Science.gov

Sample records for angular momentum distributions

  1. The angular momentum distribution in galactic halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. J.; Zurek, W. H.

    1988-08-01

    N-body simulations are used to model the formation of individual galactic halos from scale-free density perturbations in universes dominated by cold, nondissipative dark matter. In well-mixed halos, the angular momentum distribution is shown to have a systematic behavior with power law index n corresponding to that found for circular rotation curves. For a given n, the distribution of angular momentum has the same trend with radius and energy as that implied for a halo in which all the matter has its maximum possible angular momentum. Dynamical mixing during the relaxation of the halo redistributes both angular momentum and binding energy in an orderly manner. The organized nature of the collapse means that relaxation is not completely violent and that the secondary infall paradigm, in its simplest form, needs to be modified to include the organizing effects of dynamical friction. It is shown that the Mestel hypothesis is not consistent with the final collapsed state of halos, but may be applicable to the collapse of the disks of spirals.

  2. Axions and the galactic angular momentum distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, N.; Sikivie, P.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the behavior of axion dark matter before it falls into a galactic gravitational potential well. The axions thermalize sufficiently fast by gravitational self-interactions that almost all go to their lowest-energy state consistent with the total angular momentum acquired from tidal torquing. That state is a state of rigid rotation on the turnaround sphere. It predicts the occurrence and detailed properties of the caustic rings of dark matter for which observational evidence had been found earlier. We show that the vortices in the axion Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are attractive, unlike those in superfluid He4 and dilute gases. We expect that a large fraction of the vortices in the axion BEC join into a single big vortex along the rotation axis of the galaxy. The resulting enhancement of caustic rings explains the typical size of the rises in the Milky Way rotation curve attributed to caustic rings. We show that baryons and ordinary cold dark matter particles are entrained by the axion BEC and acquire the same velocity distribution. The resulting baryonic angular momentum distribution gives a good qualitative fit to the distributions observed in dwarf galaxies. We give estimates of the minimum fraction of dark matter that is composed of axions.

  3. Orbital angular momentum in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-11-21

    This is the second of two papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. In the companion paper, it is shown that propagation through atmospheric turbulence can create non-trivial angular momentum. Here, we extend the result and demonstrate that this momentum is, at least in part, orbital angular momentum. Specifically, we demonstrate that branch points (in the language of the adaptive optic community) indicate the presence of photons with non-zero OAM. Furthermore, the conditions required to create photons with non-zero orbital angular momentum are ubiquitous. The repercussions of this statement are wide ranging and these are cursorily enumerated. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  4. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  5. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  6. Accessing the quark orbital angular momentum with Wigner distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorcé, Cédric; Pasquini, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The quark orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been recognized as an important piece of the proton spin puzzle. A lot of effort has been invested in trying to extract it quantitatively from the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and the transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs), which are accessed in high-energy processes and provide three-dimensional pictures of the nucleon. Recently, we have shown that it is more natural to access the quark OAM from the phase-space or Wigner distributions. We discuss the concept of Wigner distributions in the context of quantum field theory and show how they are related to the GPDs and the TMDs. We summarize the different definitions discussed in the literature for the quark OAM and show how they can in principle be extracted from the Wigner distributions.

  7. Accessing the quark orbital angular momentum with Wigner distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorce, Cedric

    2013-04-15

    The quark orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been recognized as an important piece of the proton spin puzzle. A lot of effort has been invested in trying to extract it quantitatively from the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and the transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs), which are accessed in high-energy processes and provide three-dimensional pictures of the nucleon. Recently, we have shown that it is more natural to access the quark OAM from the phase-space or Wigner distributions. We discuss the concept of Wigner distributions in the context of quantum field theory and show how they are related to the GPDs and the TMDs. We summarize the different definitions discussed in the literature for the quark OAM and show how they can in principle be extracted from the Wigner distributions.

  8. Statistical mechanics of collisionless orbits. IV. Distribution of angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Liliya L. R.; Hjorth, Jens; Wojtak, Radosław E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown in previous work that DARKexp, which is a theoretically derived, maximum entropy, one shape parameter model for isotropic collisionless systems, provides very good fits to simulated and observed dark matter halos. Specifically, it fits the energy distribution, N(E), and the density profiles, including the central cusp. Here, we extend DARKexp N(E) to include the distribution in angular momentum, L {sup 2}, for spherically symmetric systems. First, we argue, based on theoretical, semi-analytical, and simulation results, that while dark matter halos are relaxed in energy, they are not nearly as relaxed in angular momentum, which precludes using maximum entropy to uniquely derive N(E, L {sup 2}). Instead, we require that when integrating N(E, L {sup 2}) over squared angular momenta one retrieves the DARKexp N(E). Starting with a general expression for N(E, L {sup 2}) we show how the distribution of particles in L {sup 2} is related to the shape of the velocity distribution function, VDF, and velocity anisotropy profile, β(r). We then demonstrate that astrophysically realistic halos, as judged by the VDF shape and β(r), must have linear or convex distributions in L {sup 2}, for each separate energy bin. The distribution in energy of the most bound particles must be nearly flat, and become more tilted in favor of radial orbits for less bound particles. These results are consistent with numerical simulations and represent an important step toward deriving the full distribution function for spherically symmetric dark matter halos.

  9. The Angular Momentum Distribution within Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Jing, Y.

    We study the angular momentum profile of dark matter halos for a statistical sample drawn from a set of high-resolution cosmological simulations of 2563 particles. Two typical Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models have been analyzed, and the halos are selected to have at least 3× 104 particles in order to reliably measure the angular momentum profile. In contrast with the recent claims of Bullock et al. (2001), we find that the degree of misalignment of angular momentum within a halo is very high. About 50 percent of halos have more than 10 percent of halo mass in the mass of negative angular momentum j. After the mass of negative j is excluded, the cumulative mass function M(angular momentum profile of halos in a Warm Dark Matter (WDM) model and a Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) model. We find that the angular momentum profile of halos in the WDM is statistically indistinguishable from that in the CDM model, but the angular momentum of halos in the SIDM is reduced by the self-interaction of dark matter.

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETING GAS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM ONTO CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate gas accretion flow onto a circumplanetary disk from a protoplanetary disk in detail by using high-resolution three-dimensional nested-grid hydrodynamic simulations, in order to provide a basis of formation processes of satellites around giant planets. Based on detailed analyses of gas accretion flow, we find that most of gas accretion onto circumplanetary disks occurs nearly vertically toward the disk surface from high altitude, which generates a shock surface at several scale heights of the circumplanetary disk. The gas that has passed through the shock surface moves inward because its specific angular momentum is smaller than that of the local Keplerian rotation, while gas near the midplane in the protoplanetary disk cannot accrete to the circumplanetary disk. Gas near the midplane within the planet's Hill sphere spirals outward and escapes from the Hill sphere through the two Lagrangian points L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}. We also analyze fluxes of accreting mass and angular momentum in detail and find that the distributions of the fluxes onto the disk surface are well described by power-law functions and that a large fraction of gas accretion occurs at the outer region of the disk, i.e., at about 0.1 times the Hill radius. The nature of power-law functions indicates that, other than the outer edge, there is no specific radius where gas accretion is concentrated. These source functions of mass and angular momentum in the circumplanetary disk would provide us with useful constraints on the structure and evolution of the circumplanetary disk, which is important for satellite formation.

  11. The Evolution of the Angular Momentum Distribution during Star Formation.

    PubMed

    Tomisaka

    2000-01-01

    If the angular momentum of the molecular cloud core were conserved during the star formation process, a newborn star would rotate much faster than its fission speed. This constitutes the angular momentum problem of newborn stars. In this Letter, the angular momentum transfer in the contraction of a rotating magnetized cloud is studied with axisymmetric MHD simulations. Because of the large dynamic range covered by the nested-grid method, the structure of the cloud in the range from 10 AU to 0.1 pc is explored. First, the cloud experiences a runaway collapse, and a disk forms perpendicularly to the magnetic field, in which the central density increases greatly in a finite timescale. In this phase, the specific angular momentum j of the disk decreases to about one-third of the initial cloud. After the central density of the disk exceeds approximately 1010 cm-3, the infall on to the central object develops. In this accretion stage, the rotation motion and thus the toroidal magnetic field drive the outflow. The angular momentum of the central object is transferred efficiently by the outflow as well as by the effect of the magnetic stress. In 7000 yr from the core formation, the specific angular momentum of the central 0.17 M middle dot in circle decreases a factor of 10-4 from the initial value (i.e., from 1020 to 1016 cm2 s-1).

  12. The distribution of mass and angular momentum in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Marochnik, L.S.; Mukhin, L.M.; Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1989-01-01

    This book describes the contribution of the comets in the Oort cloud to the angular momentum of the solar system. Topics covered include: Nuclear mass of the new comets observed, Mass of the Oort cloud, Mass distribution in the solar system, Zone of comet formation, Angular momentum of the Oort cloud, and Angular momentum of the Hills cloud.

  13. The Angular Momentum Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Adelheid; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In the context of the formation of spiral galaxies the evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter halos have been discussed for more than 20 years, especially the idea that the specific angular momentum of the halo can be estimated from the specific angular momentum of its disk (e.g. Fall & Efstathiou (1980), Fall (1983) and Mo et al. (1998)). We use a new set of hydrodynamic cosmological simulations called Magneticum Pathfinder which allow us to split the galaxies into spheroidal and disk galaxies via the circularity parameter ɛ, as commonly used (e.g. Scannapieco et al. (2008)). Here, we focus on the dimensionless spin parameter λ = J |E|1/2 / (G M5/2) (Peebles 1969, 1971), which is a measure of the rotation of the total halo and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution, e.g. Mo et al. (1998). The spin parameter allows one to compare the relative angular momentum of halos across different masses and different times. Fig. 1 reveals a dichotomy in the distribution of λ at all redshifts when the galaxies are split into spheroids (dashed) and disk galaxies (dash-dotted). The disk galaxies preferentially live in halos with slightly larger spin parameter compared to spheroidal galaxies. Thus, we see that the λ of the whole halo reflects the morphology of its central galaxy. For more details and a larger study of the angular momentum properties of disk and spheroidal galaxies, see Teklu et al. (in prep.).

  14. Torque distribution algorithm for effective use of reaction wheel torques and angular momentums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Mikihiro

    2017-10-01

    In attitude control of spacecraft using more than three reaction wheels, the distribution of the attitude control torque to the wheels is not unique because of the redundancy. There are several wheel torque distribution algorithms which optimize the wheel torques or other factors. In particular, the optimal torque distribution algorithm is acknowledged as algorithm which minimizes the maximum wheel torque. This algorithm is advantageous to make maximum use of the wheel torques, because each wheel torque must be lower than the wheel torque capability and torque is the primary driver in many cases. However, as a result of minimizing the maximum wheel torque, the distribution of the wheel angular momentums is not calculated by a similar formula for the wheel torques distribution. In other words, the wheel angular momentums cannot be derived from the current attitude angular momentum. When certain wheel reaches maximum angular momentum earlier than the other wheels, this prohibits maximum use of the other wheels' capability. Therefore, minimizing the maximum wheel torque is not always effective when other constraint such as angular momentum matters. Recently, it has become more important that both wheel torques and angular momentums are used more effectively in order to improve the performance of the spacecraft agility, such as the high angular acceleration and rate, by using minimum spacecraft resources (i.e. minimum number of wheels which satisfies certain agility requirements). In this paper, shown is the wheel torque distribution algorithm which is effective in terms of both the wheel torques and angular momentums as much as possible. In the proposed algorithm, the wheel torques/angular momentums distributed from the current attitude torque/angular momentum can be optimal for particular direction like the spacecraft X/Y/Z axis. In addition, it is shown by numerical simulation that the proposed algorithm improves the usage of attitude control angular momentum by up

  15. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  16. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  17. Angular Momentum in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    We study the ``angular momentum catastrophe" in the framework of interaction among baryons and dark matter through dynamical friction. By means of Del Popolo (2009) model we simulate 14 galaxies similar to those investigated by van den Bosch, Burkert and Swaters (2001), and calculate the distribution of their spin parameters and the angular momenta. Our model gives the angular momentum distribution which is in agreement with the van den Bosch et al. observations. Our result shows that the ``angular momentum catastrophe" can be naturally solved in a model that takes into account the baryonic physics and the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the baryonic clumps and dark matter through dynamical friction.

  18. Angular Momentum Distribution of Hot Gas and Implications for Disk Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. N.; Jing, Y. P.; Yoshikaw, Kohji

    2003-11-01

    We study the angular momentum profiles both for dark matter and for gas within virialized halos using a statistical sample of halos drawn from cosmological hydrodynamics simulations. Three simulations have been analyzed: one is the nonradiative simulation and the other two have radiative cooling. We find that the gas component, on average, has a larger spin and contains a smaller fraction of mass with negative angular momentum than its dark matter counterpart in the nonradiative model. As to the cooling models, the gas component shares approximately the same spin parameter as its dark matter counterpart, but the hot gas has a higher spin and is more aligned in angular momentum than dark matter, while the opposite holds for the cold gas. After the mass of negative angular momentum is excluded, the angular momentum profile of the hot gas component approximately follows the universal function originally proposed by Bullock et al. for dark matter, though the shape parameter μ is much larger for hot gas and is comfortably in the range required by observations of disk galaxies. Since disk formation is related to the distribution of hot gas that will cool, our study may explain the fact that the disk component of observed galaxies contains a smaller fraction of low angular momentum material than dark matter in halos.

  19. Cross sections, momentum distributions, and neutron angular distributions for 11Be induced reactions on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Borcea, C.; Carstoiu, F.; Lewitowicz, M.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Anne, R.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Mueller, A. C.; Pougheon, F.; Sorlin, O.; Fomitchev, A.; Lukyanov, S.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.; Skobelev, N.; Dlouhy, Z.

    1999-04-01

    The halo neutron breakup cross section for 11Be on Si has been obtained in a wide energy range by applying an integral method and separately determining the contributions of stripping and dissociation mechanisms. A new breakup mechanism, for which the core energy is strongly dumped, has also been observed. Parallel momentum distributions of 10Be resulting from breakup have been deduced for both stripping and dissociation and angular and energy distributions of the neutrons coincident with different reaction products have been measured. Charge changing cross sections for 10,11Be complemented the measurements. An extended Glauber model has been elaborated in order to provide a unitary interpretation for all the data. It takes into account both the specific structure of 11Be and the reaction mechanism, practically without free parameters. The effects of reaction mechanisms on the widths of observed momentum distributions are particularly important.

  20. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  1. Angular momentum radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thidé, B.; Tamburini, F.; Then, H.; Someda, C. G.; Mari, Elletra; Parisi, G.; Spinello, F.; Romanato, Fra

    2014-02-01

    Wireless communication amounts to encoding information onto physical observables carried by electromagnetic (EM) fields, radiating them into surrounding space, and detecting them remotely by an appropriate sensor connected to an informationdecoding receiver. Each observable is second order in the fields and fulfills a conservation law. In present-day radio only the EM linear momentum observable is fully exploited. A fundamental physical limitation of this observable, which represents the translational degrees of freedom of the charges (typically an oscillating current along a linear antenna) and the fields, is that it is single-mode. This means that a linear-momentum radio communication link comprising one transmitting and one receiving antenna, known as a single-input-single-output (SISO) link, can provide only one transmission channel per frequency (and polarization). In contrast, angular momentum, which represents the rotational degrees of freedom, is multi-mode, allowing an angular-momentum SISO link to accommodate an arbitrary number of independent transmission channels on one and the same frequency (and polarization). We describe the physical properties of EM angular momentum and how they can be exploited, discuss real-world experiments, and outline how the capacity of angular momentum links may be further enhanced by employing multi-port techniques, i.e., the angular momentum counterpart of linear-momentum multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO).

  2. Effect of Orbital Angular Momentum on Valence-Quark Helicity Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Harut Avakian; Stanley J. Brodsky; Alexandre Deur; Feng Yuan

    2007-08-01

    We study the quark helicity distributions at large x in perturbative QCD, taking into account contributions from the valence Fock states of the nucleon which have nonzero orbital angular momentum. These states are necessary to have a nonzero anomalous magnetic moment. We find that the quark orbital angular momentum contributes a large logarithm to the negative helicity quark distributions in addition to its power behavior, scaling as (1-x)^5\\log^2(1-x) in the limit of x\\to 1. Our analysis shows that the ratio of the polarized over unpolarized down quark distributions, \\Delta d/d, will still approach 1 in this limit. By comparing with the experimental data, we find that this ratio should cross zero at x\\approx 0.75.

  3. Optical orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Stephen M; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J

    2017-02-28

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  4. Unveiling Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Angular momentum is a notoriously difficult concept to grasp. Visualization often requires three-dimensional pictures of vectors pointing in seemingly arbitrary directions. A simple student-run laboratory experiment coupled with intuitive explanations by an instructor can clear up some of the inherent ambiguity of rotational motion. Specifically, the precessional period of a suspended spinning bicycle wheel can be related to the spinning frequency through a simple algebraic expression. An explanation of this precession apart from the concept of angular momentum will be given.

  5. Optical orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  6. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  7. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  8. Retrieving orbital angular momentum distribution of light with plasmonic vortex lens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hailong; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Jihua; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    We utilize a plasmonic vortex lens (PVL) to retrieve the orbital angular momentum (OAM) distribution of light. The OAM modes are coupled to the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the form of various Bessel functions respectively. By decomposing the interference pattern of SPPs into these Bessel functions, we can retrieve the relative amplitude and the relative phase of input OAM modes simultaneously. Our scheme shows advantage in integration and can measure hybrid OAM states by one measurement. PMID:27255406

  9. Angular momentum distribution during the collapse of primordial star-forming clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that angular momentum is distributed during the gravitational collapse of the primordial star forming cloud. However, so far there has been little understanding of the exact details of the distribution. We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulation, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. We find that, despite the lack of any initial turbulence and magnetic fields in the clouds the angular momentum profile follows the same characteristic power-law that has been reported in studies that employed fully self-consistent cosmological initial conditions. The fit of the power-law appears to be roughly constant regardless of the initial rotation of the cloud. We conclude that the specific angular momentum of the self-gravitating rotating gas in the primordial minihalos maintains a scaling relation with the gas mass as L ∝ M^{1.125}. We also discuss the plausible mechanisms for the power-law distribution.

  10. Optical orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  11. Quantum Heuristics of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Leblond, Jean-Marc

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the quantization of angular momentum components, Heisenberg-type inequalities for their spectral dispersions, and the quantization of the angular momentum modulus, without using operators or commutation relations. (MLH)

  12. A Large-alphabet Quantum Key Distribution Protocol Using Orbital Angular Momentum Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Gong, Long-Yan; Li, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Hua; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Cheng, Wei-Wen

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a quantum key distribution protocol using entangled photon pairs in orbital angular momentum (OAM). Here Alice uses a fixed phase hologram to modulate her OAM state on one photon with a spatial light modulator (SLM), while Bob uses the designed N different phase holograms for his N-based keys on the other photon with his SLM. With coincidences, Alice can fully retrieve the keys sent by Bob without reconciliation. We report the experiment results with N = 3 and OAM eigenmodes |l = ±1>, and discuss the security from the light path and typical attacks.

  13. Gas Accretion and Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kyle R.

    In this chapter, we review the role of gas accretion to the acquisition of angular momentum, both in galaxies and in their gaseous halos. We begin by discussing angular momentum in dark matter halos, with a brief review of tidal torque theory and the importance of mergers, followed by a discussion of the canonical picture of galaxy formation within this framework, where halo gas is presumed to shock-eat to the virial temperature of the halo, following the same spin distribution as the dark matter halo before cooling to the center of the halo to form a galaxy there. In the context of recent observational evidence demonstrating the presence of high angular momentum gas in galaxy halos, we review recent cosmological hydrodynamic simulations that have begun to emphasize the role of "cold flow" accretion—anisotropic gas accretion along cosmic filaments that does not shock-heat before sinking to the central galaxy. We discuss the implications of these simulations, reviewing a number of recent developments in the literature, and suggest a revision to the canonical model as it relates to the expected angular momentum content of gaseous halos around galaxies.

  14. The angular momentum distribution within haloes in different dark matter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. N.; Jing, Y. P.

    2002-10-01

    We study the angular momentum profile of dark matter haloes for a statistical sample drawn from a set of high-resolution cosmological simulations of 2563 particles. Two typical cold dark matter (CDM) models have been analysed, and the haloes are selected to have at least 3 × 104 particles in order to measure the angular momentumprofile reliably. In contrast with the recent claims of Bullock et al., we find that the degree of misalignment of angular momentum within a halo is very high. Approximately 50 per cent of haloes have more than 10 per cent of the halo mass in the mass of negative angular momentum j. After the mass of negative j is excluded, the cumulative mass function M(angular momentum profile of haloes in a warm dark matter (WDM) model and a self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) model. We find that the angular momentum profile of haloes in the WDM is statistically indistinguishable from that in the CDM model, but the angular momentum of haloes in the SIDM is reduced by the self-interaction of dark matter.

  15. Galactic disc profiles and a universal angular momentum distribution from statistical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpich, Jakob; Tremaine, Scott; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-06-01

    We show that the stellar surface brightness profiles in disc galaxies - observed to be approximately exponential - can be explained if radial migration efficiently scrambles the individual stars' angular momenta while conserving the circularity of the orbits and the total mass and angular momentum. In this case, the disc's distribution of specific angular momenta j should be near a maximum entropy state and therefore approximately exponential, dN ∝ \\exp (-j/< j\\rangle ) dj. This distribution translates to a surface density profile that is generally not an exponential function of radius: Σ (R) ∝ \\exp [-R/R_e({R})]/ (R R_e({R}))(1+d{ log v_c (R)}/ d{ log R}), for a rotation curve v∞(R) and R_e({R})≡ < j\\rangle /v_c (R). We show that such a profile matches the observed surface brightness profiles of disc-dominated galaxies just as well as the empirical exponential profile. Disc galaxies that exhibit population gradients cannot have fully reached a maximum-entropy state but appear to be close enough that their surface brightness profiles are well fit by this idealized model.

  16. Production of black holes and their angular momentum distribution in models with split fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn D.; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2006-05-01

    In models with TeV-scale gravity it is expected that mini black holes will be produced in near-future accelerators. On the other hand, TeV-scale gravity is plagued with many problems like fast proton decay, unacceptably large n-n¯ oscillations, flavor changing neutral currents, large mixing between leptons, etc. Most of these problems can be solved if different fermions are localized at different points in the extra dimensions. We study the cross section for the production of black holes and their angular momentum distribution in these models with “split” fermions. We find that, for a fixed value of the fundamental mass scale, the total production cross section is reduced compared with models where all the fermions are localized at the same point in the extra dimensions. Fermion splitting also implies that the bulk component of the black hole angular momentum must be taken into account in studies of the black hole decay via Hawking radiation.

  17. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  18. Orbital angular momentum microlaser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-29

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Quantum Key Distribution with High Order Fibonacci-like Orbital Angular Momentum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ziwen; Cai, Jiarui; Wang, Chuan

    2017-08-01

    The coding space in quantum communication could be expanded to high-dimensional space by using orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of photons, as both the capacity of the channel and security are enhanced. Here we present a novel approach to realize high-capacity quantum key distribution (QKD) by exploiting OAM states. The innovation of the proposed approach relies on a unique type of entangled-photon source which produces entangled photons with OAM randomly distributed among high order Fiboncci-like numbers and a new physical mechanism for efficiently sharing keys. This combination of entanglement with mathematical properties of high order Fibonacci sequences provides the QKD protocol immunity to photon-number-splitting attacks and allows secure generation of long keys from few photons. Unlike other protocols, reference frame alignment and active modulation of production and detection bases are unnecessary.

  20. The Orbital Angular Momentum Sum Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Fatma; Burkardt, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    As an alternative to the Ji sum rule for the quark angular momentum, a sum rule for the quark orbital angular momentum, based on a twist-3 generalized parton distribution, has been suggested. We study the validity of this sum rule in the context of scalar Yukawa interactions as well as in QED for an electron.

  1. Orbital angular momentum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mary Jacquiline Romero

    Entanglement in higher dimensions is an attractive concept that is a challenge to realise experimentally. To this end, the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons holds promise. The OAM state-space is discrete and theoretically unbounded. In the work that follows, we investigate various aspects of OAM entanglement. We show how the correlations in OAM and its conjugate variable, angular position, are determined by phase- matching and the shape of the pump beam in spontaneous parametric down- conversion. We implement tests of quantum mechanics which have been previously done for other variables. We show the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox for OAM and angle, supporting the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with locality and realism. We demonstrate violations of Bell-type inequalities, thereby discounting local hidden variables for describing the correlations we observe. We show the Hardy paradox using OAM, again highlighting the nonlocal nature of quantum mechanics. We demonstrate violations of Leggett-type inequalities, thereby discounting nonlocal hidden variables for describing correlations. Lastly, we have looked into the entanglement of topological vortex structures formed from a special superposition of OAM modes and show violations of Bell-type inequalities confined to a finite, isolated volume.

  2. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  3. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  4. Transverse angular momentum of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    We develop the quantum theory of transverse angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order transverse derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.

  5. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Effects of Turbulent Aberrations on Probability Distribution of Orbital Angular Momentum for Optical Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Cang, Ji

    2009-07-01

    Effects of atmospheric turbulence tilt, defocus, astigmatism and coma aberrations on the orbital angular momentum measurement probability of photons propagating in weak turbulent regime are modeled with Rytov approximation. By considering the resulting wave as a superposition of angular momentum eigenstates, the orbital angular momentum measurement probabilities of the transmitted digit are presented. Our results show that the effect of turbulent tilt aberration on the orbital angular momentum measurement probabilities of photons is the maximum among these four kinds of aberrations. As the aberration order increases, the effects of turbulence aberrations on the measurement probabilities of orbital angular momentum generally decrease, whereas the effect of turbulence defocus can be ignored. For tilt aberration, as the difference between the measured orbital angular momentum and the original orbital angular momentum increases, the orbital angular momentum measurement probability decreases.

  6. MBL Experiment in Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Among the series of beautiful take-home experiments designed by A.P. French and J.G. King for MIT students, the one on angular momentum studies the loss and conservation of angular momentum using a small dc motor as generator. Here we describe a version of the experiment that increases its accuracy, enables students to perform detailed rotational dynamics calculations, and sharpens the ability to isolate the region where the collision occurs.

  7. GPDs and Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    Generalized Parton Distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs. In the context of the scalar diquark model we demonstrate that the effect from that torque contributes at the same order as single-spin asymmetries.

  8. Isomer production ratios and the angular momentum distribution of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Jandel, M.

    2013-10-01

    Latest generation fission experiments provide an excellent testing ground for theoretical models. In this contribution we compare the measurements for 235U(nth,f), obtained with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) calorimeter at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), with our full-scale simulation of the primary fragment de-excitation, using the recently developed cgmf code, based on a Monte Carlo implementation of the Hauser-Feshbach theoretical model. We compute the isomer ratios as a function of the initial angular momentum of the fission fragments, for which no direct information exists. Comparison with the available experimental data allows us to determine the initial spin distribution. We also study the dependence of the isomer ratio on the knowledge of the low-lying discrete spectrum input for nuclear fission reactions, finding a high degree of sensitivity. Finally, in the same Hauser-Feshbach approach, we calculate the isomer production ratio for thermal neutron capture on stable isotopes, where the initial conditions (spin, excitation energy, etc.) are well understood. We find that with the current parameters involved in Hauser-Feshbach calculations, we obtain up to a factor of 2 deviation from the measured isomer ratios.

  9. Variations in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Twice-daily values of the atmosphere's angular momentum about the polar axis during the five years from 1976 through 1980 are presented in graphs and a table. The compilation is based on a global data set, incorporating 90 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. The relationship between changes in the angular momentum of the atmosphere and changes in the length of day is described, as are the main sources of error in the data. The variability in angular momentum is revealed in a preliminary fashion by means of a spectral decomposition. The data presented should stimulate comparisons with other measures of the length of day and so provide a basis for greater understanding of Earth-atmosphere interactions.

  10. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-05

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

  11. Automated Angular Momentum Recoupling Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. T.; Silbar, Richard R.

    1992-04-01

    We present a set of heuristic rules for algebraic solution of angular momentum recoupling problems. The general problem reduces to that of finding an optimal path from one binary tree (representing the angular momentum coupling scheme for the reduced matrix element) to another (representing the sub-integrals and spin sums to be done). The method lends itself to implementation on a microcomputer, and we have developed such an implementation using a dialect of LISP. We describe both how our code, called RACAH, works and how it appears to the user. We illustrate the use of RACAH for several transition and scattering amplitude matrix elements occurring in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.

  12. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  13. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  14. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Nuclei at High Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R. M.; Stephens, F. S.

    1980-12-01

    It appears that most nuclei show a compromise between purely collective and purely non-collective behavior at very high spins.non~collective behavior in nuclei has been seen only as high as 36 or 37{bar h}, at which point a more collective structure seems to develop. The concepts underlying the study of high angular momentum states are discussed. The factors that limit angular momentum in nuclei are considered. The currently emerging state of physics of very high spin states is reviewed. The detailed calculations currently made for high spin states are described, focusing not on the calculations themselves, but on the physical input to them and results that come out. Production of high-spin states using heavy-ion reactions is reviewed. Studies of {gamma}-rays de-exciting the evaporation residues from heavy-ion reactions are covered. Two types of {gamma} rays occur: those that cool the nucleus to or toward the yrast line, called "statistical," and those that are more or less parallel to the yrast line and remove the angular momentum, called "yrast~like." Collective rotation, in simplest form the motion of a deformed nucleus around an axis perpendicular to its symmetry axis, is also covered.

  16. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  17. Angular momentum decomposition for an electron

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias; Hikmat, BC

    2009-04-01

    We calculate the orbital angular momentum of the 'quark' in the scalar diquark model as well as that of the electron in QED (to order {alpha}). We compare the orbital angular momentum obtained from the Jaffe-Manohar decomposition to that obtained from the Ji relation and estimate the importance of the vector potential in the definition of orbital angular momentum.

  18. Angular Momentum Decomposition for an Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias; BC, Hikmat

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the orbital angular momentum of the `quark' in the scalar diquark model as well as that of the electron in QED (to order $\\alpha$). We compare the orbital angular momentum obtained from the Jaffe-Manohar decomposition to that obtained from the Ji relation and estimate the importance of the vector potential in the definition of orbital angular momentum.

  19. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites

  20. Localizing the angular momentum of linear gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Luke M.; Lasenby, Anthony; Hobson, Michael

    2012-10-01

    In a previous article [L. M. Butcher, , Phys. Rev. D 82, 104040 (2010).], we derived an energy-momentum tensor for linear gravity that exhibited positive energy density and causal energy flux. Here we extend this framework by localizing the angular momentum of the linearized gravitational field, deriving a gravitational spin tensor which possesses similarly desirable properties. By examining the local exchange of angular momentum (between matter and gravity) we find that gravitational intrinsic spin is localized, separately from “orbital” angular momentum, in terms of a gravitational spin tensor. This spin tensor is then uniquely determined by requiring that it obey two simple physically motivated algebraic conditions. Firstly, the spin of an arbitrary (harmonic-gauge) gravitational plane wave is required to flow in the direction of propagation of the wave. Secondly, the spin tensor of any transverse-traceless gravitational field is required to be traceless. (The second condition ensures that local field redefinitions suffice to cast our gravitational energy-momentum tensor and spin tensor as sources of gravity in a quadratic approximation to general relativity.) Additionally, the following properties arise in the spin tensor spontaneously: all transverse-traceless fields have purely spatial spin, and any field generated by a static distribution of matter will carry no spin at all. Following the structure of our previous paper, we then examine the (spatial) angular momentum exchanged between the gravitational field and an infinitesimal detector, and develop a microaveraging procedure that renders the process gauge-invariant. The exchange of nonspatial angular momentum (i.e., moment of energy) is also analyzed, leading us to conclude that a gravitational wave can displace the center of mass of the detector; this conclusion is also confirmed by a “first principles” treatment of the system. Finally, we discuss the spin carried by a gravitational plane wave.

  1. Magnetic field and angular momentum evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic field in young stellar object is clearly the most important component when one dealing with the angular momentum evolution of solar-like stars. It controls this latter one from the pre-main sequence, during the ``disk locking'' phase where the stars magnetically interact with their surrounding disk, to the main-sequence through powerful stellar winds that remove angular momentum from the stellar surface. We present new models for the rotational evolution of solar-like stars between 1 Myr and 10 Gyr with the aim to reproduce the distributions of rotational periods observed for star forming regions and young open clusters within this age range. Our simulations are produced by a recent model dedicated to the study of the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars. This model include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetized stellar winds and a specific dynamo and mass-loss prescription are used to link the angular momentum loss-rate to angular velocity evolution. The model additionally allows for a core/envelope decoupling with an angular momentum transfer between these two regions. Since this former model didn't include any physical star/disk interaction description, two star/disk interaction processes are eventually added to it in order to reproduce the apparent small angular velocities to which the stellar surface is subject during the disk accretion phase. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow, median and fast rotators including two star/disk interaction scenarios that are the magnetospheric ejection and the accretion powered stellar winds processes. The models appear to fail at reproducing the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars except when a more intense magnetic field is used during the disk accretion phase.

  2. Single particle momentum and angular distributions in hadron-hadron collisions at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, T. T.; Chen, N. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The forward-backward charged multiplicity distribution (P n sub F, n sub B) of events in the 540 GeV antiproton-proton collider has been extensively studied by the UA5 Collaboration. It was pointed out that the distribution with respect to n = n sub F + n sub B satisfies approximate KNO scaling and that with respect to Z = n sub F - n sub B is binomial. The geometrical model of hadron-hadron collision interprets the large multiplicity fluctuation as due to the widely different nature of collisions at different impact parameters b. For a single impact parameter b, the collision in the geometrical model should exhibit stochastic behavior. This separation of the stochastic and nonstochastic (KNO) aspects of multiparticle production processes gives conceptually a lucid and attractive picture of such collisions, leading to the concept of partition temperature T sub p and the single particle momentum spectrum to be discussed in detail.

  3. Optical angular momentum in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2017-06-01

    Invoking Maxwell’s classical equations in conjunction with expressions for the electromagnetic (EM) energy, momentum, force, and torque, we use a few simple examples to demonstrate the nature of the EM angular momentum. The energy and the angular momentum of an EM field will be shown to have an intimate relationship; a source radiating EM angular momentum will, of necessity, pick up an equal but opposite amount of mechanical angular momentum; and the spin and orbital angular momenta of the EM field, when absorbed by a small particle, will be seen to elicit different responses from the particle.

  4. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  5. Do waves carrying orbital angular momentum possess azimuthal linear momentum?

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M

    2013-09-06

    All beams are a superposition of plane waves, which carry linear momentum in the direction of propagation with no net azimuthal component. However, plane waves incident on a hologram can produce a vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum that seems to require an azimuthal linear momentum, which presents a paradox. We resolve this by showing that the azimuthal momentum is not a true linear momentum but the azimuthal momentum density is a true component of the linear momentum density.

  6. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  7. The Angular Momentum Distribution and Baryon Content of Star-forming Galaxies at z ˜ 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Lang, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Beifiori, A.; Bender, R.; Brammer, G.; Chan, J.; Davies, R.; Dekel, A.; Fabricius, M.; Fossati, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Lutz, D.; Mendel, J. T.; Momcheva, I.; Nelson, E. J.; Naab, T.; Renzini, A.; Saglia, R.; Sharples, R. M.; Sternberg, A.; Wilman, D.; Wuyts, E.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the angular momenta of massive star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at the peak of the cosmic star formation epoch (z ˜ 0.8-2.6). Our sample of ˜360 log(M */M ⊙) ˜ 9.3-11.8 SFGs is mainly based on the KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys of Hα kinematics, and collectively provides a representative subset of the massive star-forming population. The inferred halo scale angular momentum distribution is broadly consistent with that theoretically predicted for their dark matter halos, in terms of mean spin parameter < λ > ˜ 0.037 and its dispersion (σ logλ ˜ 0.2). Spin parameters correlate with the disk radial scale and with their stellar surface density, but do not depend significantly on halo mass, stellar mass, or redshift. Our data thus support the long-standing assumption that on average, even at high redshifts, the specific angular momentum of disk galaxies reflects that of their dark matter halos (j d = j DM). The lack of correlation between λ × (j d /j DM) and the nuclear stellar density Σ*(1 kpc) favors a scenario where disk-internal angular momentum redistribution leads to “compaction” inside massive high-redshift disks. For our sample, the inferred average stellar to dark matter mass ratio is ˜2%, consistent with abundance matching results. Including the molecular gas, the total baryonic disk to dark matter mass ratio is ˜5% for halos near 1012 M ⊙, which corresponds to 31% of the cosmologically available baryons, implying that high-redshift disks are strongly baryon dominated. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme IDs 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 079.A-0341, 080.A-0330, 080.A-0339, 080.A-0635, 081.B-0568, 081.A-0672, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 087.A-0081, 088.A-0202, 088.A-0209, 091.A-0126, 092.A-0091, 093.A-0079, 094.A-0217, 095.A-0047, 096.A-0025).

  8. Chirality and the angular momentum of light.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Robert P; Götte, Jörg B; Barnett, Stephen M; Yao, Alison M

    2017-02-28

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  10. Orbital angular momentum in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L.L.; Klimov, A.B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2011-02-15

    Research Highlights: > We propose a comprehensive Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum. > We present a simple and useful toolkit for the practitioner. > We derive simple evolution equations in terms of a star product in the semiclassical limit. - Abstract: A comprehensive theory of the Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum is presented. Special attention is paid to the problems linked to rotational periodicity and angular-momentum discreteness.

  11. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  12. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies.

  13. Envelope Modes of Beams with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Losic, B

    2000-08-21

    For a particle beam propagating in an alternating gradient focusing system, envelope equations are often employed to describe the evolution of the beam radii in the two directions transverse to the direction of propagation, and aligned with the principle axes of the alternating gradient system. When the beams have zero net angular momentum and when the alternating gradient focusing is approximated by a continuous focusing system, there are two normal modes to the envelope equations: the 'breathing' mode and a 'quadrupole' mode. In the former, the two radii oscillate in phase, and in the latter the radii oscillate 180 degrees out of phase. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include beams that have a finite angular momentum. We perturb the moment equations of ref. [1], wherein it was assumed that space charge is a distributed in a uniform density ellipse. Two additional modes are obtained. The breathing mode remains, but the quadrupole mode is split into two modes, and a new low frequency mode appears. We calculate the frequencies and eigenmodes of these four modes as a function of tune depression and a dimensionless net angular momentum. These modes can be excited by rotational errors of the quadrupoles in an alternating gradient focusing channel.

  14. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Allen, L

    2017-02-28

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  15. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.

    2017-02-01

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  16. Orbital angular momentum in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Gerald T.

    2010-05-15

    Analysis of the measured value of the integrated d-bar-u-bar asymmetry (I{sub fas} = 0.147 +- 0.027) in the nucleon show it to arise from nucleon fluctuations into baryon plus pion. Requiring angular momentum conservation in these fluctuations shows the associated orbital angular momentum is equal to the value of the flavor asymmetry.

  17. Interpretation of quantum and classical angular momentum polarization moments.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F Javier

    2004-08-20

    This Letter presents a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization. The results involve an "uncertainty broadening" term that directly expresses the restrictions imposed by the uncertainty principle. It is argued that neglect of this term can lead to error in the interpretation of theoretical or experimental angular momentum polarization data. Functions that take the uncertainty broadening into account, appropriate for use in quantum or quasiclassical descriptions of spatial distributions of angular momenta, are defined.

  18. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  19. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  20. Physical angular momentum separation for QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    We study the non-uniqueness problem of the gauge-invariant angular momentum separation for the case of QED, which stems from the recent controversy concerning the proper definitions of the orbital angular momentum and spin operator of the individual parts of a gauge field system. For the free quantum electrodynamics without matter, we show that the basic requirement of Euclidean symmetry selects a unique physical angular momentum separation scheme from the multitude of the possible angular momentum separation schemes constructed using the various gauge-invariant extensions (GIEs). Based on these results, we propose a set of natural angular momentum separation schemes for the case of interacting QED by invoking the formalism of asymptotic fields. Some perspectives on such a problem for the case of QCD are briefly discussed.

  1. Angular Momentum of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kirsty M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Oh, Se-Heon

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of baryonic mass {M}{{b}} and specific angular momentum (sAM) {j}{{b}} in 14 rotating dwarf Irregular (dIrr) galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS sample. These measurements, based on 21 cm kinematic data from the Very Large Array and stellar mass maps from the Spitzer Space Telescope, extend previous AM measurements by more than two orders of magnitude in {M}{{b}}. The dwarf galaxies show systematically higher {j}{{b}} values than expected from the {j}{{b}}\\propto {M}{{b}}2/3 scaling of spiral galaxies, representative of a scale-free galaxy formation scenario. This offset can be explained by decreasing baryon mass fractions {f}{{M}}={M}{{b}}/{M}{dyn} (where {M}{dyn} is the dynamical mass) with decreasing {M}{{b}} (for {M}{{b}}< {10}11 {M}ȯ ). We find that the sAM of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) alone is about 2.5 times higher than that of the stars. The M–j relation of H i is significantly steeper than that of the stars, as a direct consequence of the systematic variation of the H i fraction with {M}{{b}}.

  2. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosso, Pasquale; Das, Saurya

    2017-08-01

    Various models of quantum gravity suggest a modification of the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, to the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle, between position and momentum. In this work we show how this modification influences the theory of angular momentum in Quantum Mechanics. In particular, we compute Planck scale corrections to angular momentum eigenvalues, the hydrogen atom spectrum, the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. We also examine effects of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle on multi-particle systems.

  3. Wave angular momentum in nonneutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Roy W.

    1999-12-01

    Angular momentum and energy are added (or removed) when exciting a mode, such as a diocotron, Trivelpiece-Gould, or Dubin mode, and we discuss rates at which mode angular momentum and energy are added by applied fields. Excitation of a plasma mode is an effective way to transfer angular momentum and energy to the plasma because it is a resonant process. We relate this to recent experiments on compression and expansion of plasmas using a "rotating wall" field. We also calculate the torque on a Coulomb crystal which is phase-locked to a "rotating wall" field and describe phase oscillations and the maximum rate of acceleration which can be achieved.

  4. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  5. Measurement of W boson angular distributions in events with high transverse momentum jets at s=8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-12-06

    The W boson angular distribution in events with high transverse momentum jets is measured using data collected by the ATLAS experiment from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s=8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb -1 . The focus is on the contributions to W+jets processes from real W emission, which is achieved by studying events where a muon is observed close to a high transverse momentum jet. At small angular separations, these contributions are expected to be large. Various theoretical models of this process are compared to the data in termsmore » of the absolute cross-section and the angular distributions of the muon from the leptonic W decay.« less

  6. Measurement of W boson angular distributions in events with high transverse momentum jets at √{ s} = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. 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F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; St. Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spannowsky, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-02-01

    The W boson angular distribution in events with high transverse momentum jets is measured using data collected by the ATLAS experiment from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √{ s} = 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. The focus is on the contributions to W +jets processes from real W emission, which is achieved by studying events where a muon is observed close to a high transverse momentum jet. At small angular separations, these contributions are expected to be large. Various theoretical models of this process are compared to the data in terms of the absolute cross-section and the angular distributions of the muon from the leptonic W decay.

  7. The Rotation Period Distributions of 4-10 Myr T Tauri Stars in Orion OB1: New Constraints on Pre-main-sequence Angular Momentum Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Md Tanveer; Stassun, Keivan G.; Briceño, César; Vivas, A. Katherina; Raetz, Stefanie; Mateu, Cecilia; José Downes, Juan; Calvet, Nuria; Hernández, Jesús; Neuhäuser, Ralph; Mugrauer, Markus; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tachihara, Kengo; Chini, Rolf; Cruz-Dias, Gustavo A.; Aarnio, Alicia; James, David J.; Hackstein, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    Most existing studies of the angular momentum evolution of young stellar populations have focused on the youngest (≲1-3 Myr) T Tauri stars. In contrast, the angular momentum distributions of older T Tauri stars (˜4-10 Myr) have been less studied, even though they hold key insights to understanding stellar angular momentum evolution at a time when protoplanetary disks have largely dissipated and when models therefore predict changes in the rotational evolution that can in principle be tested. We present a study of photometric variability among 1974 confirmed T Tauri members of various subregions of the Orion OB1 association, and with ages spanning 4-10 Myr, using optical time series from three different surveys. For 564 of the stars (˜32% of the weak-lined T Tauri stars and ˜13% of the classical T Tauri stars in our sample) we detect statistically significant periodic variations, which we attribute to the stellar rotation periods, making this one of the largest samples of T Tauri star rotation periods yet published. We observe a clear change in the overall rotation period distributions over the age range 4-10 Myr, with the progressively older subpopulations exhibiting systematically faster rotation. This result is consistent with angular momentum evolution model predictions of an important qualitative change in the stellar rotation periods starting at ˜5 Myr, an age range for which very few observational constraints were previously available.

  8. Unipolar motor and angular momentum conservation law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2017-07-01

    A simple unipolar electric motor is described. The motor is a closed electromechanical system. The proposed apparatus allows us to demonstrate angular momentum conservation law at a qualitative level.

  9. Orbital angular momentum 25 years on [Invited].

    PubMed

    Padgett, Miles J

    2017-05-15

    Twenty-five years ago Allen, Beijersbergen, Spreeuw, and Woerdman published their seminal paper establishing that light beams with helical phase-fronts carried an orbital angular momentum. Previously orbital angular momentum had been associated only with high-order atomic/molecular transitions and hence considered to be a rare occurrence. The realization that every photon in a laser beam could carry an orbital angular momentum that was in excess of the angular momentum associated with photon spin has led both to new understandings of optical effects and various applications. These applications range from optical manipulation, imaging and quantum optics, to optical communications. This brief review will examine some of the research in the field to date and consider what future directions might hold.

  10. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-01

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  11. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-17

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  12. Angular Momentum and Galaxy Formation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-01

    -M sstarf scaling relations. This provides a physical motivation for characterizing galaxies most basically with two parameters: mass and bulge-to-disk ratio. Next, in an approach complementary to numerical simulations, we construct idealized models of angular momentum content in a cosmological context, using estimates of dark matter halo spin and mass from theoretical and empirical studies. We find that the width of the halo spin distribution cannot account for the differences between spiral and elliptical j sstarf, but that the observations are reproduced well if these galaxies simply retained different fractions of their initial j complement (~60% and ~10%, respectively). We consider various physical mechanisms for the simultaneous evolution of j sstarf and M sstarf (including outflows, stripping, collapse bias, and merging), emphasizing that the vector sum of all such processes must produce the observed j sstarf-M sstarf relations. We suggest that a combination of early collapse and multiple mergers (major or minor) may account naturally for the trend for ellipticals. More generally, the observed variations in angular momentum represent simple but fundamental constraints for any model of galaxy formation.

  13. Gluon orbital angular momentum at small x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yuya; Xiao, Bowen; Yuan, Feng; Zhao, Yong

    2017-06-01

    We present a general analysis of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) distribution of gluons Lg(x ) inside the nucleon with particular emphasis on the small-x region. We derive a novel operator representation of Lg(x ) in terms of Wilson lines and argue that it is approximately proportional to the gluon helicity distribution Lg(x )≈-2 Δ G (x ) at small x . We also compute longitudinal single-spin asymmetry in exclusive diffractive dijet production in lepton-nucleon scattering in the next-to-eikonal approximation and show that the asymmetry is a direct probe of the gluon helicity/OAM distribution as well as the QCD odderon exchange.

  14. Wave Angular Momentum in Nonneutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Roy W.

    1999-11-01

    We show that angular momentum and energy are added or removed when exciting a mode, such as a diocotron, Trivelpiece-Gould, or Dubin mode, and we calculate the rates (with sign) at which angular momentum and energy are added by the application of a ``rotating wall" field. Excitation of a mode which rotates faster than the plasma increases the total angular momentum and total energy and compresses the plasma, whereas excitation of a mode which rotates slower than the plasma decreases the total angular momentum and total energy and expands the plasma, in accord with recent ``rotating wall" experiments^1. Furthermore, the transfer rates are sharply peaked when the angular velocity of the ``rotating wall" is equal to the angular velocity of a mode, because mode excitation is a resonant process. Thus mode excitation is a very efficient way to transfer angular momentum and energy to or from the plasma. We also calculate the torque on a spheroidal Coulomb crystal which is phase-locked^2 to a ``rotating wall" field, and discuss phase oscillations and the maximum rate of acceleration which can be achieved. 1 F. Anderegg et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4875 (1998). 2 X.-P. Huang et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 73 (1998).

  15. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  16. Angular momentum decomposition of Richardson's pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Dussel, G. G.; Sofia, H. M.

    2008-07-15

    The angular momentum decomposition of pairs obtained using Richardson's exact solution of the pairing Hamiltonian for the deformed {sup 174}Yb nucleus are displayed. The probabilities for low angular momenta of the collective pairs are strikingly different from the ones obtained in the BCS ground state.

  17. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  18. Electron vortices: Beams with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, S. M.; Babiker, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Yuan, J.

    2017-07-01

    The recent prediction and subsequent creation of electron vortex beams in a number of laboratories occurred after almost 20 years had elapsed since the recognition of the physical significance and potential for applications of the orbital angular momentum carried by optical vortex beams. A rapid growth in interest in electron vortex beams followed, with swift theoretical and experimental developments. Much of the rapid progress can be attributed in part to the clear similarities between electron optics and photonics arising from the functional equivalence between the Helmholtz equations governing the free-space propagation of optical beams and the time-independent Schrödinger equation governing freely propagating electron vortex beams. There are, however, key differences in the properties of the two kinds of vortex beams. This review is primarily concerned with the electron type, with specific emphasis on the distinguishing vortex features: notably the spin, electric charge, current and magnetic moment, the spatial distribution, and the associated electric and magnetic fields. The physical consequences and potential applications of such properties are pointed out and analyzed, including nanoparticle manipulation and the mechanisms of orbital angular momentum transfer in the electron vortex interaction with matter.

  19. Orbital angular momentum of general astigmatic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Jorrit; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2004-07-01

    We present an operator method to obtain complete sets of astigmatic Gaussian solutions of the paraxial wave equation. In case of general astigmatism, the astigmatic intensity and phase distribution of the fundamental mode differ in orientation. As a consequence, the fundamental mode has a nonzero orbital angular momentum, which is not due to phase singularities. Analogous to the operator method for the quantum harmonic oscillator, the corresponding astigmatic higher-order modes are obtained by repeated application of raising operators on the fundamental mode. The nature of the higher-order modes is characterized by a point on a sphere, in analogy with the representation of polarization on the Poincare sphere. The north and south poles represent astigmatic Laguerre-Gaussian modes, similar to circular polarization on the Poincare sphere, while astigmatic Hermite-Gaussian modes are associated with points on the equator, analogous to linear polarization. We discuss the propagation properties of the modes and their orbital angular momentum, which depends on the degree of astigmatism and on the location of the point on the sphere.

  20. Angular and Linear Momentum of Excited Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Kamra, Akashdeep; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions. However, spin and orbital angular momentum are not conserved separately anymore. We also define the linear momentum of ferromagnetic textures. We illustrate the general principles with special reference to spin transfer torques and identify the emergence of a non-adiabatic effective field acting on domain walls in ferromagnetic insulators

  1. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    PubMed Central

    Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light–matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069764

  2. Optical Momentum, Spin, and Angular Momentum in Dispersive Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y.; Nori, Franco

    2017-08-01

    We examine the momentum, spin, and orbital angular momentum of structured monochromatic optical fields in dispersive inhomogeneous isotropic media. There are two bifurcations in this general problem: the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma and the kinetic (Poynting-like) versus canonical (spin-orbital) pictures. We show that the kinetic Abraham momentum describes the energy flux and group velocity of the wave in the medium. At the same time, we introduce novel canonical Minkowski-type momentum, spin, and orbital angular momentum densities of the field. These quantities exhibit fairly natural forms, analogous to the Brillouin energy density, as well as multiple advantages as compared with previously considered formalisms. As an example, we apply this general theory to inhomogeneous surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves at a metal-vacuum interface and show that SPPs carry a "supermomentum," proportional to the wave vector kp>ω /c , and a transverse spin, which can change its sign depending on the frequency ω .

  3. Optical Momentum, Spin, and Angular Momentum in Dispersive Media.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y; Nori, Franco

    2017-08-18

    We examine the momentum, spin, and orbital angular momentum of structured monochromatic optical fields in dispersive inhomogeneous isotropic media. There are two bifurcations in this general problem: the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma and the kinetic (Poynting-like) versus canonical (spin-orbital) pictures. We show that the kinetic Abraham momentum describes the energy flux and group velocity of the wave in the medium. At the same time, we introduce novel canonical Minkowski-type momentum, spin, and orbital angular momentum densities of the field. These quantities exhibit fairly natural forms, analogous to the Brillouin energy density, as well as multiple advantages as compared with previously considered formalisms. As an example, we apply this general theory to inhomogeneous surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves at a metal-vacuum interface and show that SPPs carry a "supermomentum," proportional to the wave vector k_{p}>ω/c, and a transverse spin, which can change its sign depending on the frequency ω.

  4. Olympic Wrestling and Angular Momentum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Reported is the use of a wrestling photograph in a noncalculus introductory physics course. The photograph presents a maneuver that could serve as an example for a discussion on equilibrium, forces, torque, and angular motion. Provided are some qualitative thoughts as well as quantitative calculations. (YP)

  5. Angular Momentum Profiles of Warm Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James S.; Kravtsov, and Andrey V.; Colín, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    We compare the specific angular momentum profiles of virialized dark halos in cold dark matter (CDM) and warm dark matter (WDM) models, using high-resolution dissipationless simulations. The simulations were initialized using the same set of modes, except on small scales, where the power was suppressed in WDM below the filtering length. Remarkably, WDM as well as CDM halos are well described by the two-parameter angular momentum profile of Bullock and coworkers, even though the halo masses are below the filtering scale of the WDM. Although the best-fit shape parameters change quantitatively for individual halos in the two simulations, we find no systematic variation in profile shapes as a function of the dark matter type. The scatter in shape parameters is significantly smaller for the WDM halos, suggesting that substructure and/or merging history plays a role in producing scatter about the mean angular momentum distribution, but that the average angular momentum profiles of halos originate from larger scale phenomena or a mechanism associated with the virialization process. The known mismatch between the angular momentum distributions of dark halos and disk galaxies is, therefore, present in WDM as well as CDM models. Our WDM halos tend to have a less coherent (more misaligned) angular momentum structure and smaller spin parameters than do their CDM counterparts, although we caution that this result is based on a small number of halos.

  6. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Angular-momentum distributions sigma/sub L/ for the compound nucleus /sup 164/Yb were deduced from measurements of ..gamma..-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of /sup 64/Ni and /sup 100/Mo at and below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation functions can be reproduced with coupled-channels calculations only if additional coupling beyond the known inelastic strengths is included. Even with this augmented coupling, however, at the lowest bombarding energies the experimental sigma/sub L/ extend to higher L values than the predictions. Single-barrier penetration models for a potential with an energy-dependent depth and shape fitted to the excitation function likewise underestimate the role of high-L partial waves. Somewhat better success is achieved with models in which fission is allowed to occur at distances comparable with or even larger than the Coulomb barrier radius. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  8. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  9. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect.

  10. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions.

  11. Free-space measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol using decoy states with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Gong, Long-Yan; Cheng, Wei-Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol using orbital angular momentum (OAM) in free space links, named the OAM-MDI-QKD protocol. In the proposed protocol, the OAM states of photons, instead of polarization states, are used as the information carriers to avoid the reference frame alignment, the decoy-state is adopted to overcome the security loophole caused by the weak coherent pulse source, and the high efficient OAM-sorter is adopted as the measurement tool for Charlie to obtain the output OAM state. Here, Charlie may be an untrusted third party. The results show that the authorized users, Alice and Bob, could distill a secret key with Charlie’s successful measurements, and the key generation performance is slightly better than that of the polarization-based MDI-QKD protocol in the two-dimensional OAM cases. Simultaneously, Alice and Bob can reduce the number of flipping the bits in the secure key distillation. It is indicated that a higher key generation rate performance could be obtained by a high dimensional OAM-MDI-QKD protocol because of the unlimited degree of freedom on OAM states. Moreover, the results show that the key generation rate and the transmission distance will decrease as the growth of the strength of atmospheric turbulence (AT) and the link attenuation. In addition, the decoy states used in the proposed protocol can get a considerable good performance without the need for an ideal source. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271238 and 61475075), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20123223110003), the Natural Science Research Foundation for Universities of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. 11KJA510002), the Open Research Fund of Key Laboratory of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network Technology, Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. NYKL2015011), and the

  12. On the vector model of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  13. Angular momentum paradoxes with solenoids and monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkin, Harry J.; Peshkin, Murray

    1982-12-01

    The Poynting vector produced by crossing the Coulomb field from a charged particle with a distant external magnetic field gives rise to a physical angular momentum which must be included in applications of angular momentum conservation and quantization. Simple examples show how the neglect of the return flux in an infinite solenoid or in two-dimensional models can lead to unphysical effects, how the Dirac charge quantization is obtained and can be modified by the presence of additional long range forces, and why the origin must be excluded in describing the motion of a point charge in the field of a fixed point monopole.

  14. Ultrafast angular momentum transfer in multisublattice ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; López-Flores, V; Halté, V; Hehn, M; Stamm, C; Pontius, N; Beaurepaire, E; Boeglin, C

    2014-03-11

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to induce ultrafast changes of the magnetization in magnetic materials. However, one of the unsolved questions is that of conservation of the total angular momentum during the ultrafast demagnetization. Here we report the ultrafast transfer of angular momentum during the first hundred femtoseconds in ferrimagnetic Co0.8Gd0.2 and Co0.74Tb0.26 films. Using time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism allowed for time-resolved determination of spin and orbital momenta for each element. We report an ultrafast quenching of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and show that at early times the demagnetization in ferrimagnetic alloys is driven by the local transfer of angular momenta between the two exchange-coupled sublattices while the total angular momentum stays constant. In Co0.74Tb0.26 we have observed a transfer of the total angular momentum to an external bath, which is delayed by ~150 fs.

  15. Ultrafast coherent control of angular momentum during a one-photon excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, D. A.; Eppink, A. T. J. B.; Meerts, W. L.; Kimel, A. V.; Kirilyuk, A.; Rasing, Th.; Zande, W. J. van der

    2011-10-15

    The subpicosecond dynamics of angular momentum transfer in the excited rubidium 5p state is studied in real time by observing photoelectron angular distributions with velocity map imaging. Retrieving the populations of the degenerate Zeeman levels and reconstructing the angular momentum, we show that in the case of resonant excitation the angular momentum does not follow the momentary helicity of the electric field of the pulse. This is in contrast with off-resonant excitation where the angular momentum and pulse helicity are fully correlated. Our study shows how to generate and shape ultrashort pulses of orbital and spin angular momentum in a controllable way.

  16. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  17. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  18. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  19. Controversy concerning the definition of quark and gluon angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, Elliot

    2011-05-01

    A major controversy has arisen in QCD as to how to split the total angular momentum into separate quark and gluon contributions, and as to whether the gluon angular momentum can itself be split, in a gauge-invariant way, into a spin and orbital part. Several authors have proposed various answers to these questions and offered a variety of different expressions for the relevant operators. I argue that none of these is acceptable and suggest that the canonical expression for the momentum and angular momentum operators is the correct and physically meaningful one. It is then an inescapable fact that the gluon angular momentum operator cannot, in general, be split in a gauge-invariant way into a spin and orbital part. However, the projection of the gluon spin onto its direction of motion, i.e. its helicity is gauge invariant and is measured in deep inelastic scattering on nucleons. The Ji sum rule, relating the quark angular momentum to generalized parton distributions, though not based on the canonical operators, is shown to be correct, if interpreted with due care. I also draw attention to several interesting aspects of QED and QCD, which, to the best of my knowledge, are not commented upon in the standard textbooks on field theory.

  20. Inclusion of angular momentum in FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    2015-05-18

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  1. Size, angular momentum and mass for objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada, Pablo; Gabach-Clement, M. E.; Ortiz, Omar E.

    2017-06-01

    We obtain a geometrical inequality involving the ADM mass, the angular momentum and the size of an ordinary, axially symmetric object. We use the monotonicity of the Geroch quasi-local energy on 2-surfaces along the inverse mean curvature flow. We also compute numerical examples to test the robustness of our hypotheses and results

  2. ANGULAR MOMENTUM ACQUISITION IN GALAXY HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Bullock, James S.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; Diemand, Juerg; Wadsley, James; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2013-05-20

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to study the angular momentum acquisition of gaseous halos around Milky-Way-sized galaxies. We find that cold mode accreted gas enters a galaxy halo with {approx}70% more specific angular momentum than dark matter averaged over cosmic time (though with a very large dispersion). In fact, we find that all matter has a higher spin parameter when measured at accretion than when averaged over the entire halo lifetime, and is well characterized by {lambda} {approx} 0.1, at accretion. Combined with the fact that cold flow gas spends a relatively short time (1-2 dynamical times) in the halo before sinking to the center, this naturally explains why cold flow halo gas has a specific angular momentum much higher than that of the halo and often forms ''cold flow disks.'' We demonstrate that the higher angular momentum of cold flow gas is related to the fact that it tends to be accreted along filaments.

  3. Multi-state complex angular momentum residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylwe, Karl-Erik

    2006-09-01

    A relation between a multi-state complex angular momentum (CAM) pole residue and the corresponding CAM-state wavefunction is derived for a real symmetric potential matrix. The result generalizes a residue formula available for single-channel atomical collision systems and it is based on a diagonalization of the S matrix together with the use of exact Wronskian relations.

  4. Generalization of the Gaussian electrostatic model: Extension to arbitrary angular momentum, distributed multipoles, and speedup with reciprocal space methods

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, G. Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The simulation of biological systems by means of current empirical force fields presents shortcomings due to their lack of accuracy, especially in the description of the nonbonded terms. We have previously introduced a force field based on density fitting termed the Gaussian electrostatic model-0 (GEM-0) J.-P. Piquemal et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 104101 (2006)] that improves the description of the nonbonded interactions. GEM-0 relies on density fitting methodology to reproduce each contribution of the constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) energy decomposition scheme, by expanding the electronic density of the molecule in s-type Gaussian functions centered at specific sites. In the present contribution we extend the Coulomb and exchange components of the force field to auxiliary basis sets of arbitrary angular momentum. Since the basis functions with higher angular momentum have directionality, a reference molecular frame (local frame) formalism is employed for the rotation of the fitted expansion coefficients. In all cases the intermolecular interaction energies are calculated by means of Hermite Gaussian functions using the McMurchie-Davidson [J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)] recursion to calculate all the required integrals. Furthermore, the use of Hermite Gaussian functions allows a point multipole decomposition determination at each expansion site. Additionally, the issue of computational speed is investigated by reciprocal space based formalisms which include the particle mesh Ewald (PME) and fast Fourier-Poisson (FFP) methods. Frozen-core (Coulomb and exchange-repulsion) intermolecular interaction results for ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface, as well as a one-dimensional surface scan for the canonical water dimer, formamide, stacked benzene, and benzene water dimers, are presented. All results show reasonable agreement with the corresponding CSOV calculated reference contributions, around 0.1 and 0.15 kcal/mol error for

  5. Generalization of the Gaussian electrostatic model: Extension to arbitrary angular momentum, distributed multipoles, and speedup with reciprocal space methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, G. Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A.

    2006-11-01

    The simulation of biological systems by means of current empirical force fields presents shortcomings due to their lack of accuracy, especially in the description of the nonbonded terms. We have previously introduced a force field based on density fitting termed the Gaussian electrostatic model-0 (GEM-0) J.-P. Piquemal et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 104101 (2006)] that improves the description of the nonbonded interactions. GEM-0 relies on density fitting methodology to reproduce each contribution of the constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) energy decomposition scheme, by expanding the electronic density of the molecule in s-type Gaussian functions centered at specific sites. In the present contribution we extend the Coulomb and exchange components of the force field to auxiliary basis sets of arbitrary angular momentum. Since the basis functions with higher angular momentum have directionality, a reference molecular frame (local frame) formalism is employed for the rotation of the fitted expansion coefficients. In all cases the intermolecular interaction energies are calculated by means of Hermite Gaussian functions using the McMurchie-Davidson [J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)] recursion to calculate all the required integrals. Furthermore, the use of Hermite Gaussian functions allows a point multipole decomposition determination at each expansion site. Additionally, the issue of computational speed is investigated by reciprocal space based formalisms which include the particle mesh Ewald (PME) and fast Fourier-Poisson (FFP) methods. Frozen-core (Coulomb and exchange-repulsion) intermolecular interaction results for ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface, as well as a one-dimensional surface scan for the canonical water dimer, formamide, stacked benzene, and benzene water dimers, are presented. All results show reasonable agreement with the corresponding CSOV calculated reference contributions, around 0.1 and 0.15kcal/mol error for

  6. Two-photon state selection and angular momentum polarization probed by velocity map imaging: Application to H atom photofragment angular distributions from the photodissociation of two-photon state selected HCl and HBr

    SciTech Connect

    Manzhos, Sergei; Romanescu, Constantin; Loock, Hans-Peter; Underwood, Jonathan G.

    2004-12-15

    A formalism for calculating the angular momentum polarization of an atom or a molecule following two-photon excitation of a J-selected state is presented. This formalism is used to interpret the H atom photofragment angular distributions from single-photon dissociation of two-photon rovibronically state selected HCl and HBr prepared via a Q-branch transition. By comparison of the angular distributions measured using the velocity map imaging technique with the theoretical model it is shown that single-photon dissociation of two-photon prepared states can be used for pathway identification, allowing for the identification of the virtual state symmetry in the two-photon absorption and/or the symmetry of the dissociative state. It is also shown that under conditions of excitation with circularly polarized light, or for excitation via non-Q-branch transitions with linearly polarized light the angular momentum polarization is independent of the dynamics of the two-photon transition and analytically computable.

  7. Two-photon state selection and angular momentum polarization probed by velocity map imaging: application to H atom photofragment angular distributions from the photodissociation of two-photon state selected HCl and HBr.

    PubMed

    Manzhos, Sergei; Romanescu, Constantin; Loock, Hans-Peter; Underwood, Jonathan G

    2004-12-15

    A formalism for calculating the angular momentum polarization of an atom or a molecule following two-photon excitation of a J-selected state is presented. This formalism is used to interpret the H atom photofragment angular distributions from single-photon dissociation of two-photon rovibronically state selected HCl and HBr prepared via a Q-branch transition. By comparison of the angular distributions measured using the velocity map imaging technique with the theoretical model it is shown that single-photon dissociation of two-photon prepared states can be used for pathway identification, allowing for the identification of the virtual state symmetry in the two-photon absorption and/or the symmetry of the dissociative state. It is also shown that under conditions of excitation with circularly polarized light, or for excitation via non-Q-branch transitions with linearly polarized light the angular momentum polarization is independent of the dynamics of the two-photon transition and analytically computable.

  8. Measurement of the leptonic angular distribution in $W$ boson decay as a function of the $W$ transverse momentum using the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2002-04-01

    A measurement of the angular distribution of leptons from the analysis of W-boson decay data is presented. Although the properties of the leptonic angular distribution from W decays have been studied extensively in the past decades, the amount of data collected at the Tevatron is sufficient to observe Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) corrections. When QCD is included, the lepton polar-angle distribution is best described by two parameters, $\\alpha_1$ and $\\alpha_2$, functions of $p^W_T$: $\\frac{{\\rm d}\\sigma}{{\\rm d}\\cos\\theta^*} \\propto (1\\pm\\alpha_1 \\cos\\theta^* +\\alpha_2 \\cos^2\\theta^*),$ where $\\theta^*$ is measured in the W rest-frame with respect to the proton beam. Both the W asymmetry measurement and the W mass precision measurement at CDF rely on the accurate understanding and simulation of the leptonic angular distribution. The data analysed in this thesis, which include both the electron and the muon channels, were collected with the CDF detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider during Run Ib (1994$-$1996). The coefficient $\\alpha_2$ of the polar-angle distribution is measured as a function of the W-boson transverse-momentum up to 100 GeV. The measurement strategy consists of fitting the transverse-mass distribution to a set of templates from a Monte Carlo event and detector simulation. A log-likelihood method is used to determine $\\alpha_2$. The measured values of $\\alpha_2$ confirm the Standard Model expectation for the W-polarisation at high transverse-momentum. A study for a measurement of $\\alpha_1$ is also presented. However, there is insufficient sensitivity for the measurement of $\\alpha_1$ with the CDF Run I detector.

  9. Intrinsic transverse spin angular momentum of fiber eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Liang; Wang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    We study the transverse spin angular momentum of fiber eigenmodes. As an intrinsic property of fiber eigenmodes, it becomes considerable in optical nanofibers and, especially, increases sharply in the evanescent field. We derive analytical expressions of this angular momentum, and present its density distribution inside and outside nanofibers. Significantly, we find the optimal ratio of the fiber core radius to the wavelength to obtain the maximum surface transverse spin. For instance, the optimal fiber radius is one-fourth of the wavelength for the fundamental mode. Furthermore, we investigate the spin flow of each guided mode on the nanofiber surface and the transverse mechanical effects originated from the transverse spin on small particles.

  10. Creation of orbital angular momentum states with chiral polaritonic lenses.

    PubMed

    Dall, Robert; Fraser, Michael D; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Li, Guangyao; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Ostrovskaya, Elena A

    2014-11-14

    Controlled transfer of orbital angular momentum to an exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensate spontaneously created under incoherent, off resonant excitation conditions is a long-standing challenge in the field of microcavity polaritonics. We demonstrate, experimentally and theoretically, a simple and efficient approach to the generation of nontrivial orbital angular momentum states by using optically induced potentials-chiral polaritonic lenses. These lenses are produced by a structured optical pump with a spatial distribution of intensity that breaks the chiral symmetry of the system.

  11. The Origin of Angular Momentum in Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitvitska, Maya; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Primack, Joel R.; Bullock, James S.

    2002-12-01

    We propose a new explanation for the origin of angular momentum in galaxies and their dark halos, in which the halos obtain their spin through the cumulative acquisition of angular momentum from satellite accretion. In our model, the buildup of angular momentum is a random walk process associated with the mass assembly history of the halo's major progenitor. We assume no correlation between the angular momenta of accreted objects. The main role of tidal torques in this approach is to produce the random tangential velocities of merging satellites. Using the extended Press-Schechter approximation, we calculate the growth of mass, angular momentum, and spin parameter λ for many halos. Our random walk model reproduces the key features of the angular momentum of halos found in ΛCDM N-body simulations: a lognormal distribution in λ with an average of <λ>~0.045 and dispersion σλ=0.56, independent of mass and redshift. The evolution of the spin parameter in individual halos in this model is quite different from the steady increase with time of angular momentum in the tidal torque picture. We find both in N-body simulations and in our random walk model that the value of λ changes significantly with time for a halo's major progenitor. It typically has a sharp increase due to major mergers and a steady decline during periods of gradual accretion of small satellites. The model predicts that, on average, the λ of ~1012 Msolar halos that had major mergers after redshift z=3 should be substantially larger than the λ of those that did not. Perhaps surprisingly, this suggests that halos that host later forming elliptical galaxies should rotate faster than halos of spiral galaxies.

  12. COEVOLUTION BETWEEN SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND BULGES IS NOT VIA INTERNAL FEEDBACK REGULATION BUT BY RATIONED GAS SUPPLY DUE TO ANGULAR MOMENTUM DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2015-05-20

    We reason that without physical fine-tuning, neither the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) nor the stellar bulges can self-regulate or inter-regulate by driving away already fallen cold gas to produce the observed correlation between them. We suggest an alternative scenario where the observed mass ratios of the SMBHs to bulges reflect the angular momentum distribution of infallen gas such that the mass reaching the stable accretion disk is a small fraction of that reaching the bulge region, averaged over the cosmological timescales. We test this scenario using high-resolution, large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, without active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, assuming the angular momentum distribution of gas landing in the bulge region yields a Mestel disk that is supported by independent simulations resolving the Bondi radii of SMBHs. A mass ratio of 0.1%–0.3% between the very low angular momentum gas that free falls to the subparsec region to accrete to the SMBH and the overall star formation rate is found. This ratio is found to increase with increasing redshift to within a factor of ∼2, suggesting that the SMBH-to-bulge ratio is nearly redshift independent, with a modest increase with redshift, which is a testable prediction. Furthermore, the duty cycle of AGNs with high Eddington ratios is expected to increase significantly with redshift. Finally, while SMBHs and bulges are found to coevolve on ∼30–150 Myr timescales or longer, there is indication that on still smaller timescales, the SMBH accretion and star formation may be less correlated.

  13. Orbital Angular Momentum-Entanglement Frequency Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Shi-Long; Li, Yan; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Shuai; Dong, Ming-Xin; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-09-01

    Entanglement is a vital resource for realizing many tasks such as teleportation, secure key distribution, metrology, and quantum computations. To effectively build entanglement between different quantum systems and share information between them, a frequency transducer to convert between quantum states of different wavelengths while retaining its quantum features is indispensable. Information encoded in the photon's orbital angular momentum (OAM) degrees of freedom is preferred in harnessing the information-carrying capacity of a single photon because of its unlimited dimensions. A quantum transducer, which operates at wavelengths from 1558.3 to 525 nm for OAM qubits, OAM-polarization hybrid-entangled states, and OAM-entangled states, is reported for the first time. Nonclassical properties and entanglements are demonstrated following the conversion process by performing quantum tomography, interference, and Bell inequality measurements. Our results demonstrate the capability to create an entanglement link between different quantum systems operating in a photon's OAM degrees of freedom, which will be of great importance in building a high-capacity OAM quantum network.

  14. The missing angular momentum of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2008-06-01

    We point out that the Meissner effect, the process by which a superconductor expels magnetic field from its interior, represents an unsolved puzzle within the London-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theoretical framework used to describe the physics of conventional superconductors, because it appears to give rise to non-conservation of angular momentum. Possible ways to avoid this inconsistency within the conventional theory of superconductivity are argued to be far-fetched. Consequently, we argue that unless/until a consistent explanation is put forth, the existence of the Meissner effect represents an anomaly that casts doubt on the validity of the conventional framework. Instead, we point out that three elements of the unconventional theory of hole superconductivity (that are not part of the conventional theory) allow for a consistent explanation of the Meissner effect, namely: (i) that the charge distribution in superconductors is macroscopically inhomogeneous, (ii) that superconducting electrons reside in mesoscopic orbits of radius 2λL (λL = London penetration depth), and (iii) that spin-orbit coupling plays an essential role in superconductivity.

  15. Angular Momentum Loss Via Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Sean; Pinzon, G.; Greene, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of stellar spin rates observed during star formation is not yet understood, due primarily to the fact that it is still not clear which mechanism(s) is responsible for removing angular momentum. Stellar winds may exert significant torques during pre-main-sequence evolution, provided that the mass loss rates are enhanced by several orders of magnitude relative to their main sequence values. This may be possible, if the winds are powered by the accretion process. We present new calculations of the angular momentum loss from enhanced stellar winds and address how this may help our understanding of young star spins. SPM was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at Ames Research Center, administered by ORAU through a contract with NASA.

  16. Angular momentum in cluster Spherical Collapse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupani, Guido; Mezzetti, Marino; Mardirossian, Fabio

    2011-11-01

    Our new formulation of the Spherical Collapse Model (SCM-L) takes into account the presence of angular momentum associated with the motion of galaxy groups infalling towards the centre of galaxy clusters. The angular momentum is responsible for an additional term in the dynamical equation which is useful to describe the evolution of the clusters in the non-equilibrium region which is investigated in the present paper. Our SCM-L can be used to predict the profiles of several strategic dynamical quantities as the radial and tangential velocities of member galaxies, and the total cluster mass. A good understanding of the non-equilibrium region is important since it is the natural scenario where the infall in galaxy clusters and the accretion phenomena present in these objects can be studied. Our results corroborate previous estimates and are in very good agreement with the analysis of recent observations and of simulated clusters.

  17. Interplay of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anthony W

    2008-09-05

    We derive the consequences of the Myhrer-Thomas explanation of the proton spin problem for the distribution of orbital angular momentum on the valence and sea quarks. After QCD evolution, these results are found to be in very good agreement with both recent lattice QCD calculations and the experimental constraints from Hermes and JLab.

  18. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  19. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-28

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. A Universal Angular Momentum Profile for Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shihong; Chen, Jianxiong; Chu, M.-C.

    2017-07-01

    The angular momentum distribution in dark matter halos and galaxies is a key ingredient in understanding their formation. Specifically, the internal distribution of angular momenta is closely related to the formation of disk galaxies. In this article, we use halos identified from a high-resolution simulation, the Bolshoi simulation, to study the spatial distribution of specific angular momenta, j(r,θ ). We show that by stacking halos with similar masses to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, the profile can be fitted as a simple function, j{(r,θ )={j}s{\\sin }2{(θ /{θ }s)(r/{r}s)}2/(1+r/{r}s)}4, with three free parameters, {j}s,{r}s, and {θ }s. Specifically, j s correlates with the halo mass M vir as {j}s\\propto {M}{vir}2/3, r s has a weak dependence on the halo mass as {r}s\\propto {M}{vir}0.040, and {θ }s is independent of M vir. This profile agrees with that from a rigid shell model, though its origin is unclear. Our universal specific angular momentum profile j(r,θ ) is useful in modeling the angular momenta of halos. Furthermore, by using an empirical stellar mass-halo mass relation, we can infer the average angular momentum distribution of a dark matter halo. The specific angular momentum-stellar mass relation within a halo computed from our profile is shown to share a similar shape as that from the observed disk galaxies.

  1. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies in EAGLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Cortese, Luca; Padilla, Nelson D.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Croton, Darren

    2017-02-01

    We use the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulation suite to study the specific angular momentum of galaxies, j, with the aims of (i) investigating the physical causes behind the wide range of j at fixed mass and (ii) examining whether simple, theoretical models can explain the seemingly complex and non-linear nature of the evolution of j. We find that j of the stars, jstars, and baryons, jbar, are strongly correlated with stellar and baryon mass, respectively, with the scatter being highly correlated with morphological proxies such as gas fraction, stellar concentration, (u-r) intrinsic colour, stellar age and the ratio of circular velocity to velocity dispersion. We compare with available observations at z = 0 and find excellent agreement. We find that jbar follows the theoretical expectation of an isothermal collapsing halo under conservation of specific angular momentum to within ≈50 per cent, while the subsample of rotation-supported galaxies are equally well described by a simple model in which the disc angular momentum is just enough to maintain marginally stable discs. We extracted evolutionary tracks of the stellar spin parameter of EAGLE galaxies and found that the fate of their jstars at z = 0 depends sensitively on their star formation and merger histories. From these tracks, we identified two distinct physical channels behind low jstars galaxies at z = 0: (i) galaxy mergers, and (ii) early star formation quenching. The latter can produce galaxies with low jstars and early-type morphologies even in the absence of mergers.

  2. Nuclear structure at high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    This review paper begins by discussing the limits faced in the attempts to get nuclei to hold very high angular momentum. The method presently used to produce nuclei with the maximum angular momentum is described. Then the physics of high-spin states is taken up; some properties of a purely collective, classical rotor are described, and the effects of coupling single-particle motion to this are considered. Next, backbending, its causes, and a new spectroscopy of bands and backbends at high spin values are discussed. Noncollective states occur when the nuclear angular momentum is carried by a few high-j particles and is aligned along a symmetry axis. There results an irregular yrast line, along which there are no collective transitions. Noncollective behavior in the lead region, the hafnium region, and the N = 82 region is examined. Then the discussion moves on to collective behavior and recent studies on continuum spectra. Evidence for rotation is given, and effective moments of inertia for this rotation are evaluated. Finally, current ..gamma..-ray energy correlation studies are described. 68 references, 36 figures. (RWR)

  3. Coherent Detection of Orbital Angular Momentum in Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The angular momentum propagated by a beam of radiation has two contributions: spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital...angular momentum (OAM). SAM corresponds to wave polarisation, while OAM-carrying beams are characterized by a phase which is a function of azimuth. We...Coherent detection of orbital angular momentum in radio The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and

  4. Optical angular momentum: Multipole transitions and photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, David L.

    2010-03-15

    The premise that multipolar decay should produce photons uniquely imprinted with a measurably corresponding angular momentum is shown in general to be untrue. To assume a one-to-one correlation between the transition multipoles involved in source decay and detector excitation is to impose a generally unsupportable one-to-one correlation between the multipolar form of emission transition and a multipolar character for the detected field. It is specifically proven impossible to determine without ambiguity, by use of any conventional detector, and for any photon emitted through the nondipolar decay of an atomic excited state, a unique multipolar character for the transition associated with its generation. Consistent with the angular quantum uncertainty principle, removal of a detector from the immediate vicinity of the source produces a decreasing angular uncertainty in photon propagation direction, reflected in an increasing range of integer values for the measured angular momentum. In such a context it follows that when the decay of an electronic excited state occurs by an electric quadrupolar transition, for example, any assumption that the radiation so produced is conveyed in the form of 'quadrupole photons' is experimentally unverifiable. The results of the general proof based on irreducible tensor analysis invite experimental verification, and they signify certain limitations on quantum optical data transmission.

  5. Improved numerical projection of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Kevin; Johnson, Calvin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear many-body states have good angular momenta, but many theoretical building blocks such as deformed Slater determinants do not. Hence one must numerically project out states of good angular momenta, usually through a computationally taxing three-dimensional integral. We took an existing code for angular-momentum projected Hartree-Fock and improved its performance, partly through judicious ordering of the loops, precomputing arrays of important combinatorics, and careful application of parallelization. We also investigated a novel inversion scheme. This work is potentially applicable to multiple approaches in many-body calculations, and should also be generalizable to particle number projection. Supported by SDSU Summer Undergraduate Research Program and by DOE Award Number DE-FG02-96ER40985.

  6. Orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Ji, Zhiyue; Ru, Guoyun

    2016-07-01

    Based on the vectorial Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral formulae, the analytical expression of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam with an arbitrary topological charge is derived in free space. By using the analytical expressions of the electromagnetic field beyond the paraxial approximation, the orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam can be calculated. The effects of the linearly polarized angle and the topological charge on the three components of the orbital angular momentum density are investigated in the reference plane. The two transversal components of the orbital angular momentum are composed of two lobes with the same areas and opposite signs. The longitudinal component of the orbital angular momentum density is composed of four lobes with the same areas. The sign of the orbital angular momentum density in a pair of lobes is positive, and that of the orbital angular momentum density in the other pair of lobes is negative. Moreover, the negative magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density is larger than the positive magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density. The linearly polarized angle affects not only the shape and the location of the lobes, but also the magnitude of the three components of the orbital angular momentum density. With increasing the topological charge, the distribution of the orbital angular momentum density expands, the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density increases, and the shape of the lobe also slightly changes.

  7. Angular-momentum transfer due to postcollision interaction in atomic inner n s2 -shell photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerchikov, L.; Guillemin, R.; Simon, M.; Sheinerman, S.

    2017-06-01

    A concrete mechanism of angular-momentum transfer in photoionization process is proposed for electron photoemission from deep inner atomic shells. It is demonstrated that the leading contribution to angular-momentum transfer is provided by postcollision interaction of the photoelectrons and Auger electrons. The standard theoretical approach to postcollision interaction has been considerably improved by taking into account angular-momentum transfer. The theory developed is applied to the photoionization of 1 s2 shell in Ar. Calculations show the noticeable influence of angular-momentum transfer on the photoelectron angular distribution.

  8. Energy, momentum and angular momentum conservations in de Sitter gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jia-An

    2016-08-01

    In de Sitter (dS) gravity, where gravity is a gauge field introduced to realize the local dS invariance of the matter field, two kinds of conservation laws are derived. The first kind is a differential equation for a dS-covariant current, which unites the canonical energy-momentum (EM) and angular momentum (AM) tensors. The second kind presents a dS-invariant current which is conserved in the sense that its torsion-free divergence vanishes. The dS-invariant current unites the total (matter plus gravity) EM and AM currents. It is well known that the AM current contains an inherent part, called the spin current. Here it is shown that the EM tensor also contains an inherent part, which might be observed by its contribution to the deviation of the dust particle’s world line from a geodesic. All the results are compared to the ordinary Lorentz gravity.

  9. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  10. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent.

  11. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  12. CONNECTING ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALACTIC DYNAMICS: THE COMPLEX INTERPLAY BETWEEN SPIN, MASS, AND MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Teklu, Adelheid F.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander M.; Burkert, Andreas; Schulze, Felix; Steinborn, Lisa K.; Schmidt, Andreas S.

    2015-10-10

    The evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter (DM) halos have been discussed in several studies over the past decades. In particular, the idea arose that angular momentum conservation should allow us to infer the total angular momentum of the entire DM halo from measuring the angular momentum of the baryonic component, which is populating the center of the halo, especially for disk galaxies. To test this idea and to understand the connection between the angular momentum of the DM halo and its galaxy, we use a state-of-the-art, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation taken from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder simulations. Thanks to the inclusion of the relevant physical processes, the improved underlying numerical methods, and high spatial resolution, we successfully produce populations of spheroidal and disk galaxies self-consistently. Thus, we are able to study the dependence of galactic properties on their morphology. We find that (1) the specific angular momentum of stars in disk and spheroidal galaxies as a function of their stellar mass compares well with observational results; (2) the specific angular momentum of the stars in disk galaxies is slightly smaller compared to the specific angular momentum of the cold gas, in good agreement with observations; (3) simulations including the baryonic component show a dichotomy in the specific stellar angular momentum distribution when splitting the galaxies according to their morphological type (this dichotomy can also be seen in the spin parameter, where disk galaxies populate halos with slightly larger spin compared to spheroidal galaxies); (4) disk galaxies preferentially populate halos in which the angular momentum vector of the DM component in the central part shows a better alignment to the angular momentum vector of the entire halo; and (5) the specific angular momentum of the cold gas in disk galaxies is approximately 40% smaller than the specific angular momentum of the total DM halo

  13. Measuring orbital angular momentum of light with a torsion pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2005-03-01

    We report experiments aimed at measuring the orbital angular momentum of light by means of a torsion pendulum, in the spirit of the classical spin angular momentum experiment by Beth (1936) but using present-day technology. Although our set-up has adequate sensitivity and resolution to measure orbital angular momentum of light, the systematic errors that are caused by the inherent asymmetry in the conversion of orbital angular moment remain a problem.

  14. Angular momentum desaturation for Skylab using gravity gradient torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    An angular momentum desaturation method for momentum exchange devices of orbiting spacecraft is described. The specific application of the method is to the Skylab which contains three double-gimbaled control moment gyros for precise attitude control and maneuvering. It is assumed that the attitude reference is inertially fixed and that two of the vehicle principal moments of inertia are much larger than the third. Gravity gradient torques and resultant angular momentum accumulation are developed for small deviations from the reference. The assumed moment-of-inertia distribution allows desaturation about all axes with only two attitude angles each for the two axes with large moments of inertia. The necessary desaturation maneuvers can be decoupled for a special set of orbital coordinates. All maneuvers are made during the night portion of the orbit, and the percentage utilized for desaturation is selectable. Expressions for the attitude angle commands are developed assuming infinite vehicle rates. The effect of finite rates introduces an efficiency into the desaturation. Expressions for this efficiency are developed and means for compensation are treated. Arbitrary misalignments between geometric vehicle axes and principal moment-of-inertia axes are permissible. An angle bias about the sun line minimizes the angular momentum accumulation about the sun line projection into the orbital plane. Adaptive desaturation maneuver limiting consistent with the available maneuver momentum is included.

  15. Maximum magnetic moment to angular momentum conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Gibbons, G. W.

    2017-03-01

    Conjectures play a central role in theoretical physics, especially those that assert an upper bound to some dimensionless ratio of physical quantities. In this paper we introduce a new such conjecture bounding the ratio of the magnetic moment to angular momentum in nature. We also discuss the current status of some old bounds on dimensionless and dimensional quantities in arbitrary spatial dimension. Our new conjecture is that the dimensionless Schuster-Wilson-Blackett number, c μ /J G1/2 , where μ is the magnetic moment and J is the angular momentum, is bounded above by a number of order unity. We verify that such a bound holds for charged rotating black holes in those theories for which exact solutions are available, including the Einstein-Maxwell theory, Kaluza-Klein theory, the Kerr-Sen black hole, and the so-called STU family of charged rotating supergravity black holes. We also discuss the current status of the maximum tension conjecture, the Dyson luminosity bound, and Thorne's hoop conjecture.

  16. Quark orbital angular momentum in the MIT bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtoy, A.; Miramontes, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results for the generalized transverse momentum distribution related to quark orbital angular momentum, i.e., F14, in the MIT bag model. This model has been modified to include the Peierls-Yoccoz projection to restore translational invariance. Such a modification allows us to fulfil more satisfactorily basic sum rules that would otherwise be less elegantly carried out with the original version. Using the same model, we have calculated the twist-3 generalized parton distribution (GPD) that corresponds to orbital angular momentum à la Ji, through the Penttinen-Polyakov-Shuvaev-Strikman sum rule. Recently, a new relation between the two definitions of the quark orbital angular momentum at the density level has been proposed, which we illustrate here within the model. The sum rule is fulfilled. Still within the framework of the MIT bag model, we analyze the Wandzura-Wilczek expression for the GPD of interest. The genuine quark-gluon contribution is evaluated directly thanks to the equation of motion of the bag, which allows for a direct control of the kinematical contributions to the twist-3 GPD.

  17. Single beam optical vortex tweezers with tunable orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Drevinskas, Rokas Beresna, Martynas; Kazansky, Peter G.

    2014-06-09

    We propose a single beam method for generating optical vortices with tunable optical angular momentum without altering the intensity distribution. With the initial polarization state varying from linear to circular, we gradually control the torque transferred to the trapped non-absorbing and non-birefringent silica beads. The continuous transition from the maximum rotation speed to zero without changing the trapping potential gives a way to study the complex tribological interactions.

  18. A spectral analysis of the earth's angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.; Callahan, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The exchange of angular momentum between the solid earth and the atmosphere from January 1976 through March 1982 is investigated using estimates of the earth's rotation from optical astrometry and lunar laser ranging and meteorological estimates of the atmospheric angular momentum M(atm). The physics of the earth's angular momentum budget is described, and earth rotation measurements are related to changes in the angular momentum of the fluid parts of the earth. The availability and reliability of earth rotation and M(atm) data are reported, and the possibility of estimating the exchange of angular momentum with the oceans and with the core is examined. Estimates of the power spectrum, cospectral coherence, and linear transfer functions and an analysis of the unmodeled part of the angular momentum budget are presented and discussed. The amplitude and phase of the semiannual, monthly, and fortnightly tidal variations in the length of day are estimated after removing observed atmospheric excitation.

  19. Untangling Galaxy Components - The Angular Momentum Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Martha; Merrifield, Michael; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new technique to decompose Integral Field spectral data cubes into separate bulge and disk components, allowing us to study the kinematic and stellar population properties of the individual components and how they vary with position. We present here the application of this method to a sample of fast rotator early type galaxies from the MaNGA integral field survey, and demonstrate how it can be used to explore key properties of the individual components. By extracting ages, metallicities and the angular momentum parameter lambda of the bulges and disks, we show how this method can give us new insights into the underlying structure of the galaxies and discuss what this can tell us about their evolution history.

  20. High Orbital Angular Momentum Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Alves, E. P.; Fonseca, R. A.; Mendonça, J. T.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-12-01

    We identify and explore a high orbital angular momentum (OAM) harmonics generation and amplification mechanism that manipulates the OAM independently of any other laser property, by preserving the initial laser wavelength, through stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. The high OAM harmonics spectra can extend at least up to the limiting value imposed by the paraxial approximation. We show with theory and particle-in-cell simulations that the orders of the OAM harmonics can be tuned according to a selection rule that depends on the initial OAM of the interacting waves. We illustrate the high OAM harmonics generation in a plasma using several examples including the generation of prime OAM harmonics. The process can also be realized in any nonlinear optical Kerr media supporting three-wave interactions.

  1. High Orbital Angular Momentum Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Trines, R M G M; Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Mendonça, J T; Bingham, R; Norreys, P; Silva, L O

    2016-12-23

    We identify and explore a high orbital angular momentum (OAM) harmonics generation and amplification mechanism that manipulates the OAM independently of any other laser property, by preserving the initial laser wavelength, through stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. The high OAM harmonics spectra can extend at least up to the limiting value imposed by the paraxial approximation. We show with theory and particle-in-cell simulations that the orders of the OAM harmonics can be tuned according to a selection rule that depends on the initial OAM of the interacting waves. We illustrate the high OAM harmonics generation in a plasma using several examples including the generation of prime OAM harmonics. The process can also be realized in any nonlinear optical Kerr media supporting three-wave interactions.

  2. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-05

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM.

  3. Orbital Angular Momentum Measurements for Turbulence Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Sun, W.; MacDonnell, D.; Weimer, C. S.; Hou, W.; Josset, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in cloud-climate feedback is the primary source of uncertainty in climate sensitivity. Turbulence plays important role in cloud life cycle, but it has never been measured globally. Here we introduce an innovative turbulence characterization technique through orbital angular momentum (OAM) measurements. OAM is sensitive to turbulence. OAM is a new research area in optical communication community to increase bandwidth of free space communication. Turbulence is their problem since it causes changes in OAM and a lot of studies are carried out by that community. There are simple relations between turbulence intensity and OAM change for both weak and strong turbulence (Rodenburg et al., 2012). OAM can be measured using the photon sieve technique developed at NASA Langley Research center (MacDonnell 2016; Sun et al., 2016). This study will lead to a space-based OAM measurement concept for turbulence characterization, which will help improve cloud and climate modeling.

  4. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  5. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  6. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  7. Angular momentum of dark matter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2017-04-01

    We provide strongly suggestive evidence that the halo constituents of dark matter are Primordial Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (PIMBHs). PIMBHs are described by a Kerr metric with two parameters, mass M and angular momentum J. There has been little discussion of J since it plays no role in the upcoming attempt at PIMBH detection by microlensing. Nevertheless J does play a central role in understanding their previous lack of detection, especially by CMB distortion. We explain why bounds previously derived from lack of CMB distortion are too strong for PIMBHs with J non-vanishing and that, provided almost no dark matter black holes originate from stellar collapse, excessive CMB distortion is avoided.

  8. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  9. Whole-body angular momentum in incline and decline walking.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Wilken, Jason M; Sinitski, Emily H; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-04-05

    Angular momentum is highly regulated over the gait cycle and is important for maintaining dynamic stability and control of movement. However, little is known regarding how angular momentum is regulated on irregular surfaces, such as slopes, when the risk of falling is higher. This study examined the three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum patterns of 30 healthy subjects walking over a range of incline and decline angles. The range of angular momentum was either similar or reduced on decline surfaces and increased on incline surfaces relative to level ground, with the greatest differences occurring in the frontal and sagittal planes. These results suggest that angular momentum is more tightly controlled during decline walking when the risk of falling is greater. In the frontal plane, the range of angular momentum was strongly correlated with the peak hip and knee abduction moments in early stance. In the transverse plane, the strongest correlation occurred with the knee external rotation peak in late stance. In the sagittal plane, all external moment peaks were correlated with the range of angular momentum. The peak ankle plantarflexion, knee flexion and hip extension moments were also strongly correlated with the sagittal-plane angular momentum. These results highlight how able-bodied subjects control angular momentum differently on sloped surfaces relative to level walking and provide a baseline for comparison with pathological populations that are more susceptible to falling.

  10. Ideal linear-chain polymers with fixed angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthew; Deutsch, J M

    2011-07-01

    The statistical mechanics of a linear noninteracting polymer chain with a large number of monomers is considered with fixed angular momentum. The radius of gyration for a linear polymer is derived exactly by functional integration. This result is then compared to simulations done with a large number of noninteracting rigid links at fixed angular momentum. The simulation agrees with the theory up to finite-size corrections. The simulations are also used to investigate the anisotropic nature of a spinning polymer. We find universal scaling of the polymer size along the direction of the angular momentum, as a function of rescaled angular momentum.

  11. Angular Momentum Redistribution in Turbulent Compressible Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal; Brummell, Nicholas; Toomre, Juri

    1997-08-01

    We consider the dynamics of turbulent compressible convection within a curved local segment of a rotating spherical shell. We aim to understand the disparity between the observed solar differential rotation and previous numerical simulations. The angular extent of the curved domain is limited to a small solid angle in order to exploit fully the available spatial degrees of freedom on current supercomputers and attain the highest possible Reynolds numbers. Here we present simulations with Rayleigh numbers in excess of 10^7, and Prandtl numbers less than 0.1. This computational domain takes the form of a curved, periodic channel in longitude with stress-free sidewalls in latitude and radius. The numerical solutions are obtained using high-order accuracy explicit code. It evaluates spatial derivatives using sixth-order compact finite differences in radius and latitude and psuedospectral methods in longitude and advances the solutions in time using a fourth-order Bulirsch-Stoer integrator. The surface flows form broad, laminar networks which mask the much more turbulent flows of the interior. The dynamics within this turbulent region is controlled by the interactions of a tangled web of strong vortex tubes. These tubes and their interactions redistrubute the angular momentum, generating azimuthal flows with strong shear in both radius and latitude. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab

  12. Angular Momentum in the Formation of Disc Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Jian; Shu, Cheng-Gang

    2004-03-01

    Within the current framework of disc galaxy formation, we discuss the resulted surface-density profiles according to the theoretical angular momentum distributions (AMDs) presented by Bullock et al. [Astrophys. J. 555 (2001) 240(B01)] for the LambdaCDM cosmology in both spherical and cylindrical coordinates. It is found that the derived surface density distribution of a disc in the outer region is in general similar to an exponential disc for both the theoretical AMDs. In the central region, the results from both the theoretical AMDs are inconsistent with observations whether the disc bar-instability is taken into account or not. The cylindrical form of the theoretical AMD leads to the bar-instability more easily for a galaxy than that for spherical AMD, which could result in a more massive bulge. After comparing the model predictions with our Milky Way Galaxy, we find that the theoretical AMDs predict larger mass fractions of baryons with low angular momentum than the observed ones, which would lead to the disc sizes being smaller. Two possible processes which could solve the angular momentum problem are discussed. EHPRG Award Lecture.

  13. Creating high-harmonic beams with controlled orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T J; Frumker, E; Boyd, Robert W; Corkum, P B

    2014-10-10

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ = ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ| = 1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  14. Creating High-Harmonic Beams with Controlled Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T. J.; Frumker, E.; Boyd, Robert W.; Corkum, P. B.

    2014-10-01

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ =ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ|=1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  15. Semiclassical complex angular momentum theory and Pade reconstruction for resonances, rainbows, and reaction thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolovski, D.; Msezane, A.Z.

    2004-09-01

    A semiclassical complex angular momentum theory, used to analyze atom-diatom reactive angular distributions, is applied to several well-known potential (one-particle) problems. Examples include resonance scattering, rainbow scattering, and the Eckart threshold model. Pade reconstruction of the corresponding matrix elements from the values at physical (integral) angular momenta and properties of the Pade approximants are discussed in detail.

  16. Distilling angular momentum nonclassical states in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Militello, B.; Messina, A.

    2004-09-01

    In the spirit of quantum nondemolition measurements, we show that by exploiting suitable vibronic couplings and repeatedly measuring the atomic population of a confined ion, it is possible to distill center-of-mass vibrational states with a well-defined square of angular momentum or, alternatively, angular momentum projection Schroedinger cat states.

  17. Measurement of angular momentum flux in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Asavei, Theodor; Preece, Daryl; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2011-03-01

    It is well established that a light beam can carry angular momentum and therefore when using optical tweezers it is possible to exert torques to twist or rotate microscopic objects. Both spin and orbital angular momentum can be transferred. This transfer can be achieved using birefringent particles exposed to a Gaussian circularly polarized beam. In this case, a transfer of spin angular momentum will occur. The change in spin, and hence the torque, can be readily measured optically. On the other hand, it is much more challenging to measure orbital angular momentum and torque. Laguerre-Gauss mode decomposition, as used for orbital angular momentum encoding for quantum communication, and rotational frequency shift can be used, and are effective methods in a macro-environment. However, the situation becomes more complicated when a measurement is done on microscale, especially with highly focused laser beams. We review the methods for the measurement of the angular momentum of light in optical tweezers, and the challenges faced when measuring orbital angular momentum. We also demonstrate one possible simple method for a quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum in optical tweezers.

  18. Non-negative Wigner functions for orbital angular momentum states

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Klimov, A. B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2010-01-15

    The Wigner function of a pure continuous-variable quantum state is non-negative if and only if the state is Gaussian. Here we show that for the canonical pair angle and angular momentum, the only pure states with non-negative Wigner functions are the eigenstates of the angular momentum. Some implications of this surprising result are discussed.

  19. The Angular Momentum Dilemma and Born-Jordan Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2017-01-01

    The rigorous equivalence of the Schrödinger and Heisenberg pictures requires that one uses Born-Jordan quantization in place of Weyl quantization. We confirm this by showing that the much discussed " angular momentum dilemma" disappears if one uses Born-Jordan quantization. We argue that the latter is the only physically correct quantization procedure. We also briefly discuss a possible redefinition of phase space quantum mechanics, where the usual Wigner distribution has to be replaced with a new quasi-distribution associated with Born-Jordan quantization, and which has proven to be successful in time-frequency analysis.

  20. Angular Momentum Sensitive Two-Center Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Walter, P.; Deinert, S.; Rothkirch, A.; Seltmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Decleva, P.; Langer, B.; Knie, A.; Ehresmann, A.; Al-Dossary, O. M.; Braune, M.; Hartmann, G.; Meissner, A.; Tribedi, L. C.; AlKhaldi, M.; Becker, U.

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  1. Angular momentum sensitive two-center interference.

    PubMed

    Ilchen, M; Glaser, L; Scholz, F; Walter, P; Deinert, S; Rothkirch, A; Seltmann, J; Viefhaus, J; Decleva, P; Langer, B; Knie, A; Ehresmann, A; Al-Dossary, O M; Braune, M; Hartmann, G; Meissner, A; Tribedi, L C; AlKhaldi, M; Becker, U

    2014-01-17

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  2. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  3. Optical communications beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Trichili, Abderrahmen; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Current optical communication technologies are predicted to face a bandwidth capacity limit in the near future. The nature of the limitation is fundamental rather than technological and is set by nonlinearities in optical fibers. One solution, suggested over 30 years ago, comprises the use of spatial modes of light as information carriers. Along this direction, light beams endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been demonstrated as potential information carriers in both, free space and fibres. However, recent studies suggest that purely OAM modes does not increase the bandwidth of optical communication systems. In fact, in all work to date, only the azimuthal component of transverse spatial modes has been used. Crucially, all transverse spatial modes require two degrees of freedom to be described; in the context of Laguerre-Gaussian (LGp`) beams these are azimuthal (l) and radial (p), the former responsible for OAM. Here, we demonstrate a technique where both degrees of freedom of LG modes are used as information carrier over free space. We transfer images encoded using 100 spatial modes in three wavelengths as our basis, and employ a spatial demultiplexing scheme that detects all 100 modes simultaneously. Our scheme is a hybrid of MIMO and SMM, and serves as a proof-of-principle demonstration. The cross-talk between the modes is small and independent of whether OAM modes are used or not.

  4. Angular-momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.

    1993-11-01

    It has been known since about 1980 that fusion of heavy ions is greatly enhanced below the Coulomb barrier compared with normal barrier-penetration expectations. The excitation function for fusion of {sup 64}Ni + {sup 100}Mo measured in collaboration with a group at Washington University shows the effect clearly. The barrier energy is about 142 MeV; the lowest point is at about 90% of the barrier energy. The dotted curve is the prediction of a one-dimensional-barrier-penetration calculation of a type that reproduces the fusion of light projectiles very well. Several theoretical approaches have been successful in explaining the enhancement seen in much of the excitation-function data, but it cannot be said that a full understanding of the physics is in hand even after more than a decade of hard work. In fact, the reasonable success of several rather different models shows that the underlying phenomena are not well understood. Other types of data might be helpful in distinguishing among the many different theoretical approaches. An important kind of information not measured in most of the experiments is the dependence on {ell}, the angular momentum of the fusing system. We obtained such information on the cross sections, {sigma}{ell}, as a function of {ell} for the fusion of {sup 64}Ni and {sup 100}Mo using the Spin Spectrometer. This paper will first review the experimental method and data and then present results from a more sophisticated analysis of the same data.

  5. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission.

  6. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-09-06

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission.

  7. Interannual variation of global atmospheric angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Tribbia, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    The relative atmospheric angular momentum (RAM) integrated over the globe is an explicit variable representing the state of the atmospheric general circulation. After removing the annual, semiannual, and higher-frequency components, the filtered global RAM time series for the past 14 years (1979-92) is highly correlated with both the Southern Oscillation index and the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature averaged over Area NINO-3 (5{degrees}S-5{degrees}N, 150{degrees}W-90{degrees}W). The interannual variation of global RAM is coherent with the poleward propagation of RAM anomalies. The global RAM anomalies reach their minimum values when westerly anomalies emerge in the Tropics and higher latitudes during a cold El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event. On the other hand, global RAM anomalies attain their maximum values when westerly anomalies arrive at the subtropics of both hemispheres during a warm ENSO event. It is demonstrated that the poleward propagation of RAM anomalies results from the flip-flop oscillation of the anomalous circulation between cold and warm ENSO events. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Cyclic transformation of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlederer, Florian; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Malik, Mehul; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states.

  9. Dependencies of lepton angular distribution coefficients on the transverse momentum and rapidity of Z bosons produced in p p collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen-Chen; McClellan, Randall Evan; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Teryaev, Oleg

    2017-09-01

    High precision data of lepton angular distributions for γ*/Z production in p p collisions at the LHC, covering broad ranges of dilepton transverse momenta (qT) and rapidity (y ), were recently reported. Strong qT dependencies were observed for several angular distribution coefficients, Ai, including A0-A4. Significant y dependencies were also found for the coefficients A1, A3 and A4, while A0 and A2 exhibit very weak rapidity dependence. Using an intuitive geometric picture, we show that the qT and y dependencies of the angular distributions coefficients can be well described.

  10. Angular momentum projection with quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ching-Yun; Banerjee, M. K.

    1991-04-01

    We have improved a simple and rapid method of calculating expectation values of operators in states of good angular momentum projected from a hedgehog baryon state introduced by Birse et al. We have included the contributions of quantum mesons, while in the original method only classical meson fields were included. The method has been applied to models where the mean-field approximation does not include loop terms. Hence, for reasons of consistency, contributions of quantum loops to the matrix elements have been dropped. The symmetry of the hedgehog state under grand reversal (the combined operation of time reversal and eiπI^2, where I^ is the isospin operator) introduces remarkable simplification in the calculation of matrix elements of operators which do not contain time derivatives of meson fields. The quantum meson contributions turn out to be 3/2/ times the classical meson-field contributions, with ||B> being the hedgehog state. Such operators are encountered in the calculation of nucleon magnetic moments, gA(0) and gπNN(0)/2M. Calculation of charge radii involves operators containing time derivatives of meson fields and requires the knowledge of wave functions of quantum mesons. Proper nonperturbative treatment, even though at the tree level, requires that these wave functions describe the motion of the mesons in the potential generated by the baryon. Fortunately, because of the neglect of the loop terms, one needs only the even-parity, grand-spin-1 states which are purely pionic. The Goldberger-Treiman relations, an exact result for the model, serves as a partial test of the method of calculation discussed here. This has been used to demonstrate the remarkable improvement in the results produced by the inclusion of quantum effects of the mesons.

  11. Angular momentum projection with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, C.; Banerjee, M.K. Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 )

    1991-04-01

    We have improved a simple and rapid method of calculating expectation values of operators in states of good angular momentum projected from a hedgehog baryon state introduced by Birse {ital et} {ital al}. We have included the contributions of quantum mesons, while in the original method only classical meson fields were included. The method has been applied to models where the mean-field approximation does not include loop terms. Hence, for reasons of consistency, contributions of quantum loops to the matrix elements have been dropped. The symmetry of the hedgehog state under grand reversal (the combined operation of time reversal and {ital e}{sup {ital i}{pi}{bold {cflx I}}}{sub 2}, where {bold {cflx I}} is the isospin operator) introduces remarkable simplification in the calculation of matrix elements of operators which do not contain time derivatives of meson fields. The quantum meson contributions turn out to be 3/2/{l angle}{ital B}{vert bar}{ital {cflx J}}{sup 2}{vert bar}{ital B}{r angle} times the classical meson-field contributions, with {vert bar}{ital B}{r angle} being the hedgehog state. Such operators are encountered in the calculation of nucleon magnetic moments, {ital g}{sub {ital A}}(0) and {ital g}{sub {pi}{ital N}{ital N}}(0)/2{ital M}. Calculation of charge radii involves operators containing time derivatives of meson fields and requires the knowledge of wave functions of quantum mesons. Proper nonperturbative treatment, even though at the tree level, requires that these wave functions describe the motion of the mesons in the potential generated by the baryon. Fortunately, because of the neglect of the loop terms, one needs only the even-parity, grand-spin-1 states which are purely pionic. The Goldberger-Treiman relations, an exact result for the model, serves as a partial test of the method of calculation discussed here.

  12. Interaction-free generation of orbital angular momentum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Dong; Gu, Xuemei; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Due to the infinite range of possibly achievable degrees of freedom, orbital angular momentum (OAM) can tremendously increase the capacity of communication system. Here, we propose a scheme to generate OAM entanglement by using interaction-free measurement (IFM). As the superposition state of the quantum absorption object is not changed after IFM, our scheme can be extended to multiparty easily. The numerical analysis results show that the fidelity of generated OAM entanglement can be arbitrarily close to unity. Besides, the implementation issues are also discussed to evaluate the feasibility in experiment. This OAM entanglement with multiple degrees of freedom will play a key role in distributed entanglement computing and efficient quantum communication.

  13. Efficient sorting of free electron orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Benjamin J.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Lavery, Martin P. J.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method for sorting electrons by orbital angular momentum (OAM). Several methods now exist to prepare electron wavefunctions in OAM states, but no technique has been developed for efficient, parallel measurement of pure and mixed electron OAM states. The proposed technique draws inspiration from the recent demonstration of the sorting of OAM through modal transformation. We show that the same transformation can be performed on electrons with electrostatic optical elements. Specifically, we show that a charged needle and an array of electrodes perform the transformation and phase correction necessary to sort OAM states. This device may enable the analysis of the spatial mode distribution of inelastically scattered electrons.

  14. Pure angular momentum generator using a ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y F; Fu, Y H; Zhang, X M; Liu, A Q; Bourouina, T; Mei, T; Shen, Z X; Tsai, D P

    2010-10-11

    This paper reports a pure angular momentum generator using a ring resonator surrounded by a group of nano-rods. The evanescent waves of the circulating light in the ring are scattered by the nano-rods and generate a rotating electromagnetic field, which has only angular momentum but no linear momentum along the axis of rotation. The angular order is determined by the difference between the order of Whispering Gallery mode and the number of the rods, the rotating frequency is equal to the light frequency divided by the angular order. The maximum amplitude of the rotating electromagnetic fields can be 10 times higher than the amplitude of the input field when there are 36 rods (R(rod) = 120 nm, nr = 1.6). The pure angular momentum generator provides a new platform for trapping and rotation of small particles.

  15. Wigner functions for the pair angle and orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastrup, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    The problem of constructing physically and mathematically well-defined Wigner functions for the canonical pair angle θ and angular momentum p is solved. While a key element for the construction of Wigner functions for the planar phase space {(q ,p ) ∈R2} is the Heisenberg-Weyl group, the corresponding group for the cylindrical phase space {(θ ,p ) ∈S1×R } is the Euclidean group E (2 ) of the plane and its unitary representations. Here the angle θ is replaced by the pair (cosθ ,sinθ ) , which corresponds uniquely to the points on the unit circle. The main structural properties of the Wigner functions for the planar and the cylindrical phase spaces are strikingly similar. A crucial role is played by the s i n c function, which provides the interpolation for the discontinuous quantized angular momenta in terms of the continuous classical ones, in accordance with the famous Whittaker cardinal function well known from interpolation and sampling theories. The quantum mechanical marginal distributions for the angle (continuous) and angular momentum (discontinuous) are, as usual, uniquely obtained by appropriate integrations of the (θ ,p ) Wigner function. Among the examples discussed is an elementary system of simple cat states.

  16. Quark orbital angular momentum: can we learn about it from GPDs and TMDs?

    SciTech Connect

    H.Avakian, A.V.Efremov, P.Schweitzer, O.V.Teryaev, P.Zavada

    2011-05-01

    It is known how to access information on quark orbital angular momentum from generalized parton distribution functions, in a certain specified framework. It is intuitively expected, that such information can be accessed also through transverse momentum dependent distribution functions, but not known how. Now quark models provide promising hints. Recent results are reviewed.

  17. Angular momentum and tidal evolution of the Uranian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursa, Milan

    1992-08-01

    The basic parameters describing the angular momentum distribution within the Uranus system and of its tidal evolution have been estimated. The nine satellites orbiting under the synchronous zone of Uranus is the maximum number in the solar system and it makes the Uranus system different compared with any other in solar system, however the satellites in question are relatively small and their contribution of the tidal dynamics of the system is small. The time for existence of the nine satellites as integrated bodies can be estimated as 1.4 billion y and more. The total tidal decrease in the Uranus angular velocity of rotation is estimated as 7 x 10 to the -9th/sec.

  18. Generation and detection of orbital angular momentum via metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jinjin; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Hui; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Beams carrying orbital angular momentum possess a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. In this paper, we theoretically design and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact array of elliptical nanoholes, which could convert the circularly polarized light into the cross-polarized vortex beam. To measure the topological charges of orbital angular momentum in a simple manner, another elliptical nanoholes array is designed to generate reference beam as a reference light. This approach may provide a new way for the generation and detection of orbital angular momentum in a compact device. PMID:27052796

  19. Electro-optic analyzer of angular momentum hyperentanglement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziwen; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing a high-dimensional entanglement is fundamental in quantum information applications. Here, we propose a theoretical scheme to analyze and characterize the angular momentum hyperentanglement that two photons are entangled simultaneously in spin and orbital angular momentum. Based on the electro-optic sampling with a proposed hyper-entanglement analyzer and the simple matrix operation using Cramer rule, our simulations show that it is possible to retrieve effectively both the information about the degree of polarization entanglement and the spiral spectrum of high-dimensional orbital angular momentum entanglement. PMID:26911530

  20. Generation and detection of orbital angular momentum via metasurface.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinjin; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Hui; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-04-07

    Beams carrying orbital angular momentum possess a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. In this paper, we theoretically design and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact array of elliptical nanoholes, which could convert the circularly polarized light into the cross-polarized vortex beam. To measure the topological charges of orbital angular momentum in a simple manner, another elliptical nanoholes array is designed to generate reference beam as a reference light. This approach may provide a new way for the generation and detection of orbital angular momentum in a compact device.

  1. Electro-optic analyzer of angular momentum hyperentanglement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziwen; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-02-25

    Characterizing a high-dimensional entanglement is fundamental in quantum information applications. Here, we propose a theoretical scheme to analyze and characterize the angular momentum hyperentanglement that two photons are entangled simultaneously in spin and orbital angular momentum. Based on the electro-optic sampling with a proposed hyper-entanglement analyzer and the simple matrix operation using Cramer rule, our simulations show that it is possible to retrieve effectively both the information about the degree of polarization entanglement and the spiral spectrum of high-dimensional orbital angular momentum entanglement.

  2. Experimental Evidence for Partonic Orbital Angular Momentum at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Douglas E.

    2011-12-14

    Although one might naively anticipate that the proton, being the lowest baryonic energy state, would be in a L = 0 state, the current theoretical understanding is that it must carry orbital angular momentum in order, for example, to have a non-zero anomalous magnetic moment. I will review the experimental evidence linked theoretically to orbital angular momentum of the proton's constituents from the RHIC experiments and summarize by presenting a challenge to the theory community--to develop a consistent framework which can explain the spin polarization asymmetries seen at RHIC and elsewhere, and give insight to the partonic wave-functions including orbital angular momentum.

  3. Detection of a spinning object using light's orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Martin P J; Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M; Padgett, Miles J

    2013-08-02

    The linear Doppler shift is widely used to infer the velocity of approaching objects, but this shift does not detect rotation. By analyzing the orbital angular momentum of the light scattered from a spinning object, we observed a frequency shift proportional to product of the rotation frequency of the object and the orbital angular momentum of the light. This rotational frequency shift was still present when the angular momentum vector was parallel to the observation direction. The multiplicative enhancement of the frequency shift may have applications for the remote detection of rotating bodies in both terrestrial and astronomical settings.

  4. Angular momentum algebra for symbolic expansions in atomic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulioniene, Rasa

    Computer programs based on multiconfiguration methods have become standard tools in atomic structure theory. Reliable predictions of atomic properties require very large configuration expansions. The computational resources required often exceed the capabilities of conventional computers. There is a need to restructure existing computer programs to take advantage of modern high-performance computational technology. This dissertation deals with one important aspect of the effort to implement two widely used atomic structure packages (MCHF and GRASP92) on distributed memory parallel computers: the method for handling the angular momentum algebra. In the existing algorithms, the angular integrations required for the Hamiltonian matrix elements are computed for each pair of configurations, even though the results may be identical or very similar for all configurations of a given type. This redundancy leads to a significant increase in computer resource requirements, because the angular matrix elements, which are repeatedly reused in the calculation, need to be stored in computer memory or on disk. At present, the size (and, therefore, accuracy) of the calculations is limited by the large amounts of angular data produced. The aim of the research reported in this dissertation is to provide the theoretical basis for a computational method to curtail the growth of stored angular data with the size of the calculation. The multiconfiguration basis is often generated by one- and two-particle replacements from a reference set to correlation orbitals. The redundancy in the stored angular data could be removed by reformulating the algorithm to treat simultaneously all angular matrix elements that differ only in the quantum numbers of the correlation orbitals. To accomplish this, we expand N- electron matrix elements of a general symmetric two-body scalar operator, an example of which is the Hamiltonian, in terms of two-electron matrix elements. Using diagrammatic methods of

  5. Angular momentum evolution during star and planetary system formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Claire L.; Greaves, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    We focused on analysing the role played by protoplanetary disks in the evolution of angular momentum during star formation. If all the angular momentum contained within collapsing pre-stellar cores was conserved during their formation, proto-stars would reach rotation rates exceeding their break-up velocities before they reached the main sequence (Bodenheimer 1995). In order to avoid this occuring, methods by which proto-stars can lose angular momentum must exist. Angular momentum can be transferred from star to disk via stellar magnetic field lines through a process called magnetic braking (Camenzind 1990; Königl 1991). Alternatively, the stellar angular momentum can be lost from the star-disk system entirely via stellar- or disk-winds (e.g. Pelletier & Pudritz 1992; Matt & Pudritz 2005). The proportion of lost stellar angular momentum retained within the protoplanetary disk is important to studies of planetary system formation. If the bulk motion within the disk remains Keplerian, any increase of angular momentum in the disk causes an outward migration of disk material and an expansion of the disk. Therefore, an increase in disk angular momentum may cause a reduction in the disk surface density, often used to indicate the disk's ability to form planets. We made use of multi-wavelength data available in the literature to directly calculate the stellar and disk angular momenta for two nearby regions of star formation. Namely, these were the densely populated and highly irradiated Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the comparitively sparse Taurus-Auriga region. Due to the limited size of the ONC dataset, we produced an average surface density profile for the region. We modelled the stars as solid body rotators due to their fully convective nature (Krishnamurthi et al. 1997) and assumed the disks are flat and undergo Keplerian rotation about the same rotation axis as the star. We observed the older disks within each of the two star forming regions to be preferentially

  6. Orbital angular momentum in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozinovic, Nenad

    Internet data traffic capacity is rapidly reaching limits imposed by nonlinear effects of single mode fibers currently used in optical communications. Having almost exhausted available degrees of freedom to orthogonally multiplex data in optical fibers, researchers are now exploring the possibility of using the spatial dimension of fibers, via multicore and multimode fibers, to address the forthcoming capacity crunch. While multicore fibers require complex manufacturing, conventional multi-mode fibers suffer from mode coupling, caused by random perturbations in fibers and modal (de)multiplexers. Methods that have been developed to address the problem of mode coupling so far, have been dependent on computationally intensive digital signal processing algorithms using adaptive optics feedback or complex multiple-input multiple-output algorithms. Here we study the possibility of using the orbital angular momentum (OAM), or helicity, of light, as a means of increasing capacity of future optical fiber communication links. We first introduce a class of specialty fibers designed to minimize mode coupling and show their potential for OAM mode generation in fibers using numerical analysis. We then experimentally confirm the existence of OAM states in these fibers using methods based on fiber gratings and spatial light modulators. In order to quantify the purity of created OAM states, we developed two methods based on mode-image analysis, showing purity of OAM states to be 90% after 1km in these fibers. Finally, in order to demonstrate data transmission using OAM states, we developed a 4-mode multiplexing and demultiplexing systems based on free-space optics and spatial light modulators. Using simple coherent detection methods, we successfully transmit data at 400Gbit/s using four OAM modes at a single wavelength, over 1.1 km of fiber. Furthermore, we achieve data transmission at 1.6Tbit/s using 10 wavelengths and two OAM modes. Our study indicates that OAM light can exist

  7. Angular distributions in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenner, R.W.; Klobuchar, R.L.; Haustein, P.E.; Virtes, G.J.; Cumming, J.B.; Loveland, W.

    2006-04-15

    Angular distributions are reported for {sup 37}Ar and {sup 127}Xe from 381-GeV {sup 28}Si+Au interactions and for products between {sup 24}Na and {sup 149}Gd from 28-GeV {sup 1}H+Au. Sideward peaking and forward deficits for multifragmentation products are significantly enhanced for heavy ions compared with protons. Projectile kinetic energy does not appear to be a satisfactory scaling variable. The data are discussed in terms of a kinetic-focusing model in which sideward peaking is due to transverse motion of the excited product from the initial projectile-target interaction.

  8. Spectral Energy Distributions of Young Stars in IC 348: The Role of Disks in Angular Momentum Evolution of Young, Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Blanc, Thompson S.; Covey, Kevin R.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2011-08-01

    Theoretical work suggests that a young star's angular momentum content and rotation rate may be strongly influenced by magnetic interactions with its circumstellar disk. A generic prediction of these "disk-locking" theories is that a disk-locked star will be forced to co-rotate with the Keplerian angular velocity of the inner edge of the disk; that is, the disk's inner-truncation radius should equal its co-rotation radius. These theories have also been interpreted to suggest a gross correlation between young stars' rotation periods and the structural properties of their circumstellar disks, such that slowly rotating stars possess close-in disks that enforce the star's slow rotation, whereas rapidly rotating stars possess anemic or evacuated inner disks that are unable to brake the stars and instead the stars spin up as they contract. To test these expectations, we model the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 33 young stars in IC 348 with known rotation periods and infrared excesses indicating the presence of circumstellar disks. For each star, we match the observed SED, typically sampling 0.6-8.0 μm, to a grid of 200,000 pre-computed star+disk radiative transfer models, from which we infer the disk's inner-truncation radius. We then compare this truncation radius to the disk's co-rotation radius, calculated from the star's measured rotation period. We do not find obvious differences in the disk truncation radii of slow rotators versus rapid rotators. This holds true both at the level of whether close-in disk material is present at all, and in analyzing the precise location of the inner disk edge relative to the co-rotation radius among the subset of stars with close-in disk material. One interpretation is that disk locking is unimportant for the IC 348 stars in our sample. Alternatively, if disk locking does operate, then it must operate on both the slow and rapid rotators, potentially producing both spin-up and spin-down torques, and the transition from the

  9. The angular momentum content of dwarf galaxies: new challenges for the theory of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Burkert, Andreas; Swaters, Rob A.

    2001-09-01

    We compute the specific angular momentum distributions for a sample of low-mass disc galaxies observed by Swaters. We compare these distributions to those of dark matter haloes obtained by Bullock et al. from high-resolution N-body simulations of structure formation in a ΛCDM universe. We find that although the disc mass fractions are significantly smaller than the universal baryon fraction, the total specific angular momenta of the discs are in good agreement with those of dark matter haloes. This suggests that discs form out of only a small fraction of the available baryons, but yet manage to draw most of the available angular momentum. In addition we find that the angular momentum distributions of discs are clearly distinct from those of the dark matter; discs lack predominantly both low and high specific angular momenta. Understanding these findings in terms of a coherent picture for disc formation is challenging. Cooling, feedback and stripping, which are the main mechanisms to explain the small disc mass fractions found, seem unable to simultaneously explain the angular momentum distributions of the discs. In fact, it seems that the baryons that make up the discs must have been born out of angular momentum distributions that are clearly distinct from those of ΛCDM haloes. However, the dark and baryonic mass components experience the same tidal forces, and it is therefore expected that they should have similar angular momentum distributions. Therefore, understanding the angular momentum content of disc galaxies remains an important challenge for our picture of galaxy formation.

  10. Effect of angular momentum conservation on hydrodynamic simulations of colloids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Theers, Mario; Hu, Jinglei; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G; Ripoll, Marisol

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to most real fluids, angular momentum is not a locally conserved quantity in some mesoscopic simulation methods. Here we quantify the importance of this conservation in the flow fields associated with different colloidal systems. The flow field is analytically calculated with and without angular momentum conservation for the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method, and simulations are performed to verify the predictions. The flow field generated around a colloidal particle moving under an external force with slip boundary conditions depends on the conservation of angular momentum, and the amplitude of the friction force is substantially affected. Interestingly, no dependence on the angular momentum conservation is found for the flow fields generated around colloids under the influence of phoretic forces. Moreover, circular Couette flow between a no-slip and a slip cylinder is investigated, which allows us to validate one of the two existing expressions for the MPC stress tensor.

  11. Angular Momentum Evolution of Young Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amard, Louis; Palacios, Ana; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    We present stellar evolution models of young solar-type stars including self consistent treatment of rotational mixing and extraction of angular momentum (AM) by magnetized wind including the most up-to-date physic of AM transport.

  12. The mass and angular momentum of reconstructed metric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Meent, Maarten

    2017-06-01

    We prove a key result regarding the mass and angular momentum content of linear vacuum perturbations of the Kerr metric obtained through the formalism developed by Chrzarnowski, Cohen, and Kegeles (CCK). More precisely, we prove that the Abbott-Deser mass and angular momentum integrals of any such perturbation vanish when that perturbation was obtained from a regular Fourier mode of the Hertz potential. As a corollary we obtain a generalization of previous results on the completion of the ‘no string’ radiation gauge metric perturbation generated by a point particle. We find that for any bound orbit around a Kerr black hole, the mass and angular momentum perturbations completing the CCK metric are simply the energy and angular momentum of the particle ‘outside’ the orbit and vanish ‘inside’ the orbit.

  13. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; McElwaine, J. N.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

  14. Uncertainty Relation between Angular Momentum and Angle Variable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, C. L.; Sannigrahi, A. B.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses certain pitfalls regarding the uncertainty relation between angular momentum and the angle variable from a pedagogic point of view. Further, an uncertainty relation has been derived for these variables in a simple and consistant manner. (Author/HM)

  15. Partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2010-08-04

    In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.

  16. The remarkable influence of an ``insignificant'' quantity: How recoil orbital angular momentum determines product j distributions and (v;j) correlation in H+LH reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffery, Anthony J.

    2008-12-01

    Reactions for which the reactant (r)-to-product (p) mass ratio (μr/μp) is high, the well-known H +LH→HH+L processes, convert most of available energy to product rotation, while that disposed as recoil is often regarded as negligible. In angular momentum (AM) terms, however, this recoil orbital AM (lp) is shown to be a critical component of the overall AM balance. For products of light μp, the maximum value of lp is energy limited and as a result the formation of products in low rotational (jp) states is severely restricted. Here energy constraints on recoil orbital AM and the consequent restrictions on jp-state populations are quantified using novel diagrammatic methods that illustrate how constraints on lp determine the jp states that are allowed or forbidden by the need to conserve energy and AM for each state-to-state transition. The method accurately predicts jBaIj (v =0,1,2) peaks from crossed-beam Ba +HI experiments, providing a quantitative and physically transparent rationale for the observed BaI rotational distributions. Extension to a wider range of reactions having μr/μp>1 shows that at least some jp are formally forbidden for each given reactant relative velocity or, more accurately, lr. The fraction of inaccessible product states for a given initial velocity rises rapidly with μr/μp (>96% in Ba +HI). The method is also used to demonstrate that recoil orbital AM will be strongly aligned parallel to product rotational AM for high μr/μp, although this correlation is generally lost in the low jp region as the parallel vector requirement is relaxed.

  17. A Very Fast and Angular Momentum Conserving Tree Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcello, Dominic C.

    2017-09-01

    There are many methods used to compute the classical gravitational field in astrophysical simulation codes. With the exception of the typically impractical method of direct computation, none ensure conservation of angular momentum to machine precision. Under uniform time-stepping, the Cartesian fast multipole method of Dehnen (also known as the very fast tree code) conserves linear momentum to machine precision. We show that it is possible to modify this method in a way that conserves both angular and linear momenta.

  18. Emittance compensation studies of photoinjector beams with angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven

    2003-05-19

    Beam dynamics studies on the FNPL photo injector that seek to optimize the transport of intense electron beams with large values of canonical angular momentum have been performed. These studies investigate the effect of solenoid emittance compensation on beams that evolve under the combined influence of intense space charge forces and large angular momentum. We present details of experimental measurements and supporting simulations of beam envelope evolution.

  19. Angular momentum relaxation in atom-diatom dilute gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Glenn T.

    1987-04-01

    The angular momentum relaxation cross sections for a diatomic molecule in a dilute atomic gas are estimated subject to the assumption that the intermolecular torque is dominated by the hard, impulsive contribution (evaluated using Boltzmann kinetic theory for nonspherical molecules). For carbon monoxide in a variety of gases, the kinetic theory derived contribution to the angular momentum cross section is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results of Jameson, Jameson, and Buchi.

  20. Characterization of quantum angular-momentum fluctuations via principal components

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, Angel; Luis, Alfredo

    2008-02-15

    We elaborate an approach to quantum fluctuations of angular momentum based on the diagonalization of the covariance matrix in two versions: real symmetric and complex Hermitian. At difference with previous approaches this is SU(2) invariant and avoids any difficulty caused by nontrivial commutators. Meaningful uncertainty relations are derived which are nontrivial even for vanishing mean angular momentum. We apply this approach to some relevant states.

  1. Characterization of quantum angular-momentum fluctuations via principal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Ángel; Luis, Alfredo

    2008-02-01

    We elaborate an approach to quantum fluctuations of angular momentum based on the diagonalization of the covariance matrix in two versions: real symmetric and complex Hermitian. At difference with previous approaches this is SU(2) invariant and avoids any difficulty caused by nontrivial commutators. Meaningful uncertainty relations are derived which are nontrivial even for vanishing mean angular momentum. We apply this approach to some relevant states.

  2. Vector correlation analysis for inelastic and reactive collisions between partners possessing spin and orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2009-12-31

    A general reactive collision of the type A + B --> C + D is considered where both the collision partners (A and B) or the products (C and D) may possess internal, i.e., spin, orbital or rotational, angular momenta. Compact expressions are derived using a rigorous quantum mechanical analysis for the angular momentum anisotropy of either of the products (C or D) arising from an initially polarized distribution of the reactant angular momentum. The angular momentum distribution of the product is expressed in terms of canonical spherical tensors multiplied by anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L). These coefficients act as transformation coefficients between the angular momentum anisotropy of the reactants and that of the product. They are independent of scattering angle but depend on the details of the scattering dynamics. The relationship between the coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L) and the body-fixed scattering S matrix is given and the methodology for the quantum mechanical calculation of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients is clearly laid out. The anisotropy-transforming coefficients are amenable to direct experimental measurement in a similar manner to vector correlation and alignment parameters in photodissociation processes. A key aspect of the theory is the use of projections of both reactant and product angular momenta onto the product recoil vector direction. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that if the state multipole for reactant angular momentum distribution has a projection q(k) onto the product recoil vector the state multipoles for the product angular momentum distribution all have this same projection. Expressions are also presented for the distribution of the product angular momentum when its components are evaluated relative to the space-fixed Z-axis. Notes with detailed derivations of all the formulas are available as Supporting Information.

  3. Generation of angular momentum in cold gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaiem, D.; Joyce, M.; Sylos Labini, F.; Worrakitpoonpon, T.

    2016-01-01

    During the violent relaxation of a self-gravitating system, a significant fraction of its mass may be ejected. If the time-varying gravitational field also breaks spherical symmetry, this mass can potentially carry angular momentum. Thus, starting initial configurations with zero angular momentum can, in principle, lead to a bound virialised system with non-zero angular momentum. Using numerical simulations we explore here how much angular momentum can be generated in a virialised structure in this way, starting from configurations of cold particles that are very close to spherically symmetric. For the initial configurations in which spherical symmetry is broken only by the Poissonian fluctuations associated with the finite particle number N, with N in range 103 to 105, we find that the relaxed structures have standard "spin" parameters λ ~ 10-3, and decreasing slowly with N. For slightly ellipsoidal initial conditions, in which the finite-N fluctuations break the residual reflection symmetries, we observe values λ ~ 10-2, i.e. of the same order of magnitude as those reported for elliptical galaxies. The net angular momentum vector is typically aligned close to normal to the major semi-axis of the triaxial relaxed structure and of the ejected mass. This simple mechanism may provide an alternative, or complement, to the so-called tidal torque theory for understanding the origin of angular momentum in astrophysical structures.

  4. A random matrix/transition state theory for the probability distribution of state-specific unimolecular decay rates: Generalization to include total angular momentum conservation and other dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.; Miller, W.H.; Moore, C.B. ); Polik, W.F. )

    1993-07-15

    A previously developed random matrix/transition state theory (RM/TST) model for the probability distribution of state-specific unimolecular decay rates has been generalized to incorporate total angular momentum conservation and other dynamical symmetries. The model is made into a predictive theory by using a semiclassical method to determine the transmission probabilities of a nonseparable rovibrational Hamiltonian at the transition state. The overall theory gives a good description of the state-specific rates for the D[sub 2]CO[r arrow]D[sub 2]+CO unimolecular decay; in particular, it describes the dependence of the distribution of rates on total angular momentum [ital J]. Comparison of the experimental values with results of the RM/TST theory suggests that there is mixing among the rovibrational states.

  5. Calculations of the effects of angular momentum on the early evolution of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P.

    1977-01-01

    Early phases in the evolutionary development of a rotating cloud of gas and dust are investigated to determine whether physically reasonable initial conditions are likely to produce a planet-satellite system with the values of specific orbital angular momentum currently observed for Jupiter and its inner satellites. Spherically symmetric computations of Jupiter's evolutionary history are reviewed, and transport of angular momentum is considered along with evolutionary sequences of individual differentially rotating models with decreasing values of equatorial radius. The problem of accounting for the present specific orbital angular momenta of Jupiter and its regular satellites is examined qualitatively, and a range of possible angular-momentum distributions in an initially tidally unstable cloud is assessed. The results show that particular physically plausible angular-momentum distributions, which could either be established as initial conditions or be caused by angular-momentum transport, will lead to favorable situations for the formation of a central planet and a surrounding rotating cloud with specific angular momentum comparable to that of the regular satellites.

  6. Calculations of the effects of angular momentum on the early evolution of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P.

    1977-01-01

    Early phases in the evolutionary development of a rotating cloud of gas and dust are investigated to determine whether physically reasonable initial conditions are likely to produce a planet-satellite system with the values of specific orbital angular momentum currently observed for Jupiter and its inner satellites. Spherically symmetric computations of Jupiter's evolutionary history are reviewed, and transport of angular momentum is considered along with evolutionary sequences of individual differentially rotating models with decreasing values of equatorial radius. The problem of accounting for the present specific orbital angular momenta of Jupiter and its regular satellites is examined qualitatively, and a range of possible angular-momentum distributions in an initially tidally unstable cloud is assessed. The results show that particular physically plausible angular-momentum distributions, which could either be established as initial conditions or be caused by angular-momentum transport, will lead to favorable situations for the formation of a central planet and a surrounding rotating cloud with specific angular momentum comparable to that of the regular satellites.

  7. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  8. Plasmons carrying orbital angular momentum in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shabbir A.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.; Mendonca

    2013-10-01

    The existence of plasmons with orbital angular momentum due to the Laguerre-Gaussian-type density and potential perturbations is studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Starting from appropriate hydrodynamic equations for the electrostatic electron dynamics, a dispersion equation is derived in paraxial approximation. The Laguerre-Gaussian beam solutions are obtained and the properties of electric field components, energy flux, and corresponding angular momentum density of plasmons are investigated. The electric field lines are found to form helical structures with a dominant axial component. The results are analyzed numerically and the influence of radial and angular mode numbers on potential and electric field components is illustrated.

  9. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Kathrin Fedosov, Dmitry A. Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  10. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kathrin; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier-Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor-Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  11. Extreme Ultraviolet Fractional Orbital Angular Momentum Beams from High Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Alex; Rego, Laura; Picón, Antonio; San Román, Julio; Hernández-García, Carlos

    2017-03-10

    We investigate theoretically the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) beams carrying fractional orbital angular momentum. To this end, we drive high-order harmonic generation with infrared conical refraction (CR) beams. We show that the high-order harmonic beams emitted in the EUV/soft x-ray regime preserve the characteristic signatures of the driving beam, namely ringlike transverse intensity profile and CR-like polarization distribution. As a result, through orbital and spin angular momentum conservation, harmonic beams are emitted with fractional orbital angular momentum, and they can be synthesized into structured attosecond helical beams -or "structured attosecond light springs"- with rotating linear polarization along the azimuth. Our proposal overcomes the state of the art limitations for the generation of light beams far from the visible domain carrying non-integer orbital angular momentum and could be applied in fields such as diffraction imaging, EUV lithography, particle trapping, and super-resolution imaging.

  12. Extreme Ultraviolet Fractional Orbital Angular Momentum Beams from High Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, Alex; Rego, Laura; Picón, Antonio; San Román, Julio; Hernández-García, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) beams carrying fractional orbital angular momentum. To this end, we drive high-order harmonic generation with infrared conical refraction (CR) beams. We show that the high-order harmonic beams emitted in the EUV/soft x-ray regime preserve the characteristic signatures of the driving beam, namely ringlike transverse intensity profile and CR-like polarization distribution. As a result, through orbital and spin angular momentum conservation, harmonic beams are emitted with fractional orbital angular momentum, and they can be synthesized into structured attosecond helical beams –or “structured attosecond light springs”– with rotating linear polarization along the azimuth. Our proposal overcomes the state of the art limitations for the generation of light beams far from the visible domain carrying non-integer orbital angular momentum and could be applied in fields such as diffraction imaging, EUV lithography, particle trapping, and super-resolution imaging.

  13. Near-perfect sorting of orbital angular momentum and angular position states of light.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Malik, Mehul; Boyd, Robert W

    2012-10-22

    We present a novel method for efficient sorting of photons prepared in states of orbital angular momentum (OAM) and angular position (ANG). A log-polar optical transform is used in combination with a holographic beam-splitting method to achieve better mode discrimination and reduced cross-talk than reported previously. Simulating this method for 7 modes, we have calculated an improved mutual information of 2.43 bits/photon and 2.29 bits/photon for OAM and ANG modes respectively. In addition, we present preliminary results from an experimental implementation of this technique. This method is expected to have important applications for high-dimensional quantum key distribution systems.

  14. Estimates of mass and angular momentum in the oort cloud.

    PubMed

    Marochnik, L S; Mukhin, L M; Sagdeev, R Z

    1988-10-28

    Estimates can be made of unseen mass (in the form of cometary nuclei) at the heliocentric distances between 3 x 10(3) and 2 x 10(4) astronomical units(AU) under the assumptions (i) that the Oort cloud is a rarefied halo surrounding the core (dense, inner cometary cloud) and (ii) that the mass and albedo of comet Halley is typical for comets both in the core and the Oort cloud populations. The mass appears to be approximately 0.03 solar masses, with angular momentum of the order of 10(52) to 10(53) g-cm(2)/s. This mass is of the order of the total mass of the planetary system before the loss of volatiles. This leads to an estimate of a mass M(o) approximately 100 M( plus sign in circle) (where M( plus sign in circle) is the mass of Earth) concentrated in the Oort cloud (r > 2 x 10(4) AU) with an angular momentum that may exceed the present angular momentum of the whole planetary system by one order of magnitude. The present angular momentum of the Oort cloud appears to be of the same order as the total angular momentum of the planetary system before the loss of volatiles.

  15. Polarization control of single photon quantum orbital angular momentum states.

    PubMed

    Nagali, E; Sciarrino, F; De Martini, F; Piccirillo, B; Karimi, E; Marrucci, L; Santamato, E

    2009-10-12

    The orbital angular momentum of photons, being defined in an infinite-dimensional discrete Hilbert space, offers a promising resource for high-dimensional quantum information protocols in quantum optics. The biggest obstacle to its wider use is presently represented by the limited set of tools available for its control and manipulation. Here, we introduce and test experimentally a series of simple optical schemes for the coherent transfer of quantum information from the polarization to the orbital angular momentum of single photons and vice versa. All our schemes exploit a newly developed optical device, the so-called "q-plate", which enables the manipulation of the photon orbital angular momentum driven by the polarization degree of freedom. By stacking several q-plates in a suitable sequence, one can also have access to higher-order angular momentum subspaces. In particular, we demonstrate the control of the orbital angular momentum m degree of freedom within the subspaces of |m| = 2h and |m| = 4h per photon.

  16. Is the angular momentum of an electron conserved in a uniform magnetic field?

    PubMed

    Greenshields, Colin R; Stamps, Robert L; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-12-12

    We show that an electron moving in a uniform magnetic field possesses a time-varying "diamagnetic" angular momentum. Surprisingly this means that the kinetic angular momentum of the electron may vary with time, despite the rotational symmetry of the system. This apparent violation of angular momentum conservation is resolved by including the angular momentum of the surrounding fields.

  17. Tunable orbital angular momentum in high-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, D.; Ribič, P. Rebernik; Adhikary, G.; Camper, A.; Chappuis, C.; Cucini, R.; Dimauro, L. F.; Dovillaire, G.; Frassetto, F.; Géneaux, R.; Miotti, P.; Poletto, L.; Ressel, B.; Spezzani, C.; Stupar, M.; Ruchon, T.; de Ninno, G.

    2017-04-01

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in optics. These light beams, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), have been successfully utilized in the visible and infrared in a wide variety of applications. Moving to shorter wavelengths may open up completely new research directions in the areas of optical physics and material characterization. Here, we report on the generation of extreme-ultraviolet optical vortices with femtosecond duration carrying a controllable amount of OAM. From a basic physics viewpoint, our results help to resolve key questions such as the conservation of angular momentum in highly nonlinear light-matter interactions, and the disentanglement and independent control of the intrinsic and extrinsic components of the photon's angular momentum at short-wavelengths. The methods developed here will allow testing some of the recently proposed concepts such as OAM-induced dichroism, magnetic switching in organic molecules and violation of dipolar selection rules in atoms.

  18. Protostellar angular momentum transport by spiral density waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, C.; Cassen, P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of rotational stability criteria to a specific model of star formation leads to the conclusion that the growth of stellar angular momentum is limited by its transfer to the disk. Excess accreted angular momentum can be transferred by torques connected with spiral density waves induced by even a slight protostellar triaxiality. In addition, viscous damping of the density waves is likely to cause the excess angular momentum to be deposited within a small region close to the protostar. Thus, it would be appropriate to treat that part of the growing protostellar disk beyond the outer Lindblad resonance as an accretion disk with a torque applied to its inner edge. It is noted that this situation is directly relevant to certain models of the evolution of the protosun and solar nebula.

  19. Origins and demonstrations of electrons with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Benjamin J; Agrawal, Amit; Ercius, Peter A; Grillo, Vincenzo; Herzing, Andrew A; Harvey, Tyler R; Linck, Martin; Pierce, Jordan S

    2017-02-28

    The surprising message of Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)) was that photons could possess orbital angular momentum in free space, which subsequently launched advancements in optical manipulation, microscopy, quantum optics, communications, many more fields. It has recently been shown that this result also applies to quantum mechanical wave functions describing massive particles (matter waves). This article discusses how electron wave functions can be imprinted with quantized phase vortices in analogous ways to twisted light, demonstrating that charged particles with non-zero rest mass can possess orbital angular momentum in free space. With Allen et al. as a bridge, connections are made between this recent work in electron vortex wave functions and much earlier works, extending a 175 year old tradition in matter wave vortices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  20. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  1. Fractional Angular Momentum in Cold-Atom Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G. J.; Gemelke, N. D.; Jain, J. K.

    2014-10-01

    The quantum statistics of bosons or fermions are manifest through the even or odd relative angular momentum of a pair. We show theoretically that, under certain conditions, a pair of certain test particles immersed in a fractional quantum Hall state possesses, effectively, a fractional relative angular momentum, which can be interpreted in terms of fractional braid statistics. We propose that the fractionalization of the angular momentum can be detected directly through the measurement of the pair correlation function in rotating ultracold atomic systems in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Such a measurement will also provide direct evidence for the effective magnetic field resulting from Berry phases arising from attached vortices, and of excitations with a fractional particle number, analogous to the fractional charge of the electron fractional quantum Hall effect.

  2. Fractional angular momentum in cold-atom systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G J; Gemelke, N D; Jain, J K

    2014-10-17

    The quantum statistics of bosons or fermions are manifest through the even or odd relative angular momentum of a pair. We show theoretically that, under certain conditions, a pair of certain test particles immersed in a fractional quantum Hall state possesses, effectively, a fractional relative angular momentum, which can be interpreted in terms of fractional braid statistics. We propose that the fractionalization of the angular momentum can be detected directly through the measurement of the pair correlation function in rotating ultracold atomic systems in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Such a measurement will also provide direct evidence for the effective magnetic field resulting from Berry phases arising from attached vortices, and of excitations with a fractional particle number, analogous to the fractional charge of the electron fractional quantum Hall effect.

  3. On-chip noninterference angular momentum multiplexing of broadband light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Qiming; Gu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Angular momentum division has emerged as a physically orthogonal multiplexing method in high-capacity optical information technologies. However, the typical bulky elements used for information retrieval from the overall diffracted field, based on the interference method, impose a fundamental limit toward realizing on-chip multiplexing. We demonstrate noninterference angular momentum multiplexing by using a mode-sorting nanoring aperture with a chip-scale footprint as small as 4.2 micrometers by 4.2 micrometers, where nanoring slits exhibit a distinctive outcoupling efficiency on tightly confined plasmonic modes. The nonresonant mode-sorting sensitivity and scalability of our approach enable on-chip parallel multiplexing over a bandwidth of 150 nanometers in the visible wavelength range. The results offer the possibility of ultrahigh-capacity and miniaturized nanophotonic devices harnessing angular momentum division.

  4. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light–matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems. PMID:27694805

  5. On-chip noninterference angular momentum multiplexing of broadband light.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Qiming; Gu, Min

    2016-05-13

    Angular momentum division has emerged as a physically orthogonal multiplexing method in high-capacity optical information technologies. However, the typical bulky elements used for information retrieval from the overall diffracted field, based on the interference method, impose a fundamental limit toward realizing on-chip multiplexing. We demonstrate noninterference angular momentum multiplexing by using a mode-sorting nanoring aperture with a chip-scale footprint as small as 4.2 micrometers by 4.2 micrometers, where nanoring slits exhibit a distinctive outcoupling efficiency on tightly confined plasmonic modes. The nonresonant mode-sorting sensitivity and scalability of our approach enable on-chip parallel multiplexing over a bandwidth of 150 nanometers in the visible wavelength range. The results offer the possibility of ultrahigh-capacity and miniaturized nanophotonic devices harnessing angular momentum division. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Transfer of orbital angular momentum through sub-wavelength waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqin; Ma, Xiaoliang; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Cui, Jianhua; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-02-09

    Data capacity of optical communication is achieving its limit owing to the non-linear effect of optical fiber. As an effective alternative, light carrying orbital angular momentum can greatly increase the capacity for its unprecedented degree of freedom. We demonstrate the propagation of orbital angular momentum with topological charge of 1 and 2 in plasmonic circular waveguide with sub-wavelength diameter with little propagation loss of 2.73 dB/μm, which has never been observed in optical fibers with sub-wavelength diameter. We also confirm that lights carrying orbital angular momentum can be maintained in sharp bended sub-wavelength waveguide. This plasmonic waveguide may serve as a key component in on-chip systems involving OAM.

  7. Tunable orbital angular momentum in high-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D; Ribič, P Rebernik; Adhikary, G; Camper, A; Chappuis, C; Cucini, R; DiMauro, L F; Dovillaire, G; Frassetto, F; Géneaux, R; Miotti, P; Poletto, L; Ressel, B; Spezzani, C; Stupar, M; Ruchon, T; De Ninno, G

    2017-04-05

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in optics. These light beams, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), have been successfully utilized in the visible and infrared in a wide variety of applications. Moving to shorter wavelengths may open up completely new research directions in the areas of optical physics and material characterization. Here, we report on the generation of extreme-ultraviolet optical vortices with femtosecond duration carrying a controllable amount of OAM. From a basic physics viewpoint, our results help to resolve key questions such as the conservation of angular momentum in highly nonlinear light-matter interactions, and the disentanglement and independent control of the intrinsic and extrinsic components of the photon's angular momentum at short-wavelengths. The methods developed here will allow testing some of the recently proposed concepts such as OAM-induced dichroism, magnetic switching in organic molecules and violation of dipolar selection rules in atoms.

  8. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Christian T; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-03

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  9. Origins and demonstrations of electrons with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Benjamin J.; Agrawal, Amit; Ercius, Peter A.; Grillo, Vincenzo; Herzing, Andrew A.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Linck, Martin; Pierce, Jordan S.

    2017-02-01

    The surprising message of Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)) was that photons could possess orbital angular momentum in free space, which subsequently launched advancements in optical manipulation, microscopy, quantum optics, communications, many more fields. It has recently been shown that this result also applies to quantum mechanical wave functions describing massive particles (matter waves). This article discusses how electron wave functions can be imprinted with quantized phase vortices in analogous ways to twisted light, demonstrating that charged particles with non-zero rest mass can possess orbital angular momentum in free space. With Allen et al. as a bridge, connections are made between this recent work in electron vortex wave functions and much earlier works, extending a 175 year old tradition in matter wave vortices. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  10. Tunable orbital angular momentum in high-harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, D.; Ribič, P. Rebernik; Adhikary, G.; Camper, A.; Chappuis, C.; Cucini, R.; DiMauro, L. F.; Dovillaire, G.; Frassetto, F.; Géneaux, R.; Miotti, P.; Poletto, L.; Ressel, B.; Spezzani, C.; Stupar, M.; Ruchon, T.; De Ninno, G.

    2017-01-01

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in optics. These light beams, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), have been successfully utilized in the visible and infrared in a wide variety of applications. Moving to shorter wavelengths may open up completely new research directions in the areas of optical physics and material characterization. Here, we report on the generation of extreme-ultraviolet optical vortices with femtosecond duration carrying a controllable amount of OAM. From a basic physics viewpoint, our results help to resolve key questions such as the conservation of angular momentum in highly nonlinear light–matter interactions, and the disentanglement and independent control of the intrinsic and extrinsic components of the photon's angular momentum at short-wavelengths. The methods developed here will allow testing some of the recently proposed concepts such as OAM-induced dichroism, magnetic switching in organic molecules and violation of dipolar selection rules in atoms. PMID:28378741

  11. Unveiling pseudospin and angular momentum in photonic graphene.

    PubMed

    Song, Daohong; Paltoglou, Vassilis; Liu, Sheng; Zhu, Yi; Gallardo, Daniel; Tang, Liqin; Xu, Jingjun; Ablowitz, Mark; Efremidis, Nikolaos K; Chen, Zhigang

    2015-02-17

    Pseudospin, an additional degree of freedom inherent in graphene, plays a key role in understanding many fundamental phenomena such as the anomalous quantum Hall effect, electron chirality and Klein paradox. Unlike the electron spin, the pseudospin was traditionally considered as an unmeasurable quantity, immune to Stern-Gerlach-type experiments. Recently, however, it has been suggested that graphene pseudospin is a real angular momentum that might manifest itself as an observable quantity, but so far direct tests of such a momentum remained unfruitful. Here, by selective excitation of two sublattices of an artificial photonic graphene, we demonstrate pseudospin-mediated vortex generation and topological charge flipping in otherwise uniform optical beams with Bloch momentum traversing through the Dirac points. Corroborated by numerical solutions of the linear massless Dirac-Weyl equation, we show that pseudospin can turn into orbital angular momentum completely, thus upholding the belief that pseudospin is not merely for theoretical elegance but rather physically measurable.

  12. Manifest Rotation Symmetric Expressions for Angular Momentum Eigenfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eeg, J. O.; Wroldsen, J.

    1983-12-01

    We give manifest rotation symmetric expressions for eigenfunctions for spin s, orbital angular momentum l and total angular momentum j = l + s,...,|l - s| in terms of (2j + 1) × (2s + 1) multipole transition matrices (MTM). These matrices, which are irreducible tensor matrices, have an algebra together with ordinary spin matrices for spin s and spin j. Explicit expressions for MTM's and their algebra are given for angular momenta <= 3. By means of some examples we show that within this formalism angular integrations in central field problems will be simplified considerably. Thus the formalism turns out to be very useful for instance for calculations within the MIT-bag and also within spin-spin interactions in atomic physics.

  13. Angular Momentum of a Magnetically Trapped Atomic Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Jen, H. H.; Sun, C. P.; You, L.

    2007-01-19

    For an atomic condensate in an axially symmetric magnetic trap, the sum of the axial components of the orbital angular momentum and the hyperfine spin is conserved. Inside an Ioffe-Pritchard trap (IPT) whose magnetic field (B field) is not axially symmetric, the difference of the two becomes surprisingly conserved. In this Letter we investigate the relationship between the values of the sum or difference angular momentums for an atomic condensate inside a magnetic trap and the associated gauge potential induced by the adiabatic approximation. Our result provides significant new insight into the vorticity of magnetically trapped atomic quantum gases.

  14. Electron vortex beams with high quanta of orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Benjamin J; Agrawal, Amit; Anderson, Ian M; Herzing, Andrew A; Lezec, Henri J; McClelland, Jabez J; Unguris, John

    2011-01-14

    Electron beams with helical wavefronts carrying orbital angular momentum are expected to provide new capabilities for electron microscopy and other applications. We used nanofabricated diffraction holograms in an electron microscope to produce multiple electron vortex beams with well-defined topological charge. Beams carrying quantized amounts of orbital angular momentum (up to 100ħ) per electron were observed. We describe how the electrons can exhibit such orbital motion in free space in the absence of any confining potential or external field, and discuss how these beams can be applied to improved electron microscopy of magnetic and biological specimens.

  15. Kinetic description of electron plasma waves with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, J. T.

    2012-11-15

    We describe the kinetic theory of electron plasma waves with orbital angular momentum or twisted plasmons. The conditions for a twisted Landau resonance to exist are established, and this concept is introduced for the first time. Expressions for the kinetic dispersion relation and for the electron Landau damping are derived. The particular case of a Maxwellian plasma is examined in detail. The new contributions to wave dispersion and damping due the orbital angular momentum are discussed. It is shown that twisted plasmons can be excited by rotating electron beams.

  16. Effect of Orbital Angular Momentum on Nondiffracting Ultrashort Optical Pulses.

    PubMed

    Ornigotti, Marco; Conti, Claudio; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-09-04

    We introduce a new class of nondiffracting optical pulses possessing orbital angular momentum. By generalizing the X-wave solution of the Maxwell equation, we discover the coupling between angular momentum and the temporal degrees of freedom of ultrashort pulses. The spatial twist of propagation invariant light pulse turns out to be directly related to the number of optical cycles. Our results may trigger the development of novel multilevel classical and quantum transmission channels free of dispersion and diffraction. They may also find application in the manipulation of nanostructured objects by ultrashort pulses and for novel approaches to the spatiotemporal measurements in ultrafast photonics.

  17. Undulator radiation carrying spin and orbital angular momentum.

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.; McNulty, I.; Dejus, R.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-11-11

    We show that the radiation from a helical undulator not only carries spin angular momentum (circular polarization) but also orbital angular momentum. This exotic property of the undulator radiation may be useful in coherent X-ray imaging and scattering experiments and to probe electronic transitions in matter by orbital dichroism spectroscopy. Also, we present that a new magnet configuration, similar to the structure of Figure-8 undulator or the PERA undulator, may generate right- and left-hand circularly polarized off-axis radiation simultaneously.

  18. Earth Rotation and Coupling to Changes in Atmospheric Angular Momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Richard D.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The research supported under the contract dealt primarily with: (a) the mechanisms responsible for the exchange of angular momentum between the solid Earth and atmosphere; (b) the quality of the data sets used to estimate atmospheric angular momentum; and (c) the ability of these data and of global climate models to detect low-frequency signals in the momentum and, hence, circulation of the atmosphere. Three scientific papers reporting on the results of this research were produced during the course of the contract. These papers identified the particular torques responsible for the peak in atmospheric angular momentum and length-of-day during the 1982-93 El Nino event, and, more generally, the relative roles of torques over land and ocean in explaining the broad spectrum of variability in the length-of-day. In addition, a tendency for interannual variability in atmospheric angular momentum to increase during the last several decades of the 20th century was found in both observations and a global climate model experiment.

  19. Functional phases and angular momentum characteristics of Tkatchev and Kovacs.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Gareth; Exell, Timothy A; Manning, Michelle L; Kerwin, David G

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the technical requirements and underlying biomechanics of complex release and re-grasp skills on high bar allows coaches and scientists to develop safe and effective training programmes. The aim of this study was to examine the differences in the functional phases between the Tkatchev and Kovacs skills and to explain how the angular momentum demands are addressed. Images of 18 gymnasts performing 10 Tkatchevs and 8 Kovacs at the Olympic Games were recorded (50 Hz), digitised and reconstructed (3D Direct Linear Transformation). Orientation of the functional phase action, defined by the rapid flexion to extension of the shoulders and extension to flexion of the hips as the performer passed through the lower vertical, along with shoulder and hip angular kinematics, angular momentum and key release parameters (body angle, mass centre velocity and angular momentum about the mass centre and bar) were compared between skills. Expected differences in the release parameters of angle, angular momentum and velocity were observed and the specific mechanical requirement of each skill were highlighted. Whilst there were no differences in joint kinematics, hip and shoulder functional phase were significantly earlier in the circle for the Tkatchev. These findings highlight the importance of the orientation of the functional phase in the preceding giant swing and provide coaches with further understanding of the critical timing in this key phase.

  20. h{sub 1T}{sup perpendicular} and quark orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    She Jun; Zhu Jiacai; Ma Boqiang

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the pretzelosity distribution (h{sub 1T}{sup perpendicular}), which is one of the eight leading twist transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs), in the light-cone formalism. We find that this quantity has a simple relation with the quark orbital angular momentum distribution, thus it may provide a new possibility to access the quark orbital angular momentum inside the nucleon. The pretzelosity distribution can manifest itself through the sin(3{phi}{sub h}-{phi}{sub S}) asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process. We calculate the sin(3{phi}{sub h}-{phi}{sub S}) asymmetry at HERMES, COMPASS, and JLab kinematics and present our prediction on different targets including the proton, deuteron, and neutron targets. Inclusion of transverse momentum cut in data analysis could significantly enhance the sin(3{phi}{sub h}-{phi}{sub S}) asymmetry for future measurements.

  1. How orbital angular momentum affects beam shifts in optical reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Merano, M.; Hermosa, N.; Woerdman, J. P.; Aiello, A.

    2010-08-15

    It is well known that reflection of a Gaussian light beam (TEM{sub 00}) by a planar dielectric interface leads to four beam shifts when compared to the geometrical-optics prediction. These are the spatial Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift, the angular GH shift, the spatial Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shift, and the angular IF shift. We report here, theoretically and experimentally, that endowing the beam with orbital angular momentum leads to coupling of these four shifts; this is described by a 4x4 mixing matrix.

  2. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Compressible Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, N. E.; Brummell, N. H.; Toomre, J.

    1996-05-01

    We consider the dynamics of compressible convection within a curved local segment of a rotating spherical shell, aiming to resolve the disparity between the differential rotation profiles predicted by previous laminar simulations (angular velocity constant on cylinders) and those deduced from helioseismic inversion of the observed frequency splitting of p modes. By limiting the horizontal extent of the domain under study, we can utilize the available spatial degrees of freedom on current supercomputers to attain more turbulent flows than in the full shell. Our previous study of three-dimensional convection within a slab geometry of an f-plane neglected the effects of curvature, and thus did not admit the generation of Rossby waves. These waves propagate in the longitudinal direction and thus produce rather different spectral characteristics and mean flows in the north-south and east-west directions. By considering motions in a curvilinear geometry in which the Coriolis parameter varies with latitude, we admit the possibility of Rossby waves which couple to the turbulent convection. Here we present simulations with Rayleigh numbers in excess of 10(6) , and Prandtl numbers less than 0.1 in such a curved local segment of a spherical shell using a newly developed code based on compact finite differences. This computational domain takes the form of a curved, periodic channel in longitude with stress-free sidewalls in latitude and radius. Despite the differences in geometry and boundary conditions, the flows maintain similarities with those of our previous f-plane simulations. The surface flows form broad, laminar networks which mask the much more turbulent flows of the interior. The dynamics within this turbulent region is controlled by the interactions of a tangled web of strong vortex tubes. These interactions are further complicated by the effects of curvature. The differential rotation generated by the turbulent convection typically increases with depth and attains

  3. The oceanic contribution to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Johns, C. M.; Hide, R.; Thompson, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the speed of the Earth's rotation manifest themselves as fluctuations in the length of the day (LOD) with an amplitude of about 1000 microseconds. We know from previous work that at least 95% of these variations can be accounted for in terms of angular momentum exchanged between the atmosphere and the solid Earth. Here we examine the respective contributions of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the global oceans to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, using in situ data from the Drake Passage and results from both the oceanic regional model (Fine Resolution Antarctic Model -- FRAM) of Webb et al. (1991) and the global ocanic model of Maier-Reimer et al. (1993) as analyzed by Brosche et al. (1990). The estimated annual contribution of the ACC (2-4 microsec) is much smaller than the total variation in the oceanic models or the existing LOD-AAM residual (both approximately 15-20 microsec). The estimated semi-annual ACC contribution (3-8 microsec) is offset by counter-current further north in both oceanic models, which exhibit larger semi-annual variations in planetary angular momentum. Further refinements in the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, therefore, will require the full (planetary plus relative) contribution of the global oceans in addition to that of the ACC.

  4. Spin-Orbit Coupling and the Conservation of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2012-01-01

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, the total (i.e. orbital plus spin) angular momentum of a charged particle with spin that moves in a Coulomb plus spin-orbit-coupling potential is conserved. In a classical nonrelativistic treatment of this problem, in which the Lagrange equations determine the orbital motion and the Thomas equation yields the…

  5. Muscle contributions to frontal plane angular momentum during walking.

    PubMed

    Neptune, Richard R; McGowan, Craig P

    2016-09-06

    The regulation of whole-body angular momentum is important for maintaining dynamic balance during human walking, which is particularly challenging in the frontal plane. Whole-body angular momentum is actively regulated by individual muscle forces. Thus, understanding which muscles contribute to frontal plane angular momentum will further our understanding of mediolateral balance control and has the potential to help diagnose and treat balance disorders. The purpose of this study was to identify how individual muscles and gravity contribute to whole-body angular momentum in the frontal plane using a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation analysis. A three-dimensional simulation was developed that emulated the average walking mechanics of a group of young healthy adults (n=10). The results showed that a finite set of muscles are the primary contributors to frontal plane balance and that these contributions vary throughout the gait cycle. In early stance, the vasti, adductor magnus and gravity acted to rotate the body towards the contralateral leg while the gluteus medius acted to rotate the body towards the ipsilateral leg. In late stance, the gluteus medius continued to rotate the body towards the ipsilateral leg while the soleus and gastrocnemius acted to rotate the body towards the contralateral leg. These results highlight those muscles that are critical to maintaining dynamic balance in the frontal plane during walking and may provide targets for locomotor therapies aimed at treating balance disorders.

  6. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  7. Measuring orbital angular momentum superpositions of light by mode transformation.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Gregorius C G; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Beijersbergen, Marco W

    2011-05-15

    We recently reported on a method for measuring orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light based on the transformation of helically phased beams to tilted plane waves [Phys. Rev. Lett.105, 153601 (2010)]. Here we consider the performance of such a system for superpositions of OAM states by measuring the modal content of noninteger OAM states and beams produced by a Heaviside phase plate.

  8. Multichannel Polarization-Controllable Superpositions of Orbital Angular Momentum States.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fuyong; Wen, Dandan; Zhang, Chunmei; Gerardot, Brian D; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2017-04-01

    A facile metasurface approach is shown to realize polarization-controllable multichannel superpositions of orbital angular momentum (OAM) states with various topological charges. By manipulating the polarization state of the incident light, four kinds of superpositions of OAM states are realized using a single metasurface consisting of space-variant arrays of gold nanoantennas.

  9. Spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in dielectric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Robert Charles; Ambrosio, Antonio; Wintz, Daniel; Oscurato, Stefano Luigi; Zhu, Alexander Yutong; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Oh, Jaewon; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Capasso, Federico

    2017-01-09

    Vortex beams are characterized by a helical wavefront and a phase singularity point on the propagation axis that results in a doughnut-like intensity profile. These beams carry orbital angular momentum proportional to the number of intertwined helices constituting the wavefront. Vortex beams have many applications in optics, such as optical trapping, quantum optics and microscopy. Although beams with such characteristics can be generated holographically, spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion has attracted considerable interest as a tool to create vortex beams. In this process, the geometrical phase is exploited to create helical beams whose handedness is determined by the circular polarization (left/right) of the incident light, that is by its spin. Here we demonstrate high-efficiency Spin-to-Orbital angular momentum-Converters (SOCs) at visible wavelengths based on dielectric metasurfaces. With these SOCs we generate vortex beams with high and fractional topological charge and show for the first time the simultaneous generation of collinear helical beams with different and arbitrary orbital angular momentum. This versatile method of creating vortex beams, which circumvents the limitations of liquid crystal SOCs and adds new functionalities, should significantly expand the applications of these beams.

  10. Optical fibers for the transmission of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Charles; Rusch, Leslie A.

    2017-02-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light is a promising means for exploiting the spatial dimension of light to increase the capacity of optical fiber links. We summarize how OAM enables efficient mode multiplexing for optical communications, with emphasis on the design of OAM fibers.

  11. Muscle Contributions to Frontal Plane Angular Momentum during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Neptune, Richard R.; McGowan, Craig P.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of whole-body angular momentum is important for maintaining dynamic balance during human walking, which is particularly challenging in the frontal plane. Whole-body angular momentum is actively regulated by individual muscle forces. Thus, understanding which muscles contribute to frontal plane angular momentum will further our understanding of mediolateral balance control and has the potential to help diagnose and treat balance disorders. The purpose of this study was to identify how individual muscles and gravity contribute to whole-body angular momentum in the frontal plane using a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation analysis. A three-dimensional simulation was developed that emulated the average walking mechanics of a group of young healthy adults (n=10). The results showed that a finite set of muscles are the primary contributors to frontal plane balance and that these contributions vary throughout the gait cycle. In early stance, the vasti, adductor magnus and gravity acted to rotate the body towards the contralateral leg while the gluteus medius acted to rotate the body towards the ipsilateral leg. In late stance, the gluteus medius continued to rotate the body towards the ipsilateral leg while the soleus and gastrocnemius acted to rotate the body towards the contralateral leg. These results highlight those muscles that are critical to maintaining dynamic balance in the frontal plane during walking and may provide targets for locomotor therapies aimed at treating balance disorders. PMID:27522538

  12. Spin-Orbit Coupling and the Conservation of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2012-01-01

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, the total (i.e. orbital plus spin) angular momentum of a charged particle with spin that moves in a Coulomb plus spin-orbit-coupling potential is conserved. In a classical nonrelativistic treatment of this problem, in which the Lagrange equations determine the orbital motion and the Thomas equation yields the…

  13. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  14. The Transfer of Angular Momentum between Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbasov, R. F.; Klapp, J.; Rodríguez-Meza, M. A.; Cervantes-Cota, J. L.; Dehnen, H.

    2003-06-01

    In this work, we employ a TREE-Code to study the collision of two spiral galaxies when they approach each other in a parabolic orbit. During a collision, we follow the evolution of the angular momentum (AM) of the different components of the galaxies, i.e., disk, bulge and halo.

  15. Low Angular Momentum in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andrew W.; McGregor, Peter J.; Damjanov, Ivana; Popping, Attila; Jørgensen, Inger

    2015-12-01

    We measure the stellar specific angular momentum {j}s={J}s/{M}s in four nearby (z ≈ 0.1) disk galaxies that have stellar masses {M}s near the break {M}s* of the galaxy mass function but look like typical star-forming disks at z ≈ 2 in terms of their low stability (Q ≈ 1), clumpiness, high ionized gas dispersion (40-50 {km} {{{s}}}-1), high molecular gas fraction (20%-30%), and rapid star formation (˜ 20{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). Combining high-resolution (Keck-OSIRIS) and large-radius (Gemini-GMOS) spectroscopic maps, only available at low z, we discover that these targets have ˜ 3 times less stellar angular momentum than typical local spiral galaxies of equal stellar mass and bulge fraction. Theoretical considerations show that this deficiency in angular momentum is the main cause of their low stability, while the high gas fraction plays a complementary role. Interestingly, the low {j}s values of our targets are similar to those expected in the {M}s* population at higher z from the approximate theoretical scaling {j}s\\propto {(1+z)}-1/2 at fixed {M}s. This suggests that a change in angular momentum, driven by cosmic expansion, is the main cause for the remarkable difference between clumpy {M}s* disks at high z (which likely evolve into early-type galaxies) and mass-matched local spirals.

  16. Adaptive power-controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) multicasting.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-05-19

    We report feedback-assisted adaptive multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single phase-only spatial light modulator loaded with a complex phase pattern. By designing and optimizing the complex phase pattern through the adaptive correction of feedback coefficients, the power of each multicast OAM channel can be arbitrarily controlled. We experimentally demonstrate power-controllable multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to two and six OAM modes with different target power distributions. Equalized power multicasting, "up-down" power multicasting and "ladder" power multicasting are realized in the experiment. The difference between measured power distributions and target power distributions is assessed to be less than 1 dB. Moreover, we demonstrate data-carrying OAM multicasting by employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 64-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM 64-QAM) signal. The measured bit-error rate curves and observed optical signal-to-noise ratio penalties show favorable operation performance of the proposed adaptive power-controllable OAM multicasting.

  17. Adaptive power-controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) multicasting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We report feedback-assisted adaptive multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single phase-only spatial light modulator loaded with a complex phase pattern. By designing and optimizing the complex phase pattern through the adaptive correction of feedback coefficients, the power of each multicast OAM channel can be arbitrarily controlled. We experimentally demonstrate power-controllable multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to two and six OAM modes with different target power distributions. Equalized power multicasting, “up-down” power multicasting and “ladder” power multicasting are realized in the experiment. The difference between measured power distributions and target power distributions is assessed to be less than 1 dB. Moreover, we demonstrate data-carrying OAM multicasting by employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 64-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM 64-QAM) signal. The measured bit-error rate curves and observed optical signal-to-noise ratio penalties show favorable operation performance of the proposed adaptive power-controllable OAM multicasting. PMID:25989251

  18. Analogies between optical and quantum mechanical angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Gerard

    2017-02-01

    The insight that a beam of light can carry orbital angular momentum (AM) in its propagation direction came up in 1992 as a surprise. Nevertheless, the existence of momentum and AM of an electromagnetic field has been well known since the days of Maxwell. We compare the expressions for densities of AM in general three-dimensional modes and in paraxial modes. Despite their classical nature, these expressions have a suggestive quantum mechanical appearance, in terms of linear operators acting on mode functions. In addition, paraxial wave optics has several analogies with real quantum mechanics, both with the wave function of a free quantum particle and with a quantum harmonic oscillator. We discuss how these analogies can be applied. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  19. Optomechanics based on angular momentum exchange between light and matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, H.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2016-08-01

    The subject of optomechanics involves interactions between optical and mechanical degrees of freedom, and is currently of great interest as an enabler of fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, as well as a platform for ultrasensitive measurement devices. The majority of optomechanical configurations rely on the exchange of linear momentum between light and matter. We will begin this tutorial with a brief description of such systems. Subsequently, we will introduce optomechanical systems based on angular momentum exchange. In this context, optical fields carrying polarization and orbital angular momentum will be considered, while for the mechanics, torsional and free rotational motion will be of relevance. Our overall aims will be to supply basic analyses of some of the existing theoretical proposals, to provide functional descriptions of some of the experiments conducted thus far, and to consider some directions for future research. We hope this tutorial will be useful to both theorists and experimentalists interested in the subject.

  20. Analogies between optical and quantum mechanical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Gerard

    2017-02-28

    The insight that a beam of light can carry orbital angular momentum (AM) in its propagation direction came up in 1992 as a surprise. Nevertheless, the existence of momentum and AM of an electromagnetic field has been well known since the days of Maxwell. We compare the expressions for densities of AM in general three-dimensional modes and in paraxial modes. Despite their classical nature, these expressions have a suggestive quantum mechanical appearance, in terms of linear operators acting on mode functions. In addition, paraxial wave optics has several analogies with real quantum mechanics, both with the wave function of a free quantum particle and with a quantum harmonic oscillator. We discuss how these analogies can be applied.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  1. Angular momentum transport in turbulent flow between independently rotating cylinders.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, M S; Lathrop, D P

    2011-01-14

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the (Ω1, Ω2) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where Ω1 (Ω2) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro = (Ω1 - Ω2)/Ω2 fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro = ∞) ≡ G∞. The ratio G/G∞ is a linear function of Ro(-1) in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London), 444, 343 (2006)], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)].

  2. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Flow between Independently Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, M. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the (Ω1, Ω2) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where Ω1 (Ω2) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro=(Ω1-Ω2)/Ω2 fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro=∞)≡G∞. The ratio G/G∞ is a linear function of Ro-1 in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836, 444, 343 (2006)10.1038/nature05323], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)AAEJAF0004-6361].

  3. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Flow between Independently Rotating Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, M. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2011-01-14

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the ({Omega}{sub 1}, {Omega}{sub 2}) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where {Omega}{sub 1} ({Omega}{sub 2}) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro=({Omega}{sub 1}-{Omega}{sub 2})/{Omega}{sub 2} fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro={infinity}){identical_to}G{sub {infinity}.} The ratio G/G{sub {infinity}} is a linear function of Ro{sup -1} in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London), 444, 343 (2006)], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)].

  4. Preferred alignments of angular momentum vectors of galaxies in six dynamically unstable Abell clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Shiv N.; Aryal, Binil; Saurer, Walter

    2017-07-01

    A spatial orientation of angular momentum vectors of galaxies in six dynamically unstable Abell clusters (S1171, S0001, A1035, A1373, A1474 and A4053) is studied. For this, two-dimensional observed parameters (e.g., positions, diameters and position angles) are converted into three-dimensional (3D) rotation axes of the galaxy using the ‘position angle - inclination’ method. The expected isotropic distribution curves for angular momentum vectors are obtained by performing random simulations. The observed and expected distributions are compared using several statistical tests. No preferred alignments of angular momentum vectors of galaxies are noticed in all six dynamically unstable clusters, supporting the hierarchy model of galaxy formation. These clusters have a larger value of velocity dispersion. However, local effects are noticed in the clusters that have substructures in the 1D-3D number density maps.

  5. Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-16

    of a photon provides a two dimensional Hilbert space. But in principle, OAM is associated with the spatial distribution of the wave function and...spiral phase plate, cylindrical lens, spatial light modulator and q-plates. Pervious work in the literature also includes experimental results of...tilt” of the plane wave in the far-field. This concept applies to methods that spatially unwrap the spiral phase or convert the spiral phase

  6. Polarization of molecular angular momentum in the chemical reactions Li + HF and F + HD.

    PubMed

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B; Popov, Ruslan S; Roncero, Octavio; De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2013-06-28

    The quantum mechanical approach to vector correlation of angular momentum orientation and alignment in chemical reactions [G. Balint-Kurti and O. S. Vasyutinskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 14281 (2009)] is applied to the molecular reagents and products of the Li + HF [L. Gonzalez-Sanchez, O. S. Vasyutinskii, A. Zanchet, C. Sanz-Sanz, and O. Roncero, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13656 (2011)] and F + HD [D. De Fazio, J. Lucas, V. Aquilanti, and S. Cavalli, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 8571 (2011)] reactions for which accurate scattering information has become recently available through time-dependent and time-independent approaches. Application of the theory to two important particular cases of the reactive collisions has been considered: (i) the influence of the angular momentum polarization of reactants in the entrance channel on the spatial distribution of the products in the exit channel and (ii) angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction between unpolarized reactants. In the former case, the role of the angular momentum alignment of the reactants is shown to be large, particularly when the angular momentum is perpendicular to the reaction scattering plane. In the latter case, the orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum was found to be significant and strongly dependent on the scattering angle. The calculation also reveals significant differences between the vector correlation properties of the two reactions under study which are due to difference in the reaction mechanisms. In the case of F + HD reaction, the branching ratio between HF and DF production points out interest in the insight gained into the detailed dynamics, when information is available either from exact quantum mechanical calculations or from especially designed experiments. Also, the geometrical arrangement for the experimental determination of the product angular momentum orientation and alignment based on a compact and convenient spherical tensor expression for

  7. The Localization of Angular Momentum in Optical Waves Propagating Through Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-02

    has been shown [2], that traveling waves can contain angular momentum and that this momentum is comprised of spin and orbital components. And in fact...to each other and perpendicular to the direction of propagation.) As with atoms, angular momentum in photons is comprised of spin angular momentum ...plus orbital angular momentum . To get a lower bound of what “non-trivial” means, say the spin component is zero, and the orbital component is in the

  8. Simplified Generation of High-Angular-Momentum Light Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Grudinin, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    A simplified method of generating a beam of light having a relatively high value of angular momentum (see figure) involves the use of a compact apparatus consisting mainly of a laser, a whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) resonator, and optical fibers. The method also can be used to generate a Bessel beam. ( Bessel beam denotes a member of a class of non-diffracting beams, so named because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have high values of angular momentum.) High-angular-momentum light beams are used in some applications in biology and nanotechnology, wherein they are known for their ability to apply torque to make microscopic objects rotate. High-angular-momentum light beams could also be used to increase bandwidths of fiber-optic communication systems. The present simplified method of generating a high-angular-momentum light beam was conceived as an alternative to prior such methods, which are complicated and require optical setups that include, variously, holograms, modulating Fabry-Perot cavities, or special microstructures. The present simplified method exploits a combination of the complex structure of the electromagnetic field inside a WGM resonator, total internal reflection in the WGM resonator, and the electromagnetic modes supported by an optical fiber. The optical fiber used to extract light from the WGM resonator is made of fused quartz. The output end of this fiber is polished flat and perpendicular to the fiber axis. The input end of this fiber is cut on a slant and placed very close to the WGM resonator at an appropriate position and orientation. To excite the resonant whispering- gallery modes, light is introduced into the WGM resonator via another optical fiber that is part of a pigtailed fiber-optic coupler. Light extracted from the WGM resonator is transformed into a high-angular- momentum beam inside the extraction optical fiber and this beam is emitted from the

  9. Optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from plasmonic vortex lens to light.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Yang, Haifang; Xu, Xiangang; Wang, Zhengping; Petrov, V; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-11-12

    We demonstrate the optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from subwavelength plasmonic vortex lens (PVLs) to light and the generating process of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Illuminating plasmonic vortex lenses with beams carrying optical orbital angular momentum, the SP vortices with orbital angular momentum were generated and inherit the optical angular momentum of light beams and PVLs. The angular momentum of twisting SP electromagnetic field is tunable by the twisted metal/dielectric interfaces of PVLs and angular momentum of illuminating singular light. This work may open the door for several possible applications of SP vortices in subwavelength region.

  10. Optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from plasmonic vortex lens to light

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Yang, Haifang; Xu, Xiangang; Wang, Zhengping; Petrov, V.; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from subwavelength plasmonic vortex lens (PVLs) to light and the generating process of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Illuminating plasmonic vortex lenses with beams carrying optical orbital angular momentum, the SP vortices with orbital angular momentum were generated and inherit the optical angular momentum of light beams and PVLs. The angular momentum of twisting SP electromagnetic field is tunable by the twisted metal/dielectric interfaces of PVLs and angular momentum of illuminating singular light. This work may open the door for several possible applications of SP vortices in subwavelength region. PMID:24217130

  11. GR angular momentum in the quadratic spinor Lagrangian formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siao-Jing

    2016-08-01

    We inquire into the question of whether the quadratic spinor Lagrangian (QSL) formulation can describe the angular momentum for a general-relativistic system. The QSL Hamiltonian has previously been shown to be able to yield an energy-momentum quasilocalization which brings a proof of the positive gravitational energy when the spinor satisfies the conformal Witten equation. After inspection, we find that, under the constraint that the spinor on the asymptotic boundary is a constant, the QSL Hamiltonian is successful in giving an angular momentum quasilocalization. We also make certain the spinor in the Hamiltonian plays the role of a gauge field, a warrant of our permission to impose constraints on the spinor. Then, by some adjustment of the QSL Hamiltonian, we gain a covariant center-of-mass moment quasilocalization only under the condition that the displacement on the asymptotic boundary is a Killing boost vector. We expect the spinor expression will bring a proof of some connection between the gravitational energy and angular momentum.

  12. Possible Angular Momentum Dependence of Dissipation in Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Toke, Jan; Udo Schroeder, W.

    2008-04-01

    A comparative analysis of the pre-scission neutron multiplicities observed in a new experiment [1] and one reported earlier [2] suggests that, besides known deformation [3] and temperature [4] dependencies, nuclear dissipation in fission may have an angular momentum dependence. The analysis based on a Langevin equation coupled with a statistical decay model [3] considers angular momentum effects on fission dynamics. Pre-saddle reduced dissipation coefficients of β = 2 x10^21s-1 and 3 x10^21s-1 have been extracted for the matched reactions ^16O + ^181Ta and ^19F + ^178Hf [1],respectively. The difference in the extracted β values is attributed to the difference in the angular momenta contributing to the fission process in the two reactions. Work attempting to derive a quantitative expression for an angular momentum dependence of the dissipation strength is in progress. [1] H.Singh et al., Phys. Rev. C76 (2007) 044610 [2] L.G.Moretto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1995) 4186; Phys. Rev. C54 (1996) 3062 [3] P.Frobrich and I.I.Gontchar, Phys. Rep. 292(1998) 131 [4] P.Paul and M.Thoennessen, Ann. Rev. Part. Sci. 44(1994) 65

  13. Measurement of Angular-Momentum-Dependent Fission Probabilities of 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Burke, Jason; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-09-01

    An experimental technique using the surrogate reaction method has been developed to measure fission probabilities of actinides as a function of angular momentum state of the fissioning nucleus near the fission barrier. In this work, the 240Pu (α ,α' f) reaction was used as a surrogate for 239Pu (n , f) . An array of 12 silicon telescopes positioned at 10 degree intervals from 40 to 140 degrees detect the outgoing reaction particle for identification and measurement of the excitation energy. The angular momentum state is determined by measuring the angular distribution of fission fragments. The expected distributions are predicted from the Wigner d function. An array of 50 photovoltaic (solar) cells detects fission fragments with 10-degree granularity. The solar cells are sensitive to fission fragments but have no response to light ions. Relative contributions from different angular momentum states are extracted from the measured distributions and compared across all α particle scattering angles to determine fission probability at a specific angular momentum state. The first experiment using this technique was recently completed using 37 MeV α particles incident on 240Pu. First results will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Nu.

  14. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B0. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B0. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B0 are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field topologies. The work will

  15. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B{sub 0}. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B{sub 0} are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field

  16. Polarization radiation of vortex electrons with large orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Igor P.; Karlovets, Dmitry V.

    2013-10-01

    Vortex electrons—freely propagating electrons whose wave functions have helical wave fronts—could become a novel tool in the physics of electromagnetic radiation. They carry a nonzero intrinsic orbital angular momentum (OAM) ℓ with respect to the propagation axis and, for ℓ≫1, a large OAM-induced magnetic moment μ≈ℓμB (μB is the Bohr magneton), which influences the radiation of electromagnetic waves. Here, we consider in detail the OAM-induced effects caused by such electrons in two forms of polarization radiation, namely, in Cherenkov radiation and transition radiation. Thanks to the large ℓ, we can neglect quantum or spin-induced effects, which are of the order of ℏω/Ee≪1, but retain the magnetic moment contribution ℓℏω/Ee≲1, which makes the quasiclassical approach to polarization radiation applicable. We discuss the magnetic moment contribution to polarization radiation, which has never been experimentally observed, and study how its visibility depends on the kinematical parameters and the medium permittivity. In particular, it is shown that this contribution can, in principle, be detected in azimuthally nonsymmetrical problems, for example when vortex electrons obliquely cross a metallic screen (transition radiation) or move near it (diffraction radiation). We predict a left-right angular asymmetry of the transition radiation (in the plane where the charge radiation distributions would stay symmetric), which appears due to an effective interference between the charge radiation field and the magnetic moment contribution. Numerical values of this asymmetry for vortex electrons with Ee=300 keV and ℓ=100-1000 are 0.1%-1%, and we argue that this effect could be detected with existing technology. The finite conductivity of the target and frequency dispersion play crucial roles in these predictions.

  17. Two-body scattering without angular-momentum decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Deltuva, A.; Cravo, E.; Fonseca, A. C.; Crespo, R.

    2008-09-15

    Two-body scattering is studied by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in momentum space without angular-momentum decomposition for a local spin-dependent short-range interaction plus Coulomb. The screening and renormalization approach is employed to treat the Coulomb interaction. Benchmark calculations are performed by comparing our procedure with partial-wave calculations in configuration space for p-{sup 10}Be,p-{sup 16}O, and {sup 12}C-{sup 10}Be elastic scattering, using a simple optical potential model.

  18. Quasi-Local Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabados, László B.

    2009-06-01

    The present status of the quasi-local mass, energy-momentum and angular-momentum constructions in general relativity is reviewed. First, the general ideas, concepts, and strategies, as well as the necessary tools to construct and analyze the quasi-local quantities, are recalled. Then, the various specific constructions and their properties (both successes and deficiencies are discussed. Finally, some of the (actual and potential) applications of the quasi-local concepts and specific constructions are briefly mentioned.

  19. Spatial distributions of angular momenta in quantum and quasiclassical stereodynamics.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F Javier; Sáez-Rábanos, V; Brouard, Mark

    2004-11-22

    We have recently reported a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization [M. P. de Miranda and F. Javier Aoiz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083201 (2004)]. This paper presents a detailed account of the derivation outlined in that paper, and discusses the implications of the new results. These include (i) a new expression of the role of the uncertainty principle in the broadening of angular momentum distributions, (ii) the attribution of azimuthal fluctuations of angular momentum distributions to spatial quantum beats, (iii) the definition of a new Fourier transform of the density matrix, distinct from those suggested in the past, that provides an alternative view of how the quantum description of angular momentum polarization approaches the classical one in the correspondence principle limit, (iv) a prescription for the determination of a quasiclassical angular momentum distribution function that does not suffer from problems encountered with its purely classical counterpart, and (v) a description of how angular momentum distributions commonly visualized with recourse to the classical vector model can be depicted with exact and well-defined quantum mechanics.

  20. Spatial distributions of angular momenta in quantum and quasiclassical stereodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miranda, Marcelo P.; Aoiz, F. Javier; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Brouard, Mark

    2004-11-01

    We have recently reported a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization [M. P. de Miranda and F. Javier Aoiz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083201 (2004)]. This paper presents a detailed account of the derivation outlined in that paper, and discusses the implications of the new results. These include (i) a new expression of the role of the uncertainty principle in the broadening of angular momentum distributions, (ii) the attribution of azimuthal fluctuations of angular momentum distributions to spatial quantum beats, (iii) the definition of a new Fourier transform of the density matrix, distinct from those suggested in the past, that provides an alternative view of how the quantum description of angular momentum polarization approaches the classical one in the correspondence principle limit, (iv) a prescription for the determination of a quasiclassical angular momentum distribution function that does not suffer from problems encountered with its purely classical counterpart, and (v) a description of how angular momentum distributions commonly visualized with recourse to the classical vector model can be depicted with exact and well-defined quantum mechanics.

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Counterintuitive angular shifts in the photoelectron momentum distribution for atoms in strong few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, C. P. J.; Abu-samha, M.; Madsen, L. B.

    2009-08-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a three-cycle circularly polarized laser pulse interacting with an atom. The photoelectron momentum distributions show counterintuitive shifts, similar to those observed in a recent experiment (Eckle et al 2008 Science 322 1525). The physical origin of the shifts is examined by a detailed investigation of the wave packet after the pulse. We show that the shifts arise as a consequence of an intimate interplay between the external field and the binding potential, and that the shifts occur also at lower intensities than used in the experiment, corresponding to the multiphoton regime. In contrast to the recent experiment we do not invoke the concept of a tunnelling time in our explanation of the shifts.

  2. Radar imaging using electromagnetic wave carrying orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tiezhu; Cheng, Yongqiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Qin, Yuliang; Fan, Bo

    2017-03-01

    The concept of radar imaging based on orbital angular momentum (OAM) modulation, which has the ability of azimuthal resolution without relative motion, has recently been proposed. We investigate this imaging technique further in greater detail. We first analyze the principle of the technique, accounting for its resolving ability physically. The phase and intensity distributions of the OAM-carrying fields produced by phased uniform circular array antenna, which have significant effects on the imaging results, are investigated. The imaging model shows that the received signal has the form of inverse discrete Fourier transform with the use of OAM and frequency diversities. The two-dimensional Fourier transform is employed to reconstruct the target images in the case of large and small elevation angles. Due to the peculiar phase and intensity characteristics, the small elevation is more suitable for practical application than the large one. The minimum elevation angle is then obtained given the array parameters. The imaging capability is analyzed by means of the point spread function. All results are verified through numerical simulations. The proposed staring imaging technique can achieve extremely high azimuthal resolution with the use of plentiful OAM modes.

  3. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P.; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  4. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence.

    PubMed

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-12

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  5. Zombie Vortices: Angular Momentum Transport and Planetesimal Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Joseph; Marcus, Philip; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Lecoanet, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Zombie vortices may fill the dead zones of protoplanetary disks, where they may play important roles in star and planet formation. We will investigate this new, purely hydrodynamic instability and explore the conditions necessary to resurrect the dead zone and fill it with large amplitude vortices that may transport angular momentum and allow mass to accrete onto the protostar. One unresolved issue is whether angular momentum transport is mediated via asymmetries in the vortices, vortex-vortex interactions, or acoustic waves launched by the vortices. Vortices may also play a crucial role in the formation of planetesimals, the building blocks of planets. It is still an open question how grains grow to kilometer-size. We will investigate the interactions of dust with vortices generated via our new hydrodynamic instability, and bridge the gap between micron-sized grains and kilometer-sized planetesimals. Supported by NSF AST-1010052.

  6. Majorana Quasiparticles Protected by Z2 Angular Momentum Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iemini, F.; Mazza, L.; Fallani, L.; Zoller, P.; Fazio, R.; Dalmonte, M.

    2017-05-01

    We show how angular momentum conservation can stabilize a symmetry-protected quasitopological phase of matter supporting Majorana quasiparticles as edge modes in one-dimensional cold atom gases. We investigate a number-conserving four-species Hubbard model in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. The latter reduces the global spin symmetry to an angular momentum parity symmetry, which provides an extremely robust protection mechanism that does not rely on any coupling to additional reservoirs. The emergence of Majorana edge modes is elucidated using field theory techniques, and corroborated by density-matrix-renormalization-group simulations. Our results pave the way toward the observation of Majorana edge modes with alkaline-earth-like fermions in optical lattices, where all basic ingredients for our recipe—spin-orbit coupling and strong interorbital interactions—have been experimentally realized over the last two years.

  7. Cholesteric polymers and the orbital angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, W.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    The interaction of light's orbital angular momentum (OAM) with matter has still several unexplored aspects. In particular, it is unknown if there exists for OAM an effect analogous to spin angular momentum-based optical activity. Here we study experimentally the influence of OAM on the interaction of light with a cholesteric liquid crystal polymer. We use strongly focussed light where the polarization and the orbital degrees of freedom are coupled. Two possible manifestations of an OAM-sensitive interaction are investigated: (i) the modification of circular dichroism, and (ii) the occurrence of intermodal dispersion of the {l = +1, l = -1} modes. We conclude that such an interaction does not exist within the experimental parameter range studied here.

  8. Acoustic radiation torque and the conservation of angular momentum (L).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-04-01

    This note concerns the evaluation of the static acoustic radiation torque exerted by an acoustic field on a scatterer immersed in a nonviscous fluid based on far-field scattering. The radiation torque is expressed as the integral of the time-averaged flux of angular momentum over a spherical surface far removed from the scattering object with its center at the centroid of the object. That result was given previously [G. Maidanik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 30, 620-623 (1956)]. Another expression given recently [Z. W. Fan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 2727-2732 (2008)] is simplified to this formula. Comments are made on obtaining it directly from the general theorem of angular momentum conservation in the integral form.

  9. A seasonal budget of the earth's axial angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Isao; Kikuchi, Naokichi

    1990-04-01

    The seasonal variation of the earth's axial angular momentum budget is discussed with an error on the order of a few percent. The budget is based on the core-mantle decoupling (CMD) hypothesis. The atmospheric relative angular momentum changes due to zonal wind account for an additional 23 percent contribution over the annual budget. However, this is counterbalanced by the effects of the redistributions of air and water masses. About 16 percent is accounted for by the redistribution of air mass, and remained about 7 percent agrees with the contribution from surface water storage estimate on continents by Chao and O'Connor (1988). These facts demonstrate a confirmation of the CMD hypothesis on time scale of a year. At the semiannual period, however, there still is a shortage of about 6 percent in atmospheric and hydrospheric contributions to the budget.

  10. Majorana Quasiparticles Protected by Z_{2} Angular Momentum Conservation.

    PubMed

    Iemini, F; Mazza, L; Fallani, L; Zoller, P; Fazio, R; Dalmonte, M

    2017-05-19

    We show how angular momentum conservation can stabilize a symmetry-protected quasitopological phase of matter supporting Majorana quasiparticles as edge modes in one-dimensional cold atom gases. We investigate a number-conserving four-species Hubbard model in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. The latter reduces the global spin symmetry to an angular momentum parity symmetry, which provides an extremely robust protection mechanism that does not rely on any coupling to additional reservoirs. The emergence of Majorana edge modes is elucidated using field theory techniques, and corroborated by density-matrix-renormalization-group simulations. Our results pave the way toward the observation of Majorana edge modes with alkaline-earth-like fermions in optical lattices, where all basic ingredients for our recipe-spin-orbit coupling and strong interorbital interactions-have been experimentally realized over the last two years.

  11. Resolving enantiomers using the optical angular momentum of twisted light

    PubMed Central

    Brullot, Ward; Vanbel, Maarten K.; Swusten, Tom; Verbiest, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Circular dichroism and optical rotation are crucial for the characterization of chiral molecules and are of importance to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, proteins, DNA, and many others. These techniques are based on the different interactions of enantiomers with circularly polarized components of plane wave light that carries spin angular momentum (SAM). For light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), for example, twisted or helical light, the consensus is that it cannot engage with the chirality of a molecular system as previous studies failed to demonstrate an interaction between optical OAM and chiral molecules. Using unique nanoparticle aggregates, we prove that optical OAM can engage with materials’ chirality and discriminate between enantiomers. Further, theoretical results show that compared to circular dichroism, mainly based on magnetic dipole contributions, the OAM analog helical dichroism (HD) is critically dependent on fundamentally different chiral electric quadrupole contributions. Our work opens new venues to study chirality and can find application in sensing and chiral spectroscopy. PMID:26998517

  12. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  13. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss.

  14. Dynamical horizons: energy, angular momentum, fluxes, and balance laws.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Krishnan, Badri

    2002-12-23

    Dynamical horizons are considered in full, nonlinear general relativity. Expressions of fluxes of energy and angular momentum carried by gravitational waves across these horizons are obtained. Fluxes are local, the energy flux is positive, and change in the horizon area is related to these fluxes. The flux formulas also give rise to balance laws analogous to the ones obtained by Bondi and Sachs at null infinity and provide generalizations of the first and second laws of black-hole mechanics.

  15. Angular-momentum nonclassicality by breaking classical bounds on statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo; Rivas, Angel

    2011-10-15

    We derive simple practical procedures revealing the quantum behavior of angular momentum variables by the violation of classical upper bounds on the statistics. Data analysis is minimum and definite conclusions are obtained without evaluation of moments, or any other more sophisticated procedures. These nonclassical tests are very general and independent of other typical quantum signatures of nonclassical behavior such as sub-Poissonian statistics, squeezing, or oscillatory statistics, being insensitive to the nonclassical behavior displayed by other variables.

  16. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  17. Intrinsic spin and orbital angular momentum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yang, Z

    2005-02-18

    A generalized definition of intrinsic and extrinsic transport coefficients is introduced. We show that transport coefficients from the intrinsic origin are solely determined by local electronic structure, and thus the intrinsic spin Hall effect is not a transport phenomenon. The intrinsic spin Hall current is always accompanied by an equal but opposite intrinsic orbital angular momentum Hall current. We prove that the intrinsic spin Hall effect does not induce a spin accumulation at the edge of the sample or near the interface.

  18. Shape evolution with angular momentum in Lu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, Azam; Sayyah, Sepideh

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear potential energies of Lu isotopes with neutron number N = 90 - 98 up to high spins are computed within the framework of the unpaired cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky method. The potential and the macroscopic Lublin-Strasbourg drop (LSD) energy-surface diagrams are analyzed in terms of quadrupole deformation and triaxiality parameter. The shape evolution of these isotopes with respect to angular momentum, as well as the neutron number is studied.

  19. Orbital angular momentum exchange in an optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, M.; Nussenzveig, P.; Huguenin, J. A.O.; Khoury, A.Z.

    2004-07-01

    We present a study of orbital angular momentum transfer from pump to down-converted beams in a type-II optical parametric oscillator. Cavity and anisotropy effects are investigated and demonstrated to play a central role in the transverse mode dynamics. While the idler beam can oscillate in a Laguerre-Gauss mode, the crystal birefringence induces an astigmatic effect in the signal beam that prevents the resonance of such a mode.

  20. Orbital angular momentum in twisted and rotating cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    We use an algebraic method to derive explicit expressions for the structure of paraxial modes in a cavity consisting of astigmatic mirrors. The algebra is based upon the use of ladder operators that raise or lower the mode indices, when acting on a mode function. We show that the method is also applicable when the mirrors perform a uniform rotation about their axes. We also find expressions for the orbital angular momentum in these modes.

  1. Black hole mass and angular momentum in topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchareb, Adel; Clément, Gérard

    2007-11-01

    We extend the Abbott Deser Tekin approach to the computation of the Killing charge for a solution of topologically massive gravity (TMG) linearized around an arbitrary background. This is then applied to evaluate the mass and angular momentum of black hole solutions of TMG with non-constant curvature asymptotics. The resulting values, together with the appropriate black hole entropy, fit nicely into the first law of black hole thermodynamics.

  2. Gyrokinetic theory and simulation of angular momentum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F. L.

    2007-12-15

    A gyrokinetic theory of turbulent toroidal angular momentum transport as well as modifications to neoclassical poloidal rotation from turbulence is formulated starting from the fundamental six-dimensional kinetic equation. The gyro-Bohm scaled transport is evaluated from toroidal delta-f gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The simulations recover two pinch mechanisms in the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum: The slab geometry ExB shear pinch [Dominguez and Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5, 387 (1993)] and the toroidal geometry 'Coriolis' pinch [Peeters, Angioni, and Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. The pinches allow the steady state null stress (or angular momentum transport flow) condition required to understand intrinsic (or spontaneous) toroidal rotation in heated tokamak without an internal source of torque [Staebler, Kinsey, and Waltz, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46, 221 (2001)]. A predicted turbulent shift in the neoclassical poloidal rotation [Staebler, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1064 (2004)] appears to be small at the finite relative gyroradius (rho-star) of current experiments.

  3. Hydrodynamic turbulence cannot transport angular momentum effectively in astrophysical disks.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael; Schartman, Ethan; Goodman, Jeremy

    2006-11-16

    The most efficient energy sources known in the Universe are accretion disks. Those around black holes convert 5-40 per cent of rest-mass energy to radiation. Like water circling a drain, inflowing mass must lose angular momentum, presumably by vigorous turbulence in disks, which are essentially inviscid. The origin of the turbulence is unclear. Hot disks of electrically conducting plasma can become turbulent by way of the linear magnetorotational instability. Cool disks, such as the planet-forming disks of protostars, may be too poorly ionized for the magnetorotational instability to occur, and therefore essentially unmagnetized and linearly stable. Nonlinear hydrodynamic instability often occurs in linearly stable flows (for example, pipe flows) at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers. Although planet-forming disks have extreme Reynolds numbers, keplerian rotation enhances their linear hydrodynamic stability, so the question of whether they can be turbulent and thereby transport angular momentum effectively is controversial. Here we report a laboratory experiment, demonstrating that non-magnetic quasi-keplerian flows at Reynolds numbers up to millions are essentially steady. Scaled to accretion disks, rates of angular momentum transport lie far below astrophysical requirements. By ruling out purely hydrodynamic turbulence, our results indirectly support the magnetorotational instability as the likely cause of turbulence, even in cool disks.

  4. Shocks in the low angular momentum accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suková, Petra; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    We address the variability of low luminous galactic nuclei including the Sgr A* or other transient accreting systems, e.g. the black hole X-ray binaries, such as GX 339-4 or IGR J17091. These sources exhibit bright X-ray flares and quasi-periodical oscillations and are theoretically interpreted as the quasi-spherical accretion flows, formed instead of or around Keplerianaccretion disks. In low angular momentum flows the existence of shocks for some range of leading parameters (energy, angular momentum and adiabatic constant of the gas) was studied semi-analytically. The possible hysteresis effect, caused by the fact that the evolution of the flow and the formation of the shock depends on its own history, was discovered. The presence of the shock in the accreted material is important for the observable properties of the out-coming radiation. In the shocked region the gas is dense and hot, thus much more luminous than in the other case. We study the appearance of standing shocks in low angular momentum gas accreting onto a black hole with numerical hydrodynamicalsimulations, using the ZEUS code with Paczynski-Wiitapseudo-Newtonian potential.

  5. Angular momentum transport within evolved low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Mankovich, Christopher; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2014-06-10

    Asteroseismology of 1.0-2.0 M {sub ☉} red giants by the Kepler satellite has enabled the first definitive measurements of interior rotation in both first ascent red giant branch (RGB) stars and those on the helium burning clump. The inferred rotation rates are 10-30 days for the ≈0.2 M {sub ☉} He degenerate cores on the RGB and 30-100 days for the He burning core in a clump star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Evolution code, we calculate state-of-the-art stellar evolution models of low mass rotating stars from the zero-age main sequence to the cooling white dwarf (WD) stage. We include transport of angular momentum due to rotationally induced instabilities and circulations, as well as magnetic fields in radiative zones (generated by the Tayler-Spruit dynamo). We find that all models fail to predict core rotation as slow as observed on the RGB and during core He burning, implying that an unmodeled angular momentum transport process must be operating on the early RGB of low mass stars. Later evolution of the star from the He burning clump to the cooling WD phase appears to be at nearly constant core angular momentum. We also incorporate the adiabatic pulsation code, ADIPLS, to explicitly highlight this shortfall when applied to a specific Kepler asteroseismic target, KIC8366239.

  6. Angular momentum transport via internal gravity waves in evolving stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jim; Lecoanet, Daniel; Cantiello, Matteo; Brown, Ben

    2014-11-20

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many subgiant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low-mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into subgiants, however, low-frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen-burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the subgiant branch when stars have surface temperatures of T ≈ 5500 K. However, gravity waves can still spin down the upper radiative region, implying that the observed differential rotation is likely confined to the deep core near the hydrogen-burning shell. The torque on the upper radiative region may also prevent the core from accreting high angular momentum material and slow the rate of core spin-up. The observed spin-down of cores on the red giant branch cannot be totally attributed to gravity waves, but the waves may enhance shear within the radiative region and thus increase the efficacy of viscous/magnetic torques.

  7. Tunable orbital angular momentum in high-harmonic generation

    DOE PAGES

    Gauthier, David; Ribič, P. Rebernik; Adhikary, G.; ...

    2017-04-05

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in optics. These light beams, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), have been successfully utilized in the visible and infrared in a wide variety of applications. Moving to shorter wavelengths may open up completely new research directions in the areas of optical physics and material characterization. Here, we report on the generation of extreme-ultraviolet optical vortices with femtosecond duration carrying a controllable amount of OAM. From a basic physics viewpoint, our results help to resolve key questions such as the conservation of angular momentum in highly nonlinear light–matter interactions,more » and the disentanglement and independent control of the intrinsic and extrinsic components of the photon’s angular momentum at short-wavelengths. Finally, the methods developed here will allow testing some of the recently proposed concepts such as OAM-induced dichroism, magnetic switching in organic molecules and violation of dipolar selection rules in atoms.« less

  8. Angular momentum blockade in nanoscale high-Tc superconducting grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancarella, Francesco; Balatsky, Alexander; Wallin, Mats; Rosengren, Anders; Nordita-Condensed Matter Collaboration; KTH-Theoretical Physics Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the angular momentum blockade in small d-wave SC grains in an external magnetic field. We find abrupt changes in angular momentum state of the condensate (''angular momentum blockade'') as a result of the variation of the external field. The effect represents a direct analog of the Coulomb blockade. We use the Ginzburg-Landau theory to illustrate how the field turns a d-wave order parameter (OP) into a(dx2 -y2 + idxy)-OP. We derive the volume magnetic susceptibility as a function of the field, and corresponding small jumps in magnetization at critical values of the field that should be experimentally observable in SC grains. The observation of these jumps requires a small grain, since their extent is inversely proportional to the number of Cooper pairs in the sample. The general source of instability of the pure d-wave gap is the presence of gap nodes, completely lifted by the secondary OP component. A d + id' -state is chiral and hence has an orbital moment carried by Cooper pairs. We consider fields H <

  9. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  10. Statistical properties of an anomalous hollow beam with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenchen; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Chengliang; Wang, Kuilong; Cai, Yangjian

    2015-02-01

    Due to the wide application of the vortex beam, a new theoretical model is introduced to describe the anomalous hollow beam (AHB) with optical angular momentum (OAM). The analytical propagation expression for the AHB with OAM passing through an ABCD optical system is derived. The effect of topological charge (TC) on the propagation properties of the AHB with OAM is studied numerically. The dependence of the normalized intensity distribution, the phase distribution and the optical angular momentum density (OAMD) distribution of the proposed beam on its TC is illustrated numerically. Furthermore, it is found that the intensity distribution, phase distribution, and the OAMD distribution are shaped through varying the TC and propagation distance. Our results will be useful for optical communication and optical trapping.

  11. Effect of orbital angular momentum on electron acoustic waves in double-Kappa plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Aman-ur; Shan, S. Ali; Hamza, M. Yousaf; Lee, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    Kinetic theory of electron acoustic waves (EAWs) in the presence of wave angular momentum has been derived to study the effect of wave angular momentum on the propagation of EAWs in a non-Maxwellian plasma. Both types of electrons (hot and cool) are modeled as Kappa-distributed velocity distribution functions. The theory is also applied to Saturn's magnetosphere where these kinds of distribution functions are commonly found. It is seen that the presence of wave angular momentum in the model has a significant effect on the existence of the regions where EAWs are weakly damped. The effect of wave angular momentum on EAWs is studied by defining a parameter η = k/(lqθ), which is the ratio of the planar wave number to the azimuthal wave number. The wave is purely planar if η→∞. The weakly damped region of EAWs depends strongly on this parameter in addition to other parameters such as hot electron spectral index κh, cool electron spectral index κc, the fraction of hot electrons, and hot to cool electrons temperature ratio. The results also show the effect of η on the propagation of EAWs in various regions of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  12. Total angular momentum waves for scalar, vector, and tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc; Jeong, Donghui

    2012-12-01

    Most calculations in cosmological perturbation theory, including those dealing with the inflationary generation of perturbations, their time evolution, and their observational consequences, decompose those perturbations into plane waves (Fourier modes). However, for some calculations, particularly those involving observations performed on a spherical sky, a decomposition into waves of fixed total angular momentum (TAM) may be more appropriate. Here we introduce TAM waves—solutions of fixed total angular momentum to the Helmholtz equation—for three-dimensional scalar, vector, and tensor fields. The vector TAM waves of given total angular momentum can be decomposed further into a set of three basis functions of fixed orbital angular momentum, a set of fixed helicity, or a basis consisting of a longitudinal (L) and two transverse (E and B) TAM waves. The symmetric traceless rank-2 tensor TAM waves can be similarly decomposed into a basis of fixed orbital angular momentum or fixed helicity, or a basis that consists of a longitudinal (L), two vector (VE and VB, of opposite parity), and two tensor (TE and TB, of opposite parity) waves. We show how all of the vector and tensor TAM waves can be obtained by applying derivative operators to scalar TAM waves. This operator approach then allows one to decompose a vector field into three covariant scalar fields for the L, E, and B components and symmetric-traceless-tensor fields into five covariant scalar fields for the L, VE, VB, TE, and TB components. We provide projections of the vector and tensor TAM waves onto vector and tensor spherical harmonics. We provide calculational detail to facilitate the assimilation of this formalism into cosmological calculations. As an example, we calculate the power spectra of the deflection angle for gravitational lensing by density perturbations and by gravitational waves. We comment on an alternative approach to cosmic microwave background fluctuations based on TAM waves. An

  13. The evolution of angular momentum among zero-age main-sequence solar-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; Stauffer, John R.; Macgregor, Keith B.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a survey of rotation among F, G, and K dwarfs of the Pleiades in the context of other young clusters (Alpha Persei and the Hyades) and pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars (in Taurus-Auriga and Orion) in order to examine how the angular momentum of a star like the sun evolves during its early life on the main sequence. The rotation of PMS stars can be evolved into distributions like those seen in the young clusters if there is only modest, rotation-independent angular momentum loss prior to the ZAMS. Even then, the ultrafast rotators (UFRs, or ZAMS G and K dwarfs with v sin i equal to or greater than 30 km/s) must owe their extra angular momentum to their conditions of formation and to different angular momentum loss rates above a threshold velocity, for it is unlikely that these stars had angular momentum added as they neared the ZAMS, nor can a spread in ages within a cluster account for the range of rotation seen. Only a fraction of solar-type stars are thus capable of becoming UFRs, and it is not a phase that all stars experience. Simple scaling relations (like the Skumanich relation) applied to the observed surface rotation rates of young solar-type stars cannot reproduce the way in which the Pleiades evolve into the Hyades. We argue that invoking internal differential rotation in these ZAMS stars can explain several aspects of the observations and thus can provide a consistent picture of ZAMS angular momentum evolution.

  14. The evolution of angular momentum among zero-age main-sequence solar-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; Stauffer, John R.; Macgregor, Keith B.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a survey of rotation among F, G, and K dwarfs of the Pleiades in the context of other young clusters (Alpha Persei and the Hyades) and pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars (in Taurus-Auriga and Orion) in order to examine how the angular momentum of a star like the sun evolves during its early life on the main sequence. The rotation of PMS stars can be evolved into distributions like those seen in the young clusters if there is only modest, rotation-independent angular momentum loss prior to the ZAMS. Even then, the ultrafast rotators (UFRs, or ZAMS G and K dwarfs with v sin i equal to or greater than 30 km/s) must owe their extra angular momentum to their conditions of formation and to different angular momentum loss rates above a threshold velocity, for it is unlikely that these stars had angular momentum added as they neared the ZAMS, nor can a spread in ages within a cluster account for the range of rotation seen. Only a fraction of solar-type stars are thus capable of becoming UFRs, and it is not a phase that all stars experience. Simple scaling relations (like the Skumanich relation) applied to the observed surface rotation rates of young solar-type stars cannot reproduce the way in which the Pleiades evolve into the Hyades. We argue that invoking internal differential rotation in these ZAMS stars can explain several aspects of the observations and thus can provide a consistent picture of ZAMS angular momentum evolution.

  15. Hunting the Gluon Orbital Angular Momentum at the Electron-Ion Collider.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiangdong; Yuan, Feng; Zhao, Yong

    2017-05-12

    Applying the connection between the parton Wigner distribution and orbital angular momentum (OAM), we investigate the probe of the gluon OAM in hard scattering processes at the planned electron-ion collider. We show that the single longitudinal target-spin asymmetry in the hard diffractive dijet production is very sensitive to the gluon OAM distribution. The associated spin asymmetry leads to a characteristic azimuthal angular correlation of sin(ϕ_{q}-ϕ_{Δ}), where ϕ_{Δ} and ϕ_{q} are the azimuthal angles of the proton momentum transfer and the relative transverse momentum between the quark-antiquark pair. This study may motivate a first measurement of the gluon OAM in the proton spin sum rule.

  16. Hunting the Gluon Orbital Angular Momentum at the Electron-Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangdong; Yuan, Feng; Zhao, Yong

    2017-05-01

    Applying the connection between the parton Wigner distribution and orbital angular momentum (OAM), we investigate the probe of the gluon OAM in hard scattering processes at the planned electron-ion collider. We show that the single longitudinal target-spin asymmetry in the hard diffractive dijet production is very sensitive to the gluon OAM distribution. The associated spin asymmetry leads to a characteristic azimuthal angular correlation of sin (ϕq-ϕΔ) , where ϕΔ and ϕq are the azimuthal angles of the proton momentum transfer and the relative transverse momentum between the quark-antiquark pair. This study may motivate a first measurement of the gluon OAM in the proton spin sum rule.

  17. A Computational Technique to Determine the Angular Displacement, Velocity and Momentum of a Human Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, James G.; Wilson, Barry D.

    The angular momentum of a human body derived from both the angular velocity and angular displacement, utilizing cinematographic records has not been adequately assessed, prior to this study. Miller (1970) obtained the angular momentum but only during the airborne phase of activity. The method used by Ramey (1973) involved a force platform, but…

  18. Alignment of the angular momentum vectors of planetary nebulae in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, B.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    We use high-resolution Hα images of 130 planetary nebulae (PNe) to investigate whether there is a preferred orientation for PNe within the Galactic Bulge. The orientations of the full sample have a uniform distribution. However, at a significance level of 0.01, there is evidence for a non-uniform distribution for those PNe with evident bipolar morphology. If we assume that the bipolar PNe have a unimodal distribution of the polar axis in Galactic coordinates, the mean Galactic position angle is consistent with 90°, i.e. along the Galactic Plane, and the significance level is better than 0.001 (the equivalent of a 3.7σ significance level for a Gaussian distribution). The shapes of PNe are related to angular momentum of the original star or stellar system, where the long axis of the nebula measures the angular momentum vector. In old, low-mass stars, the angular momentum is largely in binary orbital motion. Consequently, the alignment of bipolar nebulae that we have found indicates that the orbital planes of the binary systems are oriented perpendicular to the Galactic Plane. We propose that strong magnetic fields aligned along the Galactic Plane acted during the original star formation process to slow the contraction of the star-forming cloud in the direction perpendicular to the Plane. This would have produced a propensity for wider binaries with higher angular momentum with orbital axes parallel to the Galactic Plane. Our findings provide the first indication of a strong, organized magnetic field along the Galactic Plane that impacted on the angular momentum vectors of the resulting stellar population.

  19. Internal spin angular momentum of an asymptotically flat spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Randono, Andrew; Sloan, David

    2009-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the manner in which the internal spin angular momentum of a spinor field is encoded in the gravitational field at asymptotic infinity. The inclusion of internal spin requires us to reanalyze our notion of asymptotic flatness. In particular, the Poincare symmetry at asymptotic infinity must be replaced by a spin-enlarged Poincare symmetry. Likewise, the generators of the asymptotic symmetry group must be supplemented to account for the internal spin. In the Hamiltonian framework of first-order Einstein-Cartan gravity, the extra generator comes from the boundary term of the Gauss constraint in the asymptotically flat context. With the additional term, we establish the relations among the Noether charges of a Dirac field, the Komar integral, and the asymptotic Arnowitt-Deser-Misner-like geometric integral. We show that by imposing mild restraints on the generating functionals of gauge transformations at asymptotic infinity, the phase space is rendered explicitly finite. We construct the energy-momentum and the new total (spin+orbital) angular momentum boundary integrals that satisfy the appropriate algebra to be the generators of the spin-enlarged Poincare symmetry. This demonstrates that the internal spin is encoded in the tetrad at asymptotic infinity. In addition, we find that a new conserved and (spin-enlarged) Poincare invariant charge emerges that is associated with the global structure of a gauge transformation.

  20. Internal spin angular momentum of an asymptotically flat spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randono, Andrew; Sloan, David

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the manner in which the internal spin angular momentum of a spinor field is encoded in the gravitational field at asymptotic infinity. The inclusion of internal spin requires us to reanalyze our notion of asymptotic flatness. In particular, the Poincaré symmetry at asymptotic infinity must be replaced by a spin-enlarged Poincaré symmetry. Likewise, the generators of the asymptotic symmetry group must be supplemented to account for the internal spin. In the Hamiltonian framework of first-order Einstein-Cartan gravity, the extra generator comes from the boundary term of the Gauss constraint in the asymptotically flat context. With the additional term, we establish the relations among the Noether charges of a Dirac field, the Komar integral, and the asymptotic Arnowitt-Deser-Misner-like geometric integral. We show that by imposing mild restraints on the generating functionals of gauge transformations at asymptotic infinity, the phase space is rendered explicitly finite. We construct the energy-momentum and the new total (spin+orbital) angular momentum boundary integrals that satisfy the appropriate algebra to be the generators of the spin-enlarged Poincaré symmetry. This demonstrates that the internal spin is encoded in the tetrad at asymptotic infinity. In addition, we find that a new conserved and (spin-enlarged) Poincaré invariant charge emerges that is associated with the global structure of a gauge transformation.

  1. Generation and detection of neutron beams with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry A.; Barankov, Roman A.; Clark, Charles W.; Huber, Michael G.; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G.

    2015-05-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, in which photons carry lℏ units of angular momentum along their direction of propagation, are of interest in a variety of applications. The Schrödinger equation for massive particles also supports OAM solutions, and OAM states have been demonstrated with ultracold atoms and electrons. Here we report the first generation and detection of OAM states of neutrons, with l up to 7. These are made using spiral phase plates (SPP), milled out of 6061 aluminum alloy dowels with a high-resolution computer-controlled milling machine. When a SPP is placed in one arm of a Mach-Zehnder neutron interferometer, the interferogram reveals the characteristic patterns of OAM states. Addition of angular momenta is effected by concatenation of SPPs with different values of l; we have found the experimental result 1 + 2 = 3 , in reasonable agreement with theory. The advent of OAM provides an additional, quantized, degree of freedom to neutron interferometry, enlarging the qubit structure available for tests of quantum information processing and foundations of quantum physics.

  2. Graphical analysis of angular momentum for collision products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danos, Michael; Fano, Ugo

    1998-10-01

    The complexity of atomic and nuclear structures and their collision processes involves conservation laws, bearing mainly on angular momenta; indeed angular momentum treatments prove most laborious. The analytic treatments, preferably carried out in Racah’s calculus, combine initially independent elements stepwise into structures branching out into resulting products. Graphical procedures that ensure phase and amplitude control of their manifold elements, illustrate these sequential steps and provide their results. The present report should familiarize readers with these procedures through examples of reactions of increasing complexity, bearing of course on structure calculations as well. The report has thus two aims: (i) computing correlation functions for reactions yielding several emitted particles (hence of arbitrary complexity) in terms of a novel method of computation, and (ii), describing the mathematical techniques relevant to solve high-complexity angular momentum problems, including the computation of many-body systems’ bound states. The complexity reflects the symmetries of the reaction products, and, more generally, of many-body system. The basic mathematical tool for such treatments is the Racah calculus which employs recoupling transformations, thus avoiding the many summations required by expansions in terms of vector coupling coefficients. The application of the Racah calculus is greatly aided by appropriate definitions and graphical procedures ensuring phase and amplitude control of their manifold elements, as well as illustrating the physical content. Beginning with photon absorption by discrete states, our examples progress to an Auger process yielding a correlation function with seven direction and polarization parameters.

  3. Offset tolerance of an orbital angular momentum optical communication system with angular deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiao-li; Sang, Hong-qing; Cui, Xiao-Zhou; Chang, Huan; Li, Li; Wu, Guo-hua

    2017-06-01

    This work studied the offset tolerance (OT) with a particular focus on the angular deflection of an orbital angular momentum (OAM) system in free space. We derived an analytical expression of the OT for an angular-deflected Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam via Fourier series (FS) expansion and determined the upper bound of the OT for OAM-multiplexed systems. Next, we analyzed the effects of the beam waist, transmitted distance and OAM state number on the OT numerically. The calculation results indicate that the OT of the deflected beam is inversely proportional to the square root of the OAM number and approximately reciprocal to the propagation distance. Finally, we calculated the bit-error rate (BER) and aggregated capacity of multiplexed systems with different sets of channels. The results confirmed that the estimated upper bound is reasonable, especially for larger mode spacings. This work can provide guidance for the design and optimization of angular-deflected OAM-multiplexed communication systems.

  4. Statistical Assignment of Neutron Orbital Angular Momentum to a Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Soo-Youl; Chang, Jonghwa; Leal, Luiz C.

    2004-09-15

    We have derived formulas in a general form for suggesting the neutron orbital angular momentum quantum number l to each neutron resonance if it is not identified experimentally. By assuming the (2J + 1) law of level density, these general formulas are reduced to the formulas found in previous works. The suggestion of l is based on the probability that a resonance having a certain value of g{gamma}{sub n} is an l-wave resonance. The probability is calculated from the Bayes theorem on conditional probability. For each l, the probability density function (pdf) of g{gamma}{sub n} was derived from the {chi}{sup 2} distribution proposed by Porter and Thomas. The pdf takes into account two possible channel spins that result in the same total spin for a given l larger than zero. Meanwhile, regardless of the resolution of measurement, we suggest adopting the level density as the prior probability in the Bayesian approach, as Gyulassy et al. did. As a sample problem, we presented the result of l-assignment for {sup 109}Ag resonances. The SUGGEL code, in which the methodology is incorporated, correctly assigned l's for 67 among 70 resonances for which l's had been determined experimentally. The other test for {sup 27}Al showed the applicability of the code as a preanalysis tool, even though such applicability is limited to a certain extent for light nuclides. The use of the code SUGGEL is expected to reduce the number of repeated runs of a fitting code such as SAMMY, thus reducing time and effort for the extraction of resonance parameters from measurements.

  5. Angular momentum and torque described with the complex octonion

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2014-08-15

    The paper aims to adopt the complex octonion to formulate the angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields. Applying the octonionic representation enables one single definition of angular momentum (or torque, force) to combine some physics contents, which were considered to be independent of each other in the past. J. C. Maxwell used simultaneously two methods, the vector terminology and quaternion analysis, to depict the electromagnetic theory. It motivates the paper to introduce the quaternion space into the field theory, describing the physical feature of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The spaces of electromagnetic field and of gravitational field can be chosen as the quaternion spaces, while the coordinate component of quaternion space is able to be the complex number. The quaternion space of electromagnetic field is independent of that of gravitational field. These two quaternion spaces may compose one octonion space. Contrarily, one octonion space can be separated into two subspaces, the quaternion space and S-quaternion space. In the quaternion space, it is able to infer the field potential, field strength, field source, angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the gravitational field. In the S-quaternion space, it is capable of deducing the field potential, field strength, field source, current continuity equation, and electric (or magnetic) dipolar moment etc in the electromagnetic field. The results reveal that the quaternion space is appropriate to describe the gravitational features, including the torque, force, and mass continuity equation etc. The S-quaternion space is proper to depict the electromagnetic features, including the dipolar moment and current continuity equation etc. In case the field strength is weak enough, the force and the continuity equation etc can be respectively reduced to that in the classical field theory.

  6. Topological angular momentum and radiative heat transport in closed orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2017-03-01

    We study the role of topological edge states of light in the transport of thermally generated radiation in a closed cavity at a thermodynamic equilibrium. It is shown that even in the zero temperature limit—when the field fluctuations are purely quantum mechanical—there is a persistent flow of electromagnetic momentum in the cavity in closed orbits, deeply rooted in the emergence of spatially separated unidirectional edge state channels. It is highlighted that the electromagnetic orbital angular momentum of the system is nontrivial, and that the energy circulation is towards the same direction as that determined by incomplete cyclotron orbits near the cavity walls. Our findings open inroads in topological photonics and suggest that topological states of light can determine novel paradigms in the context of radiative heat transport.

  7. Teleoperator control for passivation of satellites possessing angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Certain space shuttle missions may require the retrieval of passive spinning and processing satellites. One proposed means of retrieval utilizes a free-flying teleoperator launched from the shuttle. The feasibility of nulling the combined spin and precession (passivation) of a typical rigid satellite is first established using a Lagrangian formulation. It is shown that a proposed asymmetric teleoperator cannot be used for passivation in its present form because it would quickly tumble over after being spun-up to synchronize with the angular rates of the satellite. In addition, a dynamic analysis is made of the combined teleoperator-satellite system where an initial misalignment of their respective angular momentum vectors is assumed.

  8. Quasiclassical determination of reaction probabilities as a function of the total angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Aoiz, F J; Sáez-Rábanos, V; Martínez-Haya, Bruno; González-Lezana, Tomás

    2005-09-01

    This article presents a quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method to determine the reaction probability as a function of the total angular momentum J for any given value of the initial rotational angular momentum j. The proposed method is based on a discrete sampling of the total and orbital angular momenta for each trajectory and on the development of equations that have a clear counterpart in the quantum-mechanical (QM) case. The reliability of the method is illustrated by comparing QCT and time-dependent wave-packet QM results for the H+D(2)(upsilon=0,j=4,10) reaction. The small discrepancies between both sets of calculations, when they exist, indicate some genuine quantum effects. In addition, a procedure to extract the reaction probabilities as a function of J when trajectories are calculated in the usual way using a continuous distribution of impact parameters is also described.

  9. Anharmonic propagation of two-dimensional beams carrying orbital angular momentum in a harmonic potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R; Zhong, Weiping; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-08-15

    We analytically and numerically investigate an anharmonic propagation of two-dimensional beams in a harmonic potential. We pick noncentrosymmetric beams of common interest that carry orbital angular momentum. The examples studied include superposed Bessel-Gauss (BG), Laguerre-Gauss (LG), and circular Airy (CA) beams. For the BG beams, periodic inversion, phase transition, and rotation with periodic angular velocity are demonstrated during propagation. For the LG and CA beams, periodic inversion and variable rotation are still there but not the phase transition. On the whole, the "center of mass" and the orbital angular momentum of a beam exhibit harmonic motion, but the motion of the beam intensity distribution in detail is subject to external and internal torques and forces, causing it to be anharmonic. Our results are applicable to other superpositions of finite circularly asymmetric beams.

  10. Young's Interference Experiment with Electron Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yuya; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanimura, Shogo; Uchida, Masaya

    2013-03-01

    A Young's-type double-slit experiment using electron beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is demonstrated in a transmission electron microscope. Each of the slits is replaced by a grating mask with a fork dislocation, which generates electron beams with OAM as diffracted beams. Interference fringes produced by two diffracted electron beams with OAM appear at the observation screen. The interference fringe patterns exhibit dislocation features depending on the topological charges of the two electron beams. The experimental results clearly show the wave nature of the electron beams with OAM and gives potential applications in electron physics and quantum mechanics.

  11. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-06

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. Lastly, the OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasmamore » physics and accelerator physics.« less

  12. Area-angular-momentum inequality for axisymmetric black holes.

    PubMed

    Dain, Sergio; Reiris, Martin

    2011-07-29

    We prove the local inequality A≥8π|J|, where A and J are the area and angular momentum of any axially symmetric closed stable minimal surface in an axially symmetric maximal initial data. From this theorem it is proved that the inequality is satisfied for any surface on complete asymptotically flat maximal axisymmetric data. In particular it holds for marginal or event horizons of black holes. Hence, we prove the validity of this inequality for all dynamical (not necessarily near equilibrium) axially symmetric black holes.

  13. Erasing the orbital angular momentum information of a photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nape, Isaac; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Quantum erasers with paths in the form of physical slits have been studied extensively and proven instrumental in probing wave-particle duality in quantum mechanics. Here we replace physical paths (slits) with abstract paths of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using spin-orbit hybrid entanglement of photons, we show that the OAM content of a photon can be erased with a complementary polarization projection of one of the entangled pair. The result is the (dis)appearance of azimuthal fringes based on whether the "which-OAM" information was erased. We extend this concept to a delayed measurement scheme and show that the OAM information and fringe visibility are complementary.

  14. Angular momentum transport in thin accretion disks and intermittent accretion.

    PubMed

    Coppi, B; Coppi, P S

    2001-07-30

    The plasma modes, transporting angular momentum in accretion disks, under minimally restrictive conditions when the magnetic energy density is significant relative to the thermal energy density, are shown to be singular if the ideal MHD approximation is adopted. A similarity with the modes producing magnetic reconnection in current carrying plasmas is established. The combined effects of finite plasma temperature, of plasma compressibility, of the gradient of the rotation frequency, and of appropriate transport processes (outside ideal MHD) are involved in the onset of these nonaxisymmetric and locally corotating modes.

  15. Classical and quantum chaotic angular-momentum pumps.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, T; Dubeibe, F L

    2015-03-06

    We study directed transport of charge and intrinsic angular momentum by periodically driven scattering in the regime of fast and strong driving. A spin-orbit coupling through a kicked magnetic field confined to a compact region in space leads to irregular scattering and triggers spin flips in a spatially asymmetric manner which allows us to generate polarized currents. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the spin separation carry over to the quantum level and give rise to spin pumping. Our theory based on the Floquet formalism is confirmed by numerical solutions of the time-dependent inhomogeneous Schrödinger equation with a continuous source term.

  16. Teleportation of a controllable orbital angular momentum generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; She Weilong

    2009-12-15

    We report on a teleportation scheme, in which a controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) generator is teleported. Via our scheme, Alice is able to--according to another independent photon's spin state (polarization) sent by Carol--electrically control the remote OAM generation on Bob's photon. To this end, we introduce a local electrically tunable and spin-dependent OAM generator to transfer a preliminary OAM-OAM entanglement to a spin-OAM hybrid entanglement, which then makes a joint Bell-state measurement on Alice and Carol's photons play its role. We show that the quantum state tomography can be introduced to evaluate the performance of the teleportation.

  17. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics.

  18. Efficient sorting of orbital angular momentum states of light.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Gregorius C G; Lavery, Martin P J; Courtial, Johannes; Beijersbergen, Marco W; Padgett, Miles J

    2010-10-08

    We present a method to efficiently sort orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light using two static optical elements. The optical elements perform a Cartesian to log-polar coordinate transformation, converting the helically phased light beam corresponding to OAM states into a beam with a transverse phase gradient. A subsequent lens then focuses each input OAM state to a different lateral position. We demonstrate the concept experimentally by using two spatial light modulators to create the desired optical elements, applying it to the separation of eleven OAM states.

  19. Radio Pumping of Ionospheric Plasma with Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyser, T. B.; Norin, L.; McCarrick, M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Gustavsson, B.

    2009-02-01

    Experimental results are presented of pumping ionospheric plasma with a radio wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), using the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Optical emissions from the pumped plasma turbulence exhibit the characteristic ring-shaped morphology when the pump beam carries OAM. Features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) that are attributed to cascading Langmuir turbulence are well developed for a regular beam but are significantly weaker for a ring-shaped OAM beam in which case upper hybrid turbulence dominates the SEE.

  20. Radio pumping of ionospheric plasma with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Leyser, T B; Norin, L; McCarrick, M; Pedersen, T R; Gustavsson, B

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results are presented of pumping ionospheric plasma with a radio wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), using the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Optical emissions from the pumped plasma turbulence exhibit the characteristic ring-shaped morphology when the pump beam carries OAM. Features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) that are attributed to cascading Langmuir turbulence are well developed for a regular beam but are significantly weaker for a ring-shaped OAM beam in which case upper hybrid turbulence dominates the SEE.

  1. Radio Pumping of Ionospheric Plasma with Orbital Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Leyser, T. B.; Norin, L.; McCarrick, M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Gustavsson, B.

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results are presented of pumping ionospheric plasma with a radio wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), using the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Optical emissions from the pumped plasma turbulence exhibit the characteristic ring-shaped morphology when the pump beam carries OAM. Features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) that are attributed to cascading Langmuir turbulence are well developed for a regular beam but are significantly weaker for a ring-shaped OAM beam in which case upper hybrid turbulence dominates the SEE.

  2. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics. PMID:28164998

  3. Supermode fiber for orbital angular momentum (OAM) transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-07-13

    We present a multi-orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) multi-core supermode fiber (MOMCSF) to transmit OAM modes. The MOMCSF consists of equally-spaced and circularly-arranged multiple cores, in which the core pitch is small enough to support strong coupling OAM supermodes. The characteristics of OAM modes in MOMCSFs with different core pitches and core numbers are analyzed. The performances of mode coupling and nonlinearity are optimized by designing multiple degrees of freedom of the supermode fiber. The obtained results show that the designed MOMCSF can transmit multiple OAM modes with favorable performance of low mode coupling, low nonlinearity, and low modal dependent loss.

  4. Engineering of orbital angular momentum supermodes in coupled optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, A.; Pelegrí, G.; Polo, J.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we demonstrate the existence of orbital angular momentum (OAM) bright and dark supermodes in a three-evanescently coupled cylindrical waveguides system. Bright and dark supermodes are characterized by their coupling and decoupling from one of the waveguides, respectively. In addition, we demonstrate that complex couplings between modes of different waveguides appear naturally due to the characteristic spiral phase-front of OAM modes in two-dimensional configurations where the waveguides are arranged forming a triangle. Finally, by adding dissipation to the waveguide uncoupled to the dark supermode, we are able to filter this supermode out, allowing for the design of OAM mode cloners and inverters.

  5. Engineering of orbital angular momentum supermodes in coupled optical waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, A.; Pelegrí, G.; Polo, J.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the existence of orbital angular momentum (OAM) bright and dark supermodes in a three-evanescently coupled cylindrical waveguides system. Bright and dark supermodes are characterized by their coupling and decoupling from one of the waveguides, respectively. In addition, we demonstrate that complex couplings between modes of different waveguides appear naturally due to the characteristic spiral phase-front of OAM modes in two-dimensional configurations where the waveguides are arranged forming a triangle. Finally, by adding dissipation to the waveguide uncoupled to the dark supermode, we are able to filter this supermode out, allowing for the design of OAM mode cloners and inverters. PMID:28443618

  6. Spontaneous generation of angular momentum in holographic theories.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-05-24

    The Schwarzschild black two-brane in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space is dual to a finite temperature state in three-dimensional conformal field theory. We show that the solution acquires a nonzero angular momentum density when a gravitational Chern-Simons coupling is turned on in the bulk, even though the solution is not modified. A similar phenomenon is found for the Reissner-Nordström black two-brane with axionic coupling to the gauge field. We discuss interpretation of this phenomenon from the point of view of the boundary three-dimensional conformal field theory.

  7. The two rigid body interaction using angular momentum theory formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, Gwenaël

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an elegant formalism to model the evolution of the full two rigid body problem. The equations of motion, given in a Cartesian coordinate system, are expressed in terms of spherical harmonics and Wigner D-matrices. The algorithm benefits from the numerous recurrence relations satisfied by these functions allowing a fast evaluation of the mutual potential. Moreover, forces and torques are straightforwardly obtained by application of ladder operators taken from the angular momentum theory and commonly used in quantum mechanics. A numerical implementation of this algorithm is made. Tests show that the present code is significantly faster than those currently available in literature.

  8. Multimode quantum states with single photons carrying orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin-Bing; Fu, Shi-Yao; Zhang, Xiong; Yang, Zhen-Wei; Zeng, Qiang; Gao, Chunqing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-06-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme for generating multimode quantum states with single photons carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). Various quantum states have been realized by superposing multiple OAM modes of single photons in two possible paths. These quantum states exhibit NOON-like "super-resolving" interference behavior for the multiple OAM modes of single photons. Compared with the NOON states using many photons, these states are not only easily prepared, but also robust to photon losses. They may find potential applications in quantum optical communication and recognizing defects or objects. The method to identify a particular kind of defect has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally.

  9. Engineering of orbital angular momentum supermodes in coupled optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Turpin, A; Pelegrí, G; Polo, J; Mompart, J; Ahufinger, V

    2017-04-26

    In this work we demonstrate the existence of orbital angular momentum (OAM) bright and dark supermodes in a three-evanescently coupled cylindrical waveguides system. Bright and dark supermodes are characterized by their coupling and decoupling from one of the waveguides, respectively. In addition, we demonstrate that complex couplings between modes of different waveguides appear naturally due to the characteristic spiral phase-front of OAM modes in two-dimensional configurations where the waveguides are arranged forming a triangle. Finally, by adding dissipation to the waveguide uncoupled to the dark supermode, we are able to filter this supermode out, allowing for the design of OAM mode cloners and inverters.

  10. Impulsive control for angular momentum management of tumbling spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoji; Yamada, Katsuhiko

    2007-05-01

    We discuss an angular momentum control of a tumbling spacecraft. The proposed control method is to apply an impulse by a space robot arm, to measure and control the relative position and attitude between the target spacecraft, and then to apply another impulse until the rotational motion of the target spacecraft is well damped. A discrete controller is designed using the simplified equations of rotational motion through appropriate coordinate transformation. The stationary response under contact model uncertainty is investigated and stability condition is analytically derived. Numerical simulations are given to validate the proposed approach.

  11. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-06

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics.

  12. Simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum modes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple scheme to perform simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single complex phase mask. By designing the phase mask, the propagation directions of demultiplexed beams can be arbitrarily steered. System experiments using orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 32-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM-32QAM) signals over two OAM modes are carried out by using a two-mode complex phase mask. Moreover, demultiplexing of sixteen OAM modes and arbitrary demultiplexed beam steering are also demonstrated in the experiment. PMID:26503167

  13. Evidence for the distribution of angular velocity inside the sun and stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A round table discussion of problems of solar and stellar spindown and theory is presented. Observational evidence of the angular momentum of the solar wind is included, emphasizing the distribution of angular velocity inside the sun and stars.

  14. Extreme Ultraviolet Fractional Orbital Angular Momentum Beams from High Harmonic Generation

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Alex; Rego, Laura; Picón, Antonio; San Román, Julio; Hernández-García, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) beams carrying fractional orbital angular momentum. To this end, we drive high-order harmonic generation with infrared conical refraction (CR) beams. We show that the high-order harmonic beams emitted in the EUV/soft x-ray regime preserve the characteristic signatures of the driving beam, namely ringlike transverse intensity profile and CR-like polarization distribution. As a result, through orbital and spin angular momentum conservation, harmonic beams are emitted with fractional orbital angular momentum, and they can be synthesized into structured attosecond helical beams –or “structured attosecond light springs”– with rotating linear polarization along the azimuth. Our proposal overcomes the state of the art limitations for the generation of light beams far from the visible domain carrying non-integer orbital angular momentum and could be applied in fields such as diffraction imaging, EUV lithography, particle trapping, and super-resolution imaging. PMID:28281655

  15. The angular momentum of cosmological coronae and the inside-out growth of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo; Binney, James

    2017-01-01

    Massive and diffuse haloes of hot gas (coronae) are important intermediaries between cosmology and galaxy evolution, storing mass and angular momentum acquired from the cosmic web until eventual accretion onto star forming discs. We introduce a method to reconstruct the rotation of a galactic corona, based on its angular momentum distribution (AMD). This allows us to investigate in what conditions the angular momentum acquired from tidal torques can be transferred to star forming discs and explain observed galaxy-scale processes, such as inside-out growth and the build-up of abundance gradients. We find that a simple model of an isothermal corona with a temperature slightly smaller than virial and a cosmologically motivated AMD is in good agreement with galaxy evolution requirements, supporting hot-mode accretion as a viable driver for the evolution of spiral galaxies in a cosmological context. We predict moderately sub-centrifugal rotation close to the disc and slow rotation close to the virial radius. Motivated by the observation that the Milky Way has a relatively hot corona (T ≃ 2 × 106 K), we also explore models with a temperature larger than virial. To be able to drive inside-out growth, these models must be significantly affected by feedback, either mechanical (ejection of low angular momentum material) or thermal (heating of the central regions). However, the agreement with galaxy evolution constraints becomes, in these cases, only marginal, suggesting that our first and simpler model may apply to a larger fraction of galaxy evolution history.

  16. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He){sub 200}, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe{sub 200} studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  17. Communication: angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  18. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-01

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  19. Identification of trunk and pelvis movement compensations in patients with transtibial amputation using angular momentum separation.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Murray, Amanda M; Christiansen, Cory L; Davidson, Bradley S

    2016-03-01

    Patients with unilateral dysvascular transtibial amputation (TTA) have a higher risk of developing low back pain than their healthy counterparts, which may be related to movement compensations used in the absence of ankle function. Assessing components of segmental angular momentum provides a unique framework to identify and interpret these movement compensations alongside traditional observational analyses. Angular momentum separation indicates two components of total angular momentum: (1) transfer momentum and (2) rotational momentum. The objective of this investigation was to assess movement compensations in patients with dysvascular TTA, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and healthy controls (HC) by examining patterns of generating and arresting trunk and pelvis segmental angular momenta during gait. We hypothesized that all groups would demonstrate similar patterns of generating/arresting total momentum and transfer momentum in the trunk and pelvis in reference to the groups (patients with DM and HC). We also hypothesized that patients with amputation would demonstrate different (larger) patterns of generating/arresting rotational angular momentum in the trunk. Patients with amputation demonstrated differences in trunk and pelvis transfer angular momentum in the sagittal and transverse planes in comparison to the reference groups, which indicates postural compensations adopted during walking. However, patients with amputation demonstrated larger patterns of generating and arresting of trunk and pelvis rotational angular momentum in comparison to the reference groups. These segmental rotational angular momentum patterns correspond with high eccentric muscle demands needed to arrest the angular momentum, and may lead to consequential long-term effects such as low back pain.

  20. Optimization of Angular-Momentum Biases of Reaction Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Clifford; Lee, Allan

    2008-01-01

    RBOT [RWA Bias Optimization Tool (wherein RWA signifies Reaction Wheel Assembly )] is a computer program designed for computing angular momentum biases for reaction wheels used for providing spacecraft pointing in various directions as required for scientific observations. RBOT is currently deployed to support the Cassini mission to prevent operation of reaction wheels at unsafely high speeds while minimizing time in undesirable low-speed range, where elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication films in bearings become ineffective, leading to premature bearing failure. The problem is formulated as a constrained optimization problem in which maximum wheel speed limit is a hard constraint and a cost functional that increases as speed decreases below a low-speed threshold. The optimization problem is solved using a parametric search routine known as the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. To increase computational efficiency for extended operation involving large quantity of data, the algorithm is designed to (1) use large time increments during intervals when spacecraft attitudes or rates of rotation are nearly stationary, (2) use sinusoidal-approximation sampling to model repeated long periods of Earth-point rolling maneuvers to reduce computational loads, and (3) utilize an efficient equation to obtain wheel-rate profiles as functions of initial wheel biases based on conservation of angular momentum (in an inertial frame) using pre-computed terms.

  1. Scalable orbital-angular-momentum sorting without destroying photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang-Xiang; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-09-01

    Single photons with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have attracted substantial attention from researchers. A single photon can carry infinite OAM values theoretically. Thus, OAM photon states have been widely used in quantum information and fundamental quantum mechanics. Although there have been many methods for sorting quantum states with different OAM values, the nondestructive and efficient sorter of high-dimensional OAM remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we propose a scalable OAM sorter which can categorize different OAM states simultaneously, meanwhile, preserving both OAM and spin angular momentum. Fundamental elements of the sorter are composed of symmetric multiport beam splitters (BSs) and Dove prisms with cascading structure, which in principle can be flexibly and effectively combined to sort arbitrarily high-dimensional OAM photons. The scalable structures proposed here greatly reduce the number of BSs required for sorting high-dimensional OAM states. In view of the nondestructive and extensible features, the sorters can be used as fundamental devices not only for high-dimensional quantum information processing, but also for traditional optics.

  2. Angular Momentum Dependent Orbital Free Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Youqi; Libisch, Florian; Xia, Junchao; Wang, Lin-Wang; Carter, Emily A.

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel and general formalism for linear scaling, angular momentum dependent (AMD) orbital free (OF) density functional theory (DFT) to advance the accuracy and applicability of OFDFT. To introduce angular momentum dependence in OFDFT, we devise a hybrid scheme by partitioning the system into muffin-tin spheres and an interstitial region: the electron density inside the spheres is expressed by a set of Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT derived atom-centered basis functions combined with an on-site density matrix NR. A general OFDFT total energy functional is introduced with a crucial nonlocal energy term ENL which is neglected in conventional implementations of OFDFT. ENL corrects the errors due to the use of approximate kinetic energy density functionals and local pseudopotentials for ion-electron interactions. We approximate ENL to include AMD contributions inside the spheres: as a first step, a linear dependence on the NR is considered with a set of AMD energies ERl.ERlare determined by fitting a small set of bulk properties to KSDFT. We find AMD-OFDFT offers substantial improvements over conventional OFDFT, as we show for various properties of the transition metal Ti and its alloys (TixAl1-x) .

  3. Wind accretion in binary stars. II. Angular momentum loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanara, B.; Mitsumoto, M.; Oka, K.; Matsuda, T.; Hachisu, I.; Boffin, H. M. J.

    2005-10-01

    We present three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of mass transfer in an interacting binary system in which one component undergoes mass loss through a wind, and does so for various values of the mass ratio. The radius of the mass-losing star is taken to be half the size of its Roche lobe. Calculations are performed for gases with a ratio of specific heats γ=5/3. Mass loss is assumed to be mechanically, thermally, or radiatively driven. We compute the specific angular momentum of gas escaping the system (l_w) for these various cases. We show that lw does not reach a value higher than ˜ 1.2 for very low wind velocities and that it reaches the limiting case of a spherically symmetric wind for large wind velocities, for mass ratio smaller or equal to 1. For larger mass ratio, however, lw is larger than the expected limiting value. The value of lw depends slightly on the wind mechanism which modifies the relation between the wind velocity at the surface of the star and the velocity at the Roche lobe surface. The specific angular momentum, l_w, is large enough in a wide range of velocities to imply a shrinking of the system. This makes the symbiotic channel for Type Ia supernovae a plausible one and could also help explain the existence of Barium stars and other Peculiar Red Giants with orbital periods below, say, 1000 days.

  4. Photo-induced Spin Angular Momentum Transfer into Antiferromagnetic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fan; Fan, Yichun; Ma, Xin; Zhu, J.; Li, Q.; Ma, T. P.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, Z. H.; Zhao, H. B.; Luepke, Gunter; College of William and Mary Team; Department of Physics, Fudan University Team; Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University Team

    2014-03-01

    Spin angular momentum transfer into antiferromagnetic(AFM) insulator is observed in single crystalline Fe/CoO/MgO(001) heterostructure by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE). The transfer process is mediated by the Heisenberg exchange coupling between Fe and CoO spins. Below the Neel temperature(TN) of CoO, the fact that effective Gilbert damping parameter α is independent of external magnetic field and it is enhanced with respect to the intrinsic damping in Fe/MgO, indicates that the damping process involves both the intrinsic spin relaxation and the transfer of Fe spin angular momentum to CoO spins via FM-AFM exchange coupling and then into the lattice by spin-orbit coupling. The work at the College of William and Mary was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. The work at Department of Physics, Fudan, was supported by NSFC. The work at Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan was supported by NSFC and NCET.

  5. Squeezing of X waves with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Villari, Leone Di Mauro; Szameit, Alexander; Conti, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Multilevel quantum protocols may potentially supersede standard quantum optical polarization-encoded protocols in terms of amount of information transmission and security. However, for free-space telecommunications, we do not have tools for limiting loss due to diffraction and perturbations, as, for example, turbulence in air. Here we study propagation invariant quantum X waves with angular momentum; this representation expresses the electromagnetic field as a quantum gas of weakly interacting bosons. The resulting spatiotemporal quantized light pulses are not subject to diffraction and dispersion, and are intrinsically resilient to disturbances in propagation. We show that spontaneous down-conversion generates squeezed X waves useful for quantum protocols. Surprisingly, the orbital angular momentum affects the squeezing angle, and we predict the existence of a characteristic axicon aperture for maximal squeezing. These results may boost the applications in free space of quantum optical transmission and multilevel quantum protocols, and may also be relevant for novel kinds of interferometers, such as satellite-based gravitational wave detectors.

  6. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures.

  7. Angular momentum budget of the radiational S1 ocean tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Dobslaw, Henryk; Poropat, Lea; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The balance of diurnal S1 oceanic angular momentum (OAM) variations through torques at the sea surface and the bottom topography is validated using both a barotropic and a baroclinic numerical tide model. This analysis discloses the extent to which atmosphere-driven S1 forward simulations are reliable for use in studies of high-frequency polar motion and changes in length-of-day. Viscous and dissipative torques associated with wind stress, bottom friction, as well as internal tidal energy conversion are shown to be small, and they are overshadowed by gravitational and pressure-related interaction forces. In particular, the zonal OAM variability of S1 is almost completely balanced by the water pressure torque on the local bathymetry, whereas in the prograde equatorial case also the air pressure torque on the seafloor as well as ellipsoidal contributions from the non-spherical atmosphere and solid Earth must be taken into account. Overall, the OAM budget is well closed in both the axial and the equatorial directions, thus allowing for an identification of the main diurnal angular momentum sinks in the ocean. The physical interaction forces are found to be largest at shelf breaks and continental slopes in low latitudes, with the most dominant contribution coming from the Indonesian archipelago.

  8. Exploring the orbital angular momentum of betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Joana; Hehmann, Guenda; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Betatron radiation from laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can be used as a broadband X-ray source. Betatron x-rays have attracted great interest and have applications in biological imaging which have been demonstrated experimentally (see for instance). Endowing betatron radiation with well defined states of orbital angular momentum (OAM), a fundamental property of light by which its wave fronts become twisted, could further enhance the imaging spatial resolution. However, the conditions for the generation of betatron x-rays with OAM, and the fundamental mechanisms underlying the transfer of OAM from electron trajectories to the radiation they emit, remain outstanding open questions. To explore these exciting open challenges, we investigate the OAM spectral content of betatron x-rays in LWFA. We explore the conditions and laser driver characteristics (with/without orbital and spin angular momentum) that can enable the emission of OAM x-rays. We support our studies by 3D numerical modelling, using the particle-in-cell code Osiris and using the post processing radiation code jRad. also at DCTI/ISCTE Instituto Universitario de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

  9. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT IN CONVECTIVELY UNSTABLE SHEAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaepylae, Petri J.; Korpi, Maarit J.; Snellman, Jan E.; Brandenburg, Axel; Narayan, Ramesh

    2010-08-10

    Angular momentum transport due to hydrodynamic turbulent convection is studied using local three-dimensional numerical simulations employing the shearing box approximation. We determine the turbulent viscosity from non-rotating runs over a range of values of the shear parameter and use a simple analytical model in order to extract the non-diffusive contribution ({Lambda}-effect) to the stress in runs where rotation is included. Our results suggest that the turbulent viscosity is on the order of the mixing length estimate and weakly affected by rotation. The {Lambda}-effect is non-zero and a factor of 2-4 smaller than the turbulent viscosity in the slow rotation regime. We demonstrate that for Keplerian shear, the angular momentum transport can change sign and be outward when the rotation period is greater than the turnover time, i.e., when the Coriolis number is below unity. This result seems to be relatively independent of the value of the Rayleigh number.

  10. An Uncertainty Relation for the Orbital Angular Momentum Operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Sayyah-Fard, M.

    2016-08-01

    A common reducible representation space of the Lie algebras su(1, 1) and su(2) is equipped with two different types of scalar products. The representation bases are labeled by the azimuthal and magnetic quantum numbers. The generators of su(2) are the x-, y- and z-components of the orbital angular momentum operator. The representation of each of these Lie algebras is unitary with respect to only one of the scalar products. To each positive magnetic quantum number a family of the su(1, 1)-Barut-Girardello coherent states is associated. The normalization and resolution of the identity condition for the coherent states are realized in two different approaches, i.e. the unitary and the non-unitary approaches. For the coherent states of the non-unitary case we calculate the uncertainty relation for the Hermitian x- and y-components of the angular momentum operator. While the unitary case leads to the known uncertainty relation for the Hermitian x- and y-components of su(1, 1) Lie algebra.

  11. Trajectory-based unveiling of the angular momentum of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongnan; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Kong, Ling-Jun; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2017-04-01

    The Heisenberg uncertainty principle suggests that it is impossible to determine the trajectory of a quantum particle in the same way as a classical particle. However, we may still yield insight into novel behavior of photons based on the average photon trajectories (APTs). Here we explore the APTs of optical fields carrying spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital angular momentum (OAM) under the paraxial condition. We define the helicity and differential helicity for unveiling the three-dimensional spiral structures of the APTs of optical fields carrying the SAM and/or the OAM. We clarify the novel behaviors of the APTs caused by the SAM and OAM as well as the SAM-OAM coupling. The APT concept is also very helpful for profoundly understanding trapped particle motion and has the potential to elucidate other physical systems. Due to the presence of the helical path caused by the SAM and/or the OAM, the actual traveling distance of the photons might be much longer than the geometric distance.

  12. Inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar angular-momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2017-04-01

    Coupled with mean absolute vorticity Ω∗ (rotation and mean relative vorticity), inhomogeneous turbulent helicity is expected to contribute to the generation of global flow structure against the linear and angular momentum mixing due to turbulent or eddy viscosity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect was originally derived in Yokoi & Yoshizawa (1993) [1], and recently has been validated by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of rotating helical turbulence [2]. Turbulence effect enters the mean-vorticity equation through the turbulent vortexmotive force ⟨u'×ω'⟩ [u': velocity fluctuation, ω'(= ∇× u'): vorticity fluctuation], which is the vorticity counterpart of the electromotive force ⟨u'× b'⟩ (b': magnetic fluctuation) in the mean magnetic-field induction. The mean velocity induction δU is proportional to the vortexmotive force. According to the theoretical result [1,2], it is expressed as δU = -νT∇×Ω∗-ηT(∇2H)Ω∗, where ηT is the transport coefficient, H = ⟨u'ṡω'⟩ the turbulent helicity, and Ω∗ the mean absolute vorticity. The first term corresponds to the enhanced diffusion due to turbulent viscosity νT. The second term expresses the large-scale flow generation due to inhomogeneous helicity. Since helicity is self-generated in rotating stratified turbulence [3], an inhomogeneous helicity distribution is expected to exist in the solar convection zone. A rising flow with expansion near the surface of the Sun generates a strongly negative helicity there [4]. This spatial distribution of helicity would lead to a positive Laplacian of turbulent helicity (∇2H > 0) in the subsurface layer of the Sun. In the combination with the large-scale vorticity associated with the meridional circulation, the inhomogeneous helicity effect works for accelerating the mean velocity in the azimuthal direction. The relevance of this inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar convection zone is discussed further. References [1] Yokoi, N. and

  13. Twisted molecular excitons as mediators for changing the angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaoning; Lusk, Mark T.

    2017-07-01

    Molecules with CN or CN h symmetry can absorb quanta of optical angular momentum to generate twisted excitons with well-defined quasiangular momenta of their own. Angular momentum is conserved in such interactions at the level of a paraxial approximation for the light beam. A sequence of absorption events can thus be used to create a range of excitonic angular momenta. Subsequent decay can produce radiation with a single angular momentum equal to that accumulated. Such molecules can thus be viewed as mediators for changing the angular momentum of light. This sidesteps the need to exploit nonlinear light-matter interactions based on higher-order susceptibilities. A tight-binding paradigm is used to verify angular momentum conservation and demonstrate how it can be exploited to change the angular momentum of light. The approach is then extended to a time-dependent density functional theory setting where the key results are shown to hold in a many-body, multilevel setting.

  14. Polarization of molecular angular momentum in the chemical reactions Li + HF and F + HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B.; Popov, Ruslan S.; Roncero, Octavio; De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2013-06-01

    The quantum mechanical approach to vector correlation of angular momentum orientation and alignment in chemical reactions [G. Balint-Kurti and O. S. Vasyutinskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 14281 (2009)], 10.1021/jp902796v is applied to the molecular reagents and products of the Li + HF [L. Gonzalez-Sanchez, O. S. Vasyutinskii, A. Zanchet, C. Sanz-Sanz, and O. Roncero, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13656 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02452j and F + HD [D. De Fazio, J. Lucas, V. Aquilanti, and S. Cavalli, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 8571 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02738c reactions for which accurate scattering information has become recently available through time-dependent and time-independent approaches. Application of the theory to two important particular cases of the reactive collisions has been considered: (i) the influence of the angular momentum polarization of reactants in the entrance channel on the spatial distribution of the products in the exit channel and (ii) angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction between unpolarized reactants. In the former case, the role of the angular momentum alignment of the reactants is shown to be large, particularly when the angular momentum is perpendicular to the reaction scattering plane. In the latter case, the orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum was found to be significant and strongly dependent on the scattering angle. The calculation also reveals significant differences between the vector correlation properties of the two reactions under study which are due to difference in the reaction mechanisms. In the case of F + HD reaction, the branching ratio between HF and DF production points out interest in the insight gained into the detailed dynamics, when information is available either from exact quantum mechanical calculations or from especially designed experiments. Also, the geometrical arrangement for the experimental determination of the product angular momentum orientation and alignment based

  15. Evolution of tropical circulation anomalies associated with 30-60 day oscillation of globally averaged angular momentum during northern summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, In-Sik; Lau, K.-M.

    1990-01-01

    Lag correlation statistics was used to study intraseasonal variations of upper and lower-level zonal winds, outgoing longwave radiation, and globally averaged angular momentum (GAM) for northern summers of 1977-1984. The temporal and spatial distribution of surface wind stress in the tropics and its relationship with zonal wind anomalies were studied to assess the impact of surface frictional drag on the atmospheric angular momentum. The 30-60 day GAM fluctuation is shown to be accompanied by zonal propagation of convection and 850 mb zonal wind anomalies in the tropical belt. The climatological zonal wind in the tropics affects the magnitude of wind stress anomalies. It is suggested that momentum exchange between the lower and upper troposphere may occur in regions of active convection via vertical momentum transport. The tropical central Pacific is considered to play a key role in linking the atmosphere and the earth through angular momentum exchange on intraseasonal time scales.

  16. Evolution of tropical circulation anomalies associated with 30-60 day oscillation of globally averaged angular momentum during northern summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, In-Sik; Lau, K.-M.

    1990-01-01

    Lag correlation statistics was used to study intraseasonal variations of upper and lower-level zonal winds, outgoing longwave radiation, and globally averaged angular momentum (GAM) for northern summers of 1977-1984. The temporal and spatial distribution of surface wind stress in the tropics and its relationship with zonal wind anomalies were studied to assess the impact of surface frictional drag on the atmospheric angular momentum. The 30-60 day GAM fluctuation is shown to be accompanied by zonal propagation of convection and 850 mb zonal wind anomalies in the tropical belt. The climatological zonal wind in the tropics affects the magnitude of wind stress anomalies. It is suggested that momentum exchange between the lower and upper troposphere may occur in regions of active convection via vertical momentum transport. The tropical central Pacific is considered to play a key role in linking the atmosphere and the earth through angular momentum exchange on intraseasonal time scales.

  17. Angular Momentum Transport in Solar-type Stars: Testing the Timescale for Core-Envelope Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Terndrup, Donald M.; Newsham, Grant

    2010-06-01

    We critically examine the constraints on internal angular momentum transport which can be inferred from the spin-down of open cluster stars. The rotation distribution inferred from rotation velocities and periods is consistent for larger and more recent samples, but smaller samples of rotation periods appear biased toward shorter periods relative to vsin i studies. We therefore focus on whether the rotation period distributions observed in star forming regions can be evolved into the observed ones in the Pleiades, NGC 2516, M 34, M 35, M 37, and M 50 with plausible assumptions about star-disk coupling and angular momentum loss from magnetized solar-like winds. Solid-body (SB) models are consistent with the data for low-mass fully convective stars but highly inconsistent for higher mass stars where the surface convection zone can decouple for angular momentum purposes from the radiative interior. The Tayler-Spruit magnetic angular momentum transport mechanism, commonly employed in models of high-mass stars, predicts SB rotation on extremely short timescales of less than 1 Myr and is therefore unlikely to operate in solar-type pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) and MS stars at the predicted rate. Models with core-envelope decoupling can explain the spin-down of 1.0 and 0.8 solar mass slow rotators with characteristic coupling timescales of 55 ± 25 Myr and 175 ± 25 Myr, respectively. The upper envelope of the rotation distribution is more strongly coupled than the lower envelope of the rotation distribution, in accord with theoretical predictions that the angular momentum transport timescale should be shorter for more rapidly rotating stars. Constraints imposed by the solar rotation curve are also discussed. We argue that neither hydrodynamic mechanisms nor our revised and less efficient prescription for the Tayler-Spruit dynamo can reproduce both spin-down and the internal solar rotation profile by themselves. It is likely that a successful model of angular momentum

  18. Is angular momentum in the horizontal plane during gait a controlled variable?

    PubMed

    Thielemans, Valerie; Meyns, Pieter; Bruijn, Sjoerd M

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that angular momentum in the horizontal plane during human gait is controlled (i.e., kept minimal). However, this has not been explored in conditions when angular momentum of different segments is manipulated explicitly. In order to examine the behavior of angular momentum, 12 participants walked in 17 conditions in which angular momentum of either the arms or legs was manipulated. Subjects walked at different step lengths, different speeds and with an additional weight on either the wrist or ankle. Angular momentum of total body, arms and legs was calculated from gait kinematics. Increasing step length increased total body and leg angular momentum. When weight was added to the limbs, arm and leg angular momentum were affected and counteracted each other, so that total body angular momentum did not change. Moreover, increasing walking speed increased arm, leg and total body angular momentum. Thus, it may be concluded that if angular momentum is controlled (which only seems to be the case for conditions when weights are added), it is not strictly controlled in all gait conditions (as it may increase by walking faster/with larger steps).

  19. THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF MAGNETIZED MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES: A TWO-DIMENSIONAL-THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPARISON

    SciTech Connect

    Dib, Sami; Csengeri, Timea; Audit, Edouard; Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the rotational properties of magnetized and self-gravitating dense molecular cloud (MC) cores formed in a set of two very high resolution three-dimensional (3D) MC simulations with decaying turbulence. The simulations have been performed using the adaptative mesh refinement code RAMSES with an effective resolution of 4096{sup 3} grid cells. One simulation represents a mildly magnetically supercritical cloud and the other a strongly magnetically supercritical cloud. We identify dense cores at a number of selected epochs in the simulations at two density thresholds which roughly mimic the excitation densities of the NH{sub 3} (J - K) = (1,1) transition and the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) emission line. A noticeable global difference between the two simulations is the core formation efficiency (CFE) of the high-density cores. In the strongly supercritical simulations, the CFE is 33% per unit free-fall time of the cloud (t{sub ff,cl}), whereas in the mildly supercritical simulations this value goes down to {approx}6 per unit t{sub ff,cl}. A comparison of the intrinsic specific angular momentum (j{sub 3D}) distributions of the cores with the specific angular momentum derived using synthetic two-dimensional (2D) velocity maps of the cores (j{sub 2D}) shows that the synthetic observations tend to overestimate the true value of the specific angular momentum by a factor of {approx}8-10. We find that the distribution of the ratio j{sub 3D}/j{sub 2D} of the cores peaks at around {approx}0.1. The origin of this discrepancy lies in the fact that contrary to the intrinsic determination of j which sums up the individual gas parcels' contributions to the angular momentum, the determination of the specific angular momentum using the standard observational procedure which is based on a measurement on the global velocity gradient under the hypothesis of uniform rotation smoothes out the complex fluctuations present in the 3D velocity field. Our

  20. Interface between path and orbital angular momentum entanglement for high-dimensional photonic quantum information.

    PubMed

    Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Huber, Marcus; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Zeilinger, Anton

    2014-07-30

    Photonics has become a mature field of quantum information science, where integrated optical circuits offer a way to scale the complexity of the set-up as well as the dimensionality of the quantum state. On photonic chips, paths are the natural way to encode information. To distribute those high-dimensional quantum states over large distances, transverse spatial modes, like orbital angular momentum possessing Laguerre Gauss modes, are favourable as flying information carriers. Here we demonstrate a quantum interface between these two vibrant photonic fields. We create three-dimensional path entanglement between two photons in a nonlinear crystal and use a mode sorter as the quantum interface to transfer the entanglement to the orbital angular momentum degree of freedom. Thus our results show a flexible way to create high-dimensional spatial mode entanglement. Moreover, they pave the way to implement broad complex quantum networks where high-dimensionally entangled states could be distributed over distant photonic chips.

  1. Singularity in the Laboratory Frame Angular Distribution Derived in Two-Body Scattering Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory (lab) frame angular distribution derived in two-body scattering theory exhibits a singularity at the maximum lab scattering angle. The singularity appears in the kinematic factor that transforms the centre of momentum (cm) angular distribution to the lab angular distribution. We show that it is caused in the transformation by the…

  2. Singularity in the Laboratory Frame Angular Distribution Derived in Two-Body Scattering Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory (lab) frame angular distribution derived in two-body scattering theory exhibits a singularity at the maximum lab scattering angle. The singularity appears in the kinematic factor that transforms the centre of momentum (cm) angular distribution to the lab angular distribution. We show that it is caused in the transformation by the…

  3. The neoclassical angular momentum flux in the large aspect ratio limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.K.; Chan, V.S.

    2005-09-15

    The small rotation version of the neoclassical angular momentum flux is calculated in the large aspect ratio limit and in the banana regime. The method relies on solving an adjoint equation to the customary linearized drift kinetic equation, circumventing the difficulty of obtaining the ion distribution function that is second order in the ratio of poloidal gyroradius over plasma scale length. The result differs significantly from a long-standing result for circular cross-section flux surfaces.

  4. Angular Momentum Evolution in Young Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzón, G.; de La Reza, R.

    2006-06-01

    During the last decades, the study of rotation in young low mass stars has been one of the more active areas in the field of stellar evolution. Many theoretical efforts have been made to understand the angular momentum evolution and our picture now, reveals the main role of the stellar magnetic field in all pre-main sequence stage (Ghosh & Lamb 1979, ApJ, 234, 296; Cameron & Campbell 1993, A&A, 274, 309; Cameron & Campbell 1995, A&A, 298, 133; Kúker, Henning, & Rúdiger 2003, ApJ, 589, 397; Matt & Pudritz 2005, MNRAS, 356, 167). The mean rotation of most of the cool low mass stars remains roughly constant during the T Tauri stage. This can be explained by the disc locking scenario. This paradigm suggest that star start out as CTTS with periods of 4-14 days, perhaps locked to their disc, and that this disc is eventually lost mainly by accretion. At the current time, it is not clear that this is true for all low mass stars. Some authors have questioned its validity for stars less massive than 0.5 solar masses. Although the reality may eventually turn out to be considerably more complex, a simple consideration of the effects of and limits on disc locking of young low mass stars seems necessary.We have investigated the exchange of angular momentum between a low mass star and an accretion disc during the Hayashi Track (Pinzón, Kúker, & de la Reza 2005, in preparation) and also along the first 100Myr of stellar evolution. The model incorporates changes in the star's moment of inertia, magnetic field strength (Elstner & Rúdiger 2000, A&A, 358, 612), angular momentum loss by a magnetic wind and an exponential decrease of the accretion rate. The lifetime of the accretion disc is a free parameter in our model. The resulting rotation rates are in agreement with observed vsin and photometric periods for young stars belonging to co-moving groups and open young clusters.

  5. Hermite-Gaussian modal laser beams with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A

    2014-02-01

    A relationship for the complex amplitude of generalized paraxial Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beams is deduced. We show that under certain parameters, these beams transform into the familiar HG modes and elegant HG beams. The orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a linear combination of two generalized HG beams with a phase shift of π/2, with their double indices composed of adjacent integer numbers taken in direct and inverse order, is calculated. The modulus of the OAM is shown to be an integer number for the combination of two HG modes, always equal to unity for the superposition of two elegant HG beams, and a fractional number for two hybrid HG beams. Interestingly, a linear combination of two such HG modes also presents a mode that is characterized by a nonzero OAM and the lack of radial symmetry but does not rotate during propagation.

  6. Establishing an IERS Sub-Center for Ocean Angular Momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    2001-01-01

    With the objective of establishing the Special Bureau for the Oceans (SBO), a new archival center for ocean angular momentum (OAM) products, we have computed and analyzed a number of OAM products from several ocean models, with and without data assimilation. All three components of OAM (axial term related to length of day variations and equatorial terms related to polar motion) have been examined in detail, in comparison to the respective Earth rotation parameters. An 11+ year time series of OAM given at 5-day intervals has been made publicly available. Other OAM products spanning longer periods and with higher temporal resolution, as well as products calculated from ocean model/data assimilation systems, have been prepared and should become part of the SBO archives in the near future.

  7. Laboratory Study of Angular Momentum Transport in Astrophysical Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hantao

    2014-10-01

    Studying astrophysical processes in the lab becomes increasingly possible and exciting, as one of Stirling's favorite subjects throughout his scientific career. In this talk, I will describe experimental efforts to study mechanisms of rapid angular momentum transport required to occur in accretion disks to explain a wide range of phenomena from star formation, energetic activity of cataclysmic variables, to powering quasars, the most luminous steady sources in the Universe. By carefully isolating effects due to artificial boundaries, which are inherent to terrestrial experiments, certain astrophysical questions regarding hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic stabilities are being addressed in the laboratory. Inspirations from Stirling as well as scientific exchanges with him will be mentioned during this talk as part of my scientific journey on this subject.

  8. Multiple orbital angular momentum generated by dielectric hybrid phase element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewen; Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Hu, Dejiao; Li, Xiangping

    2017-09-01

    Vortex beam carrying multiple orbital angular momentum provides a new degree of freedom to manipulate light leading to the various exciting applications as trapping, quantum optics, information multiplexing, etc. Helical wavefront can be generated either via the geometric or the dynamic phase arising from a space-variant birefringence (q-plate) or from phase accumulation through propagation (spiral-phase-plate), respectively. Using fast direct laser writing technique we fabricate and characterize novel hybrid q-plate generating vortex beam simultaneously carrying two different high-order topological charges, which arise from the spin-orbital conversion and the azimuthal height variation of the recorded structures. We approve the versatile concept to generate multiple-OAM vortex beams combining the spin-orbital interaction and the phase accumulation in a single micro-scale device, a hybrid dielectric phase plate.

  9. Creating High-Harmonic Beams with Controlled Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    A beam of light with an angle-dependent phase Φ = lϕ , where ϕ is the azimuthal coordinate, about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum (OAM) of lℏ per photon. Such beams have been exploited to provide superresolution in visible-light microscopy. The ability to create extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable OAM would be a critical step towards extending superresolution methods to extremely small feature size. Here we show that OAM is conserved during the process of high-harmonic generation (HHG). Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with l = 1 and interferometrically determine that the q-th harmonic has an OAM quantum number l equal to its harmonic order q. We also show theoretically how to couple an arbitrary low value of the OAM quantum number l to any harmonic order q in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  10. Controlling the orbital angular momentum of high harmonic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanqi; Zhang, Chunmei; Bouchard, Frédéric; Li, Zhengyan; Brown, Graham G.; Ko, Dong Hyuk; Hammond, T. J.; Arissian, Ladan; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim; Corkum, P. B.

    2017-04-01

    Optical vortices, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), can be flexibly produced and measured with infrared and visible light. Their application is an important research topic for super-resolution imaging, optical communications and quantum optics. However, only a few methods can produce OAM beams in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or X-ray, and controlling the OAM on these beams remains challenging. Here we apply wave mixing to a tabletop high-harmonic source, as proposed in our previous work, and control the topological charge (OAM value) of XUV beams. Our technique enables us to produce first-order OAM beams with the smallest possible central intensity null at XUV wavelengths. This work opens a route for carrier-injected laser machining and lithography, which may reach nanometre or even angstrom resolution. Such a light source is also ideal for space communications, both in the classical and quantum regimes.

  11. Detection of orbital angular momentum using a photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Rui, Guanghao; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-06-20

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) state of photons offer an attractive additional degree of freedom that has found a variety of applications. Measurement of OAM state, which is a critical task of these applications, demands photonic integrated devices for improved fidelity, miniaturization, and reconfiguration. Here we report the design of a silicon-integrated OAM receiver that is capable of detecting distinct and variable OAM states. Furthermore, the reconfiguration capability of the detector is achieved by applying voltage to the GeSe film to form gratings with alternate states. The resonant wavelength for arbitrary OAM state is demonstrated to be tunable in a quasi-linear manner through adjusting the duty cycle of the gratings. This work provides a viable approach for the realization of a compact integrated OAM detection device with enhanced functionality that may find important applications in optical communications and information processing with OAM states.

  12. Automultiscopic displays based on orbital angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuefeng; Chu, Jiaqi; Smithwick, Quinn; Chu, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light has drawn increasing attention due to its intriguingly rich physics and potential for a variety of applications. Having an unbounded set of orthogonal states, OAM has been used to enhance the channel capacity of data transmission. We propose and demonstrate the viability of using OAM to create an automultiscopic 3D display. Multi-view image information is encoded using an OAM beam array, then sorted into different view directions using coordinate transformation elements. A three-view demonstration was achieved to encode and decode 9 × 9 pixel images. These demonstrations suggest that OAM could potentially serve as an additional platform for future 3D display systems.

  13. Catenary optics for achromatic generation of perfect optical angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Changtao; Hu, Chenggang; Gao, Ping; Huang, Cheng; Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Qin, Fei; Yang, Jing; Gu, Min; Hong, Minghui; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    The catenary is the curve that a free-hanging chain assumes under its own weight, and thought to be a “true mathematical and mechanical form” in architecture by Robert Hooke in the 1670s, with nevertheless no significant phenomena observed in optics. We show that the optical catenary can serve as a unique building block of metasurfaces to produce continuous and linear phase shift covering [0, 2π], a mission that is extremely difficult if not impossible for state-of-the-art technology. Via catenary arrays, planar optical devices are designed and experimentally characterized to generate various kinds of beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). These devices can operate in an ultra-broadband spectrum because the anisotropic modes associated with the spin-orbit interaction are almost independent of the incident light frequency. By combining the optical and topological characteristics, our approach would allow the complete control of photons within a single nanometric layer. PMID:26601283

  14. Detecting Lateral Motion using Light’s Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Cvijetic, Neda; Milione, Giovanni; Ip, Ezra; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Interrogating an object with a light beam and analyzing the scattered light can reveal kinematic information about the object, which is vital for applications ranging from autonomous vehicles to gesture recognition and virtual reality. We show that by analyzing the change in the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a tilted light beam eclipsed by a moving object, lateral motion of the object can be detected in an arbitrary direction using a single light beam and without object image reconstruction. We observe OAM spectral asymmetry that corresponds to the lateral motion direction along an arbitrary axis perpendicular to the plane containing the light beam and OAM measurement axes. These findings extend OAM-based remote sensing to detection of non-rotational qualities of objects and may also have extensions to other electromagnetic wave regimes, including radio and sound. PMID:26493681

  15. A new angular momentum loss mechanism for cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannizzo, John K.; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    1988-04-01

    It is well known that there is mass outflow in cataclysmic variables, since IUE observations show P Cyg profiles of various high-excitation lines of C IV and S IV. It is proposed here that these outflows are hydromagnetic winds from accretion disks. The winds extract angular momentum from these systems and therefore drive secular evolution. Disk winds are preferred to winds from the secondary star because of the lower disk surface gravities. Using values of the wind parameters inferred from observations, values are derived for the (time-averaged) induced rate of mass transfer from the red dwarf secondary which span the range inferred by Warner (1976 and 1987). It is shown that this theory accounts for both the IUE observations and the secular evolution of cataclysmic variables.

  16. Detecting Lateral Motion using Light’s Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvijetic, Neda; Milione, Giovanni; Ip, Ezra; Wang, Ting

    2015-10-01

    Interrogating an object with a light beam and analyzing the scattered light can reveal kinematic information about the object, which is vital for applications ranging from autonomous vehicles to gesture recognition and virtual reality. We show that by analyzing the change in the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a tilted light beam eclipsed by a moving object, lateral motion of the object can be detected in an arbitrary direction using a single light beam and without object image reconstruction. We observe OAM spectral asymmetry that corresponds to the lateral motion direction along an arbitrary axis perpendicular to the plane containing the light beam and OAM measurement axes. These findings extend OAM-based remote sensing to detection of non-rotational qualities of objects and may also have extensions to other electromagnetic wave regimes, including radio and sound.

  17. Detection of orbital angular momentum using a photonic integrated circuit

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Guanghao; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) state of photons offer an attractive additional degree of freedom that has found a variety of applications. Measurement of OAM state, which is a critical task of these applications, demands photonic integrated devices for improved fidelity, miniaturization, and reconfiguration. Here we report the design of a silicon-integrated OAM receiver that is capable of detecting distinct and variable OAM states. Furthermore, the reconfiguration capability of the detector is achieved by applying voltage to the GeSe film to form gratings with alternate states. The resonant wavelength for arbitrary OAM state is demonstrated to be tunable in a quasi-linear manner through adjusting the duty cycle of the gratings. This work provides a viable approach for the realization of a compact integrated OAM detection device with enhanced functionality that may find important applications in optical communications and information processing with OAM states. PMID:27321916

  18. Compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chenhao; Chen, Jian; Zhan, Qiwen

    2017-03-01

    A compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) sorter is proposed and demonstrated. The sorter comprises a quadratic fan-out mapper and a dual-phase corrector positioned in the pupil plane and the Fourier plane, respectively. The optical system is greatly simplified compared to previous demonstrations of OAM sorting, and the performance in resolution and efficiency is maintained. A folded configuration is set up using a single reflective spatial light modulator (SLM) to demonstrate the validity of the scheme. The two phase elements are implemented on the left and right halves of the SLM and connected by a right-angle prism. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolution of the compact OAM sorter, and the current limit in efficiency can be overcome by replacing with transmissive SLMs and removing the beam splitters. This novel scheme paves the way for the miniaturization and integration of high-resolution OAM sorters.

  19. Generation of Electromagnetic Waves with Arbitrary Orbital Angular Momentum Modes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li; Hong, Wei; Hao, Zhang-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) for radio communication. Here we experimentally demonstrate a planar-spiral phase plate (planar-SPP) for generating arbitrary mixed OAM beams. This proposed planar-SPP uses the concept of transmit array antenna having a perforated substrate to control the outputting phase for generating beams carrying OAM with arbitrary modes. As demonstrations, three planar-SPPs with a single OAM mode and two mixed OAM modes around 94 GHz have been investigated with design and experiments in this paper, respectively. The typical experimental intensity and phase patterns show that the proposed method of generating OAM beams really works. PMID:24770669

  20. Multi-channel orbital angular momentum detection with metahologram.

    PubMed

    Rui, Guanghao; Ma, Yanbao; Gu, Bing; Zhan, Qiwen; Cui, Yiping

    2016-09-15

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) is an intrinsic property of light that has attracted increasing attention recently. In a wide range of applications that involve OAM, it is often crucial to discern the OAM states with high fidelity. In this Letter, we propose a novel method to extend the detectable range of the OAM states by adopting a multi-sector metahologram. The incident light carrying OAM would be focused by the metahologram into surface plasmon waves with separated propagation directions that are spatially sampled by multiple subwavelength detectors. Through quantizing and mapping the detector signals into a lookup table, a wide range of OAM states could be distinguished. The principle reported in this Letter may find important applications in optical communications and information processing with the OAM states.

  1. Nondestructive Measurement of Orbital Angular Momentum for an Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larocque, Hugo; Bouchard, Frédéric; Grillo, Vincenzo; Sit, Alicia; Frabboni, Stefano; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Padgett, Miles J.; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-10-01

    Free electrons with a helical phase front, referred to as "twisted" electrons, possess an orbital angular momentum (OAM) and, hence, a quantized magnetic dipole moment along their propagation direction. This intrinsic magnetic moment can be used to probe material properties. Twisted electrons thus have numerous potential applications in materials science. Measuring this quantity often relies on a series of projective measurements that subsequently change the OAM carried by the electrons. In this Letter, we propose a nondestructive way of measuring an electron beam's OAM through the interaction of this associated magnetic dipole with a conductive loop. Such an interaction results in the generation of induced currents within the loop, which are found to be directly proportional to the electron's OAM value. Moreover, the electron experiences no OAM variations and only minimal energy losses upon the measurement, and, hence, the nondestructive nature of the proposed technique.

  2. Nondestructive Measurement of Orbital Angular Momentum for an Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Larocque, Hugo; Bouchard, Frédéric; Grillo, Vincenzo; Sit, Alicia; Frabboni, Stefano; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Padgett, Miles J; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-10-07

    Free electrons with a helical phase front, referred to as "twisted" electrons, possess an orbital angular momentum (OAM) and, hence, a quantized magnetic dipole moment along their propagation direction. This intrinsic magnetic moment can be used to probe material properties. Twisted electrons thus have numerous potential applications in materials science. Measuring this quantity often relies on a series of projective measurements that subsequently change the OAM carried by the electrons. In this Letter, we propose a nondestructive way of measuring an electron beam's OAM through the interaction of this associated magnetic dipole with a conductive loop. Such an interaction results in the generation of induced currents within the loop, which are found to be directly proportional to the electron's OAM value. Moreover, the electron experiences no OAM variations and only minimal energy losses upon the measurement, and, hence, the nondestructive nature of the proposed technique.

  3. Measuring the orbital angular momentum spectrum of an electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Tavabi, Amir H.; Venturi, Federico; Larocque, Hugo; Balboni, Roberto; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Lu, Peng-Han; Mafakheri, Erfan; Bouchard, Frédéric; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Boyd, Robert W.; Lavery, Martin P. J.; Padgett, Miles J.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Electron waves that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) are characterized by a quantized and unbounded magnetic dipole moment parallel to their propagation direction. When interacting with magnetic materials, the wavefunctions of such electrons are inherently modified. Such variations therefore motivate the need to analyse electron wavefunctions, especially their wavefronts, to obtain information regarding the material's structure. Here, we propose, design and demonstrate the performance of a device based on nanoscale holograms for measuring an electron's OAM components by spatially separating them. We sort pure and superposed OAM states of electrons with OAM values of between −10 and 10. We employ the device to analyse the OAM spectrum of electrons that have been affected by a micron-scale magnetic dipole, thus establishing that our sorter can be an instrument for nanoscale magnetic spectroscopy. PMID:28537248

  4. Do all BPS black hole microstates carry zero angular momentum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Garavuso, Richard S.; Mondal, Swapnamay; Sen, Ashoke

    2016-04-01

    From the analysis of the near horizon geometry and supersymmetry algebra it has been argued that all the microstates of single centered BPS black holes with four unbroken supersymmetries carry zero angular momentum in the region of the moduli space where the black hole description is valid. A stronger form of the conjecture would be that the result holds for any sufficiently generic point in the moduli space. In this paper we set out to test this conjecture for a class of black hole microstates in type II string theory on T 6, represented by four stacks of D-branes wrapped on various cycles of T 6. For this system the above conjecture translates to the statement that the moduli space of classical vacua must be a collection of points. Explicit analysis of systems carrying a low number of D-branes supports this conjecture.

  5. Bases for spin systems and qudits from angular momentum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibler, Maurice R.

    2010-03-01

    Spin bases of relevance for quantum systems with cyclic symmetry as well as for quantum information and quantum computation are constructed from angular momentum and Lie algebraic methods. This approach is connected to the use of generalized Pauli matrices (in dimension d) arising from a polar decomposition of the group SU(2). Such a decomposition leads to a Weyl pair which can be used as an integrity basis for constructing a generalized Pauli group and the Lie algebra of the unitary group U(d). The case where d is a prime integer yields a maximal set of d+1 mutually unbiased bases. Numerous examples are given for d=2,3 and 4.

  6. Measuring the orbital angular momentum spectrum of an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Tavabi, Amir H.; Venturi, Federico; Larocque, Hugo; Balboni, Roberto; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Lu, Peng-Han; Mafakheri, Erfan; Bouchard, Frédéric; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Boyd, Robert W.; Lavery, Martin P. J.; Padgett, Miles J.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-05-01

    Electron waves that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) are characterized by a quantized and unbounded magnetic dipole moment parallel to their propagation direction. When interacting with magnetic materials, the wavefunctions of such electrons are inherently modified. Such variations therefore motivate the need to analyse electron wavefunctions, especially their wavefronts, to obtain information regarding the material's structure. Here, we propose, design and demonstrate the performance of a device based on nanoscale holograms for measuring an electron's OAM components by spatially separating them. We sort pure and superposed OAM states of electrons with OAM values of between -10 and 10. We employ the device to analyse the OAM spectrum of electrons that have been affected by a micron-scale magnetic dipole, thus establishing that our sorter can be an instrument for nanoscale magnetic spectroscopy.

  7. Controlling the orbital angular momentum of high harmonic vortices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanqi; Zhang, Chunmei; Bouchard, Frédéric; Li, Zhengyan; Brown, Graham G; Ko, Dong Hyuk; Hammond, T J; Arissian, Ladan; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim; Corkum, P B

    2017-04-05

    Optical vortices, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), can be flexibly produced and measured with infrared and visible light. Their application is an important research topic for super-resolution imaging, optical communications and quantum optics. However, only a few methods can produce OAM beams in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or X-ray, and controlling the OAM on these beams remains challenging. Here we apply wave mixing to a tabletop high-harmonic source, as proposed in our previous work, and control the topological charge (OAM value) of XUV beams. Our technique enables us to produce first-order OAM beams with the smallest possible central intensity null at XUV wavelengths. This work opens a route for carrier-injected laser machining and lithography, which may reach nanometre or even angstrom resolution. Such a light source is also ideal for space communications, both in the classical and quantum regimes.

  8. Controlling the orbital angular momentum of high harmonic vortices

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fanqi; Zhang, Chunmei; Bouchard, Frédéric; Li, Zhengyan; Brown, Graham G.; Ko, Dong Hyuk; Hammond, T. J.; Arissian, Ladan; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim; Corkum, P. B.

    2017-01-01

    Optical vortices, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), can be flexibly produced and measured with infrared and visible light. Their application is an important research topic for super-resolution imaging, optical communications and quantum optics. However, only a few methods can produce OAM beams in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or X-ray, and controlling the OAM on these beams remains challenging. Here we apply wave mixing to a tabletop high-harmonic source, as proposed in our previous work, and control the topological charge (OAM value) of XUV beams. Our technique enables us to produce first-order OAM beams with the smallest possible central intensity null at XUV wavelengths. This work opens a route for carrier-injected laser machining and lithography, which may reach nanometre or even angstrom resolution. Such a light source is also ideal for space communications, both in the classical and quantum regimes. PMID:28378823

  9. Orbital angular momentum loss in PSR 1957 + 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banit, Menashe; Shaham, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    It is suggested that the companion winds, excited by the radiation from the neutron star in PSR 1957 + 20 form only through the combined action of the radiation heat on the companion's atmosphere and the radiation force on the slowly lifting wind. Ballistic simulations suggest that these winds leave only from selected areas of the illuminated surface of the companion; surface currents channel into these regions relatively hot (but altogether cooler than the companion escape velocity) 'coronal' matter from the whole illuminated area. Under suitable conditions, wind particles spend some time trailing the companion at close distances before taking off to escape from the system. This can torque the binary into angular momentum loss that will be as efficient as the one recently observed in PSR 1957 + 20 if the companion is bloated to dimensions close to that of the Roche lobe.

  10. Energy and angular momentum transfer in binary galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namboodiri, P. M. S.; Kochhar, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The authors numerically studied tidal effects of a massive perturber on a satellite galaxy. The model consists of a spherical satellite galaxy and a point mass perturber and the encounter is non-penetrating. A wide range of density ratios and eccentricities of the relative orbits have been considered. The disruption of the satellite galaxy has been observed when the numerical value of the fractional change in the energy is greater than two. The changes in the energy and angular momentum show smooth variation in the case of unbound orbits and irregular variation in the bound orbit cases. It is shown that for a constant pericentral distance, increasing the density ratio decreases the tidal effects; and for a given density ratio an increase in the eccentricity decreases the tidal effects.

  11. Measuring the orbital angular momentum spectrum of an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Tavabi, Amir H; Venturi, Federico; Larocque, Hugo; Balboni, Roberto; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Lu, Peng-Han; Mafakheri, Erfan; Bouchard, Frédéric; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Boyd, Robert W; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-05-24

    Electron waves that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) are characterized by a quantized and unbounded magnetic dipole moment parallel to their propagation direction. When interacting with magnetic materials, the wavefunctions of such electrons are inherently modified. Such variations therefore motivate the need to analyse electron wavefunctions, especially their wavefronts, to obtain information regarding the material's structure. Here, we propose, design and demonstrate the performance of a device based on nanoscale holograms for measuring an electron's OAM components by spatially separating them. We sort pure and superposed OAM states of electrons with OAM values of between -10 and 10. We employ the device to analyse the OAM spectrum of electrons that have been affected by a micron-scale magnetic dipole, thus establishing that our sorter can be an instrument for nanoscale magnetic spectroscopy.

  12. Focusing light with orbital angular momentum by circular array antenna.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Shohei; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2017-06-12

    We experimentally demonstrated focusing of light with orbital angular momentum (OAM) using an 8-element circular array of linear antennas. A spiral phase plate was used to generate a vortex beam with an OAM of ħ in the terahertz (THz) frequency region. We used THz near-field microscope to directly measure the phase vortex. A beam profile with a center dark spot and 2π phase rotation was observed in the small center gap region of the circular array antenna after the vortex beam excitation. The beam size is reduced by a factor of 3.4 ± 0.2. Half-wave resonance of the antenna element is responsible for the focusing function, indicating the scalability of this method to other frequency regions. This method will enable deep subwavelength focusing of light with OAM and eliminate the obstacle for the observation of the dipole forbidden transition with finite OAM of the vortex beam.

  13. Encoding orbital angular momentum of light in magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    Breaking the diffraction limit and focusing laser beams to subwavelength scale are becoming possible with the help of recent developments in plasmonics. Such subwavelength focusing bridges different length scales of laser beams and matter. Here we consider optical vortex, or laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), and discuss potential subwavelength magnetic phenomena induced by such laser. On the basis of numerical calculations using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we propose two OAM-dependent phenomena induced by optical vortices, generation of radially anisotropic spin waves and generation of topological defects in chiral magnets. The former could lead to the transient topological Hall effect through the laser-induced scalar spin chirality, and the latter reduces the time scale of generating skyrmionic defects by several orders compared to other known means.

  14. Low-crosstalk orbital angular momentum fiber coupler design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhishen; Gan, Jiulin; Heng, Xiaobo; Li, Muqiao; Li, Jiong; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin

    2017-05-15

    A fiber coupler for low-crosstalk orbital angular momentum mode beam splitter is proposed with the structure of two separate and parallel microfibers. By properly setting the center-to-center distance between microfibers, the crosstalk is less than -20 dB, which means that the purity of the needed OAM mode in output port is higher than 99%. For a fixed overlapping length, high coupling efficiency (>97%) is achieved in 1545-1560 nm. The operating wavelength is tuned to the whole C-band by using the thermosensitive liquid. So the designed coupler can achieve the tunable coupling ratio over the whole C-band, which is a prospective component for the further OAM fiber system.

  15. Be Star Outbursts: Transport of Angular Momentum by Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Mathis, S.; Saio, H.; Lee, U.

    2013-12-01

    The Be phenomenon, that is the ejection of matter from Be stars into a circumstellar disk, has been a long lasting mystery. In the last few years, the CoRoT (Convection Rotation and planetary Transits) satellite brought clear evidence that Be outbursts are directly correlated with pulsations. We found that it may be the transport of angular momentum by waves or pulsation modes that brings the already rapid stellar rotation to its critical value at the surface, and allows the star to eject material. The recent discovery of stochastically excited gravito-inertial modes by CoRoT in a hot Be star strengthens this scenario. We present the CoRoT observations and modeling of several Be stars and describe the new picture of the Be phenomenon which arose from these results.

  16. Capacity of arbitrary-order orbital angular momentum multiplexing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yaqin; Zhong, Xin; Ren, Guanghui; He, Shengyang; Wu, Zhilu

    2017-03-01

    Arbitrary-order orbital angular momentum multiplexing (AOAMM) systems utilize OAM modes with both integer and fractional topological charges which are non-orthogonal. In this paper, the transmission matrix and the capacity per unit bandwidth, i.e., the spectral efficiency (SE) of an AOAMM system is derived based on the spatial cross correlations of the OAM submodes under different aperture conditions. The results show that in limited apertures, the SEs of AOAMM systems increase dramatically as the interval of two adjacent OAM submodes decreases by losing orthogonality. AOAMM systems are effective choices for satisfying the explosive growth of the communication requirements. This paper provides insight into the selection of spatially multiplexing approaches and the design of interference mitigation techniques for AOAMM systems with increased SEs.

  17. Catenary optics for achromatic generation of perfect optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Changtao; Hu, Chenggang; Gao, Ping; Huang, Cheng; Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Qin, Fei; Yang, Jing; Gu, Min; Hong, Minghui; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-10-01

    The catenary is the curve that a free-hanging chain assumes under its own weight, and thought to be a "true mathematical and mechanical form" in architecture by Robert Hooke in the 1670s, with nevertheless no significant phenomena observed in optics. We show that the optical catenary can serve as a unique building block of metasurfaces to produce continuous and linear phase shift covering [0, 2π], a mission that is extremely difficult if not impossible for state-of-the-art technology. Via catenary arrays, planar optical devices are designed and experimentally characterized to generate various kinds of beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). These devices can operate in an ultra-broadband spectrum because the anisotropic modes associated with the spin-orbit interaction are almost independent of the incident light frequency. By combining the optical and topological characteristics, our approach would allow the complete control of photons within a single nanometric layer.

  18. Nucleon spin decomposition and orbital angular momentum in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    To get a complete decomposition of nucleon spin is a fundamentally important homework of QCD. In fact, if our researches end up without accomplishing this task, a tremendous efforts since the 1st discovery of the nucleon spin crisis would end in the air. We now have a general agreement that there are at least two physically inequivalent gauge-invariant decompositions of the nucleon. In these two decompositions, the intrinsic spin parts of quarks and gluons are just common. What discriminate these two decompositions are the orbital angular momentum (OAM) parts. The OAMs of quarks and gluons appearing in the first decomposition are the so-called ``mechanical'' OAMs, while those appearing in the second decomposition are the generalized (gauge-invariant) ``canonical'' ones. By this reason, these decompositions are broadly called the ``mechanical'' and ``canonical'' decompositions of the nucleon spin. Still, there remains several issues, which have not reached a complete consensus among the experts. (See the latest recent). In the present talk, I will mainly concentrate on the practically most important issue, i.e. which decomposition is more favorable from the observational viewpoint. There are two often-claimed advantages of canonical decomposition. First, each piece of this decomposition satisfies the SU(2) commutation relation or angular momentum algebra. Second, the canonical OAM rather than the mechanical OAM is compatible with free partonic picture of constituent orbital motion. In the present talk, I will show that both these claims are not necessarily true, and push forward a viewpoint that the ``mechanical'' decomposition is more physical in that it has more direct connection with observables. I also emphasize that the nucleon spin decomposition accessed by the lattice QCD analyses is the ``mechanical'' decomposition not the ``canonical'' one. The recent lattice QCD studies of the nucleon spin decomposition are also briefly overviewed.

  19. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSFER IN VELA-LIKE PULSAR GLITCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzochero, Pierre M.

    2011-12-10

    The angular momentum transfer associated with Vela-like glitches has never been calculated directly within a realistic scenario for the storage and release of superfluid vorticity; therefore, the explanation of giant glitches in terms of vortices has not yet been tested against observations. We present the first physically reasonable model, both at the microscopic and macroscopic level (spherical geometry, n = 1 polytropic density profile, density-dependent pinning forces compatible with vortex rigidity), to determine where in the star the vorticity is pinned, how much of it is pinned, and for how long. For standard neutron star parameters (M = 1.4 M{sub Sun }, R{sub s} = 10 km, {Omega}-dot = {Omega}-dot{sub Vela} = -10{sup -10} Hz s{sup -1}), we find that maximum pinning forces of order f{sub m} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 15} dyn cm{sup -1} can accumulate {Delta}L{sub gl} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 40} erg s of superfluid angular momentum, and release it to the crust at intervals {Delta}t{sub gl} Almost-Equal-To 3 years. This estimate of {Delta}L{sub gl} is one order of magnitude smaller than that implied indirectly by current models for post-glitch recovery, where the core and inner-crust vortices are taken as physically disconnected; yet, it successfully yields the magnitudes observed in recent Vela glitches for both jump parameters, {Delta}{Omega}{sub gl} and {Delta}{Omega}-dot{sub gl}, provided one assumes that only a small fraction (<10%) of the total star vorticity is coupled to the crust on the short timescale of a glitch. This is reasonable in our approach, where no layer of normal matter exists between the core and the inner-crust, as indicated by existing microscopic calculation. The new scenario presented here is nonetheless compatible with current post-glitch models.

  20. The transverse momentum dependent distribution functions in the bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut; Efremov, Anatoly; Schweitzer, Peter; Yuan, Feng

    2010-01-29

    Leading and subleading twist transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) are studied in a quark model framework provided by the bag model. A complete set of relations among different TMDs is derived, and the question is discussed how model-(in)dependent such relations are. A connection of the pretzelosity distribution and quark orbital angular momentum is derived. Numerical results are presented, and applications for phenomenology discussed. In particular, it is shown that in the valence-x region the bag model supports a Gaussian Ansatz for the transverse momentum dependence of TMDs.

  1. Transverse momentum dependent distribution functions in the bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Harut A. Avakian; Efremov, A. V.; Schweitzer, P.; Yuan, F.

    2010-04-01

    Leading and subleading twist transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) are studied in a quark model framework provided by the bag model. A complete set of relations among different TMDs is derived, and the question is discussed how model-(in)dependent such relations are. A connection of the pretzelosity distribution and quark orbital angular momentum is derived. Numerical results are presented, and applications for phenomenology discussed. In particular, it is shown that in the valence-x region the bag model supports a Gaussian Ansatz for the transverse momentum dependence of TMDs.

  2. Orbital angular momentum in the light emitted from laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen-Kang; Lemos, Nuno; Xu, Xinlu; Joshi, Chan

    2017-03-01

    Characterizing the angular momentum carried by photons provides a new method of understanding the nature of laser-plasma interactions, beam-plasma interactions or beam propagation in an undulator. The recent results from experiments and simulations have shown that a plasma accelerator may be a promising source of ultrashort x-ray pulses with orbital angular momentum. However, the broadband and ultrashort nature of such a pulse makes it very challenging to measure the angular momentum properties of the photons. In this study, we review and discuss several potential methods for measurement of the orbital angular momentum from laser plasma accelerators.

  3. Spatial Symmetry and Conservation of Orbital Angular Momentum in Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Sheng; Kumar, Prem

    2008-10-17

    Directly contradictory arguments coexist regarding the conservation rule of orbital angular momentum in spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We analytically show how this rule is decided by spatial symmetry. We discover that the down-converted photon pairs can carry non-negligible extrinsic orbital angular momentum in the degrees of relative-movement freedom due to spatial symmetry breaking, leading to nonconservation of total orbital angular momentum in type-II down-conversion. Also, we demonstrate that the traditional technique does not measure the extrinsic orbital angular momentum.

  4. Generation of gamma-ray beam with orbital angular momentum in the QED regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shi, Yin; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Wenpeng; Yi, Longqing; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Tongjun; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme to generate high-energy gamma-ray photons with an orbital angular momentum (OAM) from laser-plasma interactions by irradiating a circularly polarized Laguerre-Gaussian laser on a thin plasma target. The spin angular momentum and OAM are first transferred to electrons from the driving laser, and then the OAM is transferred to the gamma-ray photons from the electrons through quantum radiation. This scheme has been demonstrated by using three-dimensional quantum electrodynamics particle-in-cell simulations. The topological charge, chirality, and carrier-envelope phase of the short ultra-intense vortex laser can be revealed according to the energy distribution of gamma-ray emission.

  5. Angular momentum dependence of quasifission dynamics in the reaction 48Ca+244Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chong; Guo, Lu

    2017-09-01

    The quasifission dynamics in the reaction 48Ca+244Pu is investigated in the framework of time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. The calculations are performed in three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate without any symmetry restrictions. The full Skyrme energy functional is incorporated in our TDHF implementation. The quasifission dynamics is quite sensitive to the angular momentum of colliding system. The contact time of quasifission decreases as a function of angular momentum and then forms a plateau with small oscillations. The quasifission process is accompanied by an important multi-nucleon transfer. The quantum shell effect plays a crucial role in the mass and charge of quasifission fragments. The mass-angle distribution of the fragments is calculated, which can be compared directly with future experiments.

  6. Detection of a Dearth of Stars with Zero Angular Momentum in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason A. S.; Bovy, Jo; Carlberg, Raymond G.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the detection in the combined Gaia-DR1/RAVE data of a lack of disk stars in the solar neighborhood with velocities close to zero angular momentum. We propose that this may be caused by the scattering of stars with very low angular momentum onto chaotic, halo-type orbits when they pass through the Galactic nucleus. We model the effect in a Milky Way-like potential and fit the resulting model directly to the data, finding a likelihood (˜ 2.7σ ) of a dip in the distribution. Using this effect, we can make a dynamical measurement of the solar rotation velocity around the Galactic center: {v}⊙ =239+/- 9 {km} {{{s}}}-1. Combined with the measured proper motion of Sgr A*, this measurement gives a measurement of the distance to the Galactic center: {R}0=7.9+/- 0.3 {kpc}.

  7. Efficient separation of the orbital angular momentum eigenstates of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Mehul; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Shi, Zhimin; Boyd, Robert; University of Rochester Collaboration; University of Vienna Collaboration; University of South Florida Collaboration; University of Ottawa Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes of light show great promise as a means to extend quantum communication and computation into the high-dimensional regime. OAM modes reside in a discrete, unbounded state space and have the potential to dramatically increase the information capacity of QKD systems. Furthermore, the use a large alphabet increases the tolerance of a QKD system to eavesdropping attacks. A key capability for the use of OAM modes in communication is the ability to efficiently sort single photons based on their OAM content. Here we show an experimental technique that uses two optical transformations in order to do this. The first transformation, demonstrated by Berkhout et al. in 2010, employs a Cartesian to Log-polar transformation to map the azimuthal phase profile of an OAM mode to a tilted planar wavefront, whose tilt is proportional to the OAM quantum number. The second transformation creates seven adjacent copies of the transformed plane-wave mode, resulting in a mode with a larger size as well as a larger phase ramp. The transformed modes are then focused by a lens to spots with greater than 92% separation efficiency (97% in theory). We use a similar technique to sort modes in the angular basis, which is mutually unbiased with respect to the OAM basis.

  8. Orbital angular momentum mode-demultiplexing scheme with partial angular receiving aperture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shilie; Hui, Xiaonan; Zhu, Jiangbo; Chi, Hao; Jin, Xiaofeng; Yu, Siyuan; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-04

    For long distance orbital angular momentum (OAM) based transmission, the conventional whole beam receiving scheme encounters the difficulty of large aperture due to the divergence of OAM beams. We propose a novel partial receiving scheme, using a restricted angular aperture to receive and demultiplex multi-OAM-mode beams. The scheme is theoretically analyzed to show that a regularly spaced OAM mode set remain orthogonal and therefore can be de-multiplexed. Experiments have been carried out to verify the feasibility. This partial receiving scheme can serve as an effective method with both space and cost savings for the OAM communications. It is applicable to both free space OAM optical communications and radio frequency (RF) OAM communications.

  9. Quasi-Local Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum in GR: A Review Article.

    PubMed

    Szabados, László B

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the quasi-local mass-energy-momentum and angular momentum constructions in general relativity is reviewed. First the general ideas, concepts, and strategies, as well as the necessary tools to construct and analyze the quasi-local quantities are recalled. Then the various specific constructions and their properties (both successes and defects) are discussed. Finally, some of the (actual and potential) applications of the quasi-local concepts and specific constructions are briefly mentioned. This review is based on the talks given at the Erwin Schrödinger Institute, Vienna, in July 1997, at the Universität Tübingen, in May 1998, and at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Hsinchu and at the National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan, in July 2000.

  10. Quasi-Local Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum in GR: A Review Article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabados, László B.

    2004-12-01

    The present status of the quasi-local mass-energy-momentum and angular momentum constructions in general relativity is reviewed. First the general ideas, concepts, and strategies, as well as the necessary tools to construct and analyze the quasi-local quantities are recalled. Then the various specific constructions and their properties (both successes and defects) are discussed. Finally, some of the (actual and potential) applications of the quasi-local concepts and specific constructions are briefly mentioned. This review is based on the talks given at the Erwin Schrödinger Institute, Vienna, in July 1997, at the Universität Tübingen, in May 1998, and at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Hsinchu and at the National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan, in July 2000.

  11. Angular momentum regulation in low-mass young stars surrounded by accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Suzan; Strom, Stephen E.; Hartigan, Patrick; Strom, Karen M.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Herbst, William; Attridge, Joanne; Merrill, K. M.; Probst, Ron; Gatley, Ian

    1993-01-01

    From study of a sample of 34 T Tauri stars with photometrically derived rotation periods and spectral types later than KS, we find that the observed periods appear to be related to the presence or absence of an accretion disk. Those stars which we infer to be surrounded by accretion disks have rotation periods P(rot) over 4 days with a most probable P(rot) of about 8.5 days, while those stars which lack accretion disk signatures cover a wide range of P(rot) from 1.5 to 16 days, including a significant number of objects with P(rot) less than 4 days. This suggests the possibility that the 'initial' angular momentum of a star is not established until it dissipates its circumstellar accretion disk. During the disk accretion phase, the stellar angular velocity appears to be regulated at a low value, countering the tendency of the star to spin up both from contraction toward the main sequence and from the accretion of inner disk material of high specific angular momentum. When the accretion disk is dissipated, this regulation mechanism will cease to function. At this point, the star is no longer maintained at a low angular velocity, but is 'free' to conserve its angular momentum, and thus to increase its angular velocity in response to contraction and changes in moment of inertia. This hypothesis, combined with a spread in disk dispersal time scales, provides a context for explaining the observed distribution of stellar rotational velocities for stars on the ZAMS in young clusters.

  12. Angular momentum properties of haloes and their baryon content in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zjupa, Jolanta; Springel, Volker

    2017-04-01

    The angular momentum properties of virialized dark matter haloes have been measured with good statistics in collisionless N-body simulations, but an equally accurate analysis of the baryonic spin is still missing. We employ the Illustris simulation suite, one of the first simulations of galaxy formation with full hydrodynamics that produces a realistic galaxy population in a sizeable volume, to quantify the baryonic spin properties for more than ∼320 000 haloes. We first compare the systematic differences between different spin parameter and halo definitions, and the impact of sample selection criteria on the derived properties. We confirm that dark-matter-only haloes exhibit a close to self-similar spin distribution in mass and redshift of lognormal form. However, the physics of galaxy formation radically changes the baryonic spin distribution. While the dark matter component remains largely unaffected, strong trends with mass and redshift appear for the spin of diffuse gas and the formed stellar component. With time, the baryons staying bound to the halo develop a misalignment of their spin vector with respect to dark matter, and increase their specific angular momentum by a factor of ∼1.3 in the non-radiative case and ∼1.8 in the full physics setup at z = 0. We show that this enhancement in baryonic spin can be explained by the combined effect of specific angular momentum transfer from dark matter on to gas during mergers and from feedback expelling low specific angular momentum gas from the halo. Our results challenge certain models for spin evolution and underline the significant changes induced by baryonic physics in the structure of haloes.

  13. Control of angular momentum during walking in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body angular momentum about the vertical axis, although it was never investigated in this respect. In the current study, we thus investigated if participants with hemiparetic CP control angular momentum by compensatory movements of the unaffected arm. We measured gait kinematics of 11 CP children, and 24 age matched typically developing (TD) children, walking at both self-selected and fast walking speeds, and calculated angular momenta. We found that children with hemiparetic CP did not have a reduced angular momentum of the affected arm. However, they showed substantial increases in angular momentum generated by the legs, which were compensated by increased angular momentum of the unaffected arm. As a result, there were no differences in total body angular momentum between TD and CP children. Moreover, walking speed had no effect on total body angular momentum in both groups. These findings support the idea that angular momentum during walking is a controlled variable, even in children with hemiplegic CP.

  14. Angular Momentum Transfer and Fractional Moment of Inertia in Pulsar Glitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eya, I. O.; Urama, J. O.; Chukwude, A. E.

    2017-05-01

    We use the Jodrell Bank Observatory glitch database containing 472 glitches from 165 pulsars to investigate the angular momentum transfer during rotational glitches in pulsars. Our emphasis is on pulsars with at least five glitches, of which there are 26 that exhibit 261 glitches in total. This paper identifies four pulsars in which the angular momentum transfer, after many glitches, is almost linear with time. The Lilliefore test on the cumulative distribution of glitch spin-up sizes in these glitching pulsars shows that glitch sizes in 12 pulsars are normally distributed, suggesting that their glitches originate from the same momentum reservoir. In addition, the distribution of the fractional moment of inertia (i.e., the ratio of the moment of inertia of neutron star components that are involved in the glitch process) have a single mode, unlike the distribution of fractional glitch size (Δν/ν), which is usually bimodal. The mean fractional moment of inertia in the glitching pulsars we sampled has a very weak correlation with the pulsar spin properties, thereby supporting a neutron star interior mechanism for the glitch phenomenon.

  15. The angular momentum of cosmological coronae and the inside-out growth of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo; Binney, James

    2017-05-01

    Massive and diffuse haloes of hot gas (coronae) are important intermediaries between cosmology and galaxy evolution, storing mass and angular momentum acquired from the cosmic web until eventual accretion on to star-forming discs. We introduce a method to reconstruct the rotation of a galactic corona, based on its angular momentum distribution (AMD). This allows us to investigate in what conditions the angular momentum acquired from tidal torques can be transferred to star-forming discs and explain observed galaxy-scale processes, such as inside-out growth and the build-up of abundance gradients. We find that a simple model of an isothermal corona with a temperature slightly smaller than virial and a cosmologically motivated AMD is in good agreement with galaxy evolution requirements, supporting hot-mode accretion as a viable driver for the evolution of spiral galaxies in a cosmological context. We predict moderately sub-centrifugal rotation close to the disc and slow rotation close to the virial radius. Motivated by the observation that the Milky Way has a relatively hot corona (T ≃ 2 × 106 K), we also explore models with a temperature larger than virial. To be able to drive inside-out growth, these models must be significantly affected by feedback, either mechanical (ejection of low angular momentum material) or thermal (heating of the central regions). However, the agreement with galaxy evolution constraints becomes, in these cases, only marginal, suggesting that our first and simpler model may apply to a larger fraction of galaxy evolution history.

  16. Accretion of low angular momentum material onto black holes: 2D magnetohydrodynamical case.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proga, D.; Begelman, M. C.

    2003-03-01

    We report on the second phase of our study of slightly rotating accretion flows onto black holes. We consider magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) accretion flows with a spherically symmetric density distribution at the outer boundary, but with spherical symmetry broken by the introduction of a small, latitude-dependent angular momentum and a weak radial magnetic field. We study accretion flows by means of numerical 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with and without resistive heating. Our main result is that the properties of the accretion flow depend mostly on an equatorial accretion torus. Initially, accretion occurs only through the polar funnel, as in the hydrodynamic inviscid case, where material has zero or very low angular momentum. The material that has too much angular momentum to be accreted directly forms a thick torus near the equator. However, in the later phase of the evolution, the transport of angular momentum due to the magnetorotational instability (MRI) facilitates accretion through the torus, too. The torus thickens towards the poles and develops a corona or an outflow or both. Consequently, the mass accretion through the funnel is stopped. The accretion of rotating gas through the torus is significantly reduced compared to the accretion of non-rotating gas (i.e., the Bondi rate). Our results do not change if we switch on or off resistive heating. Overall our simulations are very similar those presented by Stone, Pringle, Hawley and Balbus despite different initial and outer boundary conditions. Thus, we confirm that the MRI is very robust and controls the nature of radiatively inefficient accretion flows. DP acknowledges support from NASA under LTSA grant NAG5-11736 and support provided by NASA through grant AR-09532 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. MB acknowledges support from NSF grant AST-9876887.

  17. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertfelder, Marius; Kley, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims: It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity Ω(r) with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods: We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system (r,ϕ) for a thin, vertically integrated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the α-model; in the BL there is no viscosity term included. Results: We find that our setup is unstable to the sonic instability which sets in shortly after the simulations have been started. Acoustic waves are generated and traverse the domain, developing weak shocks in the vicinity of the BL. Furthermore, the system undergoes recurrent outbursts where the activity in the disk increases strongly. The instability and the waves do not die out for over 2000 orbits. Conclusions: There is indeed a purely hydrodynamical mechanism that enables AM transport in the BL. It is efficient and wave mediated; however, this renders it a non-local transport method, which means that models of a effective local viscosity like the α-viscosity are probably not applicable in the BL. A variety of further implications of the non-local AM transport are discussed.

  18. Muscle contributions to whole-body sagittal plane angular momentum during walking.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; McGowan, C P

    2011-01-04

    Walking is a complex dynamic task that requires the regulation of whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance while performing walking subtasks such as propelling the body forward and accelerating the leg into swing. In human walking, the primary mechanism to regulate angular momentum is muscle force generation. Muscles accelerate body segments and generate ground reaction forces that alter angular momentum about the body's center-of-mass to restore and maintain dynamic stability. In addition, gravity contributes to whole-body angular momentum through its contribution to the ground reaction forces. The purpose of this study was to generate a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation of normal walking to quantify how individual muscles and gravity contribute to whole-body angular momentum in the sagittal plane. In early stance, the uniarticular hip and knee extensors (GMAX and VAS), biarticular hamstrings (HAM) and ankle dorsiflexors (TA) generated backward angular momentum while the ankle plantar flexors (SOL and GAS) generated forward momentum. In late stance, SOL and GAS were the primary contributors and generated angular momentum in opposite directions. SOL generated primarily forward angular momentum while GAS generated backward angular momentum. The difference between muscles was due to their relative contributions to the horizontal and vertical ground reaction forces. Gravity contributed to the body's angular momentum in early stance and to a lesser extent in late stance, which was counteracted primarily by the plantar flexors. These results may provide insight into balance and movement disorders and provide a basis for developing locomotor therapies that target specific muscle groups.

  19. Muscle Contributions to Whole-Body Sagittal Plane Angular Momentum during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Neptune, R.R.; McGowan, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Walking is a complex dynamic task that requires the regulation of whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance while performing walking subtasks such as propelling the body forward and accelerating the leg into swing. In human walking, the primary mechanism to regulate angular momentum is muscle force generation. Muscles accelerate body segments and generate ground reaction forces that alter angular momentum about the body’s center-of-mass to restore and maintain dynamic stability. In addition, gravity contributes to whole-body angular momentum through its contribution to the ground reaction forces. The purpose of this study was to generate a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation of normal walking to quantify how individual muscles and gravity contribute to whole-body angular momentum in the sagittal plane. In early stance, the uniarticular hip and knee extensors (GMAX, VAS), biarticular hamstrings (HAM) and ankle dorsiflexors (TA) generated backward angular momentum while the ankle plantar flexors (SOL, GAS) generated forward momentum. In late stance, SOL and GAS where the primary contributors and generated angular momentum in opposite directions. SOL generated primarily forward angular momentum while GAS generated backward angular momentum. The difference between muscles was due to their relative contributions to the horizontal and vertical ground reaction forces. Gravity contributed to the body’s angular momentum in early stance and to a lesser extent in late stance, which was counteracted primarily by the plantar flexors. These results may provide insight into balance and movement disorders and provide a basis for developing locomotor therapies that target specific muscle groups. PMID:20833396

  20. Construction of optimal laws of variation of the angular momentum vector of a rigid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, V. G.; Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    2014-09-01

    We consider the problem of constructing optimal preset laws of variation of the angular momentum vector of a rigid body taking the body from an arbitrary initial angular position to the required terminal angular position in a given time. We minimize an integral quadratic performance functional whose integrand is a weighted sum of squared projections of the angular momentum vector of the rigid body. We use the Pontryagin maximum principle to derive necessary optimality conditions. In the case of a spherically symmetric rigid body, the problem has a well-known analytic solution. In the case where the body has a dynamic symmetry axis, the obtained boundary value optimization problem is reduced to a system of two nonlinear algebraic equations. For a rigid body with an arbitrarymass distribution, optimal control laws are obtained in the form of elliptic functions. We discuss the laws of controlled motion and applications of the constructed preset laws in systems of attitude control by external control torques or rotating flywheels.

  1. Mediolateral angular momentum changes in persons with amputation during perturbed walking.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Beltran, Eduardo J; Dingwell, Jonathan B; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-03-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (p<0.001) during platform oscillations. There were no significant differences between groups in whole body angular momentum range or variability during unperturbed walking. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was significantly greater for those with amputation than for controls for all segments (p<0.05). For the whole body and intact leg, angular momentum ranges were greater for patients with amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability.

  2. High-capacity millimetre-wave communications with orbital angular momentum multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Xie, Guodong; Lavery, Martin P J; Huang, Hao; Ahmed, Nisar; Bao, Changjing; Ren, Yongxiong; Cao, Yinwen; Li, Long; Zhao, Zhe; Molisch, Andreas F; Tur, Moshe; Padgett, Miles J; Willner, Alan E

    2014-09-16

    One property of electromagnetic waves that has been recently explored is the ability to multiplex multiple beams, such that each beam has a unique helical phase front. The amount of phase front 'twisting' indicates the orbital angular momentum state number, and beams with different orbital angular momentum are orthogonal. Such orbital angular momentum based multiplexing can potentially increase the system capacity and spectral efficiency of millimetre-wave wireless communication links with a single aperture pair by transmitting multiple coaxial data streams. Here we demonstrate a 32-Gbit s(-1) millimetre-wave link over 2.5 metres with a spectral efficiency of ~16 bit s(-1) Hz(-1) using four independent orbital-angular momentum beams on each of two polarizations. All eight orbital angular momentum channels are recovered with bit-error rates below 3.8 × 10(-3). In addition, we demonstrate a millimetre-wave orbital angular momentum mode demultiplexer to demultiplex four orbital angular momentum channels with crosstalk less than -12.5 dB and show an 8-Gbit s(-1) link containing two orbital angular momentum beams on each of two polarizations.

  3. Mediolateral Angular Momentum Changes in Persons With Amputation During Perturbed Walking✰

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Riley C.; Beltran, Eduardo J.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Wilken, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (p < 0.001) during platform oscillations. There were no significant differences between groups in whole body angular momentum range or variability during unperturbed walking. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was significantly greater for those with amputation than for controls for all segments (p < 0.05). For the whole body and intact leg, angular momentum ranges were greater for patients with amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability. PMID:25797789

  4. Detection of an ENSO Signal in Seasonal Atmospheric Angular Momentum Varitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.; Marcus, S. L.; Dickey, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Intro list: Investigate use of Earth rotation measurements as proxy measures of atmospheric angular momentum in global climate change studies. Examine role of observed length-of-day changes. Study observed changes in strength of seasonal lod signal. Investigate origin of this correlation by examining angular momentum of NCEP zonal winds.

  5. High-capacity millimetre-wave communications with orbital angular momentum multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Xie, Guodong; Lavery, Martin P. J.; Huang, Hao; Ahmed, Nisar; Bao, Changjing; Ren, Yongxiong; Cao, Yinwen; Li, Long; Zhao, Zhe; Molisch, Andreas F.; Tur, Moshe; Padgett, Miles J.; Willner, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    One property of electromagnetic waves that has been recently explored is the ability to multiplex multiple beams, such that each beam has a unique helical phase front. The amount of phase front ‘twisting’ indicates the orbital angular momentum state number, and beams with different orbital angular momentum are orthogonal. Such orbital angular momentum based multiplexing can potentially increase the system capacity and spectral efficiency of millimetre-wave wireless communication links with a single aperture pair by transmitting multiple coaxial data streams. Here we demonstrate a 32-Gbit s−1 millimetre-wave link over 2.5 metres with a spectral efficiency of ~16 bit s−1 Hz−1 using four independent orbital–angular momentum beams on each of two polarizations. All eight orbital angular momentum channels are recovered with bit-error rates below 3.8 × 10−3. In addition, we demonstrate a millimetre-wave orbital angular momentum mode demultiplexer to demultiplex four orbital angular momentum channels with crosstalk less than −12.5 dB and show an 8-Gbit s−1 link containing two orbital angular momentum beams on each of two polarizations. PMID:25224763

  6. Study on photonic angular momentum states in coaxial magneto-optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mu; Wu, Li-Ting; Guo, Tian-Jing; Guo, Rui-Peng; Cui, Hai-Xu; Cao, Xue-Wei; Chen, Jing

    2014-10-21

    By rigorously solving Maxwell's equations, we develop a full-wave electromagnetic theory for the study of photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs) in coaxial magneto-optical (MO) waveguides. Paying attention to a metal-MO-metal coaxial configuration, we show that the dispersion curves of the originally degenerated PAMSs experience a splitting, which are determined by the off-diagonal permittivity tensor element of the MO medium. We emphasize that this broken degeneracy in dispersion relation is accompanied by modified distributions of field component and transverse energy flux. A qualitative analysis about the connection between the split dispersion behavior and the field distribution is provided. Potential applications are discussed.

  7. Generation of Sources of Light with Well Defined Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, S. Cruz y.; Escamilla, N.; Velάzquez, V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a technique to produce spatial electromagnetic modes with definite orbital angular momentum is presented. The method is based in the construction of binary diffractive gratings generated by computer. In the classical regime the gratings produce the well known Laguerre-Gaussian modes distributions when illuminated by a plane wave. In the quantum regime the grating is placed in the signal path of a spontaneous parametric down conversion layout and the diffraction pattern, observed in the coincidence count rate, shows that the single photons are projected onto spatial states consistent with a Laguerre-Gaussian modes distribution.

  8. Relaxation of rotational angular momentum of polar diatomic molecules in simple liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, A.; Perez, J.

    2007-03-15

    The relaxation processes of rotational angular momentum of polar diatomic molecules diluted in simple liquids are analyzed by applying a non-Markovian relaxation theory to the study of the binary time autocorrelation function of the angular momentum. This non-Markovian theory was previously applied to the study of the infrared and Raman spectroscopy, and also to the analysis of the rotational energy relaxation processes. We have obtained non-Markovian evolution equations for the two-time j-level angular momentum correlation components involved in the angular momentum correlation function. In these equations, the time-dependent angular momentum transfer rates and the pure orientational angular transfer rates are given in terms of the binary time autocorrelation function of the diatomic-solvent anisotropic interaction. The non-Markovian evolution equations converge to Markovian ones in the long time limit, reaching the angular momentum transfer rates in the usual time-independent form. Alternative time scales for the angular relaxation processes, relative to the individual rotational processes as well as to the global decay correlations, are introduced and analyzed. The theory is applied to the study of the angular momentum relaxation processes of HCl diluted in liquid SF{sub 6}, a system for which rotational energy relaxation and infrared and Raman spectroscopy was previously analyzed in the scope of the same theory.

  9. Scheme for optical implementation of orbital angular momentum beam splitter of a light beam and its application in quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Xubo; Mathis, W.

    2005-04-01

    Optical beams bearing orbital angular momentum have been recently recognized as potential candidates for realizing D-dimensional quantum systems (qudits). In this paper, we propose an optical scheme to implement an orbital angular momentum beam splitter, which changes the outgoing direction with respect to the incoming direction while leaving the qudit state unchanged. Furthermore we demonstrate that such a beam splitter can be used to sort different orbital angular states of a single photon, create arbitrary superpositions of orbital angular momentum states, and implement a high-dimensional Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol for quantum key distribution.

  10. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  11. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  12. Generation of angular-momentum-dominated electron beams from a photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.-E.; Piot, P.; Kim, K.-J.; Barov, N.; Lidia, S.; Santucci, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; Wennerberg, J.

    2004-12-01

    Various projects under study require an angular-momentum-dominated electron beam generated by a photoinjector. Some of the proposals directly use the angular-momentum-dominated beams (e.g., electron cooling of heavy ions), while others require the beam to be transformed into a flat beam (e.g., possible electron injectors for light sources and linear colliders). In this paper we report our experimental study of an angular-momentum-dominated beam produced in a photoinjector, addressing the dependencies of angular momentum on initial conditions. We also briefly discuss the removal of angular momentum. The results of the experiment, carried out at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are found to be in good agreement with theoretical and numerical models.

  13. On angular momentum transfer in binary systems. [stellar orbital period change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Stothers, R.

    1975-01-01

    The maximum limit for the conversion of orbital angular momentum into rotational angular momentum of the mass-gaining component in a close binary system is derived. It is shown that this conversion process does not seriously affect the rate of orbital period change and can be neglected in computing the mass transfer rate. Integration of this limit over the entire accretion process results in a value for the maximum accumulated rotational angular momentum that is 3 to 4 times larger than that implied by the observed underluminosity of stars in such systems as Mu(1) Sco, V Pup, SX Aur, and V356 Sgr. It is suggested that shell stars and emission-line stars in binary systems may be produced when the core angular momentum is transferred into an envelope having a rotational angular momentum close to the maximum limit.-

  14. The angular momentum transport by unstable toroidal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Gellert, M.; Spada, F.; Tereshin, I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate with a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code that angular momentum can be transported because of the magnetic instability of toroidal fields under the influence of differential rotation, and that the resulting effective viscosity may be high enough to explain the almost rigid-body rotation observed in radiative stellar cores. We only consider stationary, current-free fields, and only those combinations of rotation rates and magnetic field amplitudes which provide maximal numerical values of the viscosity. We find that the dimensionless ratio of the effective over molecular viscosity, νT/ν, linearly grows with the Reynolds number of the rotating fluid multiplied by the square-root of the magnetic Prandtl number, which is approximately unity for the considered red subgiant star KIC 7341231. For the interval of magnetic Reynolds numbers considered - which is restricted by numerical constraints of the nonlinear MHD code - the magnetic Prandtl number has a remarkable influence on the relative importance of the contributions of the Reynolds stress and the Maxwell stress to the total viscosity, which is magnetically dominated only for Pm ≳ 0.5. We also find that the magnetized plasma behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid, i.e., the resulting effective viscosity depends on the shear in the rotation law. The decay time of the differential rotation thus depends on its shear and becomes longer and longer during the spin-down of a stellar core.

  15. Density matrix reconstruction of a large angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Gerd

    2001-10-01

    A complete description of the quantum state of a physical system is the fundamental knowledge necessary to statistically predict the outcome of measurements. In turning this statement around, Wolfgang Pauli raised already in 1933 the question, whether an unknown quantum state could be uniquely determined by appropriate measurements-a problem that has gained new relevance in recent years. In order to harness the prospects of quantum computing, secure communication, teleportation, and the like, the development of techniques to accurately control and measure quantum states has now become a matter of practical as well as fundamental interest. However, there is no general answer to Pauli's very basic question, and quantum state reconstruction algorithms have been developed and experimentally demonstrated only for a few systems so far. This thesis presents a novel experimental method to measure the unknown and generally mixed quantum state for an angular momentum of arbitrary magnitude. The (2F + 1) x (2F + 1) density matrix describing the quantum state is hereby completely determined from a set of Stern-Gerlach measurements with (4F + 1) different orientations of the quantization axis. This protocol is implemented for laser cooled Cesium atoms in the 6S1/2(F = 4) hyperfine ground state manifold, and is applied to a number of test states prepared by optical pumping and Larmor precession. A comparison of the input and the measured states shows successful reconstructions with fidelities of about 0.95.

  16. ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I. THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Imara, Nia; Blitz, Leo

    2011-05-10

    We present a detailed analysis comparing the velocity fields in molecular clouds and the atomic gas that surrounds them in order to address the origin of the gradients. To that end, we present first-moment intensity-weighted velocity maps of the molecular clouds and surrounding atomic gas. The maps are made from high-resolution {sup 13}CO observations and 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic H I Survey. We find that (1) the atomic gas associated with each molecular cloud has a substantial velocity gradient-ranging from 0.02 to 0.07 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1}-whether or not the molecular cloud itself has a substantial linear gradient. (2) If the gradients in the molecular and atomic gas were due to rotation, this would imply that the molecular clouds have less specific angular momentum than the surrounding H I by a factor of 1-6. (3) Most importantly, the velocity gradient position angles in the molecular and atomic gas are generally widely separated-by as much as 130 deg. in the case of the Rosette molecular cloud. This result argues against the hypothesis that molecular clouds formed by simple top-down collapse from atomic gas.

  17. Object Identification Using Correlated Orbital Angular Momentum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Fraine, Andrew; Simon, David S.; Minaeva, Olga; Sergienko, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Using spontaneous parametric down-conversion as a source of correlated photon pairs, correlations are measured between the orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a target beam (which contains an unknown object) and that in an empty reference beam. Unlike previous studies, the effects of the object on off-diagonal elements of the OAM correlation matrix are examined. Because of the presence of the object, terms appear in which the signal and idler OAM do not add up to that of the pump. Using these off-diagonal correlations, the potential for high-efficiency object identification by means of correlated OAM states is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The higher-dimensional OAM Hilbert space enhances the information capacity of this approach, while the presence of the off-diagonal correlations allows for recognition of specific spatial signatures present in the object. In particular, this allows the detection of discrete rotational symmetries and the efficient evaluation of multiple azimuthal Fourier coefficients using fewer resources than in conventional pixel-by-pixel imaging. This represents a demonstration of sparse sensing using OAM states, as well as being the first correlated OAM experiment to measure properties of a real, stand-alone object, a necessary first step toward correlated OAM-based remote sensing.

  18. Object identification using correlated orbital angular momentum states.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Fraine, Andrew; Simon, David S; Minaeva, Olga; Sergienko, Alexander V

    2013-01-25

    Using spontaneous parametric down-conversion as a source of correlated photon pairs, correlations are measured between the orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a target beam (which contains an unknown object) and that in an empty reference beam. Unlike previous studies, the effects of the object on off-diagonal elements of the OAM correlation matrix are examined. Because of the presence of the object, terms appear in which the signal and idler OAM do not add up to that of the pump. Using these off-diagonal correlations, the potential for high-efficiency object identification by means of correlated OAM states is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The higher-dimensional OAM Hilbert space enhances the information capacity of this approach, while the presence of the off-diagonal correlations allows for recognition of specific spatial signatures present in the object. In particular, this allows the detection of discrete rotational symmetries and the efficient evaluation of multiple azimuthal Fourier coefficients using fewer resources than in conventional pixel-by-pixel imaging. This represents a demonstration of sparse sensing using OAM states, as well as being the first correlated OAM experiment to measure properties of a real, stand-alone object, a necessary first step toward correlated OAM-based remote sensing.

  19. High-speed acoustic communication by multiplexing orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-07-11

    Long-range acoustic communication is crucial to underwater applications such as collection of scientific data from benthic stations, ocean geology, and remote control of off-shore industrial activities. However, the transmission rate of acoustic communication is always limited by the narrow-frequency bandwidth of the acoustic waves because of the large attenuation for high-frequency sound in water. Here, we demonstrate a high-throughput communication approach using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of acoustic vortex beams with one order enhancement of the data transmission rate at a single frequency. The topological charges of OAM provide intrinsically orthogonal channels, offering a unique ability to multiplex data transmission within a single acoustic beam generated by a transducer array, drastically increasing the information channels and capacity of acoustic communication. A high spectral efficiency of 8.0 ± 0.4 (bit/s)/Hz in acoustic communication has been achieved using topological charges between -4 and +4 without applying other communication modulation techniques. Such OAM is a completely independent degree of freedom which can be readily integrated with other state-of-the-art communication modulation techniques like quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) and phase-shift keying (PSK). Information multiplexing through OAM opens a dimension for acoustic communication, providing a data transmission rate that is critical for underwater applications.

  20. Angular momentum - mass relation for dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shihong; Cheng, Dalong; Chu, Ming-Chung; Tang, Jiayu

    2015-04-01

    We study the empirical relation between an astronomical object's angular momentum J and mass M, J = βMα , the J - M relation, using N-body simulations. In particular, we investigate the time evolution of the J - M relation to study how the initial power spectrum and cosmological model affect this relation, and to test two popular models of its origin - mechanical equilibrium and tidal torque theory. We find that in the ΛCDM model, α starts with a value of 1.5 at high redshift z, increases monotonically, and finally reaches 5/3 near z = 0 , whereas β evolves linearly with time in the beginning, reaches a maximum and decreases, and stabilizes finally. A three-regime scheme is proposed to understand this newly observed picture. We show that the tidal torque theory accounts for this time evolution behaviour in the linear regime, whereas α = 5 / 3 comes from the virial equilibrium of haloes. The J - M relation in the linear regime contains the information of the power spectrum and cosmological model. The J - M relations for haloes in different environments and with different merging histories are also investigated to study the effects of a halo's non-linear evolution. An updated and more complete understanding of this relation is thus obtained.

  1. Angular Momentum-Mass Relation for Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shihong; Cheng, Dalong; Chu, M.-C.; Tang, Jiayu

    2015-08-01

    We study the empirical relation between an astronomical object’s angular momentum J and mass M, J = βMα, the J-M relation, using N-body simulations. In particular, we investigate the time evolution of the J-M relation to study how the initial power spectrum and cosmological model affect this relation and to test two popular models of its origin—mechanical equilibrium and tidal torque theory (TTT). We find that in the ΛCDM model, α starts with a value of ˜1.5 at high redshift z, increases monotonically, and finally reaches 5/3 near z = 0, whereas β evolves linearly with time in the beginning, reaches a maximum and decreases, and, finally, stabilizes. A three-regime scheme is proposed to understand this newly observed picture. We show that the TTT accounts for this time-evolution behavior in the linear regime, whereas α = 5/3 comes from the virial equilibrium of halos. The J-M relation in the linear regime contains the information of the power spectrum and cosmological model. The J-M relations for halos in different environments and with different merging histories are also investigated to study the effects of a halo’s nonlinear evolution. An updated and more complete understanding of the J-M relation is thus obtained.

  2. Non-collinear interaction of photons with orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Thomas; Heitz, Julius J. F.; Wright, Ewan M.; Faccio, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    We study the nonlinear interaction between two non-collinear light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM). More specifically, two incident beams interact at an angle in a medium with a second order nonlinearity and thus generate a third, non-collinear beam at the second harmonic frequency that experiences a reduced conversion efficiency in comparison to that expected based on conventional phase-matching theory. This reduction scales with the input beam OAM and, differently from previous spiral bandwidth calculations, is due to a geometric effect whereby the input OAM is projected along the non-collinear interaction direction. The effect is relevant even at small interaction angles and is further complicated at large angles by a non-conservation of the total OAM in the nonlinear interaction. Experiments are performed under different conditions and are in excellent agreement with the theory. Our results have implications beyond the specific case studied here of second-harmonic generation, in particular for parametric down-conversion of photons or in general for phase-matched non-collinear interactions between beams with different OAM. PMID:24336441

  3. Position, spin, and orbital angular momentum of a relativistic electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Dennis, Mark R.; Nori, Franco

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by recent interest in relativistic electron vortex states, we revisit the spin and orbital angular momentum properties of Dirac electrons. These are uniquely determined by the choice of the position operator for a relativistic electron. We consider two main approaches discussed in the literature: (i) the projection of operators onto the positive-energy subspace, which removes the Zitterbewegung effects and correctly describes spin-orbit interaction effects, and (ii) the use of Newton-Wigner-Foldy-Wouthuysen operators based on the inverse Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. We argue that the first approach [previously described in application to Dirac vortex beams in K. Y. Bliokh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 174802 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.174802] has a more natural physical interpretation, including spin-orbit interactions and a nonsingular zero-mass limit, than the second one [S. M. Barnett, Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 114802 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.114802].

  4. Accessing sea quark's angular momentum through polarized target Drell-Yan single-spin asymmetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaodong; P-1039 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A Letter-Of-Intent (P-1039) has been submitted to the Fermilab's Program Advisory Committee in May 2013, for a measurement of transversely polarized proton target (NH3) single-spin asymmetry (SSA) in Drell-Yan reaction with a 120 GeV/c unpolarized proton beam using a similar setup as in the ongoing unpolarized target experiment (E906). The goal of this LOI is to clearly pin down the u -quark Sivers distribution in the x range of 0.1-0.3, where a large sea flavor asymmetry (d / u) has been observed. A non-vanishing quark Sivers distribution arises from the imaginary piece of amplitudes interference between quark angular momentum L = 0 , and L ≠ 0 wave functions. Existing semi-inclusive DIS Sivers-type SSA data from HERMES, COMPASS and JLab-Hall A, while sensitive to valence quarks' Sivers distributions, do not provide much constrains on sea quarks' Sivers distributions. In the case that u -quark carries zero angular momentum, one expects u -quark's Sivers distribution to vanish, therefore observing a zero target SSA in Drell-Yan reaction in P-1039.

  5. Effect of stride length on overarm throwing delivery: Part II: An angular momentum response.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Dan K; Crotin, Ryan L

    2016-04-01

    This is the second component of a two-part series investigating 3D momentum profiles specific to overhand throwing, where altering stride reportedly influences throwing mechanics resulting in significantly different physiologic outcomes and linear momentum profiles. Using a randomized cross-over design, nineteen pitchers (15 collegiate and 4 high school) were assigned to pitch two simulated 80-pitch games at ±25% of their desired stride length. An 8-camera motion capture system (240Hz) integrated with two force plates (960Hz) and radar gun tracked each overhand throw. Segmental angular momentums were summed yielding throwing arm and total body momentums, from which compensation ratio's (relative contribution between the two) were derived. Pairwise comparisons at hallmark events and phases identified significantly different angular momentum profiles, in particular total body, throwing arm, and momentum compensation ratios (P⩽0.05) as a result of manipulating stride length. Sagittal, frontal, and transverse angular momentums were affected by stride length changes. Transverse magnitudes showed greatest effects for total body, throwing arm, and momentum compensation ratios. Since the trunk is the main contributor to linear and angular momentum, longer strides appear to better regulate transverse trunk momentum in double support, whereas shorter strides show increased momentum prior to throwing arm acceleration.

  6. Constraining The Primordial Angular Momentum Deficit Of The Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasser, Ramon; Walsh, K. J.; Nesvorny, D.

    2012-10-01

    The current orbits of the terrestrial planets are rather circular and fairly coplanar. A measure for the system's deviation from being cirular and coplanar is the Angular Momentum Deficit (Laskar, 1997). For the terrestrial system its normalised current, long-term average value is 0.0018. It remains an open question as to how the terrestrial system obtained its AMD. There are two viable sources: either it is a remnant of their formation or it was acquired during late-state giant planet migration. The low current AMD of the terrestrial planets led Brasser et al. (2009) and Agnor & Lin (2012) to conclude that the divergent late migration of Jupiter and Saturn had to occur on a timescale of τ 0.1 Myr or shorter. However, Agnor & Lin (2012) suggested that the migration could have been slower if the AMD modes exhibited enough destructive interference during the migration of the giant planets, and they suggested that this be explored numerically. Here we report on the results of numerical simulations where we start the terrestrial system with a primordial AMD ranging from 10% to 250% of the current value and subject it to a few cases of fast (τ <0.1 Myr) giant planet migration. We find that the current value of 0.0018 is marginally reproduced only for systems whose primordial AMD was 10% or less of the current value. We always report an increase in the AMD, even when starting with higher primordial values than the current one. Thus the interference of the modes is primarily constructive. The necessary low primordial AMD imposes a formidable constraint on future studies of terrestrial planet migration.

  7. Angular Momentum Regulates Atomic Gas Fractions of Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, D.; Glazebrook, K.; Kilborn, V.; Lutz, K.

    2016-06-01

    We show that the mass fraction {f}{{atm}}=1.35{M}{{H}{{I}}}/M of neutral atomic gas (H i and He) in isolated local disk galaxies of baryonic mass M is well described by a straightforward stability model for flat exponential disks. In the outer disk parts, where gas at the characteristic dispersion of the warm neutral medium is stable in the sense of Toomre, the disk consists of neutral atomic gas; conversely, the inner part where this medium would be Toomre-unstable, is dominated by stars and molecules. Within this model, {f}{{atm}} only depends on a global stability parameter q\\equiv jσ /({GM}), where j is the baryonic specific angular momentum of the disk and σ the velocity dispersion of the atomic gas. The analytically derived first-order solution {f}{{atm}}={min}\\{1,2.5{q}1.12\\} provides a good fit to all plausible rotation curves. This model, with no free parameters, agrees remarkably well (±0.2 dex) with measurements of {f}{{atm}} in isolated local disk galaxies, even with galaxies that are extremely H i-rich or H i-poor for their mass. The finding that {f}{{atm}} increasing monotonically with q for pure stability reasons offers a powerful intuitive explanation for the mean variation of {f}{{atm}} with M: in a cold dark matter universe, galaxies are expected to follow j\\propto {M}2/3, which implies the average scaling q\\propto {M}-1/3 and hence {f}{{atm}}\\propto {M}-0.37, in agreement with the observations.

  8. Orbital Angular Momentum of Gauge Fields: Excitation of an Atom by Twisted Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasev, Andrei V.; Carlson, Carl E.; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2014-01-01

    Twisted photon states, or photon states with large (> {h_bar}) angular momentum projection in the direction of motion, can photoexcite atomic final states of differing quantum numbers. If the photon symmetry axis coincides with the center of an atom, there are known selection rules that require exact matching between the quantum numbers of the photon and the photoexcited states. The more general case of arbitrarily positioned beams relaxes the selection rules but produces a distribution of quantum numbers of the final atomic states that is novel and distinct from final states produced by plane-wave photons. Numerical calculations are presented using a hydrogen atom as an example.

  9. Generating optical superimposed vortex beam with tunable orbital angular momentum using integrated devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Dengke; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xiangdong; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Huang, Yidong

    2015-07-20

    An integrated device, which consists of a variable amplitude splitter and an orbital angular momentum (OAM) emitter, is proposed for the superposition of optical vortex beams. With fixed wavelength and power of incident beam, the OAM of the radiated optical superimposed vortex beam can be dynamically tuned. To verify the operating principle, the proposed device has been fabricated on the SOI substrate and experimentally measured. The experimental results confirm the tunability of superimposed vortex beams. Moreover, the ability of independently varying the OAM flux and the geometric distribution of intensity is illustrated and discussed with numerical simulation. We believe that this work would be promising in various applications.

  10. Simultaneous generation of multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single phase-only element.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Long; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-05

    Based on the conventional iterative algorithm, we present a pattern search assisted iterative (PSI) algorithm to simultaneously generate multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single phase-only element. The PSI algorithm shows a favorable operation performance for generating 100 randomly spaced OAM modes and 50 evenly spaced OAM modes with high diffraction efficiency (>93%), low relative root-mean-square error (R-RMSE) and low standard deviation. Moreover, we can also manipulate the relative power distribution of the generated OAM modes simply by setting the initial weight coefficients in the PSI algorithm.

  11. First observation of photons carrying orbital angular momentum in undulator radiation.

    PubMed

    Bahrdt, J; Holldack, K; Kuske, P; Müller, R; Scheer, M; Schmid, P

    2013-07-19

    Photon beams of 99 eV energy carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been observed in the 2nd harmonic off-axis radiation of a helical undulator at the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source BESSY II. For detection, the OAM carrying photon beam was superimposed with a reference beam without OAM. The interference pattern, a spiral intensity distribution, was recorded in a plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. The orientation of the observed spiral structure is related to the helicity of the undulator radiation. Excellent agreement between measurements and simulations has been found.

  12. Two-photon polymerization of a three dimensional structure using beams with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yan Liu, Zhao-Pei; Ren, Jin-Li; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-08-11

    The focus of a beam with orbital angular momentum exhibits internal structure instead of an elliptical intensity distribution of a Gaussian beam, and the superposition of Gauss-Laguerre beams realized by two-dimensional phase modulation can generate a complex three-dimensional (3D) focus. By taking advantage of the flexibility of this 3D focus tailoring, we have fabricated a 3D microstructure with high resolution by two-photon polymerization with a single exposure. Furthermore, we have polymerized an array of double-helix structures that demonstrates optical chirality.

  13. Generating optical superimposed vortex beam with tunable orbital angular momentum using integrated devices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Dengke; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xiangdong; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Huang, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    An integrated device, which consists of a variable amplitude splitter and an orbital angular momentum (OAM) emitter, is proposed for the superposition of optical vortex beams. With fixed wavelength and power of incident beam, the OAM of the radiated optical superimposed vortex beam can be dynamically tuned. To verify the operating principle, the proposed device has been fabricated on the SOI substrate and experimentally measured. The experimental results confirm the tunability of superimposed vortex beams. Moreover, the ability of independently varying the OAM flux and the geometric distribution of intensity is illustrated and discussed with numerical simulation. We believe that this work would be promising in various applications. PMID:26190669

  14. Angular momentum conservation law in light-front quantum field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Kelly Yu-Ju; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2017-03-31

    We prove the Lorentz invariance of the angular momentum conservation law and the helicity sum rule for relativistic composite systems in the light-front formulation. We explicitly show that j3, the z -component of the angular momentum remains unchanged under Lorentz transformations generated by the light-front kinematical boost operators. The invariance of j3 under Lorentz transformations is a feature unique to the front form. Applying the Lorentz invariance of the angular quantum number in the front form, we obtain a selection rule for the orbital angular momentum which can be used to eliminate certain interaction vertices in QED and QCD. Wemore » also generalize the selection rule to any renormalizable theory and show that there exists an upper bound on the change of orbital angular momentum in scattering processes at any fixed order in perturbation theory.« less

  15. Spin and orbital angular momentum and their conversion in cylindrical vector vortices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiangbo; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Cai, Xinlun; Yu, Siyuan

    2014-08-01

    The generation of light beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been greatly advanced with the emergence of the recently reported integrated optical vortex emitters. Generally, optical vortices emitted by these devices possess cylindrically symmetric states of polarization and spiral phase fronts, and they can be defined as cylindrical vector vortices (CVVs). Using the radiation of angularly arranged dipoles to model the CVVs, these beams as hybrid modes of two circularly polarized scalar vortices are theoretically demonstrated to own well-defined total angular momentum. Moreover, the effect of spin-orbit interactions of angular momentum is identified in the CVVs when the size of the emitting structure varies. This effect results in the diminishing spin component of angular momentum and purer OAM states at large structure radii.

  16. Angular momentum conservation law in light-front quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Kelly Yu-Ju; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2017-03-01

    We prove the Lorentz invariance of the angular momentum conservation law and the helicity sum rule for relativistic composite systems in the light-front formulation. We explicitly show that j3, the z -component of the angular momentum remains unchanged under Lorentz transformations generated by the light-front kinematical boost operators. The invariance of j3 under Lorentz transformations is a feature unique to the front form. Applying the Lorentz invariance of the angular quantum number in the front form, we obtain a selection rule for the orbital angular momentum which can be used to eliminate certain interaction vertices in QED and QCD. We also generalize the selection rule to any renormalizable theory and show that there exists an upper bound on the change of orbital angular momentum in scattering processes at any fixed order in perturbation theory.

  17. GALACTIC ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN THE ILLUSTRIS SIMULATION: FEEDBACK AND THE HUBBLE SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Genel, Shy; Fall, S. Michael; Snyder, Gregory F.; Hernquist, Lars; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Vogelsberger, Mark; Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker

    2015-05-10

    We study the stellar angular momentum of thousands of galaxies in the Illustris cosmological simulation, which captures gravitational and gas dynamics within galaxies, as well as feedback from stars and black holes. We find that the angular momentum of the simulated galaxies matches observations well, and in particular two distinct relations are found for late-type versus early-type galaxies. The relation for late-type galaxies corresponds to the value expected from full conservation of the specific angular momentum generated by cosmological tidal torques. The relation for early-type galaxies corresponds to retention of only ∼30% of that, but we find that those early-type galaxies with low angular momentum at z = 0 nevertheless reside at high redshift on the late-type relation. Some of them abruptly lose angular momentum during major mergers. To gain further insight, we explore the scaling relations in simulations where the galaxy formation physics is modified with respect to the fiducial model. We find that galactic winds with high mass-loading factors are essential for obtaining the high angular momentum relation typical for late-type galaxies, while active galactic nucleus feedback largely operates in the opposite direction. Hence, feedback controls the stellar angular momentum of galaxies, and appears to be instrumental for establishing the Hubble sequence.

  18. Galactic Angular Momentum in the Illustris Simulation: Feedback and the Hubble Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genel, Shy; Fall, S. Michael; Hernquist, Lars; Vogelsberger, Mark; Snyder, Gregory F.; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker

    2015-05-01

    We study the stellar angular momentum of thousands of galaxies in the Illustris cosmological simulation, which captures gravitational and gas dynamics within galaxies, as well as feedback from stars and black holes. We find that the angular momentum of the simulated galaxies matches observations well, and in particular two distinct relations are found for late-type versus early-type galaxies. The relation for late-type galaxies corresponds to the value expected from full conservation of the specific angular momentum generated by cosmological tidal torques. The relation for early-type galaxies corresponds to retention of only ∼30% of that, but we find that those early-type galaxies with low angular momentum at z = 0 nevertheless reside at high redshift on the late-type relation. Some of them abruptly lose angular momentum during major mergers. To gain further insight, we explore the scaling relations in simulations where the galaxy formation physics is modified with respect to the fiducial model. We find that galactic winds with high mass-loading factors are essential for obtaining the high angular momentum relation typical for late-type galaxies, while active galactic nucleus feedback largely operates in the opposite direction. Hence, feedback controls the stellar angular momentum of galaxies, and appears to be instrumental for establishing the Hubble sequence.

  19. Mass and Angular Momentum Loss of B[e] Stars via Decretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, J. K.; Owocki, S. P.; Kurfürst, P.

    2017-02-01

    We study the disks of B[e] stars assuming that the disks stem from the angular momentum loss from the central object. The angular momentum loss may be induced either by evolution of the stellar interior of critically rotating star or by merger event in a binary. In contrast to the usual stellar wind mass loss set by driving from the stellar luminosity, such decretion-disk mass loss is determined by the angular momentum loss needed to keep the central object in equilibrium. The angular momentum loss is given either by the interior evolution and decline in the star's moment of inertia, or by excess angular momentum present in a merging binary. Because the specific angular momentum in a Keplerian disk increases with the square root of the radius, the decretion mass loss associated with a required level of angular momentum loss depends crucially on the outer radius for viscous coupling of the disk. The magnetorotational instability can be the source of anomalous viscosity in decretion disks. The instability operates close to the star and disappears in the region where the disk orbital velocity is roughly equal to the sound speed. We study the differences between Be and B[e] star disks and discuss the reasons why stars of the stellar type B have disks, while other stars do not.

  20. Energy and angular momentum transfers from an electromagnetic wave to a copper ring in the UHF band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Émile, Olivier; Brousseau, Christian; Émile, Janine; Mahdjoubi, Kouroch

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic waves could carry orbital angular momentum. Such momentum can be transferred to macroscopic objects and can make them rotate under a constant torque. Based on experimental observations, we investigate the origin of orbital angular momentum and energy transfer. Due to angular momentum and energy conservation, we show that angular momentum transfer is due to the change in the sign of angular momentum upon reflection. This leads to a rotational Doppler shift of the electromagnetic wave frequency, ensuring energy conservation. xml:lang="fr"