was present in most {gamma}-irradiated transformed cell lines. We used a panel of nine cell lines of diverse tissue origin, including four lymphoma cell lines (T, B and Hodgkins lymphoma), a melanoma, a sarcoma, a colon and two breast carcinomas, where seven out of nine cell lines showed nuclear TPPII expression after {gamma}-irradiation. Further, this required cellular production of ROS; treatment with either N-acetyl-Cysteine (anti-oxidant) or Rotenone (inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration) inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII. The local density of cells was important for nuclear accumulation of TPPII at early time-points following {gamma}-irradiation (at 1-4 h), indicating a bystander effect. Further, we showed that the peptide-based inhibitor Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH, but not its analogue Z-Gly-(D)-Leu-Ala-OH, excluded TPPII from the nucleus. This correlated with reduced nuclear expression of p53 as well as caspase-3 and -9 activation in {gamma}-irradiated lymphoma cells. Our data suggest a role for TPPII in ROS-dependent DNA damage responses, through alteration of its localization from the cytosol into the nucleus.

  7. Spiral Galaxies with HST/NICMOS. II. Isophotal Fits and Nuclear Cusp Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigar, Marc; Carollo, C. Marcella; Stiavelli, Massimo; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Dejonghe, Herwig

    2002-01-01

    We present surface brightness profiles for 56 of the 78 spiral galaxies observed in the HST/NICMOS2 F160W snapshot survey introduced in Paper I of this series, as well as surface brightness profiles for 23 objects out of the 41 that were also observed in the F110W filter. We fit these surface brightness profiles with the Nuker law of Lauer et al. and use the smooth analytical descriptions of the data to compute the average nuclear stellar cusp slopes <γ> in the 0.1"-0.5" radial range. Our main result is the startling similarity between the nuclear stellar cusp slopes <γ> in the near-infrared compared with those derived in the visual passband. This similarity has several implications: (1) Despite the significant local color variations that are found in the nuclear regions of spirals and that are documented in Paper I, there are typically little or no optical-NIR global color gradients, and thus no global stellar population variations, inside ~50-100 pc from the nucleus in nearby spirals. (2) The large observed range of the strength of the nuclear stellar cusps seen in the HST optical study of spiral galaxies reflects a physical difference between galaxies and is not an artifact caused by nuclear dust and/or recent star formation. (3) The dichotomy between R1/4 bulges, with steep nuclear stellar cusps <γ>~1, and exponential bulges, with shallow nuclear stellar cusps <γ><0.3, is also not an artifact of the effects of dust or recent star formation. (4) The presence of a surrounding massive disk appears to have no effect on the rise of the stellar density distribution within the innermost hundred parsecs of the R1/4 spheroids. These results imply a breakdown within the family of exponential bulges of the nuclear versus global relationships that have been found for the R1/4 spheroids. Such a breakdown is likely to have significant implications concerning the formation of exponential bulges and their connection with the R1/4 spheroids. Based on observations with the

  8. Accidental Nuclear War: The Growing Peril. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcombe, Alan, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two volumes designed to increase awareness of accidental nuclear war dangers are presented. The first of 5 sections in volume I proposes that although accidental war is preventable, the current arms race and secrecy about accidents and false alarms increase the possibility of an accidental war. Section 2 posits that decreased decision-making time…

  9. Accidental Nuclear War: The Growing Peril. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcombe, Alan, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two volumes designed to increase awareness of accidental nuclear war dangers are presented. The first of 5 sections in volume I proposes that although accidental war is preventable, the current arms race and secrecy about accidents and false alarms increase the possibility of an accidental war. Section 2 posits that decreased decision-making time…

  10. Nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells of patients with type I and II diabetes treated with folic acid.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Meda, B C; Zamora-Perez, A L; Muñoz-Magallanes, T; Sánchez-Parada, M G; García Bañuelos, J J; Guerrero-Velázquez, C; Sánchez-Orozco, L V; Vera-Cruz, J M; Armendáriz-Borunda, J; Zúñiga-González, G M

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by high blood glucose. Excessive production of free radicals may cause oxidative damage to DNA and other molecules, leading to complications of the disease. It may be possible to delay or reduce such damage by administration of antioxidants such as folic acid (FA). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of FA on nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in the oral mucosa of patients with DM. NAs (micronucleated cells, binucleated cells, pyknotic nuclei, karyorrhexis, karyolysis, abnormally condensed chromatin, and nuclear buds) were analyzed in 2000 cells from 45 healthy individuals (control group) and 55 patients with controlled or uncontrolled type I or II DM; 35 patients in the latter group were treated with FA. Samples were taken from the FA group before and after treatment. An increased rate of NAs was found in patients with DM in comparison with that of the control group (P<0.001). FA supplementation in patients with DM reduced the frequency of NAs (20.4 ± 8.0 before treatment vs. 10.5 ± 5.2 after treatment; P<0.001). The type I and type II DM and controlled and uncontrolled DM subgroups were analyzed in terms of sex, age, and smoking habit. The significantly reduced frequencies of buccal mucosa cells with micronuclei, binucleation, pyknosis, karyorrhexis, karyorrhexis+abnormally condensed chromatin, karyolysis, and nuclear buds produced by FA supplementation in DM patients (P<0.02) are consistent with the idea that free radicals are responsible for the increased frequency of NAs in DM patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  12. Distinct molecular structures of nuclear class I, II, and III DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sklar, V E; Schwartz, L B; Roeder, R G

    1975-01-01

    Class III RNA polymerases purified from the murine plasmacytoma MOPC 315 and from Xenopus laevis ovaries were compared. The subunit structures of the chromatographically distinct murine enzymes IIIA and IIIB were indistinguishable and were remarkably similar to that of the amphibian enzyme III. The plasmacytoma class III RNA polymerases were also compared with purified plasmacytoma RNA polymerases I and II. Sedimentation studies indicated that RNA polymerase III si significantly larger than RNA polymerase II, which is slightly larger than RNA polymerase I. Structural analyses showed that the molecular weights of the large subunits present in the class III enzymes (138,000 and 155,000) differ from those of the class II enzymes (140,000 and either 170,000, 205,000, or 240,000) and from those of the class I enzymes (117,000 and 195,000). Some low-molecular-weight subunits are also unique to each enzyme class. These results clearly distinguish the class I, II, and III enzymes on a structural basis. In addition, polypeptides of molecular weight 29,000 and 19,000 were found in all enzyme classes, a polypeptide of molecular weight 52,000 was found only in class I and III enzymes, and a polypeptide of molecular weight 41,000 was found only in class II and III enzymes. These findings are discussed in terms of the function and regulation of the RNA polymerases.

  13. Two distinct nuclear factors bind the conserved regulatory sequences of a rabbit major histocompatibility complex class II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sittisombut, N

    1988-01-01

    The constitutive coexpression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes in B lymphocytes requires positive, trans-acting transcriptional factors. The need for these trans-acting factors has been suggested by the reversion of the MHC class II-negative phenotype of rare B-lymphocyte mutants through somatic cell fusion with B cells or T-cell lines. The mechanism by which the trans-acting factors exert their effect on gene transcription is unknown. The possibility that two highly conserved DNA sequences, located 90 to 100 base pairs (bp) (the A sequence) and 60 to 70 bp (the B sequence) upstream of the transcription start site of the class II genes, are recognized by the trans-acting factors was investigated in this study. By using the gel electrophoresis retardation assay, a minimum of two proteins which specifically bound the conserved A or B sequence of a rabbit DP beta gene were identified in murine nuclear extracts of a B-lymphoma cell line, A20-2J. Fractionation of nuclear extract through a heparin-agarose column allowed the identification of one protein, designated NF-MHCIIB, which bound an oligonucleotide containing the B sequence and protected the entire B sequence in the DNase I protection analysis. Another protein, designated NF-MHCIIA, which bound an oligonucleotide containing the A sequence and partially protected the 3' half of this sequence, was also identified. NF-MHCIIB did not protect a CCAAT sequence located 17 bp downstream of the B sequence. The possible relationship between these DNA-binding factors and the trans-acting factors identified in the cell fusion experiments is discussed. Images PMID:3133552

  14. Analytical mass formula and nuclear surface properties in the ETF approximation. Part II: asymmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    We have recently addressed the problem of the determination of the nuclear surface energy for symmetric nuclei in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) approximation using Skyrme functionals. We presently extend this formalism to the case of asymmetric nuclei and the question of the surface symmetry energy. We propose an approximate expression for the diffuseness and the surface energy. These quantities are analytically related to the parameters of the energy functional. In particular, the influence of the different equation of state parameters can be explicitly quantified. Detailed analyses of the different energy components (local/non-local, isoscalar/isovector, surface/curvature and higher order) are also performed. Our analytical solution of the ETF integral improves previous models and leads to a precision of better than 200 keV per nucleon in the determination of the nuclear binding energy for dripline nuclei.

  15. PROTEINS IN NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC INTERACTIONS : II. Turnover and Changes in Nuclear Protein Distribution with Time and Growth.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, L; Prescott, D M

    1968-01-01

    In previous studies, we showed that essentially all the proteins of the Amoeba proteus nucleus could be classified either as Rapidly Migrating Proteins (RMP), which shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm continuously at a relatively rapid rate during interphase, or as Slow Turnover Proteins (STP), which seem to move hardly at all during interphase. In this paper, we report on the kinetics and direction of the movement of both classes of protein, as well as on aspects of their localization, with and without growth. The effects of growth were observed with and without cell division. These nuclear proteins have been studied in several ways: by transplantation of labeled nuclei into unlabeled cells and noting the rate of distribution to cytoplasm and host cell nuclei; by repeated amputation of cytoplasm from labeled cells-with and without initially labeled cytoplasm-each amputation being followed by refeeding on unlabeled food; by noting the redistribution of the various protein classes following growth and cell division. The data show (a) labeled RMP equilibrate between a grafted labeled nucleus and an unlabeled host nucleus in ca. 3 hr, but are detectable in the latter less than 30 min after the operation; (b) STP label does, indeed, leave the nucleus and does so at a rate of ca. 25% of the nuclear total per cell generation (ca. 36-40 hr at 23 degrees C); (c) the cytoplasm appears to have a reserve of material that is converted to RMP; (d) when labeled cells are amputated just before they would have divided and are refed unlabeled food after each amputation, there is a loss of 20-25% of the nuclear protein label with each amputation; (e) under the latter circumstances, an essentially complete turnover of all nuclear protein can be demonstrated.

  16. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; George, Gerald L.; Gubernatis, David C.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2015-07-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previously described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.

  17. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility. Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; ...

    2015-07-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previouslymore » described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.« less

  18. Young stellar populations in type II quasars: timing the onset of star formation and nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessiere, P. S.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Villar Martín, M.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2017-04-01

    Despite the emerging morphological evidence that luminous quasar-like active galactic nuclei (AGN) are triggered in galaxy mergers, the natures of the triggering mergers and the order of events in the triggering sequence remain uncertain. In this work, we present a detailed study of the stellar populations of the host galaxies of 21 type II quasars, with the aim of understanding the sequence of events between the onset of the merger, the triggering of the associated starburst and the initiation of the quasar activity. To this end, we model high-quality, wide spectral coverage, intermediate-resolution optical spectra of the type II quasars. We find that of the 21 objects, the higher order Balmer absorption lines, characteristic of young stellar populations (YSPs), are directly detected in ˜62 per cent of the sample. We also fit these spectra using a number of combinations of stellar and/or power-law components, representative of viable formation histories, as well as including the possibility of scattered AGN light. We find that ˜90 per cent of the type II quasar host galaxies require the inclusion of a YSP to adequately model their spectra, whilst 71 per cent of the sample require the inclusion of a YSP with age <100 Myr. Since the ages of the YSP in most type II quasar host galaxies are comparable with the expected lifetimes of the AGN activity, these results provide strong evidence that the quasars are triggered close to the peaks of the merger-induced starbursts.

  19. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of (6-9)-nuclear Ni(II) trimethylacetates and their heterospin complexes with nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, Victor; Fursova, Elena; Romanenko, Galina; Eremenko, Igor; Tretyakov, Evgeny; Ikorskii, Vladimir

    2006-07-10

    New polynuclear nickel trimethylacetates [Ni6(OH)4(C5H9O2)8(C5H10O2)4] (6), [Ni7(OH)7(C5H9O2)7(C5H10O2)6(H2O)] x 0.5 C6H14 x 0.5 H2O (7), [Ni8(OH)4(H2O)2(C5H9O2)12] (8), and [Ni9(OH)6(C5H9O2)12(C5H10O2)4] x C5H10O2 x 3 H2O (9), where C5H9O2 is trimethylacetate and C5H10O2 is trimethylacetic acid, have been found. Their structures were determined by X-ray crystallography. Because of their high solubility in low-polarity organic solvents, compounds 6-9 reacted with stable organic radicals to form the first heterospin compounds based on polynuclear Ni(II) trimethylacetate and nitronyl nitroxides containing pyrazole (L(1)-L(3)), methyl (L(4)), or imidazole (L(5)) substituent groups, respectively, in side chain [Ni7(OH)5(C5H9O2)9(C5H10O2)2(L(1))2(H2O)] x 0.5 C6H14 x H2O (6+1a), [Ni7(OH)5(C5H9O2)9(C5H10O2)2(L2)2(H2O)] x H2O (6+1b), [Ni7(OH)5(C5H9O2)9(C5H10O2)2(L(3))2(H2O)] x H2O (6+1c), [Ni6(OH)3(C5H9O2)9(C5H10O2)4(L(4))] x 1.5 C6H14 (6''), and [Ni4OH)3(C5H9O2)5(C5H10O2)4(L(5))] x 1.5 C7H8 (4). Their structures were also determined by X-ray crystallography. Although Ni(II) trimethylacetates may have varying nuclearity and can change their nuclearity during recrystallization or interactions with nitroxides, this family of compounds is easy to study because of its topological relationship. For any of these complexes, the polynuclear framework may be derived from the [Ni6] polynuclear fragment {Ni6(mu4-OH)2(mu3-OH)2(mu2-C5H9O2-O,O')6(mu2-C5H9O2-O,O)(mu4-C5H9O2-O,O,O',O')(C5H10O2)4}, which is shaped like an open book. On the basis of this fragment, the structure of 7-nuclear compounds (7 and 6+1a-c) is conveniently represented as the result of symmetric addition of other mononuclear fragments to the four Ni(II) ions lying at the vertexes of the [Ni6] open book. The 9-nuclear complex is formed by the addition of trinuclear fragments to two Ni(II) ions lying on one of the lateral edges of the [Ni6] open book. This wing of the 9-nuclear complex preserves its structure in

  20. Preliminary plans to move the special nuclear material supporting category I and II missions from TA-18 to the device assembly facility

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, William Earl; Nicholas, N. J.; Mann, P.

    2004-01-01

    In December 2002, the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) issued a Record of Decision announcing its intent to relocate safeguards Category I and II missions and associated special nuclear materials (SNM) from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 18 (TA-18) to the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Cat I and II missions support nuclear criticality safety, nuclear emergency response, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. TA-18 is the sole remaining facility in the United States with the capability to perform general-purpose nuclear materials handling experiments and training. Hands-on and remote control experiments, measurements, and training with special materials and devices are conducted. The conceptual design for modifying the DAF to house these Cat I and II missions includes plans for packaging and transporting the SNM inventory associated with the missions. This paper discusses these preliminary packaging and transporting plans, including how they fit into the plans for transitioning the relevant TA- 18 missions to DAF while ensuring that mission, cost, and schedule requirements are met.

  1. ApoA-II directs morphogenetic movements of zebrafish embryo by preventing chromosome fusion during nuclear division in yolk syncytial layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Yao, Shaohua; Wang, Ping; Yin, Chaoran; Xiao, Chun; Qian, Meilin; Liu, Donghui; Zheng, Lemin; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Liu, Jin; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2011-03-18

    The high density lipoprotein (HDL) represents a class of lipid- and protein-containing particles and consists of two major apolipoproteins apoA-I and apoA-II. ApoA-II has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, adiposity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. In embryo, apoa2 mRNAs are abundant in the liver, brain, lung, placenta, and in fish yolk syncytial layer (YSL), suggesting that apoa2 may perform a function during embryonic development. Here we find out that apoa2 modulates zebrafish embryonic development by regulating the organization of YSL. Disruption of apoa2 function in zebrafish caused chromosome fusing, which strongly blocked YSL nuclear division, inducing disorders in YSL organization and finally disturbing the embryonic epiboly. Purified native human apoA-II was able specifically to rescue the defects and induced nuclear division in zebrafish embryos and in human HeLa cells. The C terminus of apoA-II was required for the proper chromosome separation during nuclear division of YSL in zebrafish embryos and in human HeLa cells. Our data indicate that organization of YSL is required for blastoderm patterning and morphogenesis and suggest that apolipoprotein apoA-II is a novel factor of nuclear division in YSL involved in the regulation of early zebrafish embryonic morphogenesis and in mammalian cells for proliferation.

  2. A conserved family of nuclear phosphoproteins localized to sites of polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    An antibody was identified previously that recognizes sites of polymerase II transcription on lampbrush chromosomes, puffs on polytene chromosomes, and many small granules in the nucleoplasm of all cells tested. This antibody binds a conserved family of phosphorylated polypeptides in vertebrate and invertebrate cells. We developed a method for purifying these proteins that involves differential solubility in MgCl2. We isolated a Drosophila cDNA encoding one of the proteins using information obtained from microsequencing. In vivo expression studies show that this protein is concentrated on sites of polymerase II transcription and that it is highly phosphorylated. The protein shares a high degree of homology with proteins involved in alternative splicing of pre-mRNA suggesting the possibility that this protein plays a role in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:1717489

  3. Morphologies of uranium deposits produced during electrorefining of EBR-II spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T. C.

    2000-02-15

    The morphologies of U metal samples from deposits produced by electrorefining of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) spent fuel were examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy- and wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and metallography. The morphologies were analyzed to find correlations with the chemistry of the samples, the ER run conditions, and the deposit performance. A rough correlation was observed between morphology and Zr concentration; samples with Zr contents greater than approximately 200 ppm showed fine-grained, polycrystalline dendritic morphologies, while samples with Zr contents less than approximately 100 ppm were comprised of agglomerations or linked chains of rhomboidal single crystals. There were few correlations found between morphology, run conditions, and deposit performance.

  4. Nuclear inelastic scattering study of a dinuclear iron(II) complex showing a direct spin transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, J. A.; Garcia, Y.; Faus, I.; Rackwitz, S.; Schlage, K.; Wille, H.-C.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS)/nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the powder spectra of dimeric [Fe 2 L 5(NCS) 4] (L = N-salicylidene-4-amino-1,2,4-triazole) complex are presented. This system is spin crossover (SCO) material tagged with a fluorophore that can sense or "feel" the SCO signal ripping through the molecular network and thereby providing an opportunity to register the SCO transition. The spectra have been measured for the low-spin and high-spin phases of the complex. The high-spin isomer reveals one broad band above 200 cm -1, while the low-spin one displays two intense bands in the range from 390 to 430 cm -1, accompanied by a number of weaker bands below this area and one at ca. 490 cm -1. A normal coordinate analysis based on density functional calculations yields the assignment of the spin marker bands to particular molecular modes. In addition the vibrational contribution to the spin transition has been estimated

  5. Detection of Disease Genes by Use of Family Data. II. Application to Nuclear Families

    PubMed Central

    Tu, I-Ping; Balise, Raymond R.; Whittemore, Alice S.

    2000-01-01

    Two likelihood-based score statistics are used to detect association between a disease and a single diallelic polymorphism, on the basis of data from arbitrary types of nuclear families. The first statistic, the nonfounder statistic, extends the transmission/disequilibrium test to accommodate affected and unaffected offspring and missing parental genotypes. The second statistic, the founder statistic, compares observed or inferred parental genotypes with those of some reference population. In this comparison, the genotypes of affected parents or of those with many affected offspring are weighted more heavily than are the genotypes of unaffected parents or of those with few affected offspring. Genotypes of single unrelated cases and controls can be included in this analysis. We illustrate the two statistics by applying them to data on a polymorphism of the SDR5A2 gene in nuclear families with multiple cases of prostate cancer. We also use simulations to compare the power of the nonfounder statistic with that of the score statistic, on the basis of the conditional logistic regression of offspring genotypes. PMID:10739759

  6. Disasters and mass casualties: II. explosive, biologic, chemical, and nuclear agents.

    PubMed

    Born, Christopher T; Briggs, Susan M; Ciraulo, David L; Frykberg, Eric R; Hammond, Jeffrey S; Hirshberg, Asher; Lhowe, David W; O'Neill, Patricia A; Mead, Joann

    2007-08-01

    Terrorists' use of explosive, biologic, chemical, and nuclear agents constitutes the potential for catastrophic events. Understanding the unique aspects of these agents can help in preparing for such disasters with the intent of mitigating injury and loss of life. Explosive agents continue to be the most common weapons of terrorists and the most prevalent cause of injuries and fatalities. Knowledge of blast pathomechanics and patterns of injury allows for improved diagnostic and treatment strategies. A practical understanding of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear agents, their attendant clinical symptoms, and recommended management strategies is an important prerequisite for optimal preparation and response to these less frequently used agents of mass casualty. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the principles of management of catastrophic events. Stress is less an issue when one is adequately prepared. Decontamination is essential both to manage victims and prevent further spread of toxic agents to first responders and medical personnel. It is important to assess the risk of potential threats, thereby allowing disaster planning and preparation to be proportional and aligned with the actual casualty event.

  7. Theory and Implementation of Nuclear Safety System Codes - Part II: System Code Closure Relations, Validation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A Roth; Fatih Aydogan

    2014-09-01

    This is Part II of two articles describing the details of thermal-hydraulic sys- tem codes. In this second part of the article series, the system code closure relationships (used to model thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium and the coupling of the phases) for the governing equations are discussed and evaluated. These include several thermal and hydraulic models, such as heat transfer coefficients for various flow regimes, two phase pressure correlations, two phase friction correlations, drag coefficients and interfacial models be- tween the fields. These models are often developed from experimental data. The experiment conditions should be understood to evaluate the efficacy of the closure models. Code verification and validation, including Separate Effects Tests (SETs) and Integral effects tests (IETs) is also assessed. It can be shown from the assessments that the test cases cover a significant section of the system code capabilities, but some of the more advanced reactor designs will push the limits of validation for the codes. Lastly, the limitations of the codes are discussed by considering next generation power plants, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), analyz- ing not only existing nuclear power plants, but also next generation nuclear power plants. The nuclear industry is developing new, innovative reactor designs, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) and others. Sub-types of these reactor designs utilize pebbles, prismatic graphite moderators, helical steam generators, in- novative fuel types, and many other design features that may not be fully analyzed by current system codes. This second part completes the series on the comparison and evaluation of the selected reactor system codes by discussing the closure relations, val- idation and limitations. These two articles indicate areas where the models can be improved to adequately address issues with new reactor design and development.

  8. Mn(II) complexes of different nuclearity: synthesis, characterization and catecholase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prateeti; Majumder, Ishani; Banu, Kazi Sabnam; Ghosh, Bipinbihari; Kara, Hulya; Zangrando, Ennio; Das, Debasis

    2016-01-14

    Two "end-off" compartmental ligands, 2-formyl-4-chloro-6-N-ethylmorpholine-iminomethyl-phenol (HL1) and 2-formyl-4-methyl-6-N-ethylpyrrolidine-iminomethyl-phenol (HL2) have been designed and three complexes of Mn(ii), one mono-, one di- and a polynuclear, namely Mn(L1)(SCN)2(H2O)] (), [Mn2(L1)(OAc)2](BPh4)] (), and [Mn2(L2)(OAc)2(dca)]n () have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Variable temperature magnetic studies of and have been performed and data analyses reveal that Mn centers are antiferromagnetic coupled with J = -9.15 cm(-1) and J = -46.89, respectively. Catecholase activity of all the complexes has been investigated using 3,5-di-tert-butyl catechol (3,5-DTBC). All are highly active and the activity order on the basis of the kcat value is > > . In order to unveil whether the metal centered redox participation or the radical pathway is responsible for the catecholase-like activity of the complexes, detailed EPR and cyclic voltammetric (CV) studies have been performed. In addition to the six-line EPR spectrum characteristic to Mn(ii), an additional peak at g ∼ 2 is observed when the EPR study is done with the mixture of 3,5-DTBC and the catalyst, suggesting the formation of an organic radical, most likely ligand centered. The CV experiment with the mixture of 3,5-DTBC and the catalyst reveals ligand centered reduction rather than reduction of Mn(ii) to Mn(i). It is thus inferred that complexes show catecholase-like activity due to radical generation.

  9. Natural-abundance 13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance study of toxin II from Anemonia sulcata.

    PubMed

    Norton, R S; Zwick, J; Béress, L

    1980-12-01

    Natural-abundance 13C NMR spectra (at 15.04 MHz) of the polypeptide toxin II from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata have been analysed and compared with corresponding spectra reported recently for a closely related polypeptide anthopleurin A. The spectra contain many resolved one-carbon and two-carbon resonances from carbonyl, aromatic and methyl carbons, many of which have been assigned to individual carbons in the molecule on the basis of their chemical shifts, including their pH dependence, and by comparison with the 13C NMR spectrum of anthopleurin A. Analysis of the effects of pH on the spectrum yields estimates for the pKa values of a number of functional groups in the molecule, as follows: side-chain carboxylates of the two aspartic acid residues 2 and 3.1; COOH-terminal carboxylic acid, 3.5; imidazolium moieties of the two histidine residues, 6.7 and 7.6 NH2-terminal ammonium, 8. The similarity between the pKa values of these functional groups in toxin II and those of corresponding groups in anthopleurin A, together with the close agreement between chemical shifts of conserved carbons, indicates that many local interactions are nearly identical in the two molecules, and thus supports the thesis that their overall conformations in solution are similar. However, the local interactions involving one of the aspartic acid residues are altered in toxin II. Together with other data, this leads to a proposal for the site in these two molecules which is responsible for their cardiac stimulatory activity.

  10. Nuclear-translocated endostatin downregulates hypoxia inducible factor-1α activation through interfering with Zn(II) homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lifang; Chen, Yang; He, Ting; Qi, Feifei; Liu, Guanghua; Fu, Yan; Rao, Chunming; Wang, Junzhi; Luo, Yongzhang

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α) is key in tumor progression and aggressiveness as it regulates a series of genes involved in angiogenesis and anaerobic metabolism. Previous studies have shown that the transcriptional levels of HIF‑1α may be downregulated by endostatin. However, the molecular mechanism by which endostatin represses HIF‑1α expression remains unknown. The current study investigated the mechanism by which nuclear‑translocated endostatin suppresses HIF‑1α activation by disrupting Zn(II) homeostasis. Endostatin was observed to downregulate HIF‑1α expression at mRNA and protein levels. Blockage of endostatin nuclear translocation by RNA interference of importin α1/β1 or ectopic expression of NLS‑deficient mutant nucleolin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells co‑transfected with small interfering (si)‑nucleolin siRNA compromises endostatin‑reduced HIF‑1α expression. Nuclear‑translocated apo‑endostatin, but not holo‑endostatin, significantly disrupts the interaction between CBP/p300 and HIF‑1α by disturbing Zn(II) homeostasis, which leads to the transcriptional inactivation of HIF‑1α. The results reveal mechanistic insights into the method by which nuclear‑translocated endostatin downregulates HIF‑1α activation and provides a novel way to investigate the function of endostatin in endothelial cells.

  11. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (II) Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and results of intensity- and time-based seismic risk assessments of a sample nuclear power plant (NPP) to demonstrate the risk-assessment methodology proposed in its companion paper. The intensity-based assessments include three sets of sensitivity studies to identify the impact of the following factors on the seismic vulnerability of the sample NPP, namely: (1) the description of fragility curves for primary and secondary components of NPPs, (2) the number of simulations of NPP response required for risk assessment, and (3) the correlation in responses between NPP components. The time-based assessment is performed as a series of intensity-based assessments. The studies illustrate the utility of the response-based fragility curves and the inclusion of the correlation in the responses of NPP components directly in the risk computation. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann; Field, Kevin G.; Remec, Igor

    2014-11-15

    The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These results are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation of the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. Finally, the radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste.

  13. SPATIALLY RESOLVED CHEMISTRY IN NEARBY GALAXIES. II. THE NUCLEAR BAR IN MAFFEI 2

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David S.; Turner, Jean L. E-mail: turner@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-08-20

    We present 2''-10'' imaging of 11 transitions from 9 molecular species across the nuclear bar in Maffei 2. The data were obtained with the BIMA and OVRO interferometers. The 10 detected transitions are compared with existing CO isotopologues, HCN, CS, and millimeter continuum data. Dramatic spatial variations among the mapped species are observed across the nuclear bar. A principal component analysis is performed to characterize correlations between the transitions, star formation, and molecular column density. The analysis reveals that HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and 3 mm continuum are tightly correlated, indicating a direct connection to massive star formation. We find two main morphologically distinct chemical groups, CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HNCO comprising the grain chemistry molecules, versus HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and C{sub 2}H, molecules strong in the presence of star formation. The grain chemistry molecules, HNCO, CH{sub 3}OH, and SiO, trace hydrodynamical bar shocks. The near constancy of the HNCO/CH{sub 3}OH, SiO/CH{sub 3}OH, and SiO/HNCO ratios argues that shock properties are uniform across the nucleus. HCN/HCO{sup +}, HCN/HNC, HCN/CS, and HCN/CO ratios are explained primarily by variations in density. High HCO{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} ratios are correlated with the C{sub 2}H line, suggesting that this ratio may be a powerful new dense photon-dominated region probe in external galaxies. C{sub 2}H reveals a molecular outflow along the minor axis. The morphology and kinematics of the outflow are consistent with an outflow age of 6-7 Myr.

  14. The nuclear region of low luminosity flat radio spectrum sources. II. Emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Serote Roos, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marchã's et al. (\\cite{March96}) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. The fact that we observe a LINER-type spectrum in LL FRS sources supports the idea that some of these objects could be undergoing an ADAF phase; in addition, such a low ionization emission-line spectrum is in agreement with the black hole mass values and sub-Eddington accretion rates published for some FRS sources. Based on observations collected at the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mt. Hopkins. Full Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  15. Nitric oxide modulates chromatin folding in human endothelial cells via protein phosphatase 2A activation and class II histone deacetylases nuclear shuttling.

    PubMed

    Illi, Barbara; Dello Russo, Claudio; Colussi, Claudia; Rosati, Jessica; Pallaoro, Michele; Spallotta, Francesco; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Ragone, Gianluca; Martelli, Fabio; Biglioli, Paolo; Steinkuhler, Christian; Gallinari, Paola; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-04

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates important endothelial cell (EC) functions and gene expression by a molecular mechanism which is still poorly characterized. Here we show that in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) NO inhibited serum-induced histone acetylation and enhanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. By immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses it was found that NO induced class II HDAC4 and 5 nuclear shuttling and that class II HDACs selective inhibitor MC1568 rescued serum-dependent histone acetylation above control level in NO-treated HUVECs. In contrast, class I HDACs inhibitor MS27-275 had no effect, indicating a specific role for class II HDACs in NO-dependent histone deacetylation. In addition, it was found that NO ability to induce HDAC4 and HDAC5 nuclear shuttling involved the activation of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In fact, HDAC4 nuclear translocation was impaired in ECs expressing small-t antigen and exposed to NO. Finally, in cells engineered to express a HDAC4-Flag fusion protein, NO induced the formation of a macromolecular complex including HDAC4, HDAC3, HDAC5, and an active PP2A. The present results show that NO-dependent PP2A activation plays a key role in class II HDACs nuclear translocation.

  16. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a 10% load rejection transient from 75% steady state in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A. ); Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R. )

    1993-05-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); A load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); A load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); A feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the load rejection from 75% to 65% transient simulation. This transient was one of the tests carried out in Vandellos II NPP during the startup tests.

  17. TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor facility. Final report, 1 July 1980--30 June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, B.C.

    1997-05-01

    This report is a final culmination of activities funded through the Department of Energy`s (DOE) University Reactor Sharing Program, Grant DE-FG02-80ER10273, during the period 1 July 1980 through 30 June 1995. Progress reports have been periodically issued to the DOE, namely the Reactor Facility Annual Reports C00-2082/2219-7 through C00-2082/10723-21, which are contained as an appendix to this report. Due to the extent of time covered by this grant, summary tables are presented. Table 1 lists the fiscal year financial obligations of the grant. As listed in the original grant proposals, the DOE grant financed 70% of project costs, namely the total amount spent of these projects minus materials costs and technical support. Thus the bulk of funds was spent directly on reactor operations. With the exception of a few years, spending was in excess of the grant amount. As shown in Tables 2 and 3, the Reactor Sharing grant funded a immense number of research projects in nuclear engineering, geology, animal science, chemistry, anthropology, veterinary medicine, and many other fields. A list of these users is provided. Out of the average 3000 visitors per year, some groups participated in classes involving the reactor such as Boy Scout Merit Badge classes, teacher`s workshops, and summer internships. A large number of these projects met the requirements for the Reactor Sharing grant, but were funded by the University instead.

  18. Parallel Algorithms and Software for Nuclear, Energy, and Environmental Applications. Part II: Multiphysics Software

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Gaston; Luanjing Guo; Glen Hansen; Hai Huang; Richard Johnson; Dana Knoll; Chris Newman; Hyeong Kae Park; Robert Podgorney; Michael Tonks; Richard Williamson

    2012-09-01

    This paper is the second part of a two part sequence on multiphysics algorithms and software. The first [1] focused on the algorithms; this part treats the multiphysics software framework and applications based on it. Tight coupling is typically designed into the analysis application at inception, as such an application is strongly tied to a composite nonlinear solver that arrives at the final solution by treating all equations simultaneously. The application must also take care to minimize both time and space error between the physics, particularly if more than one mesh representation is needed in the solution process. This paper presents an application framework that was specifically designed to support tightly coupled multiphysics analysis. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) is based on the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method combined with physics-based preconditioning to provide the underlying mathematical structure for applications. The report concludes with the presentation of a host of nuclear, energy, and environmental applications that demonstrate the efficacy of the approach and the utility of a well-designed multiphysics framework.

  19. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Le Pape, Yann; Field, Kevin G.; Remec, Igor

    2014-11-15

    The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These results are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation ofmore » the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. Finally, the radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste.« less

  20. Measurement of hydrogen and lithium ion energy densities on PBFA II using direct nuclear activation diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Chambers, G.; Schmidlapp, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the light-ion-beam fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories an intense lithium beam is being developed to drive inertial confinement fusion targets. An important issue is the purity of the beam. To assess this concern, direct nuclear activation diagnostics based on the reactions 7Li(p,n)7Be, 10B(p,α)7Be, and 19F(7Li,d)24Na were fielded to measure the energy densities of hydrogen and lithium in the beam. The hydrogen beam energy density was measured to be less than 2% of the lithium beam energy density on a majority (10) of the 19 LiF anode shots taken and was always less than 10%. The total hydrogen energy in the beam ranged from only 0.5-10 kJ. Over this shot series increasing efforts were made to clean the anode prior to each shot. In general, there was a modest reduction in the hydrogen energy fraction with improved cleaning, but no corresponding increase in the lithium energy density was seen. The lithium energy density as a function of location was also measured and found to typically vary by factors of 1.5-4 over the diode.

  1. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. II. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, D.; Kahlau, R.; Pötzschner, B.; Körber, T.; Wagner, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-03-07

    Various {sup 2}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene-d{sub 3} (PS) over the full concentration range. The results are quantitatively compared to those of a dielectric spectroscopy (DS) study on the same system previously published [R. Kahlau, D. Bock, B. Schmidtke, and E. A. Rössler, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044509 (2014)]. While the PS dynamics does not significantly change in the mixtures compared to that of neat PS, two fractions of TPP molecules are identified, one joining the glass transition of PS in the mixture (α{sub 1}-process), the second reorienting isotropically (α{sub 2}-process) even in the rigid matrix of PS, although at low concentration resembling a secondary process regarding its manifestation in the DS spectra. Pronounced dynamical heterogeneities are found for the TPP α{sub 2}-process, showing up in extremely stretched, quasi-logarithmic stimulated echo decays. While the time window of NMR is insufficient for recording the full correlation functions, DS results, covering a larger dynamical range, provide a satisfactory interpolation of the NMR data. Two-dimensional {sup 31}P NMR spectra prove exchange within the broadly distributed α{sub 2}-process. As demonstrated by {sup 2}H NMR, the PS matrix reflects the faster α{sub 2}-process of TPP by performing a spatially highly hindered motion on the same timescale.

  2. Natural Selection with Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Transmission. II. Tests with Drosophila from Diverse Populations

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of intraspecific variation in organelle DNA have prompted a renewed interest in the evolutionary consequences of cytoplasmically transmitted factors. Attempts to quantify the significance of cytoplasmic effects are frequently limited by the difficulty in partitioning the cause of reciprocal cross differences among a series of possibilities. In the experiment reported here the nuclear genomes of a set of six lines of Drosophila melanogaster from diverse geographic locations were replaced in a series of cytoplasms. The segregation of the SM5 balancer chromsome was scored in a factorial design, and the data allowed a partitioning of variance such that cytoplasmic effects were distinguished from maternal effects and meiotic drive. An attempt was made to avoid the confounding problem of hybrid dysgenesis by performing the entire experiment (including chromosomal extractions) in a P cytotype. Results indicated a significant contribution of cytoplasm to the variance in SM5 segregation. Error variance showed an increasing trend as the experiment proceeded, and additional tests indicated that this was due to an accumulation of chromosomal mutations. These findings are interpreted in light of the population genetic theory that addresses the maintenance of cytoplasmic polymorphism. PMID:3928435

  3. Design of sample carrier for neutron irradiation facility at TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Y.; Hamid, N. A.; Mansor, M. A.; Ahmad, M. H. A. R. M.; Yusof, M. R.; Yazid, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design a sample carrier for neutron irradiation experiment at beam ports of research nuclear reactor, the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP). The sample carrier was designed so that irradiation experiment can be performed safely by researchers. This development will resolve the transferring of sample issues faced by the researchers at the facility when performing neutron irradiation studies. The function of sample carrier is to ensure the sample for the irradiation process can be transferred into and out from the beam port of the reactor safely and effectively. The design model used was House of Quality Method (HOQ) which is usually used for developing specifications for product and develop numerical target to work towards and determining how well we can meet up to the needs. The chosen sample carrier (product) consists of cylindrical casing shape with hydraulic cylinders transportation method. The sample placing can be done manually, locomotion was by wheel while shielding used was made of boron materials. The sample carrier design can shield thermal neutron during irradiation of sample so that only low fluencies fast neutron irradiates the sample.

  4. Nuclear spin dependence of the reaction of H(3)+ with H2. II. Experimental measurements.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Kyle N; Kauffman, Carrie A; Tom, Brian A; Beçka, Eftalda; McGuire, Brett A; McCall, Benjamin J

    2011-05-21

    The nuclear spin dependence of the chemical reaction H(3)(+)+ H(2) → H(2) + H(3)(+) has been studied in a hollow cathode plasma cell. Multipass infrared direct absorption spectroscopy has been employed to monitor the populations of several low-energy rotational levels of ortho- and para-H(3)(+) (o-H(3)(+) and p-H(3)(+)) in hydrogenic plasmas of varying para-H(2) (p-H(2)) enrichment. The ratio of the rates of the proton hop (k(H)) and hydrogen exchange (k(E)) reactions α ≡ k(H)/k(E) is inferred from the observed p-H(3)(+) fraction as a function of p-H(2) fraction using steady-state chemical models. Measurements have been performed both in uncooled (T(kin) ∼ 350 K) and in liquid-nitrogen-cooled (T(kin) ∼ 135 K) plasmas, marking the first time this reaction has been studied at low temperature. The value of α has been found to decrease from 1.6 ± 0.1 at 350 K to 0.5 ± 0.1 at 135 K. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Ab initio statistical mechanics of surface adsorption and desorption. II. Nuclear quantum effects.

    PubMed

    Alfè, D; Gillan, M J

    2010-07-28

    We show how the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics can be used to construct practical ab initio techniques for computing the chemical potential of molecules adsorbed on surfaces, with full inclusion of quantum nuclear effects. The techniques we describe are based on the computation of the potential of mean force on a chosen molecule and generalize the techniques developed recently for classical nuclei. We present practical calculations based on density functional theory with a generalized-gradient exchange-correlation functional for the case of H(2)O on the MgO (001) surface at low coverage. We note that the very high vibrational frequencies of the H(2)O molecule would normally require very large numbers of time slices (beads) in path-integral calculations, but we show that this requirement can be dramatically reduced by employing the idea of thermodynamic integration with respect to the number of beads. The validity and correctness of our path-integral calculations on the H(2)O/MgO(001) system are demonstrated by supporting calculations on a set of simple model systems for which quantum contributions to the free energy are known exactly from analytic arguments.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of II-Vi and Iii-V Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jian-Hui

    In this thesis, I show how the basic solid-state NMR techniques can be used to study the local electronic structures of II-VI and III-V semiconductor alloys on an atomic scale. We have focused our studies on a few high quality samples, mainly Hg_{rm 1-x}Cd_{rm x} Te in the II-VI group, In-based binary III-V bulk semiconductors InP, InAs and InSb, and the III-V alloys Ga_{rm 1-x}In _{rm x}As. For solid-state-recrystallized device-quality bulk Hg_{rm 1-x}Cd _{rm x}Te samples, with x equal to 0.2, 0.22 and 0.28, corresponding to the narrow-gap semiconducting side of the band-inversion configurations, we have obtained detailed band-edge symmetry information, and site-selective quantitative charge carrier orbital characteristics on an atomic scale. Our study also indicated that a random cation distribution model well described the materials. We have investigated ^{115 }In magnetic resonance frequency shifts and the temperature dependence of these shifts in In-based III-V binary semiconductors. We have extracted the chemical shifts from the total shifts for these III-V semiconductors at 303K and 77K. Our NMR study of these binary semiconductors not only enhanced the understanding of electronic properties of these compounds, but also served as a reference for our NMR studies of III-V alloys. We performed ^{115}In NMR studies for dilute III-V semiconductor alloy Ga _{rm 1-x}In_ {rm x}As with x equal to 0.72%. Spectra clearly indicating the local electronic configurations were obtained. We carried out a series of field orientation studies, and determined the field gradient which is due to In-In pairs. This study provided evidence of local clustering of In atoms.

  7. Analysis of heavy metals from water, sediment, and tissues of Labeo angra (Hamilton, 1822), from an Ox-box lake- an wetland site from Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Suchismita; Choudhury, Shamim Sultana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the regional impacts of heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni) on water, sediment and a native, teleost fish species, Labeo angra, inhabiting a flood plain wetland of Barak River in Assam, India. Heavy metal concentrations in the water, sediments and fish were measured; bioaccumulation factor, metal pollution index as well as condition indices were calculated, to assess the pollution load and health status of the fish. Multivariate statistical analysis was used on wetland water and sediment heavy metals to ascertain the possible sources and seasonal variations of the pollutants. Results showed that most heavy metals in the wetland water and sediments exceeded the water (drinking and irrigation) and sediment quality guidelines, respectively. Seasonal variations were observed for geogenic heavy metals, Mn, Fe, Mg and Ca while no seasonal variations were observed for anthropogenic heavy metals, Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that there was strong correlation between geogenic and anthropogenic heavy metals in water and sediment, both originating from the common anthropogenic sources. Accumulation of most of the metals in all the tissues was above the safe limits as recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization. High bioaccumulation factors and metal pollution index for these metals in the different tissues revealed that metals were extensively bio-accumulated and bioconcentrated. Condition indices in fish from the wetland suggested metabolic abnormalities.

  8. ASPECTS OF THE ECOLOGY OF PHLEBOTOMINES (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) IN AN AREA OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS OCCURRENCE, MUNICIPALITY OF ANGRA DOS REIS, COAST OF RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar, Gustavo Marins; de Azevedo, Alfredo Carlos Rodrigues; de Medeiros, Wagner Muniz; Alves, João Ricardo Carreira; Rendeiro, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Over a complete two-year period, phlebotomine specimens were caught in an area of cutaneous leishmaniasis occurrence in the municipality of Angra dos Reis. A manual suction tube was used to catch phlebotomines on house walls, and also light traps in domestic and peridomestic settings and in the forest. This yielded 14,170 specimens of 13 species: two in the genus Brumptomyia and eleven in the genus Lutzomyia. L. intermedia predominantly in domestic and peridomestic settings, with little presence in the forest, with the same trend being found in relation to L. migonei, thus proving that these species have adapted to the human environment. L. fischeri appeared to be eclectic regarding location, but was seen to be proportionally more endophilic. L. intermedia and L. migonei were more numerous in peridomestic settings, throughout the year, while L. fischeri was more numerous in domestic settings except in March, April, May and September. From the prevalence of L. intermedia, its proven anthropophily and findings of this species naturally infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, it can be incriminated as the main vector for this agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the study area, especially in the peridomestic environment. L. fischeri may be a coadjuvant in carrying the parasite. PMID:24626417

  9. Tripeptidyl Peptidase II Mediates Levels of Nuclear Phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2*

    PubMed Central

    Wiemhoefer, Anne; Stargardt, Anita; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Renner, Maria C.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Stap, Jan; Raspe, Marcel A.; Tomkinson, Birgitta; Kessels, Helmut W.; Ovaa, Huib; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Florea, Bogdan; Reits, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) is a serine peptidase involved in various biological processes, including antigen processing, cell growth, DNA repair, and neuropeptide mediated signaling. The underlying mechanisms of how a peptidase can influence this multitude of processes still remain unknown. We identified rapid proteomic changes in neuroblastoma cells following selective TPP2 inhibition using the known reversible inhibitor butabindide, as well as a new, more potent, and irreversible peptide phosphonate inhibitor. Our data show that TPP2 inhibition indirectly but rapidly decreases the levels of active, di-phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2 in the nucleus, thereby down-regulating signal transduction downstream of growth factors and mitogenic stimuli. We conclude that TPP2 mediates many important cellular functions by controlling ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation. For instance, we show that TPP2 inhibition of neurons in the hippocampus leads to an excessive strengthening of synapses, indicating that TPP2 activity is crucial for normal brain function. PMID:26041847

  10. Report of the Secretary of Defense Task Force on DoD Nuclear Weapons Management. Phase II: Review of the DoD Nuclear Mission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    8 William Broad and David Sanger , “Restraints Fray and Risks Grow as Nuclear Club Gains Members,” New York...Broad, William and David Sanger . “Restraints Fray and Risks Grow as Nuclear Club Gains Members,” New York Times, Oct. 15, 2006. Brown, Harold. “New...Area Secretary of Defense Task Force on DoD Nuclear Weapons Management Director of Analysis Mrs. Margaret R. Munson Executive Fellow

  11. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II regulates nuclear receptor, myogenic, and metabolic gene expression in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Lisa M; Wang, Shu-Ching Mary; Eriksson, Natalie A; Myers, Stephen A; Murray, Lauren A; Muscat, George E O

    2011-02-24

    We demonstrate that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) mRNA is more abundantly expressed (than COUP-TFI mRNA) in skeletal muscle C2C12 cells and in (type I and II) skeletal muscle tissue from C57BL/10 mice. Consequently, we have utilized the ABI TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) platform to analyze gene expression changes specifically attributable to ectopic COUP-TFII (relative to vector only) expression in muscle cells. Utilizing a TLDA-based platform and 5 internal controls, we analyze the entire NR superfamily, 96 critical metabolic genes, and 48 important myogenic regulatory genes on the TLDA platform utilizing 5 internal controls. The low density arrays were analyzed by rigorous statistical analysis (with Genorm normalization, Bioconductor R, and the Empirical Bayes statistic) using the (integromics) statminer software. In addition, we validated the differentially expressed patho-physiologically relevant gene (identified on the TLDA platform) glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4). We demonstrated that COUP-TFII expression increased the steady state levels of Glut4 mRNA and protein, while ectopic expression of truncated COUP-TFII lacking helix 12 (COUP-TFΔH12) reduced Glut4 mRNA expression in C2C12 cells. Moreover, COUP-TFII expression trans-activated the Glut4 promoter (-997/+3), and ChIP analysis identified selective recruitment of COUP-TFII to a region encompassing a highly conserved SP1 binding site (in mouse, rat, and human) at nt positions -131/-118. Mutation of the SpI site ablated COUP-TFII mediated trans-activation of the Glut4 promoter. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in skeletal muscle cells, COUP-TFII regulates several nuclear hormone receptors, and critical metabolic and muscle specific genes.

  12. 15N photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning NMR analysis of the electron donor of photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Diller, Anna; Roy, Esha; Gast, Peter; van Gorkom, Hans J.; de Groot, Huub J. M.; Glaubitz, Clemens; Jeschke, Gunnar; Matysik, Jörg; Alia, A.

    2007-01-01

    In natural photosynthesis, the two photosystems that operate in series to drive electron transport from water to carbon dioxide are quite similar in structure and function, but operate at widely different potentials. In both systems photochemistry begins by photo-oxidation of a chlorophyll a, but that in photosystem II (PS2) has a 0.7 eV higher midpoint potential than that in photosystem I (PS1), so their electronic structures must be very different. Using reaction centers from 15N-labeled spinach, these electronic structures are compared by their photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) in magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements. The results show that the electron spin distribution in PS1, apart from its known delocalization over 2 chlorophyll molecules, reveals no marked disturbance, whereas the pattern of electron spin density distribution in PS2 is inverted in the oxidized radical state. A model for the donor of PS2 is presented explaining the inversion of electron spin density based on a tilt of the axial histidine toward pyrrole ring IV causing π-π overlap of both aromatic systems. PMID:17652174

  13. Nuclear Waste Management under Approaching Disaster: A Comparison of Decommissioning Strategies for the German Repository Asse II.

    PubMed

    Ilg, Patrick; Gabbert, Silke; Weikard, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-14

    This article compares different strategies for handling low- and medium-level nuclear waste buried in a retired potassium mine in Germany (Asse II) that faces significant risk of uncontrollable brine intrusion and, hence, long-term groundwater contamination. We survey the policy process that has resulted in the identification of three possible so-called decommissioning options: complete backfilling, relocation of the waste to deeper levels in the mine, and retrieval. The selection of a decommissioning strategy must compare expected investment costs with expected social damage costs (economic, environmental, and health damage costs) caused by flooding and subsequent groundwater contamination. We apply a cost minimization approach that accounts for the uncertainty regarding the stability of the rock formation and the risk of an uncontrollable brine intrusion. Since economic and health impacts stretch out into the far future, we examine the impact of different discounting methods and rates. Due to parameter uncertainty, we conduct a sensitivity analysis concerning key assumptions. We find that retrieval, the currently preferred option by policymakers, has the lowest expected social damage costs for low discount rates. However, this advantage is overcompensated by higher expected investment costs. Considering all costs, backfilling is the best option for all discounting scenarios considered.

  14. Polyproline type II conformation in the C-terminal domain of the nuclear pore complex protein gp210.

    PubMed

    Pilpel, Yair; Bogin, Oren; Brumfeld, Vlad; Reich, Ziv

    2003-04-01

    gp210 is a major constituent of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) with possible structural and regulatory roles. It interacts with components of the NPC via its C-terminal domain (CTD), which follows a transmembrane domain and a massive ( approximately 200 kDa) N-terminal region that resides in the lumen of the perinuclear space. Here, we report the solution structure of the human gp210 CTD as determined by various spectroscopic techniques. In water, the CTD adopts an extended, largely unordered conformation, which contains a significant amount of left-handed polyproline type II (PII) helical structure. The conformation of the CTD is altered by high pH, charged detergents, and the hydrogen bond-promoting reagent trifluoroethanol (TFE), which decrease the PII fraction of the fragment. TFE also induces a conformational change in a region containing an SPXX motif whose serine becomes specifically phosphorylated during mitosis. We propose that PII elements in the CTD may play a role in its interaction with the NPC and may serve as recognition sites for regulatory proteins bearing WW or other, unknown PII-binding motifs.

  15. In vitro expression, monoclonal antibody and bioactivity for capsid protein of porcine circovirus type II without nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Yong; Shang, Shao-Bin; Gong, Hui; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wu, Jian-Xiang; Shen, Hui-Gang; Chen, Ting-Fei; Guo, Jun-Qing

    2005-08-04

    We expressed firstly the Capsid protein gene defecting the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Porcine circovirus type II (PCV2) in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (rGST-dCap protein). The purified rGST-dCap protein and the recombinant NLS-defected Cap protein of PCV2 (rdCap protein) from the purified rGST-dCap protein reacted specifically with swine antiserum to PCV2. Furthermore, the obtained monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rdCap protein were shown to bind to PCV2 particles replicated in PK15 cell and capsid protein (Cap protein) of PCV2 expressed in PK15 cells, respectively. mAbs to rdCap protein also revealed the neutralizing ability to PCV2 particles. These results demonstrated that rGST-dCap protein expressed in E. coli was folded correctly or at least partly, and mAbs to rdCap protein possessed the binding epitopes of PCV2 particles whereas mAbs 4C4 and 3F6 to rdCap protein remained the neutralization epitope of PCV2 particle, showing a possibility of neutralizing mAb to rdCap protein as an immnuotherapeutic agent and a potential of rGST-dCap protein as a vaccine antigen or serodiagnostic reagent.

  16. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Issues chapter contains a comprehensive list of engineering issues for fusion reactor nuclear components. The list explicitly defines the uncertainties associated with the engineering option of a fusion reactor and addresses the potential consequences resulting from each issue. The next chapter identifies the fusion nuclear technology testing needs up to the engineering demonstration stage. (MOW)

  17. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER-type nuclear reactors. II. 60Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Kálmán; Hirschberg, Gábor; Németh, Zoltán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter

    2001-10-01

    In the case of intact fuel claddings, the predominant source of radioactivity in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors is the activation of corrosion products in the core. The most important corrosion product radionuclides in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are 60Co, 58Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe (as well as 110mAg in some Soviet-made VVER-type reactor). The second part of this series is focused on the complex studies of the formation and build-up of 60Co-containing species on an austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) and magnetite-covered carbon steel often to be used in Soviet-planned VVERs. The kinetics and mechanism of the cobalt accumulation were studied by a combination (coupling) of an in situ radiotracer method and voltammetry in a model solution of the primary circuit coolant. In addition, independent techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and ICP-OES are also used to analyze the chemical state of Co species in the passive layer formed on stainless steel as well as the chemical composition of model solution. The experimental results have revealed that: (i) The passive behavior of the austenitic stainless steel at open-circuit conditions, the slightly alkaline pH and the reducing water chemistry can be considered to be optimal to minimize the 60Co contamination. (ii) The highly potential dependent deposition of various Co-oxides at E>1.10 V (vs. RHE) offers a unique possibility to elaborate a novel electrochemical method for the decrease or removal of cobalt traces from borate-containing coolants contaminated with 60Co and/or 58Co radionuclides.

  18. Nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite anchored with multi-carboxyl functional groups as an adsorbent for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) from nuclear industry wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Deepa, J R; Christa, J

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent, poly(itaconic acid/methacrylic acid)-grafted-nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite [P(IA/MAA)-g-NC/NB] with multi carboxyl functional groups for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) [Co(II)] from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM-EDS, AFM and potentiometric titrations before and after adsorption of Co(II) ions. FTIR spectra revealed that Co(II) adsorption on to the polymer may be due to the involvement of COOH groups. The surface morphological changes were observed by the SEM images. The pH was optimized as 6.0. An adsorbent dose of 2.0g/L found to be sufficient for the complete removal of Co(II) from 100mg/L at room temperature. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested to describe kinetic data and adsorption of Co(II) follows pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium attained at 120min. Isotherm studies were conducted and data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips isotherm models and best fit was Sips model. Thermodynamic study confirmed endothermic and physical nature of adsorption of the Co(II) onto the adsorbent. Desorption experiments were done with 0.1MHCl proved that without significant loss in performance adsorbent could be reused for six cycles. The practical efficacy and effectiveness of the adsorbent were tested using nuclear industrial wastewater. A double stage batch adsorption system was designed from the adsorption isotherm data of Co(II) by constructing operating lines.

  19. Public perception of the nuclear area in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Imeida, R.A. de

    2013-07-01

    In Brazil electricity production is proving increasingly important, the Brazilian government has recently launched the National Energy Plan, PNE-2030 which aims, among other objectives, to conclude construction of the Angra 3 plant and to deploy new nuclear power plants in the Northeast region. The Brazilian government wants to assess how the public has perceived its energy policy and what the public thinks about the nuclear issue. A public opinion survey was performed and sampling resulted in 127 respondents who were stratified by gender, age and educational level. The survey results show that although most respondents have post-graduate degrees, 64.6% are not aware of, or had never heard of PNE-2030. While 72 respondents consider nuclear energy as an alternative source of clean energy, 84 respondents did not know where the next Brazilian nuclear power plant will be built. The nuclear regulator, CNEN, is seen by 45.7% of respondents as the body that has most credibility to talk about the safety of nuclear power plants and the media most used to obtain information about the nuclear area were newspapers and discussion forums, with 52 and 50 votes respectively. These results prove the need to implement communication plans with clear and concise goals for different segments of society, since the degree of understanding differs within each segment.

  20. Photobilirubin II.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, R; Buckley, D G; Hamzetash, D; Hawkes, G E; Ioannou, S; Stoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    An improved preparation of photobilirubin II in ammoniacal methanol is described. Evidence is presented which distinguishes between the two structures proposed earlier for photobilirubin II in favour of the cycloheptadienyl structure. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement measurements with bilirubin IX alpha and photobilirubin II in dimethyl sulphoxide are complicated by the occurrence of negative and zero effects. The partition coefficient of photobilirubin II between chloroform and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) is 0.67. PMID:6743241

  1. Heterogeneity of nuclear estrogen-binding sites in the rat uterus: a simple method for the quantitation of type I and type II sites by (3H)estradiol exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Markaverich, B.M.; Williams, M.; Upchurch, S.; Clark, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Estrogen administration to mature-ovariectomized rats causes the activation or stimulation of secondary nuclear estrogen-binding sites (type II) in the uterus which can interfere with estrogen receptor (type I) measurement. Earlier reports from our laboratory have shown that quantitation of type I sites in the presence of the type II site is very difficult and can only be achieved by graphic analysis of saturation curves which employ a wide range (0.4-40 NM) of (/sup 3/H)estradiol concentrations in nuclear exchange assay. The studies presented in this manuscript describe simple methods which can be used to separately quantitate both nuclear estrogen-binding sites using a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Since the nuclear type II site does not bind (/sup 3/H)estradiol in the presence of reducing agent, type I sites can be easily quantitated by incubating nuclei (37 C for 30 min) in Tris-EDTA buffer containing 0.1-1.00 mM dithiothreitol using a single saturating concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Conversely, a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol (40-80 nM) can be used to quantitate the nuclear type II site by incubating nuclei in Tris-EDTA buffer under conditions (4 C for 60 min) which do not measure occupied nuclear estrogen receptor. Therefore, by using the appropriate buffer system, type I and type II sites can be easily separated in mixed binding systems. In addition, we also demonstrate that Nafoxidine does not bind to the nuclear type II site. Therefore, it can be used as a competitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding to type I sites and permit the measurement of type II sites without interference from type I sites. These techniques should be applicable to autoradiographic or fluorescence studies which cannot discriminate between steroid binding to these two classes of nuclear estrogen-binding sites.

  2. Nukes II: the nuclear power industry wants another chance. This time, it promises to do things right

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, H.G.

    1985-03-01

    Anticipating a comback for nuclear power, the nuclear industry points to the need for reliable supplies of electricity to provide over 35% of US energy requirements. The industry faces both technical and institutional problems, in contrast to the mature industry of other countries, and promises to improve its performance in safety design and efficiency. Pointing to design advances, robotics, computerized simulation and other techniques, the industry feels that regulation will be more reasonable and costs will be reduced. Economic solutions include building smaller plants and using modular construction. The biggest uncertainty, however, is whether the public will buy either the need for additional capacity or nuclear power to fill that need.

  3. Environmental resources and potential impacts for a nuclear energy center near Green River, Utah. Volume II. Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Maps are included for baseline studies for siting a nuclear energy park. Surface waters, ground water, water resources, forests, plant flora, land use, land ownership and mineral deposits are detailed. (PSB)

  4. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong H.; Rechsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan; Kelly, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3’ end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation. PMID:27541139

  5. Cyclam Derivatives with a Bis(phosphinate) or a Phosphinato-Phosphonate Pendant Arm: Ligands for Fast and Efficient Copper(II) Complexation for Nuclear Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    David, Tomáš; Kubíček, Vojtěch; Gutten, Ondrej; Lubal, Přemysl; Kotek, Jan; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hermann, Petr

    2015-12-21

    Cyclam derivatives bearing one geminal bis(phosphinic acid), -CH2PO2HCH2PO2H2 (H2L(1)), or phosphinic-phosphonic acid, -CH2PO2HCH2PO3H2 (H3L(2)), pendant arm were synthesized and studied as potential copper(II) chelators for nuclear medical applications. The ligands showed good selectivity for copper(II) over zinc(II) and nickel(II) ions (log KCuL = 25.8 and 27.7 for H2L(1) and H3L(2), respectively). Kinetic study revealed an unusual three-step complex formation mechanism. The initial equilibrium step leads to out-of-cage complexes with Cu(2+) bound by the phosphorus-containing pendant arm. These species quickly rearrange to an in-cage complex with cyclam conformation II, which isomerizes to another in-cage complex with cyclam conformation I. The first in-cage complex is quantitatively formed in seconds (pH ≈5, 25 °C, Cu:L = 1:1, cM ≈ 1 mM). At pH >12, I isomers undergo nitrogen atom inversion, leading to III isomers; the structure of the III-[Cu(HL(2))] complex in the solid state was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. In an alkaline solution, interconversion of the I and III isomers is mutual, leading to the same equilibrium isomeric mixture; such behavior has been observed here for the first time for copper(II) complexes of cyclam derivatives. Quantum-chemical calculations showed small energetic differences between the isomeric complexes of H3L(2) compared with analogous data for isomeric complexes of cyclam derivatives with one or two methylphosphonic acid pendant arm(s). Acid-assisted dissociation proved the kinetic inertness of the complexes. Preliminary radiolabeling of H2L(1) and H3L(2) with (64)Cu was fast and efficient, even at room temperature, giving specific activities of around 70 GBq of (64)Cu per 1 μmol of the ligand (pH 6.2, 10 min, ca. 90 equiv of the ligand). These specific activities were much higher than those of H3nota and H4dota complexes prepared under identical conditions. The rare combination of simple ligand synthesis, very

  6. ATMS_Phase_II: a standalone code for counting non-overlapping high-density nuclear tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Omid

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we focus on counting and density measurements of non-overlapping high-density nuclear track images. This paper is a continuum of another paper of the author introducing ATMS software which has been particularly developed for overlapping nuclear tracks. Here, as the second phase of the ATMS software, a hybrid algorithm is presented for counting the tracks according to user parameter initialization, template inserting and correlation estimation to initially detect nuclear track candidates, then to evaluate geometrical and contextual features of track candidates and finally a decision-making process according to the user's sensitivity considerations. The presented hybrid algorithm is verified and validated by a database containing 100 randomly selected Alpha track images captured from the surface of CR-39 polycarbonate detectors irradiated by environmental Alpha particles emitted from Rn-222 near a copper mine around Anarak city.

  7. Considerations of Alloy 617 Application in the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Systems - Part II: Metallurgical Property Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2010-01-01

    Alloy 617 is currently considered as a leading candidate material for high temperature components in the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Systems. Because of the unprecedented severe working conditions beyond its commercial service experience required by the Gen IV systems, the alloy faces various challenges in both mechanical and metallurgical properties. Following a previous paper discussing the mechanical property challenges, this paper is focused on the challenges and issues in metallurgical properties of the alloy for the intended nuclear application. Considerations are given in details about its metallurgical stability and aging evolution, aging effects on mechanical properties, potential Co hazard, and internal oxidation. Some research and development activities are suggested with discussions on viability to satisfy the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor System needs.

  8. Development and Validation of Methodology to Model Flow in Ventilation Systems Commonly Found in Nuclear Facilities - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Strons, Philip; Bailey, James L.; Davis, John; Grudzinski, James; Hlotke, John

    2016-03-01

    In this report we present the results of the Phase II analysis and testing of the flow patterns encountered in the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), as well as the results from an opportunity to expand upon field test work from Phase I by the use of a Class IIIb laser. The addition to the Phase I work is covered before proceeding to the results of the Phase II work, followed by a summary of findings.

  9. Applications of nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2017-01-10

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applicationsmore » of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Lastly, each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.« less

  10. Applications of nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A C

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  11. Applications of nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  12. Survey II of Public and Leadership Attitudes Toward Nuclear Power Development in the United States. Study No. 2628.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    This publication details a national survey done by Louis Harris and Associates, similar to one done in 1975, to assess attitudes toward nuclear power in the United States. The survey consisted of three parts. The first part was in-person, door-to-door interviews with 1,597 randomly selected households nationwide. The second part was 309…

  13. Sophisticated radiology in otolaryngology. II. Diagnostic imaging: non-roentgenographic (non x-ray) modalities (ultrasound, nuclear medicine, thermography).

    PubMed

    Noyek, A M; Holgate, R C; Wortzman, G; Greyson, N D; Miskin, M; Simor, I S; Steinhardt, M I; Kazdan, M S

    1977-01-01

    Newer forms of radiologic diagnostic imaging now include non-roentgenographic modalities such as ultrasound, nuclear medicin, and thermography, all of which can be applied to otolaryngology. It is the purpose of this presentation to demonstrate these modalities, and indicate their clinical application, yet in its earliest stages, to otolaryngology.

  14. Survey II of Public and Leadership Attitudes Toward Nuclear Power Development in the United States. Study No. 2628.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    This publication details a national survey done by Louis Harris and Associates, similar to one done in 1975, to assess attitudes toward nuclear power in the United States. The survey consisted of three parts. The first part was in-person, door-to-door interviews with 1,597 randomly selected households nationwide. The second part was 309…

  15. Fabrication and testing of a 4-node micro-pocket fission detector array for the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenberger, Michael A.; Nichols, Daniel M.; Stevenson, Sarah R.; Swope, Tanner M.; Hilger, Caden W.; Unruh, Troy C.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2017-08-01

    Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) have been fabricated and tested previously, but successful testing of these prior detectors was limited to single-node operation with specialized designs. Described in this work is a modular, four-node MPFD array fabricated and tested at Kansas State University (KSU). The four sensor nodes were equally spaced to span the length of the fuel-region of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor core. The encapsulated array was filled with argon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the MPFDs. The unified design improved device ruggedness and simplified construction over previous designs. A 0.315-in. (8-mm) penetration in the upper grid plate of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor was used to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The MPFD array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been developed to support pulse-mode operation. Neutron-induced pulses were observed on all four sensor channels. Stable device operation was confirmed by testing under steady-state reactor conditions. Each of the four sensors in the array responded to changes in reactor power between 10 kWth and full power (750 kWth). Reactor power transients were observed in real-time including positive transients with periods of 5, 15, and 30 s. Finally, manual reactor power oscillations were observed in real-time.

  16. Cd(II) complexes with different nuclearity and dimensionality based on 3-hydrazino-4-amino-1,2,4-triazole

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Jian-Guo Yin, Xin; Jin, Xin; Li, Tong; Zhang, Tong-Lai; Zhou, Zun-Ning

    2015-03-15

    A series of zero- to two-dimensional Cd(II) coordination compounds have been synthesized by the reaction of Cd(II) salts and 3-hydrazino-4-amino-1,2,4-triazole di-hydrochloride (HATr·2HCl). [CdCl{sub 2}(HATr){sub 2}] (1) and [Cd{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}(HATr){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (2) have discrete mononuclear and binuclear structures, respectively. [Cd(HATr){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sub n} (3) presents polymeric 1-D chain and [Cd{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(HATr){sub 2}]{sub n} (4) shows 2-D frameworks. All Cd(II) ions exhibit distorted octahedral configurations in 1–3, whilst both hexa and heptacoordinated Cd(II) are formed in 4. The HATr ligands adopt chelating coordinated mode in 1, while tri-dentate bridging–chelating mode in 2–4. The chloride ion is a mono-coordinated ligand in 1 and 2, but it bridges two adjacent metal ions in 4. Furthermore, thermal behaviors have been investigated and the results reveal that all complexes have good thermal stability. The impact sensitivity test indicates that complex 3 is sensitive to impact stimuli. - Graphical abstract: Four Cd(II) complexes based on 3-hydrazino-4-amino-1,2,4-triazole ligands exhibit diverse structures from mononuclear to 2D networks. - Highlights: • Cd(II) complexes containing 3-hydrazino-4-amino-1,2,4-triazole ligands. • Mononuclear, binuclear, 1-D and 2-D structures. • Good thermal stability. • Thermal decomposition kinetics.

  17. Cobalt(II) chloride adducts with acetonitrile, propan-2-ol and tetrahydrofuran: considerations on nuclearity, reactivity and synthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Stinghen, Danilo; Rüdiger, André Luis; Giese, Siddhartha O K; Nunes, Giovana G; Soares, Jaísa F; Hughes, David L

    2017-02-01

    High-spin cobalt(II) complexes are considered useful building blocks for the synthesis of single-molecule magnets (SMM) because of their intrinsic magnetic anisotropy. In this work, three new cobalt(II) chloride adducts with labile ligands have been synthesized from anhydrous CoCl2, to be subsequently employed as starting materials for heterobimetallic compounds. The products were characterized by elemental, spectroscopic (EPR and FT-IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. trans-Tetrakis(acetonitrile-κN)bis(tetrahydrofuran-κO)cobalt(II) bis[(acetonitrile-κN)trichloridocobaltate(II)], [Co(C2H3N)4(C4H8O)2][CoCl3(C2H3N)]2, (1), comprises mononuclear ions and contains both acetonitrile and tetrahydrofuran (thf) ligands, The coordination polymer catena-poly[[tetrakis(propan-2-ol-κO)cobalt(II)]-μ-chlorido-[dichloridocobalt(II)]-μ-chlorido], [Co2Cl4(C3H8O)4], (2'), was prepared by direct reaction between anhydrous CoCl2 and propan-2-ol in an attempt to rationalize the formation of the CoCl2-alcohol adduct (2), probably CoCl2(HO(i)Pr)m. The binuclear complex di-μ-chlorido-1:2κ(4)Cl:Cl-dichlorido-2κ(2)Cl-tetrakis(tetrahydrofuran-1κO)dicobalt(II), [Co2Cl4(C4H8O)4], (3), was obtained from (2) after recrystallization from tetrahydrofuran. All three products present cobalt(II) centres in both octahedral and tetrahedral environments, the former usually less distorted than the latter, regardless of the nature of the neutral ligand. Product (2') is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen-bond network that appears to favour a trans arrangement of the chloride ligands in the octahedral moiety; this differs from the cis disposition found in (3). The expected easy displacement of the bound solvent molecules from the metal coordination sphere makes the three compounds good candidates for suitable starting materials in a number of synthetic applications.

  18. Launch Vehicle Fire Accident Preliminary Analysis of a Liquid-Metal Cooled Thermionic Nuclear Reactor: TOPAZ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, G.; Zhao, S.; Ruan, K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, launch vehicle propellant fire accident analysis of TOPAZ-II reactor has been done by a thermionic reactor core analytic code-TATRHG(A) developed by author. When a rocket explodes on a launch pad, its payload-TOPAZ-II can be subjected to a severe thermal environment from the resulting fireball. The extreme temperatures associated with propellant fires can create a destructive environment in or near the fireball. Different kind of propellants - liquid propellant and solid propellant which will lead to different fire temperature are considered. Preliminary analysis shows that the solid propellant fires can melt the whole toxic beryllium radial reflector.

  19. Mono-nuclear copper complexes mimicking the intermediates for the binuclear copper center of the subunit II of cytochrome oxidase: a peptide based approach.

    PubMed

    Dutta Gupta, Dwaipayan; Usharani, Dandamudi; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2016-11-28

    Three stable copper complexes of peptides derived from the copper ion binding loop of the subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase have been prepared and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. These stable copper complexes of peptides were found to exhibit cysteine, histidine and/or methionine ligation, which has predominant σ-contribution in the Cys-Cu charge transfer. The copper(ii) peptide complexes showed type-2 EPR spectra, which is uncommon in copper-cysteinate complexes. UV-visible spectra, Raman and EPR results support a tetragonal structure of the coordination geometry around the copper ion. The copper complex of the 9-amino acid peptide suggested the formation of a 'red' copper center while the copper complexes of the 12- and 11-amino acid peptides showed the formation of a 'green' copper center. The results provide insights on the first stable models of the copper complexes formed in the peptide scaffold that mimic the mono-nuclear copper bound protein intermediates proposed during the formation of the binuclear Cu2S2 core of the enzyme. These three copper complexes of peptides derived from the metal ion binding loop of the CuA center of the subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase showed novel spectroscopic properties which have not so far been reported in any stable small complex.

  20. CA150, a nuclear protein associated with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme, is involved in Tat-activated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Suñé, C; Hayashi, T; Liu, Y; Lane, W S; Young, R A; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    Maximal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression requires specific cellular factors in addition to the virus-encoded trans-activator protein Tat and the RNA element TAR. We developed a functional assay, based on transcriptional activation in vitro, to identify these cellular factors. Here, we describe the purification and molecular cloning of CA150, a nuclear protein that is associated with the human RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and is involved in Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional activation. The sequence of CA150 contains an extensive glutamine- and alanine-rich repeat that is found in transcriptional modulators such as GAL11 and SSN6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zeste in Drosophila melanogaster. Immunodepletion of CA150 abolished Tat trans activation in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of a mutant CA150 protein specifically and dramatically decreased Tat-mediated activation of the HIV-1 promoter in vivo, strongly suggesting a role for CA150 in HIV-1 gene regulation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that both CA150 and Tat associate with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Furthermore, we found that functional Tat associates with the holoenzyme whereas activation-deficient Tat mutants do not. Thus, we propose that Tat action is transduced via an RNA polymerase II holoenzyme that contains CA150. PMID:9315662

  1. The Politics of Forgetting: Otto Hahn and the German Nuclear-Fission Project in World War II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2012-03-01

    As the co-discoverer of nuclear fission and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry, Otto Hahn (1879-1968) took part in Germany`s nuclear-fission project throughout the Second World War. I outline Hahn's efforts to mobilize his institute for military-related research; his inclusion in high-level scientific structures of the military and the state; and his institute's research programs in neutron physics, isotope separation, transuranium elements, and fission products, all of potential military importance for a bomb or a reactor and almost all of it secret. These activities are contrasted with Hahn's deliberate misrepresentations after the war, when he claimed that his wartime work had been nothing but "purely scientific" fundamental research that was openly published and of no military relevance.

  2. Medical countermeasures for unwanted CBRN exposures: part II radiological and nuclear threats with review of recent countermeasure patents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Romaine, Patricia L.P.; Newman, Victoria L.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The global threat of a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) disaster is an important priority for all government agencies involved in domestic security and public health preparedness. Radiological/nuclear (RN) attacks or accidents have become a larger focus of the United States Food and Drug administration (US FDA) over time because of their increased likeliness. Clinical signs and symptoms of a developing acute radiation syndrome (ARS) are grouped into three sub-syndromes named for the dominant organ system affected, namely the hematopoietic (H-ARS), gastrointestinal (GI-ARS), and neurovascular systems. The availability of safe and effective countermeasures against radiological/nuclear threats currently represents a significant unmet medical need. Areas covered: This article reviews the development of RN threat medical countermeasures and highlights those specific countermeasures that have been recently patented and approved following the FDA Animal Rule. Patents for such agents from 2015 have been presented. Expert opinion: Two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-based radiation countermeasures (Neupogen® (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA) and Neulasta® (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA)) have recently been approved by the FDA for treatment of H-ARS and both these agents are radiomitigators, used after radiation exposure. To date, there are no FDA-approved radioprotectors for ARS. PMID:27610458

  3. Specification and verification of nuclear-power-plant training-simulator response characteristics. Part II. Conclusions and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P M; Selby, D L; Kerlin, T W; Felkins, L

    1982-05-01

    The nuclear industry should adopt and NRC regulatory and research actions should support the systems approach to training as a structured framework for development and validation of personnel training systems. Potential exists for improving the ability to assess simulator fidelity. Systems Identification Technology offers a potential framework for model validation. Installation of the data collection/recording equipment required by NUREG-0696 could provide a vastly improved source of data for simulator fidelity assessment. The NRC needs to continue its post-TMI actions to involve itself more rigorously and more formally in the entire process of NPP personnel training system development. However, this involvement should be a participative one with industry. The existing similator standards and guidelines should be reorganized to support the use of systems approach to training. The standards should require and support a holistic approach to training system development that recognizes simulators and simulator training as only parts of the complete training program and full-scope, high-fidelity, site-specific simulators as only one useful training device. Some recommendations for adapting the SAT/ISD process to the nuclear industry are: The formation of an NRC/industry planning/coordination group, a program planning study to develop a programmatic plan, development of a user's guide and NRC/industry workshops to establish common terminology and practice, and a pilot study applying the adopted SAT/ISD methodology to an actual nuclear industry training program.

  4. A Census of Nuclear Star Clusters in Late-Type Spiral Galaxies: II. Spectroscopy and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeker, Torsten

    2001-07-01

    Recent HST observations have revealed that many spiral galaxies have a prominent star cluster in their dynamical center, but statistics for cluster frequency, size, and luminosity remain incomplete. To fill this gap, we are undertaking a Cycle 9 WFPC2 snapshot survey of a well-defined sample of late-type galaxies. However, imaging data alone cannot yield the age distribution of the clusters, which is needed to clarify whether nuclear cluster formation is a one-time event or a recurrent process. This question is important because a central mass concentration is required for some models of bulge formation. In the few cases where cluster ages could be measured from ground-based spectra, they have been found to be rather young { < 10^7.5 yrs} and metal-rich. The question then is whether nuclear clusters indeed form recurrently, or whether ground-based observations are biased towards the brightest and hence youngest clusters. To address this issue, we will follow up our Cycle 9 imaging program with a snapshot program of low-resolution STIS spectroscopy of the detected clusters. HST's spatial resolution is required to separate the cluster light from the underlying galaxy emission. We will use stellar population synthesis models to infer the age distribution of the clusters, and to constrain their star formation history. The combined Cycle 9 and 10 programs will provide the first systematic census of nuclear star clusters in any class of spirals.

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-1, Fundamentals of Ultrasonic Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Bruce

    This first in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II introduces the student/trainee to the basic behavior of ultrasound, describes ultrasonic test equipment, and outlines the principal methods of ultrasonic testing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  6. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-2, Operation of Ultrasonic Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This second in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II describes specific ultrasonic test techniques and calibration principles. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  7. Quantitative prediction of nuclear-spin-diffusion-limited coherence times of molecular quantum bits based on copper(ii).

    PubMed

    Lenz, S; Bader, K; Bamberger, H; van Slageren, J

    2017-04-06

    We have investigated the electron spin dynamics in a series of copper(ii) β-diketonate complexes both in frozen solutions and doped solids. Double digit microsecond coherence times were found at low temperatures. We report quantitative simulations of the coherence decays solely based on the crystal structure of the doped solids.

  8. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  9. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II. Module 32-3, Fundamentals of Magnetic Particle Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This third in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II explains the principles of magnets and magnetic fields and how they are applied in magnetic particle testing, describes the theory and methods of magnetizing test specimens, describes the test equipment used, discusses the principles and…

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  11. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-4, Operation of Magnetic Particle Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This fourth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the specific technique variables and options which are available to the test technician, provides instructions for selecting and operating the appropriate test equipment, describes physical criteria for detectable discontinuities,…

  12. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  14. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-2, Operation of Ultrasonic Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This second in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II describes specific ultrasonic test techniques and calibration principles. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  15. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-1, Fundamentals of Ultrasonic Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Bruce

    This first in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II introduces the student/trainee to the basic behavior of ultrasound, describes ultrasonic test equipment, and outlines the principal methods of ultrasonic testing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  16. Di- and tetra-nuclear copper(II), nickel(II), and cobalt(II) complexes of four bis-tetradentate triazole-based ligands: synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Juan; Kalisz, Marguerite; Clérac, Rodolphe; Brooker, Sally

    2012-05-07

    Four bis-tetradentate N(4)-substituted-3,5-{bis[bis-N-(2-pyridinemethyl)]aminomethyl}-4H-1,2,4-triazole ligands, L(Tz1)-L(Tz4), differing only in the triazole N(4) substituent R (where R is amino, pyrrolyl, phenyl, or 4-tertbutylphenyl, respectively) have been synthesized, characterized, and reacted with M(II)(BF(4))(2)·6H(2)O (M(II) = Cu, Ni or Co) and Co(SCN)(2). Experiments using all 16 possible combinations of metal salt and L(TzR) were carried out: 14 pure complexes were obtained, 11 of which are dinuclear, while the other three are tetranuclear. The dinuclear complexes include two copper(II) complexes, [Cu(II)(2)(L(Tz2))(H(2)O)(4)](BF(4))(4) (2), [Cu(II)(2)(L(Tz4))(BF(4))(2)](BF(4))(2) (4); two nickel(II) complexes, [Ni(II)(2)(L(Tz1))(H(2)O)(3)(CH(3)CN)](BF(4))(4)·0.5(CH(3)CN) (5) and [Ni(II)(2)(L(Tz4))(H(2)O)(4)](BF(4))(4)·H(2)O (8); and seven cobalt(II) complexes, [Co(II)(2)(L(Tz1))(μ-BF(4))](BF(4))(3)·H(2)O (9), [Co(II)(2)(L(Tz2))(μ-BF(4))](BF(4))(3)·2H(2)O (10), [Co(II)(2)(L(Tz3))(H(2)O)(2)](BF(4))(4) (11), [Co(II)(2)(L(Tz4))(μ-BF(4))](BF(4))(3)·3H(2)O (12), [Co(II)(2)(L(Tz1))(SCN)(4)]·3H(2)O (13), [Co(II)(2)(L(Tz2))(SCN)(4)]·2H(2)O (14), and [Co(II)(2)(L(Tz3))(SCN)(4)]·H(2)O (15). The tetranuclear complexes are [Cu(II)(4)(L(Tz1))(2)(H(2)O)(2)(BF(4))(2)](BF(4))(6) (1), [Cu(II)(4)(L(Tz3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)(μ-F)(2)](BF(4))(6)·0.5H(2)O (3), and [Ni(II)(4)(L(Tz3))(2)(H(2)O)(4)(μ-F(2))](BF(4))(6)·6.5H(2)O (7). Single crystal X-ray structure determinations revealed different solvent content from that found by microanalysis of the bulk sample after drying under a vacuum and confirmed that 5', 8', 9', 11', 12', and 15' are dinuclear while 1' and 7' are tetranuclear. As expected, magnetic measurements showed that weak antiferromagnetic intracomplex interactions are present in 1, 2, 4, 7, and 8, stabilizing a singlet spin ground state. All seven of the dinuclear cobalt(II) complexes, 9-15, have similar magnetic behavior and remain in the [HS-HS] state

  17. Nuclear inelastic scattering of 1D polymeric Fe(II) complexes of 1,2,4-aminotriazole in their high-spin and low-spin state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, Juliusz A.; Rackwitz, Sergej; Achterhold, Klaus; Muffler, Kai; Schünemann, Volker

    2012-03-01

    The vibrational properties of Fe(II) 1D spin crossover polymers have been characterized by nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). The complexes under study were the tosylate and perchlorate salts of ([Fe(4-amino-1,2,4-triazole)3]^{+2})_n complexes. The complexes have LS (S = 0) marker bands in the range of 300-500 cm - 1, while the marker bands corresponding to the HS (S = 2) state are detected between 200 cm - 1 and 300 cm - 1, in line with the decreasing Fe-N bond strengths during the transition from LS to HS. Accompanying DFT calculations using the functional B3LYP and the basis set CEP-31G confirm these assignments.

  18. Hepatic cytochrome P450s, phase II enzymes and nuclear receptors are downregulated in a Th2 environment during Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Mimche, Sylvie M; Nyagode, Beatrice A; Merrell, Matthew D; Lee, Choon-Myung; Prasanphanich, Nina S; Cummings, Richard D; Morgan, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation and infection downregulate the activity and expression of cytochrome P450s (P450s) and other drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) involved in hepatic drug clearance. Schistosoma mansoni infection was reported to cause a downregulation of hepatic P450-dependent activities in mouse liver, but little is known about the specific enzymes affected or whether phase II DMEs are also affected. Here we describe the effect of murine schistosomiasis on the expression of hepatic P450s, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes, and nuclear receptors at 30 and 45 days postinfection (dpi). Although the hepatic expression of some of these genes was altered at 30 dpi, we observed substantial changes in the expression of the majority of P450 mRNAs and proteins measured, Cpr protein, as well as many of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and sulfotransferases at 45 dpi. S. mansoni infection also altered nuclear receptor expression, inducing mRNA levels at 30 dpi and depressing levels at 45 dpi. S. mansoni evoked a T helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response at 45 dpi, as indicated by the induction of hepatic Th2 cytokine mRNAs [interleukins 4, 5, and 13], whereas the hepatic proinflammatory response was relatively weak. Thus, chronic schistosomiasis markedly and selectively alters the expression of multiple DMEs, which may be associated with Th2 cytokine release. This would represent a novel mechanism of DME regulation in disease states. These findings have important implications for drug testing in infected mice, whereas the relevance to humans with schistosomiasis needs to be determined.

  19. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  20. Measurements of miniature ionization chamber currents in the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor demonstrate the importance of the delayed contribution to the photon field in nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Barbot, Loïc; Villard, Jean-François; Kaiba, Tanja; Gašper, Žerovnik; Snoj, Luka

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of experimental locations of a research nuclear reactor implies the determination of neutron and photon flux levels within, with the best achievable accuracy. In nuclear reactors, photon fluxes are commonly calculated by Monte Carlo simulations but rarely measured on-line. In this context, experiments were conducted with a miniature gas ionization chamber (MIC) based on miniature fission chamber mechanical parts, recently developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) irradiated in the core of the Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The aim of the study was to compare the measured MIC currents with calculated currents based on simulations with the MCNP6 code. A discrepancy of around 50% was observed between the measured and the calculated currents; in the latter taking into consideration only the prompt photon field. Further experimental measurements of MIC currents following reactor SCRAMs (reactor shutdown with rapid insertions of control rods) provide evidence that over 30% of the total measured signal is due to the delayed photon field, originating from fission and activation products, which are untreated in the calculations. In the comparison between the measured and calculated values, these findings imply an overall discrepancy of less than 20% of the total signal which is still unexplained.

  1. Tripeptidyl peptidase II plays a role in the radiation response of selected primary cell types but not based on nuclear translocation and p53 stabilization.

    PubMed

    Firat, Elke; Tsurumi, Chizuko; Gaedicke, Simone; Huai, Jisen; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2009-04-15

    The giant cytosolic protease tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPPII) was recently proposed to play a role in the DNA damage response. Shown were nuclear translocation of TPPII after gamma-irradiation, lack of radiation-induced p53 stabilization in TPPII-siRNA-treated cells, and complete tumor regression in mice after gamma-irradiation when combined with TPPII-siRNA silencing or a protease inhibitor reported to inhibit TPPII. This suggested that TPPII could be a novel target for tumor radiosensitization and prompted us to study radiation responses using TPPII-knockout mice. Neither the sensitivity to total body irradiation nor the radiosensitivity of resting lymphoid cells, which both strongly depend on p53, was altered in the absence of TPPII. Functional integrity of p53 in TPPII-knockout cells is further shown by a proper G(1) arrest and by the accumulation of p53 and its transcriptional targets, p21, Bax, and Fas, on gamma-irradiation. Furthermore, we could not confirm radiation-induced nuclear translocation of TPPII. Nevertheless, after gamma-irradiation, we found slightly increased mitotic catastrophe of TPPII-deficient primary fibroblasts and increased apoptosis of TPPII-deficient activated CD8(+) T cells. The latter was accompanied by delayed resolution of the DNA double-strand break marker gammaH2AX. This could, however, be due to increased apoptotic DNA damage rather than reduced DNA damage repair. Our data do not confirm a role for TPPII in the DNA damage response based on nuclear TPPII translocation and p53 stabilization but nevertheless do show increased radiation-induced cell death of selected nontransformed cell types in the absence of the TPPII protease.

  2. Autographa californica Nucleopolyhedrovirus Ac76: a Dimeric Type II Integral Membrane Protein That Contains an Inner Nuclear Membrane-Sorting Motif

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Denghui; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaomei; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that the Autographa californica Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac76 gene is essential for both budded virion (BV) and occlusion-derived virion (ODV) development. More importantly, deletion of ac76 affects intranuclear microvesicle formation. However, the exact role by which ac76 affects virion morphogenesis remains unknown. In this report, we characterized the expression, distribution, and topology of Ac76 to further understand the functional role of Ac76 in virion morphogenesis. Ac76 contains an α-helical transmembrane domain, and phase separation showed that it was an integral membrane protein. In AcMNPV-infected cells, Ac76 was detected as a stable dimer that was resistant to SDS and thermal denaturation, and only a trace amount of monomer was detected. A coimmunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the dimerization of Ac76 by high-affinity self-association. Western blot analyses of purified virions and their nucleocapsid and envelope fractions showed that Ac76 was associated with the envelope fractions of both BVs and ODVs. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that Ac76 was localized to the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), nuclear membrane, intranuclear microvesicles, and ODV envelope. Amino acids 15 to 48 of Ac76 were identified as an atypical inner nuclear membrane-sorting motif because it was sufficient to target fusion proteins to the ER and nuclear membrane in the absence of viral infection and to the intranuclear microvesicles and ODV envelope during infection. Topology analysis of Ac76 by selective permeabilization showed that Ac76 was a type II integral membrane protein with an N terminus exposed to the cytosol and a C terminus hidden in the ER lumen. PMID:24198428

  3. Npa3/ScGpn1 carboxy-terminal tail is dispensable for cell viability and RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting but critical for microtubule stability and function.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Serrano, Gehenna; Castanedo, Leonardo; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema R; Montalvo-Arredondo, Javier; Riego-Ruíz, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene; Calera, Mónica R; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Genetic deletion of the essential GTPase Gpn1 or replacement of the endogenous gene by partial loss of function mutants in yeast is associated with multiple cellular phenotypes, including in all cases a marked cytoplasmic retention of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Global inhibition of RNAPII-mediated transcription due to malfunction of Gpn1 precludes the identification and study of other cellular function(s) for this GTPase. In contrast to the single Gpn protein present in Archaea, eukaryotic Gpn1 possesses an extension of approximately 100 amino acids at the C-terminal end of the GTPase domain. To determine the importance of this C-terminal extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gpn1, we generated yeast strains expressing either C-terminal truncated (gpn1ΔC) or full-length ScGpn1. We found that ScGpn1ΔC was retained in the cell nucleus, an event physiologically relevant as gpn1ΔC cells contained a higher nuclear fraction of the RNAPII CTD phosphatase Rtr1. gpn1ΔC cells displayed an increased size, a delay in mitosis exit, and an increased sensitivity to the microtubule polymerization inhibitor benomyl at the cell proliferation level and two cellular events that depend on microtubule function: RNAPII nuclear targeting and vacuole integrity. These phenotypes were not caused by inhibition of RNAPII, as in gpn1ΔC cells RNAPII nuclear targeting and transcriptional activity were unaffected. These data, combined with our description here of a genetic interaction between GPN1 and BIK1, a microtubule plus-end tracking protein with a mitotic function, strongly suggest that the ScGpn1 C-terminal tail plays a critical role in microtubule dynamics and mitotic progression in an RNAPII-independent manner.

  4. Sonochemical synthesis of tri-nuclear lead(II)-azido nano rods coordination polymer with 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (tmph): Crystal structure determination and preparation of nano lead(II) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifehpour, Younes; Morsali, Ali; Mirtamizdoust, Babak; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of rod-shaped nanostructure of a new 1D lead(II) tri nuclear coordination polymer containing the Pb2-(μ-N3)2 and Pb2-(μ-N3)(NO3) motifs [Pb3(tmph)4(μ-N3)5(μ-NO3)]n (1) where "tmph" is the abbreviation of 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, using a sonochemical method is described. The new coordination polymer is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. The single crystalline material is obtained using a heat gradient applied to a solution of the reagents. Single-crystal XRD analysis indicates three different lead(II) centers in the structure with coordination numbers of seven and eight with a holo and hemidirected coordination geometry. They also show that the chains interact with each other through π-π stacking interactions creating a 3D framework. PbO nanoparticles are obtained by thermolysis of 1 at 180 °C with oleic acid as a surfactant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirm formation of PbO particles around 10-20 nm.

  5. Gamma irradiation-induced modifications of polymers found in nuclear waste embedding processes Part II: The ion-exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debré, O.; Nsouli, B.; Thomas, J.-P.; Stevenson, I.; Colombini, D.; Romero, M.-A.

    1997-08-01

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) saturated in cesium and borate ions are well representative of low and medium activity nuclear waste to be embedded in an epoxy resin/amine hardener, such a conditioning procedure being under qualification. In order to test these materials in realistic conditions they are externally irradiated (air and water), in mixed beds saturated in fixed ions (cesium and borate) and water. Irradiation effects are evidenced with the HSF-SIMS technique by the variation of the emission characteristic of both the fixed ions, the chemical structure of the IERs and their interrelationship, both from the analysis of the solid material and of the residual or rinsing water. It appears that the fixed ions can be released in surrounding water as a consequence of radiation-induced resin fragments solubility.

  6. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a turbine trip from 100% power in the Vandellos II nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C. ); Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R. )

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 cycle 36.04 against a turbine trip from 100% power in the Vandellos II NPP (Spain) is presented. The work is inscribed in the framework of the Spanish contribution to ICAP Project. The model used in the simulation consists of a single loop, a steam generator and a steam line up to the steam header all of them enlarged on a scale of 3:1; and full-scaled reactor vessel and pressurizer. The results of calculations have been in reasonable agreement with plant measurements. An additional study has been performed to check the ability of a model in which all the plant components are full-scaled to reproduce the transient. A second study has been performed using the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model in the pressurizer, trying to elucidate the influence of the velocity slip in the primary depressurization rate.

  7. Primary and secondary relaxation process in plastically crystalline cyanocyclohexane studied by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance. II. Quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micko, B.; Kruk, D.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze the results of our previously reported 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in the plastically crystalline (PC) phase of cyanocyclohexane (Part I of this work) to study the fast secondary relaxation (or β-process) in detail. Both, the occurrence of an additional minimum in the spin-lattice relaxation T1 and the pronounced effects arising in the solid-echo spectrum above the glass transition temperature Tg = 134 K, allow for a direct determination of the restricting geometry of the β-process in terms of the "wobbling-in-a-cone" model. Whereas at temperatures below Tg the reorientation is confined to rather small solid angles (below 10°), the spatial restriction decreases strongly with temperature above Tg, i.e., the distribution of cone angles shifts continuously towards higher values. The β-process in the PC phase of cyanocyclohexane proceeds via the same mechanism as found in structural glass formers. This is substantiated by demonstrating the very similar behavior (for T < Tg) of spin-lattice relaxation, stimulated echo decays, and spectral parameters when plotted as a function of ⟨log τβ⟩ (taken from dielectric spectroscopy). We do, however, not observe a clear-cut relation between the relaxation strength of the β-process observed by NMR (calculated within the wobbling-in-a-cone model) and dielectric spectroscopy.

  8. Nuclear spin dependence of the reaction of H{sub 3}{sup +} with H{sub 2}. II. Experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Kyle N.; Kauffman, Carrie A.; Tom, Brian A.; Becka, Eftalda; McGuire, Brett A.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-05-21

    The nuclear spin dependence of the chemical reaction H{sub 3}{sup +}+ H{sub 2}{yields} H{sub 2} +H{sub 3}{sup +} has been studied in a hollow cathode plasma cell. Multipass infrared direct absorption spectroscopy has been employed to monitor the populations of several low-energy rotational levels of ortho- and para-H{sub 3}{sup +} (o-H{sub 3}{sup +} and p-H{sub 3}{sup +}) in hydrogenic plasmas of varying para-H{sub 2} (p-H{sub 2}) enrichment. The ratio of the rates of the proton hop (k{sup H}) and hydrogen exchange (k{sup E}) reactions {alpha}{identical_to}k{sup H}/k{sup E} is inferred from the observed p-H{sub 3}{sup +} fraction as a function of p-H{sub 2} fraction using steady-state chemical models. Measurements have been performed both in uncooled (T{sub kin}{approx} 350 K) and in liquid-nitrogen-cooled (T{sub kin}{approx} 135 K) plasmas, marking the first time this reaction has been studied at low temperature. The value of {alpha} has been found to decrease from 1.6 {+-} 0.1 at 350 K to 0.5 {+-} 0.1 at 135 K.

  9. "Double elevator palsy" eye supraducts during stage II general anesthesia supporting hypothesis of (supra)nuclear etiology.

    PubMed

    Mims, James L

    2005-01-01

    Double Elevator Palsy (DEP) was originally given its name because the assumption was, that because the affected eye could not elevate in adduction or in abduction, there must be a paresis of both the Superior Rectus (SR) and the Inferior Oblique (IO). Later, it was thought that DEP was due to a paresis of the ipsilateral SR, since the SR is the main elevator of the eye in both adduction and abduction. Gradually, a group of observations accumulated that indicated that the SR was not paretic at all in DEP, leading to the concept that DEP is due to a unilateral deficit in a nucleus that functions to elevate one eye only, a unilateral center for upgaze. The purpose of this paper is to report a clinical case with findings that further support this last hypothesis. A 15 month old girl presenting with classical signs of DEP of the left eye received a 6 mm recession of the left Inferior Rectus (IR). This was insufficient to eliminate a large chin elevation and a 9 prism diopter left hypotropia in the primary position. At the beginning of the second surgery, at which a vertical transposition of the horizontal muscles of the left eye after the technique of Knapp was planned, it was noticed during anesthesia induction that, as the child passed through stage II of the general anesthesia, both eyes briefly elevated, the DEP affected left eye (post 6 mm IR recession) more than the right. A photograph was taken to record this phenomenon. As of this report, there are now at least 4 distinct circumstances under which distinct elevation of eyes diagnosed with DEP have been observed. These 4 include Bell's phenomenon, Dissociated Vertical Deviation of the affected DEP eye, normal upgaze saccades recorded moving from the downgaze position into the primary position, and now elevation during Stage II of a general anesthetic induction. Further, there is no abnormal head posture (head tilt) in patients with DEP, no Bielschowsky phenomenon. All of these pieces of clinical evidence confirm

  10. An analysis of thermionic space nuclear reactor power system: II. Merits of using safety drums for backup control

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Huimin Xue )

    1993-01-10

    An analysis is performed to investigate the merits of using the TOPAZ-II safety drums for a backup control to prevent a reactivity excursion, stabilize the reactor, and achieve steady-state power operation, following a severe hypothetical reactivity initiated accident (RIA). Such an RIA is assumed to occur during the system start-up in orbit due to a malfunction of the drive mechanism of the control drums, causing the nine drums to accidentally rotate the full 180[degree] outward. Results show that an immediate, inward rotation of the three safety drums to an angle of 80[degree] will shutdown the reactor, however, a delay time of 10 s will not only prevents a reactivity excursion, but also enables operating the reactor at a steady-state thermal power of about 33.3 kW (0.9 kW per TFE). Conversely, when the immediate rotation of the safety drums is to a larger angle of 100[degree], a steady-state operation at about 37 kW can be achieved, but a delay of 10 s causes a reactivity excursion and overheating of the TFEs. It is therefor concluded that, should the drive mechanism be modified to enable rotating the safety drums for TOPAZ-II reactor at variable speeds of and below 22.5[degree]/s, the three safety drums could be used successfully for a backup control, following an RIA. However, since the reactivity worth of the three safety drums is only $2.0, the maximum steady-state electric power achievable for the system is limited to approximately 0.25 kW, at which the fission power is about 37 kW and the emitter temperature is approximaely 1500 K. To alleviate such a limitation and enable operation at nominal design conditions (fission power of about 107 kW or a system's total electric power of 5.6 kW), the reactivity worth of the safety drums would have to be increased by at least $0.24.

  11. Galaxy gas as obscurer - II. Separating the galaxy-scale and nuclear obscurers of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes; Bauer, Franz E.

    2017-03-01

    The 'torus' obscurer of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is poorly understood in terms of its density, sub-structure and physical mechanisms. Large X-ray surveys provide model boundary constraints, for both Compton-thin and Compton-thick levels of obscuration, as obscured fractions are mean covering factors fcov. However, a major remaining uncertainty is host-galaxy obscuration. In Paper I, we discovered a relation of {NH} ∝ M_{star }^{1/3} for the obscuration of galaxy-scale gas. Here, we apply this observational relation to the AGN population, and find that galaxy-scale gas is responsible for a luminosity-independent fraction of Compton-thin AGN, but does not produce Compton-thick columns. With the host-galaxy obscuration understood, we present a model of the remaining nuclear obscurer, which is consistent with a range of observations. Our radiation-lifted torus model consists of a Compton-thick component (fcov ∼ 35 per cent) and a Compton-thin component (fcov ∼ 40 per cent), which depends on both black hole mass and luminosity. This provides a useful summary of observational constraints for torus modellers who attempt to reproduce this behaviour. It can also be employed as a sub-grid recipe in cosmological simulations that do not resolve the torus. We also investigate host-galaxy X-ray obscuration inside cosmological, hydrodynamic simulations (Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment; Illustris). The obscuration from ray-traced galaxy gas can agree with observations, but is highly sensitive to the chosen feedback assumptions.

  12. Enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels by co-sintering with BeO: II. Fuel performance and neutronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Kevin; Mays, Claude

    2008-04-01

    The fuel rod performance and neutronics of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide (ECO) nuclear fuel with BeO have been compared to those of standard UO 2 fuel. The standards of comparison were that the ECO fuel should have the same infinite neutron-multiplication factor kinf at end of life and provide the same energy extraction per fuel assembly over its lifetime. The BeO displaces some uranium, so equivalence with standard UO 2 fuel was obtained by increasing the burnup and slightly increasing the enrichment. The COPERNIC fuel rod performance code was adapted to account for the effect of BeO on thermal properties. The materials considered were standard UO 2, UO 2 with 4.0 vol.% BeO, and UO 2 with 9.6 vol.% BeO. The smaller amount of BeO was assumed to provide increases in thermal conductivity of 0, 5, or 10%, whereas the larger amount was assumed to provide an increase of 50%. A significant improvement in performance was seen, as evidenced by reduced temperatures, internal rod pressures, and fission gas release, even with modest (5-10%) increases in thermal conductivity. The benefits increased monotonically with increasing thermal conductivity. Improvements in LOCA initialization performance were also seen. A neutronic calculation considered a transition from standard UO 2 fuel to ECO fuel. The calculation indicated that only a small increase in enrichment is required to maintain the kinf at end of life. The smallness of the change was attributed to the neutron-multiplication reaction of Be with fast neutrons and the moderating effect of BeO. Adoption of ECO fuel was predicted to provide a net reduction in uranium cost. Requirements for industrial hygiene were found to be comparable to those for processing of UO 2.

  13. Low energy electron and nuclear recoil thresholds in the DRIFT-II negative ion TPC for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, S.; Daw, E.; Forbes, J.; Ghag, C.; Gold, M.; Hagemann, C.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Lawson, T. B.; Loomba, D.; Majewski, P.; Muna, D.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Paling, S. M.; Petkov, A.; Plank, S. J. S.; Robinson, M.; Sanghi, N.; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Turk, J.; Tziaferi, E.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the ability to measure and discriminate particle events at the lowest possible energy is an essential requirement in developing new experiments to search for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. In this paper we detail an assessment of the potential sensitivity below 10 keV in the 1 m3 DRIFT-II directionally sensitive, low pressure, negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC), based on event-by-event track reconstruction and calorimetry in the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) readout. By application of a digital smoothing polynomial it is shown that the detector is sensitive to sulfur and carbon recoils down to 2.9 and 1.9 keV respectively, and 1.2 keV for electron induced events. The energy sensitivity is demonstrated through the 5.9 keV gamma spectrum of 55Fe, where the energy resolution is sufficient to identify the escape peak. The effect of a lower energy sensitivity on the WIMP exclusion limit is demonstrated. In addition to recoil direction reconstruction for WIMP searches this sensitivity suggests new prospects for applications also in KK axion searches.

  14. Control of nuclear centration in the C. elegans zygote by receptor-independent Gα signaling and myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Morgan B.; Canman, Julie C.; Senning, Eric N.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Bowerman, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Mitotic spindle positioning in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote involves microtubule-dependent pulling forces applied to centrosomes. In this study, we investigate the role of actomyosin in centration, the movement of the nucleus–centrosome complex (NCC) to the cell center. We find that the rate of wild-type centration depends equally on the nonmuscle myosin II NMY-2 and the Gα proteins GOA-1/GPA-16. In centration- defective let-99(−) mutant zygotes, GOA-1/GPA-16 and NMY-2 act abnormally to oppose centration. This suggests that LET-99 determines the direction of a force on the NCC that is promoted by Gα signaling and actomyosin. During wild-type centration, NMY-2–GFP aggregates anterior to the NCC tend to move further anterior, suggesting that actomyosin contraction could pull the NCC. In GOA-1/GPA-16–depleted zygotes, NMY-2 aggregate displacement is reduced and largely randomized, whereas in a let-99(−) mutant, NMY-2 aggregates tend to make large posterior displacements. These results suggest that Gα signaling and LET-99 control centration by regulating polarized actomyosin contraction. PMID:17893243

  15. Nuclear membrane: nuclear envelope PORosity in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Sazer, Shelley

    2010-11-09

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes closed mitosis but 'virtual nuclear envelope breakdown' at anaphase of meiosis II, in which the nuclear envelope is structurally closed but functionally open.

  16. Identification of polyproline II regions derived from the proline-rich nuclear receptor coactivators PNRC and PNRC2: new insights for ERα coactivator interactions.

    PubMed

    Byrne, C; Miclet, E; Broutin, I; Gallo, D; Pelekanou, V; Kampa, M; Castanas, E; Leclercq, G; Jacquot, Y

    2013-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions are crucial for signal transductions required for cell differentiation and proliferation. Their modulation is therefore key to the development of therapeutic alternatives, particularly in the context of cancer. According to literature data, the polyproline-rich nuclear receptor coactivators PNRC and PNRC2 interact with estrogen receptor (ERα) through their PxxP SH3-binding motifs. In a search to identify the molecular features governing this interaction, we explored using electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations, the capacity of a range of putative biologically active peptides derived from these proteins and containing this PxxP motif(s) to form polyproline II (PPII) domains. An additional more exhaustive structural study on a lead PPII peptide was also performed using 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With the exception of one of all the investigated peptides (PNRC-D), binding assays failed to detect any affinity for Grb2 SH3 domains, suggesting that PPII motifs issued from Grb2 antagonists have a binding mode distinct from those derived from Grb2 agonists. Instead, the peptides revealed a competitive binding ability against a synthetic peptide (ERα17p) with a putative PPII-cognate domain located within a coregulator recruitment region of ERα (AF-2 site). Our work, which constitutes the first structure-related interaction study concerning PNRC and PNRC2, supports not only the existence of PxxP-induced PPII sequences in these coregulators, but also confirms the presence of a PPII recognition site in the AF-2 of the steroid receptor ERα, a region important for transcription regulation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Leishmania panamensis: comparative inhibition of nuclear DNA topoisomerase II enzymes from promastigotes and human macrophages reveals anti-parasite selectivity of fluoroquinolones, flavonoids and pentamidine.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, Tania M; Coombs, Graham H; Walker, John

    2007-08-01

    Certain model inhibitors exerted selective action against the catalytic activity of nuclear DNA topoisomerase II (TOPII) of Leishmania panamensis promastigotes. The second-generation fluoroquinolones enoxacin and ciprofloxacin exhibited extraordinarily high anti-parasite selectivity displaying 582- and 40-fold greater potencies against L. panamensis TOPII as compared with the human macrophage enzyme. The flavonoids quercetin and ellagic acid showed inverse specificities, the former being 161-fold more potent against L. panamensis TOPII, and the latter 15.7-fold more active against macrophage TOPII. The protoberberine coralyne was a potent inhibitor of both Leishmania and macrophage TOPII. Bis-benzimidazoles and the diamidine diminazene aceturate exhibited uniformly high potencies against parasite and host TOPII, but a second diamidine pentamidine showed 17.6-fold greater specificity for Leishmania TOPII. The antimonial sodium stibogluconate was an ineffective inhibitor of parasite TOPII showing 4.3-fold greater potency against the macrophage enzyme. These findings suggest that the leishmanicidal activities of certain fluoroquinolones and pentamidine may be mediated partly through TOPII inhibition.

  18. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression by Disrupting Enhanceosome Assembly through Binding with the Regulatory Factor X Complex

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Suhani; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Gupta, Namrata; Challa, Shanthan; Cai, Qiliang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in adaptive antiviral immunity by presenting viral peptides to CD4+ T cells. Due to their key role in adaptive immunity, many viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have evolved multiple strategies to inhibit the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. The expression of MHC-II, which is controlled mainly at the level of transcription, is strictly dependent upon the binding of the class II transactivator (CIITA) to the highly conserved promoters of all MHC-II genes. The recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters requires its direct interactions with a preassembled MHC-II enhanceosome consisting of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) complex and regulatory factor X (RFX) complex proteins. Here, we show that KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II enhanceosome by binding to the components of the RFX complex. Our data show that LANA is capable of binding to all three components of the RFX complex, RFX-associated protein (RFXAP), RFX5, and RFX-associated ankyrin-containing protein (RFXANK), in vivo but binds more strongly with the RFXAP component in in vitro binding assays. Levels of MHC-II proteins were significantly reduced in KSHV-infected as well as LANA-expressing B cells. Additionally, the expression of LANA in a luciferase promoter reporter assay showed reduced HLA-DRA promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LANA binds to the MHC-II promoter along with RFX proteins and that the overexpression of LANA disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II promoter. These assays led to the conclusion that the interaction of LANA with RFX proteins interferes with the recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters, resulting in an inhibition of MHC-II gene expression. Thus, the data presented here identify

  19. Alternative energy source II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 6 - Nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume examines conventional nuclear energy, breeder reactors, and thermonuclear energy. The particular papers presented consider current developments in nuclear breeder technology, fusion-driven fissile fuel breeder systems, and the fusion fission hybrid reactor. The implications of nuclear energy utilization in the Phillipines and the internationally safeguarded atomic fuel exchanger center for the Asian-Pacific basin are also discussed.

  20. Oligomerization and conformation change in solutions of calf lens gamma II-crystallin. Results from 1/T1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, S H; Beaulieu, C F; Brown, R D; Spiller, M

    1990-01-01

    From analyses of the magnetic field dependence of 1/T1 (nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion [NMRD] profiles) of water protons in solutions of highly purified calf lens gamma II-crystallin, we find that monomers form oligomers at relatively low concentrations, which increase in size with increasing concentration and decreasing temperature. At approximately 16% by volume and -4 degrees C, the mean oligomeric molecular weight is approximately 120-fold greater than the monomeric value of 20 kD. Below this concentration, there is no indication of any substantive change in conformation of the monomeric subunits. At higher concentrations, the tertiary structure of the monomer appears to reconfigure rather abruptly, but reversibly, as evidenced by the appearance of spectra-like 14N peaks in the NMRD profiles. The magnitudes of these peaks, known to arise from cross-relaxation of water protons through access to amide (NH) moieties of the protein backbone, indicate that the high concentration conformation is not compact, but open and extended in a manner that allows enhanced interaction with solvent. The data are analogous to those found for homogenates of calf and chicken lens (Beaulieu, C. F., J. I. Clark, R. D. Brown III, M. Spiller, and S. H. Koenig. 1988. Magn. Reson. Med. 8:47-57; Beaulieu, C. F., R. D. Brown III, J. I. Clark, M. Spiller, and S. H. Koenig. 1989. Magn. Reson. Med. 10:62-72). This unusually large dependence of oligomeric size and conformation on concentration in the physiological range is suggested as the mechanism by which osmotic equilibrium is maintained, at minimal metabolic expense, in the presence of large gradients of protein concentration in the lens in vivo (cf Vérétout and Tardieu, 1989. Eur. Biophys. J. 17:61-68). Finally, the results of the NMRD data provide a ready explanation of the low temperature phase transition, and "cold-cataract" separation of phases, observed in gamma II-crystallin solutions; we suggest that the phases that

  1. Ligand design for alkali-metal-templated self-assembly of unique high-nuclearity CuII aggregates with diverse coordination cage units: crystal structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Du, Miao; Bu, Xian-He; Guo, Ya-Mei; Ribas, Joan

    2004-03-19

    The construction of two unique, high-nuclearity Cu(II) supramolecular aggregates with tetrahedral or octahedral cage units, [(mu(3)-Cl)[Li subset Cu(4)(mu-L(1))(3)](3)](ClO(4))(8)(H(2)O)(4.5) (1) and [[Na(2) subset Cu(12)(mu-L(2))(8)(mu-Cl)(4)](ClO(4))(8)(H(2)O)(10)(H(3)O(+))(2)](infinity) (2) by alkali-metal-templated (Li(+) or Na(+)) self-assembly, was achieved by the use of two newly designed carboxylic-functionalized diazamesocyclic ligands, N,N'-bis(3-propionyloxy)-1,4-diazacycloheptane (H(2)L(1)) or 1,5-diazacyclooctane-N,N'-diacetate acid (H(2)L(2)). Complex 1 crystallizes in the trigonal R3c space group (a = b = 20.866(3), c = 126.26(4) A and Z = 12), and 2 in the triclinic P1 space group (a = 13.632(4), b = 14.754(4), c = 19.517(6) A, alpha = 99.836(6), beta = 95.793(5), gamma = 116.124(5) degrees and Z = 1). By subtle variation of the ligand structures and the alkali-metal templates, different polymeric motifs were obtained: a dodecanuclear architecture 1 consisting of three Cu(4) tetrahedral cage units with a Li(+) template, and a supramolecular chain 2 consisting of two crystallographically nonequivalent octahedral Cu(6) polyhedra with a Na(+) template. The effects of ligand functionality and alkali metal template ions on the self-assembly processes of both coordination supramolecular aggregates, and their magnetic behaviors are discussed in detail.

  2. Studies on the sorption and desorption characteristics of Zn(II) on the surface soils of nuclear power plant sites in India using a radiotracer technique.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Sudhir; Shanwal, A V; Hegde, A G

    2005-09-01

    Zinc adsorption was studied in the soils of three nuclear power plant sites of India. 65Zn was used as a radiotracer to study the sorption characteristics of Zn(II). The sorption of zinc was determined at 25 and 45 degrees C at pH 7.8+/-0.2 in the solution of 0.01 M Ca(NO3)2 as supporting electrolyte. The sorption data was tested both in Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms and could be described satisfactorily. The effect of organic matter and other physico-chemical properties on the uptake of zinc was also studied in all the soil samples. The results showed that the cation exchange capacity, organic matter, pH and clay content were the main contributors to zinc sorption in these soils. The adsorption maximum was found to be higher in the soil on Kakarpara Atomic Power Plant sites soils having high organic matter and clay content. The zinc supply parameters of the soils are also discussed. In the desorption studies, the sequential extraction of the adsorbed zinc from soils showed that the diethylene triamine penta acetic acid extracted maximum amount of adsorbed zinc than CaCl2 and Mg(NO3)2. The zinc sorption on the soil and amount of zinc retention after extractants desorption shows a positively correlation with vermiculite and smectite mineral content present in the clay fraction of the soil. The amount desorbed by strong base (NaOH) and demineralised water was almost negligible from soils of all the sites, whereas the desorption by strong acid (HNO3) was 75-96% of the adsorbed zinc.

  3. The C-terminal domain-phosphorylated IIO form of RNA polymerase II is associated with the transcription repressor NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) and is required for transcription activation in human nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Gross, P; Wang, Z; Roeder, R G; Oelgeschläger, T

    2000-06-20

    Activation of class II gene transcription may involve alleviation of transcription repression as well as stimulation of the assembly and function of the general RNA polymerase (RNAP) II transcription machinery. Here, we investigated whether activator-reversible transcription repression by NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) contributes to maximum induction levels in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. Surprisingly, we found that depletion of NC2 does not significantly affect basal transcription, but dramatically reduces activated transcription. Immunoblot analyses revealed that the loss of activator function coincides with selective removal of the C-terminal domain (CTD)-hyperphosphorylated RNAP IIO along with NC2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with purified factors confirmed that NC2 interacts with RNAP IIO, but not with the unphosphorylated or hypophosphorylated RNAP IIA or CTD-less RNAP IIB forms. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to previously published observations in cell-free systems reconstituted with purified factors, only the CTD-phosphorylated form of RNAP II can mediate activator function in the context of unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. These findings reveal an unexpected link between NC2 and transcription activation and suggest that regulation of RNAP II transcription through reversible CTD phosphorylation might be more complex than previously proposed.

  4. Deployment of a three-dimensional array of Micro-Pocket Fission Detector triads (MPFD3) for real-time, in-core neutron flux measurements in the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark-II Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmes, Martin Francis

    A Micro-Pocket Fission Detector (MPFD) is a miniaturized type of fission chamber developed for use inside a nuclear reactor. Their unique design allows them to be located between or even inside fuel pins while being built from materials which give them an operational lifetime comparable to or exceeding the life of the fuel. While other types of neutron detectors have been made for use inside a nuclear reactor, the MPFD is the first neutron detector which can survive sustained use inside a nuclear reactor while providing a real-time measurement of the neutron flux. This dissertation covers the deployment of MPFDs as a large three-dimensional array inside the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark-II Nuclear Reactor for real-time neutron flux measurements. This entails advancements in the design, construction, and packaging of the Micro-Pocket Fission Detector Triads with incorporated Thermocouple, or MPFD3-T. Specialized electronics and software also had to be designed and built in order to make a functional system capable of collecting real-time data from up to 60 MPFD3-Ts, or 180 individual MPFDs and 60 thermocouples. Design of the electronics required the development of detailed simulations and analysis for determining the theoretical response of the detectors and determination of their size. The results of this research shows that MPFDs can operate for extended times inside a nuclear reactor and can be utilized toward the use as distributed neutron detector arrays for advanced reactor control systems and power mapping. These functions are critical for continued gains in efficiency of nuclear power reactors while also improving safety through relatively inexpensive redundancy.

  5. A study of separation and solidification of group II nuclides in waste salt delivered from the pyrochemical process of used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, H. C.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, N. Y.; Lee, T. K.; Han, S. Y.; Jang, S. A.; Kim, T. J.; Park, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.

    2017-08-01

    If group II nuclides, which contain high heat-generative elements, in waste salt are fabricated into a waste form rich in group II nuclides, the waste form can be used in radionuclide thermoelectric generator applications. For this reason, the separation of group II nuclides in salt (LiCl, LiCl-KCl) was conducted, after which a waste form rich in them was fabricated. In this study, group II nuclide chlorides in salt were effectively separated into a carbonate or oxychloride form, and the separated nuclides were successfully fabricated into a homogenous and stable glass waste form with high contents (45-50 wt%) of these nuclides.

  6. Protein kinase C epsilon-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation involved in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with angiotensin II stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Wei; Geng, Jing; Wang, Liqi; Su, Guohai; Zhang, Yun; Ge, Zhiming; Kang, Weiqiang

    2010-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a critical role in hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes; however, the molecular mechanism, especially the signaling cascades, in cardiomyocytes remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of Ang II in hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. Ang II rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCepsilon) in a time- and dose-dependent manner via Ang II receptor-1 (AT(1)). Furthermore, Ang II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) phosphorylation and translocation was mediated through a signal pathway that involves AT(1) and PKCepsilon, which resulted in transcriptional activation of myocyte enhancer factor-2C (MEF2C) and hypertrophy. Consequently, inhibiting PKCepsilon or ERK5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly attenuated Ang II-induced MEF2C activation and hypertrophy of rat cardiomyocytes. These data provide evidence that PKCepsilon-dependent ERK5 phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic traffic mediates Ang II-induced MEF2C activation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PKCepsilon and ERK5 may be potential targets in the treatment of pathological vascular hypertrophy associated with the enhanced renin-angiotensin system. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. The LLNL Heavy Element Facility -- Facility Management, Authorization Basis, and Readiness Assessment Lessons Learned in the Heavy Element Facility (B251) Transition from Category II Nuclear Facility to Radiological Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Brown, E; Gray, L

    2006-04-10

    This paper presents Facility Management, Readiness Assessment, and Authorization Basis experience gained and lessons learned during the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program (RRP). The RRP was tasked with removing contaminated glove boxes, radioactive inventory, and contaminated ventilation systems from the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The RRP was successful in its goal in April 2005 with the successful downgrade of B251 from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. The expertise gained and the lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the RRP included development of unique approaches in work planning/work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected'') and facility management. These approaches minimized worker dose and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. These lessons learned can help similar operational and management activities at other sites, including facilities restarting operations or new facility startup. B251 was constructed at LLNL to provide research areas for conducting experiments in radiochemistry using transuranic elements. Activities at B251 once included the preparation of tracer sets associated with the underground testing of nuclear devices and basic research devoted to a better understanding of the chemical and nuclear behavior of the transuranic elements. Due to the age of the facility, even with preventative maintenance, facility safety and experimental systems were deteriorating. A variety of seismic standards were used in the facility design and construction, which encompassed eight building increments constructed over a period of 26 years. The cost to bring the facility into compliance with the current seismic and other requirements was prohibitive, and simply maintaining B251 as a Category II nuclear facility posed serious cost considerations under a changing regulatory environment. Considering the high

  8. Fn14 is regulated via the RhoA pathway and mediates nuclear factor-kappaB activation by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengwei; Shen, Zhida; Du, Lailing; He, Jialin; Chen, Shengyu; Zhang, Jiefang; Luan, Yi; Fu, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Angiotesin II (Ang II) plays an important role in cardiac remodeling. Fibroblast growth factor inducible-14 (Fn14) is the smallest member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily of receptors. Currently, little is known about the functional role of Fn14 in the heart. Chiefly, we observe the up-regulation of extracellular matrix in in vivo model. We therefore assess the expression and regulation of Fn14 in cardiomyocytes and in vivo models induced by Ang II. In order to study the regulation of Fn14, cardiac remodeling was established in rats and neonatal cardiomyocytes were used in in vitro model. As well, Ang II is able to strongly induce Fn14 expression in in vivo and in vitro models. Fn14 is mediated via RhoA pathways, since siRNA against RhoA prevented the expression of Fn14 in cardiomyocytes. Pretreatment of cardiomyoctes with siRNA against NF-κB and IκBα also decreased Fn14 expression induced by Ang II. We here describe for the first time Ang II regulation of Fn14 in in vivo and in vitro models via RhoA, NF-κB and NF-κB driven gene signaling pathway. In conclusion, Fn14 may be important in regulating the process of cardiac remodeling induced by Ang II. PMID:28078010

  9. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

  10. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  11. HFNET-A Computer Program to Calculate Nuclear Effects on HF/VHF Communications Systems. Volume II. User’s Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-30

    Identify by block number) HFNET Code User’s Guide HF Communications Systems Nuclear Effects Computer Simulation 20, AiPr*t"rIAC r ntae ,eo .e std newaswy a...fds dify. by block minu b r) The HFNET computer code is a simulation for estimating the performance of HF communications systems in a nuclear weapon...and/or 22Dist Special 2.9 $PLCALC KEYWORD 28 2.10 $ DEBUG KEYWORD 30 2.11 $RUN KEYWORD 33 3 HFNET OUTPUT 35 3.1 GENERAL 35 3.2 SIMULATION START OUTPUT

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarisation via the integrated solid effect II: experiments on naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, T. R.; van den Brandt, B.; Hautle, P.; Henstra, A.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2014-07-01

    In dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP), also called hyperpolarisation, a small amount of unpaired electron spins is added to the sample containing the nuclear spins, and the polarisation of these unpaired electron spins is transferred to the nuclear spins by means of a microwave field. Traditional DNP polarises the electron spin of stable paramagnetic centres by cooling down to low temperature and applying a strong magnetic field. Then weak continuous wave microwave fields are used to induce the polarisation transfer. Complicated cryogenic equipment and strong magnets can be avoided using short-lived photo-excited triplet states that are strongly aligned in the optical excitation process. However, a much faster transfer of the electron spin polarisation is needed and pulsed DNP methods like nuclear orientation via electron spin locking (NOVEL) and the integrated solid effect (ISE) are used. To describe the polarisation transfer with the strong microwave fields in NOVEL and ISE, the usual perturbation methods cannot be used anymore. In the previous paper, we presented a theoretical approach to calculate the polarisation transfer in ISE. In the present paper, the theory is applied to the system naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14 yielding the photo-excited triplet states and compared with experimental results.

  13. Transcriptional up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase II by nuclear factor-kappaB at rostral ventrolateral medulla in a rat mevinphos intoxication model of brain stem death.

    PubMed

    Chan, Julie Y H; Wu, Carol H Y; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Cheng, Hsiao-Lei; Dai, Kuang-Yu; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2007-06-15

    As the origin of a 'life-and-death' signal that reflects central cardiovascular regulatory failure during brain stem death, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is a suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this vital phenomenon. Using a clinically relevant animal model that employed the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (Mev) as the experimental insult, we evaluated the hypothesis that transcriptional up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase I or II (NOS I or II) gene expression by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) on activation of muscarinic receptors in the RVLM underlies brain stem death. In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anaesthesia, co-microinjection of muscarinic M2R (methoctramine) or M4R (tropicamide), but not M1R (pirenzepine) or M3R (4-diphenylacetoxy-N-dimethylpiperidinium) antagonist significantly reduced the enhanced NOS I-protein kinase G signalling ('pro-life' phase) or augmented NOS II-peroxynitrite cascade ('pro-death' phase) in ventrolateral medulla, blunted the biphasic increase and decrease in baroreceptor reflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone that reflect the transition from life to death, and diminished the elevated DNA binding activity or nucleus-bound translocation of NF-kappaB in RVLM neurons induced by microinjection of Mev into the bilateral RVLM. However, NF-kappaB inhibitors (diethyldithiocarbamate or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate) or double-stranded kappaB decoy DNA preferentially antagonized the augmented NOS II-peroxynitrite cascade and the associated cardiovascular depression exhibited during the 'pro-death' phase. We conclude that transcriptional up-regulation of NOS II gene expression by activation of NF-kappaB on selective stimulation of muscarinic M2 or M4 subtype receptors in the RVLM underlies the elicited cardiovascular depression during the 'pro-death' phase in our Mev intoxication model of brain stem death.

  14. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  15. [1H]Spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance in plant tissue. I. The effect of Mn(II) and water content in wheat leaves.

    PubMed Central

    van As, H; van Vliet, W P; Schaafsma, T J

    1980-01-01

    The effect of age-dependent Mn(II)-gradients, as observed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), on the [1H]NMR spin-spin relaxation time (T2) was studied in wheat leaves. A non-exponential T2 spin-echo decay was always observed, revealing the presence of at least two different fractions of non- (or slowly) exchanging water in the leaves. No effect of the Mn(II)-concentration on T2 of the separate water fractions (covering approximately 90% of the total water content) has been found. From these observations we conclude that Mn(II) is present in bound form. The dependence of T2 on water content can be explained with a two-state model, demonstrating the occurrence of fast exchange within each of the two slowly exchanging water fractions. PMID:6266537

  16. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic studies on mono-, di-, and tri-nuclear Cu(ii) complexes of a new versatile diazine ligand.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muhammad U; Rawson, Jeremy M; Gavey, Emma L; Pilkington, Melanie; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Thompson, Laurence K

    2017-02-14

    The synthesis and coordination chemistry of a new open-chain diazine ligand (L4H2) containing bipyridine, oxime and hydrazone functionalities is reported. Reaction of L4H2 with CuCl2·2H2O affords the mononuclear complex [Cu(L4H2)Cl2] (1) in which the ligand acts as a neutral tridentate N,N',N'' donor, whereas treatment with a large excess of CuCl2·2H2O affords the dinuclear complex [Cu2(L4H)Cl3(CH3OH)(H2O)] (2) in which the ligand is singly-deprotonated at the diazine, offering N,N',N'' and N,N' donor sets to two Cu(ii) ions. Reaction with Cu(NO3)2·3H2O yields the trinuclear complex, [Cu3(L4H)2(CH3OH)4(NO3)4] (3) in which the ligand is again singly deprotonated, but now presents a tetradentate N,N',N'',N'''-donor set to the first Cu(ii) and behaves as an N,O-chelate to a second Cu(ii), with a conformational change from cis to trans at the diazine moiety. When the latter reaction is repeated in the presence of a mild base, a second trinuclear complex is isolated, [Cu3(L4)2(CH3CH2OH)](NO3)2 (4) in which both the diazine and oxime functionalities of the ligand are deprotonated which subsequently bridges all three Cu(ii) ions, acting as an N,N',N'' donor to the first Cu(ii), a N,N' donor to a second Cu(ii) (similar to 2) and as a terminal O-donor to a third Cu(ii) ion. The Cu(ii) ions are linked mutually cis via the two-atom diazine bridge in the case of 2 and 4 and trans in the case of 3. Magnetic studies reveal the presence of weak ferromagnetic interactions in 2 (g = 2.2, J/k = +12.8 K) and strong antiferromagnetic interactions in both 3 and 4 (g = 2.093 J/k = -140 K and g = 2.24 J/k = -300 K respectively).

  17. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  18. Nuclear ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  19. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  20. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

  1. Acetate/di-2-pyridyl ketone oximate "blend" as a source of high-nuclearity nickel(II) clusters: dependence of the nuclearity on the nature of the inorganic anion present.

    PubMed

    Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Diamantopoulou, Eleanna; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Escuer, Albert; Perlepes, Spyros P

    2007-04-02

    The use of di-2-pyridyl ketone oxime [(py)2CNOH] in reactions with Ni(O2CMe)2.4H2O, in the presence or absence of extra inorganic anions (N3- and SCN-) has led to Ni4, Ni5, and Ni7 clusters; the magnetic study of the heptanuclear nickel(II) complex reveals an S = 3 ground state.

  2. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-04

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  3. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-01

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  4. Estimation of conventional C-Hπ (arene), unconventional C-Hπ (chelate) and C-Hπ (thiocyanate) interactions in hetero-nuclear nickel(ii)-cadmium(ii) complexes with a compartmental Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Drew, Michael G B; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik

    2017-04-07

    Three new heteronuclear nickel(ii)/cadmium(ii) complexes, [(SCN)(Cl)Cd(L)Ni(DMF)2] (1), [(SCN)(CH3CO2)Cd(L)Ni(CH3OH)2] (2) and [(SCN)(Cl)Cd(L)Ni(NH2CH2CH2CH2NH2)]n (3) {where H2L = N,N'-bis(3-ethoxy-salicylidene)propane-1,3-diamine is a N2O4 compartmental Schiff base}, have been synthesized and characterized. The structures of the complexes have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In each complex, nickel(ii) is placed in the inner N2O2 environment and cadmium(ii) is placed in the outer O4 compartment of the compartmental Schiff base. Furthermore, the importance of unconventional C-Hπ (chelate) interactions in the solid state of both complexes and C-Hπ (thiocyanate) interaction in complex 2 has been described by means of DFT and MEP calculations and characterized using NCI plots. All complexes show photoluminescence at room temperature upon irradiation by ultraviolet light. The lifetimes of excited states are in the range of 2-6 ns.

  5. Operate a Nuclear Power Plant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimpter, Bonnie J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom use of a computer program originally published in Creative Computing magazine. "The Nuclear Power Plant" (runs on Apple II with 48K memory) simulates the operating of a nuclear generating station, requiring students to make decisions as they assume the task of managing the plant. (JN)

  6. Operate a Nuclear Power Plant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimpter, Bonnie J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom use of a computer program originally published in Creative Computing magazine. "The Nuclear Power Plant" (runs on Apple II with 48K memory) simulates the operating of a nuclear generating station, requiring students to make decisions as they assume the task of managing the plant. (JN)

  7. I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in α-Particle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Breus, Dimitry Eugene

    2005-05-16

    In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of α-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of α-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental α-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single-chance evaporation theory is

  8. Characterization of degraded EBR-II fuel from the ICPP-603 basin: National spent nuclear fuel program, FY 1999 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, R. G.

    2000-04-17

    Characterization data is reported for sodium bonded Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel which had been stored underwater in containers since the late 1970's. Sixteen stainless steel storage containers were retrieved from the ICPP-603 storage pool at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. Ten of the containers had leaked water due to improper sealing. In the container chosen for detailed destructive analysis, the stainless steel cladding on the uranium alloy fuel had ruptured and fuel oxide particulate formed and filled the bottom of the container. Headspace gas analysis determined that greater than 99% hydrogen was present. Cesium-137, which had leached out of the fuel during the aqueous corrosion process, dominated the radionuclide source term of the water. The metallic sodium from the fuel element bond had reacted with the water, forming a caustic solution of NaOH.

  9. Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule. II. Nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complex potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment to H2O . The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential-energy surfaces for the three ( B12 , A12 , and B22 ) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H2O- undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the B12 and A12 states as well as the conical intersection between the A12 and B22 states into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multidimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

  10. Dual Species Noble Gas Nuclear Spin Polarizer for a New Search for the Atomic EDM of Xe-129 at FRM-II (Munich Research Reactor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Jared; Coulter, Daniel; Frisbie, Dustin; Fromm, Steven; Huneau, Jake; Rabga, Tenzin; Underwood, Walter; Singh, Jaideep; Fierlinger, Peter; Kraegeloh, Eva; Kuchler, Florian; Lins, Tobias; Marino, Mike; Meinel, Jonas; Neissen, Benjamin; Stuiber, Stefan; Fan, Isaac; Kilian, Wolfgang; Knappe-Gruenberg, Silvia; Trahms, Lutz; Chupp, Tim; Degenkolb, Skyler; Sachdeva, Natasha; Gong, Fei; Babcock, Earl; Fierlinger Group Team; Chupp Laboratory Team; Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Collaboration; Juelich CenterNeutron Science Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Electric dipole moments are believed to be very sensitive probes of CP violation beyond the Standard Model. A new search for the atomic electric dipole moment of Xe-129 is currently underway at FRM-II in Munich. Our technique takes advantage of a state of the art magnetically shielded room, ultra-sensitive magnetometry using SQUIDs, and control of systematics using a He-3 co-magnetometer. Our goal is an order of magnitude improvement over the previous Xe-129 atomic EDM limit. We will describe the design and construction of a noble gas polarizer using spectrally-narrow diode lasers. Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  11. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a load rejection from 100% to 50% power in the Vandellos II nuclear power plant. International Agreeement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Mendizabal, R.; Perez, J.

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 cycle 36.04 against a load rejection from 100% to 50% power in Vandals II NPP (Spain) is presented. The work is inscribed in the framework of the Spanish contribution to ICAP Project. The model used in the simulation consists of a single loop, a steam generator and a steam line up to the steam header all of them enlarged on a scale of 3:1, and full-scaled reactor vessel and pressurizer. The results of the calculations have been in reasonable agreement with plant measurements.

  12. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a load rejection from 100% to 50% power in the Vandellos II nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C. ); Mendizabal, R.; Perez, J. )

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 cycle 36.04 against a load rejection from 100% to 50% power in Vandals II NPP (Spain) is presented. The work is inscribed in the framework of the Spanish contribution to ICAP Project. The model used in the simulation consists of a single loop, a steam generator and a steam line up to the steam header all of them enlarged on a scale of 3:1, and full-scaled reactor vessel and pressurizer. The results of the calculations have been in reasonable agreement with plant measurements.

  13. Highly efficient nuclear DNA typing of the World War II skeletal remains using three new autosomal short tandem repeat amplification kits with the extended European Standard Set of loci.

    PubMed

    Zupanic Pajnic, Irena; Gornjak Pogorelc, Barbara; Balazic, Joze; Zupanc, Tomaz; Stefanic, Borut

    2012-02-15

    To perform an efficiency study of three new amplification kits with the extended European Standard Set (ESS) of loci for autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) typing of skeletal remains excavated from the World War II mass graves in Slovenia. In the beginning of the 2011, we analyzed 102 bones and teeth using the PowerPlex ESX 17 System (Promega), AmpFiSTR NGM PCR Amplification Kit (Applied Biosystems), and Investigator ESSplex Kit (Qiagen). We cleaned the bones and teeth, removed surface contamination, and ground them into a powder using liquid nitrogen. Prior to DNA isolation with Biorobot EZ1 (Qiagen), 0.5 g bone or tooth powder was decalcified. Nuclear DNA of the samples was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. All three kits used the same extract with the amplification conditions recommended by the manufacturers. We extracted up to 131 ng DNA/g of powder from the bones and teeth. All three amplification kits showed very similar efficiency, since DNA typing was successful with all amplification kits in 101 out of 102 bones and teeth, which represents a 99% success rate. The commercially available ESX 17, ESSplex, and NGM kits are highly reliable for STR typing of World War II skeletal remains with the DNA extraction method optimized in our laboratory.

  14. Global disturbances of the ionosphere caused by the electric field from the high-altitude nuclear explosion 'Starfish' on July 9, 1962. I, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsedilina, E. E.; Shashun'kina, V. M.

    1990-10-01

    The theory of the formation of an artifical radiation belt of high-energy electrons in the magnetosphere is used to examine possible ionospheric effects from the electric field generated by the Starfish nuclear test explosion over Johnston Island on July 9, 1962. A region in the Northern Hemisphere is identified where the explosion led to a drop in electron density in the F-region maximum by about 20 percent and a lowering of the layer by 20-30 km in the course of one hour after the explosion. The F-layer gradually came back to normal in the following hour. It is suggested that, in the initial period after the explosion, this effect was associated with the western electric field, which caused the lowering of the F-layer, as well as with changes in the recombination-diffusion balance in this layer.

  15. Model testing using Chernobyl data: II. Assessment of the consequences of the radioactive contamination of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant cooling pond.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, I I; Sazykina, T G; Ryabov, I N; Chumak, V K; Zarubin, O L

    1996-01-01

    The "Cooling Pond" scenario is designed to test models for radioactive contamination of aquatic ecosystems, based on data for contamination of different aquatic media and biota due to fallout of radionuclides into the cooling pond of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Input data include characteristics of the cooling pond ecosystem (hydrological, hydrochemical, and hydrobiological conditions) and estimates of the amounts of 137Cs in the cooling pond. Predictions are requested in two stages: (1) calculations for 137Cs concentrations for comparison against actual measurements, including activities of 137Cs in the cooling pond water, in sediment layers, and in fish; and (2) calculations for which actual measurements are not available, including dose and risk estimates for aquatic biota and for humans following hypothetical consumption of contaminated biota. The latter calculations are intended to provide an opportunity for intercomparison among modelers of their results for a simulated assessment problem.

  16. The behaviour of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate in the presence of magnesium(II) and calcium(II): protein-free soluble InsP6 is limited to 49 microM under cytosolic/nuclear conditions.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Nicolás; Torres, Julia; Domínguez, Sixto; Mederos, Alfredo; Irvine, Robin F; Díaz, Alvaro; Kremer, Carlos

    2006-11-01

    Progress in the biology of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) has been delayed by the lack of a quantitative description of its multiple interactions with divalent cations. Our recent initial description of these [J. Torres, S. Dominguez, M.F. Cerda, G. Obal, A. Mederos, R.F. Irvine, A. Diaz, C. Kremer, J. Inorg. Biochem. 99 (2005) 828-840] predicted that under cytosolic/nuclear conditions, protein-free soluble InsP(6) occurs as Mg(5)(H(2)L), a neutral complex that exists thanks to a significant, but undefined, window of solubility displayed by solid Mg(5)(H(2)L).22H(2)O (L is fully deprotonated InsP(6)). Here we complete the description of the InsP(6)-Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) system, defining the solubilities of the Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) (Ca(5)(H(2)L).16H(2)O) solids in terms of K(s0)=[M(2+)](5)[H(2)L(10-)], with pK(s0)=32.93 for M=Mg and pK(s0)=39.3 for M=Ca. The concentration of soluble Mg(5)(H(2)L) at 37 degrees C and I=0.15M NaClO(4) is limited to 49muM, yet InsP(6) in mammalian cells may reach 100muM. Any cytosolic/nuclear InsP(6) in excess of 49muM must be protein- or membrane-bound, or as solid Mg(5)(H(2)L).22H(2)O, and any extracellular InsP(6) (e.g. in plasma) is surely protein-bound.

  17. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature.

  18. Transitions in the Nuclear Age: Late Adolescence to Early Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoorn, Judith; And Others

    1989-01-01

    College students (N=41) in 1983 completed Nuclear War Attitude Survey (NWAS II) and completed it again in 1986 or 1987. Compared to earlier responses, recent responses to NWAS II showed statistically significant decreases in frequency with which subjects reported thinking about possibility of nuclear war, estimation of likelihood of nuclear war,…

  19. Assessment of groundwater contamination resulting from a major accident in land nuclear power plants (LNPP), II: Evaluation of a melt-through event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Abraham

    1989-12-01

    Contamination assessment methodology for a point-source scenario is exemplified here for calcareous sand and sandstone aquifers. Contamination predictions were derived according to two major approaches: (a) Conservative, associated commonly with risk analyses, where parameter values are chosen to yield reasonably maximum predictions. (b) Probabilistic presentation of contamination hazards, providing the basis for making decisions according to a given acceptable risk level. Simulated contamination patterns indicates that 3H (tritium) and 129I, both presumably geochemically inert species, has the largest downstream pollution range; they are followed by 90Sr, 125Sb, 106Ru and 238Pu, whose magnitude of interaction with aquifer rocks under field conditions is still poorly documented. Since the overall hazard range is dictated in this case by geochemically inert species, this information-gap seems to be here of secondary importance. Sensitivity analyses of computed pollution ranges shows relatively low sensitivity to possible variations of nuclides inventory, dispersivity and effective thickness of aquifer formations, and high sensitivity to possible variations of the assumed true downstream velocities of released nuclides. Some possible means to reduce the potential groundwater pollution range of nuclear power plants are discussed to illuminate major findings of the presented risk assessment. Presented contamination analysis refers to a given region. The criteria for priority classification of alternative sites within that region are defined according to the contamination vulnerability of exploitable sites, remedial action requirements, and the predictability of nuclides spread in the aquifer.

  20. Inertial electrostatic confinement and nuclear fusion in the interelectrode plasma of a nanosecond vacuum discharge. II: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilenkov, Yu. K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2010-12-15

    Results of particle-in-sell simulations of ion acceleration by using the KARAT code in a cylindrical geometry in the problem formulation corresponding to an actual experiment with a low-energy vacuum discharge with a hollow cathode are presented. The fundamental role of the formed virtual cathode is analyzed. The space-time dynamics of potential wells related to the formation of the virtual cathode is discussed. Quasi-steady potential wells (with a depth of {approx}80% of the applied voltage) cause acceleration of deuterium ions to energies about the electron beam energy ({approx}50 keV). In the well, a quasi-isotropic velocity distribution function of fast ions forms. The results obtained are compared with available data on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF). In particular, similar correlations between the structure of potential wells and the neutron yield, as well as the scaling of the fusion power density, which increases with decreasing virtual cathode radius and increasing potential well depth, are considered. The chosen electrode configuration and potential well parameters provide power densities of nuclear DD fusion in a nanosecond vacuum discharge noticeably higher than those achieved in other similar IECF systems.

  1. Plant small nuclear RNAs. II. U6 RNA and a 4.5SI-like RNA are present in plant nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, T; Antal, M; Solymosy, F

    1987-01-01

    Two small nuclear RNA species (U6 RNA and a 4.5SI-like RNA) not described so far for plants were detected in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) nuclei. U6 RNA is 98 nucleotides long, contains psi and methylated nucleotides and shows a surprisingly high degree of sequence homology (80%) with its rat counterpart, particularly in the middle part (a 57 nucleotide-long stretch) of the molecule, where it amounts to 98%. The 4.5SI-like RNA, similar in its structure to 4.5SI RNA detected so far only in rodent nuclei, is 94 nucleotides long, contains psi and an unidentified nucleotide and exhibits 52% overall sequence homology with rat 4.5SI RNA. A block of 20 consecutive nucleotides at the 5' end of the molecule is conserved between broad bean 4.5SI-like RNA and rat 4.5SI RNA. The presence of the two RNA polymerase III internal promoter consensus sequences in 4.5SI-like RNA suggests that it is an RNA polymerase III transcript. Images PMID:2434924

  2. Effects of alien and intraspecies cytoplasms on manifestation of nuclear genes for wheat resistance to brown rust: II. Specificity of cytoplasm influence on different Lr genes

    SciTech Connect

    Voluevich, E.A.; Buloichik, A.A.; Palilova, A.N.

    1995-04-01

    Specificity of expression of the major nuclear genes Lr to two brown rust clones in hybrids with the same maternal cytoplasm was analyzed. It was evaluated by a resistant: susceptible ratio in the F{sub 2}. Reciprocal hybrids were obtained from the cross between the progeny of homozygous susceptible plants of the cultivar Penjamo 62 and its alloplasmatic lines carrying cytoplasms of Triticum dicoccoides var. fulvovillosum, Aegilops squarrosa var. typical, Agropyron trichophorum, and isogenic lines of the cultivar Thatcher (Th) with the Lr1, Lr9, Lr15, and Lr19 genes. It was shown that the effect of the Lr1 gene in the cytoplasm of cultivar Thatcher and in eu-, and alloplasmatic forms of Penjamo 62 was less expressed than that of other Lr genes. Cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (dicoccoides)-Penjamo 62 was the only exception: in the F{sub 2}, hybrids with Th (Lr1) had a higher yield of resistant forms than those with Th (Lr15). In the hybrid combinations studied, expression and/or transmission of the Lr19 gene was more significant than that of other genes. This gene had no advantages over Lr15 and Lr19 only in cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (squarrosa)-Penjamo 62. In certain hybrid cytoplasms, the display of the Lr1, Lr15, and Lr19 genes, in contrast to Lr9, varied with the virulence of the pathogen clones. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  4. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  5. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  6. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Related Documents: Nuclear Medicine Fact Sheet.pdf SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  7. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  8. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  9. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  10. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  11. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the magnetism in the two dimensional frustrated quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet carbon disulfide copper(II) chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, Marc-Andre

    The experimental realization of a two dimensional quantum spin liquid has been eagerly sought since first proposed by Anderson in 1973. Recently, Cs2CuCl4, a frustrated 2D quantum antiferromagnet (QAF), has shown potential in this regard triggering immense interest, both experimentally and theoretically. Amongst these studies, different scenarios on the nature of the spin liquid phase were proposed and the presence of "exotic" magnetic phases in the ground state was noticed. To this date, many of these phases are still obscured and the nature of the spin liquid state remains unsettled. To investigate the above, we present 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements on Cs2CuCl4 at temperature down to 50mK and applied magnetic field up to 15 T. We first demonstrate that Cs NMR is an effective probe of the magnetism in the compound through experiments in the paramagnetic phase. Lower temperature NMR measurements as a function of the strength and orientation of the applied magnetic field provide the most complete picture of the different phases stabilized in Cs2CuCl 4. The magnetic character of these phases is discussed in the context of the interplay between quantum fluctuations, frustration and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Furthermore, we find evidence of three new phase transitions, as well as an unexpected angular dependence of the saturation field. These findings suggest that the accepted Hamiltonian requires modifications, such as additional DM interactions. In order to probe the nature of the spin-liquid state, local magnetization and spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements were performed. A comparison with the result of a variational calculation using Gutzwiller-projected mean-field theory demonstrates the 2D magnetic behavior of the local magnetization. In addition, both temperature and magnetic field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate suggests that the relevant low energy quasiparticle excitations obey fermionic statistics.

  13. Nuclear corroboration of DNA-DNA hybridization in deep phylogenies of hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines: the phylogenetic utility of ZENK (ii).

    PubMed

    Chubb, Alison L

    2004-01-01

    This paper documents the phylogenetic utility of ZENK at the avian intra-ordinal level using hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines as case studies. ZENK sequences (1.7 kb) were used to reconstruct separate gene trees containing the major lineages of each group, and the three trees were examined for congruence with existing DNA-DNA hybridization trees. The results indicate both that ZENK is an appropriate nuclear marker for resolving relationships deep in the avian tree, and that many relationships within these three particular groups are congruent among the different datasets. Specifically, within hummingbirds there was topological agreement that the major hummingbird lineages diverged in a graded manner from the "hermits," to the "mangoes," to the "coquettes," to the "emeralds," and finally to a sister relationship between the "mountain-gems" and the "bees." Concerning swifts, the deepest divergences were congruent: treeswifts (Hemiprocnidae) were sister to the typical swifts (Apodidae), and the subfamily Apodinae was monophyletic relative to Cypseloidinae. Within Apodinae, however, were short, unresolved branches among the swiftlets, spinetails, and more typical swifts; a finding which coincides with other datasets. Within passerine birds, there was congruent support for monophyly of sub-oscines and oscines, and within sub-oscines, for monophyly of New World groups relative to the Old World lineages. New World sub-oscines split into superfamilies Furnaroidea and Tyrannoidea, with the Tyrannoid relationships completely congruent among ZENK and DNA-DNA hybridization trees. Within Furnaroidea, however, there was some incongruence regarding the positions of Thamnophilidae and Formicariidae. Concerning oscine passerines, both datasets showed a split between Corvida and Passerida and confirmed the traditional membership of passerid superfamilies Muscicapoidea and Passeroidea. Monophyly of Sylvioidea, however, remained uncertain, as did the relationships among the

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of ancient buried wood-II. Observations on the origin of coal from lignite to bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Breger, I.A.; Szeverenyi, N.; Maciel, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    Coalified logs ranging in age from Late Pennsylvania to Miocene and in rank from lignite B to bituminous coal were analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) utilizing the cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning technique, as well as by infrared spectroscopy. The results of this study indicate that at least three major stages of coalification can be observed as wood gradually undergoes transformation to bituminous coal. The first stage involves hydrolysis and loss of cellulose from wood with retention and differential concentration of the resistant lignin. The second stage involves conversion of the lignin residues directly to coalified wood of lignitic rank, during which the oxygen content of intermediate diagenetic products remains constant as the hydrogen content and the carbon content increases. These changes are thought to involve loss of methoxyl groups, water, and C3 side chains from the lignin. In the third major stage of coalification, the coalified wood increases in rank to subbituminous and bituminous coal; during this stage the oxygen content decreases, hydrogen remains constant, and the carbon content increases. These changes are thought to result from loss of soluble humic acids that are rich in oxygen and that are mobilized during compaction and dewatering. Relatively resistant resinous substances are differentially concentrated in the coal during this stage. The hypothesis that humic acids are formed as mobile by-products of the coalification of lignin and function only as vehicles for removal of oxygen represents a dramatic departure from commonly accepted views that they are relatively low-molecular-weight intermediates formed during the degradation of lignin that then condense to form high-molecular-weight coal structures. ?? 1982.

  15. Gd(iii) and Mn(ii) complexes for dynamic nuclear polarization: small molecular chelate polarizing agents and applications with site-directed spin labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Monu; Bahrenberg, Thorsten; Can, Thach V; Caporini, Marc A; Silvers, Robert; Heiliger, Jörg; Smith, Albert A; Schwalbe, Harald; Griffin, Robert G; Corzilius, Björn

    2016-10-21

    We investigate complexes of two paramagnetic metal ions Gd(3+) and Mn(2+) to serve as polarizing agents for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N at magnetic fields of 5, 9.4, and 14.1 T. Both ions are half-integer high-spin systems with a zero-field splitting and therefore exhibit a broadening of the mS = -1/2 ↔ +1/2 central transition which scales inversely with the external field strength. We investigate experimentally the influence of the chelator molecule, strong hyperfine coupling to the metal nucleus, and deuteration of the bulk matrix on DNP properties. At small Gd-DOTA concentrations the narrow central transition allows us to polarize nuclei with small gyromagnetic ratio such as (13)C and even (15)N via the solid effect. We demonstrate that enhancements observed are limited by the available microwave power and that large enhancement factors of >100 (for (1)H) and on the order of 1000 (for (13)C) can be achieved in the saturation limit even at 80 K. At larger Gd(iii) concentrations (≥10 mM) where dipolar couplings between two neighboring Gd(3+) complexes become substantial a transition towards cross effect as dominating DNP mechanism is observed. Furthermore, the slow spin-diffusion between (13)C and (15)N, respectively, allows for temporally resolved observation of enhanced polarization spreading from nuclei close to the paramagnetic ion towards nuclei further removed. Subsequently, we present preliminary DNP experiments on ubiquitin by site-directed spin-labeling with Gd(3+) chelator tags. The results hold promise towards applications of such paramagnetically labeled proteins for DNP applications in biophysical chemistry and/or structural biology.

  16. Increased expression of CD54, CD18, MHC class II molecules, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in acute puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Lucas; Romero, Maritza; Rincón, Jaimar; Mosquera, Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Cellular infiltration to renal tissues is an important feature during acute puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN) in rats. The mechanisms responsible for this infiltration are poorly understood. To elucidate the participation of adhesion molecules in PAN, nephrosis was induced in rats by intraperitoneal puromycin aminonucleoside injection. Controls represent animals injected with a 0.9% saline solution. ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1), CD18 (beta chain of lymphocyte-function-associated antigen), LCA (leukocyte common antigen), ED1 (monocyte/macrophage marker), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expressions were evaluated in renal tissues 1, 2, and 7 weeks after injection. Frozen sections from PAN rat kidneys showed increased expressions of ICAM-1 and its ligand, and these findings were associated with increased levels of LCA+ and ED1+ cells in glomerulus and interstitium. The kinetics of leukocyte infiltration was similar to the kinetics of ICAM-1 expression: high values at week 2 which returned to normal values at week 7. Increased glomerular and interstitial proliferative activities (proliferating cell nulear antigen positive cells) were also found at week 2 of nephrosis. There was a correlation between ICAM-1 expression and numbers of LCA+ and ED1+ cells and between numbers of LCA+ cells and proliferating cells in glomerulus and interstitium. Correlations between glomerular and tubular ICAM-1 expression, interstitial leukocyte infiltration, and glomerular, interstitial, and tubular proliferative activities with the proteinuria were also observed during the nephrotic phase. In addition, increased lymphocyte binding to PAN renal tissues was observed, and this binding was diminished by anti-LFA-1beta monoclonal antibody pretreatment of lymphocytes. A similar result was found with anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody pretreatment of renal tissues. Our results suggest that increased expression of ICAM-1 and proliferative activity could be important

  17. TAF4, a subunit of transcription factor II D, directs promoter occupancy of nuclear receptor HNF4A during post-natal hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Alpern, Daniil; Langer, Diana; Ballester, Benoit; Le Gras, Stephanie; Romier, Christophe; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2014-09-10

    The functions of the TAF subunits of mammalian TFIID in physiological processes remain poorly characterised. In this study, we describe a novel function of TAFs in directing genomic occupancy of a transcriptional activator. Using liver-specific inactivation in mice, we show that the TAF4 subunit of TFIID is required for post-natal hepatocyte maturation. TAF4 promotes pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation at post-natal expressed liver function genes and down-regulates a subset of embryonic expressed genes by increased RNA polymerase II pausing. The TAF4-TAF12 heterodimer interacts directly with HNF4A and in vivo TAF4 is necessary to maintain HNF4A-directed embryonic gene expression at post-natal stages and promotes HNF4A occupancy of functional cis-regulatory elements adjacent to the transcription start sites of post-natal expressed genes. Stable HNF4A occupancy of these regulatory elements requires TAF4-dependent PIC formation highlighting that these are mutually dependent events. Local promoter-proximal HNF4A-TFIID interactions therefore act as instructive signals for post-natal hepatocyte differentiation.

  18. Analyses of promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene promoter in a Drosophila nuclear extract.

    PubMed Central

    Li, B; Weber, J A; Chen, Y; Greenleaf, A L; Gilmour, D S

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of Drosophila cells have revealed that RNA polymerase II is paused in a region 20 to 40 nucleotides downstream from the transcription start site of the hsp70 heat shock gene when the gene is not transcriptionally active. We have developed a cell-free system that reconstitutes this promoter-proximal pausing. The paused polymerase has been detected by monitoring the hyperreactivity of thymines in the transcription bubble toward potassium permanganate. The pattern of permanganate reactivity for the hsp70 promoter in the reconstituted system matches the pattern found on the promoter after it has been introduced back into files by P-element-mediated transposition. Matching patterns of permanganate reactivity are also observed for a non-heat shock promoter, the histone H3 promoter. Further analysis of the hsp70 promoter in the reconstituted system reveals that pausing does not depend on sequence-specific interactions located immediately downstream from the pause site. Sequences upstream from the TATA box influence the recruitment of polymerase rather than the efficiency of pausing. Kinetic analysis indicates that the polymerase rapidly enters the paused state and remains stably in this state for at least 25 min. Further analysis shows that the paused polymerase will initially resume elongation when Sarkosyl is added but loses this capacity within minutes of pausing. Using an alpha-amanitin-resistant polymerase, we provide evidence that promoter-proximal pausing does not require the carboxy-terminal domain of the polymerase. PMID:8816456

  19. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response.

    PubMed

    Long, Heather M; Chagoury, Odette L; Leese, Alison M; Ryan, Gordon B; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T; Abbott, Rachel J M; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William; Rickinson, Alan B

    2013-05-06

    Virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8(+) T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II-epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4(+) T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8(+) T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4(+) T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4(+) T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4(+) T cell priming.

  20. A tetra­nuclear cubane-like nickel(II) complex with a tridentate salicyl­idene­imine Schiff base ligand: tetra­kis­[μ3-4-methyl-N-(2-oxidophen­yl)salicylideneiminato]tetra­kis­[methano­lnickel(II)] methanol 0.8-solvate

    PubMed Central

    Pavlović, Gordana; Majer, Mihael; Cindrić, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The tetra­nuclear title complex, [Ni4(C14H11NO2)4(CH3OH)4]·0.8CH3OH, has a distorted cubane topology shaped by four Schiff base ligands. The cubane [Ni4(μ3-O4)] core is formed via the O atoms from the Schiff base ligands. The octa­hedrally coordinated NiII ions occupy alternating vertices of the cube. Each NiII ion is coordinated by one O,N,O′-tridentate dianionic ligand, two O atoms of oxidophenyl groups from adjacent ligands and the O atom of a coordinating methanol mol­ecule. The cubane core is stabilized via an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the hy­droxy group of the coordinating methanol mol­ecules and the phenolate O atom of the aldehyde Schiff base fragment. Additional stabilization is obtained via intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving aromatic C—H groups and the oxygen atoms of adjacent methanol mol­ecules. In the crystal, complex mol­ecules are linked into chains parallel to the c axis via weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The partial-occupancy disordered methanol solvent mol­ecule has a site occupancy of 0.8 and is linked to the tetra­nuclear unit via an inter­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond involving a phenolate O atom. PMID:27980828

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 antagonizes tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor κB and up-regulation of the ADAMTS, leading to decreased degradation of disc matrix macromolecules aggrecan and collagen II.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zili; Hutton, William C; Yoon, S Tim

    2014-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a regulatory cytokine that can increase the activity of enzymes such as ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs), which degrade disc matrix. ADAMTS are enzymes that break down disc matrix and thereby mediate disc degeneration. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7), on the other hand, stimulates synthesis of the disc extracellular matrix and is a potential therapeutic molecule for the treatment of disc degeneration. However, the effects of BMP-7 on TNF-α and ADAMTS are unknown. We investigated the effects of BMP-7 on the catabolic regulators such as TNF-α and ADAMTS and evaluated the molecular mechanism by which BMP-7 affects the catabolic regulators. This was an in vitro study in which we used human intervertebral disc cells cultured in alginate beads. Human intervertebral disc cells were cultured in alginate beads, and treated with TNF-α, or TNF- α plus BMP-7, pharmacological inhibitor of ERK1/2 (U0126), p38 (SB203580), or NFκB (BAY 11-7082). The mRNA levels of target genes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the protein levels were determined by the Western blots. The nuclear factor (NF)κB activity was analyzed by measured phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the NFκB protein p65. TNF-α activated NFκB signaling and induced up-regulation of the catabolic regulators ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5, contributing to degradation of the disc matrix macromolecules aggrecan and collagen II. BMP-7 antagonized the TNF-α-induced activation of NFκB protein p65 and blocked TNF-α-induced up-regulation of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5, leading to reversing TNF-α-mediated degradation of aggrecan and collagen II. Moreover, BMP-7 antagonized the TNF-α-induced activation of NFκB signaling by suppressing phosphorylation and nucleus translocation of NFκB protein p65. BMP-7 antagonizes TNF-α-induced activation of NFκB and up-regulation of ADAMTS, leading to decreased degradation of disc

  2. Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Horowitz, Charles; Berry, Don; Briggs, Christian

    2014-03-01

    For decades it has been theorized that just below nuclear saturation density matter undergoes a series of phase transitions. These phases, which are expected to exist in core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars, involve a range of exotic nuclear shapes collectively known as nuclear pasta. Recently, Jose Pons and collaborators suggested that ``the maximum period of isolated X-ray pulsars may be the first observational evidence for an amorphous inner crust, ..., possibly owing to the existence of a nuclear pasta phase.'' In this talk we present results of semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta and discuss how each phase might contribute to neutron star crust properties.

  3. Description of nuclear systems with a self-consistent configuration-mixing approach. II. Application to structure and reactions in even-even s d -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Pillet, N.; Dupuis, M.; Le Bloas, J.; Peña Arteaga, D.; Berger, J.-F.

    2017-04-01

    Background: The variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing approach to nuclei has been proposed about a decade ago. While the first applications followed rapidly, the implementation of the full formalism of this method has only been recently completed and applied in C. Robin, N. Pillet, D. Peña Arteaga, and J.-F. Berger, [Phys. Rev. C 93, 024302 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.024302 to 12C as a test-case. Purpose: The main objective of the present paper is to carry on the study that was initiated in that reference, in order to put the variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method to more stringent tests. To that aim we perform a systematic study of even-even s d -shell nuclei. Method: The wave function of these nuclei is taken as a configuration mixing built on orbitals of the s d -shell, and both the mixing coefficients of the nuclear state and the single-particle wave functions are determined consistently from the same variational principle. As in the previous works, the calculations are done using the D1S Gogny force. Results: Various ground-state properties are analyzed. In particular, the correlation content and composition of the wave function as well as the single-particle orbitals and energies are examined. Binding energies and charge radii are also calculated and compared to experiment. The description of the first excited state is also examined and the corresponding transition densities are used as input for the calculation of reaction processes such as inelastic electron and proton scattering. Special attention is paid to the effect of the optimization of the single-particle states consistently with the correlations of the system. Conclusions: The variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing approach is systematically applied to the description of even-even s d -shell nuclei. Globally, the results are satisfying and encouraging. In particular, charge radii and excitation energies are nicely reproduced. However

  4. Nuclear DNA PCR-RFLPs that distinguish African and European honey bee groups of subspecies. II: Conversion of long PCR markers to standard PCR.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Alonso; Hall, H Glenn

    2002-08-01

    Nuclear DNA PCR-RFLPs previously found in amplifications of three long (> 5 kbp) anonymous regions of DNA were made analyzable using standard PCR procedures. RFLP analyses were simplified by restricting the amplifications to sections, within each locus, that contained most of the informative polymorphic sites. AluI digests of locus L-1 section 2 (L-1S2) revealed three suballeles of which one was African-specific (Apis mellifera scutellata Lepeletier) and one was east European-predominant (A. m. ligustica Spinola, A. m. carnica Pollman, and A. m. caucasica Gorbachev). Alleles found originally at locus L-2 with AvaI were determined in RFLP analysis of two sections, L-2S1int and L-2S2, resulting in two African-specific and two east European-predominant suballeles. Suballele identity was determined by the combination of banding patterns from both fragments. Polymorphisms revealed by HaeIII in locus L-2 were analyzed in amplifications and digests of L-2SM1int. an 830 bpfragment within L-2S1. Seven suballeles were found of which two were African-specific and three were east European-specific or predominant, including one suballele specific to the east European subspecies A. m. caucasica. In locus L-5, RFLPs were detected with HaeIII, DdeI, and SpeI. HaeIII polymorphisms were analyzed by amplification and digestion offragments L-5S1xt and L-5S1ter: Five suballeles were found of which three were African-specific and one east European-predominant. For DdeI, all five alleles originally found with long PCR could be identified in RFLP analyses of three sections. Two African-specific, one east European-specific, and one west European-predominant (A. m. mellifera L. and A. m. iberica Goetze) suballeles were found. A west European-predominant suballele was also found in RFLP analysis of L-5S3 with SpeI. Allele frequency data from Old World and US. populations are presented.

  5. Radiological investigations at the "Taiga" nuclear explosion site, part II: man-made γ-ray emitting radionuclides in the ground and the resultant kerma rate in air.

    PubMed

    Ramzaev, V; Repin, V; Medvedev, A; Khramtsov, E; Timofeeva, M; Yakovlev, V

    2012-07-01

    Samples of soil and epigeic lichens were collected from the "Taiga" peaceful nuclear explosion site (61.30°N 56.60°E, the Perm region, Russia) in 2009 and analyzed using high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. For soil samples obtained at six different plots, two products of fission ((137)Cs and (155)Eu), five products of neutron activation ((60)Co, (94)Nb, (152)Eu, (154)Eu, (207)Bi) and (241)Am have been identified and quantified. The maximal activity concentrations of (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am for the soils samples were measured as 1650, 7100, and 6800 Bq kg(-1) (d.w.), respectively. The deposit of (137)Cs for the top 20 cm of soil on the tested plots at the "Taiga" site ranged from 30 to 1020 kBq m(-2); the maximal value greatly (by almost 3 orders of magnitude) exceeded the regional background (from global fallout) level of 1.4 kBq m(-2). (137)Cs contributes approximately 57% of the total ground inventory of the man-made γ-ray emitters for the six plots tested at the "Taiga" site. The other major radionuclides -(241)Am and (60)Co, constitute around 40%. Such radionuclides as (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am, and (207)Bi have also been determined for the epigeic lichens (genera Cladonia) that colonized certain areas at the ground lip produced by the "Taiga" explosion. Maximal activity concentrations (up to 80 Bq kg(-1) for (60)Co, 580 Bq kg(-1) for (137)Cs, 200 Bq kg(-1) for (241)Am, and 5 Bq kg(-1) for (207)Bi; all are given in terms of d.w.) have been detected for the lower dead section of the organisms. The air kerma rates associated with the anthropogenic sources of gamma radiation have been calculated using the data obtained from the laboratory analysis. For the six plots tested, the kerma rates ranged from 50 to 1200 nGy h(-1); on average, 51% of the dose can be attributed to (137)Cs and 45% to (60)Co. These estimates agree reasonably well with the results of the in situ measurements made during our field survey of the "Taiga" site in August

  6. Nuclear orientation and nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The present generation of on-line nuclear orientation facilities promises to revolutionize the gathering of nuclear structure information, especially for the hitherto poorly known and understood nuclei far from stability. Following a brief review of the technological developments that have facilitated these experiments, the nuclear spectroscopic information that can be obtained is summarized. Applications to understanding nuclear structure are reviewed, and challenges for future studies are discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Nuclear networking.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  8. Photochemically induced nuclear spin polarization in reaction centers of photosystem II observed by 13C-solid-state NMR reveals a strongly asymmetric electronic structure of the P680.+ primary donor chlorophyll

    PubMed Central

    Matysik, Jörg; Alia; Gast, Peter; van Gorkom, Hans J.; Hoff, Arnold J.; de Groot, Huub J. M.

    2000-01-01

    We report 13C magic angle spinning NMR observation of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarization (photo- CIDNP) in the reaction center (RC) of photosystem II (PS2). The light-enhanced NMR signals of the natural abundance 13C provide information on the electronic structure of the primary electron donor P680 (chlorophyll a molecules absorbing around 680 nm) and on the pz spin density pattern in its oxidized form, P680⨥. Most centerband signals can be attributed to a single chlorophyll a (Chl a) cofactor that has little interaction with other pigments. The chemical shift anisotropy of the most intense signals is characteristic for aromatic carbon atoms. The data reveal a pronounced asymmetry of the electronic spin density distribution within the P680⨥. PS2 shows only a single broad and intense emissive signal, which is assigned to both the C-10 and C-15 methine carbon atoms. The spin density appears shifted toward ring III. This shift is remarkable, because, for monomeric Chl a radical cations in solution, the region of highest spin density is around ring II. It leads to a first hypothesis as to how the planet can provide itself with the chemical potential to split water and generate an oxygen atmosphere using the Chl a macroaromatic cycle. A local electrostatic field close to ring III can polarize the electronic charge and associated spin density and increase the redox potential of P680 by stabilizing the highest occupied molecular orbital, without a major change of color. This field could be produced, e.g., by protonation of the keto group of ring V. Finally, the radical cation electronic structure in PS2 is different from that in the bacterial RC, which shows at least four emissive centerbands, indicating a symmetric spin density distribution over the entire bacteriochlorophyll macrocycle. PMID:10944191

  9. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  10. 78 FR 33117 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Applications and Amendments to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrew Hon, Project Manager, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U... Manager, Plant Licensing Branch II-2, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR...

  11. Nuclear Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Erich

    2010-07-27

    We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s-wave neutrons (or single s-wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the ''thickness'' of the nuclear surface in the mean-free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are, where they occur, what their properties are and some of their impact on nuclear observations.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  13. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  14. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  15. Nuclear Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E G

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  16. Soviet theater nuclear capabilities: the European nuclear balance in transition

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.

    1983-08-31

    This memorandum examined the changing strategic and theater nuclear environment; Soviet theater nuclear force improvements and doctrine; the implications of Soviet theater nuclear buildup for deterrence and the defense of Europe; and NATO's response. The author concludes that the changing balance of theater capabilities has resulted in a devaluation of deterrence, a decline in Western self-confidence, and an increase in NATO's vulnerabilities. The author also contends that if the Soviet Union is unwilling to negotiate a significant reduction intermediate-range nuclear forces that now pose a serious threat to the West, the NATO deployment of Pershing II and cruise missiles will not only help to restore balance to the NATO/Warsaw Pact nuclear equation, but will also enhance deterrence, reduce NATO's vulnerabilities, and thus, will contribute to crisis stability in Europe.

  17. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unidentified nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): II. Heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the early Solar System inferred from in situ high-precision magnesium-isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with isotopic mass fractionation effects and unidentified nuclear isotopic anomalies (FUN CAIs) have been studied for more than 40 years, but their origins remain enigmatic. Here we report in situ high precision measurements of aluminum-magnesium isotope systematics of FUN CAIs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual minerals were analyzed in six FUN CAIs from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Axtell (compact Type A CAI Axtell 2271) and Allende (Type B CAIs C1 and EK1-4-1, and forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs BG82DH8, CG-14, and TE). Most of these CAIs show evidence for excess 26Mg due to the decay of 26Al. The inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] and the initial magnesium isotopic compositions (δ26Mg0) calculated using an exponential law with an exponent β of 0.5128 are (3.1 ± 1.6) × 10-6 and 0.60 ± 0.10‰ (Axtell 2271), (3.7 ± 1.5) × 10-6 and -0.20 ± 0.05‰ (BG82DH8), (2.2 ± 1.1) × 10-6 and -0.18 ± 0.05‰ (C1), (2.3 ± 2.4) × 10-5 and -2.23 ± 0.37‰ (EK1-4-1), (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10-5 and -0.42 ± 0.08‰ (CG-14), and (5.3 ± 0.9) × 10-5 and -0.05 ± 0.08‰ (TE) with 2σ uncertainties. We infer that FUN CAIs recorded heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the CAI-forming region(s). Comparison of 26Al-26Mg systematics, stable isotope (oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium) and trace element studies of FUN and non-FUN igneous CAIs indicates that there is a continuum among these CAI types. Based on these observations and evaporation experiments on CAI-like melts, we propose a generic scenario for the origin of igneous (FUN and non-FUN) CAIs: (i) condensation of isotopically normal solids in an 16O-rich gas of approximately solar composition; (ii) formation of CAI precursors by aggregation of these solids together with variable abundances of isotopically anomalous grains-possible carriers of unidentified nuclear (UN) effects; and (iii) melt evaporation of these precursors

  18. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  19. Nuclear privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1995-11-01

    The United Kingdom government announced in May 1995 plans to privatize the country`s two nuclear generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear. Under the plan, the two companies will become operating divisions of a unified holding company, to be called British Electric, with headquarters in Scotland. Britain`s nuclear plants were left out of the initial privatization in 1989 because the government believed the financial community would be unwilling to accept the open-ended liability of decommissioning the original nine stations based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor. Six years later, the government has found a way around this by retaining these power stations in state ownership, leaving the new nuclear company with the eight Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) stations and the recently completed Sizewell B PWR stations. The operating Magnox stations are to be transferred to BNFL, which operates two Magnox stations of their own at Calder Hall and Chapelcross.

  20. Nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) processes plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. This fact sheet responds to your September 6, 1991, request, that we describe the methods and facilities for DOE's plutonium processing. Plutonium, which is used to make nuclear weapons, does not exist in nature and has to be produced. However, DOE no longer produces plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. Instead, DOE processes and recycles the plutonium from retired nuclear weapons and the plutonium that remains as scrap or residue from plutonium processing. This paper reports that DOE recovers plutonium through two basic processes-aqueous and pyrochemical-at four processing sites-Rocky Flats, Savannah River, Hanford, and Los Alamos. However, because of environmental and safety concerns and reductions in nuclear weapons, DOE has closed or may close most of the processing facilities. Only Los Alamos' processing facilities are currently operating.

  1. Di/mono-nuclear iron(I)/(II) complexes as functional models for the 2Fe2S subunit and distal Fe moiety of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases: protonations, molecular structures and electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Fan, Jiangli; Sun, Shiguo; Song, Fengling; Peng, Xiaojun; Duan, Qian; Jiang, Dayong; Liang, Qingcheng

    2012-10-21

    Di/mono-nuclear iron(I)/(II) complexes containing conjugated and electron-withdrawing S-to-S linkers, [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(2)(CO)(6)] (1), [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(2)(CO)(5)(PMe(3))] (1P), and [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(CO)(2)(PMe(3))(2)] (2) were prepared as biomimetic models for the 2Fe2S subunit and distal Fe moiety of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases. The N atoms in the heterocyclic pyrazines of 1 and 2 were protonated in the presence of proton acid to generate one and two hydrides, [1(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-), [2(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-), and [2(NH)(2)](2+) (CF(3)SO(3)(-))(2), respectively. The protonation processes were evidenced by in situ IR and NMR spectroscopy. The molecular structures of the protonated species [1(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-) and [2(NH)(2)](2+) (CF(3)SO(3)(-))(2) together with their originating complexes and , and the mono-PMe(3) substituted diiron complex were identified by X-ray crystallography. The IR and single-crystal analysis data all suggested that the electron-withdrawing bridge, pyrazine, led to decreased electron density at the Fe centers of the model complexes, which was consistent with the electrochemical studies. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that complex exhibited a low primary reduction potential at -1.17 V vs. Fc-Fc(+) with a 270 mV positive shift compared with that of the benzene-1,2-dithiolate (bdt) bridged analogue [(μ-bdt)Fe(2)(CO)(6)]. Under the weak acid conditions, complexes 1 and 2 could electrochemically catalyze the proton reduction. More interestingly, the mononuclear ferrous complex 2 showed two catalytic peaks during the formation of hydrogen, confirming its potential as a catalyst for hydrogen production.

  2. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  3. Nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Halley-Stott, Richard P; Pasque, Vincent; Gurdon, J B

    2013-06-01

    There is currently particular interest in the field of nuclear reprogramming, a process by which the identity of specialised cells may be changed, typically to an embryonic-like state. Reprogramming procedures provide insight into many mechanisms of fundamental cell biology and have several promising applications, most notably in healthcare through the development of human disease models and patient-specific tissue-replacement therapies. Here, we introduce the field of nuclear reprogramming and briefly discuss six of the procedures by which reprogramming may be experimentally performed: nuclear transfer to eggs or oocytes, cell fusion, extract treatment, direct reprogramming to pluripotency and transdifferentiation.

  4. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Venta, Patrick J; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-10-01

    We developed a method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish using laser-ablated metaphase II eggs as recipients, the micropyle for transfer of the nucleus and an egg activation protocol after nuclear reconstruction. We produced clones from cells of both embryonic and adult origins, although the latter did not give rise to live adult clones.

  5. START II and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, J.

    1996-10-01

    The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START II), signed by President George Bush and Russian President Boris yeltsin in January 1993, was ratified by the US Senate in January 1996 by and overwhelming vote of 87-4. The treaty, which will slash the strategic arsenals of the United States and Russia to 3,000-3,500 warheads each, is now before the two houses of the Russian Parliament (the Duma and the Federation Council) awaiting ratification amidst confusion and criticism. The Yeltsin administration supports START II and spoke in favor of Russian ratification after the Senate acted on the treaty. The Russian foreign minister and the Russian military believed that START II should be ratified as soon as possible. During the recent presidential campaign and his subsequent illness, President Yeltsin has been virtually silent on the subject of START II and nuclear force reductions. Without a push from the Yeltsin administration, the tone among Duma members, has been sharply critical of START II. Voices across the Russian political spectrum have questioned the treaty and linked it to constraints on highly capable theater missile defense (TMD) systems and the continued viability of the ABM Treaty. And urged that START II ratification be held hostage until NATO abandons its plans to expand eastward. Although the START I and START II accords have generated the momentum, opportunity and expectation-both domestic and international-for additional nuclear arms reductions, the current impasse over ratification in the Duma has cast a shadow over the future of START II and raised questions about the chances for any follow-on (START III) agreement.

  6. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  7. Nuclear battlefields

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, W.M.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides complete data on the nuclear operations and research facilities in the U.S.A., the U.S.S.R., France, China and the U.K. It describes detailed estimates on the U.S.S.R.'s nuclear stockpile for over 500 locations. It shows how non-nuclear countries cooperate with the world-wide war machine. And it maps the U.S. nuclear facilities from Little America, WY, and Charleston, SC, to the battleships patroling the world's oceans and subs stalking under the sea. The data were gathered from unclassified sources through the Freedom of Information Act, from data supplied to military installations, and from weapons source books. It provides guidance for policymakers, government and corporate officials.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  9. Nuclear Disarmament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  10. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  11. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  12. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  13. Nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, J.A.

    1982-05-01

    A nuclear accident with radioactive contamination can happen anywhere in the world. Because expert nuclear emergency teams may take several hours to arrive at the scene, local authorities must have a plan of action for the hours immediately following an accident. The site should be left untouched except to remove casualties. Treatment of victims includes decontamination and meticulous wound debridement. Acute radiation syndrome may be an overwhelming sequela.

  14. Nuclear telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, R. T.; Szasz, I. J.

    1990-06-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine patient images have been transniitted for 8 years from a regional conununity hospital to a university teaching hospital 700 kiloinetres away employing slow scan TV and telephone. Transruission and interpretation were done at the end of each working day or as circumstances required in cases of emergencies. Referring physicians received the nuclear medicine procedure report at the end of the completion day or within few minutes of completion in case of emergency procedures. To date more than 25 patient studies have been transmitted for interpretation. Blinded reinterpretation of the original hard copy data of 350 patient studies resulted in 100 agreement with the interpretation of transmitted data. This technique provides high quality diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine services in remote hospitals where the services of an on-site nuclear physician is not available. 2. HISTORY Eight years ago when the nuclear medicine physician at Trail Regional Hospital left the Trail area and an other could not be recruited we examined the feasibility of image transmission by phone for interpretation since closing the department would have imposed unacceptable physical and financial hardship and medical constraints on the patient population the nearest nuclear medicine facility was at some 8 hours drive away. In hospital patients would have to be treated either based purely on physical findings or flown to Vancouver at considerable cost to the health care system (estimated cost $1500.

  15. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  16. Nuclear risk

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, M.

    1989-01-01

    The title of our session, Nuclear Risk Versus Other Power Options, is provocative. It is also a title with different meanings to different people. To the utility chief executive officer, nuclear power is a high-risk financial undertaking because of political and economic barriers to cost recovery. To the utility dispatcher, it is a high-risk future power source since plant completion and start-up dates can be delayed for very long times due to uncertain legal and political issues. To the environmentalist, concerned about global effects such as greenhouse and acid rain, nuclear power is a relatively low risk energy source. To the financial people, nuclear power is a cash cow turned sour because of uncertainties as to what new plants will cost and whether they will even be allowed to operate. The statistics on risk are known and the results of probability risk assessment calculations of risks are known. The challenge is not to make nuclear power safer, it is already one of the safest, if not the safest, source of power currently available. The challenge is to find a way to communicate this to the public.

  17. Linoleic acid-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase II via p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB pathway in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, I-Mo; Yang, Chang-Hao; Yang, Chung-May; Chen, Muh-Shy

    2007-11-01

    High linoleic acid (LA) intake is known to correlate with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of LA on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase II (COX-2) and their associated signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 cells were treated with different concentrations of LA. Expressions of iNOS and COX-2 were examined using semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the culture medium were determined by enzyme-link immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Activation of p42/44, p38, JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factors (NF)-kappaB were evaluated by Western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We found that LA induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 in RPE cells at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-and dose-dependent manner. Upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 resulted in increased production of NO and PGE(2). Moreover, LA caused degradation of IkappaB and increased NF-kappaB DNA binding activity. Effects of LA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were inhibited by a NF-kappaB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). LA activated p42/44, but not p38 or JNK MAPK. Inhibition of p42/44 activity by PD98059 significantly reduced LA-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Linoleic acid-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 as well as PGE(2) and NO release in RPE cells were sequentially mediated through activation of p42/p44, MAPK, then NF-kappaB. These results may provide new insights into both mechanisms of LA action on RPE cells and pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

  18. The Bad News and the Good about Nuclear Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Traces the changes in the nuclear energy field since World War II, citing distinct periods of growth in the nuclear industry, as well as downtrends. Analyzes the reasons for the changes in public support for nuclear energy and the impact upon careers in the field. (TW)

  19. The Bad News and the Good about Nuclear Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Traces the changes in the nuclear energy field since World War II, citing distinct periods of growth in the nuclear industry, as well as downtrends. Analyzes the reasons for the changes in public support for nuclear energy and the impact upon careers in the field. (TW)

  20. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2010-08-15

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) was declared by the 62nd General Assembly of the United Nations and was also endorsed by UNESCO. Investigations in the realms of particle and nuclear physicsmake a large contribution in the development of our ideas of the properties of the Universe. The present article discusses some problems of the evolution of the Universe, nucleosyntheses, and cosmochronology from the point of view of nuclear and particle physics. Processes occurring in the Universe are compared with the mechanisms of the production and decay of nuclei, as well as with the mechanisms of their interaction at high energies. Examples that demonstrate the potential of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and the properties of the Universe are given. The results that come from investigations into nuclear reactions induced by beams of radioactive nuclei and which make it possible to take a fresh look at the nucleosynthesis scenario in the range at light nuclei are presented.

  2. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This paper discusses how, as part of the Department of Energy's implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, DOE is required to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and, if it determines that the site is suitable, recommend to the President its selection for a nuclear waste repository. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in considering development of the plan, issued five objections, one of which is DOE's failure to recognize the range of alternative conceptual models of the Yucca Mountain site that can be supported by the limited existing technical data. At the end of the quarter DOE directed its project offices in Washington and Texas to begin orderly phase-out of all site-specific repository activities. Costs for this phase-out are $53 million for the Deaf Smith site and $85 million for the Hanford site.

  3. Nuclear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  4. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fossion, Ruben

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  5. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  6. YAP Nuclear Localization in the Absence of Cell-Cell Contact Is Mediated by a Filamentous Actin-dependent, Myosin II- and Phospho-YAP-independent Pathway during Extracellular Matrix Mechanosensing*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arupratan; Fischer, Robert S.; Pan, Duojia; Waterman, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell contact inhibition and the mechanical environment of cells have both been shown to regulate YAP nuclear localization to modulate cell proliferation. Changes in cellular contractility by genetic, pharmacological, and matrix stiffness perturbations regulate YAP nuclear localization. However, because contractility and F-actin organization are interconnected cytoskeletal properties, it remains unclear which of these distinctly regulates YAP localization. Here we show that in the absence of cell-cell contact, actomyosin contractility suppresses YAP phosphorylation at Ser112, however, neither loss of contractility nor increase in YAP phosphorylation is sufficient for its nuclear exclusion. We find that actin cytoskeletal integrity is essential for YAP nuclear localization, and can override phosphoregulation or contractility-mediated regulation of YAP nuclear localization. This actin-mediated regulation is conserved during mechanotransduction, as substrate compliance increased YAP phosphorylation and reduced cytoskeletal integrity leading to nuclear exclusion of both YAP and Ser(P)112-YAP. These data provide evidence for two actin-mediated pathways for YAP regulation; one in which actomyosin contractility regulates YAP phosphorylation, and a second that involves cytoskeletal integrity-mediated regulation of YAP nuclear localization independent of contractility. We suggest that in non-contact inhibited cells, this latter mechanism may be important in low stiffness regimes, such as may be encountered in physiological environments. PMID:26757814

  7. YAP Nuclear Localization in the Absence of Cell-Cell Contact Is Mediated by a Filamentous Actin-dependent, Myosin II- and Phospho-YAP-independent Pathway during Extracellular Matrix Mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Das, Arupratan; Fischer, Robert S; Pan, Duojia; Waterman, Clare M

    2016-03-18

    Cell-cell contact inhibition and the mechanical environment of cells have both been shown to regulate YAP nuclear localization to modulate cell proliferation. Changes in cellular contractility by genetic, pharmacological, and matrix stiffness perturbations regulate YAP nuclear localization. However, because contractility and F-actin organization are interconnected cytoskeletal properties, it remains unclear which of these distinctly regulates YAP localization. Here we show that in the absence of cell-cell contact, actomyosin contractility suppresses YAP phosphorylation at Ser(112), however, neither loss of contractility nor increase in YAP phosphorylation is sufficient for its nuclear exclusion. We find that actin cytoskeletal integrity is essential for YAP nuclear localization, and can override phosphoregulation or contractility-mediated regulation of YAP nuclear localization. This actin-mediated regulation is conserved during mechanotransduction, as substrate compliance increased YAP phosphorylation and reduced cytoskeletal integrity leading to nuclear exclusion of both YAP and Ser(P)(112)-YAP. These data provide evidence for two actin-mediated pathways for YAP regulation; one in which actomyosin contractility regulates YAP phosphorylation, and a second that involves cytoskeletal integrity-mediated regulation of YAP nuclear localization independent of contractility. We suggest that in non-contact inhibited cells, this latter mechanism may be important in low stiffness regimes, such as may be encountered in physiological environments. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Nuclear winter or nuclear fall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, André

    Climate is universal. If a major modern nuclear war (i.e., with a large number of small-yield weapons) were to happen, it is not even necessary to have a specific part of the world directly involved for there to be cause to worry about the consequences for its inhabitants and their future. Indeed, smoke from fires ignited by the nuclear explosions would be transported by winds all over the world, causing dark and cold. According to the first study, by Turco et al. [1983], air surface temperature over continental areas of the northern mid-latitudes (assumed to be the nuclear war theatre) would fall to winter levels even in summer (hence the term “nuclear winter”) and induce drastic climatic conditions for several months at least. The devastating effects of a nuclear war would thus last much longer than was assumed initially. Discussing to what extent these estimations of long-term impacts on climate are reliable is the purpose of this article.

  9. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  10. Nuclear Terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2001-01-01

    As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

  11. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  12. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  13. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  14. Nuclear orbiting

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear orbiting following collisions between sd and p shell nuclei is discussed. The dependence of this process on the real and imaginary parts of the nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed, as well as the evolution of the dinucleus toward a fully equilibrated fused system. 26 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  16. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    The technical principles and practices of the civil nuclear industry are described with particular reference to fission and its products, natural and artificial radioactivity elements principally concerned and their relationships, main types of reactor, safety issues, the fuel cycle, waste management, issues related to weapon proliferation, environmental considerations and possible future developments.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  18. Theft and Diversion of Special Nuclear Materials and Military Nuclear Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-12

    7 II. Computed Probability per Year for Nuclear Diversion....... 10 III. Amount of U235 Compounds for One Critical Ms...15 IVo Probability of Success,for Making a Nuclear Weapon from UF6 . 19 V. Risk Assessments for Attempted Diversion of F....... 22 VIo Probability of...Richardson of the Nuclear Safety Division, is due special acknowledgment for their interest in the project, and for their financial aid in supporting

  19. The nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the nuclear equation of state in determining the fate of the collapsing cores of massive stars is examined in light of both recent theoretical advances in this subject and recent experimental measurements with relativistic heavy ions. The difficulties existing in attempts to bring the softer nuclear matter apparently required by the theory of Type II supernovae into consonance with the heavy ion data are discussed. Relativistic mean field theory is introduced as a candidate for derivation of the equation of state, and a simple form for the saturation compressibility is obtained. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    SAGE II Data and Information The goals of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment ( SAGE ) II are to determine the spatial distributions of stratospheric ... profiles and calculating monthly averages of each. The SAGE II sensor (a Sun Photometer) was launched into a 57-degree inclination ...

  1. Argentine nuclear development: capabilities and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Complacency was shattered in 1974 by the Indian explosion of a nuclear device developed from a civil nuclear program. The fear of nuclear weapon spread led the international system to consider the other states that could develop devices from what were assumed to be peaceful nuclear programs. Many states of the non-nuclear ranks, often the more developed states of the Third World, resented the nuclear suppliers weapon holders dictating to the developing states the types of technology that these states could handle. Some of these developing states had highly sophisticated nuclear programs that no longer rely on the suppliers for assistance. These states are using the options that their nuclear developments present in an attempt to alter the international system, or the balance of power, that has existed since the end of World War II. Argentina's nuclear program has become one of the most-sophisticated in the Third World. This work discusses the implications of the country's present capabilities as they affect Argentine actions in the foreign policy areas of nuclear commerce and the international nuclear weapons non-proliferation regime.

  2. Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Streek, Penny Vande; Carretta, Robert; Weiland, Frederick L.

    1994-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following epitomes of progress in nuclear medicine. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and clinical importance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, and scholars to stay abreast of progress in medicine, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The epitomes included here were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Nuclear Medicine of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under the direction of Dr Lyons and the panel. PMID:7529452

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  4. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  6. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Radioactive waste is mounting at U.S. nuclear power plants at a rate of more than 2,000 metric tons a year. Pursuant to statute and anticipating that a geologic repository would be available in 1998, the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into disposal contracts with nuclear utilities. Now, however, DOE does not expect the repository to be ready before 2010. For this reason, DOE does not want to develop a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) by 1998. This book is concerned about how best to store the waste until a repository is available, congressional requesters asked GAO to review the alternatives of continued storage at utilities' reactor sites or transferring waste to an MRS facility, GAO assessed the likelihood of an MRSA facility operating by 1998, legal implications if DOE is not able to take delivery of wastes in 1998, propriety of using the Nuclear Waste Fund-from which DOE's waste program costs are paid-to pay utilities for on-site storage capacity added after 1998, ability of utilities to store their waste on-site until a repository is operating, and relative costs and safety of the two storage alternatives.

  7. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  8. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  9. Childhood leukemia around nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M

    1992-12-15

    Epidemiologic studies on the health effects of living near nuclear facilities have been rare and, indeed, radiobiological models would not predict any detectable increase in cancer risk to the general public from the very low levels of radioactivity emitted by nuclear installations. Thus the recent evidence suggesting an excess of childhood leukemias in the vicinity of certain nuclear sites in the United Kingdom has generated considerable controversy. To help resolve the uncertainty and enhance interpretability of results, future epidemiologic studies will need to be designed with great care (and within realistic cost limits). This commentary suggests three areas for methodologic consideration: (i) definition and modelling of radiation exposure; (ii) selection of cancer sites and sensitive subgroups; and (iii) use of incidence or mortality data. Specific suggestions for further epidemiologic research are offered as well.

  10. Nuclear eclectic power.

    PubMed

    Rose, D J

    1974-04-19

    The uranium and thorium resources, the technology, and the social impacts all seem to presage an even sharper increase in nuclear power for electric generation than had hitherto been predicted. There are more future consequences. The "hydrogen economy." Nuclear power plants operate best at constant power and full load. Thus, a largely nuclear electric economy has the problem of utilizing substantial off-peak capacity; the additional energy generation can typically be half the normal daily demand. Thus, the option of generating hydrogen as a nonpolluting fuel receives two boosts: excess nuclear capacity to produce it, plus much higher future costs for oil and natural gas. However, the so-called "hydrogen economy" must await the excess capacity, which will not occur until the end of the century. Nonelectric uses. By analyses similar to those performed here, raw nuclear heat can be shown to be cheaper than heat from many other fuel sources, especially nonpolluting ones. This will be particularly true as domestic natural gas supplies become more scarce. Nuclear heat becomes attractive for industrial purposes, and even for urban district heating, provided (i) the temperature is high enough (this is no problem for district heating, but could be for industry; the HTGR's and breeders, with 600 degrees C or more available, have the advantage); (ii) there is a market for large quantities (a heat rate of 3800 Mw thermal, the reactor size permitted today, will heat Boston, with some to spare); and (iii) the social costs become more definitely resolved in favor of nuclear power. Capital requirements. Nuclear-electric installations are very capital-intensive. One trillion dollars for the plants, backup industry, and so forth is only 2 percent of the total gross national product (GNP) between 1974 and 2000, at a growth rate of 4 percent per year. But capital accumulation tends to run at about 10 percent of the GNP, so the nuclear requirements make a sizable perturbation. Also

  11. Institute for Nuclear Theory annual report No. 2, 1 March 1991--29 February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.; Henley, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics in Nuclear physics: electromagnetic interactions and few-nucleon systems; N*'s and nucleon structure; mesons and fields in nuclei; and nuclear astrophysics of type II supernovae. (LSP).

  12. 78 FR 28005 - System Energy Resources, Inc.; Grand Gulf Nuclear Station; Order Approving Direct and Indirect...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... adjacent to Grand Gulf Nuclear Station (GGNS). The GGNS is located in Claiborne County, Mississippi. II By... 2013. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Glenn M. Tracy, Director, Office of New Reactors. BILLING...

  13. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

  14. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

  15. The Nuclear Power/Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Sam; Totten, Martha Wescoat

    1985-01-01

    Once they have nuclear power, most countries will divert nuclear materials from commercial to military programs. In excerpts from the book "Facing the Danger" (by Totten, S. and M. W., Crossing Press, 1984), five anti-nuclear activists explain how and why they have been addressing the nuclear connection. (RM)

  16. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Explains problems enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968. Provides factual charts and details concerning the production of nuclear energy and arms, the processing and disposal of waste products, and outlines the nuclear fuel cycle. Discusses safeguards, the risk of nuclear terrorism, and ways to deal with these problems. (NL)

  17. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Explains problems enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968. Provides factual charts and details concerning the production of nuclear energy and arms, the processing and disposal of waste products, and outlines the nuclear fuel cycle. Discusses safeguards, the risk of nuclear terrorism, and ways to deal with these problems. (NL)

  18. The Nuclear Power/Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Sam; Totten, Martha Wescoat

    1985-01-01

    Once they have nuclear power, most countries will divert nuclear materials from commercial to military programs. In excerpts from the book "Facing the Danger" (by Totten, S. and M. W., Crossing Press, 1984), five anti-nuclear activists explain how and why they have been addressing the nuclear connection. (RM)

  19. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  20. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  1. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  2. Nuclear security

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-02-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, located in Livermore, California, generates and controls large numbers of classified documents associated with the research and testing of nuclear weapons. Concern has been raised about the potential for espionage at the laboratory and the national security implications of classified documents being stolen. This paper determines the extent of missing classified documents at the laboratory and assesses the adequacy of accountability over classified documents in the laboratory's custody. Audit coverage was limited to the approximately 600,000 secret documents in the laboratory's custody. The adequacy of DOE's oversight of the laboratory's secret document control program was also assessed.

  3. Nuclear dualism.

    PubMed

    Karrer, Kathleen M

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear dualism is a characteristic feature of the ciliated protozoa. Tetrahymena have two different nuclei in each cell. The larger, polyploid, somatic macronucleus (MAC) is the site of transcriptional activity in the vegetatively growing cell. The smaller, diploid micronucleus (MIC) is transcriptionally inactive in vegetative cells, but is transcriptionally active in mating cells and responsible for the genetic continuity during sexual reproduction. Although the MICs and MACs develop from mitotic products of a common progenitor and reside in a common cytoplasm, they are different from one another in almost every respect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Russian nuclear-powered submarine decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bukharin, O.; Handler, J.

    1995-11-01

    Russia is facing technical, economic and organizational difficulties in dismantling its oversized and unsafe fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The inability of Russia to deal effectively with the submarine decommissioning crisis increases the risk of environmental disaster and may hamper the implementation of the START I and START II treaties. This paper discusses the nuclear fleet support infrastructure, the problems of submarine decommissioning, and recommends international cooperation in addressing these problems.

  5. The second coming of the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect

    Ikle, F.C.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear weapons were used for the first and only time in World War II, and the world has grown accustomed to their nonuse. But the overwhelming deterrent forces that worked during the Cold War will not provide protection against the new threats: terrorism and catastrophic accident. The arsenals and mindsets of the past half-century present a formidable barrier to change, but the United States must lead the way in preventing nuclear weapons from becoming acceptable.

  6. The Common Sense of Small Nuclear Arsenals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    reasons, France developed a small, independent nuclear arsenal after World War II. 4 It kept its force levels comparatively low, even during the Cold War...00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Common Sense of Small Nuclear Arsenals 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...survival motive” is law-like. All human conduct is shaped in some measure by what individuals believe to be general laws. In science , laws establish

  7. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    . Bloch ions / T. A. Chubb. II. Inhibited diffusion driven surface transmutations / T. A. Chubb. III. Bloch nuclides, Iwamura transmutations, and Oriani showers / T. A. Chubb. Bose-Einstein condensate. Theoretical study of nuclear reactions induced by Bose-Einstein condensation in Pd / K.-I. Tsuchiya and H. Okumura. Proposal for new experimental tests of the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reaction and transmutation processes in deuterium loaded micro- and nano-scale cavities / Y. E. Kim ... [et al.]. Mixtures of charged bosons confined in harmonic traps and Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reactions and transmutation processes in condensed matters / Y. E. Kim and A. L. Zubarev. Alternative interpretation of low-energy nuclear reaction processes with deuterated metals based on the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism / Y. E. Kim and T. O. Passell. Multi-body fusion. [symbol]He/[symbol]He production ratios by tetrahedral symmetric condensation / A. Takahashi. Phonon coupling. Phonon-exchange models: some new results / P. L. Hagelstein. Neutron clusters. Cold fusion phenomenon and solid state nuclear physics / H. Kozima. Neutrinos, magnetic monopoles. Neutrino-driven nuclear reactions of cold fusion and transmutation / V. Filimonov. Light monopoles theory: an overview of their effects in physics, chemistry, biology, and nuclear science (weak interactions) / G. Lochak. Electrons clusters and magnetic monopoles / M. Rambaut. Others. Effects of atomic electrons on nuclear stability and radioactive decay / D. V. Filippov, L. I. Urutskoev, and A. A. Rukhadze. Search for erzion nuclear catalysis chains from cosmic ray erzions stopping in organic scintillator / Yu. N. Bazhutov and E. V. Pletnikov. Low-energy nuclear reactions resulting as picometer interactions with similarity to K-shell electron capture / H. Hora ... [et al.] -- 5. Other topics. On the possible magnetic mechanism of shortening the runaway of RBMK-1000 reactor

  8. Risk perspectives for TOPAZ II flight mission

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.C. Jr.; Haskin, F.E.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary estimate of the nuclear-related public health risk presented by launching and operating the Russian TOPAZ II space reactor as part of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). This risk is then compared to the risks from the operation of commercial nuclear power reactors and previously planned and/or launched space nuclear power missions. For the current mission profile, the initial estimate of the risk posed by launching and operating TOPAZ II is significantly less (at least two orders of magnitude) than that estimated for prior space nuclear missions. Even allowing for the large uncertainties in this estimate, it does not appear that the NEPSTP mission will present a significant health risk to the public.

  9. Nuclear "waffles"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. Purpose: To characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function (RDF) g (r ) and the structure factor S (q ) , for systems with proton fractions Yp=0.10 ,0.20 ,0.30 , and 0.40 at about one-third of nuclear saturation density, n =0.050 fm-3 , and temperatures near k T =1 MeV . Methods: We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with 51 200 and 409 600 nucleons. From the output of the MD simulations we obtain the two desired observables. Results: We compute and discuss the differences in topology and observables for each simulation. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, Yp=0.10 and 0.20 , equilibrate quickly and form liquidlike structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, Yp=0.30 and 0.40 , take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solidlike periodic structures. Furthermore, the Yp=0.40 system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the Yp=0.30 systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. Conclusions: The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions Yp≥0.30 have important consequences for the structure factors S (q ) of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation, and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above 1.0 MeV and

  10. BASS II

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-14

    ISS038-E-047576 (14 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  11. BASS II

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-14

    ISS038-E-047582 (14 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  12. Heavy hadrons in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    Current studies on heavy hadrons in nuclear medium are reviewed with a summary of the basic theoretical concepts of QCD, namely chiral symmetry, heavy quark spin symmetry, and the effective Lagrangian approach. The nuclear matter is an interesting place to study the properties of heavy hadrons from many different points of view. We emphasize the importance of the following topics: (i) charm/bottom hadron-nucleon interaction, (ii) structure of charm/bottom nuclei, and (iii) QCD vacuum properties and hadron modifications in nuclear medium. We pick up three different groups of heavy hadrons, quarkonia (J / ψ, ϒ), heavy-light mesons (D/ D ¯ , B ¯ / B) and heavy baryons (Λc, Λb). The modifications of those hadrons in nuclear matter provide us with important information to investigate the essential properties of heavy hadrons. We also give the discussions about the heavy hadrons, not only in infinite nuclear matter, but also in finite-size atomic nuclei with finite baryon numbers, to serve future experiments.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  15. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  17. Nuclear exoticism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  18. Nuclear exoticism

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-15

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  19. Nuclear Education Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Metta L.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the controversial issue of nuclear education in public schools. Highlights include resolutions passed by the National Congress of Parent Teacher Associations, what nuclear education is, distinction between nuclear education and education in the nuclear age, educational materials, a review of teaching materials, nuclear literacy, and…

  20. Nuclear Education Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Metta L.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the controversial issue of nuclear education in public schools. Highlights include resolutions passed by the National Congress of Parent Teacher Associations, what nuclear education is, distinction between nuclear education and education in the nuclear age, educational materials, a review of teaching materials, nuclear literacy, and…

  1. Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Ronald N.; Moore, David D.; Willson, Timothy M.; Guy, R. Kip

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) sponsored a workshop, “Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors and Metabolism,” in April 2009 to explore how chemical and molecular biology and physiology can be exploited to further our understanding of nuclear receptor structure, function, and role in disease. Signaling cascades involving nuclear receptors are more complex and interrelated than once thought. Nuclear receptors continue to be attractive targets for drug discovery. The overall goal of this workshop was to identify gaps in our understanding of the complexity of ligand activities and begin to address them by (i) increasing the collaboration of investigators from different disciplines, (ii) developing a better understanding of chemical modulation of nuclear receptor action, and (iii) identifying opportunities and roadblocks in the path of translating basic research to discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:19654413

  2. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, R.

    1998-07-01

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  3. Completely automated nuclear reactors for long-term operation II: toward a conceptual-level point design of a high-temperature, gas-cooled central power station system

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Ishikawa, M.; Wood, L.; Hyde, R.; Nuckolls, J.

    1996-06-01

    We discuss a new type of nuclear fission power reactor optimized for the generation of heat for use in obviously safe, economic, and long- duration electricity production in large central power stations. These reactors are fundamentally different in design, implementation, and operation from conventional light-water-cooled and- moderated reactors (LWRs) currently in widespread use. they feature a low- average-enrichment initial fuel loading which lasts the entire 30 year, full-power design life of the power plant, and which is intended never to be removed from the reactor. The reactor contains a cylindrical core comprised of a nuclear ignitor and a much larger nuclear [breeding + burning] wave propagating region containing natural thorium or uranium fuel, a surrounding neutron reflector and radiation shield, distributed means for implementing a thermostating function on the reactivity and local power density, a redundant pressurized gas coolant transport system, and automatic and redundant heat dumping means to obviate concerns regarding all classes of loss-of-coolant accidents during the plants operational and post operational life. These reactors are proposed to be situated at {>=}100 meter depths underground. There operation will be completely automatic, with no powered mechanisms, no operator controls and no provision for human access during or after their operational lifetime, in order to avoid both error and misuse. The power plant`s heat engine and electrical generator sub-systems are located above ground and are connected to the nuclear heat source only with readily sealed coolant conduits. This paper outlines a concept level point design of a 1 GWe member of this type of reactor, one oriented to production of high temperature, high pressure coolant gas and directed towards 60% efficiency, combined-cycle electricity generation.

  4. Nuclear weapons databook. Volume V: British, French, and Chinese nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Burrows, A.S.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    How insecurity and the search military independence drove post World War II nuclear proliferation beyond the United States and the Soviet Union is the subject of the latest and most voluminous title in the Natural Resources Defense Council`s highly acclaimed Nuclear Weapons Databook series. Volume 5 explains how atomic and thermonuclear weapons spread to Britain, France, and China despite the political turmoil and economic hardship that beset these countries. The history of the British nuclear weapons program includes the most comprehensive collection of photos and specifications of British warheads and nuclear tests ever assembled in one publication. The role of the United States in the French nuclear weapons program is discussed. This is a comprehensive source for the mechanics and politics of nuclear weapons proliferation.

  5. Foundations of Nuclear Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, J. M.; Hollenbach, D. F.

    2002-05-01

    Herndon suggested that the inner core of the Earth consists, not of partially crystallized iron metal, but of nickel silicide. He has shown by fundamental mass ratios that i) the Earth as a whole, especially the inner 82%, has a state of oxidation like primitive enstatite chondrites, and ii) the lower mantle and core are similar in composition to the Abee enstatite chondrite. By analogy with Abee data, CaS and MgS precipitates from the core are expected to collect at the core-mantle boundary and, significantly, a major fraction of the actinides are expected to precipitate from the core and to collect at the center of the Earth. Herndon demonstrated the feasibility of a nuclear fission reactor at the center of the Earth as the energy source for the geomagnetic field and described a natural mechanism that would lead to variations in energy production and thus variations in the geomagnetic field. Hollenbach and Herndon produced numerical simulations of the operation of the geo-reactor over the lifetime of the Earth using the state-of-the-art, validated, industry standard SCALE code package developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results clearly demonstrate that such a geo-reactor would i) function as a fast-neutron breeder reactor; ii) under appropriate conditions, operate over the entire period of geologic time; iii) function in such a manner as to yield variable and/or intermittent output; iv) generate energy at levels in the range generally accepted by the geophysics community; and, v) produce He-3 and He-4 in ratios that are in the range observed from deep-mantle sources. Deep-source He-3, the authors submit, is evidence of in-core sustained nuclear fission, rather than the out-gassing of primordial He-3; which in turn is evidence of large amounts of uranium residing in the Earth's core; which in turn is evidence that the core has a state of oxidation like the corresponding matter in primitive enstatite chondrites. The factors affecting He-3/He-4 ratios

  6. Nanoparticles of Ni(II) and Co(II) metallo-organic molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras Ojea, María José; Pons Balagué, Alba; Reta Mañeru, Daniel; Carolina Sañudo, E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of a neutral fluorescent Co(II) ferromagnet and a high nuclearity coordination Ni(II) complex have been prepared. The stability in solution of the complexes has been studied by paramagnetic proton NMR. The formation of nanoparticles from 5 to 500 nm in size, depending on the synthetic conditions, has been checked by TEM, UV-Vis and fluorescence.

  7. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  8. Nuclear war: Opposing viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Szumski, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents opposing viewpoints on nuclear war. Topics discussed include: how nuclear would begin; would humanity survive; would civil defense work; will an arms agreement work; and can space weapons reduce the risk of nuclear war.

  9. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  10. Nuclear thermal/nuclear electric hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of the nuclear thermal and nuclear electric hybrid. The specifications are described along with its mission performance. Next, the technical status, development requirements, and some cost estimates are provided.

  11. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  12. Nuclear South Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    inseparable from the history of nuclear developments in both India and Pakistan. The timing of India’s tests was determined by the pronuclear stance of the...Rawalpindi, 2001), 17-18. 53 3Robert Boardman, The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear Exports and World Politics (New...disasters of nuclear arms race. 61 BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Boardman, Robert. The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear

  13. Hollow nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Gao-Chan

    2016-01-01

    It is generally considered that an atomic nucleus is always compact. Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann nuclear transport model, here I show that large block nuclear matter or excited nuclear matter may both be hollow. The size of the inner bubble in these matter is affected by the charge number of nuclear matter. The existence of hollow nuclear matter may have many implications in nuclear or atomic physics or astrophysics as well as some practical applications.

  14. Projected Costs of U.S. Nuclear Forces, 2017 to 2026

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    CBO FEBRUARY 2017 Projected Costs of U.S. Nuclear Forces, 2017 to 2026 Nuclear weapons have been a cornerstone of U.S. national security since they...were developed during World War II. In the Cold War, nuclear forces were central to U.S. defense policy, resulting in the buildup of a large...arsenal. Since that time, nuclear forces have figured less prominently than conventional forces, and the United States has not built any new nuclear

  15. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  16. Delta II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Delta II expendable launch vehicle with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite), cooperative space X-ray astronomy mission between NASA, Germany and United Kingdom, was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on June 1, 1990.

  17. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  18. Nuclear Proliferation: A Global Nuclear Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    thinking about nuclear weapons as a “ Wild Card ” in this case. Finally, just as North Korea is using nuclear weapons as a “bargaining chip,” we...definite disadvantage for non-nuclear nations not to have a nuclear” Wild Card ”. So some misguided Japanese politicians are attracted to the “ Wild Card ” advantage

  19. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  20. General Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Biopsies - Overview Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) Alzheimer's Disease X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  1. Focused technology: Nuclear propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Five viewgraphs are presented that outline the objectives and elements of the Nuclear Propulsion Program, mission considerations, propulsion technologies, and the logic flow path for nuclear propulsion development.

  2. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  3. Why Nuclear Education? A Sourcebook for Educators and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Susan

    This guide is designed as a resource for individuals and groups who are considering why and how to implement teaching about nuclear issues in the classroom. Section I presents some questions frequently asked about nuclear education and responses based upon the experience and research of Educators for Social Responsibility. Section II highlights…

  4. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  5. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  6. Nuclear Power in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun

    2012-02-01

    In response to the Fukushima accident, China is strengthening its nuclear safety at reactors in operation, under construction and in preparation, including efforts to improve nuclear safety regulations and guidelines based on lessons learned from the accident. Although China is one of the major contributors in the global nuclear expansion, China's nuclear power industry is relatively young. Its nuclear safety regulators are less experienced compared to those in other major nuclear power countries. To realize China's resolute commitment to rapid growth of safe nuclear energy, detailed analyses of its nuclear safety regulatory system are required. This talk explains China's nuclear energy program and policy at first. It also explores China's governmental activities and future nuclear development after Fukushima accidents. At last, an overview of China's nuclear safety regulations and practices are provided. Issues and challenges are also identified for police makers, regulators, and industry professionals.

  7. Theoretical study of the nuclear spin-molecular rotation coupling for relativistic electrons and non-relativistic nuclei. II. Quantitative results in HX (X = H,F,Cl,Br,I) compounds.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gómez, Sergio S; Melo, Juan I; Giribet, Claudia C; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C

    2013-04-07

    In the present work, numerical results of the nuclear spin-rotation (SR) tensor in the series of compounds HX (X = H,F,Cl,Br,I) within relativistic 4-component expressions obtained by Aucar et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 204119 (2012)] are presented. The SR tensors of both the H and X nuclei are discussed. Calculations were carried out within the relativistic Linear Response formalism at the Random Phase Approximation with the DIRAC program. For the halogen nucleus X, correlation effects on the non-relativistic values are shown to be of similar magnitude and opposite sign to relativistic effects. For the light H nucleus, by means of the linear response within the elimination of the small component approach it is shown that the whole relativistic effect is given by the spin-orbit operator combined with the Fermi contact operator. Comparison of "best estimate" calculated values with experimental results yield differences smaller than 2%-3% in all cases. The validity of "Flygare's relation" linking the SR tensor and the NMR nuclear magnetic shielding tensor in the present series of compounds is analyzed.

  8. Data trimming, nuclear emissions, and climate change.

    PubMed

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin Sharon

    2009-03-01

    Ethics requires good science. Many scientists, government leaders, and industry representatives support tripling of global-nuclear-energy capacity on the grounds that nuclear fission is "carbon free" and "releases no greenhouse gases." However, such claims are scientifically questionable (and thus likely to lead to ethically questionable energy choices) for at least 3 reasons. (i) They rely on trimming the data on nuclear greenhouse-gas emissions (GHGE), perhaps in part because flawed Kyoto Protocol conventions require no full nuclear-fuel-cycle assessment of carbon content. (ii) They underestimate nuclear-fuel-cycle releases by erroneously assuming that mostly high-grade uranium ore, with much lower emissions, is used. (iii) They inconsistently compare nuclear-related GHGE only to those from fossil fuels, rather than to those from the best GHG-avoiding energy technologies. Once scientists take account of (i)-(iii), it is possible to show that although the nuclear fuel cycle releases (per kWh) much fewer GHG than coal and oil, nevertheless it releases far more GHG than wind and solar-photovoltaic. Although there may be other, ethical, reasons to support nuclear tripling, reducing or avoiding GHG does not appear to be one of them.

  9. Consequences of Regional Scale Nuclear Conflicts and Acts of Individual Nuclear Terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    The number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986. However, the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races, and for a significant expansion in the number of nuclear weapons states. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build weapons if they so desire. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in "megacities", which are ideal targets for nuclear weapons. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as high-yield weapons, if they are targeted at city centers. A single low-yield nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in major historical conflicts. A regional war between the smallest current nuclear states involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal) could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II (WW-II), or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Portions of megacities attacked with nuclear devices or exposed to fallout of long-lived isotopes, through armed conflict or terrorism, would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war might induce significant climatic and ozone anomalies on global scales. While there are many uncertainties in the issues we discuss here, the major uncertainties are the type and scale of conflict that might occur. Each of these potential hazards deserves careful analysis by governments worldwide advised by a broad section of the world scientific community, as well as widespread

  10. Nuclear and Radiochemistry: the First 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, G.; Herrmann, G.

    This chapter gives a brief overview of the development of nuclear and radiochemistry from Mme. Curie's chemical isolation of radium toward the end of the twentieth century. The first four sections deal with fairly distinct time periods: (1) the pioneering years when the only radioactive materials available were the naturally occurring ones; (2) the decade of rapid growth and expansion of both the fundamental science and its applications following the discoveries of the neutron and artificial radioactivity; (3) the World War II period characterized by the intense exploration of nuclear fission and its ramifications; (4) what can be called the “golden era” - the 3 to 4 decades following World War II when nuclear science was generously supported and therefore flourished. In the final section, research trends pursued near the end of the century are briefly touched upon.

  11. Nuclear power for Mars surface

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Buksa, J.J.; Howe, S.D.

    1993-01-01

    Safe, reliable, low-mass, low-volume, long-life nuclear fission power supplies are an attractive option for meeting lunar and Martian surface power requirements. Two factors will have a strong impact on the suitability of a surface nuclear power supply: the technology used by the reactor and the overall system mass. Because thermionic technology is well suited for surface applications, this paper briefly discusses the existing 6 kWe Russian TOPAZ II reactor and two near-term US thermionic space nuclear power supplies capable of providing 40 kWe. Man-rated shielding will be a significant fraction of the mass of any surface nuclear fission power supply. Because of the importance of optimizing the reactor shield, this paper presents detailed calculations related to the shielding properties of lunar and Martian soil, and the effectiveness of using existing craters to shield a reactor. Preliminary results indicate that it may be desirable to incorporate neutron shielding into the reactor design, but when possible in-situ materials should be used. Preliminary calculations also indicate that while existing craters could provide substantial shielding, radiation scatter off of the crater rim may limit the overall shielding effectiveness of the crater. 7 refs.

  12. Who Should Control Nuclear Technology? A Curriculum Unit for Contemporary U.S. and World History, Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimney, Michelle; Boston, Jane

    Since the end of World War II and the onset of the "new age," nuclear technology has remained high on the world's agenda as questions regarding sovereignty and the balance of power, control of the development and spread of nuclear weapons, non-military uses for nuclear technology, and nuclear safety are debated among and within nations.…

  13. Who Should Control Nuclear Technology? A Curriculum Unit for Contemporary U.S. and World History, Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimney, Michelle; Boston, Jane

    Since the end of World War II and the onset of the "new age," nuclear technology has remained high on the world's agenda as questions regarding sovereignty and the balance of power, control of the development and spread of nuclear weapons, non-military uses for nuclear technology, and nuclear safety are debated among and within nations.…

  14. Virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Kojidani, Tomoko; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Sato, Mamiko; Ding, Da-Qiao; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2010-11-09

    Asymmetric localization of Ran regulators (RanGAP1 and RanGEF/RCC1) produces a gradient of RanGTP across the nuclear envelope. In higher eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope breaks down as the cell enters mitosis (designated "open" mitosis). This nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) leads to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and the diffusion of nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules in the cell, resulting in irreversible progression of the cell cycle. On the other hand, in many fungi, chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD (designated "closed" mitosis). Here we report that in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, despite the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complex remaining intact throughout both the meiotic and mitotic cell cycles, nuclear proteins diffuse into the cytoplasm transiently for a few minutes at the onset of anaphase of meiosis II. We also found that nuclear protein diffusion into the cytoplasm occurred coincidently with nuclear localization of Rna1, an S. pombe RanGAP1 homolog that is usually localized in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that nuclear localization of RanGAP1 and depression of RanGTP activity in the nucleus may be mechanistically tied to meiosis-specific diffusion of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This nucleocytoplasmic shuffling of RanGAP1 and nuclear proteins represents virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  15. Terrorists and Nuclear Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, David

    1975-01-01

    This essay explores the ways terrorist groups may gain possession of nuclear materials; the way in which they may use nuclear weapons and other nuclear technologies to their benefit; and various courses of action designed to minimize the possibilities of terrorists utilizing nuclear technology to their benefit and society's detriment. (BT)

  16. Terrorists and Nuclear Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, David

    1975-01-01

    This essay explores the ways terrorist groups may gain possession of nuclear materials; the way in which they may use nuclear weapons and other nuclear technologies to their benefit; and various courses of action designed to minimize the possibilities of terrorists utilizing nuclear technology to their benefit and society's detriment. (BT)

  17. Nuclear medicine annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed in this work: nuclear physicians role in planning for and handling radiation accidents; the role of nuclear medicine in evaluating the hypertensive patient; studies of the heart with radionuclides; role of radionuclide imaging in the patient undergoing chemotherapy; hematologic nuclear medicine; the role of nuclear medicine in sports related injuries; radionuclide evaluation of hepatic function with emphasis on cholestatis.

  18. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    Current developments in nuclear structure at the `limits` are discussed. The studies of nuclear behavior at extreme conditions provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk frontiers of nuclear structure are briefly reviewed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  19. The New Nuclear Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the issue of nuclear proliferation, noting that the countries with nuclear capability now include Israel, South Africa, India, and Pakistan. Describes the role and problems of the United States in halting nuclearization. Supplies charts, maps, and information concerning the state of nuclear capability in each country. (NL)

  20. Nuclear energy and security

    SciTech Connect

    BLEJWAS,THOMAS E.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; EAGAN,ROBERT J.; BAKER,ARNOLD B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity.

  1. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  2. Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation

    DOE PAGES

    Pozzi, Sara A.; Hamel, Michael C.; Polack, J. Kyle; ...

    2016-11-13

    The detection and characterization of special nuclear materials is a high priority area for applications in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. We are developing new instruments based on organic scintillators to detect and characterize the emissions from special nuclear materials. This paper describes some of the gaps and challenges in nuclear safeguards and proposed approaches.

  3. The New Nuclear Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the issue of nuclear proliferation, noting that the countries with nuclear capability now include Israel, South Africa, India, and Pakistan. Describes the role and problems of the United States in halting nuclearization. Supplies charts, maps, and information concerning the state of nuclear capability in each country. (NL)

  4. Biosorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions by cross-linked metal-imprinted chitosans with epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yun; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Arh-Hwang

    2011-03-01

    Cross-linked metal-imprinted chitosan microparticles were prepared from chitosan, using four metals (Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II)) as templates, and epichlorohydrin as the cross-linker. The microparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. They were used for comparative biosorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in an aqueous solution. The results showed that the sorption capacities of Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II) on the templated microparticles increased from 25 to 74%, 13 to 46%, 41 to 57%, and 12 to 43%, respectively, as compared to the microparticles without metal ion templates. The dynamic study showed that the sorption process followed the second-order kinetic equation. Three sorption models, Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich, were applied to the equilibrium isotherm data. The result showed that the Langmuir isotherm equation best fitted for monolayer sorption processes. Furthermore, the microparticles can be regenerated and reused for the metal removal.

  5. [Chilean nuclear policy].

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, E

    1996-06-01

    This official document is statement of the President of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, Dr. Eduardo Bobadilla, about the nuclear policy of the Chilean State, Thanks to the international policy adopted by presidents Aylwin (1990-1994) and his successor Frei Ruiz Tagle (1994-), a nuclear development plan, protected by the Chilean entrance to the nuclear weapons non proliferation treaty and Tlatelolco Denuclearization treaty, has started. Chile will be able to develop without interference, an autonomous nuclear electrical system and other pacific uses of nuclear energy. Chile also supports a new international treaty to ban nuclear weapon tests.

  6. Perspectives of The Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) on future nuclear powered space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.B. ); Pyatt, D.W. ); Sholtis, J.A. ); Winchester, R.O. , c/o Directorate of Nuclear Surety, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 )

    1993-01-10

    The Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) has provided reviews of all nuclear powered spacecraft launched by the United States. The two most recent launches were Ulysses in 1990 and Galileo in 1989. One reactor was launched in 1965 (SNAP-10A). All other U.S. space missions have utilized radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTGs). There are several missions in the next few years that are to be nuclear powered, including one that would utilize the Topaz II reactor purchased from Russia. INSRP must realign itself to perform parallel safety assessments of a reactor powered space mission, which has not been done in about thirty years, and RTG powered missions.

  7. The nuclear freeze controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, K.B.; Gray, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear arms control. Topics considered include the background and rationale behind the nuclear freeze proposal, nuclear deterrence, national defense, arms races, arms buildup, warfare, the moral aspects of nuclear deterrence, treaty verification, the federal budget, the economy, a historical perspective on Soviet policy toward the freeze, the other side of the Soviet peace offensive, and making sense of the nuclear freeze debate.

  8. Integrated residency training pathways of the future: diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Oates, M Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Following up on the recommendations of the ACR/SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training, the respective leaderships convened Task Force II. Its charge is to develop realistic residency training pathways integrating diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging. The diagnostic radiology participants offer these "pathways of the future" that are built on a foundation of training in diagnostic radiology. It is hoped that these pathways will ensure that the traditional and emerging clinical, educational, and research domains of nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging will be sustained and will indeed flourish in the decades to come. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Advanced nuclear precleaner

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.R.

    1997-10-01

    This Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program`s goal is to develop a dynamic, self-cleaning air precleaner for high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration systems that would extend significantly the life of HEPA filter banks by reducing the particulate matter that causes filter fouling and increased pack pressure. HEPA filters are widely used in DOE, Department of Defense, and a variety of commercial facilities. InnovaTech, Inc. (Formerly Micro Composite materials Corporation) has developed a proprietary dynamic separation device using a concept called Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer (BLMT) to extract particulate matter from fluid process streams. When used as a prefilter in the HVAC systems or downstream of waste vitrifiers in nuclear power plants, fuel processing facilities, and weapons decommissioning factories, the BLMT filter will dramatically extend the service life and increase the operation efficiency of existing HEPA filtration systems. The BLMT filter is self cleaning, so there will be no degraded flow or increased pressure drop. Because the BLMT filtration process is independent of temperature, it can be designed to work in ambient, medium, or high-temperature applications. During Phase II, the authors are continuing development of the computerized flow simulation model to include turbulence and incorporate expansion into a three-dimensional model that includes airflow behavior inside the filter housing before entering the active BLMT device. A full-scale (1000 ACFM) prototype filter is being designed to meet existing HEPA filter standards and will be fabricated for subsequent testing. Extensive in-house testing will be performed to determine a full range of performance characteristics. Final testing and evaluation of the prototype filter will be conducted at a DOE Quality Assurance Filter Test Station.

  10. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  11. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  13. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  15. FAQs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    In their paper entitled "Why should postsecondary institutions consider partnering to offer (Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?" the authors reviewed frequently asked questions they encountered from higher education professionals about IDAs, but as their research continued so did the questions. FAQ II has more in-depth questions and…

  16. 75 FR 3497 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ..., ``Hybrid Hearing Procedures for Expansion of Spent Fuel Storage Capacity at Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear...

  17. Quantum nuclear pasta and nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, F. J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Schuetrumpf, B.

    2017-05-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries, collectively referred to as "nuclear pasta," are expected to appear naturally in dense nuclear matter found in the crusts of neutron stars and supernovae environments. The pasta geometries depend on the average baryon density, proton fraction, and temperature and are critically important in the determination of many transport properties of matter in supernovae and the crusts of neutron stars. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals, we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0.03 ≤ρ ≤0.10 fm-3 , proton fractions 0.05 ≤Yp≤0.40 , and zero temperature. The full quantum simulations, in particular, allow us to thoroughly investigate the role and impact of the nuclear symmetry energy on pasta configurations. We use the Sky3D code that solves the Skyrme Hartree-Fock equations on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. For the nuclear interaction we use the state-of-the-art UNEDF1 parametrization, which was introduced to study largely deformed nuclei, hence is suitable for studies of the nuclear pasta. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is simulated by tuning two purely isovector observables that are insensitive to the current available experimental data. We find that a minimum total number of nucleons A =2000 is necessary to prevent the results from containing spurious shell effects and to minimize finite size effects. We find that a variety of nuclear pasta geometries are present in the neutron star crust, and the result strongly depends on the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of the nuclear symmetry energy is less pronounced as the proton fractions increase. Quantum nuclear pasta calculations at T =0 MeV are shown to get easily trapped in metastable states, and possible remedies to avoid metastable solutions are discussed.

  18. The Future Nuclear Arms Control Agenda and Its Potential Implications for the Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear Arms Control Agenda and Its Potential Implications for the Air Force     The Future Nuclear Arms Control Agenda and Its Potential...TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction: The Future Nuclear Arms Control Agenda and Its Potential Implications for the Air Force...1 II. The Arms Control Context

  19. Consideration of Initial Nuclear Radiation in an Attack on a Civilian Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    4 2.Initial Nuclear Radiation. .. ................ 5 D. Thermal and Residual ?Fuclear Radiation ....... 9 E. Blast Casualties...Comparison of Distance and Explosive Yield for Blast, Thermal Radiation, and Components of the Initial Nuclear Radiation Field ..... ........... 15 II...several of the phenomena. Phenomena that occur promptly are air blast and ground shock, thermal radiation and heat, initial nuclear radiation, and

  20. 78 FR 35989 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ..., Maryland 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elaine N. Keegan, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U... second light-water nuclear reactor (the facility), WBN Unit 2, located on the applicant's site in Rhea... Branch II-1, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. BILLING...

  1. 7SK small nuclear RNA, a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA with gene-specific features.

    PubMed

    Egloff, Sylvain; Studniarek, Cécilia; Kiss, Tamás

    2017-08-18

    The 7SK small nuclear RNA is a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA that controls the nuclear activity of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), specifically targets P-TEFb to the promoter regions of selected protein-coding genes and promotes transcription of RNA polymerase II-specific spliceosomal small nuclear RNA genes.

  2. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  3. Recent developments in Topaz II reactor safety assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1993-07-01

    In December 1991, the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of a US launch of a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. The primary mission goal would be to demonstrate and evaluate Nuclear Electric Propulsion technology to establish a capability for future civilian and military missions. A preliminary nuclear safety assessment, involving selected safety analyses, was initiated to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. This paper describes the preliminary safety assessment results and the nuclear safety program now being established for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP).

  4. Technical evaluation report TMI action -- NUREG-0737 (II.D.1). Relief and safety valve testing, Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Dockets 50-390 and 50-391)

    SciTech Connect

    Fineman, C.P.

    1995-02-01

    In the past, safety and relief valves installed in the primary coolant system of light water reactors have performed improperly. As a result, the authors of NUREG-0578 (TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force Status Report and Short-Term Recommendations) and, subsequently, NUREG-0737 (Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements) recommended development and completion of programs to do two things. First, they should reevaluate the functional performance capabilities of pressurized water reactor safety, relief, and block valves. Second, they should verify the integrity of the pressurizer safety and relief valve piping systems for normal, transient, and accident conditions. This report documents the review of those programs by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company. Specifically, this report documents the review of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Applicant response to the requirements of NUREG-0578 and NUREG-0737. This review found the Applicant provided an acceptable response reconfirming they met General Design Criteria 14, 15, and 30 of Appendix A to 10 CFR 50 for the subject equipment. It should also be noted Lockheed Idaho performed this review for both Units 1 and 2. However, the applicability of this review to Unit 2 depends on verifying that the Unit 2 as-built system conforms to the Unit 1 design reviewed in this report.

  5. Atmospheric discharge and dispersion of radionuclides during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Part II: verification of the source term and analysis of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion.

    PubMed

    Terada, Hiroaki; Katata, Genki; Chino, Masamichi; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2012-10-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric dispersion simulations were carried out to verify the source term of (131)I and (137)Cs estimated in our previous studies, and to analyze the atmospheric dispersion and surface deposition during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The accuracy of the source term was evaluated by comparing the simulation results with measurements of daily and monthly surface depositions (fallout) over land in eastern Japan from March 12 to April 30, 2011. The source term was refined using observed air concentrations of radionuclides for periods when there were significant discrepancies between the calculated and measured daily surface deposition, and when environmental monitoring data, which had not been used in our previous studies, were now available. The daily surface deposition using the refined source term was predicted mostly to within a factor of 10, and without any apparent bias. Considering the errors in the model prediction, the estimated source term is reasonably accurate during the period when the plume flowed over land in Japan. The analysis of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion and deposition suggests that the present distribution of a large amount of (137)Cs deposition in eastern Japan was produced primarily by four events that occurred on March 12, 15-16, 20, and 21-23. The ratio of wet deposition to the total varied widely depending on the influence by the particular event. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  7. 77 FR 16098 - In the Matter of All Operating Boiling Water Reactor Licensees With Mark I and Mark II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... Communications.'' The Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation may, in writing, relax or rescind any of the... writing to the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Nuclear Reactor Regulation. Operating Boiling Water Reactor Licenses With Mark I and Mark II...

  8. Nuclear Methods for Transmutation of Nuclear Waste: Problems, Perspextives, Cooperative Research - Proceedings of the International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khankhasayev, Zhanat B.; Kurmanov, Hans; Plendl, Mikhail Kh.

    1996-12-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * I. Review of Current Status of Nuclear Transmutation Projects * Accelerator-Driven Systems — Survey of the Research Programs in the World * The Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation of Nuclear Waste Concept * Nuclear Waste Transmutation Program in the Czech Republic * Tentative Results of the ISTC Supported Study of the ADTT Plutonium Disposition * Recent Neutron Physics Investigations for the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle * Optimisation of Accelerator Systems for Transmutation of Nuclear Waste * Proton Linac of the Moscow Meson Factory for the ADTT Experiments * II. Computer Modeling of Nuclear Waste Transmutation Methods and Systems * Transmutation of Minor Actinides in Different Nuclear Facilities * Monte Carlo Modeling of Electro-nuclear Processes with Nonlinear Effects * Simulation of Hybrid Systems with a GEANT Based Program * Computer Study of 90Sr and 137Cs Transmutation by Proton Beam * Methods and Computer Codes for Burn-Up and Fast Transients Calculations in Subcritical Systems with External Sources * New Model of Calculation of Fission Product Yields for the ADTT Problem * Monte Carlo Simulation of Accelerator-Reactor Systems * III. Data Basis for Transmutation of Actinides and Fission Products * Nuclear Data in the Accelerator Driven Transmutation Problem * Nuclear Data to Study Radiation Damage, Activation, and Transmutation of Materials Irradiated by Particles of Intermediate and High Energies * Radium Institute Investigations on the Intermediate Energy Nuclear Data on Hybrid Nuclear Technologies * Nuclear Data Requirements in Intermediate Energy Range for Improvement of Calculations of ADTT Target Processes * IV. Experimental Studies and Projects * ADTT Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center * Neutron Multiplicity Distributions for GeV Proton Induced Spallation Reactions on Thin and Thick Targets of Pb and U * Solid State Nuclear Track Detector and

  9. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  10. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  11. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C.

    2016-05-22

    One interdisciplinary field devoted to achieving the end-state of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through reuse and/or permanent disposal. The reuse option aims to make use of the remaining energy content in UNF and reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive materials that require permanent disposal. The planned approach in the U.S., as well as in many other countries worldwide, is direct permanent disposal in a deep geologic repository. Used nuclear fuel is fuel that has been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to the point where it is no longer capable of sustaining operational objectives. The vast majority (by mass) of UNF is from electricity generation in commercial nuclear power reactors. Furthermore, the other main source of UNF in the U.S. is the Department of Energy’s (DOE) and other federal agencies’ operation of reactors in support of federal government missions, such as materials production, nuclear propulsion, research, testing, and training. Upon discharge from a reactor, UNF emits considerable heat from radioactive decay. Some period of active on-site cooling (e.g., 2 or more years) is typically required to facilitate efficient packaging and transportation to a disposition facility. Hence, the field of UNF disposition broadly includes storage, transportation and ultimate disposition. See also: Nuclear Fission (content/nuclear-fission/458400), Nuclear Fuels (/content/nuclear-fuels/458600), Nuclear Fuel Cycle (/content/nuclear-fuel-cycle/458500), Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing (/content/nuclear-fuels-reprocessing/458700), Nuclear Power (/content/nuclear-power/459600), Nuclear Reactor (/content/nuclear-reactor/460100), Radiation (/content/radiation/566300), and Radioactive Waste Management (/content/radioactive-waste-management/568900).

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposition

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, John C.

    2016-05-22

    One interdisciplinary field devoted to achieving the end-state of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through reuse and/or permanent disposal. The reuse option aims to make use of the remaining energy content in UNF and reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive materials that require permanent disposal. The planned approach in the U.S., as well as in many other countries worldwide, is direct permanent disposal in a deep geologic repository. Used nuclear fuel is fuel that has been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to the point where it is no longer capable of sustaining operational objectives. The vast majority (by mass) of UNFmore » is from electricity generation in commercial nuclear power reactors. Furthermore, the other main source of UNF in the U.S. is the Department of Energy’s (DOE) and other federal agencies’ operation of reactors in support of federal government missions, such as materials production, nuclear propulsion, research, testing, and training. Upon discharge from a reactor, UNF emits considerable heat from radioactive decay. Some period of active on-site cooling (e.g., 2 or more years) is typically required to facilitate efficient packaging and transportation to a disposition facility. Hence, the field of UNF disposition broadly includes storage, transportation and ultimate disposition. See also: Nuclear Fission (content/nuclear-fission/458400), Nuclear Fuels (/content/nuclear-fuels/458600), Nuclear Fuel Cycle (/content/nuclear-fuel-cycle/458500), Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing (/content/nuclear-fuels-reprocessing/458700), Nuclear Power (/content/nuclear-power/459600), Nuclear Reactor (/content/nuclear-reactor/460100), Radiation (/content/radiation/566300), and Radioactive Waste Management (/content/radioactive-waste-management/568900).« less

  14. A Conversation with William A. Fowler Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, John

    2005-06-01

    Physicist William A.Fowler initiated an experimental program in nuclear astrophysics after World War II. He recalls here the Steady State versus Big Bang controversy and his celebrated collaboration with Fred Hoyle and Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge on nucleosynthesis in stars. He also comments on the shift away from nuclear physics in universities to large accelerators and national laboratories.

  15. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  16. Quantitative assessment of amide proton transfer (APT) and nuclear overhauser enhancement (NOE) imaging with extrapolated semisolid magnetization transfer reference (EMR) signals: II. Comparison of three EMR models and application to human brain glioma at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Heo, Hye-Young; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Shanshan; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the use of three extrapolated semisolid magnetization transfer reference (EMR) methods to quantify amide proton transfer (APT) and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) signals in human glioma. Eleven patients with high-grade glioma were scanned at 3 Tesla. aEMR(2) (asymmetric magnetization-transfer or MT model to fit two-sided, wide-offset data), sEMR(2) (symmetric MT model to fit two-sided, wide-offset data), and sEMR(1) (symmetric MT model to fit one-sided, wide-offset data) were assessed. ZEMR and experimental data at 3.5 ppm and -3.5 ppm were subtracted to calculate the APT and NOE signals (APT(#) and NOE(#)), respectively. The aEMR(2) and sEMR(1) models provided quite similar APT(#) signals, while the sEMR(2) provided somewhat lower APT(#) signals. The aEMR(2) had an erroneous NOE(#) quantification. Calculated APT(#) signal intensities of glioma (∼4%), much larger than the values reported previously, were significantly higher than those of edema and normal tissue. Compared with normal tissue, gadolinium-enhancing tumor cores were consistently hyperintense on the APT(#) maps and slightly hypointense on the NOE(#) maps. The sEMR(1) model is the best choice for accurately quantifying APT and NOE signals. The APT-weighted hyperintensity in the tumor was dominated by the APT effect, and the MT asymmetry at 3.5 ppm is a reliable and valid metric for APT imaging of gliomas at 3T. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Radon and Thoron Measured in Petrol and Gas-oil Exhaust Fumes by Using CR-39 and LR-115 II Nuclear Track Detectors: Radiation Doses to the Respiratory Tract of Mechanic Workers.

    PubMed

    Misdaq, M A; Chaouqi, A; Ouguidi, J; Touti, R; Mortassim, A

    2015-06-01

    Mechanic workers are exposed to exhaust fumes when controlling vehicle engines in motion inside repair shops. To assess radiation doses due to radon short-lived progeny from the inhalation of exhaust fumes by mechanic workers, concentrations of these radionuclides were measured in petrol (gasoline) and gas-oil exhaust fumes by evaluating mean critical angles of etching of the CR-39 and LR-115 type II SSNTDs for alpha particles emitted by the radon and thoron decay series. Committed effective doses due to ²¹⁸Po and ²¹⁴Po short-lived radon decay products from the inhalation of petrol and gas-oil exhaust fumes by workers were evaluated. A maximum value of 1.35 mSv y⁻¹ due to radon short-lived decay products from the inhalation of gas-oil exhaust fumes by mechanic workers was found, which is lower than the (3-10 mSv y⁻¹) dose limit interval for workers.

  18. A mutation in At-nMat1a, which encodes a nuclear gene having high similarity to group II intron maturase, causes impaired splicing of mitochondrial NAD4 transcript and altered carbon metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Naoki; Sakurai, Naoki

    2006-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of cellulose synthesis, we isolated a mutant of Arabidopsis (changed sensitivity to cellulose synthesis inhibitors 1, css1) that showed changed sensitivity to cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. The analysis of phenotypes indicated that the css1 mutation influenced various fundamental metabolic pathways including amino acid metabolism, triacylglycerol degradation and polysaccharide synthesis (cellulose and starch) during the early stage of plant growth. Unexpectedly, the map-based cloning of the gene responsible for the css1 mutation identified a protein (At-nMat1a) that was assumed to be a splicing factor of the mitochondrial group II intron. In accordance with this result, this mutant exhibited improper splicing of the mitochondrial NAD4 transcript. We noticed that the phenotypes of the css1 mutant are similar to the responses to anoxia that hinders mitochondrial aerobic respiration. It seems that the defect in the function of mitochondria influences various aspects of fundamental cellular metabolism including cellulose synthesis. Our results suggested that sucrose synthase (SuSy), an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of cellulose, plays key roles in the connection between mitochondria and cellulose synthesis. The isolation of the css1 mutant also provides a useful resource in the study of post-transcriptional gene regulation in mitochondria.

  19. Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  20. Pyrochemical Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. Goff; K. L. Howden; G. M. Teske; T. A. Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Over the last 10 years, pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel has progressed from demonstration activities to engineering-scale production operations. As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, pyrochemical treatment operations are being performed as part of the treatment of fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II at the Idaho National Laboratory. Integral to these treatment operations are research and development activities that are focused on scaling further the technology, developing and implementing process improvements, qualifying the resulting high-level waste forms, and demonstrating the overall pyrochemical fuel cycle.

  1. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  2. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's history with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) technology goes back to the earliest days of the Agency. The Manned Lunar Rover Vehicle and the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications p...

  3. Teaching "The Nuclear Predicament."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Philip; Kneeshaw, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Contends that courses on nuclear war must help students examine the political, social, religious, philosophical, economic, and moral assumptions which characterized the dilemma of nuclear armament/disarmament. Describes the upper level undergraduate course taught by the authors. (JDH)

  4. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  5. Teaching "The Nuclear Predicament."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Philip; Kneeshaw, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Contends that courses on nuclear war must help students examine the political, social, religious, philosophical, economic, and moral assumptions which characterized the dilemma of nuclear armament/disarmament. Describes the upper level undergraduate course taught by the authors. (JDH)

  6. Nuclear fear revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  7. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  8. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  9. Nuclear power browning out

    SciTech Connect

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1996-05-01

    When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

  10. JPRS Report Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    release; Distribution Unlimited | -—fb 40 Nuclear Developments JPRS-TND-88-016 CONTENTS 2 SEPTEMBER 1988 CHINA Nuclear Power Chief Seeks...Foreign Cooperation [Yuan Zhou; CHINA DAILY (BUSINESS WEEKLY) 1 Aug 88] 1 Nuclear Fusion Study Reaches Advanced Level [Xiao Longlian; Beijing...Government ’Welcomes’ Group [Beijing XINHUA 12 Aug 88] 4 No Decision on Disposal of Daya Nuclear Waste [Andy Ho; Hong Kong SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST

  11. Nuclear air cushion vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper serves several functions. It identifies the 'state-of-the-art' of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant. Using mission studies and cost estimates, the report describes some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles. The paper also summarizes the technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies that have been performed at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  12. Teaching Nuclear History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holl, Jack M.; Convis, Sheila C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of the teaching about nuclear history at U.S. colleges and universities. Reports the existence of a well-established and extensive literature, a focus on nuclear weapons or warfare, and a concentration on nuclear citizenship, therapy, or eschatology for courses outside of history departments. Discusses individual…

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  14. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  15. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  16. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  17. Nuclear energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  18. Nuclear fact book

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, O. F.; Platt, A. M.; Robinson, J. V.

    1983-05-01

    This reference provides significant highlights and summary facts in the following areas: general energy; nuclear energy; nuclear fuel cycle; uranium supply and enrichment; nuclear reactors; spent fuel and advanced repacking concepts; reprocessing; high-level waste; gaseous waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; remedial action; transportation; disposal; radiation information; environment; legislation; socio-political aspects; conversion factors; and a glossary. (GHT)

  19. Teaching Nuclear History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holl, Jack M.; Convis, Sheila C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of the teaching about nuclear history at U.S. colleges and universities. Reports the existence of a well-established and extensive literature, a focus on nuclear weapons or warfare, and a concentration on nuclear citizenship, therapy, or eschatology for courses outside of history departments. Discusses individual…

  20. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    TURKEY Joint Argentine Firm To Sell Nuclear Reactors [ANATOLIA] ....................................................... 34 Civil Defense Against Iraqi... Reactor and Nuclear Materials Control Law, the Radiation Hazard Prevention Law and the Law on THAILAND the Promotion of Development and Peaceful Applica...and carried without nuclear fuel in the reactor and only with generating unit 5 in particular are obviously passing the help of expensive equipment

  1. Nuclear systems 1

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Kazami, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The book covers thermal hydraulic design fundamentals and analysis of the core of a nuclear reactor. Other components of the nuclear power plant, such as the pressurizer, the containment and the entire primary coolant system are addressed. The book reflects the importance of such considerations in thermal engineering of a modern nuclear power plant.

  2. Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future…

  3. Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future…

  4. PESTICINS II. I and II

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.; Surgalla, Michael J.

    1962-01-01

    Brubaker, Robert R. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Michael J. Surgalla. Pesticins. II. Production of pesticin I and II. J. Bacteriol. 84:539–545. 1962.—Pesticin I was separated from pesticin I inhibitor by ion-exchange chromatography of cell-free culture supernatant fluids and by acid precipitation of soluble preparations obtained from mechanically disrupted cells. The latter procedure resulted in formation of an insoluble pesticin I complex which, upon removal by centrifugation and subsequent dissolution in neutral buffer, exhibited a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in antibacterial activity over that originally observed. However, activity returned to the former level upon addition of the acid-soluble fraction, which contained pesticin I inhibitor. Since the presence of pesticin I inhibitor leads to serious errors in the determination of pesticin I, an assay medium containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in excess Ca++ was developed; this medium eliminated the effect of the inhibitor. By use of the above medium, sufficient pesticin I was found to be contained within 500 nonirradiated cells to inhibit growth of a suitable indicator strain; at least 107 cells were required to effect a corresponding inhibition by pesticin II. Although both pesticins are located primarily within the cell during growth, pesticin I may arise extracellularly during storage of static cells. Slightly higher activity of pesticin I inhibitor was found in culture supernatant fluids than occurred in corresponding cell extracts of equal volume. The differences and similarities between pesticin I and some known bacteriocins are discussed. PMID:14016110

  5. March to Armageddon: The United States and the nuclear arms race, 1939 to the present

    SciTech Connect

    Powaski, R.

    1987-01-01

    This history of the events, forces, and factors that have brought the world to the brink of nuclear holocaust probes two basic questions: what factors perpetuate the nuclear arms race and why is it so difficult to end. Starting with the opening days of World War II, this study traces the escalating arms race up to the present and notes that, while nuclear arsenals continue to grow, nuclear arms treaties are on the verge of collapse.

  6. Living with Nuclear Weapons - Avoiding Nuclear War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    00 LIVING ’V1I4. NUCL EAR WEAPONS -AVOIDING NUCLEAR W~AR C. Pr~ston Niblack ..une -8 P-75-7 The RAND ",rporation Papers are issued by The RAND...necessarily shared by RAND or its research sponsors. The RAND Corporation. 1700 Main Street, P ) Bix 213t8, Santa Monica, CA 90406- � LIVING WITH NUCLEAR...is p"etty impressive. Still, nuclear weapons exist . and that alone is very womsome to many people. including to all of us here, because as long as they

  7. Changing Facets of Nuclear Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covello, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Section I. Exotic nuclear structure. Radioactive beams at TRIUMF / A. C. Shotter. Status of RI-beam factory project at RIKEN / H. Ueno. Population of neutron unbound states via two-proton knockout reactions / N. Frank ... [et al.]. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using ISOL facilities at CERN and Jyväskylä / J. Äystö. Shell structure evolution far from stability: recent results from GANIL / F. Azaiez. Magnetic moment meaurements: pushing the limits / N. Benczer-Koller. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors of excited states with large multi-detector arrays: an application to neutron rich nuclei produced in spontaneous fission / A. V. Ramayya ... [et al.]. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: identification of the 10+ isomer in [symbol]Ni / C. Fahlander ... [et al.]. Exploring the evolution of the shell structure by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Angelis. Studies on the exotic structure of [symbol]Al by measurements of [symbol] and P[symbol] / D. Q. Fang ... [et al.]. Extended cluster model for light and medium nuclei / M. Tomaselli ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei with radioactive beams - present status and future perspectives at FAIR / P. Egelhof. The SPES direct target project at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro / G. Prete ... [et al.] -- Section II. Nuclear structure and nuclear forces. Modern aspects of nuclear structure theory / J. Wambach. Correlations in nuclei: a review / R. Schiavilla. Correlated nucleons in k- and r-space / I. Sick. Roles of all-order core polarizations and Brown-Rho scaling in nucleon effective interactions / T. T. S. Kuo ... [et al.]. Ab initio and ab exitu no core shell model / J. P. Vary ... [et al.]. Ab-initio coupled cluster theory for open quantum systems / G. Hagen ... [et al.]. Symplectic no-core shell model / J. P. Draayer ... [et al.]. Role of deformed symplectic configurations in ab initio no-core shell model results / T. Dytrych ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure

  8. The nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry energy in relation to nuclear structure, astrophysics of Neutron Stars and supernovae, and heavy ion collision experiments, trying to elucidate the connections of these different fields on the basis of the symmetry energy peculiarities. The interplay between experimental and observational data and theoretical developments is stressed. The expected future developments and improvements are schematically addressed, together with most demanded experimental and theoretical advances for the next few years.

  9. History of Nuclear India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ram

    2000-04-01

    India emerged as a free and democratic country in 1947, and entered into the nuclear age in 1948 by establishing the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), with Homi Bhabha as the chairman. Later on the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) was created under the Office of the Prime Minister Jawahar Lal Nehru. Initially the AEC and DAE received international cooperation, and by 1963 India had two research reactors and four nuclear power reactors. In spite of the humiliating defeat in the border war by China in 1962 and China's nuclear testing in 1964, India continued to adhere to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. On May 18, 1974 India performed a 15 kt Peaceful Nuclear Explosion (PNE). The western powers considered it nuclear weapons proliferation and cut off all financial and technical help, even for the production of nuclear power. However, India used existing infrastructure to build nuclear power reactors and exploded both fission and fusion devices on May 11 and 13, 1998. The international community viewed the later activity as a serious road block for the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; both deemed essential to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. India considers these treaties favoring nuclear states and is prepared to sign if genuine nuclear disarmament is included as an integral part of these treaties.

  10. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. The plant nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Rose, Annkatrin; Patel, Shalaka; Meier, Iris

    2004-01-01

    This review summarizes our present knowledge about the composition and function of the plant nuclear envelope. Compared with animals or yeast, our molecular understanding of the nuclear envelope in higher plants is in its infancy. However, fundamental differences in the structure and function of the plant and animal nuclear envelope have already been found. Here, we compare and contrast these differences with respect to nuclear pore complexes, targeting of Ran signaling to the nuclear envelope, inner nuclear envelope proteins, and the role and fate of the nuclear envelope during mitosis. Further investigation of the emerging fundamental differences as well as the similarities between kingdoms might illuminate why there appears to be more than one blueprint for building a nucleus.

  12. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  13. 75 FR 30078 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). By letter dated May 20, 2010, the Director denied the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee...

  14. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Naus, Dan J

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  15. British nuclear policymaking

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, C.J.; Platt, A.

    1984-01-01

    This study analyzes the domestic political, economic, and bureaucratic factors that affect the nuclear policymaking process in Great Britain. Its major conclusion is that, although there have been changes in that process in recent years (notably the current involvement of a segment of the British public in the debate about the deployment of intermediate-range nuclear forces), future British nuclear policymaking will remain much what it has been in the past. Three ideas are central to understanding British thinking on the subject: (1) Britain's long-standing resolve to have her own national nuclear force is largely traceable to her desire to maintain first-rank standing among the nations of the world in spite of loss of empire. (2) Financial considerations have always been important--so much so that they have usually dominated issues of nuclear policy. (3) The executive branch of government dominates the nuclear policymaking process but does not always present a united front. The United States heavily influences British nuclear policy through having supplied Britain since the late 1950s with nuclear data and components of nuclear weapon systems such as Polaris and Trident. The relationship works both ways since the U.S. depends on Britain as a base for deployment of both conventional and nuclear systems.

  16. Fifty years with nuclear fission. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-12-31

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ``Fifty years with nuclear fission,`` in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  17. The Topaz-II project: A technical teaming of US and Russian scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.V.; Wyant, F.J.; Oglobin, B.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes research efforts associated with the Topaz-II project and thermionic conversion. The Thermionic System Evaluation test is a program that is executed by Air FOrce Phillips Laboratory and involves the purchase of two Russian TOPAZ II space nuclear power reactor systems and support equipment necessary for nonuclear ground testing. The laboratory also is involved with the The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Power System that involes the evaluation of the TOPAZ II system from a safety perspective.

  18. Assembly dynamics of PML nuclear bodies in living cells.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenser, Thorsten; Hemmerich, Peter

    2010-03-05

    The mammalian cell nucleus contains a variety of organelles or nuclear bodies which contribute to key nuclear functions. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, antiviral responses, the DNA damage response and chromatin structure, but their precise biochemical function in these nuclear pathways is unknown. One strategy to tackle this problem is to assess the biophysical properties of the component parts of these macromolecular assemblies in living cells. In this study we determined PML NB assembly dynamics by live cell imaging, combined with mathematical modeling. For the first time, dynamics of PML body formation were measured in cells lacking endogenous PML. We show that all six human nuclear PML isoforms are able to form nuclear bodies in PML negative cells. All isoforms exhibit individual exchange rates at NBs in PML positive cells but PML I, II, III and IV are static at nuclear bodies in PML negative cells, suggesting that these isoforms require additional protein partners for efficient exchange. PML V turns over at PML Nbs very slowly supporting the idea of a structural function for this isoform. We also demonstrate that SUMOylation of PML at Lysine positions K160 and/or K490 are required for nuclear body formation in vivo.We propose a model in which the isoform specific residence times of PML provide both, structural stability to function as a scaffold and flexibility to attract specific nuclear proteins for efficient biochemical reactions at the surface of nuclear bodies.MCS code: 92C37.

  19. Nuclear power failure signals end of an era

    SciTech Connect

    Mariotte, M.

    1996-07-01

    In the United States, {open_quotes}the nuclear industry is dead, kaput, finished{close_quotes} says Michael Mariotte, executive director of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service in Washington, D.C. Why? Investors are reluctant to gamble their money on a future generation of supposedly safe, economic nuclear power plants. {open_quotes}in 1979, the `safe` Three Mile Island-2 reactor turned a several-hundred-million-dollar investment into a billion-dollar loss in a matter of hours,{close_quotes} Mariotte says. {open_quotes}In fact, investing in nuclear power at this point would be like investing in the Titanic II.{close_quotes} However, diehard proponents of nuclear energy persist in their optimism for a new nuclear age, Mariotte says. These nuclear backers see the need to replace aging plants with a new generation of safer plants. But would a new generation of reactors really be safer? {open_quotes}To date, the industry may spur some new nuclear plants, it is more likely to lead to alternative renewable sources of energy that are more economical. {open_quotes}The nuclear age has ended as a result of inefficiency and unacceptable risks...After 50 years of sustained abuse, the Earth has finally and deservedly entered the end of the nuclear age,{close_quotes} Mariotte says.

  20. Rational serendipity: "undirected" synthesis of a large {MnCu} complex from pre-formed Mn(II) building blocks.

    PubMed

    Frost, Jamie M; Kettles, Fraser J; Wilson, Claire; Murrie, Mark

    2016-11-15

    Use of an aminopolyalcohol-based Mn(II) complex in solvothermal Cu(II) chemistry leads to a rare example of a high nuclearity heterometallic {MnCu} system, in which four Cu(II)(H1Edte) units trap an inner {MnCu(II)} oxide core.