Science.gov

Sample records for angular resolution approximately

  1. High angular resolution at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, A.; Arcidiacono, C.; Bertero, M.; Boccacci, P.; Davies, A. G.; Defrere, D.; de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.; Hinz, P.; Hofmann, K. H.; La Camera, A.; Leisenring, J.; Kürster, M.; Rathbun, J. A.; Schertl, D.; Skemer, A.; Skrutskie, M.; Spencer, J. R.; Veillet, C.; Weigelt, G.; Woodward, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    High angular resolution from ground-based observatories stands as a key technology for advancing planetary science. In the window between the angular resolution achievable with 8-10 meter class telescopes, and the 23-to-40 meter giants of the future, LBT provides a glimpse of what the next generation of instruments providing higher angular resolution will provide. We present first ever resolved images of an Io eruption site taken from the ground, images of Io's Loki Patera taken with Fizeau imaging at the 22.8 meter LBT [Conrad, et al., AJ, 2015]. We will also present preliminary analysis of two data sets acquired during the 2015 opposition: L-band fringes at Kurdalagon and an occultation of Loki and Pele by Europa (see figure). The light curves from this occultation will yield an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution along the path of ingress and egress. We will conclude by providing an overview of the overall benefit of recent and future advances in angular resolution for planetary science.

  2. Supernovae at the Highest Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyk, S. Van; Weiler, K.; Sramek, R.; Panagia, N.; Lacey, C.; Montes, M.; Mercaide, J.; Lewin, W.; Fox, D.; Filippenko, A.; Peng, C.

    2000-01-01

    The study of supernovae (SNe) and their environments in host galaxies at the highest possible angular resolution in a number of wavelength regimes is providing vital clues to the nature of their progenitor stars.

  3. Angular Distributions of Synchrotron Radiation in the Nonrelativistic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Loginov, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    The angular distribution functions of the polarized components of synchrotron radiation in the nonrelativistic approximation are investigated using methods of classical and quantum theory. Particles of zero spin (bosons) and spin 1/2 (electrons) are considered in the quantum theory. It is shown that in the first nonzero approximation the angular distribution functions, calculated by methods of classical and quantum theory, coincide identically. Quantum corrections to the angular distribution functions appear only in the subsequent approximation whereas the total radiated power contains quantum and spin corrections already in the first approximation.

  4. Pioneering high angular resolution at GTC: FRIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    FRIDA imager and integral-field spectrograph will provide the GTC community with the first diffraction-limited angular resolutions of a 10 m telescope: 25 - 40 mas in the 1 - 2.5 um range. These angular resolutions are a factor 15 improvement with respect to those of current and/or planned instruments for GTC, factor 1.5 superior to that of JWST. In this talk I will develop on science paths for FRIDA, with natural and laser guide star that illustrate the potential and unique capabilities of GTCAO+FRIDA till the arrival of the ELTs.

  5. Angular resolution of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifazi, C.

    2005-08-01

    We studied the angular resolution of the Pierre Auger Detector using data collected from January 2004 to May 2005. The detector consists of two independent components, the fluorescence detector and the surface detector. Hybrid events, observed simultaneously by both components, have smaller reconstruction uncertainties than the events observed with only one component. The hybrid resolution is extracted from artificial showers generated by laser shots, while the surface detector angular accuracy is then determined from the comparison of the hybrid geometrical fit with the one obtained from the surface detector alone. We used adjacent surface detector stations to cross check our methods. The angular reconstruction accuracy of the surface detector events is given as a function of station multiplicity.

  6. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Deepak; Onikeri, Pratibha B.; Murgod, Lakshmi P.

    2017-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the accuracy in the arrival direction of particles estimated using a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We also present a theoretical estimate of angular resolution of such a setup. In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  7. Angular resolution studies of the CYGNUS array using the shadows of the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Using the cosmic ray shadows of the sun and moon, we have estimated the angular resolution of the CYGNUS extensive air shower array. With the event sample now available we estimate the angular resolution of the array to be 0.70[sub [minus]0.06][sup [plus]0.07] degrees. The resolution depends on the total number of detected shower particles. A new parameterization of the measured shower-front timing structure and the use of counters with small pulse areas lead to a [approximately]25% improvement in the resolution. The systematic pointing error of the array is less than 0.4[degree].

  8. Angular resolution studies of the CYGNUS array using the shadows of the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, A.L.; The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Using the cosmic ray shadows of the sun and moon, we have estimated the angular resolution of the CYGNUS extensive air shower array. With the event sample now available we estimate the angular resolution of the array to be 0.70{sub {minus}0.06}{sup {plus}0.07} degrees. The resolution depends on the total number of detected shower particles. A new parameterization of the measured shower-front timing structure and the use of counters with small pulse areas lead to a {approximately}25% improvement in the resolution. The systematic pointing error of the array is less than 0.4{degree}.

  9. Resolution analysis of an angular domain imaging system with two dimensional angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter to distinguish between quasi-ballistic and scattered photons based on trajectory. A 2D angular filter array was constructed using 3D printing technology to generate an array of micro-channels 500 μm x 500 μm with a length of 12 cm. The main barrier to 2D imaging with the 2D angular filter array was the shadows cast on the image by the 500 μm walls of the angular filter. The objective of this work was to perform a resolution analysis of the 2D angular filter array. The approach was to position the AFA with a two dimensional positioning stage to obtain images of areas normally obstructed by the walls of the AFA. A digital light processor was also incorporated to generate various light patterns to improve the contrast of the images. A resolution analysis was completed by imaging a knife edge submerged in various uniform scattering media (Intralipid® dilutions with water). The edge response functions obtained were then used to compute the line spread function and the theoretical resolution of the imaging system. The theoretical system resolution was measured to be between 110 μm - 180 μm when the scattering level was at or below 0.7% Intralipid®. The theoretical resolution was in agreement with a previous resolution analysis of a silicon-based angular filter with a similar aspect ratio. The measured resolution was also found to be smaller than the size of an individual channel, suggesting that the resolution of an AFA based ADI system is not dependent on the size of the micro-channel.

  10. Imaging transient events at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Gail H.

    2016-08-01

    Resolving the spatial structure of transient events provides insights into their physical nature and origin. Recent observations using long baseline optical/infrared interferometry have revealed the size, shape, and angular expansion of bright novae within a few days after their outbursts. This has implications for understanding the timescale for the development of asymmetric features in novae ejecta. Additionally, combining spectroscopic measurements of the expansion velocity with the angular expansion rate provides a way to measure a geometric distance to the nova. In this paper, I provide a review of interferometric observations of novae, with a focus on recent results on the expansion and spatial structure of nova V339 Del in 2013. I also discuss other promising applications of interferometry to transient sources, such as measuring the image size and centroid displacements to measure planetary masses in gravitational microlensing events. Given the timescales of transient events, it is critical for interferometric arrays to respond rapidly to targets of opportunity in order to optimize the instrumental sensitivity and baselines required to resolve the source while its brightness and size change over time.

  11. Binary Cepheids From High-Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.

    2015-12-01

    Optical interferometry is the only technique giving access to milli-arcsecond (mas) spatial resolution. This is a powerful and unique tool to detect the close orbiting companions of Cepheids, and offers an unique opportunity to make progress in resolving the Cepheid mass discrepancy. Our goal in studying binary Cepheids is to measure the astrometric position of the high-contrast companion, and then combine them with spectroscopic measurements to derive the orbital elements, distances, and dynamical masses. In the course of this program, we developed a new tool, CANDID, to search for high-contrast companions and set detection limits from interferometric observations

  12. Drawing Trees with Perfect Angular Resolution and Polynomial Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    ized. Fig. 7: Placing a single disk D′ in the ex- tended small zone of Di (shaded gray). C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 v1 v2 v4 v3 v5 v6 v7 Fig. 8: Drawing a heavy...behavior when required to have perfect angular resolution. This tree has as its spine a k-vertex path, each vertex of which has 3 additional leaf nodes...embedded on the same side of the spine . When drawn with straight-line edges, no crossings, and with perfect angular resolution, the caterpillar is forced

  13. High Angular Resolution Microwave Sensing with Large, Sparse, Random Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    b.cnuainas saldaatv an quired at microwaves to achieve the rec0n(pwro cam’ forming or seti -colternng or phas. synchronzing. After the moo optical...AD A126 866 HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTICN MICROWAVE SENSING WITH LARGE 1/ SPARSE RANDOM ARRAYS..U) MOORE SCHOOL OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PHILADELPHIAPA...RESOLUTION TEST CHART N4ATIONAL BUREAU Of SrANDARDS 1963 A iOSR-TR- 83-0225 HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION MICROWAVE SENSING WITH LARGE, SPARSE, RANDOM ARRAYS Annual

  14. Compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chenhao; Chen, Jian; Zhan, Qiwen

    2017-03-01

    A compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) sorter is proposed and demonstrated. The sorter comprises a quadratic fan-out mapper and a dual-phase corrector positioned in the pupil plane and the Fourier plane, respectively. The optical system is greatly simplified compared to previous demonstrations of OAM sorting, and the performance in resolution and efficiency is maintained. A folded configuration is set up using a single reflective spatial light modulator (SLM) to demonstrate the validity of the scheme. The two phase elements are implemented on the left and right halves of the SLM and connected by a right-angle prism. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolution of the compact OAM sorter, and the current limit in efficiency can be overcome by replacing with transmissive SLMs and removing the beam splitters. This novel scheme paves the way for the miniaturization and integration of high-resolution OAM sorters.

  15. Holographic Imaging: A Versatile Tool for High Angular Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, R.; Girard, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Speckle holography can be used to reconstruct high angular resolution images from long series of short exposures if the point spread function (PSF) from each frame can be measured reliably. We show that through use of multiple reference stars and iterative PSF subtraction, we can obtain highly accurate PSFs. The technique is optimised for crowded fields and results in images with excellent cosmetics and high Strehl ratio from the optical to the mid-infrared regimes. With examples from NACO, VISIR, and HAWK-I we show that holography opens up novel and unforeseen possibilities and can be an attractive alternative to adaptive optics.

  16. Angular resolution of the Ohya air shower detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, K.; Aoki, T.; Okada, A.; Ohashi, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Shibata, S.; Nakamura, I.; Kojima, H.; Kitamura, T.; Minorikawa, Y.; Kato, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Higashi, S.; Kobayakawa, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    1990-05-01

    Accurate measurements of the total number of muons in an air shower are important for the discrimination of showers produced by astronomical gamma rays from those produced by protons. In order to perform this discrimination, muon detectors with a total area of about 400 m2 have been constructed in the Ohya stone mine. At ground level, scintillation detectors have been distributed for determining the total number of electrons in the air shower. The arrival direction of the air shower determined by usual timing information was examined using independent data on the arrival direction determined by muons in the shower. The angular resolution thus obtained at the shower maximum is 1.7° in the south-north plane and 2° in the east-west plane. The difference of the resolution is due to the asymmetric arrangement of scintillation detectors.

  17. HOW DOES ANGULAR RESOLUTION AFFECT DIFFUSION IMAGING MEASURES?

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Leow, Alex D.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Barysheva, Marina; Lee, Agatha D.; Toga, Arthur W.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    A key question in diffusion imaging is how many diffusion-weighted images suffice to provide adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for studies of fiber integrity. Motion, physiological effects, and scan duration all affect the achievable SNR in real brain images, making theoretical studies and simulations only partially useful. We therefore scanned 50 healthy adults with 105-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) at 4 Tesla. From gradient image subsets of varying size (6≤N≤94) that optimized a spherical angular distribution energy, we created SNR plots (versus gradient numbers) for seven common diffusion anisotropy indices: fractional and relative anisotropy (FA, RA), mean diffusivity (MD), volume ratio (VR), geodesic anisotropy (GA), its hyperbolic tangent (tGA), and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA). SNR, defined in a region of interest in the corpus callosum, was near-maximal with 58, 66 and 62 gradients for MD, FA and RA in respectively, and with about 55 gradients for GA and tGA. For VR and GFA, SNR increased rapidly with more gradients. SNR was optimized when the ratio of diffusion-sensitized to non-sensitized images was 9.13 for GA and tGA, 10.57 for FA, 9.17 for RA, and 26 for MD and VR. In orientation density functions modeling the HARDI signal as a continuous mixture of tensors, the diffusion profile reconstruction accuracy rose rapidly with additional gradients. These plots may help in making trade-off decisions when designing diffusion imaging protocols. PMID:19819339

  18. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheymits, Maxim; Leonov, Alexey

    The measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV, which will be realized by the specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope, concern with the following broad range of science topics. Search for signatures of dark matter, surveying the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measuring the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, study of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution nearby 1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods, developed to reconstruct the direction of incident gamma photon, are presented in this paper. The main point concerns with the space topology of high energy gamma photon interaction in the matter of GAMMA-400. Multiple secondary particles, generated inside gamma-ray telescope, produce significant problems to restore the direction of initial gamma photon. Also back-splash particles, i.e., charged particles and gamma photons generated in calorimeter and moved upward, mask the initial tracks of electron/positron pair from conversion of incident gamma photon. The processed methods allow us to reconstruct the direction of electromagnetic shower axis and extract the electron/positron trace. As a result, the direction of incident gamma photon with the energy of 100 GeV is calculated with an accuracy of more than 0.02 deg.

  19. Instrument for Achieving High Angular Resolution on the Infrared Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Donald N. B.

    1998-01-01

    Aberrations in stellar images caused by the atmosphere sets a significant limit on angular resolution in ground based astronomy. The largest of these aberrations is the image motion or wavefront tilt. Since the image motion is random it causes a blurring of the image, and this causes a blurring of the image from 0.3 arcseconds to about 0.7 arcseconds. The purpose of the tip-tilt project was to devise a system for the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility that would measure the image movement and correct it by rapidly tilting a mirror in two axes (tip and tilt). The system would involve building a CCD sensor package to measure the image motion, a new top end for the telescope to hold the tip-tilt mirror, a control system, and software. The system was designed to correct images for the facility camera, NSFCAM, and for the facility spectrometer, SPEX. Both of these instruments are equipped with a cold beamsplitter to feed the sensor package.

  20. ISMI: a classification index for high angular resolution diffusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttger, D.; Dudai, D.; Merhof, D.; Müller, S.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion imaging provides a unique insight into the white matter architecture of the brain in vivo. Applications include neurosurgical planning and fundamental neuroscience. Contrary to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) is able to characterize complex intra-voxel diffusion distributions and hence provides more accurate information about the true diffusion profile. Anisotropy indices aim to reduce the information of the diffusion probability function to a meaningful scalar representation that classifies the underlying diffusion and thereby the neuronal fiber configuration within a voxel. These indices can be used to answer clinical questions such as the integrity of certain neuronal pathways. Information about the underlying fiber distribution can be beneficial in tractography approaches, reconstructing neuronal pathways using local diffusion orientations. Therefore, an accurate classification of diffusion profiles is of great interest. However, the differentiation between multiple fiber orientations and isotropic diffusion is still a challenging task. In this work, we introduce ISMI, an index which successfully differentiates isotropic diffusion and single and multiple fiber populations. The classifier is based on the orientation distribution function (ODF) resulting from Q-ball imaging. We compare our results with the well-known general fractional anisotropy (GFA) index using a fiber phantom comprising challenging diffusion profiles such as crossing, fanning and kissing fiber configurations and a human brain dataset considering the centrum semiovale. Additionally, we visualize the results directly on the fibers represented by streamtubes using a heat color map.

  1. Hypertelescope architectures for direct imaging at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, Antoine; Arnold, Luc; Riaud, Pierre; Lardière, Olivier; Borkowski, Virginie; Gilet, Sohie; Dejonghe, Julien; Le Coroller, Hervé

    Optical arrays having many apertures, small compared to their spacings, can provide direct images with full luminosity if utilized according to the "densified pupil" or ``hypertelescope" scheme. On Earth, flat sites larger than 10km can be equipped with numerous mobile telescopes, or fixed telescopes with mobile beam combiners. Also of interest, although smaller, are instruments using a crater or other natural depression in a way similar to Arecibo's radio-telescope but with a diluted primary mirrror. These may be seen as "exploded" versions of machines such as the OWL. At equal collecting area, they provide the same limiting magnitude with 10 or 20 times improved angular resolution. A candidate design, called CARLINA, having the collecting area of the OWL is under study. Space versions of the latter type of architecture are also proposed to the space agencies for projects DARWIN and Terrestrial Planet Finder. Second-generation versions spanning several hundred kilometers, will in principle be capable of resolving details of Earth-like exo-planets.

  2. Apparent diffusion profile estimation from high angular resolution diffusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Angelino, Elaine; Fitzgibbons, Shaun; Deriche, Rachid

    2006-03-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) has recently been of great interest to characterize non-Gaussian diffusion process. In the white matter of the brain, this occurs when fiber bundles cross, kiss or diverge within the same voxel. One of the important goal is to better describe the apparent diffusion process in these multiple fiber regions, thus overcoming the limitations of classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In this paper, we design the appropriate mathematical tools to describe noisy HARDI data. Using a meaningful modified spherical harmonics basis to capture the physical constraints of the problem, we propose a new regularization algorithm to estimate a smoother and closer diffusivity profile to the true diffusivities without noise. We exploit properties of the spherical harmonics to define a smoothing term based on the Laplace-Beltrami for functions defined on the unit sphere. An additional contribution of the paper is the derivation of the general transformation taking the spherical harmonics coefficients to the high order tensor independent elements. This allows the careful study of the state of the art high order anisotropy measures computed from either spherical harmonics or tensor coefficients. We analyze their ability to characterize the underlying diffusion process. We are able to recover voxels with isotropic, single fiber anisotropic and multiple fiber anisotropic diffusion. We test and validate the approach on diffusion profiles from synthetic data and from a biological rat phantom.

  3. An angular momentum approximation for molecular collisions in the presence of intense laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    An approximation to a previously presented rigorous description of molecular (atom-atom) collisions occurring in the presence of intense radiation is investigated. This rigorous description explicitly considers the angular momentum transferred between the molecule and the radiation field in the absorption or emission of a photon, but involves a complicated system of close-coupled equations which must be solved independently for each projection M of the initial, total molecular angular momentum. (This is a direct consequence of the lack of rotational invariance in the molecule-field problem). These equations are solved for a model system which mimics the collision of a halogen with a rare gas atom. Empirical observations made in the course of performing these calculations lead to the development of an approximation which avoids the repeated calculations for each initial M. This orientational average approximation greatly reduces the effort required to describe the system, and for the model calculation, yields accurate results for field intensities as high as 10 GW/sq cm.

  4. Spatially Regularized Compressed Sensing for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Yogesh; Dolui, Sudipto

    2013-01-01

    Despite the relative recency of its inception, the theory of compressive sampling (aka compressed sensing) (CS) has already revolutionized multiple areas of applied sciences, a particularly important instance of which is medical imaging. Specifically, the theory has provided a different perspective on the important problem of optimal sampling in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with an ever-increasing body of works reporting stable and accurate reconstruction of MRI scans from the number of spectral measurements which would have been deemed unacceptably small as recently as five years ago. In this paper, the theory of CS is employed to palliate the problem of long acquisition times, which is known to be a major impediment to the clinical application of high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). Specifically, we demonstrate that a substantial reduction in data acquisition times is possible through minimization of the number of diffusion encoding gradients required for reliable reconstruction of HARDI scans. The success of such a minimization is primarily due to the availability of spherical ridgelet transformation, which excels in sparsifying HARDI signals. What makes the resulting reconstruction procedure even more accurate is a combination of the sparsity constraints in the diffusion domain with additional constraints imposed on the estimated diffusion field in the spatial domain. Accordingly, the present paper describes an original way to combine the diffusion-and spatial-domain constraints to achieve a maximal reduction in the number of diffusion measurements, while sacrificing little in terms of reconstruction accuracy. Finally, details are provided on an efficient numerical scheme which can be used to solve the aforementioned reconstruction problem by means of standard and readily available estimation tools. The paper is concluded with experimental results which support the practical value of the proposed reconstruction methodology. PMID:21536524

  5. Trade-off between angular and spatial resolutions in in vivo fiber tractography.

    PubMed

    Vos, Sjoerd B; Aksoy, Murat; Han, Zhaoying; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Maclaren, Julian; Viergever, Max A; Leemans, Alexander; Bammer, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Tractography is becoming an increasingly popular method to reconstruct white matter connections in vivo. The diffusion MRI data that tractography is based on requires a high angular resolution to resolve crossing fibers whereas high spatial resolution is required to distinguish kissing from crossing fibers. However, scan time increases with increasing spatial and angular resolutions, which can become infeasible in clinical settings. Here we investigated the trade-off between spatial and angular resolutions to determine which of these factors is most worth investing scan time in. We created a unique diffusion MRI dataset with 1.0 mm isotropic resolution and a high angular resolution (100 directions) using an advanced 3D diffusion-weighted multi-slab EPI acquisition. This dataset was reconstructed to create subsets of lower angular (75, 50, and 25 directions) and lower spatial (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mm) resolution. Using all subsets, we investigated the effects of angular and spatial resolutions in three fiber bundles-the corticospinal tract, arcuate fasciculus and corpus callosum-by analyzing the volumetric bundle overlap and anatomical correspondence between tracts. Our results indicate that the subsets of 25 and 50 directions provided inferior tract reconstructions compared with the datasets with 75 and 100 directions. Datasets with spatial resolutions of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm were comparable, while the lowest resolution (2.5 mm) datasets had discernible inferior quality. In conclusion, we found that angular resolution appeared to be more influential than spatial resolution in improving tractography results. Spatial resolutions higher than 2.0 mm only appear to benefit multi-fiber tractography methods if this is not at the cost of decreased angular resolution.

  6. An angularly refineable phase space finite element method with approximate sweeping procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kophazi, J.; Lathouwers, D.

    2013-07-01

    An angularly refineable phase space finite element method is proposed to solve the neutron transport equation. The method combines the advantages of two recently published schemes. The angular domain is discretized into small patches and patch-wise discontinuous angular basis functions are restricted to these patches, i.e. there is no overlap between basis functions corresponding to different patches. This approach yields block diagonal Jacobians with small block size and retains the possibility for S{sub n}-like approximate sweeping of the spatially discontinuous elements in order to provide efficient preconditioners for the solution procedure. On the other hand, the preservation of the full FEM framework (as opposed to collocation into a high-order S{sub n} scheme) retains the possibility of the Galerkin interpolated connection between phase space elements at arbitrary levels of discretization. Since the basis vectors are not orthonormal, a generalization of the Riemann procedure is introduced to separate the incoming and outgoing contributions in case of unstructured meshes. However, due to the properties of the angular discretization, the Riemann procedure can be avoided at a large fraction of the faces and this fraction rapidly increases as the level of refinement increases, contributing to the computational efficiency. In this paper the properties of the discretization scheme are studied with uniform refinement using an iterative solver based on the S{sub 2} sweep order of the spatial elements. The fourth order convergence of the scalar flux is shown as anticipated from earlier schemes and the rapidly decreasing fraction of required Riemann faces is illustrated. (authors)

  7. Announcement - Scientific Importance of High Angular Resolution at Infrared and Optical Wavelengths - ESO Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-03-01

    The European Southern Observatory is organizing an international conference on the subject "SCIENTIFIC IMPORTANCE OF HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION AT INFRARED AND OPTICAL WAVELENGTHS", to be held in the ESO building at Garching bei München during the period of 24-27 March 1981. The purpose of this conference is to discuss, on the one hand, the systems in use or under construction and possible future developments to achieve high angular resolution and, on the other hand, to discuss the areas of astrophysics which, in the next decades, will most benefit from observations at high angular resolution.

  8. Globbic approximation in low-resolution direct-methods phasing.

    PubMed

    Guo, D Y; Blessing, R H; Langs, D A

    2000-09-01

    Probabilistic direct-methods phasing theory, originally based on a uniform atomic distribution hypothesis, is shown to be adaptable to a non-uniform bulk-solvent-compensated globbic approximation for protein crystals at low resolution. The effective number n(g) of non-H protein atoms per polyatomic glob increases with decreasing resolution; low-resolution phases depend on the positions of only N(g) = N(a)/n(g) globs rather than N(a) atoms. Test calculations were performed with measured structure-factor data and the refined structural parameters from a protein crystal with approximately 10 000 non-H protein atoms per molecule and approximately 60% solvent volume. Low-resolution data sets with d(min) ranging from 15 to 5 A gave n(g) = ad(min) + b, with a = 1.0 A(-1) and b = -1.9 for the test case. Results of tangent-formula phase-estimation trials emphasize that completeness of the low-resolution data is critically important for probabilistic phasing.

  9. Multiwavelength fiber lasers based on spatial mode beating for high resolution linear and angular displacement sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan-Kuang; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Cheng, Wood-Hi; Guo, Tuan; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate multiwavelength fiber lasers by incorporating the micro Michelson interferometer with spatial mode beating phenomenon, which comes from the interferences among cladding modes, into ring cavity for high resolution linear and angular displacement sensing.

  10. Monte-Carlo studies of the angular resolution of a future Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-24

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of this observational technique, providing high sensitivity and an angular resolution of {approx}0.1 deg. per event above an energy threshold of {approx}100 GeV. Planned future arrays of IACTs such as AGIS or CTA are aiming at significantly improving the angular resolution. Preliminary results have shown that values down to {approx}1' might be achievable. Here we present the results of Monte-Carlo simulations that aim to exploring the limits of angular resolution for next generation IACTs and investigate how the resolution can be optimised by changes to array and telescope parameters such as the number of pixel in the camera, the field of view of the camera, the angular pixel size, the mirror size, and also the telescope separation.

  11. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Lee, Chin-Fei; Foster, Jonathan B.; Pineda, Jaime E. E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this work and

  12. Analytical inversions in remote sensing of particle size distributions. I - Multispectral extinctions in the anomalous diffraction approximation. II Angular and spectral scattering in diffraction approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to analytical inversions in the remote sensing of particle size distributions, noting multispectral extinctions in anomalous diffraction approximation and angular and spectral scattering in diffraction approximation. A closed-form analytical inverse solution is derived in order to reconstruct the size distribution of atmospheric aerosols. The anomalous diffraction approximation to Mie's solution is used to describe the particles. Experimental data yield the geometrical area of aerosol polydispersion. Size distribution is thus found from a set of multispectral extinction measurements. In terms of the angular and spectral scattering of light in a narrow forward cone, it is shown that an analytical inverse solution may also be found for the Fraunhofer approximation to the Kirchhoff diffraction, and for an improved expression of this approximation due to Penndorf (1962) and Shifrin-Punina (1968).

  13. Coherent optical system of modular imaging collectors (COSMIC) - An approach for a large aperture high angular resolution telescope in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B.; Hunt, G.; Nein, M.; Korsch, D.

    1984-01-01

    Very high angular resolution can be achieved in UV/optical astronomy through interferometers in space. A concept analysis of COSMIC, which may be placed into orbit by the Space Shuttle in the late 1990's, is discussed. The photon-collecting area is three times larger than that of Space Telescope (ST), and exceeds its resolution by approximately an order of magnitude. Several alternative configurations are presented to scope the extent of design approaches which may be achievable within the transportation capability of the Space Shuttle.

  14. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.

    1996-06-04

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut ({alpha}=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5--30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the {micro}eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator. 7 figs.

  15. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Alp, Ercan E.; Mooney, Timothy M.; Toellner, Thomas

    1996-06-04

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

  16. Error analysis of angular resolution for direct intercepting measurement laser warning equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Jinxi; Zhang, Jinchun; Wang, Hongjun; Cheng, Bin

    2016-11-01

    The accurate warning and reconnaissance to incoming laser signal is the presupposition of electro-optical jamming. However, the error of angular resolution of laser warning equipment directly affects the accuracy of warning. In this paper, the working mechanism of direct intercepting measurement laser warning equipment was analyzed. Then, the structure of its detector array system and the causes of error of angular resolution were analyzed. At different distance, the resolution errors of laser warning equipment with different detecting unit were calculated. The conclusion has some reference value to test and detect of such equipment.

  17. The Multiplicity of Massive Stars: A High Angular Resolution Survey With The HST Fine Guidance Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    THE MULTIPLICITY OF MASSIVE STARS : A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY WITH THE HST FINE GUIDANCE SENSOR* E. J. Aldoretta1,2, S. M. Caballero-Nieves3, D...all-sky survey made with the Fine Guidance Sensor on the Hubble Space Telescope to search for angularly resolved binary systems among massive stars . The...sample of 224 stars is comprised mainly of Galactic O- and B-type stars and luminous blue variables, plus a few luminous stars in the Large

  18. Angular resolution of orthogonal polarizations using inhomogeneous control field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu; Kumar, Pardeep

    2016-05-01

    The control of propagation direction of light by another light through their interaction with the medium has created a new avenue of research, with a special focus on the beam deflection in a homogeneous medium subjected to external fields. The key requirement for such a deflection is the spatial modulation of the refractive index of the medium induced by an inhomogeneous field. Beam deflection has been previously studied inside a medium, where electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) or active Raman gain (ARG) plays the crucial role. Here, we present a theoretical analysis to demonstrate the polarization-dependent light deflection of a weak probe field in a weakly birefringent medium in tripod configuration. We show that by changing the incidence angle of a control field as well as its transverse intensity profile, one can induce quite large (~ 100 mrad) angular divergence to different polarization components of the probe field. We identify that it is the coherent population oscillation (CPO) that leads to negligible absorption of the polarization components, contrary to the proposals which rely upon EIT and ARG.

  19. The High Angular Resolution Multiplicity of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Helsel, John W.

    2009-02-01

    We present the results of a speckle interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars that complements and expands upon a similar survey made over a decade ago. The speckle observations were made with the Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 4 m telescopes and USNO speckle camera, and they are sensitive to the detection of binaries in the angular separation regime between 0farcs03 and 5'' with relatively bright companions (ΔV < 3). We report on the discovery of companions to 14 OB stars. In total we resolved companions of 41 of 385 O-stars (11%), 4 of 37 Wolf-Rayet stars (11%), and 89 of 139 B-stars (64%; an enriched visual binary sample that we selected for future orbital determinations). We made a statistical analysis of the binary frequency among the subsample that are listed in the Galactic O Star Catalog by compiling published data on other visual companions detected through adaptive optics studies and/or noted in the Washington Double Star Catalog and by collecting published information on radial velocities and spectroscopic binaries. We find that the binary frequency is much higher among O-stars in clusters and associations compared to the numbers for field and runaway O-stars, consistent with predictions for the ejection processes for runaway stars. We present a first orbit for the O-star δ Orionis; a linear solution of the close, apparently optical, companion of the O-star ι Orionis; and an improved orbit of the Be star δ Scorpii. Finally, we list astrometric data for another 249 resolved and 221 unresolved targets that are lower mass stars that we observed for various other science programs.

  20. Electrostatic analyzer design for solar wind proton measurements with high temporal, energy, and angular resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, Antoine; Lavraud, Benoit; Fedorov, Andrei; De Keyser, Johan; DeMarco, Rossana; Marcucci, M. Federica; Valentini, Francesco; Servidio, Sergio; Bruno, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    We present the design study of an electrostatic analyzer that permits combined high temporal, energy, and angular resolution measurements of solar wind ions. The requirements for high temporal, energy, and angular resolutions, combined with the need for sufficient counting statistics, lead to an electrostatic analyzer with large radius (140 mm) and large geometric factor. The resulting high count rates require the use of channel electron multipliers (CEMs), instead of microchannel plates, to avoid saturation. The large radius further permits the placement of 32 CEM detectors at the analyzer focal plane, thereby providing very high angular resolution in azimuth (1.5°). Electrostatic simulations were performed to define the analyzer geometric factor, energy resolution, analyzer constant (K), elevation response, etc. Simulations were also performed to define the geometry of the deflectors and collimator that are used to provide the proper energy resolution, field of view, and angular resolution (1.5°) in elevation as well (the total field of view of the design is ±24° × ±24°). We show how this design permits unprecedented measurements of the fine structure of the solar wind proton beam and other important features such as temperature anisotropy. This design is used for the Cold Solar Wind instrument of the medium-class Turbulent Heating ObserveR mission, currently in phase A at the European Space Agency. These unprecedented measurement capabilities are in accordance with and even beyond the requirements of the mission.

  1. Low Power Compact Radio Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, G.; Taylor, G.B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NRAO, Socorro

    2005-06-30

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution multi-frequency (8 and 22 GHz) VLA images of five low power compact (LPC) radio sources, and phase referenced VLBA images at 1.6 GHz of their nuclear regions. At the VLA resolution we resolve the structure and identify component positions and flux densities. The phase referenced VLBA data at 1.6 GHz reveals flat-spectrum, compact cores (down to a few milliJansky) in four of the five sources. The absolute astrometry provided by the phase referencing allows us to identify the center of activity on the VLA images. Moreover, these data reveal rich structures, including two-sided jets and secondary components. On the basis of the arcsecond scale structures and of the nuclear properties, we rule out the presence of strong relativistic effects in our LPCs, which must be intrinsically small (deprojected linear sizes {approx}< 10 kpc). Fits of continuous injection models reveal break frequencies in the GHz domain, and ages in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} yrs. In LPCs, the outermost edge may be advancing more slowly than in more powerful sources or could even be stationary; some LPCs might also have ceased their activity. In general, the properties of LPCs can be related to a number of reasons, including, but not limited to: youth, frustration, low kinematic power jets, and short-lived activity in the radio.

  2. High angular resolution X-ray astronomy in the next 50 years. Back to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    The 0.5 arc second angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory is likely to be the best that can be obtained with grazing incidence optics, especially when larger effective area is required. We describe a telescope concept based upon transmitting diffractive-refractive optics that appears to be capable of providing better than mili arc second angular resolution. However, focal lengths are of the order of 1000 km, which requires long distance formation-flying between two spacecraft. In order to counteract gravity gradient forces to maintain alignment of optics with the detector and change targets,one of the spacecraft must contain engines for propulsion.

  3. Bayesian Deconvolution for Angular Super-Resolution in Forward-Looking Scanning Radar

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yuebo; Huang, Yulin; Sun, Zhichao; Wang, Yue; Yang, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Scanning radar is of notable importance for ground surveillance, terrain mapping and disaster rescue. However, the angular resolution of a scanning radar image is poor compared to the achievable range resolution. This paper presents a deconvolution algorithm for angular super-resolution in scanning radar based on Bayesian theory, which states that the angular super-resolution can be realized by solving the corresponding deconvolution problem with the maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion. The algorithm considers that the noise is composed of two mutually independent parts, i.e., a Gaussian signal-independent component and a Poisson signal-dependent component. In addition, the Laplace distribution is used to represent the prior information about the targets under the assumption that the radar image of interest can be represented by the dominant scatters in the scene. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed deconvolution algorithm has higher precision for angular super-resolution compared with the conventional algorithms, such as the Tikhonov regularization algorithm, the Wiener filter and the Richardson–Lucy algorithm. PMID:25806871

  4. Chiral resolution of spin angular momentum in linearly polarized and unpolarized light

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, R. J.; Mazzulla, A.; Provenzano, C.; Pagliusi, P.; Cipparrone, G.

    2015-01-01

    Linearly polarized (LP) and unpolarized (UP) light are racemic entities since they can be described as superposition of opposite circularly polarized (CP) components of equal amplitude. As a consequence they do not carry spin angular momentum. Chiral resolution of a racemate, i.e. separation of their chiral components, is usually performed via asymmetric interaction with a chiral entity. In this paper we provide an experimental evidence of the chiral resolution of linearly polarized and unpolarized Gaussian beams through the transfer of spin angular momentum to chiral microparticles. Due to the interplay between linear and angular momentum exchange, basic manipulation tasks, as trapping, spinning or orbiting of micro-objects, can be performed by light with zero helicity. The results might broaden the perspectives for development of miniaturized and cost-effective devices. PMID:26585284

  5. Anatomy of a Photodissociation Region: High angular resolution images of molecular emission in the Orion Bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Jan A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meixner, Margaret; Foldsmith, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of the molecular component of the Orion Bar, a prototypical Photodissociation Region (PDR) illuminated by the Trapezium cluster. The high angular resolution (6 sec-10 sec) that we have achieved by combining single-dish and interferometric observations has allowed us to examine in detail the spatial and kinematic morphology of this region and to estimate the physical characteristics of the molecular gas it contains. Our observations indicate that this PDR can be essentially described as a homogeneously distributed slab of moderately dense material (approximately 5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm), in which are embedded a small number of dense (greater than 10(exp 6)/cu cm) clumps. The latter play little or no role in determining the thickness and kinetic temperature structure of this PDR. This observational picture is largely supported by PDR model calculations for this region, which we describe in detail in this work. We also find our model predictions of the intensities of a variety of atomic and molecular lines to be in good general agreement with a number of previous observations.

  6. Evaluation of the accuracy and angular resolution of q-ball imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kuan-Hung; Yeh, Chun-Hung; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Chao, Yi-Ping; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Ching-Po

    2008-08-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) has been proposed for the mapping of multiple intravoxel fiber structures using the Funk-Radon transform on high angular resolution diffusion images (HARDI). However, the accuracy and the angular resolution of QBI to define fiber orientations and its dependence on diffusion imaging parameters remain unclear. The phantom models, made up of sheets of parallel capillaries filled with water, were designed to evaluate the accuracy and the angular resolution of QBI at different |q| values. With an inner diameter of 20 mum and an outer diameter of 90 mum, the capillaries afforded a restrictive environment compared with the diffusion measurement scale. Further, the angular resolutions of QBI at various |q| value were also quantified on the corpus callosum in the human brain. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main lobe of normalized orientation distribution function (nODF) was calculated and adopted to quantify the angular resolution of QBI. With the phantom model, a higher |q| value resulted in worse accuracy but better angular resolution for QBI. The same trend where a higher |q| value yielded a better angular resolution was also observed in the human study. Upon comparison of QBI with T2WI, QBI with |q|=277 cm(-1) (b=3000 s/mm(2)) was found to be insufficient to differentiate capillaries crossing at 45 degrees . However, when encoding with |q|=320, 358, and 392 cm(-1) (b=4000, 5000, and 6000 s/mm(2)), the deviation angles between the primary ODF and the 45 degrees phantoms were -4.91 degrees +/-2.72 degrees , -1.37 degrees +/-2.32 degrees , and -0.69 degrees +/-1.54 degrees with adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These results were consistent with the FWHM-nODF, which showed that a |q| value of 320 cm(-1) was the threshold to resolve capillaries intersecting at 45 degrees . Additionally, it was demonstrated in both the phantom model and the human brain that QBI encoding with lower |q| values may result in underestimation of the

  7. High Angular Resolution Imaging of Solar Radio Bursts from the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, Robert J.; Lazio, Joseph; Bale, Stuart; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, William M.; Gopalswamy, Nat; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin Christophe; Weiler, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Locating low frequency radio observatories on the lunar surface has a number of advantages, including positional stability and a very low ionospheric radio cutoff. Here, we describe the Radio Observatory on the lunar Surface for Solar studies (ROLSS), a concept for a low frequency, radio imaging interferometric array designed to study particle acceleration in the corona and inner heliosphere. ROLSS would be deployed during an early lunar sortie or by a robotic rover as part of an unmanned landing. The preferred site is on the lunar near side to simplify the data downlink to Earth. The prime science mission is to image type II and type III solar radio bursts with the aim of determining the sites at and mechanisms by which the radiating particles are accelerated. Secondary science goals include constraining the density of the lunar ionosphere by measuring the low radio frequency cutoff of the solar radio emissions or background galactic radio emission, measuring the flux, particle mass, and arrival direction of interplanetary and interstellar dust, and constraining the low energy electron population in astrophysical sources. Furthermore, ROLSS serves a pathfinder function for larger lunar radio arrays. Key design requirements on ROLSS include the operational frequency and angular resolution. The electron densities in the solar corona and inner heliosphere are such that the relevant emission occurs below 10 M Hz, essentially unobservable from Earth's surface due to the terrestrial ionospheric cutoff. Resolving the potential sites of particle acceleration requires an instrument with an angular resolution of at least 2 deg at 10 MHz, equivalent to a linear array size of approximately one kilometer. The major components of the ROLSS array are 3 antenna arms, each of 500 m length, arranged in a Y formation, with a central electronics package (CEP) at their intersection. Each antenna arm is a linear strip of polyimide film (e.g., Kapton(TradeMark)) on which 16 single

  8. A Future Generation High Angular Resolution X-ray Telescope Based Upon Physical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Although the highest priority objective for the next major X-ray mission is high resolution spectroscopy we will ultimately want the next generation high angular resolution X-ray observatory. This author believes that the 0.5 arc second angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory is likely to be close to the best that can be obtained with grazing incidence optics, especially with larger effective area. Telescopes based upon physical optics, diffraction and refraction that transmit rather than reflect X-rays can have an angular resolution of a mili arc second or better. Combining the diffractive and refractive components into one unit can neutralize the chromatic aberration of each individually over a ~15% bandwidth at 6 keV. The aperture could be divided into several diffractive-refractive pairs to broaden the bandwidth. Furthermore these telescopes would be very low cost, very light weight, and more tolerant of figure errors and surface roughness than grazing incidence telescopes. However, focal lengths are of the order of 1000 km, which requires a new mission architecture consisting of long distance formation-flying between two spacecraft, one hosting the optics, the other, the detector. One of the spacecraft requires propulsion, provided by, for example, ion engines to maintain the optics-detector alignment by counteracting gravity gradient forces, and for changing targets. Although their effective area can be large and their angular resolution very high diffractive-refractive telescopes are not necessarily more sensitive than Chandra because their large focal plane scale (1 mili arc second ~ 1 mm) subjects them to a higher level of cosmic ray background and their opacity results in a lower energy limit of 2 keV. The intrinsic field of view is wide but the large focal length scale and practical limits on the size of the detector array results in a small field of view.

  9. CHARRON: Code for High Angular Resolution of Rotating Objects in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Zorec, J.; Vakili, F.

    2012-12-01

    Rotation is one of the fundamental physical parameters governing stellar physics and evolution. At the same time, spectrally resolved optical/IR long-baseline interferometry has proven to be an important observing tool to measure many physical effects linked to rotation, in particular, stellar flattening, gravity darkening, differential rotation. In order to interpret the high angular resolution observations from modern spectro-interferometers, such as VLTI/AMBER and VEGA/CHARA, we have developed an interferometry-oriented numerical model: CHARRON (Code for High Angular Resolution of Rotating Objects in Nature). We present here the characteristics of CHARRON, which is faster (≃q10-30 s per model) and thus more adapted to model-fitting than the first version of the code presented by Domiciano de Souza et al. (2002).

  10. Aerosol Retrieval from Multiangle Multispectral Photopolarimetric Measurements: Importance of Spectral Range and Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Hasekamp, O.; Van Diedenhoven, B.; Cairns, B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the importance of spectral range and angular resolution for aerosol retrieval from multiangle photopolarimetric measurements over land. For this purpose, we use an extensive set of simulated measurements for different spectral ranges and angular resolutions and subsets of real measurements of the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) carried out during the PODEX and SEAC4RS campaigns over the continental USA. Aerosol retrievals performed from RSP measurements show good agreement with ground-based AERONET measurements for aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and refractive index. Furthermore, we found that inclusion of shortwave infrared bands (1590 and/or 2250 nm) significantly improves the retrieval of AOD, SSA and coarse mode microphysical properties. However, accuracies of the retrieved aerosol properties do not improve significantly when more than five viewing angles are used in the retrieval.

  11. Method for improving the angular resolution of a neutron scatter camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Gerling, Mark; Cooper, Robert Lee; Mrowka, Stanley; Brennan, James S.

    2012-12-25

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source wherein the neutron detection efficiency is increased has been described. Instead of the previous technique that uses a time-of-flight (TOF) between 2 widely spaced fixed planes of neutron detectors to measure scatter neutron kinetic energy, we now use the recoil proton energy deposited in the second of the 2 scatter planes which can now be repositioned either much closer together or further apart. However, by doubling the separation distance between the 2 planes from 20 cm to a distance of 40 cm we improved the angular resolution of the detector from about 12.degree. to about 10.degree.. A further doubling of the separation distance to 80 cm provided an addition improvement in angular resolution of the detector to about 6.degree. without adding additional detectors or ancillary electronics. The distance between planes also may be dynamically changed using a suitable common technique such as a gear- or motor-drive to toggle between the various positions. The angular resolution of this new configuration, therefore, is increased at the expanse of detection sensitivity. However, the diminished sensitivity may be acceptable for those applications where the detector is able to interrogate a particular site for an extended period.

  12. Angular versus spatial resolution trade-offs for diffusion imaging under time constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Liang; Jahanshad, Neda; Ennis, Daniel B; Jin, Yan; Bernstein, Matthew A; Borowski, Bret J; Jack, Clifford R; Toga, Arthur W; Leow, Alex D; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-10-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) are now widely used to assess brain integrity in clinical populations. The growing interest in mapping brain connectivity has made it vital to consider what scanning parameters affect the accuracy, stability, and signal-to-noise of diffusion measures. Trade-offs between scan parameters can only be optimized if their effects on various commonly-derived measures are better understood. To explore angular versus spatial resolution trade-offs in standard tensor-derived measures, and in measures that use the full angular information in diffusion signal, we scanned eight subjects twice, 2 weeks apart, using three protocols that took the same amount of time (7 min). Scans with 3.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm isotropic voxels were collected using 48, 41, and 37 diffusion-sensitized gradients to equalize scan times. A specially designed DTI phantom was also scanned with the same protocols, and different b-values. We assessed how several diffusion measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and the full 3D orientation distribution function (ODF) depended on the spatial/angular resolution and the SNR. We also created maps of stability over time in the FA, MD, ODF, skeleton FA of 14 TBSS-derived ROIs, and an information uncertainty index derived from the tensor distribution function, which models the signal using a continuous mixture of tensors. In scans of the same duration, higher angular resolution and larger voxels boosted SNR and improved stability over time. The increased partial voluming in large voxels also led to bias in estimating FA, but this was partially addressed by using "beyond-tensor" models of diffusion.

  13. High angular resolution observations of star-forming regions with BETTII and SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Maxime; Rinehart, Stephen; Mundy, Lee G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Dhabal, Arnab; Fixsen, Dale J.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Stephen F.; Mentzell, Eric; Silverberg, Robert F.; Staguhn, Johannes; Veach, Todd; Cardiff BETTII Team

    2016-01-01

    High angular resolution observations in the far-infrared are important to understand the star formation process in embedded star clusters where extinction is large and stars form in close proximity. The material taking part in the star forming process is heated by the young stars and emits primarily in the far-IR; hence observations of the far-IR dust emission yields vital information about the gravitational potential, the mass and energy distribution, and core/star formation process. Previous observatories, such as Herschel, Spitzer and WISE lack the angular resolution required to study these dense star forming cores and are further limited by saturation in bright cores.The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is pioneering the path to sub-arcsecond resolution at far-IR wavelengths. This thesis talk discusses the instrumental challenges in building BETTII, as well as results from our SOFIA survey to illustrate the potential of higher-angular resolution observations. The 8m-long two element interferometer is being tested at NASA GSFC and is scheduled for first flight in fall 2016. BETTII will provide 0.5 to 1 arcsecond spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of 10 to 100 between 30 and 90 microns, where most of the dust continuum emission peaks in local star forming regions. It will achieve spatially-resolved spectroscopy of bright, dense cores with unprecedented high definition. This talk focuses on the main challenges and solutions associated with building BETTII: thermal stability, attitude/pointing control, and path length stabilization. In each of these areas we look at the trade-off between design, control, and knowledge in order to achieve the best-possible instrumental capability and sensitivity.As a first step towards resolving cluster cores, we surveyed 10 nearby star-forming clusters with SOFIA FORCAST at 11, 19, 31 and 37 microns. The FORCAST instrument has the highest angular resolution currently available in

  14. High Angular Resolution and Lightweight X-Ray Optics for Astronomical Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Evans, T. C.; Hong, M.; Jones, W. D.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. M.; McClelland, R. S.; ODell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray optics with both high angular resolution and lightweight is essential for further progress in x-ray astronomy. High angular resolution is important in avoiding source confusion and reducing background to enable the observation of the most distant objects of the early Universe. It is also important in enabling the use of gratings to achieve high spectral resolution to study, among other things, the myriad plasmas that exist in planetary, stellar, galactic environments, as well as interplanetary, inter-stellar, and inter-galactic media. Lightweight is important for further increase in effective photon collection area, because x-ray observations must take place on space platforms and the amount of mass that can be launched into space has always been very limited and is expected to continue to be very limited. This paper describes an x-ray optics development program and reports on its status that meets these two requirements. The objective of this program is to enable Explorer type missions in the near term and to enable flagship missions in the long term.

  15. Next Generation X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, William

    2013-01-01

    Since its beginning 50 years ago, X-ray astronomy has advanced by leaps and bounds, culminating in its current golden age in which three major observatories—Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku—are operating simultaneously and addressing some of the most important astronomical and astrophysical problems of our time. Building upon this success, the recent Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics has defined objectives for x-ray astronomy whose realization requires both new optics and new detector technologies. The development of these technologies has been identified as one of the highest priorities for funding to enable future x-ray missions. X-ray optics technology based on precision glass slumping is on the verge of revolutionizing x-ray telescope making. It has shown that extremely thin (< 0.4mm) and lightweight (areal density < 1 kg/m2) true Wolter-I mirror segments with angular resolutions better than 7 arc-seconds can be fabricated consistently, efficiently, and inexpensively. In comparison with those of XMM-Newton, these mirror segments represent a factor of 10 reduction in mass while achieving slightly better angular resolution. In comparison with those of Suzaku, they represent a factor of 20 improvement in angular resolution while maintaining the same mass areal density. These advances have been demonstrated with x-ray images from aligned and bonded mirror segments. In short, this technology is approaching TRL-5 for making the mirror assemblies required for a 10 arc-second observatory. In this poster we will present the latest x-ray and environment test results obtained with technology development modules which are substantially similar to flight modules in the way they constructed and tested.

  16. A broadband x-ray imaging spectroscopy with high-angular resolution: the FORCE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Koji; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okajima, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    We are proposing FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution) as a future Japan-lead Xray observatory to be launched in the mid 2020s. Hitomi (ASTRO-H) possesses a suite of sensitive instruments enabling the highest energy-resolution spectroscopy in soft X-ray band, a broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy in soft and hard X-ray bands, and further high energy coverage up to soft gamma-ray band. FORCE is the direct successor to the broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy aspect of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) with significantly higher angular resolution. The current design of FORCE defines energy band pass of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of < 15 in half-power diameter, achieving a 10 times higher sensitivity above 10 keV compared to any previous missions with simultaneous soft X-ray coverage. Our primary scientific objective is to trace the cosmic formation history by searching for "missing black holes" in various mass-scales: "buried supermassive black holes (SMBHs)" (> 104 M⊙) residing in the center of galaxies in a cosmological distance, "intermediate-mass black holes" (102-104 M⊙) acting as the possible seeds from which SMBHs grow, and "orphan stellar-mass black holes" (< 102 M⊙) without companion in our Galaxy. In addition to these missing BHs, hunting for the nature of relativistic particles at various astrophysical shocks is also in our scope, utilizing the broadband X-ray coverage with high angular-resolution. FORCE are going to open a new era in these fields. The satellite is proposed to be launched with the Epsilon vehicle that is a Japanese current solid-fuel rocket. FORCE carries three identical pairs of Super-mirror and wide-band X-ray detector. The focal length is currently planned to be 10 m. The silicon mirror with multi-layer coating is our primary choice to achieve lightweight, good angular optics. The detector is a descendant of hard X-ray imager onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) replacing its silicon strip detector with SOI-CMOS silicon pixel

  17. Approximate Solution to the Angular Speeds of a Nearly-Symmetric Mass-Varying Cylindrical Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjangud, Angadh; Eke, Fidelis

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines the rotational motion of a nearly axisymmetric rocket type system with uniform burn of its propellant. The asymmetry comes from a slight difference in the transverse principal moments of inertia of the system, which then results in a set of nonlinear equations of motion even when no external torque is applied to the system. It is often difficult, or even impossible, to generate analytic solutions for such equations; closed form solutions are even more difficult to obtain. In this paper, a perturbation-based approach is employed to linearize the equations of motion and generate analytic solutions. The solutions for the variables of transverse motion are analytic and a closed-form solution to the spin rate is suggested. The solutions are presented in a compact form that permits rapid computation. The approximate solutions are then applied to the torque-free motion of a typical solid rocket system and the results are found to agree with those obtained from the numerical solution of the full non-linear equations of motion of the mass varying system.

  18. X-ray Interferometry with Transmissive Beam Combiners for Ultra-High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, G. K.; Krismanic, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interferometry provides one of the possible routes to ultra-high angular resolution for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Sub-micro-arc-second angular resolution, necessary to achieve objectives such as imaging the regions around the event horizon of a super-massive black hole at the center of an active galaxy, can be achieved if beams from parts of the incoming wavefront separated by 100s of meters can be stably and accurately brought together at small angles. One way of achieving this is by using grazing incidence mirrors. We here investigate an alternative approach in which the beams are recombined by optical elements working in transmission. It is shown that the use of diffractive elements is a particularly attractive option. We report experimental results from a simple 2-beam interferometer using a low-cost commercially available profiled film as the diffractive elements. A rotationally symmetric filled (or mostly filled) aperture variant of such an interferometer, equivalent to an X-ray axicon, is shown to offer a much wider bandpass than either a Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) or a PFL with a refractive lens in an achromatic pair. Simulations of an example system are presented.

  19. Contrast and resolution analysis of angular domain imaging for iterative optical projection tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Angular domain imaging (ADI) generates a projection image of an attenuating target within a turbid medium by employing a silicon micro-tunnel array to reject photons that have deviated from the initial propagation direction. In this imaging method, image contrast and resolution are position dependent. The objective of this work was to first characterize the contrast and resolution of the ADI system at a multitude of locations within the imaging plane. The second objective was to compare the reconstructions of different targets using filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. The ADI system consisted of a diode laser laser (808nm, CW, ThorLabs) with a beam expander for illumination of the sample cuvette. At the opposite side of the cuvette, an Angular Filter Array (AFA) of 80 μm x 80 μm square-shaped tunnels 1 cm in length was used to reject the transmitted scattered light. Image-forming light exiting the AFA was detected by a linear CCD (16-bit, Mightex). Our approach was to translate two point attenuators (0.5 mm graphite rod, 0.368 mm drill bit) submerged in a 0.6% IntralipidTM dilution using a SCARA robot (Epson E2S351S) to cover a 37x37 and 45x45 matrix of grid points in the imaging plane within the 1 cm path length sample cuvette. At each grid point, a one-dimensional point-spread distribution was collected and system contrast and resolution were measured. Then, the robot was used to rotate the target to collect projection images at several projection angles of various objects, and reconstructed with a filtered back projection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm.

  20. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  1. Converting Multi-Shell and Diffusion Spectrum Imaging to High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Verstynen, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-shell and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) are becoming increasingly popular methods of acquiring diffusion MRI data in a research context. However, single-shell acquisitions, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), still remain the most common acquisition schemes in practice. Here we tested whether multi-shell and DSI data have conversion flexibility to be interpolated into corresponding HARDI data. We acquired multi-shell and DSI data on both a phantom and in vivo human tissue and converted them to HARDI. The correlation and difference between their diffusion signals, anisotropy values, diffusivity measurements, fiber orientations, connectivity matrices, and network measures were examined. Our analysis result showed that the diffusion signals, anisotropy, diffusivity, and connectivity matrix of the HARDI converted from multi-shell and DSI were highly correlated with those of the HARDI acquired on the MR scanner, with correlation coefficients around 0.8~0.9. The average angular error between converted and original HARDI was 20.7° at voxels with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5. The network topology measures had less than 2% difference, whereas the average nodal measures had a percentage difference around 4~7%. In general, multi-shell and DSI acquisitions can be converted to their corresponding single-shell HARDI with high fidelity. This supports multi-shell and DSI acquisitions over HARDI acquisition as the scheme of choice for diffusion acquisitions. PMID:27683539

  2. Understanding Active Galactic Nuclei using near-infrared high angular resolution polarimetry II: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Grosset, L.; Goosmann, R.; Gratadour, D.; Rouan, D.; Clénet, Y.; Pelat, D.; Rojas Lobos, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this second research note of a series of two, we present the first near-infrared results we obtained when modeling Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our first proceedings showed the comparison between the MontAGN and STOKES Monte Carlo codes. Now we use our radiative transfer codes to simulate the polarization maps of a prototypical, NGC 1068-like, type-2 radio-quiet AGN. We produced high angular resolution infrared (1 μm) polarization images to be compared with recent observations in this wavelength range. Our preliminary results already show a good agreement between the models and observations but cannot account for the peculiar linear polarization angle of the torus such as observed. tet{Gratadour2015} found a polarization position angle being perpendicular to the bipolar outflows axis. Further work is needed to improve the models by adding physical phenomena such as dichroism and clumpiness.

  3. The multiplicity of massive stars: A high angular resolution survey with the HST fine guidance sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aldoretta, E. J.; Gies, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.-C.; Norris, R. P. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: jao@chara.gsu.edu; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an all-sky survey made with the Fine Guidance Sensor on the Hubble Space Telescope to search for angularly resolved binary systems among massive stars. The sample of 224 stars is comprised mainly of Galactic O- and B-type stars and luminous blue variables, plus a few luminous stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The FGS TRANS mode observations are sensitive to the detection of companions with an angular separation between 0.″01 and 1.″0 and brighter than △m=5. The FGS observations resolved 52 binary and 6 triple star systems and detected partially resolved binaries in 7 additional targets (43 of these are new detections). These numbers yield a companion detection frequency of 29% for the FGS survey. We also gathered literature results on the numbers of close spectroscopic binaries and wider astrometric binaries among the sample, and we present estimates of the frequency of multiple systems and the companion frequency for subsets of stars residing in clusters and associations, field stars, and runaway stars. These results confirm the high multiplicity fraction, especially among massive stars in clusters and associations. We show that the period distribution is approximately flat in increments of logP. We identify a number of systems of potential interest for long-term orbital determinations, and we note the importance of some of these companions for the interpretation of the radial velocities and light curves of close binaries that have third companions.

  4. Conceptual Design of the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) for the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Mary Anne; Groff, Tyler; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; McElwain, Michael W.; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert; Gunn, James E.; Knapp, Gillian; Gong, Qian; Carlotti, Alexis; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Hayashi, Masahiko; Takato, Naruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in high-contrast imaging techniques now make possible both imaging and spectroscopy of planets around nearby stars. We present the conceptual design of the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), a lenslet-based, cryogenic integral field spectrograph (IFS) for imaging exoplanets on the Subaru telescope. The IFS will provide spectral information for 140 x 140 spatial elements over a 1.75 arcsecs x 1.75 arcsecs field of view (FOV). CHARIS will operate in the near infrared (lambda = 0.9 - 2.5 micron) and provide a spectral resolution of R = 14, 33, and 65 in three separate observing modes. Taking advantage of the adaptive optics systems and advanced coronagraphs (AO188 and SCExAO) on the Subaru telescope, CHARIS will provide sufficient contrast to obtain spectra of young self-luminous Jupiter-mass exoplanets. CHARIS is in the early design phases and is projected to have first light by the end of 2015. We report here on the current conceptual design of CHARIS and the design challenges.

  5. Physical Performance of GAMMA-400 Telescope. Angular Resolution, Proton and Electron Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. O. Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Gusakov, Y. V.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kheymits, M. D.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Naumov, P. Y.; Runtso, M. F.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zverev, V. G.

    The specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope will realize the measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following broad range of scientific topics. Search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution ∼1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods, developed to reconstruct the direction of incident gamma photon, are presented in this paper, as well as, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is discussed.

  6. PREFACE: Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserlohe, Christof; Karas, Vladimir; Krips, Melanie; Eckart, Andreas; Britzen, Silke; Fischer, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei conference. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG), Bad Honnef, Germany, from 28 August to 2 September 2011. It was the second conference of this kind, following the Astronomy at High Angular Resolution conference held in Bad Honnef, three years earlier in 2008. The main objective of the conference was to frame the discussion of the broad range of physical processes that occur in the central 100pc of galactic nuclei. In most cases, this domain is difficult to probe through observations. This is mainly because of the lack of angular resolution, the brightness of the central engine and possible obscurations through dust and gas, which play together in the central regions of host galaxies of galactic nuclei within a broad range of activity. The presence of large amounts of molecular and atomic (both neutral and ionized) gas, dust and central engines with outflows and jets implies that the conditions for star formation in these regions are very special, and probably different from those in the disks of host galaxies. Numerous presentations covering a broad range of topics, both theoretical and experimental, those related to research on Active Galactic Nuclei and on a wide range of observed wavelengths were submitted to the Scientific Organizing Committee. Presentations have been grouped into six sessions: The nuclei of active galaxies The Galactic Center The immediate environment of Super Massive Black Holes The physics of nuclear jets and the interaction of the interstellar medium The central 100pc of the nuclear environment Star formation in that region The editors thank all participants of the AHAR 2011 conference for their enthusiasm and their numerous and vivid contributions to this conference. We would especially like to thank John Hugh Seiradakis from the Aristotle

  7. Importance of energy and angular resolutions in top-hat electrostatic analysers for solar wind proton measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, R.; Marcucci, M. F.; Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Lavraud, B.; Louarn, P.; Salatti, M.

    2016-08-01

    We use a numerical code which reproduces the angular/energy response of a typical top-hat electrostatic analyser starting from solar wind proton velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by numerical simulations. The simulations are based on the Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical algorithm which integrates the Vlasov equation for the ion distribution function, while the electrons are treated as a fluid. A virtual satellite launched through the simulation box measures the particle VDFs. Such VDFs are moved from the simulation Cartesian grid to energy-angular coordinates to mimic the response of a real sensor in the solar wind. Different energy-angular resolutions of the analyser are investigated in order to understand the influence of the phase-space resolution in existing and upcoming space missions, with regards to determining the key parameters of plasma dynamics.

  8. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  9. γ-ray telescopes using conversions to e+e- pairs: event generators, angular resolution and polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, P.; Bernard, D.

    2017-02-01

    We benchmark various available event generators in Geant4 and EGS5 in the light of ongoing projects for high angular-resolution pair-conversion telescopes at low energy. We compare the distributions of key kinematic variables extracted from the geometry of the three final state particles. We validate and use as reference an exact generator using the full 5D differential cross-section of the conversion process. We focus in particular on the effect of the unmeasured recoiling nucleus on the angular resolution. We show that for high resolution trackers, the choice of the generator affects the estimated resolution of the telescope. We also show that the current available generator are unable to describe accurately a linearly polarised photon source.

  10. High quality Imaging for space VLBI observations with ultra high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhachev, S.

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this presentation will be the problems associated with obtaining high quality images from a high orbiting space VLBI (SVLBI) mission. SVLBI intensifies and magnifies all imaging problems, making these problems clearer to understand, though much harder to solve. It is necessary to notice that as an astronomical instrument SVLBI possesses one explicit advantage: it is an extremely high angular resolution. Currently it could be up to microarcseconds and unlimited potentially in prospect. At the same time we have to "pay" for this advantage by a few disadvantages making high orbiting SVLBI mission hard to implement. These disadvantages are the following: phase instability, poor (u,v)-coverage, low sensitivity. Possible ways of the solution the problems above were considered. These ways could be the following: usage of Multi-Frequency Synthesis (MFS) enable us to improve poor (u,v)-coverage, dynamic range, and phase instability; usage of sensitive radio telescopes or compact arrays as ground support of the SVLBI mission enable us to improve a sensitivity of the SVLBI mission; usage of two or more space-borne radio telescopes enable us to improve poor (u,v)-coverage and sensitivity; developing a modern imaging technology.

  11. Estimation of integral curves from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Owen; Sakhanenko, Lyudmila

    2015-01-01

    We develop statistical methodology for a popular brain imaging technique HARDI based on the high order tensor model by Özarslan and Mareci [10]. We investigate how uncertainty in the imaging procedure propagates through all levels of the model: signals, tensor fields, vector fields, and fibers. We construct asymptotically normal estimators of the integral curves or fibers which allow us to trace the fibers together with confidence ellipsoids. The procedure is computationally intense as it blends linear algebra concepts from high order tensors with asymptotical statistical analysis. The theoretical results are illustrated on simulated and real datasets. This work generalizes the statistical methodology proposed for low angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging by Carmichael and Sakhanenko [3], to several fibers per voxel. It is also a pioneering statistical work on tractography from HARDI data. It avoids all the typical limitations of the deterministic tractography methods and it delivers the same information as probabilistic tractography methods. Our method is computationally cheap and it provides well-founded mathematical and statistical framework where diverse functionals on fibers, directions and tensors can be studied in a systematic and rigorous way. PMID:25937674

  12. Estimation of integral curves from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Owen; Sakhanenko, Lyudmila

    2015-05-15

    We develop statistical methodology for a popular brain imaging technique HARDI based on the high order tensor model by Özarslan and Mareci [10]. We investigate how uncertainty in the imaging procedure propagates through all levels of the model: signals, tensor fields, vector fields, and fibers. We construct asymptotically normal estimators of the integral curves or fibers which allow us to trace the fibers together with confidence ellipsoids. The procedure is computationally intense as it blends linear algebra concepts from high order tensors with asymptotical statistical analysis. The theoretical results are illustrated on simulated and real datasets. This work generalizes the statistical methodology proposed for low angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging by Carmichael and Sakhanenko [3], to several fibers per voxel. It is also a pioneering statistical work on tractography from HARDI data. It avoids all the typical limitations of the deterministic tractography methods and it delivers the same information as probabilistic tractography methods. Our method is computationally cheap and it provides well-founded mathematical and statistical framework where diverse functionals on fibers, directions and tensors can be studied in a systematic and rigorous way.

  13. Segmentation of high angular resolution diffusion MRI using sparse riemannian manifold clustering.

    PubMed

    Çetingül, H Ertan; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M; Vidal, René

    2014-02-01

    We address the problem of segmenting high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data into multiple regions (or fiber tracts) with distinct diffusion properties. We use the orientation distribution function (ODF) to model diffusion and cast the ODF segmentation problem as a clustering problem in the space of ODFs. Our approach integrates tools from sparse representation theory and Riemannian geometry into a graph theoretic segmentation framework. By exploiting the Riemannian properties of the space of ODFs, we learn a sparse representation for each ODF and infer the segmentation by applying spectral clustering to a similarity matrix built from these representations. In cases where regions with similar (resp. distinct) diffusion properties belong to different (resp. same) fiber tracts, we obtain the segmentation by incorporating spatial and user-specified pairwise relationships into the formulation. Experiments on synthetic data evaluate the sensitivity of our method to image noise and to the concentration parameters, and show its superior performance compared to alternative methods when analyzing complex fiber configurations. Experiments on phantom and real data demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method in segmenting simulated fibers and white matter fiber tracts of clinical importance.

  14. European Extremely Large Telescope Site Characterization. II. High Angular Resolution Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez Ramió, Héctor; Vernin, Jean; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Sarazin, Marc; Varela, Antonia M.; Trinquet, Hervé; Delgado, José Miguel; Fuensalida, Jesús J.; Reyes, Marcos; Benhida, Abdelmajid; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair; García Lambas, Diego; Hach, Youssef; Lazrek, M.; Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Recabarren, Pablo; Renzi, Victor; Sabil, Mohammed; Vrech, Rubén

    2012-08-01

    This is the second article of a series devoted to European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) site characterization. In this article we present the main properties of the parameters involved in high angular resolution observations from the data collected in the site testing campaign of the E-ELT during the design study (DS) phase. Observations were made in 2008 and 2009, in the four sites selected to shelter the future E-ELT (characterized under the ELT-DS contract): Aklim mountain in Morocco, Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM) in Spain, Macón range in Argentina, and Cerro Ventarrones in Chile. The same techniques, instruments, and acquisition procedures were taken on each site. A multiple aperture scintillation sensor (MASS) and a differential image motion monitor (DIMM) were installed at each site. Global statistics of the integrated seeing, the free atmosphere seeing, the boundary layer seeing, and the isoplanatic angle were studied for each site, and the results are presented here. In order to estimate other important parameters, such as the coherence time of the wavefront and the overall parameter “coherence étendue,” additional information of vertical profiles of the wind speed was needed. Data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) archive. Ground wind speed was measured by automatic weather stations (AWS). More aspects of the turbulence parameters, such as their seasonal trend, their nightly evolution, and their temporal stability, were also obtained and analyzed.

  15. PREFACE: The Universe under the Microscope: Astrophysics at High Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    High angular resolution techniques at infrared and centimeter to millimeter wavelengths have become of ever increasing importance for astrophysical research in the past decade. They have led to important breakthroughs, like the direct imaging of protoplanetary discs and of the first exoplanets, the measurement of stellar orbits around the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, or the detection of sub-parsec-scale jets in low luminosity AGN. With adaptive optics in a mature state, infrared/optical astronomy is pushing toward extreme adaptive optics, extremely large telescopes, and infrared/optical interferometry with large aperture telescopes. At longer wavelengths, large arrays start to conquer the sub-millimeter window, with the mid-term goal of global VLBI at sub-millimeter wavelengths. These new techniques will have enormous impact on the field because they will enable us to address issues such as directly measuring the properties of exoplanets, imaging the surfaces of stars, examining stellar dynamics in extremely dense cluster cores, disentangling the processes at the bottom of black hole accretion flows in the jet launching region, or testing general relativity in the strong gravity regime near the event horizon of supermassive black holes. The conference The Universe under the Microscope: Astrophysics at High Angular Resolution, held at the Physikzentrum of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft in Bad Honnef, Germany, on 12-25 April 2008, aimed at an interdisciplinary approach by bringing together astrophysicists from the three great branches of the field, instrumentation, observation, and theory, to discuss the current state of research and the possibilities offered by the next-generation instruments. Editors of the proceedings Rainer Schödel Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía -CSIC, Granada, Spain Andreas Eckart I. Physikalisches Institut der Universität zu Köln, Köln, Germany Susanne Pfalzner I. Physikalisches Institut der Universität zu

  16. Development of cerebellar connectivity in human fetal brains revealed by high angular resolution diffusion tractography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Emi; Hayashi, Emiko; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-08-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) tractography has provided insights into major white matter pathways and cortical development in the human fetal cerebrum. Our objective in this study was to further apply HARDI tracography to the developing human cerebellum ranging from fetal to adult stages, to outline in broad strokes the 3-dimensional development of white matter and local gray matter organization in the cerebellum. We imaged intact fixed fetal cerebellum specimens at 17 gestational weeks (W), 21W, 31W, 36W, and 38W along with an adult cerebellum for comparison. At the earliest gestational age studied (17W), coherent pathways that formed the superior, middle, and inferior cerebellar peduncles were already detected, but pathways between deep cerebellar nuclei and the cortex were not observed until after 38W. At 36-38W, we identified emerging regional specification of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In the cerebellar cortex, we observed disappearance of radial organization in the sagittal orientation during the studied developmental stages similar to our previous observations in developing cerebral cortex. In contrast, in the axial orientation, cerebellar cortical pathways emerged first sparsely (31W) and then with increased prominence at 36-38W with pathways detected both in the radial and tangential directions to the cortical surface. The cerebellar vermis first contained only pathways tangential to the long axes of folia (17-21W), but pathways parallel to the long axes of folia emerged between 21 and 31W. Our results show the potential for HARDI tractography to image developing human cerebellar connectivity.

  17. The photon angular momentum controversy: Resolution of a conflict between laser optics and particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, Elliot

    2016-05-01

    The claim some years ago, contrary to all textbooks, that the angular momentum of a photon (and gluon) can be split in a gauge-invariant way into an orbital and spin term, sparked a major controversy in the Particle Physics community, exacerbated by the realization that many different forms of the angular momentum operators are, in principle, possible. A further cause of upset was the realization that the gluon polarization in a nucleon, a supposedly physically meaningful quantity, corresponds only to the gauge-variant gluon spin derived from Noether's theorem, evaluated in a particular gauge. On the contrary, Laser Physicists have, for decades, been happily measuring physical quantities which correspond to photon orbital and spin angular momentum evaluated in a particular gauge. This paper reconciles the two points of view, and shows that it is the gauge invariant version of the canonical angular momentum which agrees with the results of a host of laser optics experiments.

  18. Southern Massive Stars at High Angular Resolution: Observational Campaign and Companion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, H.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Duvert, G.; Gauchet, L.; Norris, B.; Olofsson, J.; Pickel, D.; Zins, G.; Absil, O.; de Koter, A.; Kratter, K.; Schnurr, O.; Zinnecker, H.

    2014-11-01

    Multiplicity is one of the most fundamental observable properties of massive O-type stars and offers a promising way to discriminate between massive star formation theories. Nevertheless, companions at separations between 1 and 100 milliarcsec (mas) remain mostly unknown due to intrinsic observational limitations. At a typical distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to projected physical separations of 2-200 AU. The Southern MAssive Stars at High angular resolution survey (SMaSH+) was designed to fill this gap by providing the first systematic interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars. We observed 117 O-type stars with VLTI/PIONIER and 162 O-type stars with NACO/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM), probing the separation ranges 1-45 and 30-250 mas and brightness contrasts of ΔH < 4 and ΔH < 5, respectively. Taking advantage of NACO's field of view, we further uniformly searched for visual companions in an 8'' radius down to ΔH = 8. This paper describes observations and data analysis, reports the discovery of almost 200 new companions in the separation range from 1 mas to 8'' and presents a catalog of detections, including the first resolved measurements of over a dozen known long-period spectroscopic binaries. Excluding known runaway stars for which no companions are detected, 96 objects in our main sample (δ < 0° H < 7.5) were observed both with PIONIER and NACO/SAM. The fraction of these stars with at least one resolved companion within 200 mas is 0.53. Accounting for known but unresolved spectroscopic or eclipsing companions, the multiplicity fraction at separation ρ < 8'' increases to f m = 0.91 ± 0.03. The fraction of luminosity class V stars that have a bound companion reaches 100% at 30 mas while their average number of physically connected companions within 8'' is f c = 2.2 ± 0.3. This demonstrates that massive stars form nearly exclusively in multiple systems. The nine non-thermal radio emitters observed by SMaSH+ are all resolved, including the newly

  19. SOUTHERN MASSIVE STARS AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION: OBSERVATIONAL CAMPAIGN AND COMPANION DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sana, H.; Lacour, S.; Gauchet, L.; Pickel, D.; Berger, J.-P.; Norris, B.; Olofsson, J.; Absil, O.; De Koter, A.; Kratter, K.; Schnurr, O.; Zinnecker, H.

    2014-11-01

    Multiplicity is one of the most fundamental observable properties of massive O-type stars and offers a promising way to discriminate between massive star formation theories. Nevertheless, companions at separations between 1 and 100 milliarcsec (mas) remain mostly unknown due to intrinsic observational limitations. At a typical distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to projected physical separations of 2-200 AU. The Southern MAssive Stars at High angular resolution survey (SMaSH+) was designed to fill this gap by providing the first systematic interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars. We observed 117 O-type stars with VLTI/PIONIER and 162 O-type stars with NACO/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM), probing the separation ranges 1-45 and 30-250 mas and brightness contrasts of ΔH < 4 and ΔH < 5, respectively. Taking advantage of NACO's field of view, we further uniformly searched for visual companions in an 8'' radius down to ΔH = 8. This paper describes observations and data analysis, reports the discovery of almost 200 new companions in the separation range from 1 mas to 8'' and presents a catalog of detections, including the first resolved measurements of over a dozen known long-period spectroscopic binaries. Excluding known runaway stars for which no companions are detected, 96 objects in our main sample (δ < 0°; H < 7.5) were observed both with PIONIER and NACO/SAM. The fraction of these stars with at least one resolved companion within 200 mas is 0.53. Accounting for known but unresolved spectroscopic or eclipsing companions, the multiplicity fraction at separation ρ < 8'' increases to f {sub m} = 0.91 ± 0.03. The fraction of luminosity class V stars that have a bound companion reaches 100% at 30 mas while their average number of physically connected companions within 8'' is f {sub c} = 2.2 ± 0.3. This demonstrates that massive stars form nearly exclusively in multiple systems. The nine non-thermal radio emitters observed by SMaSH+ are all resolved

  20. The X-Ray Optics for the High Angular Resolution Imager (HARI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation shows the basic parameters of the x-ray optics, the housing,a graph of the effective area vs energy, another graph showing the angular off-set vs HEW, and a series of graphs showing the detector offsets and tilts,

  1. Possible resolution of the angular momentum paradox: Fractional charge, twist, and topology in THe-A

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.; Garg, A.; Muzikar, P.

    1985-11-18

    We attempt to resolve the angular momentum paradox in THe-A by connecting it to the phenomenon of charge fractionalization and by writing the current as a weighted Fermi-surface sum of fractional charges. We also give a novel interpretation of the twist term in terms of topology on the Fermi surface.

  2. A High Angular Resolution Multiplicity Survey of the Open Clusters α Persei and Praesepe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patience, J.; Ghez, A. M.; Reid, I. N.; Matthews, K.

    2002-03-01

    Two hundred forty-two members of the Praesepe and α Persei clusters have been surveyed with high angular resolution 2.2 μm speckle imaging on the 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility, the 5 m Hale, and the 10 m Keck telescopes, along with direct imaging using the near-infrared camera (NICMOS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The observed stars range in spectral type from B (~5 Msolar) to early M (~0.5 Msolar), with the majority of the targets more massive than ~0.8 Msolar. The one quadruple and 39 binary systems detected encompass separations from 0.053" to 7.28" 28 of the systems are new detections, and there are nine candidate substellar companions. The results of the survey are used to test binary star formation and evolution scenarios and to investigate the effects of companion stars on X-ray emission and stellar rotation. The main results are as follows:1. Over the projected separation range of 26 to 581 AU and magnitude differences of ΔK<4.0 (comparable to mass ratios q=Msec/Mprim>0.25), the companion-star fraction (CSF) for α Per is 0.09+/-0.03, and that for Praesepe is 0.10+/-0.03. This fraction is consistent with the field G dwarf value, implying that there is not a systematic decline in multiplicity with age at these separations on timescales of a few times 107 yr. The combination of previous spectroscopic work and the current cluster survey results in a cluster binary separation distribution that peaks at 4+1-1.5 AU, a significantly smaller value than the peaks of both the field G dwarf and the nearby T Tauri distributions. If the field G dwarf distribution represents a superposition of distributions from the populations that contributed to the field, then the data imply that ~30% of field binaries formed in dark clouds like the nearby T Tauri stars and the remaining ~70% formed in denser regions.2. An exploration of the binary star properties reveals a cluster CSF that increases with decreasing target mass, and a cluster mass ratio distribution that

  3. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): High Angular Resolution Astronomy at Far-Infrared Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Astronomical studies at infrared wavelengths have dramatically improved our understanding of the universe, and observations with Spitzer, the upcoming Herschel mission. and SOFIA will continue to provide exciting new discoveries. The comparatively low spatial resolution of these missions, however. is insufficient to resolve the physical scales on which mid- to far-infrared emission arises, resulting in source and structure ambiguities that limit our ability to answer key science questions. Interferometry enables high angular resolution at these wavelengths. We have proposed a new high altitude balloon experiment, the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). High altitude operation makes far-infrared (30- 300micron) observations possible, and BETTII's 8-meter baseline provides unprecedented angular resolution (-0.5 arcsec) in this band. BETTII will use a double- Fourier instrument to simultaneously obtain both spatial and spectral informatioT. he spatially resolved spectroscopy provided by BETTII will address key questions about the nature of disks in young cluster stars and active galactic nuclei and the envelopes of evolved stars. BETTII will also lay the groundwork for future space interferometers.

  4. Angular-resolution and material-characterization measurements for a dual-particle imaging system with mixed-oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson-Rivière, Alexis; Polack, J. Kyle; Hamel, Michael C.; Klemm, Dietrich D.; Ito, Kai; McSpaden, Alexander T.; Flaska, Marek; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Tomanin, Alice; Peerani, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    A dual-particle imaging (DPI) system, capable of simultaneously imaging fast neutrons and gamma rays, has been operated in the presence of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel to assess the system's angular resolution and material-characterization capabilities. The detection principle is based on the scattering physics of neutrons (elastic scattering) and gamma rays (Compton scattering) in organic and inorganic scintillators. The detection system is designed as a combination of a two-plane Compton camera and a neutron-scatter camera. The front plane consists of EJ-309 liquid scintillators and the back plane consists of interleaved EJ-309 and NaI(Tl) scintillators. MCNPX-PoliMi was used to optimize the geometry of the system and the resulting prototype was built and tested using a Cf-252 source as an SNM surrogate. A software package was developed to acquire and process data in real time. The software was used for a measurement campaign to assess the angular resolution of the imaging system with MOX samples. Measurements of two MOX canisters of similar isotopics and intensity were performed for 6 different canister separations (from 5° to 30°, corresponding to distances of 21 cm and 131 cm, respectively). The measurements yielded a minimum separation of 20° at 2.5 m (86-cm separation) required to see 2 separate hot spots. Additionally, the results displayed good agreement with MCNPX-PoliMi simulations. These results indicate an angular resolution between 15° and 20°, given the 5° step. Coupled with its large field of view, and its capability to differentiate between spontaneous fission and (α,n) sources, the DPI system shows its potential for nuclear-nonproliferation applications.

  5. Small-size, high-resolution angular displacement measurement technology based on an imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Wan, Qiuhua; Lu, Xinran; Du, Yingcai; Yang, Shouwang

    2017-01-20

    It is challenging to design a photoelectric encoder that is small in size while ensuring it has sufficiently high resolution and accuracy. Traditional displacement measurement via the moiré fringe signal does not facilitate high resolution at small grate sizes; photoelectric and digital photo processing can significantly improve the angle measurement resolution over traditional techniques. The primary focus of this paper includes grating displacement coding and decoding, as well as the corresponding high-resolution subdivision and measurement error factors. A small-size absolute photographic encoder was designed (50 mm diameter) that exhibits resolution of 1.24'' (20 bit) with a standard deviation of error of 14.3''. The results presented here may provide a theoretical and technological foundation for further research on small-size, high-resolution photographic rotary encoders.

  6. Angularly-resolved elastic scatter from single particles collected over a large solid angle and with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    Elastic light scattering from a single non-spherical particle of various morphologies has been measured simultaneously with a large angular range (90° < θ < 165° and 0° < phi < 360°) and with high angular resolution (1024 pixels in θ and 512 pixels in phi). Because the single-shot laser pulse is short (pulse duration of 70 ns), the tumbling and flowing particle can be treated as frozen in space. The large angle two-dimensional angular optical scattering (hereafter referred to as LA TAOS) intensity pattern, I(θ,phi), has been measured for a variety of particle morphology, such as the following: (1) single polystyrene latex (PSL) sphere; (2) cluster of PSL spheres; (3) single Bacillus subtilis (BG) spore; (4) cluster of BG spores; (5) dried aggregates of bio-aerosols as well as background clutter aerosols. All these measurements were made using the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (0.532 μm). Islands structures in the LA TAOS patterns seem to be the prominent feature. Efforts are being made to extract metrics from these islands and compare them to theoretical results based on the T-matrix method.

  7. High resolution Coulomb explosion spectra and angular distributions of fragment ions of N 2 in a femtosecond laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Mingyuan; Huang, Shaochuan; Xi, Wei; Liu, Zuoye; Du, Hongchuan; Ding, Baowei; Hu, Bitao

    2017-03-01

    Femtosecond laser field-induced ionization and Coulomb explosion are systematically investigated using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Meanwhile a good alignment of the N2 is achieved geometrically. Based on the energy and momentum conservation laws, the events from different Coulomb explosion channels are identified accurately and further used to obtain the Kinetic Energy Release (KER) by the created molecular ion pairs and the angular distributions of the fragment ions. The KERs measured at laser intensities varying from 4 × 10^{14} W/cm2 to 2 × 10^{15} W/cm2 are found to stay constant. The angular distributions are measured at laser intensity of 9 × 10^{14} W/cm2. The atomic ions N+, N^{2+} and N^{3+} exhibit highly anisotropic distributions and for higher charge state, the angular distributions become narrower. With good exclusion of channel N(1,0), the non-zeroes normal to the laser polarization vector in channel N(1,1) still exist, which indicates the presence of geometric alignments (GA). The elusive shrink structure at θ=0° for channels N(1,1), N(1,2) and N(2,3) is observed, which implies that the non-sequential process exists, and the electron rescattering plays role in the ionization process.

  8. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  9. Spatiotemporal multi-resolution approximation of the Amari type neural field model.

    PubMed

    Aram, P; Freestone, D R; Dewar, M; Scerri, K; Jirsa, V; Grayden, D B; Kadirkamanathan, V

    2013-02-01

    Neural fields are spatially continuous state variables described by integro-differential equations, which are well suited to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of cortical activations on multiple scales. Here we develop a multi-resolution approximation (MRA) framework for the integro-difference equation (IDE) neural field model based on semi-orthogonal cardinal B-spline wavelets. In this way, a flexible framework is created, whereby both macroscopic and microscopic behavior of the system can be represented simultaneously. State and parameter estimation is performed using the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. A synthetic example is provided to demonstrate the framework.

  10. Relaxation approximations to second-order traffic flow models by high-resolution schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolos, I.K.; Delis, A.I.; Papageorgiou, M.

    2015-03-10

    A relaxation-type approximation of second-order non-equilibrium traffic models, written in conservation or balance law form, is considered. Using the relaxation approximation, the nonlinear equations are transformed to a semi-linear diagonilizable problem with linear characteristic variables and stiff source terms with the attractive feature that neither Riemann solvers nor characteristic decompositions are in need. In particular, it is only necessary to provide the flux and source term functions and an estimate of the characteristic speeds. To discretize the resulting relaxation system, high-resolution reconstructions in space are considered. Emphasis is given on a fifth-order WENO scheme and its performance. The computations reported demonstrate the simplicity and versatility of relaxation schemes as numerical solvers.

  11. Slumped glass optics with interfacing ribs for high angular resolution x-ray astronomy: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civitani, M.; Basso, S.; Brizzolari, C.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.; Breunig, E.; Burwitz, V.; Hartner, G. D.; Menz, B.

    2015-09-01

    The Slumped Glass Optics technology, developed at INAF/OAB since a few years, is becoming a competitive solution for the realization of the future X-ray telescopes with a very large collecting area, as e.g. the proposed Athena, with more than 2 m2 effective area at 1 keV and with a high angular resolution (5'' HEW). The developed technique is based on modular elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOUs), made of several layers of thin foils of glass, previously formed by direct hot slumping in cylindrical configuration, and then stacked in a Wolter-I configuration, through interfacing ribs. The achievable global angular resolution of the optics relies on the surface shape accuracy of the slumped foils, on the smoothness of the mirror surfaces and on the correct integration and co-alignment of the mirror segments achieved with a dedicated Integration Machine (IMA). In this paper we provide an update of the project development, reporting on the last results achieved. In particular, we will present the results obtained with full illumination X-ray tests for the last developed prototypes.

  12. Ultra High Angular Resolution and sub-mas Astrometry with HST's FGS1r

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, M.; Makidon, R. B.; Jong, D.; Nelan, E.

    2001-05-01

    The 3 Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) - white-light shearing interferometers - are critical to the mission of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by providing highly accurate guiding for the observatory. Moreover, FGS1r in particular is a capable science instrument. Its two observing modes - Position Mode and Transfer Mode - support wide angle and narrow angle astrometry respectively. In Position Mode, a star's interferometric fringes are tracked to determine its angular position relative to other stars in the detector's field of view. Using this method, a star's parallax, proper motion, and reflex motion can be measured with a precision of about 1 mas per observation, while multi-epoch observing programs have yielded astrometry with accuracies approaching 0.2 mas for objects as bright as V=3 or as faint as V=16.5. Transfer Mode observations repeatedly scan an object's interferometric fringes to achieve sub-mas sampling of the fringe morphology with high signal-to-noise (conceptually analogous to imaging with a 1 mas pixel array). Post-observation analysis allows the measurement of angular separation, position angle and relative brightness of binary components, or a determination of the angular size of an extended object. Close binary systems with V < 12 can be detected down to 7 mas, while systems as faint as V=15 can be characterized to 12 mas, provided the magnitude difference between the components is less than about 2. (Wider systems with magnitude differences as large as 3.5 can be resolved.) Both FGS observing modes can be utilized to derive the total and fractional masses of binary systems, and thus the mass-luminosity relationship of the binary components. The FGS have also been used to observe and characterize non-point source objects, including Mira variables, asteroids, and active galactic nuclei, yielding information on the structure of these objects on scales as small as 8 mas. The FGS also function as 40 Hz photometers, offering milli-magnitude precision

  13. Investigation of the Chromosphere-Corona Interface with the Upgraded Very High Angular Resolution Ultraviolet Telescope (VAULT2.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Beltran, Samuel Tun; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Eisenhower, Kevin; Korendyke, Clarence; Feldman, Ronen; Moser, John; Shea, John; Johnson-Rambert, Mary; McMullin, Don; Stenborg, Guillermo; Shepler, Ed; Roberts, David

    2016-03-01

    Very high angular resolution ultraviolet telescope (VAULT2.0) is a Lyman-alpha (Lyα; 1216Å) spectroheliograph designed to observe the upper chromospheric region of the solar atmosphere with high spatial (<0.5‧‧) and temporal (8s) resolution. Besides being the brightest line in the solar spectrum, Lyα emission arises at the temperature interface between coronal and chromospheric plasmas and may, hence, hold important clues about the transfer of mass and energy to the solar corona. VAULT2.0 is an upgrade of the previously flown VAULT rocket and was launched successfully on September 30, 2014 from White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). The target was AR12172 midway toward the southwestern limb. We obtained 33 images at 8s cadence at arc second resolution due to hardware problems. The science campaign was a resounding success, with all space and ground-based instruments obtaining high-resolution data at the same location within the AR. We discuss the science rationale, instrument upgrades, and performance during the first flight and present some preliminary science results.

  14. High angular resolution stellar imaging with occultations from the Cassini spacecraft - II. Kronocyclic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Lloyd, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We present an advance in the use of Cassini observations of stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn for stellar studies. Stewart et al. demonstrated the potential use of such observations for measuring stellar angular diameters. Here, we use these same observations, and tomographic imaging reconstruction techniques, to produce two-dimensional images of complex stellar systems. We detail the determination of the basic observational reference frame. A technique for recovering model-independent brightness profiles for data from each occulting edge is discussed, along with the tomographic combination of these profiles to build an image of the source star. Finally, we demonstrate the technique with recovered images of the α Centauri binary system and the circumstellar environment of the evolved late-type giant star, Mira.

  15. Exploring Small Spatial Scales in the Transition Region and Solar Corona with the Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, D. H.; Korendyke, C. M.; Vourlidas, A.; Brown, C. M.; Tun-Beltran, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Landi, E.; Seely, J.; Davila, J. M.; Hagood, R.; Roberts, D.; Shepler, E.; Feldman, R.; Moser, J.; Shea, J.

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the transition region and coronal loops point to the importance of processes occurring on small spatial scales in governing the strong dynamics and impulsive energy release in these regions. As a consequence, high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution over a broad temperature range, and accuracy in velocity and density determinations are all critical observational parameters. Current instruments lack one or more of these properties. These observational deficiencies have created a wide array of opposing descriptions of coronal loop heating and questions such as whether or not the plasma within coronal loops is multi-thermal or isothermal. High spectral and spatial resolution spectroscopic data are absolutely required to resolve these controversies and to advance our understanding of the dynamics within the solar atmosphere. We will achieve this with the Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS) sounding rocket payload. VERIS consists of an off-axis paraboloid telescope feeding a very high angular resolution, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging spectrometer that will provide the first ever, simultaneous sub-arcsecond (0.16 arcsecond/pixel) spectra in bright lines needed to study plasma structures in the transition region, quiet corona, and active region core. It will do so with a spectral resolution of >5000 to allow Doppler velocity determinations to better than 3 km/s. VERIS uses a novel two-element, normal incidence optical design with highly reflective, broad wavelength coverage EUV coatings to access a spectral range with broad temperature coverage (0.03-15 MK) and density-sensitive line ratios. Combined with Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) and ground based observatories, VERIS will deliver simultaneous observations of the entire solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the multi-million degree corona at sub-arcsecond resolution for the first time ever, allowing us to understand the

  16. Thin fused silica optics for a few arcsec angular resolution and large collecting area x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citterio, O.; Civitani, M. M.; Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Campana, S.; Conconi, P.; Ghigo, M.; Mattaini, E.; Moretti, A.; Parodi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of a X-ray mission with high imaging capabilities, similar to those achieved with Chandra (< 1 arcsec Half Energy Width, HEW), but with a much larger throughput is a very attractive perspective, even if challenging. For such a mission the scientific opportunities, in particular for the study of the early Universe, would remain at the state of the art for the next decades. At the beginning of the new millennium the XEUS mission has been proposed, with an effective area of several m2 and an angular resolution better than 2 arcsec HEW. Unfortunately, after the initial study, this mission was not implemented, mainly due to the costs and the low level of technology readiness. Currently the most advanced proposal for such a kind of mission is the SMART-X project, led by CfA and involving several other US Institutes. This project is based on adjustable segments of thin foil mirrors with piezo-electric actuators, aiming to achieve an effective area < 2 m2 at 1 keV and an angular resolution better than 1 arcsec HEW. Another attractive technology to realize an X-ray telescope with similar characteristics is being developed at NASA/Goddard. In this case the mirrors are based on Si substrates that are super-polished and figured starting from a bulky Si ingot, from which they are properly cut. Here we propose an alternative method based on precise direct grinding, figuring and polishing of thin (a few mm) glass shells with innovative deterministic polishing methods. This is followed by a final correction via ion figuring to obtain the desired accuracy in order to achieve the 1 arc sec HEW requirement. For this purpose, a temporary stiffening structure is used to support the shell from the polishing operations up to its integration in the telescope supporting structure. We will present the technological process under development, the results achieved so far and some mission scenarios based on this kind of optics, aiming to achieve an effective area more than

  17. Thin fused silica optics for a high angular resolution and large collecting area X Ray telescope after Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta M; Basso, Stefano; Campana, Sergio; Conconi, Paolo; Ghigo, Mauro; Mattaini, Enrico; Moretti, Alberto; Parodi, Giancarlo; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-08-01

    The implementation of an X-ray mission with high imaging capabilities, similar to those achieved with Chandra (<1 arcsec Half Energy Width, HEW), but with a much larger throughput is very attractive, even if challenging. For such a mission the scientific opportunities, in particular for the study of the early Universe, would remain at the state of the art for the next decades. Initially the ESA-led XEUS mission was proposed, with an effective area of several m2 and an angular resolution better than 2 arcsec HEW. Unfortunately, this mission was not implemented, mainly due to the costs and the low level of technology readiness. Currently the most advanced proposal for such a mission is the SMART-X project, led by CfA together with other US institutes. This project is based on adjustable segments of thin foil mirrors with piezo-electric actuators, aiming to achieve an effective area >2 m2 at 1 keV and an angular resolution better than 1 arcsec HEW. Another attractive technology to realize an X-ray telescope with similar characteristics is being developed at NASA/Goddard. In this case the mirrors are based on Si substrates that are super-polished and figured starting from a bulky Si ingot, from which they are properly cut. Here we propose an alternative method based on precise direct grinding, figuring and polishing of thin (a few mm) glass shells with innovative deterministic polishing methods. This is followed by a final correction via ion figuring to obtain the desired accuracy. For this purpose, a temporary stiffening structure is used to support the shell from the polishing operations up to its integration in the telescope supporting structure. This paper deals with the technological process under development, the results achieved so far and some mission scenarios based on this kind of optics, aiming to achieve an effective area more than 10 times larger than Chandra and an angular resolution of 1 arcsec HEW on axis and of a few arcsec off-axis across a large

  18. Pose-Angular Tracking of Maneuvering Targets With High Range Resolution (HRR) Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    useful for tracking maneuvering targets . For target identification (ID), range profiles obtained by a high range resolution (HRR) radar are...of moving targets . Keywords: Tracking, Maneuver, Target ID, Pose, HRR. 1 Introduction Compared to conventional tracking with post- detection ...range profile is generated. HRR range profiles have long been used for target identification (ID) or fingerprinting [8, 9, 13, 15]. It has also

  19. Angular effects and correction on medium resolution sensors for crop monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing imagery at medium spatial resolutions (20-60m) such as Landsat, the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) and the Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) have been broadly used in mapping crop types and monitoring crop conditions. This paper examined the influence of viewing and illumina...

  20. Dense sampled transmission matrix for high resolution angular spectrum imaging through turbid media via compressed sensing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hwanchol; Yoon, Changhyeong; Choi, Wonshik; Eom, Tae Joong; Lee, Heung-No

    2016-03-01

    We provide an approach to improve the quality of image reconstruction in wide-field imaging through turbid media (WITM). In WITM, a calibration stage which measures the transmission matrix (TM), the set of responses of turbid medium to a set of plane waves with different incident angles, is preceded to the image recovery. Then, the TM is used for estimation of object image in image recovery stage. In this work, we aim to estimate highly resolved angular spectrum and use it for high quality image reconstruction. To this end, we propose to perform a dense sampling for TM measurement in calibration stage with finer incident angle spacing. In conventional approaches, incident angle spacing is made to be large enough so that the columns in TM are out of memory effect of turbid media. Otherwise, the columns in TM are correlated and the inversion becomes difficult. We employ compressed sensing (CS) for a successful high resolution angular spectrum recovery with dense sampled TM. CS is a relatively new information acquisition and reconstruction framework and has shown to provide superb performance in ill-conditioned inverse problems. We observe that the image quality metrics such as contrast-to-noise ratio and mean squared error are improved and the perceptual image quality is improved with reduced speckle noise in the reconstructed image. This results shows that the WITM performance can be improved only by executing dense sampling in the calibration stage and with an efficient signal reconstruction framework without elaborating the overall optical imaging systems.

  1. Angular Resolution of an EAS Array for Gamma Ray Astronomy at Energies Greater Than 5 x 10 (13) Ev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apte, A. R.; Gopalakrishnan, N. V.; Tonwar, S. C.; Uma, V.

    1985-01-01

    A 24 detector extensive air shower array is being operated at Ootacamund (2300 m altitude, 11.4 deg N latitude) in southern India for a study of arrival directions of showers of energies greater than 5 x 10 to the 13th power eV. Various configurations of the array of detectors have been used to estimate the accuracy in determination of arrival angle of showers with such an array. These studies show that it is possible to achieve an angular resolution of better than 2 deg with the Ooty array for search for point sources of Cosmic gamma rays at energies above 5 x 10 to the 13th power eV.

  2. Auger-electron angular distributions calculated without the two-step approximation: Calculation of angle-resolved resonant Auger spectra of C2 H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, Renato; Embriaco, Davide; Massini, Michol; Simonucci, Stefano; Taioli, Simone

    2004-10-01

    Analytic expressions for the direct, resonant, and interference contributions to the differential cross section of a resonant Auger process, produced by the inner-shell photoionization of a linear molecule either “fixed in space” or belonging to a gas of randomly oriented molecules, have been derived following Dill’s procedures [ Dill , Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1393 (1980) ], but going beyond the two-step approximation. Angle-resolved Auger spectra of the C2H2 molecule measured on top of the C1s→π* resonance [ Kivimäki , J. Phys. B 30, 4279 (1997) ] have been calculated together with asymmetry parameters, analyzing also the different contributions to the electron angular distributions.

  3. Numerical study of particle-size distributions retrieved from angular light-scattering data using an evolution strategy with the Fraunhofer approximation.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ubera, Javier; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan Jaime; Aguilar, J Félix; Gale, David Michel

    2007-06-10

    An algorithm is presented based on an evolution strategy to retrieve a particle size distribution from angular light-scattering data. The analyzed intensity patterns are generated using the Mie theory, and the algorithm retrieves a series of known normal, gamma, and lognormal distributions by using the Fraunhofer approximation. The distributions scan the interval of modal size parameters 100 < or = alpha < or = 150. The numerical results show that the evolution strategy can be successfully applied to solve this kind of inverse problem, obtaining a more accurate solution than, for example, the Chin-Shifrin inversion method, and avoiding the use of a priori information concerning the domain of the distribution, commonly necessary for reconstructing the particle size distribution when this analytical inversion method is used.

  4. High Angular Resolution Mid-Infrared Imaging of Young Stars in Orion BN/KL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Gezari, D. Y.; Danchi, W. C.; Najita, J.; Monnier, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present Keck LWS images of the Orion BN/KL star forming region obtained in the first multi-wavelength study to have 0.3--0.5 resolution from 4.7 (micro)m to 22 (micro)m. The young stellar objects designed infrared source n and radio source I are believed to dominate the BN/KL region. They have detected extended emission from a probable accretion disk around source n but infer a stellar luminosity on the order of only 2000 L(sub (center-dot)).

  5. High-angular-resolution stellar imaging with occultations from the Cassini spacecraft - III. Mira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of spectral and spatial data of Mira obtained by the Cassini spacecraft, which not only observed the star's spectra over a broad range of near-infrared wavelengths, but was also able to obtain high-resolution spatial information by watching the star pass behind Saturn's rings. The observed spectral range of 1-5 microns reveals the stellar atmosphere in the crucial water-bands which are unavailable to terrestrial observers, and the simultaneous spatial sampling allows the origin of spectral features to be located in the stellar environment. Models are fitted to the data, revealing the spectral and spatial structure of molecular layers surrounding the star. High-resolution imagery is recovered revealing the layered and asymmetric nature of the stellar atmosphere. The observational data set is also used to confront the state-of-the-art cool opacity-sampling dynamic extended atmosphere models of Mira variables through a detailed spectral and spatial comparison, revealing in general a good agreement with some specific departures corresponding to particular spectral features.

  6. Next Generation Astronomical X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang. W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M. L.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. R.; McClelland, R. S.; O'Dell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray astronomy depends on the availability of telescopes with high resolution and large photon collecting areas. Since x-ray observation can only be carried out above the atmosphere, these telescopes must be necessarily lightweight. Compounding the lightweight requirement is that an x-ray telescope consists of many nested concentric shells, which further require that x-ray mirrors must also be geometrically thin to achieve high packing efficiency. This double lightweight and geometrically thin requirement poses significant technical challenges in fabricating the mirrors and in integrating them into mirror assemblies. This paper reports on the approach, strategy and status of our x-ray optics development program whose objective is to meet these technical challenges at modest cost to enable future x-ray missions, including small Explorer missions in the near term, probe class missions in the medium term, and large flagship missions in the long term.

  7. High resolution angular sensor. [reducing ring laser gyro output quantization using phase locked loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gneses, M. I.; Berg, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    Specifications for the pointing stabilization system of the large space telescope were used in an investigation of the feasibility of reducing ring laser gyro output quantization to the sub-arc-second level by the use of phase locked loops and associated electronics. Systems analysis procedures are discussed and a multioscillator laser gyro model is presented along with data on the oscillator noise. It is shown that a second order closed loop can meet the measurement noise requirements when the loop gain and time constant of the loop filter are appropriately chosen. The preliminary electrical design is discussed from the standpoint of circuit tradeoff considerations. Analog, digital, and hybrid designs are given and their applicability to the high resolution sensor is examined. the electrical design choice of a system configuration is detailed. The design and operation of the various modules is considered and system block diagrams are included. Phase 1 and 2 test results using the multioscillator laser gyro are included.

  8. High angular resolution diffusion imaging in a child with autism spectrum disorder and comparison with his unaffected identical twin

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Eugenia; Pannek, Kerstin; Calderoni, Sara; Gaglianese, Anna; Fiori, Simona; Brovedani, Paola; Scelfo, Danilo; Rose, Stephen; Tosetti, Michela; Cioni, Giovanni; Guzzetta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Summary In recent years, the use of brain diffusion MRI has led to the hypothesis that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show abnormally connected brains. We used the model of disease-discordant identical twins to test the hypothesis that higher-order diffusion MRI protocols are able to detect abnormal connectivity in a single subject. We studied the structural connectivity of the brain of a child with ASD, and of that of his unaffected identical twin, using high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) probabilistic tractography. Cortical regions were automatically parcellated from high-resolution structural images, and HARDI-based connection matrices were produced for statistical comparison. Differences in diffusion indexes between subjects were tested by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Tracts were defined as discordant when they showed a between-subject difference of 10 percent or more. Around 11 percent of the discordant intra-hemispheric tracts showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the ASD twin, while only 1 percent showed higher values. This difference was significant. Our findings in a disease-discordant identical twin pair confirm previous literature consistently reporting lower FA values in children with ASD. PMID:26446271

  9. First Light Adaptive Optics Images from the Keck II Telescope: A New Era of High Angular Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizinowich, P.; Acton, D. S.; Shelton, C.; Stomski, P.; Gathright, J.; Ho, K.; Lupton, W.; Tsubota, K.; Lai, O.; Max, C.; Brase, J.; An, J.; Avicola, K.; Olivier, S.; Gavel, D.; Macintosh, B.; Ghez, A.; Larkin, J.

    2000-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology that corrects in real time for the blurring effects of atmospheric turbulence, in principle allowing Earth-bound telescopes to achieve their diffraction limit and to ``see'' as clearly as if they were in space. The power of AO using natural guide stars has been amply demonstrated in recent years on telescopes up to 3-4 m in diameter. The next breakthrough in astronomical resolution was expected to occur with the implementation of AO on the new generation of large, 8-10 m diameter telescopes. In this paper we report the initial results from the first of these AO systems, now coming on line on the 10 m diameter Keck II Telescope. The results include the highest angular resolution images ever obtained from a single telescope (0.022" and 0.040" at 0.85 and 1.65 μm wavelengths, respectively), as well as tests of system performance on three astronomical targets.

  10. Atmospheric Phase Correction Using CARMA-PACS: High Angular Resolution Observations of the FU Orionis Star PP 13S*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura M.; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Carpenter, John M.; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Isella, Andrea; Bock, Douglas C.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Carlstrom, John; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Joy, Marshall; Kwon, Woojin; Leitch, Erik M.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Scott, Stephen L.; Teuben, Peter J.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.

    2010-11-01

    We present 0farcs15 resolution observations of the 227 GHz continuum emission from the circumstellar disk around the FU Orionis star PP 13S*. The data were obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) Paired Antenna Calibration System (C-PACS), which measures and corrects the atmospheric delay fluctuations on the longest baselines of the array in order to improve the sensitivity and angular resolution of the observations. A description of the C-PACS technique and the data reduction procedures are presented. C-PACS was applied to CARMA observations of PP 13S*, which led to a factor of 1.6 increase in the observed peak flux of the source, a 36% reduction in the noise of the image, and a 52% decrease in the measured size of the source major axis. The calibrated complex visibilities were fitted with a theoretical disk model to constrain the disk surface density. The total disk mass from the best-fit model corresponds to 0.06 M sun, which is larger than the median mass of a disk around a classical T Tauri star. The disk is optically thick at a wavelength of 1.3 mm for orbital radii less than 48 AU. At larger radii, the inferred surface density of the PP 13S* disk is an order of magnitude lower than that needed to develop a gravitational instability.

  11. ATMOSPHERIC PHASE CORRECTION USING CARMA-PACS: HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF THE FU ORIONIS STAR PP 13S*

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Laura M.; Carpenter, John M.; Isella, Andrea; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Leitch, Erik M.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Scott, Stephen L.; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Teuben, Peter J.; Bock, Douglas C.; Carlstrom, John; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Joy, Marshall; Kwon, Woojin; Plambeck, Richard L.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.

    2010-11-20

    We present 0.''15 resolution observations of the 227 GHz continuum emission from the circumstellar disk around the FU Orionis star PP 13S*. The data were obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) Paired Antenna Calibration System (C-PACS), which measures and corrects the atmospheric delay fluctuations on the longest baselines of the array in order to improve the sensitivity and angular resolution of the observations. A description of the C-PACS technique and the data reduction procedures are presented. C-PACS was applied to CARMA observations of PP 13S*, which led to a factor of 1.6 increase in the observed peak flux of the source, a 36% reduction in the noise of the image, and a 52% decrease in the measured size of the source major axis. The calibrated complex visibilities were fitted with a theoretical disk model to constrain the disk surface density. The total disk mass from the best-fit model corresponds to 0.06 M{sub sun}, which is larger than the median mass of a disk around a classical T Tauri star. The disk is optically thick at a wavelength of 1.3 mm for orbital radii less than 48 AU. At larger radii, the inferred surface density of the PP 13S* disk is an order of magnitude lower than that needed to develop a gravitational instability.

  12. High Angular Resolution Mid-Infrared Imaging of Young Stars in Orion BN/KL

    SciTech Connect

    greenhill, l

    2004-06-25

    The authors present Keck LWS images of the Orion BN/KL star forming region obtained in the first multi-wavelength study to have 0.3--0.5 resolution from 4.7 {micro}m to 22 {micro}m. The young stellar objects designed infrared source n and radio source I are believed to dominate the BN/KL region. They have detected extended emission from a probable accretion disk around source n but infer a stellar luminosity on the order of only 2000 L{sub {center_dot}}. Although source I is believed to be more luminous, they do not detect an infrared counterpart even at the longest wavelengths. However, they resolve the closeby infrared source, IRc2, into an arc of knots {approx} 10{sup 3} AU long at all wavelengths. Although the physical relation of source I to IRc2 remains ambiguous, they suggest these sources mark a high density core (10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} pc{sup -3} over {approx} 10{sup 3} AU) within the larger BN/KL star forming cluster. The high density may be a consequence of the core being young and heavily embedded. The authors suggest the energetics of the BN/KL region may be dominated by this cluster core rather than one or two individual sources.

  13. High spatial and angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging reveals forniceal damage related to memory impairment☆

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Katherine A.; Sakaie, Ken E.; Lowe, Mark J.; Lin, Jian; Stone, Lael; Bermel, Robert A.; Beall, Erik B.; Rao, Stephen M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Phillips, Micheal D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly those measures associated with a specific white matter pathway, have consistently shown correlations with function. This study sought to investigate correlations between DTI measures in the fornix and common cognitive deficits in MS patients, including episodic memory, working memory and attention. Materials and Methods Patients with MS and group age- and sex-matched controls underwent high-resolution diffusion scanning (1-mm isotropic voxels) and cognitive testing. Manually drawn forniceal regions of interest were applied to individual maps of tensor-derived measures, and mean values of transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD), longitudinal diffusivity (LD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated. Results In 40 patients with MS [mean age±S.D.=42.55±9.1 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)=2.0±1.2; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) score=0.38±0.46] and 20 healthy controls (mean age±S.D.=41.35±9.7 years; EDSS=0.0±0; MSFC score=0.74±0.24), we found that FA, MD and TD values in the fornix were significantly different between groups (P<.03), and patient performance on the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R) was correlated with DTI measures (P<.03). Discussion These results are consistent with findings of axonal degeneration in MS and support the use of DTI as an indicator of disease progression. PMID:23295147

  14. Development of high angular resolution x-ray telescopes based on slumped glass foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Borsa, F.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Conconi, P.; Pagano, G.; Pareschi, G.; Proserpio, L.; Salmaso, B.; Sironi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Zambra, A.; Parodi, G.; Martelli, F.; Gallieni, D.; Tintori, M.; Bavdaz, M.; Wille, E.

    2012-09-01

    The mirrors of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) were based on a large number of high quality segments, aiming at achieving a global spatial resolution better than 5” HEW while giving a large collecting area (around 3m2@ 1 keV). A study concerning the hot slumping of thin glass foils was started in Europe, funded by ESA and led by the Brera Astronomical Observatory (INAF-OAB), for the development of a replication technology based on glass material. The study is currently continuing even after the IXO program has been descoped and renamed ATHENA, in the perspective of using the technology under development for other future missions or applications. INAF-OAB efforts have been focused on the "Direct" slumping approach with convex moulds, meaning that during the thermal cycle the optical surface of the glass is in direct contact with the mould surface. The single mirror segments are made of thin glass plates (0.4 mm thick), with a reflecting area of 200 mm × 200 mm. The adopted integration process foresees the use of glass reinforcing ribs for bonding together the plates in such a way to form a rigid and stiff stack of segmented mirror shells; the stack is supported by a thick backplane. During the bonding process, the plates are constrained in close contact with the surface of a precisely figured integration master by the application of vacuum pump suction. In this way, the springback deformations and the low frequency errors still present in the plates' profile after slumping can be corrected. The status of the technology development is presented in this paper, together with the description and metrology of the prototypes already realized or under construction at the Observatory laboratories.

  15. High angular resolution Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations of MACS J1423.8+2404 with NIKA: Multiwavelength analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, R.; Comis, B.; Bartalucci, I.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Arnaud, M.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Hasnoun, B.; Hermelo, I.; Kramer, C.; Lagache, G.; Leclercq, S.; Macías-Pérez, J.-F.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pointecouteau, E.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Revéret, V.; Ritacco, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2016-02-01

    The prototype of the NIKA2 camera, NIKA, is a dual-band instrument operating at the IRAM 30-m telescope, which can observe the sky simultaneously at 150 and 260 GHz. One of the main goals of NIKA (and NIKA2) is to measure the pressure distribution in galaxy clusters at high angular resolution using the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. Such observations have already proved to be an excellent probe of cluster pressure distributions even at intermediate and high redshifts. However, an important fraction of clusters host sub-millimeter and/or radio point sources, which can significantly affect the reconstructed signal. Here we report on <20 arcsec angular resolution observations at 150 and 260 GHz of the cluster MACS J1423.8+2404, which hosts both radio and sub-millimeter point sources. We examine the morphological distribution of the tSZ signal and compare it to other datasets. The NIKA data are combined with Herschel satellite data to study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the sub-millimeter point source contaminants. We then perform a joint reconstruction of the intracluster medium (ICM) electronic pressure and density by combining NIKA, Planck, XMM-Newton, and Chandra data, focusing on the impact of the radio and sub-millimeter sources on the reconstructed pressureprofile. We find that large-scale pressure distribution is unaffected by the point sources because of the resolved nature of the NIKA observations. The reconstructed pressure in the inner region is slightly higher when the contribution of point sources are removed. We show that it is not possible to set strong constraints on the central pressure distribution without accurately removing these contaminants. The comparison with X-ray only data shows good agreement for the pressure, temperature, and entropy profiles, which all indicate that MACS J1423.8+2404 is a dynamically relaxed cool core system. The present observations illustrate the possibility of measuring these quantities with a

  16. Structure of keyhole limpet hemocyanin type 1 (KLH1) at 15 A resolution by electron cryomicroscopy and angular reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Orlova, E V; Dube, P; Harris, J R; Beckman, E; Zemlin, F; Markl, J; van Heel, M

    1997-08-22

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of keyhole limpet hemocyanin type 1 (KLH1) has been obtained using electron cryomicroscopy at liquid helium temperatures and single particle image processing. The use of a high-contrast embedding medium, 1% (w/v) glucose and 2% (w/v) ammonium molybdate (pH 7.0), enables high-resolution electron micrographs to be recorded close to focus, i.e. with excellent transfer of high-resolution information, while maintaining enough image contrast to localise the individual macromolecules in the images. When low-pass filtered to approximately 45 A resolution, the new 15 A resolution reconstruction is very similar to the earlier reconstructions of gastropodan hemocyanins of specimens embedded in vitreous ice. The map shows much detail and reveals many new symmetry elements in this very large cylindrical molluscan hemocyanin. The full KLH1 didecamer has D5 pointgroup symmetry, yet within the KLH1 decameric half-molecules local 2-fold axes have emerged that make the wall of the KLH1 decamer, in spite of its having an exact C5 symmetry only, resemble the D5-symmetric wall of the decameric cephalopod hemocyanins. In fact, the outside of each tier of this six-tiered gastropodan hemocyanin was found to have an approximate D5 symmetry. Local 2-fold axes also relate the "functional units" within the dimeric "morphological units" of the wall and the collar areas of the 8 MDa KLH1 molecule. Certain local-symmetry-related surface motifs may be present up to 60 times on the outside wall of this highly symmetric cylindrical hemocyanin. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin is used clinically as an immunostimulant. The very strong immune reaction elicited by this hemocyanin may be associated with its intricate hierarchy of local-symmetry components.

  17. The 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign: First Results from High Angular Resolution Observations toward the HL Tau Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALMA Partnership; Brogan, C. L.; Pérez, L. M.; Hunter, T. R.; Dent, W. R. F.; Hales, A. S.; Hills, R. E.; Corder, S.; Fomalont, E. B.; Vlahakis, C.; Asaki, Y.; Barkats, D.; Hirota, A.; Hodge, J. A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Kneissl, R.; Liuzzo, E.; Lucas, R.; Marcelino, N.; Matsushita, S.; Nakanishi, K.; Phillips, N.; Richards, A. M. S.; Toledo, I.; Aladro, R.; Broguiere, D.; Cortes, J. R.; Cortes, P. C.; Espada, D.; Galarza, F.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Humphreys, E. M.; Jung, T.; Kameno, S.; Laing, R. A.; Leon, S.; Marconi, G.; Mignano, A.; Nikolic, B.; Nyman, L.-A.; Radiszcz, M.; Remijan, A.; Rodón, J. A.; Sawada, T.; Takahashi, S.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; Vila Vilaro, B.; Watson, L. C.; Wiklind, T.; Akiyama, E.; Chapillon, E.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Di Francesco, J.; Gueth, F.; Kawamura, A.; Lee, C.-F.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Mangum, J.; Pietu, V.; Sanhueza, P.; Saigo, K.; Takakuwa, S.; Ubach, C.; van Kempen, T.; Wootten, A.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Francke, H.; Gallardo, J.; Garcia, J.; Gonzalez, S.; Hill, T.; Kaminski, T.; Kurono, Y.; Liu, H.-Y.; Lopez, C.; Morales, F.; Plarre, K.; Schieven, G.; Testi, L.; Videla, L.; Villard, E.; Andreani, P.; Hibbard, J. E.; Tatematsu, K.

    2015-07-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations from the 2014 Long Baseline Campaign in dust continuum and spectral line emission from the HL Tau region. The continuum images at wavelengths of 2.9, 1.3, and 0.87 mm have unprecedented angular resolutions of 0.″ 075 (10 AU) to 0.″ 025 (3.5 AU), revealing an astonishing level of detail in the circumstellar disk surrounding the young solar analog HL Tau, with a pattern of bright and dark rings observed at all wavelengths. By fitting ellipses to the most distinct rings, we measure precise values for the disk inclination (46\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 72+/- 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 05) and position angle (+138\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 02+/- 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 07). We obtain a high-fidelity image of the 1.0 mm spectral index (α), which ranges from α ˜ 2.0 in the optically thick central peak and two brightest rings, increasing to 2.3-3.0 in the dark rings. The dark rings are not devoid of emission, and we estimate a grain emissivity index of 0.8 for the innermost dark ring and lower for subsequent dark rings, consistent with some degree of grain growth and evolution. Additional clues that the rings arise from planet formation include an increase in their central offsets with radius and the presence of numerous orbital resonances. At a resolution of 35 AU, we resolve the molecular component of the disk in HCO+ (1-0) which exhibits a pattern over LSR velocities from 2-12 km s-1 consistent with Keplerian motion around a ˜1.3 {M}⊙ star, although complicated by absorption at low blueshifted velocities. We also serendipitously detect and resolve the nearby protostars XZ Tau (A/B) and LkHα358 at 2.9 mm. .

  18. The Milli-Arc-Second Structure Imager, MASSIM: A New Concept for a High Angular Resolution X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerry; Arzoumanian, Z.; Cash, W.; Gehrels, N.; Gendreau, K.; Gorenstein, P.; Krizmanic, J.; Leitner, J.; Miller, M.; Reasenberg, R.; Reynolds, C.; Sambruna, R.; Streitmatter, R.; Windt, D.

    2008-01-01

    MASSIM, the Milli-Arc-Second Structure Imager, is a mission that has been proposed for study within the context of NASA's "Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Studies" program. It uses a set of achromatic diffractive-refractive Fresnel lenses on an optics spacecraft to focus 5-11 keV X-rays onto detectors on a second spacecraft flying in formation 1000 km away. It will have a point-source sensitivity comparable with that of the current generation of major X-ray observatories (Chandra, XMM-Newton) but an angular resolution some three orders of magnitude better. MASSIM is optimized for the study of jets and other phenomena that occur in the immediate vicinity of black holes and neutron stars. It can also be used for studying other astrophysical phenomena on the milli-arc-second scale, such as those involving proto-stars, the surfaces and surroundings of nearby active stars and interacting winds. After introducing the principle of diffractive imaging in the x-ray/gamma-ray regime, the MASSIM mission concept and baseline design will be described along with a discussion of the options and trade-offs within the X-ray optics design.

  19. Polarimetric imaging of NGC 1068 at high angular resolution in the near infrared. Direct evidence of an extended nuclear torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratadour, D.; Rouan, D.; Grosset, L.; Boccaletti, A.; Clénet, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: One of the main observational challenges for investigating the central regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) at short wavelengths, using high angular resolution, and high contrast observations, is to directly detect the circumnuclear optically thick material hiding the central core emission when viewed edge-on. The lack of direct evidence is limiting our understanding of AGN, and several scenarios have been proposed to cope for the diverse observed aspects of activity in a unified approach. Methods: Observations in the near-infrared spectral range have shown themselves to be powerful for providing essential hints to the characterisation of the unified model ingredients because of the reduced optical depth of the obscuring material. Moreover, it is possible to trace this material through light scattered from the central engine's closest environment, so that polarimetric observations are the ideal tool for distinguishing it from purely thermal and stellar emissions. Results: Here we show strong evidence that there is an extended nuclear torus at the center of NGC 1068 thanks to new adaptive-optics-assisted polarimetric observations in the near-infrared. The orientation of the polarization vectors proves that there is a structured hourglass-shaped bicone and a compact elongated (20 × 60 pc) nuclear structure perpendicular to the bicone axis. The linearly polarized emission in the bicone is dominated by a centro-symmetric pattern, but the central compact region shows a clear deviation from the latter with linear polarization aligned perpendicular to the bicone axis. Figure 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgData obtained with the SPHERE an instrument designed and built by a consortium consisting of IPAG (France), MPIA (Germany), LAM (France), LESIA (France), Laboratoire Lagrange (France), INAF - Osservatorio di Padova (Italy), Observatoire de Genève (Switzerland), ETH Zurich (Switzerland), NOVA (Netherlands), ONERA (France), and ASTRON

  20. The complex evolutionary paths of local infrared bright galaxies: a high-angular resolution mid-infrared view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Poulton, R.; Roche, P. F.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Aretxaga, I.; Martínez-Paredes, M.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Colina, L.; Esquej, P.; González-Martín, O.; Ichikawa, K.; Imanishi, M.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Telesco, C.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the evolutionary connection between local infrared (IR)-bright galaxies (log LIR ≥ 11.4 L⊙) and quasars. We use high-angular resolution (˜0.3-0.4 arcsec ˜ few hundred parsecs) 8-13 μm ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the active galactic nuclei (AGN) mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or projected nuclear separation. This suggests that the changes in the distribution of the nuclear obscuring material may be taking place rapidly and at different interaction stages washing out the evidence of an evolutionary path. When compared to normal AGN, the nuclear star formation activity of quasars appears to be dimming, whereas it is enhanced in some IR-bright nuclei, suggesting that the latter are in an earlier star formation-dominated phase.

  1. MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS: DUST IN THE HEART OF IRAS 18162-2048

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Lopez, M.; Curiel, S.; Girart, J. M.; Ho, P. T. P.; Patel, N.; Gomez, Y. E-mail: scuriel@astroscu.unam.mx E-mail: y.gomez@astrosmo.unam.mx

    2011-03-15

    The GGD27 complex includes the HH 80-81-80N system, which is one of the most powerful molecular outflows associated with a high-mass star-forming region observed to date. This outflow is powered by the star associated with the source IRAS 18162-2048. Here, we report on the detection of continuum emission at subarcsec/arcsec resolution with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 1.36 mm and 456 {mu}m, respectively. We detected dust emission arising from two compact cores, MM1 and MM2, separated by about 7'' ({approx}12,000 AU in projected distance). MM1 spatially coincides with the powerful thermal radio continuum jet that powers the very extended molecular outflow, while MM2 is associated with the protostar that drives the compact molecular outflow recently found in this region. High angular resolution observations at 1.36 mm show that MM1 is unresolved and that MM2 splits into two subcomponents separated by {approx}1''. The mass of MM1 is about 4 M{sub sun} and it has a size of {approx}<300 AU. This is consistent with MM1 being associated with a massive and dense (n(H{sub 2}) {approx}> 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) circumstellar dusty disk surrounding a high-mass protostar, which has not yet developed a compact H II region. On the other hand, the masses of the two separate components of MM2 are about 2 M{sub sun} each. One of these components is a compact core with an intermediate-mass young protostar inside and the other component is probably a prestellar core. MM1 is the brightest source at 1.36 mm, while MM2 dominates the emission at 456 {mu}m. These are the only (sub)millimeter sources detected in the SMA observations. Hence, it seems that both sources may contribute significantly to the bolometric luminosity of the region. Finally, we argue that the characteristics of these two sources indicate that MM2 is probably in an earlier evolutionary stage than MM1.

  2. S U (2 ) gauge field theories, gauge-invariant angular momenta, and a Coulomb theorem: A new viewpoint on the resolution of the nucleon spin crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Changyu; Huang, Yong-Chang; Zhou, Bao-Hua

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the inner structure of a general S U (2 ) [naturally including S O (3 )] symmetry system—the fermion-gauge field interaction system—and achieve naturally a set of gauge-invariant spin and orbital angular momentum operators of fermion and gauge fields by Noether's theorem in general field theory. Some new relations concerning non-Abelian field strengths are discovered, e.g., the covariant transverse condition, covariant parallel condition (i.e., non-Abelian divergence, non-Abelian curl), and simplified S U (2 ) Coulomb theorem. And we show that the condition that Chen et al. obtained to construct their gauge-invariant angular momentum operators is a result of some fundamental equations in the general field theory. The results obtained in this paper present a new perspective for looking at the overall structure of the gauge field, and provide a new viewpoint to the final resolution of the nucleon spin crisis in the general field theory. Especially, the achieved theory in this paper can calculate the strong interactions with isospin symmetry and solves the serious problem without gauge-invariant angular momenta in strong interaction systems with isospin symmetry, and then the achieved predictions in the calculations can be exactly measured by particle physics experiments due to their gauge invariant properties.

  3. Continued Development of Small-Pixel CZT and CdTe Detectors for Future High-Angular-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Small Explorer Mission was launched in June 2012 and has demonstrated the technical feasibility and high scientific impact of hard X-ray astronomy. We propose to continue our current R&D program to develop finely pixelated semiconductor detectors and the associated readout electronics for the focal plane of a NuSTAR follow-up mission. The detector-ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) package will be ideally matched to the new generation of low-cost, low-mass X-ray mirrors which achieve an order of magnitude better angular resolution than the NuSTAR mirrors. As part of this program, the Washington University group will optimize the contacts of 2x2 cm^2 footprint Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors contacted with 100x116 hexagonal pixels at a next-neighbor pitch of 200 microns. The Brookhaven National Laboratory group will design, fabricate, and test the next generation of the HEXID ASIC matched to the new X-ray mirrors and the detectors, providing a low-power 100x116 channel ASIC with extremely low readout noise (i.e. with a root mean square noise of 13 electrons). The detectors will be tested with radioactive sources and in the focal plane of high-angular-resolution X-ray mirrors at the X-ray beam facilities at the Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers.

  4. The resolution of the identity approximation for calculations of spin-spin contribution to zero-field splitting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganyushin, Dmitry; Gilka, Natalie; Taylor, Peter R.; Marian, Christel M.; Neese, Frank

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the resolution of the identity (RI) approximation is developed for the calculation of the electron-electron spin-spin coupling (SSC) interaction that is a central component of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) term in the effective spin Hamiltonian. The approximated integrals are then used in large-scale multireference configuration interaction treatments of the SSC interaction. The SSC contribution to the ZFS is treated using the Breit-Pauli spin-spin Hamiltonian in conjunction with first-order perturbation theory. Test calculations on a set of diatomic molecules reveal that the error of the RI approximation does not exceed 0.01 cm-1 even if standard auxiliary basis sets are used. This error of less than 1% is considered to be negligible compared to the presently achievable accuracy of the SSC calculations relative to experimental data. The present development allows the correlated ab initio calculation of ZFS parameters of larger systems such as linear polyenes and linear polyacenes. The basis set convergence of the calculated ZFS values was investigated, and the effect of electronic correlation on the calculated ZFS parameters is discussed.

  5. High-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy with angular dispersion-type Fabry-Perot interferometer and its application to a quartz crystal.

    PubMed

    Ike, Y; Tsukada, S; Kojima, S

    2007-07-01

    Although the multichannel Brillouin spectroscopy with an angular dispersion-type Fabry-Perot interferometer (ADFPI) becomes a powerful tool for quick measurements, its resolution and contrast are not enough for the study of single crystals. A highly sensitive multichannel detector enables the ADFPI to use a solid etalon with high reflectivity (99.5%); hence, the high resolution and the high contrast of a spectrum are achieved. The finesse, the inverse of the resolution, reaches 100 with a 10 mm diameter of aperture size. The highest finesse of 140 is obtained by using a smaller diameter of 2 mm. The accuracy is examined by the measurement of a quartz crystal. The improvement in the resolution and contrast enables investigations of weak attenuation in a quartz crystal. The elastic anomaly of the alpha-beta transition of a quartz crystal is clearly observed both in sound velocity and attenuation. From the elastic constant c(11), the critical parameter K=0.76 is determined.

  6. Sealed position sensitive hard X-ray detector having large drift region for all sky camera with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Perlman, D.; Parsignault, D.; Burns, R.

    1979-01-01

    A sealed position sensitive proportional counter filled with two atmospheres of 95% xenon and 5% methane, and containing a drift region of 24 atm cm, has operated in a stable manner for many months. The detector contains G-10 frames to support the anode and cathode wires. The detector was sealed successfully by a combination of vacuum baking the G-10 frames at 150 C for two weeks followed by assembly into the detector in an environment of dry nitrogen, and the use of passive internal getters. The counter is intended for use with a circumferential cylindrical collimator. Together they provide a very broad field of view detection system with the ability to locate cosmic hard X-ray and soft gamma ray sources to an angular precision of a minute of arc. A set of instruments based on this principle have been proposed for satellites to detect and precisely locate cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  7. Unconventional application of the two-flux approximation for the calculation of the Ambartsumyan-Chandrasekhar function and the angular spectrum of the backward-scattered radiation for a semi-infinite isotropically scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remizovich, V. S.

    2010-06-01

    It is commonly accepted that the Schwarzschild-Schuster two-flux approximation (1905, 1914) can be employed only for the calculation of the energy characteristics of the radiation field (energy density and energy flux density) and cannot be used to characterize the angular distribution of radiation field. However, such an inference is not valid. In several cases, one can calculate the radiation intensity inside matter and the reflected radiation with the aid of this simplest approximation in the transport theory. In this work, we use the results of the simplest one-parameter variant of the two-flux approximation to calculate the angular distribution (reflection function) of the radiation reflected by a semi-infinite isotropically scattering dissipative medium when a relatively broad beam is incident on the medium at an arbitrary angle relative to the surface. We do not employ the invariance principle and demonstrate that the reflection function exhibits the multiplicative property. It can be represented as a product of three functions: the reflection function corresponding to the single scattering and two identical h functions, which have the same physical meaning as the Ambartsumyan-Chandrasekhar function ( H) has. This circumstance allows a relatively easy derivation of simple analytical expressions for the H function, total reflectance, and reflection function. We can easily determine the relative contribution of the true single scattering in the photon backscattering at an arbitrary probability of photon survival Λ. We compare all of the parameters of the backscattered radiation with the data resulting from the calculations using the exact theory of Ambartsumyan, Chandrasekhar, et al., which was developed decades after the two-flux approximation. Thus, we avoid the application of fine mathematical methods (the Wiener-Hopf method, the Case method of singular functions, etc.) and obtain simple analytical expressions for the parameters of the scattered radiation

  8. Implications of a High Angular Resolution Image of the Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Effect in RXJ1347-1145

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, B. S.; Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Devlin, M.; Cotton, W. D.; Koch, P. M.; Molnar, S. M.; Sievers, J.; Aguirre, J. E.; Benford, D.; Staguhn, J. G.; Moseley, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Ade, P.

    2010-01-01

    The most X-ray luminous cluster known, RXJ1347-1145 (z = 0.45), has been the object of extensive study across the electromagnetic spectrum. We have imaged the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 90 GHz (lambda = 33 mm) in RXJ1347-1145 at 10" resolution with the 64 pixel MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope, confirming a previously reported strong, localized enhancement of the SZE 20" to the southeast of the center of X-ray emission. This enhancement of the SZE has been interpreted as shock-heated (>20keV) gas caused by an ongoing major (low mass ratio) merger event. Our data support this interpretation. We also detect a pronounced asymmetry in the projected cluster pressure profile, with the pressure just east of the cluster core approx. 1.6x higher than just to the west. This is the highest resolution image of the SZE made to date.

  9. Probing Gas and Dust around B[e] Stars at the Highest Angular Resolution: A Decade of Interferometric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilland, A.

    2017-02-01

    Long-baseline interferometry is the one and only technique offering the sub-milliarcsecond resolution needed to spatially resolve the close environment of stars. Since the construction of modern facilities such as the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) in Chile, and the Center for High Resolution Array (CHARA) in California, it became a key technique to probe massive stars and their often complex circumstellar environments. The more recent generation of instruments even combines the power of interferometry and spectroscopy allowing to put more constraints on chemical, physical, and dynamical properties of circumstellar gas and dust. Here I briefly present the technique and the current generation of instruments, I review the main results obtained in the last decade on B[e] stars, and, I present the upcoming second generation of instruments at VLTI and the current plan to upgrade CHARA.

  10. Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation: High-resolution overtone spectroscopy of H2D+ and D2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fárník, Michal; Davis, Scott; Kostin, Maxim A.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Nesbitt, David J.

    2002-04-01

    Transitions to overtone 2ν2 and 2ν3, and combination ν2+ν3 vibrations in jet-cooled H2D+ and D2H+ molecular ions have been measured for the first time by high-resolution IR spectroscopy. The source of these ions is a pulsed slit jet supersonic discharge, which allows for efficient generation, rotational cooling, and high frequency (100 KHz) concentration modulation for detection via sensitive lock-in detection methods. Isotopic substitution and high-resolution overtone spectroscopy in this fundamental molecular ion permit a systematic, first principles investigation of Born-Oppenheimer "breakdown" effects due to large amplitude vibrational motion as well as provide rigorous tests of approximate theoretical methods beyond the Born-Oppenheimer level. The observed overtone transitions are in remarkably good agreement (<0.1 cm-1) with non-Born-Oppenheimer ab initio theoretical predictions, with small but systematic deviations for 2ν2, ν2+ν3, and 2ν3 excited states indicating directions for further improvement in such treatments. Spectroscopic assignment and analysis of the isotopomeric transitions reveals strong Coriolis mixing between near resonant 2ν3 and ν2+ν3 vibrations in D2H+. Population-independent line intensity ratios for transitions from common lower states indicate excellent overall agreement with theoretical predictions for D2H+, but with statistically significant discrepancies noted for H2D+. Finally, H2D+ versus D2H+ isotopomer populations are analyzed as a function of D2/H2 mixing ratio and can be well described by steady state kinetics in the slit discharge expansion.

  11. Generation-X: A large area and high angular resolution X-ray observatory to study the dawn of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Petre, R.; White, N.

    In this talk we will describe the scientific and technology requirements of an X-ray observatory, called Generation-X, that is to follow the Constellation-X mission. The Generation-X mission is designed to observe the formation and evolution of the first galaxies and black holes at high redshift. To do this r quires a factor of ~1000e increased area compared to Chandra, while maintaining an angular resolution of ~ 1. The mission will determine the role of accreting black holes in the formation of structure in the early universe, which are crucial in both providing an ionizing radiation and the dynamics of galaxies formation. The Chandra mission succeeded in its prime task of solving the mystery of the X ray background, with the deep- fields showing that most, if not all, the background is the result of active galactic nuclei (AGN). This has demonstrated that X-ray surveys are an excellent tracer of accreting black holes. The Constellation-X mission will obtain detailed high resolution spectra of these faint X-ray sources. The 5-15 and 3 m2 collecting area of Constellation-X are specified to avoid confusion of these AGN, and reach flux levels of ~10-1 6 ergs/cm2 /s. To observe galaxies and black holes (as low as 10,000 solar masses) at z~10 requires telescope parameters to avoid galaxy confusion and sufficient to separate the extended galaxy emission from the nucleus. This is 50-150 m2 with an angular resolution of 0.1 to 1--- the mission parameters for Generation- X. These parameters will in a 106 -second exposure be capable of detecting sources down to a flux level of 5×10-2 0 ergs/cm2 /s and perform spectroscopic study down to 5×10-1 8 ergs/cm2 /s. With such a capability many other new science topics can be addressed, e.g. the properties of compact objects in nearby galaxies and the nature of the intergalactic mediu m at high redshift. The enabling technology for this mission is lightweight precision optics, which is beyond our existing capabilities, but will

  12. Auger-electron angular distributions calculated without the two-step approximation: Calculation of angle-resolved resonant Auger spectra of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Colle, Renato; Embriaco, Davide; Massini, Michol; Simonucci, Stefano; Taioli, Simone

    2004-10-01

    Analytic expressions for the direct, resonant, and interference contributions to the differential cross section of a resonant Auger process, produced by the inner-shell photoionization of a linear molecule either 'fixed in space' or belonging to a gas of randomly oriented molecules, have been derived following Dill's procedures [Dill et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1393 (1980)], but going beyond the two-step approximation. Angle-resolved Auger spectra of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecule measured on top of the C 1s{yields}{pi}* resonance [Kivimaeki et al., J. Phys. B 30, 4279 (1997)] have been calculated together with asymmetry parameters, analyzing also the different contributions to the electron angular distributions.

  13. PROVIDING STRINGENT STAR FORMATION RATE LIMITS OF z ∼ 2 QSO HOST GALAXIES AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A.; Do, Tuan; Larkin, James E.; Armus, Lee; Gallagher, S. C.

    2016-04-10

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ∼ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ∼0.″2 (∼1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (z{sub Hα} = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (z{sub Hα} = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290–350 km s{sup −1}. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ∼7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%–40% of the Eddington rate, if

  14. High mass resolution, high angular acceptance time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for planetary missions under the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David T.

    1991-01-01

    This final report covers three years and several phases of work in which instrumentation for the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) were successfully developed. There were two main thrusts to this research: (1) to develop and test methods for electrostatically scanning detector field-of-views, and (2) to improve the mass resolution of plasma mass spectrometers to M/delta M approximately 25, their field-of-view (FOV) to 360 degrees, and their E-range to cover approximately 1 eV to 50 keV. Prototypes of two different approaches to electrostatic scanning were built and tested. The Isochronous time-of-flight (TOF) and the linear electric field 3D TOF devices were examined.

  15. Abnormal white matter tractography of visual pathways detected by high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) corresponds to visual dysfunction in cortical/cerebral visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Corinna M; Heidary, Gena; Koo, Bang-Bon; Killiany, Ronald J; Bex, Peter; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2014-08-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) is characterized by visual dysfunction associated with damage to the optic radiations and/or visual cortex. Typically it results from pre- or perinatal hypoxic damage to postchiasmal visual structures and pathways. The neuroanatomical basis of this condition remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to how the resulting maldevelopment of visual processing pathways relates to observations in the clinical setting. We report our investigation of 2 young adults diagnosed with CVI and visual dysfunction characterized by difficulties related to visually guided attention and visuospatial processing. Using high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), we characterized and compared their individual white matter projections of the extrageniculo-striate visual system with a normal-sighted control. Compared to a sighted control, both CVI cases revealed a striking reduction in association fibers, including the inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus as well as superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. This reduction in fibers associated with the major pathways implicated in visual processing may provide a neuroanatomical basis for the visual dysfunctions observed in these patients.

  16. A high angular resolution survey of massive stars in Cygnus OB2: Results from the Hubble space telescope fine guidance sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Nieves, S. M.; Gies, D. R.; Jao, W.-C. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu; and others

    2014-02-01

    We present results of a high angular resolution survey of massive OB stars in the Cygnus OB2 association that we conducted with the fine guidance sensor 1R (FGS1r) on the Hubble Space Telescope. FGS1r is able to resolve binary systems with a magnitude difference ΔV < 4 down to separations as small as 0.''01. The sample includes 58 of the brighter members of Cyg OB2, one of the closest examples of an environment containing a large number of very young and massive stars. We resolved binary companions for 12 targets and confirmed the triple nature of one other target, and we offer evidence of marginally resolved companions for two additional stars. We confirm the binary nature of 11 of these systems from complementary adaptive optics imaging observations. The overall binary frequency in our study is 22% to 26% corresponding to orbital periods ranging from 20 to 20,000 yr. When combined with the known short-period spectroscopic binaries, the results support the hypothesis that the binary fraction among massive stars is >60%. One of the new discoveries is a companion to the hypergiant star MT 304 = Cyg OB2-12, and future measurements of orbital motion should provide mass estimates for this very luminous star.

  17. Adaptive smoothing of high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging data by generalized cross-validation improves Q-ball orientation distribution function reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Metwalli, Nader S; Hu, Xiaoping P; Carew, John D

    2010-09-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) technique for reconstructing the orientation distribution function (ODF). Some form of smoothing or regularization is typically required in the ODF reconstruction from low signal-to-noise ratio HARDI data. The amount of smoothing or regularization is usually set a priori at the discretion of the investigator. In this article, we apply an adaptive and objective means of smoothing the raw HARDI data using the smoothing splines on the sphere method with generalized cross-validation (GCV) to estimate the diffusivity profile in each voxel. Subsequently, we reconstruct the ODF, from the smoothed data, based on the Funk-Radon transform (FRT) used in QBI. The spline method was applied to both simulated data and in vivo human brain data. Simulated data show that the smoothing splines on the sphere method with GCV smoothing reduces the mean squared error in estimates of the ODF as compared with the standard analytical QBI approach. The human data demonstrate the utility of the method for estimating smooth ODFs.

  18. Design and Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Semiconducting Bolometer Arrays for the High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Allen, Christine A.; Amato, Michael J.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Bartels, Arlin E.; Benford, Dominic J.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Dowell, C. Darren; Harper, D. Al; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Simpson, A. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC 11) will use almost identical versions of an ion-implanted silicon bolometer array developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The GSFC "Pop-Up" Detectors (PUD's) use a unique folding technique to enable a 12 x 32-element close-packed array of bolometers with a filling factor greater than 95 percent. A kinematic Kevlar(Registered Trademark) suspension system isolates the 200 mK bolometers from the helium bath temperature, and GSFC - developed silicon bridge chips make electrical connection to the bolometers, while maintaining thermal isolation. The JFET preamps operate at 120 K. Providing good thermal heat sinking for these, and keeping their conduction and radiation from reaching the nearby bolometers, is one of the principal design challenges encountered. Another interesting challenge is the preparation of the silicon bolometers. They are manufactured in 32-element, planar rows using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) semiconductor etching techniques, and then cut and folded onto a ceramic bar. Optical alignment using specialized jigs ensures their uniformity and correct placement. The rows are then stacked to create the 12 x 32-element array. Engineering results from the first light run of SHARC II at the CalTech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) are presented.

  19. Design and Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Semiconducting Bolometer Arrays for the High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Allen, Christine A.; Amato, Michael J.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Bartels, Arlin E.; Benford, Dominic J.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Dowell, C. Darren; Harper, D. Al; Jhabvala, Murzy D.

    2002-01-01

    The High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC II) will use almost identical versions of an ion-implanted silicon bolometer array developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The GSFC 'Pop-up' Detectors (PUD's) use a unique folding technique to enable a 12 x 32-element close-packed array of bolometers with a filling factor greater than 95 percent. A kinematic Kevlar(trademark) suspension system isolates the 200 mK bolometers from the helium bath temperature, and GSFC - developed silicon bridge chips make electrical connection to the bolometers, while maintaining thermal isolation. The JFET preamps operate at 120 K. Providing good thermal heat sinking for these, and keeping their conduction and radiation from reaching the nearby bolometers, is one of the principal design challenges encountered. Another interesting challenge is the preparation of the silicon bolometers. They are manufactured in 32-element, planar rows using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) semiconductor etching techniques, and then cut and folded onto a ceramic bar. Optical alignment using specialized jigs ensures their uniformity and correct placement. The rows are then stacked to create the 12 x 32-element array. Engineering results from the first light run of SHARC II at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) are presented.

  20. A deep look at the nuclear region of UGC 5101 through high angular resolution mid-IR data with GTC/CanariCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Paredes, M.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Aretxaga, I.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; González-Martín, O.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Packham, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Elitzur, M.; Esquej, P.; García-Bernete, I.; Imanishi, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the nuclear infrared (IR, 1.6-18 μm) emission of the ultraluminous IR galaxy UGC 5101 to derive the properties of its active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its obscuring material. We use new mid-IR high angular resolution (0.3-0.5 arcsec) imaging using the Si-2 filter (λC = 8.7 μm) and 7.5-13 μm spectroscopy taken with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. We also use archival Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS and Subaru/COMICS imaging and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy. We estimate the near- and mid-IR unresolved nuclear emission by modelling the imaging data with GALFIT. We decompose the Spitzer/IRS and CC spectra using a power-law component, which represents the emission due to dust heated by the AGN, and a starburst component, both affected by foreground extinction. We model the resulting unresolved near- and mid-IR, and the starburst subtracted CC spectrum with the CLUMPY torus models of Nenkova et al. The derived geometrical properties of the torus, including the large covering factor and the high foreground extinction needed to reproduce the deep 9.7 μm silicate feature, are consistent with the lack of strong AGN signatures in the optical. We derive an AGN bolometric luminosity Lbol ˜ 1.9 × 1045 erg s-1 that is in good agreement with other estimates in the literature.

  1. Stellar diameters and temperatures - VI. High angular resolution measurements of the transiting exoplanet host stars HD 189733 and HD 209458 and implications for models of cool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyajian, Tabetha; von Braun, Kaspar; Feiden, Gregory A.; Huber, Daniel; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre; Fischer, Debra A.; Schaefer, Gail; Mann, Andrew W.; White, Timothy R.; Maestro, Vicente; Brewer, John; Lamell, C. Brooke; Spada, Federico; López-Morales, Mercedes; Ireland, Michael; Farrington, Chris; van Belle, Gerard T.; Kane, Stephen R.; Jones, Jeremy; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Ciardi, David R.; McAlister, Harold A.; Ridgway, Stephen; Goldfinger, P. J.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Laszlo

    2015-02-01

    We present direct radii measurements of the well-known transiting exoplanet host stars HD 189733 and HD 209458 using the CHARA Array interferometer. We find the limb-darkened angular diameters to be θLD = 0.3848 ± 0.0055 and 0.2254 ± 0.0072 mas for HD 189733 and HD 209458, respectively. HD 189733 and HD 209458 are currently the only two transiting exoplanet systems where detection of the respective planetary companion's orbital motion from high-resolution spectroscopy has revealed absolute masses for both star and planet. We use our new measurements together with the orbital information from radial velocity and photometric time series data, Hipparcos distances, and newly measured bolometric fluxes to determine the stellar effective temperatures (Teff = 4875 ± 43, 6092 ± 103 K), stellar linear radii (R* = 0.805 ± 0.016, 1.203 ± 0.061 R⊙), mean stellar densities (ρ* = 1.62 ± 0.11, 0.58 ± 0.14 ρ⊙), planetary radii (Rp = 1.216 ± 0.024, 1.451 ± 0.074 RJup), and mean planetary densities (ρp = 0.605 ± 0.029, 0.196 ± 0.033 ρJup) for HD 189733b and HD 209458b, respectively. The stellar parameters for HD 209458, an F9 dwarf, are consistent with indirect estimates derived from spectroscopic and evolutionary modelling. However, we find that models are unable to reproduce the observational results for the K2 dwarf, HD 189733. We show that, for stellar evolutionary models to match the observed stellar properties of HD 189733, adjustments lowering the solar-calibrated mixing-length parameter to αMLT =1.34 need to be employed.

  2. The Angular Momentum Distribution within Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Jing, Y.

    We study the angular momentum profile of dark matter halos for a statistical sample drawn from a set of high-resolution cosmological simulations of 2563 particles. Two typical Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models have been analyzed, and the halos are selected to have at least 3× 104 particles in order to reliably measure the angular momentum profile. In contrast with the recent claims of Bullock et al. (2001), we find that the degree of misalignment of angular momentum within a halo is very high. About 50 percent of halos have more than 10 percent of halo mass in the mass of negative angular momentum j. After the mass of negative j is excluded, the cumulative mass function M(approximately the universal function proposed by Bullock et al. (2001), though we still find a significant fraction of halos (˜ 50%) which exhibit systematic deviations from the universal function. Our results, however, are broadly in good agreement with the recent work of van den Bosch et al. (2002). We also study the angular momentum profile of halos in a Warm Dark Matter (WDM) model and a Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) model. We find that the angular momentum profile of halos in the WDM is statistically indistinguishable from that in the CDM model, but the angular momentum of halos in the SIDM is reduced by the self-interaction of dark matter.

  3. The 2008 outburst in the young stellar system Z CMa. III. Multi-epoch high-angular resolution images and spectra of the components in near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.; Dougados, C.; Kóspál, Á.; Benisty, M.; Duchêne, G.; Bouvier, J.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Whelan, E.; Antoniucci, S.; Podio, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Z CMa is a complex pre-main sequence binary with a current separation of 110 mas, known to consist of an FU Orionis star (SE component) and an embedded Herbig Be star (NW component). Although it represents a well-studied and characterized system, the origin of photometric variabilities, the component properties, and the physical configuration of the system remain mostly unknown. Aims: Immediately when the late-2008 outburst of Z CMa was announced to the community, we initiated a high angular resolution imaging campaign aimed at characterizing the outburst state of both components of the system in the near-infrared. Methods: We used the VLT/NACO and the Keck/NIRC2 near-infrared adaptive optics instrument to monitor the astrometric position and the near-infrared photometry of the Z CMa components during the outburst phase and one year after. The VLT/SINFONI and Keck/OSIRIS integral field spectroscrographs were in addition used to characterize for the first time the resolved spectral properties of the FU Orionis and the Herbig Be component during and after the outburst. Results: We confirm that the NW star dominates the system flux in the 1.1-3.8 μm range and is responsible for the photometric outburst. We extract the first medium-resolution (R 2000-4000) near-infrared (1.1-2.4 μm) spectra of the individual components. The SE component has a spectrum typical of FU Orionis objects. The NW component spectrum is characteristic of embedded outbursting protostars and EX Or objects. It displays numerous emission lines whose intensity correlates with the system activity. In particular, we find a correlation between the Brγ equivalent width and the system brightness. The bluing of the continuum of the NW component along with the absolute flux and color-variation of the system during the outburst suggests that the outburst was caused by a complex interplay between a variation of the extinction in the line of sight of the NW component on one hand, and the emission

  4. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  5. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  6. Angular resolution measurements at SPring-8 of a hard x-ray optic for the New Hard X-ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Raimondi, L.; Furuzawa, A.; Basso, S.; Binda, R.; Borghi, G.; Cotroneo, V.; Grisoni, G.; Kunieda, H.; Marioni, F.; Matsumoto, H.; Mori, H.; Miyazawa, T.; Negri, B.; Orlandi, A.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Uesugi, K.; Valsecchi, G.; Vernani, D.

    2011-09-01

    The realization of X-ray telescopes with imaging capabilities in the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray band requires the adoption of optics with shallow (< 0.25 deg) grazing angles to enhance the reflectivity of reflective coatings. On the other hand, to obtain large collecting area, large mirror diameters (< 350 mm) are necessary. This implies that mirrors with focal lengths >=10 m shall be produced and tested. Full-illumination tests of such mirrors are usually performed with onground X-ray facilities, aimed at measuring their effective area and the angular resolution; however, they in general suffer from effects of the finite distance of the X-ray source, e.g. a loss of effective area for double reflection. These effects increase with the focal length of the mirror under test; hence a "partial" full-illumination measurement might not be fully representative of the in-flight performances. Indeed, a pencil beam test can be adopted to overcome this shortcoming, because a sector at a time is exposed to the X-ray flux, and the compensation of the beam divergence is achieved by tilting the optic. In this work we present the result of a hard X-ray test campaign performed at the BL20B2 beamline of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility, aimed at characterizing the Point Spread Function (PSF) of a multilayer-coated Wolter-I mirror shell manufactured by Nickel electroforming. The mirror shell is a demonstrator for the NHXM hard X-ray imaging telescope (0.3 - 80 keV), with a predicted HEW (Half Energy Width) close to 20 arcsec. We show some reconstructed PSFs at monochromatic X-ray energies of 15 to 63 keV, and compare them with the PSFs computed from post-campaign metrology data, self-consistently treating profile and roughness data by means of a method based on the Fresnel diffraction theory. The modeling matches the measured PSFs accurately.

  7. PKS 1502+106: A high-redshift Fermi blazar at extreme angular resolution. Structural dynamics with VLBI imaging up to 86 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamanavis, V.; Fuhrmann, L.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Angelakis, E.; Hodgson, J.; Nestoras, I.; Myserlis, I.; Zensus, J. A.; Sievers, A.; Ciprini, S.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Blazars are among the most energetic objects in the Universe. In 2008 August, Fermi/LAT detected the blazar PKS 1502+106, which showed a rapid and strong γ-ray outburst followed by high and variable flux over the next months. This activity at high energies triggered an intensive multi-wavelength campaign that also covered the radio, optical, UV, and X-ray bands, indicating that the flare was accompanied by a simultaneous outburst at optical/UV/X-rays and a delayed outburst at radio bands. Aims: We explore the phenomenology and physical conditions within the ultra-relativistic jet of the γ-ray blazar PKS 1502+106. Additionally, we address the question of the spatial localization of the MeV/GeV-emitting region of the source. Methods: We used ultra-high angular resolution mm-VLBI observations at 43 and 86 GHz complemented by VLBI observations at 15 GHz. We also employed single-dish radio data from the F-GAMMA program at frequencies matching the VLBI monitoring. Results: PKS 1502+106 shows a compact core-jet morphology and fast superluminal motion with apparent speeds in the range 5-22 c. Estimating Doppler factors along the jet yields values of between ~7 up to ~50. This Doppler factor gradient implies an accelerating jet. The viewing angle towards the source differs between the inner and outer jet, with the former at θ ~ 3° and the latter at θ ~ 1°, after the jet bends towards the observer beyond 1 mas. The de-projected opening angle of the ultra-fast magnetically dominated jet is found to be (3.8 ± 0.5)°. A single jet component can be associated with the pronounced flare both at high energies and in radio bands. Finally, the γ-ray emission region is localized at ≤ 5.9 pc away from the jet base. Images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A60

  8. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss.

  9. The resolution of identity and chain of spheres approximations for the LPNO-CCSD singles Fock term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izsák, Róbert; Hansen, Andreas; Neese, Frank

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, the RIJCOSX approximation, developed earlier for accelerating the SCF procedure, is applied to one of the limiting factors of LPNO-CCSD calculations: the evaluation of the singles Fock term. It turns out that the introduction of RIJCOSX in the evaluation of the closed shell LPNO-CCSD singles Fock term causes errors below the microhartree limit. If the proposed procedure is also combined with RIJCOSX in SCF, then a somewhat larger error occurs, but reaction energy errors will still remain negligible. The speedup for the singles Fock term only is about 9-10 fold for the largest basis set applied. For the case of Penicillin using the def2-QZVPP basis set, a single point energy evaluation takes 2 day 16 h on a single processor leading to a total speedup of 2.6 as compared to a fully analytic calculation. Using eight processors, the same calculation takes only 14 h.

  10. Laser-speckle angular-displacement sensor: theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Rose, B; Imam, H; Hanson, S G; Yura, H T; Hansen, R S

    1998-04-10

    A novel, to our knowledge, method for the measurement of angular displacement for arbitrarily shaped objects is presented in which the angular displacement is perpendicular to the optical axis. The method is based on Fourier-transforming the scattered field from a single laser beam that illuminates the target. The angular distribution of the light field at the target is linearly mapped on a linear image sensor placed in the Fourier plane. Measuring this displacement facilitates the determination of the angular displacement of the target. It is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the angular-displacement sensor is insensitive to object shape and target distance if the linear image sensor is placed in the Fourier plane. A straightforward procedure for positioning the image sensor in the Fourier plane is presented. Any transverse or longitudinal movement of the target will give rise to partial speckle decorrelation, but it will not affect the angular measurement. Furthermore, any change in the illuminating wavelength will not affect the angular measurements. Theoretically and experimentally it is shown that the method has a resolution of 0.3 mdeg ( approximately 5 murad) for small angular displacements, and methods for further improvement in resolution is discussed. No special surface treatment is required for surfaces giving rise to fully developed speckle. The effect of partially developed speckle is considered both theoretically and experimentally.

  11. CONNECTING ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALACTIC DYNAMICS: THE COMPLEX INTERPLAY BETWEEN SPIN, MASS, AND MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Teklu, Adelheid F.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander M.; Burkert, Andreas; Schulze, Felix; Steinborn, Lisa K.; Schmidt, Andreas S.

    2015-10-10

    The evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter (DM) halos have been discussed in several studies over the past decades. In particular, the idea arose that angular momentum conservation should allow us to infer the total angular momentum of the entire DM halo from measuring the angular momentum of the baryonic component, which is populating the center of the halo, especially for disk galaxies. To test this idea and to understand the connection between the angular momentum of the DM halo and its galaxy, we use a state-of-the-art, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation taken from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder simulations. Thanks to the inclusion of the relevant physical processes, the improved underlying numerical methods, and high spatial resolution, we successfully produce populations of spheroidal and disk galaxies self-consistently. Thus, we are able to study the dependence of galactic properties on their morphology. We find that (1) the specific angular momentum of stars in disk and spheroidal galaxies as a function of their stellar mass compares well with observational results; (2) the specific angular momentum of the stars in disk galaxies is slightly smaller compared to the specific angular momentum of the cold gas, in good agreement with observations; (3) simulations including the baryonic component show a dichotomy in the specific stellar angular momentum distribution when splitting the galaxies according to their morphological type (this dichotomy can also be seen in the spin parameter, where disk galaxies populate halos with slightly larger spin compared to spheroidal galaxies); (4) disk galaxies preferentially populate halos in which the angular momentum vector of the DM component in the central part shows a better alignment to the angular momentum vector of the entire halo; and (5) the specific angular momentum of the cold gas in disk galaxies is approximately 40% smaller than the specific angular momentum of the total DM halo

  12. Errors in the estimation of approximate entropy and other recurrence-plot-derived indices due to the finite resolution of RR time series.

    PubMed

    García-González, Miguel A; Fernández-Chimeno, Mireya; Ramos-Castro, Juan

    2009-02-01

    An analysis of the errors due to the finite resolution of RR time series in the estimation of the approximate entropy (ApEn) is described. The quantification errors in the discrete RR time series produce considerable errors in the ApEn estimation (bias and variance) when the signal variability or the sampling frequency is low. Similar errors can be found in indices related to the quantification of recurrence plots. An easy way to calculate a figure of merit [the signal to resolution of the neighborhood ratio (SRN)] is proposed in order to predict when the bias in the indices could be high. When SRN is close to an integer value n, the bias is higher than when near n - 1/2 or n + 1/2. Moreover, if SRN is close to an integer value, the lower this value, the greater the bias is.

  13. Distributed memory parallel implementation of energies and gradients for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with the resolution-of-the-identity approximation.

    PubMed

    Hättig, Christof; Hellweg, Arnim; Köhn, Andreas

    2006-03-14

    We present a parallel implementation of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with the resolution-of-the-identity approximation (RI-MP2). The implementation is based on a recent improved sequential implementation of RI-MP2 within the Turbomole program package and employs the message passing interface (MPI) standard for communication between distributed memory nodes. The parallel implementation extends the applicability of canonical MP2 to considerably larger systems. Examples are presented for full geometry optimizations with up to 60 atoms and 3300 basis functions and MP2 energy calculations with more than 200 atoms and 7000 basis functions.

  14. The angular momentum distribution within haloes in different dark matter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. N.; Jing, Y. P.

    2002-10-01

    We study the angular momentum profile of dark matter haloes for a statistical sample drawn from a set of high-resolution cosmological simulations of 2563 particles. Two typical cold dark matter (CDM) models have been analysed, and the haloes are selected to have at least 3 × 104 particles in order to measure the angular momentumprofile reliably. In contrast with the recent claims of Bullock et al., we find that the degree of misalignment of angular momentum within a halo is very high. Approximately 50 per cent of haloes have more than 10 per cent of the halo mass in the mass of negative angular momentum j. After the mass of negative j is excluded, the cumulative mass function M(approximately the universal function proposed by Bullock et al., although we still find a significant fraction of haloes (~50 per cent) that exhibit systematic deviations from the universal function. Our results, however, are broadly in good agreement with a recent work of van den Bosch et al. We also study the angular momentum profile of haloes in a warm dark matter (WDM) model and a self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) model. We find that the angular momentum profile of haloes in the WDM is statistically indistinguishable from that in the CDM model, but the angular momentum of haloes in the SIDM is reduced by the self-interaction of dark matter.

  15. The stellar mass-size relation for cluster galaxies at z = 1 with high angular resolution from the Gemini/GeMS multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Sharp, Robert; Glazebrook, Karl; Rigaut, Francois; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Brodwin, Mark; Bayliss, Matthew; Stalder, Brian; Abraham, Roberto; McGregor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present the stellar mass-size relation for 49 galaxies within the z = 1.067 cluster SPT-CL J0546-5345, with full width at half-maximum ˜80-120 mas Ks-band data from the Gemini multiconjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS/GSAOI). This is the first such measurement in a cluster environment, performed at sub-kpc resolution at rest-frame wavelengths dominated by the light of the underlying old stellar populations. The observed stellar mass-size relation is offset from the local relation by 0.21 dex, corresponding to a size evolution proportional to (1 + z)-1.25, consistent with the literature. The slope of the stellar mass-size relation β = 0.74 ± 0.06, consistent with the local relation. The absence of slope evolution indicates that the amount of size growth is constant with stellar mass. This suggests that galaxies in massive clusters such as SPT-CL J0546-5345 grow via processes that increase the size without significant morphological interference, such as minor mergers and/or adiabatic expansion. The slope of the cluster stellar mass-size relation is significantly shallower if measured in Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging at wavelengths blueward of the Balmer break, similar to rest-frame ultraviolet relations at z = 1 in the literature. The stellar mass-size relation must be measured at redder wavelengths, which are more sensitive to the old stellar population that dominates the stellar mass of the galaxies. The slope is unchanged when GeMS Ks-band imaging is degraded to the resolution of K-band HST/Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer resolution but dramatically affected when degraded to Ks-band Magellan/FourStar resolution. Such measurements must be made with adaptive optics in order to accurately characterize the sizes of compact, z = 1 galaxies.

  16. The oceanic contribution to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Johns, C. M.; Hide, R.; Thompson, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the speed of the Earth's rotation manifest themselves as fluctuations in the length of the day (LOD) with an amplitude of about 1000 microseconds. We know from previous work that at least 95% of these variations can be accounted for in terms of angular momentum exchanged between the atmosphere and the solid Earth. Here we examine the respective contributions of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the global oceans to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, using in situ data from the Drake Passage and results from both the oceanic regional model (Fine Resolution Antarctic Model -- FRAM) of Webb et al. (1991) and the global ocanic model of Maier-Reimer et al. (1993) as analyzed by Brosche et al. (1990). The estimated annual contribution of the ACC (2-4 microsec) is much smaller than the total variation in the oceanic models or the existing LOD-AAM residual (both approximately 15-20 microsec). The estimated semi-annual ACC contribution (3-8 microsec) is offset by counter-current further north in both oceanic models, which exhibit larger semi-annual variations in planetary angular momentum. Further refinements in the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, therefore, will require the full (planetary plus relative) contribution of the global oceans in addition to that of the ACC.

  17. Low Angular Momentum in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andrew W.; McGregor, Peter J.; Damjanov, Ivana; Popping, Attila; Jørgensen, Inger

    2015-12-01

    We measure the stellar specific angular momentum {j}s={J}s/{M}s in four nearby (z ≈ 0.1) disk galaxies that have stellar masses {M}s near the break {M}s* of the galaxy mass function but look like typical star-forming disks at z ≈ 2 in terms of their low stability (Q ≈ 1), clumpiness, high ionized gas dispersion (40-50 {km} {{{s}}}-1), high molecular gas fraction (20%-30%), and rapid star formation (˜ 20{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). Combining high-resolution (Keck-OSIRIS) and large-radius (Gemini-GMOS) spectroscopic maps, only available at low z, we discover that these targets have ˜ 3 times less stellar angular momentum than typical local spiral galaxies of equal stellar mass and bulge fraction. Theoretical considerations show that this deficiency in angular momentum is the main cause of their low stability, while the high gas fraction plays a complementary role. Interestingly, the low {j}s values of our targets are similar to those expected in the {M}s* population at higher z from the approximate theoretical scaling {j}s\\propto {(1+z)}-1/2 at fixed {M}s. This suggests that a change in angular momentum, driven by cosmic expansion, is the main cause for the remarkable difference between clumpy {M}s* disks at high z (which likely evolve into early-type galaxies) and mass-matched local spirals.

  18. High Angular Resolution Observations of Episodic Dust Emission from Long Period Variable Stars Twenty Years of Observations with the Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William

    2010-01-01

    Over the past twenty years the U. C. Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer has observed a number of Long Period Variable stars in the mid-infrared, obtaining information on the spatial distribution of dust around these stars with resolutions of the order of a few tens of milliarcseconds. The ISI is a heterodyne interferometer operating mostly at 11.15 microns, initially with two telescopes. In the last decade, it has been taking data regularly with three telescopes, thus obtaining visibility data on three baselines and also a closure phase. Over the course of the years, the ISI has been able to measure the physical properties of the dust shells surrounding these stars, in particular the inner radii of the dust shells, as well as the temperature and density distribution. For some stars, the ISI has also made precision measurements of their diameters in the mid-infrared. Closure phase measurements have revealed asymmetries in the dust distributions around many stars. Most surprisingly the ISI data has shown evidence for substantial changes in the amount of dust on time scales of 5-10 years, rather than being directly correlated with the stellar pulsation periods, which are of the order of one year. We discuss past results and new results from the ISI that highlight the dynamic environment around these stars.

  19. High resolution Dopplerimetry of correlated angular and quantum state-resolved CO(2) scattering dynamics at the gas-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Bradford G; Nesbitt, David J

    2010-11-14

    Full three dimensional (3D) translational distributions for quantum state-resolved scattering dynamics at the gas-liquid interface are presented for experimental and theoretical studies of CO(2) + perfluorinated surfaces. Experimentally, high resolution absorption profiles are measured as a function of incident (θ(inc)) and scattering (θ(scat)) angles for CO(2) that has been scattered from a 300 K perfluorinated polyether surface (PFPE) with an incident energy of E(inc) = 10.6(8) kcal mol(-1). Line shape analysis of the absorption profiles reveals non-equilibrium dynamics that are characterized by trapping-desorption (TD) and impulsive scattering (IS) components, with each channel simply characterized by an effective "temperature" that compares very well with previous results from rotational state analysis [Perkins and Nesbitt, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2008, 112, 9324]. From a theoretical perspective, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CO(2) + fluorinated self-assembled monolayer surface (F-SAMs) yield translational probability distributions that are also compared with experimental results. Trajectories are parsed by θ(scat) and J, with the results rigorously corrected by flux-to-density transformation and providing comparisons in near quantitative agreement with experiment. 3D flux and velocity distributions obtained from MD simulations are also presented to illustrate the role of in- and out-of-plane scattering.

  20. Angular radiation transfer in inhomogeneous dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, E. A.; El Ghazaly, A. A.; Krim, M. S. Abdel

    1988-10-01

    The equation of radiative transfer for an inhomogeneous dispersive finite medium subject to general boundary conditions is solved. The Padé approximation technique is used to calculate the angular distribution of radiation. Numerical results for the [0/1] Padé approximant lead to numerical results that compare with the exact results.

  1. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  2. High-resolution STEM imaging with a quadrant detector--conditions for differential phase contrast microscopy in the weak phase object approximation.

    PubMed

    Majert, S; Kohl, H

    2015-01-01

    Differential phase contrast is a contrast mechanism that can be utilized in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to determine the distribution of magnetic or electric fields. In practice, several different detector geometries can be used to obtain differential phase contrast. As recent high resolution differential phase contrast experiments with the STEM are focused on ring quadrant detectors, we evaluate the contrast transfer characteristics of different quadrant detector geometries, namely two ring quadrant detectors with different inner detector angles and a conventional quadrant detector, by calculating the corresponding phase gradient transfer functions. For an ideal microscope and a weak phase object, this can be done analytically. The calculated phase gradient transfer functions indicate that the barely illuminated ring quadrant detector setup used for imaging magnetic fields in the specimen reduces the resolution limit to about 2.5Å for an aberration corrected STEM. Our results show that the resolution can be drastically improved by using a conventional quadrant detector instead.

  3. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  4. Beyond Chandra (towards the X-ray Surveyor mission): possible solutions for the implementation of very high angular resolution X-ray telescopes in the new millennium based on fused silica segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M. M.; Ghigo, M.; Parodi, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.

    2016-07-01

    An important challenge for the X-ray astronomy of the new millennium is represented by the implementation of an Xray telescope able to maintain the exquisite angular resolution of Chandra (with a sub-arcsec HEW, on-axis) but, at the same time, being characterized by a much larger throughput and grasp. A mission with similar characteristics is represented by the X-ray Surveyor Mission. The project has been recently proposed in USA and is being currently studied by NASA. It will host an X-ray telescope with an effective area of more than 2 square meters at 1 keV (i.e. 30 times greater than Chandra) and a 15-arcminutes field-of-view, with 1-arcsecond or better half-power diameter (versus the 4 arcmin diameter of Chandra). While the scientific reasons for implementing a similar mission are clear, being related to compelling problems like e.g. the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift or the identification of the first galaxy groups and proto-clusters, the realization of a grazing-angle optics system able to fulfil these specs remain highly challenging. Different technologies are being envisaged, like e.g. the use of adjustable segmented mirrors (with use of piezoelectric or magneto-restrictive film actuators on the back surface) or the direct polishing of a variety of thin substrates or the use of innovative correction methods like e.g. differential deposition, ionfiguring or the correction of the profile via controlled stress films. In this paper we present a possible approach based on the direct polishing (with final ion figuring correction of the profile) of thin SiO2 segmented substrates (typically 2 mm thick), discussing different aspects of the technology under implementation and presenting some preliminary results.

  5. Test-retest reliability of high angular resolution diffusion imaging acquisition within medial temporal lobe connections assessed via tract based spatial statistics, probabilistic tractography and a novel graph theory metric.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, T; Gullett, J M; Nguyen, P; Boutzoukas, A E; Ford, A; Colon-Perez, L M; Triplett, W; Carney, P R; Mareci, T H; Price, C C; Bauer, R M

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the reliability of high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (HARDI) data collected on a single individual across several sessions using the same scanner. HARDI data was acquired for one healthy adult male at the same time of day on ten separate days across a one-month period. Environmental factors (e.g. temperature) were controlled across scanning sessions. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was used to assess session-to-session variability in measures of diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). To address reliability within specific structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL; the focus of an ongoing investigation), probabilistic tractography segmented the Entorhinal cortex (ERc) based on connections with Hippocampus (HC), Perirhinal (PRc) and Parahippocampal (PHc) cortices. Streamline tractography generated edge weight (EW) metrics for the aforementioned ERc connections and, as comparison regions, connections between left and right rostral and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Coefficients of variation (CoV) were derived for the surface area and volumes of these ERc connectivity-defined regions (CDR) and for EW across all ten scans, expecting that scan-to-scan reliability would yield low CoVs. TBSS revealed no significant variation in FA or MD across scanning sessions. Probabilistic tractography successfully reproduced histologically-verified adjacent medial temporal lobe circuits. Tractography-derived metrics displayed larger ranges of scanner-to-scanner variability. Connections involving HC displayed greater variability than metrics of connection between other investigated regions. By confirming the test retest reliability of HARDI data acquisition, support for the validity of significant results derived from diffusion data can be obtained.

  6. Test-Retest Reliability of High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging Acquisition within Medial Temporal Lobe Connections Assessed via Tract Based Spatial Statistics, Probabilistic Tractography and a Novel Graph Theory Metric

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, T.; Gullett, J. M.; Nguyen, P.; Boutzoukas, A. E.; Ford, A.; Colon-Perez, L. M.; Triplett, W.; Carney, P.R.; Mareci, T. H.; Price, C. C.; Bauer, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study examined the reliability of high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (HARDI) data collected on a single individual across several sessions using the same scanner. Methods HARDI data was acquired for one healthy adult male at the same time of day on ten separate days across a one-month period. Environmental factors (e.g. temperature) were controlled across scanning sessions. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was used to assess session-to-session variability in measures of diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). To address reliability within specific structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL; the focus of an ongoing investigation), probabilistic tractography segmented the Entorhinal cortex (ERc) based on connections with Hippocampus (HC), Perirhinal (PRc) and Parahippocampal (PHc) cortices. Streamline tractography generated edge weight (EW) metrics for the aforementioned ERc connections and, as comparison regions, connections between left and right rostral and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Coefficients of variation (CoV) were derived for the surface area and volumes of these ERc connectivity-defined regions (CDR) and for EW across all ten scans, expecting that scan-to-scan reliability would yield low CoVs. Results TBSS revealed no significant variation in FA or MD across scanning sessions. Probabilistic tractography successfully reproduced histologically-verified adjacent medial temporal lobe circuits. Tractography-derived metrics displayed larger ranges of scanner-to-scanner variability. Connections involving HC displayed greater variability than metrics of connection between other investigated regions. Conclusions By confirming the test retest reliability of HARDI data acquisition, support for the validity of significant results derived from diffusion data can be obtained. PMID:26189060

  7. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  8. Recurrence of angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Dahlen, G

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of recurrence of angular cheilitis following a successful antimicrobial treatment was studied in 48 patients. Clinical assessments including a microbial examination were carried out 8 months and 5 yr after termination of treatment. Eighty percent of the patients reported recurrence of their angular cheilitis on one or more occasions during the observation period. Patients with cutaneous disorders associated with dry skin or intraoral leukoplakia had an increased incidence of recrudescence. Neither the presence of denture stomatitis nor the type of microorganisms isolated from the original lesions of angular cheilitis, i.e. Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus, were associated with the number of recurrences. The present observations indicate that treatment of the majority of patients with angular cheilitis should be considered in a longer perspective than previously supposed, due to the short lasting therapeutic effects of the antimicrobial therapy.

  9. [Malignant angular cheilitis].

    PubMed

    Seoane, J; Vázquez, J; Cazenave, A; de la Cruz Mera, A; Argila, F; Aguado, A

    1996-01-01

    A case of chronic angular cheilitis is reported. Candida albicans was isolated repeatedly and the process developed into epitheliomatous carcinoma. The etiopathogenic role of Candida albicans and possible mechanism of action are discussed.

  10. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  11. Approximation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Andreas S.; Shmoys, David B.; Williamson, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing global competition, rapidly changing markets, and greater consumer awareness have altered the way in which corporations do business. To become more efficient, many industries have sought to model some operational aspects by gigantic optimization problems. It is not atypical to encounter models that capture 106 separate “yes” or “no” decisions to be made. Although one could, in principle, try all 2106 possible solutions to find the optimal one, such a method would be impractically slow. Unfortunately, for most of these models, no algorithms are known that find optimal solutions with reasonable computation times. Typically, industry must rely on solutions of unguaranteed quality that are constructed in an ad hoc manner. Fortunately, for some of these models there are good approximation algorithms: algorithms that produce solutions quickly that are provably close to optimal. Over the past 6 years, there has been a sequence of major breakthroughs in our understanding of the design of approximation algorithms and of limits to obtaining such performance guarantees; this area has been one of the most flourishing areas of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. PMID:9370525

  12. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  13. One particularity of energy-angular secondary electrons spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. S.; Zaitsev, S. I.

    2006-05-01

    In this work we discuss the problems of the energy-angular spectrum of backscattered and true secondary electrons simulation using the discrete (DLA) and the continuous (CLA) loss approximations. The presence of an angular spectrum artefact - the deviation from the sinusoidal distribution over the range of 177-18O° from the beam direction is shown.

  14. The Angular Momentum Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Adelheid; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In the context of the formation of spiral galaxies the evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter halos have been discussed for more than 20 years, especially the idea that the specific angular momentum of the halo can be estimated from the specific angular momentum of its disk (e.g. Fall & Efstathiou (1980), Fall (1983) and Mo et al. (1998)). We use a new set of hydrodynamic cosmological simulations called Magneticum Pathfinder which allow us to split the galaxies into spheroidal and disk galaxies via the circularity parameter ɛ, as commonly used (e.g. Scannapieco et al. (2008)). Here, we focus on the dimensionless spin parameter λ = J |E|1/2 / (G M5/2) (Peebles 1969, 1971), which is a measure of the rotation of the total halo and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution, e.g. Mo et al. (1998). The spin parameter allows one to compare the relative angular momentum of halos across different masses and different times. Fig. 1 reveals a dichotomy in the distribution of λ at all redshifts when the galaxies are split into spheroids (dashed) and disk galaxies (dash-dotted). The disk galaxies preferentially live in halos with slightly larger spin parameter compared to spheroidal galaxies. Thus, we see that the λ of the whole halo reflects the morphology of its central galaxy. For more details and a larger study of the angular momentum properties of disk and spheroidal galaxies, see Teklu et al. (in prep.).

  15. Optical orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Stephen M; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J

    2017-02-28

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  16. Optical orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  17. Optical orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  18. Creating high-harmonic beams with controlled orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T J; Frumker, E; Boyd, Robert W; Corkum, P B

    2014-10-10

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ = ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ| = 1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  19. Creating High-Harmonic Beams with Controlled Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T. J.; Frumker, E.; Boyd, Robert W.; Corkum, P. B.

    2014-10-01

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ =ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ|=1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  20. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  1. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  2. A dual-heterodyne laser interferometer for simultaneous measurement of linear and angular displacements.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hao; Duan, Hui-Zong; Li, Lin-Tao; Liang, Yu-Rong; Luo, Jun; Yeh, Hsien-Chi

    2015-12-01

    Picometer laser interferometry is an essential tool for ultra-precision measurements in frontier scientific research and advanced manufacturing. In this paper, we present a dual-heterodyne laser interferometer for simultaneously measuring linear and angular displacements with resolutions of picometer and nanoradian, respectively. The phase measurement method is based on cross-correlation analysis and realized by a PXI-bus data acquisition system. By implementing a dual-heterodyne interferometer with a highly symmetric optical configuration, low frequency noises caused by the environmental fluctuations can be suppressed to very low levels via common-mode noise rejection. Experimental results for the dual-heterodyne interferometer configuration presented demonstrate that the noise levels of the linear and angular displacement measurements are approximately 1 pm/Hz(1/2) and 0.5 nrad/Hz(1/2) at 1 Hz.

  3. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  4. Miniaturized photoelectric angular sensor with simplified design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Schiaua, Silviu

    1999-09-01

    In building the movable elements of robots, peripheral devices and measuring apparata, increasing the resolution of the angular sensor systems, based on incremental rotary encoders, is essential, together with decreasing the complexity, dimensions and weight. Especially when the angular sensor is integrated in a measuring system, belonging to a programmed light airplane for surveillance, the key issue is to reduce both dimensions and weight. This can be done using a simplified design, which consists in the following solutions: replacement of the fragile Cr on glass substrate, 1.5 mm thick (normally used for the fabrication of incremental disks), with light Cr on polycarbonate substrate, with only 0.15 mm thick; the absence of collimating optics (based on microlenses, used in IR emitter-photocell receiver assembly), as a result of the good coupling efficiency (due to the possible approaching of these elements at minimum 0.45 mm); the shrinkage of the disk's diameters to only 14 mm; the use of surface mounting devices and the related surface mounting technology, enabling to reduce dimensions and weight. The maximum number of slits on a 14 mm diameter dividing disk, usually obtained in a Cr on polycarbonate version, being approx. 1000, no problem occurs in our case, for 360 slits. The requested angular resolution (only 0.5 degrees for the light airplane), using the whole classical '4x digital multiplication' is not necessary, but a lower one of only 2x, resulting in a simplified electronics. The proposed design permitted, that an original arrangement, for building a small size, lightweight, heavy-duty incremental transducer based angular sensor system, to be obtained, useful not only in avionics, but also in robotics, or other special applications. Besides, extending the number of fixed gratings (masks) allows, that many primary signals to be derived, and a further increase in resolution of even 6 angular minutes to be obtained from the initial 360 slits.

  5. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  6. Approximate resolution of hard numbering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailleux, O.; Chabrier, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    We present a new method for estimating the number of solutions of constraint satisfaction problems. We use a stochastic forward checking algorithm for drawing a sample of paths from a search tree. With this sample, we compute two values related to the number of solutions of a CSP instance. First, an unbiased estimate, second, a lower bound with an arbitrary low error probability. We will describe applications to the Boolean Satisfiability problem and the Queens problem. We shall give some experimental results for these problems.

  7. Angular cheilitis after tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    England, R J; Lau, M; Ell, S R

    1999-08-01

    The operation of tonsillectomy requires the oral cavity to be held open mechanically in an unconscious patient, and intra-oral instrumentation to occur. Angular cheilitis may arise as a result of this after operation. This can cause morbidity and delay the re-establishment of a normal diet. The aim of this study was to identify what factors increase the likelihood of developing this problem postoperatively. Sixty patients were randomly selected in a prospective manner. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative variables were recorded. The frequency of development of postoperative angular cheilitis was recorded. The prevalence of the condition was related to the prerecorded variables. Parametric analysis showed that the chance of developing angular cheilitis was directly related to the use of diathermy haemostasis (P = 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of developing this complication if diathermy was used is 3.5 (95% confidence intervals 0.99, 12.4) and operation difficulty may also be a relevant variable. No other recorded variables were found to be significant.

  8. Semiclassical complex angular momentum theory and Pade reconstruction for resonances, rainbows, and reaction thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolovski, D.; Msezane, A.Z.

    2004-09-01

    A semiclassical complex angular momentum theory, used to analyze atom-diatom reactive angular distributions, is applied to several well-known potential (one-particle) problems. Examples include resonance scattering, rainbow scattering, and the Eckart threshold model. Pade reconstruction of the corresponding matrix elements from the values at physical (integral) angular momenta and properties of the Pade approximants are discussed in detail.

  9. High-resolution electron microscopy analysis of structural defects in a (2/1, 5/3)-type approximant of a decagonal quasicrystal of an Al-Pd-Mn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.P.; Ren, G.; Zhang, Z.

    1996-10-01

    Structural defects were analyzed by means of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) in a crystalline (2/1, 5/3)-type Fibonacci approximant of an Al-Pd-Mn alloy system. A kind of stacking fault is observed with a projected displacement vector R parallel to the [{minus}3 0 29] direction; its amplitude {vert_bar}R{vert_bar} = 2a sin 18 deg = 1.19 nm, and its habit plane lies in the (1 0 1) plane. Two kinds of domain boundaries have been found and the domains are related by a 180 deg rotation around the c-axis plus a displacement along the [3 0 {minus}29] or the [{minus}3 0 {minus}29] direction in a plane perpendicular to the b-axis. The domain boundary planes are the {l_brace}1 0 1{r_brace} planes.

  10. Angular Momentum in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    We study the ``angular momentum catastrophe" in the framework of interaction among baryons and dark matter through dynamical friction. By means of Del Popolo (2009) model we simulate 14 galaxies similar to those investigated by van den Bosch, Burkert and Swaters (2001), and calculate the distribution of their spin parameters and the angular momenta. Our model gives the angular momentum distribution which is in agreement with the van den Bosch et al. observations. Our result shows that the ``angular momentum catastrophe" can be naturally solved in a model that takes into account the baryonic physics and the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the baryonic clumps and dark matter through dynamical friction.

  11. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  12. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  13. Angular distributions in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenner, R.W.; Klobuchar, R.L.; Haustein, P.E.; Virtes, G.J.; Cumming, J.B.; Loveland, W.

    2006-04-15

    Angular distributions are reported for {sup 37}Ar and {sup 127}Xe from 381-GeV {sup 28}Si+Au interactions and for products between {sup 24}Na and {sup 149}Gd from 28-GeV {sup 1}H+Au. Sideward peaking and forward deficits for multifragmentation products are significantly enhanced for heavy ions compared with protons. Projectile kinetic energy does not appear to be a satisfactory scaling variable. The data are discussed in terms of a kinetic-focusing model in which sideward peaking is due to transverse motion of the excited product from the initial projectile-target interaction.

  14. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  15. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B.

    1992-08-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  16. Orbital angular momentum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mary Jacquiline Romero

    Entanglement in higher dimensions is an attractive concept that is a challenge to realise experimentally. To this end, the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons holds promise. The OAM state-space is discrete and theoretically unbounded. In the work that follows, we investigate various aspects of OAM entanglement. We show how the correlations in OAM and its conjugate variable, angular position, are determined by phase- matching and the shape of the pump beam in spontaneous parametric down- conversion. We implement tests of quantum mechanics which have been previously done for other variables. We show the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox for OAM and angle, supporting the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with locality and realism. We demonstrate violations of Bell-type inequalities, thereby discounting local hidden variables for describing the correlations we observe. We show the Hardy paradox using OAM, again highlighting the nonlocal nature of quantum mechanics. We demonstrate violations of Leggett-type inequalities, thereby discounting nonlocal hidden variables for describing correlations. Lastly, we have looked into the entanglement of topological vortex structures formed from a special superposition of OAM modes and show violations of Bell-type inequalities confined to a finite, isolated volume.

  17. Plasmons carrying orbital angular momentum in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shabbir A.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.; Mendonca

    2013-10-01

    The existence of plasmons with orbital angular momentum due to the Laguerre-Gaussian-type density and potential perturbations is studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Starting from appropriate hydrodynamic equations for the electrostatic electron dynamics, a dispersion equation is derived in paraxial approximation. The Laguerre-Gaussian beam solutions are obtained and the properties of electric field components, energy flux, and corresponding angular momentum density of plasmons are investigated. The electric field lines are found to form helical structures with a dominant axial component. The results are analyzed numerically and the influence of radial and angular mode numbers on potential and electric field components is illustrated.

  18. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  19. Improving the resolution of chopper spectrometers at pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M. ); Mildner, D.F.R. . Center for Analytical Chemistry)

    1990-01-01

    We examine the relationships between intensity and resolution in pulsed-source chopper spectrometers, including the effects of Soller collimation, narrower rotor slits and higher rotor speeds. The basis is a simplified description of a spectrometer, approximately optimizing the rotor pulse and lighthouse effects. the analysis includes a new treatment of the angular distribution transmitted through a system consisting of a coarse collimator and a Soller collimator. The results encourage the prospect for a reasonably easily accomplished, higher resolution, optional configuration of the pulsed source chopper spectrometers at IPNS. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Comparison of Three Efficient Approximate Exact-Exchange Algorithms: The Chain-of-Spheres Algorithm, Pair-Atomic Resolution-of-the-Identity Method, and Auxiliary Density Matrix Method.

    PubMed

    Rebolini, Elisa; Izsák, Róbert; Reine, Simen Sommerfelt; Helgaker, Trygve; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo

    2016-08-09

    We compare the performance of three approximate methods for speeding up evaluation of the exchange contribution in Hartree-Fock and hybrid Kohn-Sham calculations: the chain-of-spheres algorithm (COSX; Neese , F. Chem. Phys. 2008 , 356 , 98 - 109 ), the pair-atomic resolution-of-identity method (PARI-K; Merlot , P. J. Comput. Chem. 2013 , 34 , 1486 - 1496 ), and the auxiliary density matrix method (ADMM; Guidon , M. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010 , 6 , 2348 - 2364 ). Both the efficiency relative to that of a conventional linear-scaling algorithm and the accuracy of total, atomization, and orbital energies are compared for a subset containing 25 of the 200 molecules in the Rx200 set using double-, triple-, and quadruple-ζ basis sets. The accuracy of relative energies is further compared for small alkane conformers (ACONF test set) and Diels-Alder reactions (DARC test set). Overall, we find that the COSX method provides good accuracy for orbital energies as well as total and relative energies, and the method delivers a satisfactory speedup. The PARI-K and in particular ADMM algorithms require further development and optimization to fully exploit their indisputable potential.

  1. Switching mechanism senses angular acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Switching mechanism actuates an electrical circuit when a predetermined angular acceleration and displacement are reached. A rotor in the mechanism overcomes the restraint of a magnetic detent when the case in which the detent is mounted reaches the predetermined angular acceleration.

  2. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  3. Envelope Modes of Beams with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Losic, B

    2000-08-21

    For a particle beam propagating in an alternating gradient focusing system, envelope equations are often employed to describe the evolution of the beam radii in the two directions transverse to the direction of propagation, and aligned with the principle axes of the alternating gradient system. When the beams have zero net angular momentum and when the alternating gradient focusing is approximated by a continuous focusing system, there are two normal modes to the envelope equations: the 'breathing' mode and a 'quadrupole' mode. In the former, the two radii oscillate in phase, and in the latter the radii oscillate 180 degrees out of phase. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include beams that have a finite angular momentum. We perturb the moment equations of ref. [1], wherein it was assumed that space charge is a distributed in a uniform density ellipse. Two additional modes are obtained. The breathing mode remains, but the quadrupole mode is split into two modes, and a new low frequency mode appears. We calculate the frequencies and eigenmodes of these four modes as a function of tune depression and a dimensionless net angular momentum. These modes can be excited by rotational errors of the quadrupoles in an alternating gradient focusing channel.

  4. Rational approximations for tomographic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Matthew; Beylkin, Gregory; Monzón, Lucas

    2013-06-01

    We use optimal rational approximations of projection data collected in x-ray tomography to improve image resolution. Under the assumption that the object of interest is described by functions with jump discontinuities, for each projection we construct its rational approximation with a small (near optimal) number of terms for a given accuracy threshold. This allows us to augment the measured data, i.e., double the number of available samples in each projection or, equivalently, extend (double) the domain of their Fourier transform. We also develop a new, fast, polar coordinate Fourier domain algorithm which uses our nonlinear approximation of projection data in a natural way. Using augmented projections of the Shepp-Logan phantom, we provide a comparison between the new algorithm and the standard filtered back-projection algorithm. We demonstrate that the reconstructed image has improved resolution without additional artifacts near sharp transitions in the image.

  5. Angular Distribution of Ly(alpha) Resonant Photons Emergent from Optically Thick Medium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-26

    solutions with the Eddington approximation, which assume I to be linearly dependent on the angular variable µ, yield similar frequency profiles of the photon...flux as that without the Eddington approximation. However, the solutions of the µ distribution evolution are significantly different from that given...by Eddington approximation. First, the angular distribution of I are found to be substantially de- pendent on the frequency of photons. For photons

  6. High angular resolution cosmic X-ray astronomy observations in the energy range 0.15-2 keV and XUV observations of nearby stars from an attitude controlled rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. P.

    1974-01-01

    The construction of a two dimensional focusing Wolter Type I mirror system for X-ray and XUV astronomical observations from an Astrobee F sounding rocket is described. The mirror design goal will have a one degree field, a 20-arc seconds resolution, an effective area of about 50 sq cm at 1 keV and 10 sq cm at 0.25 keV on axis. A star camera provides aspect data to about 15-arc seconds. Two detectors are placed at the focus with an interchange mechanism to allow a detector change during flight. The following specific developments are reported: (1) position sensitive proportional counter development; (2) channel plate multiplier development; (3) telescope mirror development and payload structure; (4) Australian rocket flight results; (5) Comet Kohoutek He I observation; and (6) Vela, Puppis A, and Gem-Mon bright patch observations.

  7. Resolution in Electromagnetic Prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.; Schramm, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) signals are commonly used in geophysical exploration of the shallow subsurface. Sensitivity to conductivity implies they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of porous media. However, low-frequency EM wavefields are diffusive, and have significantly larger wavelengths compared to seismic signals of equal frequency. The wavelength of a 30 Hz sinusoid propagating with seismic velocity 3000 m/s is 100 m, whereas an analogous EM signal diffusing through a conductive body of 0.1 S/m (clayey shale) has wavelength 1825 m. The larger wavelength has implications for resolution of the EM prospecting method. We are investigating resolving power of the EM method via theoretical and numerical experiments. Normal incidence plane wave reflection/transmission by a thin geologic bed is amenable to analytic solution. Responses are calculated for beds that are conductive or resistive relative to the host rock. Preliminary results indicate the classic seismic resolution/detection limit of bed thickness ~1/8 wavelength is not achieved. EM responses for point or line current sources recorded by general acquisition geometries are calculated with a 3D finite-difference algorithm. These exhibit greater variability which may allow inference of bed thickness. We also examine composite responses of two point scatterers with separation when illuminated by an incident EM field. This is analogous to the Rayleigh resolution problem of estimating angular separation between two light sources. The First Born Approximation implies that perturbations in permittivity, permeability, and conductivity have different scattering patterns, which may be indicators of EM medium properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. MBL Experiment in Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Among the series of beautiful take-home experiments designed by A.P. French and J.G. King for MIT students, the one on angular momentum studies the loss and conservation of angular momentum using a small dc motor as generator. Here we describe a version of the experiment that increases its accuracy, enables students to perform detailed rotational dynamics calculations, and sharpens the ability to isolate the region where the collision occurs.

  9. Detection and recognition of angular frequency patterns.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hugh R; Propp, Roni

    2015-05-01

    Previous research has extensively explored visual encoding of smoothly curved, closed contours described by sinusoidal variation of pattern radius as a function of polar angle (RF patterns). Although the contours of many biologically significant objects are curved, we also confront shapes with a more jagged and angular appearance. To study these, we introduce here a novel class of visual stimuli that deform smoothly from a circle to an equilateral polygon with N sides (AF patterns). Threshold measurements reveal that both AF and RF patterns can be discriminated from circles at the same deformation amplitude, approximately 18.0arcsec, which is in the hyperacuity range. Thresholds were slightly higher for patterns with 3.0 cycles than for those with 5.0 cycles. Discrimination between AF and RF patterns was 75% correct at an amplitude that was approximately 3.0 times the threshold amplitude, which implies that AF and RF patterns activate different neural populations. Experiments with jittered patterns in which the contour was broken into several pieces and shifted inward or outward had much less effect on AF patterns than on RF patterns. Similarly, thresholds for single angles of AF patterns showed no significant difference from thresholds for the entire AF pattern. Taken together, these results imply that the visual system incorporates angles explicitly in the representation of closed object contours, but it suggests that angular contours are represented more locally than are curved contours.

  10. Aldebaran's angular diameter: How well do we know it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Roccatagliata, V.

    2005-04-01

    The bright, well-known K5 giant Aldebaran, α Tau, is probably the star with the largest number of direct angular diameter determinations, achieved over a long time by several authors using various techniques. In spite of this wealth of data, or perhaps as a direct result of it, there is not a very good agreement on a single angular diameter value. This is particularly unsettling if one considers that Aldebaran is also used as a primary calibrator for some angular resolution methods, notably for optical and infrared long baseline interferometry. Directly connected to Aldebaran's angular diameter and its uncertainties is its effective temperature, which also has been used for several empirical calibrations. Among the proposed explanations for the elusiveness of an accurate determination of the angular diameter of Aldebaran are the possibility of temporal variations as well as a possible dependence of the angular diameter on the wavelength. We present here a few, very accurate new determinations obtained by means of lunar occultations and long baseline interferometry. We derive an average value of 19.96±0.03 milliarcsec for the uniform disk diameter. The corresponding limb-darkened value is 20.58±0.03 milliarcsec, or 44.2±0.9 R⊙. We discuss this result, in connection with previous determinations and with possible problems that may affect such measurements. Based on observations collected at TIRGO (Gornergrat, Switzerland). TIRGO is operated by CNR - CAISMI Arcetri, Italy.

  11. Angular Momentum Profiles of Warm Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James S.; Kravtsov, and Andrey V.; Colín, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    We compare the specific angular momentum profiles of virialized dark halos in cold dark matter (CDM) and warm dark matter (WDM) models, using high-resolution dissipationless simulations. The simulations were initialized using the same set of modes, except on small scales, where the power was suppressed in WDM below the filtering length. Remarkably, WDM as well as CDM halos are well described by the two-parameter angular momentum profile of Bullock and coworkers, even though the halo masses are below the filtering scale of the WDM. Although the best-fit shape parameters change quantitatively for individual halos in the two simulations, we find no systematic variation in profile shapes as a function of the dark matter type. The scatter in shape parameters is significantly smaller for the WDM halos, suggesting that substructure and/or merging history plays a role in producing scatter about the mean angular momentum distribution, but that the average angular momentum profiles of halos originate from larger scale phenomena or a mechanism associated with the virialization process. The known mismatch between the angular momentum distributions of dark halos and disk galaxies is, therefore, present in WDM as well as CDM models. Our WDM halos tend to have a less coherent (more misaligned) angular momentum structure and smaller spin parameters than do their CDM counterparts, although we caution that this result is based on a small number of halos.

  12. Interpolation and Approximation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaijser, Sten

    1991-01-01

    Introduced are the basic ideas of interpolation and approximation theory through a combination of theory and exercises written for extramural education at the university level. Topics treated are spline methods, Lagrange interpolation, trigonometric approximation, Fourier series, and polynomial approximation. (MDH)

  13. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; Marriage, Tobias; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2017-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveryor (CLASS) is a ground based telescope array designed to measure the large-angular scale polarization signal of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The large-angular scale CMB polarization measurement is essential for a precise determination of the optical depth to reionization (from the E-mode polarization) and a characterization of inflation from the predicted polarization pattern imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves in the early universe (from the B-mode polarization). CLASS will characterize the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, to 0.01 (95% CL).CLASS is uniquely designed to be sensitive to the primordial B-mode signal across the entire range of angular scales where it could possibly dominate over the lensing signal that converts E-modes to B-modes while also making multi-frequency observations both high and low of the frequency where the CMB-to-foreground signal ratio is at its maximum. The design enables CLASS to make a definitive cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to scattering from reionization.CLASS is an array of 4 telescopes operating at approximately 40, 90, 150, and 220 GHz. CLASS is located high in the Andes mountains in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The location of the CLASS site at high altitude near the equator minimizes atmospheric emission while allowing for daily mapping of ~70% of the sky.A rapid front end Variable-delay Polarization Modulator (VPM) and low noise Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detectors allow for a high sensitivity and low systematic error mapping of the CMB polarization at large angular scales. The VPM, detectors and their coupling structures were all uniquely designed and built for CLASS.We present here an overview of the CLASS scientific strategy, instrument design, and current progress. Particular attention is given to the development and status of the Q-band receiver currently surveying the sky from the Atacama Desert and the development of

  14. Estimates of mass and angular momentum in the oort cloud.

    PubMed

    Marochnik, L S; Mukhin, L M; Sagdeev, R Z

    1988-10-28

    Estimates can be made of unseen mass (in the form of cometary nuclei) at the heliocentric distances between 3 x 10(3) and 2 x 10(4) astronomical units(AU) under the assumptions (i) that the Oort cloud is a rarefied halo surrounding the core (dense, inner cometary cloud) and (ii) that the mass and albedo of comet Halley is typical for comets both in the core and the Oort cloud populations. The mass appears to be approximately 0.03 solar masses, with angular momentum of the order of 10(52) to 10(53) g-cm(2)/s. This mass is of the order of the total mass of the planetary system before the loss of volatiles. This leads to an estimate of a mass M(o) approximately 100 M( plus sign in circle) (where M( plus sign in circle) is the mass of Earth) concentrated in the Oort cloud (r > 2 x 10(4) AU) with an angular momentum that may exceed the present angular momentum of the whole planetary system by one order of magnitude. The present angular momentum of the Oort cloud appears to be of the same order as the total angular momentum of the planetary system before the loss of volatiles.

  15. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  16. Orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Ji, Zhiyue; Ru, Guoyun

    2016-07-01

    Based on the vectorial Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral formulae, the analytical expression of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam with an arbitrary topological charge is derived in free space. By using the analytical expressions of the electromagnetic field beyond the paraxial approximation, the orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam can be calculated. The effects of the linearly polarized angle and the topological charge on the three components of the orbital angular momentum density are investigated in the reference plane. The two transversal components of the orbital angular momentum are composed of two lobes with the same areas and opposite signs. The longitudinal component of the orbital angular momentum density is composed of four lobes with the same areas. The sign of the orbital angular momentum density in a pair of lobes is positive, and that of the orbital angular momentum density in the other pair of lobes is negative. Moreover, the negative magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density is larger than the positive magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density. The linearly polarized angle affects not only the shape and the location of the lobes, but also the magnitude of the three components of the orbital angular momentum density. With increasing the topological charge, the distribution of the orbital angular momentum density expands, the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density increases, and the shape of the lobe also slightly changes.

  17. Oscillation of boson star in Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarwal, Bharti; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2017-03-01

    Boson star (BS) rotation is studied under Newtonian approximation. A Coulombian potential term is added as perturbation to the radial potential of the system without disturbing the angular momentum. The results of the stationary states of these ground state, first and second excited state are analyzed with the correction of Coulombian potential. It is found that the results with correction increased in the amplitude of oscillation of BS in comparison to potential without perturbation correction.

  18. Interferometric measurement of angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10-11 rad/sqrt{textrm {Hz}} from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  19. Variations in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Twice-daily values of the atmosphere's angular momentum about the polar axis during the five years from 1976 through 1980 are presented in graphs and a table. The compilation is based on a global data set, incorporating 90 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. The relationship between changes in the angular momentum of the atmosphere and changes in the length of day is described, as are the main sources of error in the data. The variability in angular momentum is revealed in a preliminary fashion by means of a spectral decomposition. The data presented should stimulate comparisons with other measures of the length of day and so provide a basis for greater understanding of Earth-atmosphere interactions.

  20. The angular momentum of condensations within elephant trunks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, V.; Raga, A. C.; Esquivel, A.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: The radiation from newly born stars photoevaporates their parental neutral cloud, leading to the formation of dense clumps that will eventually form stars. Methods: We present 3D simulations of the interaction of a neutral cloud with an external ionising radiation field, and compute the angular momenta of these collapsing clumps. Results: The angular momenta of these collapsing clumps show that they have preferential orientations mostly perpendicular to the direction of the incident ionising photon field. Therefore, the axes of the jet systems that will be eventually ejected (from the star + accretion disk systems that will form) will be oriented approximately perpendicular to the direction to the photoionising source.

  1. Angular Momentum of a Magnetically Trapped Atomic Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Jen, H. H.; Sun, C. P.; You, L.

    2007-01-19

    For an atomic condensate in an axially symmetric magnetic trap, the sum of the axial components of the orbital angular momentum and the hyperfine spin is conserved. Inside an Ioffe-Pritchard trap (IPT) whose magnetic field (B field) is not axially symmetric, the difference of the two becomes surprisingly conserved. In this Letter we investigate the relationship between the values of the sum or difference angular momentums for an atomic condensate inside a magnetic trap and the associated gauge potential induced by the adiabatic approximation. Our result provides significant new insight into the vorticity of magnetically trapped atomic quantum gases.

  2. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  3. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  4. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  5. High-resolution imaging with AEOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patience, Jennifer; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Max, Claire E.

    2001-12-01

    The U.S. Air Force Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) which includes a 941 actuator adaptive optics system on a 3.7 m telescope has recently been made available for astronomical programs. Operating at a wavelength of 750 nm, the diffraction-limited angular resolution of the system is 0'.04; currently, the magnitude limit is V approximately 7 mag. At the distances of nearby open clusters, diffraction- limited images should resolve companions with separations as small as 4 - 6 AU - comparable to the Sun-Jupiter distance. The ability to study such close separations is critical, since most companions are expected to have separations in the few AU to tens of AU range. With the exceptional angular resolution of the current AEOS setup, but restricted target magnitude range, we are conducting a companion search of a large, well-defined sample of bright early-type stars in nearby open clusters and in the field. Our data set will both characterize this relatively new adaptive optics system and answer questions in binary star formation and stellar X- ray activity. We will discuss our experience using AEOS, the data analysis involved, and our initial results.

  6. High Orbital Angular Momentum Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Alves, E. P.; Fonseca, R. A.; Mendonça, J. T.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-12-01

    We identify and explore a high orbital angular momentum (OAM) harmonics generation and amplification mechanism that manipulates the OAM independently of any other laser property, by preserving the initial laser wavelength, through stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. The high OAM harmonics spectra can extend at least up to the limiting value imposed by the paraxial approximation. We show with theory and particle-in-cell simulations that the orders of the OAM harmonics can be tuned according to a selection rule that depends on the initial OAM of the interacting waves. We illustrate the high OAM harmonics generation in a plasma using several examples including the generation of prime OAM harmonics. The process can also be realized in any nonlinear optical Kerr media supporting three-wave interactions.

  7. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  8. A resolution recognizing June 2010 as National Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiecstasia (HHT) month established to increase awareness of HHT, which is a complex genetic blood vessel disorder that affects approximately 70,000 people in the United States.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Johnson, Tim [D-SD

    2010-04-29

    05/26/2010 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4469-4470; text as passed Senate: CR S4470) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Automated and angular time-synchronized directional gamma-ray scintillation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The authors` previous research resulted in directional sensors for gamma rays and X rays that have a 4{pi} solid angle of acceptance and, at the same time, a high angular resolution that is limited only by their ability to measure small angles. Angular resolution of {approximately}1 s of arc was achieved. These sensors are capable of operating and accurately detecting high and very low intensity radiation patterns. Such a system can also be used to image broad area sources and their scattering patterns. The principle of operation and design of directional sensors used in this study was described elsewhere; however, for convenience, a part of that text is repeated here. It was shown analytically that the angular distribution of radiation incident on the sensor is proportional to the first derivative of the scan data, that is, of the events` count rate versus orientation of the detector. The previously published results were obtained with a annual operating system. The detector assembly was set at a specific angle, and a pulse rate count was made. This was repeated at numerous other angles of orientation, a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. Recently, the authors automated this system, which is based on the detection of scintillations. The detector, which consists of a stack of plates of Lucite, plastic scintillator, and lead foils, rotates by means of a motor in front of a stationary photomultiplier tube (PMT). One revolution per second was chosen for the motor. At time zero, a trigger indicates that a revolution has started. The angle of orientation of the detector in the laboratory system is proportional to the time during one revolution. The process repeats itself a desired number of times. The trigger signal initiates a scan of a multichannel scalar (MCS). The detector assembly is allowed to rotate in the radiation field, and the MCS scans are repeated in an accumulated mode of operation until enough events are collected for the location of the

  10. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  11. Microstructural characteristics of an ultrafine grain metal processed with equal-channel angular pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Minoru; Horita, Zenji; Nemoto, Minoru; Valiev, R.Z.; Langdon, T.G.

    1996-11-01

    Equal-channel angular pressing is a procedure for producing a fully dense material with an ultrafine grain size, typically in the submicrometer or nanometer range, by subjecting the material to a very high plastic strain. This paper describes the principle of equal-channel angular pressing and illustrates the capability of the technique by reference to a series of detailed experiments conducted on an Al-3%Mg solid solution alloy in which the grain size was successfully reduced by equal-channel angular pressing from an initial size of {approximately}500{micro}m in the hot-rolled condition to a final size of {approximately}0.2{micro}m.

  12. A novel model of the geometric and detector response for limited angular sampling pinhole SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietholt, Christian; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Clough, Anne V.; Chen, Chin-Tu

    2006-03-01

    Reconstruction methodologies for data sets with reduced angular sampling (RAS) are essential for efficient dynamic or static preclinical animal imaging research using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Modern iterative reconstruction methods can obtain 3D radiotracer distributions of the highest possible quality and resolution. Essential to these algorithms is an accurate model of the physical imaging process. We developed a new point-spread function (PSF) model for the pinhole geometry and compared it to a Gaussian model in a RAS setting. The new model incorporates the geometric response of the pinhole and the detector response of the camera by simulating the system PSF using the error function. Reconstruction of simulated data was done with OS-EM and COS-EM: a new convergent OS-EM based algorithm. The reconstruction of projection data of a simulated point source using the novel method showed improved FWHM values compared to a standard Gaussian method. COS-EM delivers improved results for RAS data, although it converges slower than OS-EM. The reconstruction of Monte Carlo simulated projection data from a resolution phantom shows that as few as 40 projections are sufficient to reconstruct an image with a resolution of approximately 4 mm. The new pinhole model applied to iterative reconstruction methods can reduce imaging time in small animal experiments by a factor of three or reduce the number of cameras needed to perform dynamic SPECT.

  13. Penalty Approximation for Non-smooth Constraints in Vibroimpact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, Lætitia; Schatzman, Michelle

    2001-12-01

    We examine the penalty approximation of the free motion of a material point in an angular domain; we choose an over-damped penalty approximation, and we prove that if the first impact point is not at the vertex, then the limit of the approximation exists and is described by Moreau's rule for inelastic impacts. The proofs rely on validated asymptotics and use some classical tools of the theory of dynamical systems.

  14. The High Angular Resolution Multiplicity of Massive Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    were probably ejected from clusters. The ejection process may have involved close gravitational encounters of binaries and/or supernovae explosions in...1990) while the latter are the result of a supernova explosion in a binary, so both processes must contribute to the ejection of massive stars from

  15. Evolved stars at high angular resolution: present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The late evolutionary stages of stellar evolution are a key ingredient for our understanding in many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution and the enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) via stellar yields. Already the first interferometric campaigns identified evolved stars as the primary targets because of their extended and partially optically thin atmospheres, and the brightness in the infrared. Interferometric studies spanning different wavelength ranges, from visual to mid-infrared, have greatly increased our knowledge of the complex atmospheres of these objects where different dynamic processes are at play. In less than two decades this technique went from measuring simple diameters to produce the first images of stellar surfaces. By scanning the extended atmospheres we constrained theoretical models, learnt about molecular stratification, dust formation, and stellar winds, and there is still a lot to be done. In this contribution I will review the recent results that optical/infrared interferometry has made on our current understanding of cool evolved stars. The presentation will focus on asymptotic giant branch stars, and red supergiants. I will discuss the challenges of image reconstruction, and highlight how this field of research will benefit from the synergy of the current interferometric instrument(s) with the second generation VLTI facilities GRAVITY and MATISSE. Finally I will conclude with a short introspection on applications of a visible interferometer and of the the Planet Formation Imager (PFI) to the field of evolved stars.

  16. Quantifying Stellar Mass Loss with High Angular Resolution Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    material – via massive winds, planetary nebulae and supernova explosions – seeding the interstellar medium with heavier elements. Subsequent...of Planetary Nebulae (Harpaz, ApJ, 498,293, (1998)), impacts the pre-explosion characteristic of SNII (Taylor, “The Stars”, Cambridge (1994)), and...A 464, 119) or may have an important role, such as Be Stars, W-R stars, and planetary nebulae . The Future of Interferometric O/IR Imaging. The

  17. High angular resolution and position determinations by infrared interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Interferometer systems are described in the form of publications and reports. 'Distance Meter Helps Track the Stars', 'Berkeley Heterodyne Interferometer', 'Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy of CO2 on Mars', and 'A 10 micron Heterodyne Stellar Interferometer' are papers reported.

  18. High Angular Resolution Microwave Sensing with Large, Sparse, Random Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    MICROWAVE SENSING WITH LARGE, SPARSE, RANDOM ARRAYS Final Scientific Report AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AFOSR 82-0012 Valley Forge Research ...CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Air Force Office of Scientific Research /NE Nov 1983 - . Bildin 41073. NUMBER Or PAG ES BOllinZ AFB, DIC...Air Force Office of Scientific Research , under Grant No. AFOSR-78-3688. March, 1981 QPR No. 37 VFRC QPR No. 37 A-1 S

  19. High Angular Resolution Microwave Sensing with Large, Sparse, Random Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    8 Image Quality Enhancement in Large. ApertUiC Systems. .. .....8 REFERENCES .. ...... .............................................10...aperture can enormously increase the power- apertu -.e product 161. Consequently, an aircraft-size aperture will permit significantly increased detection

  20. New Frontiers in Binary Stars: Science at High Angular Resolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    for Nanoradian Astronomy) project to link Mauna Kea telescopes with optical fiber will potentially open for interferometric use baselines as long as...Information: Gail Schaefer The CHARA Array of Georgia State University Mount Wilson Observatory Mount Wilson, CA 91023 626-796-5405 schaefer@chara-array.org...Wilson Observatory ,Mount Wilson,CA,91023 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR

  1. Higher order treatment on temporal derivative of angular flux for time-dependent MOC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Kamiyama, Y.; Kirimura, K.

    2013-07-01

    A new kinetic analysis method, whose angular dependence of temporal derivative for angular flux is accurately treated within practical memory requirement, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, the computational resources, i.e., the memory capacity, can be still a crucial problem for rigorous kinetic calculations using MOC. In the straightforward approach for kinetic calculation using MOC, the segment-averaged angular fluxes should be stored on the memory in order to explicitly calculate the temporal derivative of the angular flux, which would require huge memory. Thus, in the conventional kinetic calculation code using MOC, the temporal derivative of the angular flux has been approximated as angularly isotropic in order to reduce the memory requirement (isotropic assumption). However, the approximation error caused by the conventional isotropic assumption has not been thoroughly and quantitatively investigated so far and an accurate kinetic calculation method, which can quantitatively estimate the above approximation error within practical memory storage, has not been developed. The present study tries to address this issue with a newly developed approach. Effect of the approximate treatment for the temporal derivative of angular flux is evaluated through benchmark calculations. (authors)

  2. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26α and H30α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30α line. H26α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R ‑4. In addition, the H30α and H26α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  3. Angularly Adaptive P1--Double P0 Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems in Planar Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2005-06-06

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. The standard P{sub 1} angular approximation represents the angular dependence of the radiation specific intensity using a linear function in the angular domain -1 {le} {mu} {le} 1. In contrast, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation represents the angular dependence as isotropic in each half angular range -1 {le} {mu} < 0 and 0 < {mu} {le} 1. Neglecting the time derivative of the radiation flux, both the P{sub 1} and DP{sub 0} equations can be written as a single diffusion equation for the radiation energy density. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near the non-equilibrium wave front. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for a test problem due to Su and Olson for which a semi-analytic transport solution exists. The numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  4. Approximation of Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiniluoto, Ilkka

    2014-03-01

    Approximation of laws is an important theme in the philosophy of science. If we can make sense of the idea that two scientific laws are "close" to each other, then we can also analyze such methodological notions as approximate explanation of laws, approximate reduction of theories, approximate empirical success of theories, and approximate truth of laws. Proposals for measuring the distance between quantitative scientific laws were given in Niiniluoto (1982, 1987). In this paper, these definitions are reconsidered as a response to the interesting critical remarks by Liu (1999).

  5. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell impact ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3d-shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wavefunctions for the target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3d electrons, are widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to the Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  6. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3rd shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wave functions for target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3rd electrons, is widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  7. On Dunkl angular momenta algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Misha; Hakobyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    We consider the quantum angular momentum generators, deformed by means of the Dunkl operators. Together with the reflection operators they generate a subalgebra in the rational Cherednik algebra associated with a finite real reflection group. We find all the defining relations of the algebra, which appear to be quadratic, and we show that the algebra is of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) type. We show that this algebra contains the angular part of the Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian and that together with constants it generates the centre of the algebra. We also consider the gl( N ) version of the subalge-bra of the rational Cherednik algebra and show that it is a non-homogeneous quadratic algebra of PBW type as well. In this case the central generator can be identified with the usual Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian associated with the Coxeter group in the harmonic confinement.

  8. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  9. State-to-state and state-to-all-states reactive scattering angular distributions: F+H /sub 2/. -->. HF+H

    SciTech Connect

    Emmons, R.W.; Suck, S.H.

    1983-04-01

    How each state-to-state reactive transition determines nonundulatory ''state-to-all-states'' angular distribution has not yet been investigated. Here we present a complete exposure of state-to-state distorted-wave Born-approximation angular distributions in order to examine how the nonoscillatory and backward-peaked state-to-all-states reactive scattering angular distribution occurs.

  10. Power calculation of linear and angular incremental encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofev, Aleksandr V.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.; Mednikov, Sergey V.; Sycheva, Elena A.

    2016-04-01

    Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and transmit the measured values back to the control unit. The capabilities of these systems are undergoing continual development in terms of their resolution, accuracy and reliability, their measuring ranges, and maximum speeds. This article discusses the method of power calculation of linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders, to find the optimum parameters for its components, such as light emitters, photo-detectors, linear and angular scales, optical components etc. It analyzes methods and devices that permit high resolutions in the order of 0.001 mm or 0.001°, as well as large measuring lengths of over 100 mm. In linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders optical beam is usually formulated by a condenser lens passes through the measuring unit changes its value depending on the movement of a scanning head or measuring raster. Past light beam is converting into an electrical signal by the photo-detecter's block for processing in the electrical block. Therefore, for calculating the energy source is a value of the desired value of the optical signal at the input of the photo-detecter's block, which reliably recorded and processed in the electronic unit of linear and angular incremental optoelectronic encoders. Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and

  11. Angular Momentum Decomposition for an Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias; BC, Hikmat

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the orbital angular momentum of the `quark' in the scalar diquark model as well as that of the electron in QED (to order $\\alpha$). We compare the orbital angular momentum obtained from the Jaffe-Manohar decomposition to that obtained from the Ji relation and estimate the importance of the vector potential in the definition of orbital angular momentum.

  12. Two-dimensional angular filter array for angular domain imaging with 3D printed angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) is a technique that is capable of generating two dimensional shadowgrams of attenuating targets embedded in a scattering medium. In ADI, an angular filter array (AFA) is positioned between the sample and the detector to distinguish between quasi-ballistic photons and scattered photons. An AFA is a series of micro-channels with a high aspect ratio. Previous AFAs from our group were constructed by micro-machining the micro-channels into a silicon wafer, limiting the imaging area to a one dimensional line. Two dimensional images were acquired via scanning. The objective of this work was to extend the AFA design to two dimensions to allow for two dimensional imaging with minimal scanning. The second objective of this work was to perform an initial characterization of the imaging capabilities of the 2D AFA. Our approach was to use rapid 3D prototyping techniques to generate an array of micro-channels. The imaging capabilities were then evaluated by imaging a 0.9 mm graphite rod submerged in a scattering media. Contrast was observed to improve when a second angular filter array was placed in front of the sample to mask the incoming light.

  13. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  14. Green Ampt approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Parlange, J.-Y.; Li, L.; Jeng, D.-S.; Crapper, M.

    2005-10-01

    The solution to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is expressible in terms of the Lambert W-1 function. Approximations for Green and Ampt infiltration are thus derivable from approximations for the W-1 function and vice versa. An infinite family of asymptotic expansions to W-1 is presented. Although these expansions do not converge near the branch point of the W function (corresponds to Green-Ampt infiltration with immediate ponding), a method is presented for approximating W-1 that is exact at the branch point and asymptotically, with interpolation between these limits. Some existing and several new simple and compact yet robust approximations applicable to Green-Ampt infiltration and flux are presented, the most accurate of which has a maximum relative error of 5 × 10 -5%. This error is orders of magnitude lower than any existing analytical approximations.

  15. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  16. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  17. A test of galaxy evolutionary models via angular sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Myungshin; Casertano, Stefano; Griffiths, Richard E.; Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Tyson, J. Anthony

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between angular size, magnitude, and redshift of faint galaxies is explored as a potential tool to distinguish between galaxy evolutionary models. Different models, based on merging, mild luminosity evolution, and no evolution, lead to different predictions of the angular size distribution, redshift- size relation, and magnitude-size relation. The merging model predicts significantly smaller sizes for faint galaxies than the standard model, because of the requirement for more intrinsically small faint objects at high redshift. A dwarf-rich no-evolution model also predicts small sizes for faint galaxies. The mild luminosity evolution model predicts more luminous galaxies of large angular size at high redshift, as does a standard no-evolution model. Prefurbishment Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey observations of magnitudes and sizes of faint galaxies indicate an excess of small versus large faint galaxies, favoring the dwarf rich, no evolution model with respect to the merging model; the other two models are more discrepant with the data. While these results cannot yet rule out with certainty any of the proposed models, they demonstrate the potential of angular size to discriminate between models of galaxy evolution, especially with the high-resolution HST wide field/planetary camera-2 (WFPC2) data.

  18. The multifrequency angular power spectrum of the epoch of reionization 21-cm signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy; Bharadwaj, Somnath

    2007-06-01

    Observations of redshifted 21-cm radiation from neutral hydrogen (HI) at high redshifts is an important future probe of reionization. We consider the multifrequency angular power spectrum (MAPS) to quantify the statistics of the HI signal as a joint function of the angular multipole l and frequency separation Δν. The signal at two different frequencies is expected to decorrelate as Δν is increased, and quantifying this is particularly important in deciding the frequency resolution for future HI observations. This is also expected to play a very crucial role in extracting the signal from foregrounds as the signal is expected to decorrelate much faster than the foregrounds (which are largely continuum sources) with increasing Δν. In this paper, we develop formulae relating MAPS to different components of the 3D HI power spectrum taking into account HI peculiar velocities. We show that the flat-sky approximation provides a very good representation over the angular scales of interest, and a final expression which is very simple to calculate and interpret. We present results for z = 10 assuming a neutral hydrogen fraction of 0.6 considering two models for the HI distribution, namely, (i) DM: where HI traces the dark matter and (ii) PR: where the effects of patchy reionization are incorporated through two parameters which are the bubble size and the clustering of the bubble centres relative to the dark matter (bias), respectively. We find that while the DM signal is largely featureless, the PR signal peaks at the angular scales of the individual bubbles where it is Poisson fluctuation dominated, and the signal is considerably enhanced for large bubble size. For most cases of interest at l ~ 100 the signal is uncorrelated beyond Δν ~ 1MHz or even less, whereas this occurs around ~0.1MHz at l ~ 103. The Δν dependence also carries an imprint of the bubble size and the bias, and is expected to be an important probe of the reionization scenario. Finally, we find

  19. Over-cosine angular distributions of sputtered atoms at normal incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Y.; Muraoka, K.

    1989-06-01

    The angular distribution of sputtered atoms for normal incidence ions has been investigated theoretically and by computer simulation. For low energy ions the angular distribution is under-cosine, while for relatively high energy ions we obtain an over-cosine angular distribution for the sputtered atoms. It is found that the outward-peakness of the angular distribution for relatively high energy ions is due to the geometrical asymmetry near the surface. Using the Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT, which is based on the binary collision approximation, the angular distributions of sputtered atoms are calculated for various incident energies of Ar ions incident normally on an Fe target. It is found that one needs to take into account the surface roughness in order to obtain good agreement with experiment. The surface roughness is believed to reduce the degree of the over-cosine distribution because a rough surface has a larger effective surface area as compared with an unirradiated surface.

  20. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies.

  1. Angular dependent study on ferromagnetic resonance and spin excitations by spin rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichao; Fan, Xiaolong Zhao, Xiaobing; Rao, Jinwei; Zhou, Hengan; Guo, Dangwei; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2015-01-14

    We report angular dependent spin rectification spectra which are applied to studying spin excitations in single permalloy stripe. Based on planar Hall effect, those spin excitations generate special resonant dc Hall voltages, which have been characterized as functions of the amplitude and direction of applied magnetic field. Through high angular resolution 2D mappings, the evolutions of different spin excitation can be directly presented, and the dynamic magnetic parameters such as the gyromagnetic ratio, effective exchange field, as well as the quantized numbers of standing spin waves can be accurately determined through fitting the angular evolution of each resonance.

  2. Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    RD-A1II58 265 INTRINSIC NILPOTENT APPROXIMATION(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST 1/2 OF TECH CAMBRIDGE LAB FOR INFORMATION AND, DECISION UMCLRSSI SYSTEMS C...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation Technical Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER LIDS-R-1482 7. AUTHOR(.) S...certain infinite-dimensional filtered Lie algebras L by (finite-dimensional) graded nilpotent Lie algebras or g . where x E M, (x,,Z) E T*M/O. It

  3. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  4. Goal-based angular adaptivity applied to a wavelet-based discretisation of the neutral particle transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Dargaville, Steven; Pain, Christopher C.; Smith, Paul N.; Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.

    2015-01-15

    A method for applying goal-based adaptive methods to the angular resolution of the neutral particle transport equation is presented. The methods are applied to an octahedral wavelet discretisation of the spherical angular domain which allows for anisotropic resolution. The angular resolution is adapted across both the spatial and energy dimensions. The spatial domain is discretised using an inner-element sub-grid scale finite element method. The goal-based adaptive methods optimise the angular discretisation to minimise the error in a specific functional of the solution. The goal-based error estimators require the solution of an adjoint system to determine the importance to the specified functional. The error estimators and the novel methods to calculate them are described. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods. It is shown that the methods can significantly reduce the number of unknowns and computational time required to obtain a given error. The novelty of the work is the use of goal-based adaptive methods to obtain anisotropic resolution in the angular domain for solving the transport equation. -- Highlights: •Wavelet angular discretisation used to solve transport equation. •Adaptive method developed for the wavelet discretisation. •Anisotropic angular resolution demonstrated through the adaptive method. •Adaptive method provides improvements in computational efficiency.

  5. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    Much of human reasoning is approximate in nature. Formal models of reasoning traditionally try to be precise and reject the fuzziness of concepts in natural use and replace them with non-fuzzy scientific explicata by a process of precisiation. As an alternate to this approach, it has been suggested that rather than regard human reasoning processes as themselves approximating to some more refined and exact logical process that can be carried out with mathematical precision, the essence and power of human reasoning is in its capability to grasp and use inexact concepts directly. This view is supported by the widespread fuzziness of simple everyday terms (e.g., near tall) and the complexity of ordinary tasks (e.g., cleaning a room). Spatial reasoning is an area where humans consistently reason approximately with demonstrably good results. Consider the case of crossing a traffic intersection. We have only an approximate idea of the locations and speeds of various obstacles (e.g., persons and vehicles), but we nevertheless manage to cross such traffic intersections without any harm. The details of our mental processes which enable us to carry out such intricate tasks in such apparently simple manner are not well understood. However, it is that we try to incorporate such approximate reasoning techniques in our computer systems. Approximate spatial reasoning is very important for intelligent mobile agents (e.g., robots), specially for those operating in uncertain or unknown or dynamic domains.

  6. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  7. Addressing Angular Single-Event Effects in the Estimation of On-Orbit Error Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, David S.; Swift, Gary M.; Wirthlin, Michael J.; ...

    2015-12-01

    Our study describes complications introduced by angular direct ionization events on space error rate predictions. In particular, prevalence of multiple-cell upsets and a breakdown in the application of effective linear energy transfer in modern-scale devices can skew error rates approximated from currently available estimation models. Moreover, this paper highlights the importance of angular testing and proposes a methodology to extend existing error estimation tools to properly consider angular strikes in modern-scale devices. Finally, these techniques are illustrated with test data provided from a modern 28 nm SRAM-based device.

  8. Is photon angular momentum important in molecular collision processes occurring in a laser field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of the rigorous treatment of photon angular momentum in molecular-collision processes occurring in the presence of intense radiation is investigated. An alternate approximate treatment, which essentially neglects the angular momentum coupling between the photon and the molecular degrees of freedom by averaging over the angular dependence of the interaction matrix elements, is presented and applied to a model calculation. The degeneracy-averaged results of this calculation compare remarkably well with the results of a rigorous calculation, from which we conclude (with reservation) that the explicit consideration of photoangular momentum coupling in molecular-collision problems is unnecessary.

  9. Tracing the Angular Dependence of the CGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattinger, Michael; Christensen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The circumgalactic media (CGM) is enriched with metals through a process called the baryon cycle, which may play a significant role in the regulation of star formation. While the relationship between the CGM’s baryonic makeup and impact parameter is well documented, the relationship between the baryonic distribution of the CGM and the azimuthal angle out of the plane of the galaxy remains an open question. We investigated the angular distribution of baryons in the CGM by creating mock-absorption line spectra for a high-resolution simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy at redshift zero. By comparison with data from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph-Halos survey, we determined that our equivalent widths of HI, MgII, CIII, SiII, and SiIII are consistent with observations. Using our data, we found that low ionization state material is more prevalent at low azimuthal angles and that high ionization state material is more prevalent at high angles within the virial radius. We attributed this increased ionization to higher temperatures at high angles. We also found that the highest metallicity levels appear at high and low azimuthal angles, with lower metallicities at middle angles. This evidence supports the recycled accretion model of CGM baryon flow.

  10. Angular domain fluorescence imaging for small animal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Belton, Michelle; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel macroscopic fluorescent imaging technique called angular domain fluorescence imaging (ADFI) applicable to the detection of fluorophores embedded in biological tissues. The method exploits the collimation detection capabilities of an angular filter array (AFA). The AFA uses the principle of acceptance angle filtration to extract minimally scattered photons emitted from fluorophores deep within tissue. Our goal was to develop an ADFI system for imaging near-infrared fluorescent markers for small animal imaging. According to the experimental results, the ADFI system offered higher resolution and contrast compared to a conventional lens and lens-pinhole fluorescent detection system. Furthermore, ADFI of a hairless mouse injected with a fluorescent bone marker revealed vertebral structural and morphometric data that correlated well with data derived from volumetric x-ray computed tomography images. The results suggested that ADFI is a useful technique for submillimeter mapping of the distribution of fluorescent biomarkers in small animals.

  11. Angular Positioning Sensor for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Nicolas; Chapuis, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Angular position sensors are used on various rotating mechanisms such as solar array drive mechanisms, antenna pointing mechanisms, scientific instruments, motors or actuators.Now a days, potentiometers and encoders are mainly used for angular measurement purposes. Both of them have their own pros and cons.As alternative, Ruag Space Switzerland Nyon (RSSN) is developing and qualifying two innovative technologies of angular position sensors which offer easy implementation, medium to very high lifetime and high flexibility with regards to the output signal shape/type.The Brushed angular position sensor uses space qualified processes which are already flying on RSSN's sliprings for many years. A large variety of output signal shape can be implemented to fulfill customer requirements (digital, analog, customized, etc.).The contactless angular position sensor consists in a new radiation hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) based on the Hall effect and providing the angular position without complex processing algorithm.

  12. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  13. Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-16

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS TR-2014-0045 TR-2014-0045 Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum David Voelz Klipsch...Orbital Angular Momentum FA9451-13-1-0261 GR0004113 David Voelz Klipsch School of ECE New Mexico State University MSC 3-O, PO Box 30001 Las Cruces, NM...1026 . Government Purpose Rights. A light beam carry Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) has typical wave front and singularity at the optical axis. The

  14. Chirality and the angular momentum of light.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Robert P; Götte, Jörg B; Barnett, Stephen M; Yao, Alison M

    2017-02-28

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  15. Orbital angular momentum in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L.L.; Klimov, A.B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2011-02-15

    Research Highlights: > We propose a comprehensive Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum. > We present a simple and useful toolkit for the practitioner. > We derive simple evolution equations in terms of a star product in the semiclassical limit. - Abstract: A comprehensive theory of the Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum is presented. Special attention is paid to the problems linked to rotational periodicity and angular-momentum discreteness.

  16. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  17. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  18. Laser-polarization-dependent photoelectron angular distributions from polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Lu, Peixiang; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-11-21

    Photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of oriented polar molecules in response to different polarized lasers are systematically investigated. It is found that the PADs of polar CO molecules show three distinct styles excited by linearly, elliptically and circularly polarized lasers respectively. In the case of elliptical polarization, a deep suppression is observed along the major axis and the distribution concentrates approximately along the minor axis. Additionally, it is also found that the concentrated distributions rotate clockwise as the ellipticity increases. Our investigation presents a method to manipulate the motion and angular distribution of photoelectrons by varying the polarization of the exciting pulses, and also implies the possibility to control the processes in laser-molecule interactions in future work.

  19. Measurement of polarization with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Leitch, E M; Kovac, J M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Dragovan, M; Reddall, B; Sandberg, E S

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can reveal with remarkable precision the conditions of the Universe when it was approximately 400,000 years old. The three most fundamental properties of the CMB are its frequency spectrum (which determines the temperature), and the fluctuations in both the temperature and polarization across a range of angular scales. The frequency spectrum has been well determined, and considerable progress has been made in measuring the power spectrum of the temperature fluctuations. But despite many efforts to measure the polarization, detection of this property of the CMB has hitherto been beyond the reach of even the most sensitive observations. Here we describe the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), an array of radio telescopes, which for the past two years has conducted polarization-sensitive observations of the CMB from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station.

  20. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  1. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C.; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E.

    1998-06-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of their technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. Their method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) the authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing; (2) they also show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  2. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C. |; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E. |

    1997-12-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of the technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. The method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) The authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing. (2) They show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  3. On Stochastic Approximation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Hans

    This paper deals with a stochastic process for the approximation of the root of a regression equation. This process was first suggested by Robbins and Monro. The main result here is a necessary and sufficient condition on the iteration coefficients for convergence of the process (convergence with probability one and convergence in the quadratic…

  4. Approximating Integrals Using Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.; Caudle, Kyle A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a discussion on Monte Carlo methods, which outlines how to use probability expectations to approximate the value of a definite integral. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on this technique and then to show several examples using visual basic as a programming tool. It is an interesting method because it combines two branches of…

  5. Longitudinal Profile Diagnostic Scheme with Subfemtosecond Resolution for High-Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Andonian, G.; Hemsing, E.; Xiang, D.; Musumeci, P.; Murokh, A.; Tochitsky, S.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; /UCLA

    2012-05-03

    High-resolution measurement of the longitudinal profile of a relativistic electron beam is of utmost importance for linac based free-electron lasers and other advanced accelerator facilities that employ ultrashort bunches. In this paper, we investigate a novel scheme to measure ultrashort bunches (subpicosecond) with exceptional temporal resolution (hundreds of attoseconds) and dynamic range. The scheme employs two orthogonally oriented deflecting sections. The first imparts a short-wavelength (fast temporal resolution) horizontal angular modulation on the beam, while the second imparts a long-wavelength (slow) angular kick in the vertical dimension. Both modulations are observable on a standard downstream screen in the form of a streaked sinusoidal beam structure. We demonstrate, using scaled variables in a quasi-1D approximation, an expression for the temporal resolution of the scheme and apply it to a proof-of-concept experiment at the UCLA Neptune high-brightness injector facility. The scheme is also investigated for application at the SLAC NLCTA facility, where we show that the subfemtosecond resolution is sufficient to resolve the temporal structure of the beam used in the echo-enabled free-electron laser. We employ beam simulations to verify the effect for typical Neptune and NLCTA parameter sets and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept.

  6. Optimizing the Zeldovich approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Pellman, Todd F.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1994-01-01

    We have recently learned that the Zeldovich approximation can be successfully used for a far wider range of gravitational instability scenarios than formerly proposed; we study here how to extend this range. In previous work (Coles, Melott and Shandarin 1993, hereafter CMS) we studied the accuracy of several analytic approximations to gravitational clustering in the mildly nonlinear regime. We found that what we called the 'truncated Zeldovich approximation' (TZA) was better than any other (except in one case the ordinary Zeldovich approximation) over a wide range from linear to mildly nonlinear (sigma approximately 3) regimes. TZA was specified by setting Fourier amplitudes equal to zero for all wavenumbers greater than k(sub nl), where k(sub nl) marks the transition to the nonlinear regime. Here, we study the cross correlation of generalized TZA with a group of n-body simulations for three shapes of window function: sharp k-truncation (as in CMS), a tophat in coordinate space, or a Gaussian. We also study the variation in the crosscorrelation as a function of initial truncation scale within each type. We find that k-truncation, which was so much better than other things tried in CMS, is the worst of these three window shapes. We find that a Gaussian window e(exp(-k(exp 2)/2k(exp 2, sub G))) applied to the initial Fourier amplitudes is the best choice. It produces a greatly improved crosscorrelation in those cases which most needed improvement, e.g. those with more small-scale power in the initial conditions. The optimum choice of kG for the Gaussian window is (a somewhat spectrum-dependent) 1 to 1.5 times k(sub nl). Although all three windows produce similar power spectra and density distribution functions after application of the Zeldovich approximation, the agreement of the phases of the Fourier components with the n-body simulation is better for the Gaussian window. We therefore ascribe the success of the best-choice Gaussian window to its superior treatment

  7. Angular Structure of FrII Radio Sources 3C169.1 and 3C263 at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchishin, R. V.; Shepelev, V. A.; Lozinskyy, A. B.; Lytvynenko, O. A.

    The radio galaxy 3C169.1 and the quasar 3C263, located at nearly the same distance with red shift z>0.6, have similar morphological and spectral characteristics. The maps of the sources obtained at decimeter and centimeter wavelengths have shown they are FRII radio sources with steep spectra and approximately equal angular sizes. The very first investigation of the sources structure at decameter wavelengths is presented in the report. Observations were made using a network of the URAN decameter interferometers with baselines 42 to 950 km and with maximum angular resolution of arcsec order of magnitude. The models of the image of these sources based on visibility functions measured have been obtained at frequencies of 20 and 25 MHz. They were composed of elliptical components with Gaussian brightness distribution. To facilitate the comparison of these lowfrequency models with high-frequency radio images, the latter were converted to the similar models by fitting the Gaussian components to lobes and hot spots selected at the maps. Comparison of the models revealed changes in a structure of the sources caused by the frequency decrease.

  8. Applied Routh approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Routh approximation technique for reducing the complexity of system models was applied in the frequency domain to a 16th order, state variable model of the F100 engine and to a 43d order, transfer function model of a launch vehicle boost pump pressure regulator. The results motivate extending the frequency domain formulation of the Routh method to the time domain in order to handle the state variable formulation directly. The time domain formulation was derived and a characterization that specifies all possible Routh similarity transformations was given. The characterization was computed by solving two eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. The application of the time domain Routh technique to the state variable engine model is described, and some results are given. Additional computational problems are discussed, including an optimization procedure that can improve the approximation accuracy by taking advantage of the transformation characterization.

  9. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Allen, L

    2017-02-28

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  10. Stellar angular diameters from occultation observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, B.-C.

    This paper reviews the history of measuring stellar angular diameters from lunar occultation observations and the techniques of data analysis. Several effects which can affect the results of measurement are discussed. The author finds that there may be systematic errors in angular diameters measured by various observatories for Aldebaran.

  11. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  12. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.

    2017-02-01

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  13. Topics in Metric Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeb, William Edward

    This thesis develops effective approximations of certain metrics that occur frequently in pure and applied mathematics. We show that distances that often arise in applications, such as the Earth Mover's Distance between two probability measures, can be approximated by easily computed formulas for a wide variety of ground distances. We develop simple and easily computed characterizations both of norms measuring a function's regularity -- such as the Lipschitz norm -- and of their duals. We are particularly concerned with the tensor product of metric spaces, where the natural notion of regularity is not the Lipschitz condition but the mixed Lipschitz condition. A theme that runs throughout this thesis is that snowflake metrics (metrics raised to a power less than 1) are often better-behaved than ordinary metrics. For example, we show that snowflake metrics on finite spaces can be approximated by the average of tree metrics with a distortion bounded by intrinsic geometric characteristics of the space and not the number of points. Many of the metrics for which we characterize the Lipschitz space and its dual are snowflake metrics. We also present applications of the characterization of certain regularity norms to the problem of recovering a matrix that has been corrupted by noise. We are able to achieve an optimal rate of recovery for certain families of matrices by exploiting the relationship between mixed-variable regularity conditions and the decay of a function's coefficients in a certain orthonormal basis.

  14. Angular structure of extragalactic radio sources at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Koshovy, V. V.; Lozynsky, A. R.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovsky, S. L.; Shepelev, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    The low frequency VLBI of URAN network operated in the decameter range has been designed in Ukraine to study cosmic radio sources. The network consists of five radio telescopes making up of four interferometers with baselines range from 42 to 913 km with UTR-2 radio telescope operated as the main antenna of the interferometers. The angular resolution of the network amount to 1 arcsec at the highest frequency of the range, and its sensitivity is about 20 Jy. Regular observations of galactic and extragalactic radio sources are performed with the network. Some results of studies are presented here.

  15. Angular Momentum of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kirsty M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Oh, Se-Heon

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of baryonic mass {M}{{b}} and specific angular momentum (sAM) {j}{{b}} in 14 rotating dwarf Irregular (dIrr) galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS sample. These measurements, based on 21 cm kinematic data from the Very Large Array and stellar mass maps from the Spitzer Space Telescope, extend previous AM measurements by more than two orders of magnitude in {M}{{b}}. The dwarf galaxies show systematically higher {j}{{b}} values than expected from the {j}{{b}}\\propto {M}{{b}}2/3 scaling of spiral galaxies, representative of a scale-free galaxy formation scenario. This offset can be explained by decreasing baryon mass fractions {f}{{M}}={M}{{b}}/{M}{dyn} (where {M}{dyn} is the dynamical mass) with decreasing {M}{{b}} (for {M}{{b}}< {10}11 {M}ȯ ). We find that the sAM of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) alone is about 2.5 times higher than that of the stars. The M–j relation of H i is significantly steeper than that of the stars, as a direct consequence of the systematic variation of the H i fraction with {M}{{b}}.

  16. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  17. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  18. Angularly Adaptive P1 - Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2006-08-08

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  19. Angularly Adaptive P1-Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2005-12-13

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  20. Asymptotic Diffusion-Limit Accuracy of Sn Angular Differencing Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Morel, J E; Chang, J H

    2009-11-05

    In a previous paper, Morel and Montry used a Galerkin-based diffusion analysis to define a particular weighted diamond angular discretization for S{sub n}n calculations in curvilinear geometries. The weighting factors were chosen to ensure that the Galerkin diffusion approximation was preserved, which eliminated the discrete-ordinates flux dip. It was also shown that the step and diamond angular differencing schemes, which both suffer from the flux dip, do not preserve the diffusion approximation in the Galerkin sense. In this paper we re-derive the Morel and Montry weighted diamond scheme using a formal asymptotic diffusion-limit analysis. The asymptotic analysis yields more information than the Galerkin analysis and demonstrates that the step and diamond schemes do in fact formally preserve the diffusion limit to leading order, while the Morel and Montry weighted diamond scheme preserves it to first order, which is required for full consistency in this limit. Nonetheless, the fact that the step and diamond differencing schemes preserve the diffusion limit to leading order suggests that the flux dip should disappear as the diffusion limit is approached for these schemes. Computational results are presented that confirm this conjecture. We further conjecture that preserving the Galerkin diffusion approximation is equivalent to preserving the asymptotic diffusion limit to first order.

  1. Modeling the Anisotropic Resolution and Noise Properties of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Image Reconstructions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    space should be sampled only within double-napped cones ( DNCs ) whose opening angle matches the angular range of the DBT scan. The analytical modeling...illustrates that super-resolution is possible well outside the DNCs whose opening angle spans -7.5° to +7.5° for the Selenia Dimensions system... DNCs in frequency space have an opening angle spanning approximately -7.5° to +7.5° for measurements made near the midpoint of the chest wall. At

  2. A Novel Single-Excitation Capacitive Angular Position Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Bo; Zhou, Bin; Song, Mingliang; Lin, Zhihui; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a high-precision capacitive angular position sensor (CAPS). The CAPS is designed to be excited by a single voltage to eliminate the matching errors of multi-excitations, and it is mainly composed of excitation electrodes, coupling electrodes, petal-form sensitive electrodes and a set of collection electrodes. A sinusoidal voltage is applied on the excitation electrodes, then the voltage couples to the coupling electrodes and sensitive electrodes without contact. The sensitive electrodes together with the set of collection electrodes encode the angular position to amplitude-modulated signals, and in order to increase the scale factor, the sensitive electrodes are patterned in the shape of petal-form sinusoidal circles. By utilizing a resolver demodulation method, the amplitude-modulated signals are digitally decoded to get the angular position. A prototype of the CAPS is fabricated and tested. The measurement results show that the accuracy of the sensor is 0.0036°, the resolution is 0.0009° and the nonlinearity over the full range is 0.008° (after compensation), indicating that the CAPS has great potential to be applied in high-precision applications with a low cost. PMID:27483278

  3. Generation and detection of neutron beams with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry A.; Barankov, Roman A.; Clark, Charles W.; Huber, Michael G.; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G.

    2015-05-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, in which photons carry lℏ units of angular momentum along their direction of propagation, are of interest in a variety of applications. The Schrödinger equation for massive particles also supports OAM solutions, and OAM states have been demonstrated with ultracold atoms and electrons. Here we report the first generation and detection of OAM states of neutrons, with l up to 7. These are made using spiral phase plates (SPP), milled out of 6061 aluminum alloy dowels with a high-resolution computer-controlled milling machine. When a SPP is placed in one arm of a Mach-Zehnder neutron interferometer, the interferogram reveals the characteristic patterns of OAM states. Addition of angular momenta is effected by concatenation of SPPs with different values of l; we have found the experimental result 1 + 2 = 3 , in reasonable agreement with theory. The advent of OAM provides an additional, quantized, degree of freedom to neutron interferometry, enlarging the qubit structure available for tests of quantum information processing and foundations of quantum physics.

  4. Extreme Ultraviolet Fractional Orbital Angular Momentum Beams from High Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Alex; Rego, Laura; Picón, Antonio; San Román, Julio; Hernández-García, Carlos

    2017-03-10

    We investigate theoretically the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) beams carrying fractional orbital angular momentum. To this end, we drive high-order harmonic generation with infrared conical refraction (CR) beams. We show that the high-order harmonic beams emitted in the EUV/soft x-ray regime preserve the characteristic signatures of the driving beam, namely ringlike transverse intensity profile and CR-like polarization distribution. As a result, through orbital and spin angular momentum conservation, harmonic beams are emitted with fractional orbital angular momentum, and they can be synthesized into structured attosecond helical beams -or "structured attosecond light springs"- with rotating linear polarization along the azimuth. Our proposal overcomes the state of the art limitations for the generation of light beams far from the visible domain carrying non-integer orbital angular momentum and could be applied in fields such as diffraction imaging, EUV lithography, particle trapping, and super-resolution imaging.

  5. A demonstration of the conservation of the orbital angular momentum of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizza, Leonardo J.; Mayochi, Mariano G.; Ciocci Brazzano, Ligia; Pedrosa, Susana E.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a simple but quantitative experiment to demonstrate the conservation of angular momentum. We measure the correlation of the apparent radius and angular velocity of the Sun with respect to the stars, due to the conservation of the angular momentum of Earth in its orbit. We also determine the direction of Earth's angular momentum vector and show that it is conserved. The experiment can be performed using a small telescope and a digital camera. It is conceptually simple, allowing students to get direct physical insight from the data. The observations are performed near the resolution limit imposed by the atmosphere, and in the presence of strong competing effects. These effects necessitate a careful experimental setup and allow students to improve their skills in experimentation.

  6. Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation on Large and Medium Angular Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, Anthony; Timbie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This grant has supported work at Brown University on measurements of the 2.7 K Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB). The goal has been to characterize the spatial variations in the temperature of the CMB in order to understand the formation of large-scale structure in the universe. We have concurrently pursued two measurements using millimeter-wave telescopes carried aloft by scientific balloons. Both systems operate over a range of wavelengths, chosen to allow spectral removal of foreground sources such as the atmosphere, Galaxy, etc. The angular resolution of approx. 25 arcminutes is near the angular scale at which the most structure is predicted by current models to be visible in the CMB angular power spectrum. The main goal is to determine the angular scale of this structure; in turn we can infer the density parameter, Omega, for the universe as well as other cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant.

  7. Extreme Ultraviolet Fractional Orbital Angular Momentum Beams from High Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, Alex; Rego, Laura; Picón, Antonio; San Román, Julio; Hernández-García, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) beams carrying fractional orbital angular momentum. To this end, we drive high-order harmonic generation with infrared conical refraction (CR) beams. We show that the high-order harmonic beams emitted in the EUV/soft x-ray regime preserve the characteristic signatures of the driving beam, namely ringlike transverse intensity profile and CR-like polarization distribution. As a result, through orbital and spin angular momentum conservation, harmonic beams are emitted with fractional orbital angular momentum, and they can be synthesized into structured attosecond helical beams –or “structured attosecond light springs”– with rotating linear polarization along the azimuth. Our proposal overcomes the state of the art limitations for the generation of light beams far from the visible domain carrying non-integer orbital angular momentum and could be applied in fields such as diffraction imaging, EUV lithography, particle trapping, and super-resolution imaging.

  8. Approximate option pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Chalasani, P.; Saias, I.; Jha, S.

    1996-04-08

    As increasingly large volumes of sophisticated options (called derivative securities) are traded in world financial markets, determining a fair price for these options has become an important and difficult computational problem. Many valuation codes use the binomial pricing model, in which the stock price is driven by a random walk. In this model, the value of an n-period option on a stock is the expected time-discounted value of the future cash flow on an n-period stock price path. Path-dependent options are particularly difficult to value since the future cash flow depends on the entire stock price path rather than on just the final stock price. Currently such options are approximately priced by Monte carlo methods with error bounds that hold only with high probability and which are reduced by increasing the number of simulation runs. In this paper the authors show that pricing an arbitrary path-dependent option is {number_sign}-P hard. They show that certain types f path-dependent options can be valued exactly in polynomial time. Asian options are path-dependent options that are particularly hard to price, and for these they design deterministic polynomial-time approximate algorithms. They show that the value of a perpetual American put option (which can be computed in constant time) is in many cases a good approximation to the value of an otherwise identical n-period American put option. In contrast to Monte Carlo methods, the algorithms have guaranteed error bounds that are polynormally small (and in some cases exponentially small) in the maturity n. For the error analysis they derive large-deviation results for random walks that may be of independent interest.

  9. Approximate Qualitative Temporal Reasoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    i.e., their boundaries can be placed in such a way that they coincide with the cell boundaries of the appropriate partition of the time-line. (Think of...respect to some appropriate partition of the time-line. For example, I felt well on Saturday. When I measured my temperature I had a fever on Monday and on...Bittner / Approximate Qualitative Temporal Reasoning 49 [27] I. A. Goralwalla, Y. Leontiev , M. T. Özsu, D. Szafron, and C. Combi. Temporal granularity for

  10. Where angular momentum goes in a precessing black-hole binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    We evolve a set of 32 equal-mass black-hole binaries with collinear spins (with intrinsic spin magnitudes |S⃗1,2/m1,22|=0.8) to study the effects of precession in the highly nonlinear plunge and merger regimes. We compare the direction of the instantaneous radiated angular momentum, δJ^rad(t), to the directions of the total angular momentum, J^(t), and the orbital angular momentum, L^(t). We find that δJ^rad(t) approximately follows L^ throughout the evolution. During the orbital evolution and merger, we observe that the angle between L⃗ and total spin S⃗ is approximately conserved to within 1°, which allows us to propose and test models for the merger remnant's mass and spin. For instance, we verify that the hang-up effect is the dominant effect and largely explains the observed total energy and angular momentum radiated by these precessing systems. We also verify that the total angular momentum, which significantly decreases in magnitude during the inspiral, varies in direction by less than ˜5°. The maximum variation in the direction of J⃗ occurs when the spins are nearly antialigned with the orbital angular momentum. Based on our results, we conjecture that transitional precession, which would lead to large variations in the direction of J⃗, is not possible for similar-mass binaries and would require a mass ratio m1/m2≲1/4.

  11. Angular Momentum Distribution of Hot Gas and Implications for Disk Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. N.; Jing, Y. P.; Yoshikaw, Kohji

    2003-11-01

    We study the angular momentum profiles both for dark matter and for gas within virialized halos using a statistical sample of halos drawn from cosmological hydrodynamics simulations. Three simulations have been analyzed: one is the nonradiative simulation and the other two have radiative cooling. We find that the gas component, on average, has a larger spin and contains a smaller fraction of mass with negative angular momentum than its dark matter counterpart in the nonradiative model. As to the cooling models, the gas component shares approximately the same spin parameter as its dark matter counterpart, but the hot gas has a higher spin and is more aligned in angular momentum than dark matter, while the opposite holds for the cold gas. After the mass of negative angular momentum is excluded, the angular momentum profile of the hot gas component approximately follows the universal function originally proposed by Bullock et al. for dark matter, though the shape parameter μ is much larger for hot gas and is comfortably in the range required by observations of disk galaxies. Since disk formation is related to the distribution of hot gas that will cool, our study may explain the fact that the disk component of observed galaxies contains a smaller fraction of low angular momentum material than dark matter in halos.

  12. Angular momentum transport in thin accretion disks and intermittent accretion.

    PubMed

    Coppi, B; Coppi, P S

    2001-07-30

    The plasma modes, transporting angular momentum in accretion disks, under minimally restrictive conditions when the magnetic energy density is significant relative to the thermal energy density, are shown to be singular if the ideal MHD approximation is adopted. A similarity with the modes producing magnetic reconnection in current carrying plasmas is established. The combined effects of finite plasma temperature, of plasma compressibility, of the gradient of the rotation frequency, and of appropriate transport processes (outside ideal MHD) are involved in the onset of these nonaxisymmetric and locally corotating modes.

  13. Angular Dynamics of a Small Particle in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Candelier, F; Einarsson, J; Mehlig, B

    2016-11-11

    We compute the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant nearly spherical particle immersed in an unsteady fluid. We assume that the particle is small, that its translational slip velocity is negligible, and that unsteady and convective inertia are small perturbations. We derive an approximation for the torque on the particle that determines the first inertial corrections to Jeffery's equation. These corrections arise as a consequence of local vortex stretching and can be substantial in turbulence, where local vortex stretching is strong and closely linked to the irreversibility of turbulence.

  14. Fabricating High Resolution Mirrors for Hand X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speegle, Chet O.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Engelhaupt, Darell; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the fabrication process for producing high-resolution conical mirrors for hard x-ray astronomy. When flown aboard stratospheric balloons, these high-resolution reflective mirrors focus hard x-rays (10-70 keV) emitted from cosmic sources such as supernovae, neutron stars, and quasars onto imaging focal plane detectors. Focused hard x-ray images allow scientists to determine the elemental compositions, temperatures, magnetic fields, velocities, and gravitational fields of these celestial bodies. The fabrication process involves generating super-polished mandrels, mandrel metrology, mirror shell nickel electroforming, and mirror testing. Each mandrel is a cylinder consisting of two conical segments; each segment is approximately 305-mm long. Through precision grinding these mandrels before super polishing, we have achieved 30 arc seconds, half power diameter replicated mirrors. During a May 2001 high atmosphere balloon flight, these mirrors focused high energy x-rays from three different celestial sources. However, we seek to improve the angular resolutions of future mirror shells by a factor of two. To achieve this goal, we have begun single point diamond turning the mandrels before super polishing. This has allowed greater precision tolerances on mandrel surface roughness and axial figure errors before super polishing. Surface roughnesses before polishing have been reduced from approximately 60 nm to approximately 15 nm. The peak to valley axial figure profile errors have been reduced from approximately 1.0 micrometers to approximately 0.4 micrometers. We are currently in Phase 2 of the HERO (high energy replicated optics) program which entails the production of sixteen 6-m-focal-length mirror modules, each containing a nested array of 15 mirror shells of diameters ranging from 50-mm to 94-mm. This flight is slated for the fall of 2003.

  15. Optimal simulations of ultrasonic fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays using the angular spectrum approach.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; McGough, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The angular spectrum approach is evaluated for the simulation of focused ultrasound fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays. For an input pressure or normal particle velocity distribution in a plane, the angular spectrum approach rapidly computes the output pressure field in a three dimensional volume. To determine the optimal combination of simulation parameters for angular spectrum calculations, the effect of the size, location, and the numerical accuracy of the input plane on the computed output pressure is evaluated. Simulation results demonstrate that angular spectrum calculations performed with an input pressure plane are more accurate than calculations with an input velocity plane. Results also indicate that when the input pressure plane is slightly larger than the array aperture and is located approximately one wavelength from the array, angular spectrum simulations have very small numerical errors for two dimensional planar arrays. Furthermore, the root mean squared error from angular spectrum simulations asymptotically approaches a nonzero lower limit as the error in the input plane decreases. Overall, the angular spectrum approach is an accurate and robust method for thermal therapy simulations of large ultrasound phased arrays when the input pressure plane is computed with the fast nearfield method and an optimal combination of input parameters.

  16. Approximation for the Rayleigh Resolution of a Circular Aperture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    are barely resolved by an optical instrument when the central maximum of the diffraction pattern due to one source coincides with the first minimum... Fraunhofer diffrac- tion pattern having a central maximum of horizontal half-width q = l/a. That pattern is superposed with those of all the other strips... diffraction in the horizontal direction, strips of narrow vertical height would greatly exaggerate the diffraction in the vertical direction. To treat the

  17. Approximation for the Rayleigh Resolution of a Circular Aperture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2009-01-01

    Rayleigh's criterion states that a pair of point sources are barely resolved by an optical instrument when the central maximum of the diffraction pattern due to one source coincides with the first minimum of the pattern of the other source. As derived in standard introductory physics textbooks, the first minimum for a rectangular slit of width "a"…

  18. Angular momentum projection with quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ching-Yun; Banerjee, M. K.

    1991-04-01

    We have improved a simple and rapid method of calculating expectation values of operators in states of good angular momentum projected from a hedgehog baryon state introduced by Birse et al. We have included the contributions of quantum mesons, while in the original method only classical meson fields were included. The method has been applied to models where the mean-field approximation does not include loop terms. Hence, for reasons of consistency, contributions of quantum loops to the matrix elements have been dropped. The symmetry of the hedgehog state under grand reversal (the combined operation of time reversal and eiπI^2, where I^ is the isospin operator) introduces remarkable simplification in the calculation of matrix elements of operators which do not contain time derivatives of meson fields. The quantum meson contributions turn out to be 3/2/ times the classical meson-field contributions, with ||B> being the hedgehog state. Such operators are encountered in the calculation of nucleon magnetic moments, gA(0) and gπNN(0)/2M. Calculation of charge radii involves operators containing time derivatives of meson fields and requires the knowledge of wave functions of quantum mesons. Proper nonperturbative treatment, even though at the tree level, requires that these wave functions describe the motion of the mesons in the potential generated by the baryon. Fortunately, because of the neglect of the loop terms, one needs only the even-parity, grand-spin-1 states which are purely pionic. The Goldberger-Treiman relations, an exact result for the model, serves as a partial test of the method of calculation discussed here. This has been used to demonstrate the remarkable improvement in the results produced by the inclusion of quantum effects of the mesons.

  19. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    PubMed Central

    Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light–matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069764

  20. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  1. Hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brandon M.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a powerful technique for estimating the posterior distribution of a model’s parameters. It is especially important when the model to be fit has no explicit likelihood function, which happens for computational (or simulation-based) models such as those that are popular in cognitive neuroscience and other areas in psychology. However, ABC is usually applied only to models with few parameters. Extending ABC to hierarchical models has been difficult because high-dimensional hierarchical models add computational complexity that conventional ABC cannot accommodate. In this paper we summarize some current approaches for performing hierarchical ABC and introduce a new algorithm called Gibbs ABC. This new algorithm incorporates well-known Bayesian techniques to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the ABC approach for estimation of hierarchical models. We then use the Gibbs ABC algorithm to estimate the parameters of two models of signal detection, one with and one without a tractable likelihood function. PMID:24297436

  2. The angular momentum content of dwarf galaxies: new challenges for the theory of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Burkert, Andreas; Swaters, Rob A.

    2001-09-01

    We compute the specific angular momentum distributions for a sample of low-mass disc galaxies observed by Swaters. We compare these distributions to those of dark matter haloes obtained by Bullock et al. from high-resolution N-body simulations of structure formation in a ΛCDM universe. We find that although the disc mass fractions are significantly smaller than the universal baryon fraction, the total specific angular momenta of the discs are in good agreement with those of dark matter haloes. This suggests that discs form out of only a small fraction of the available baryons, but yet manage to draw most of the available angular momentum. In addition we find that the angular momentum distributions of discs are clearly distinct from those of the dark matter; discs lack predominantly both low and high specific angular momenta. Understanding these findings in terms of a coherent picture for disc formation is challenging. Cooling, feedback and stripping, which are the main mechanisms to explain the small disc mass fractions found, seem unable to simultaneously explain the angular momentum distributions of the discs. In fact, it seems that the baryons that make up the discs must have been born out of angular momentum distributions that are clearly distinct from those of ΛCDM haloes. However, the dark and baryonic mass components experience the same tidal forces, and it is therefore expected that they should have similar angular momentum distributions. Therefore, understanding the angular momentum content of disc galaxies remains an important challenge for our picture of galaxy formation.

  3. Monitoring Location and Angular Orientation of a Pill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schipper, John F.

    2012-01-01

    A mobile pill transmitter system moves through, or adjacent to, one or more organs in an animal or human body, while transmitting signals from its present location and/or present angular orientation. The system also provides signals from which the present roll angle of the pill, about a selected axis, can be determined. When the location coordinates angular orientation and the roll angle of the pill are within selected ranges, an aperture on the pill container releases a selected chemical into, or onto, the body. Optionally, the pill, as it moves, provides a sequence of visually perceptible images. The times for image formation may correspond to times at which the pill transmitter system location or image satisfies one of at least four criteria. This invention provides and supplies an algorithm for exact determination of location coordinates and angular orientation coordinates for a mobile pill transmitter (PT), or other similar device that is introduced into, and moves within, a GI tract of a human or animal body. A set of as many as eight nonlinear equations has been developed and applied, relating propagation of a wireless signal between either two, three, or more transmitting antennas located on the PT, to four or more non-coplanar receiving antennas located on a signal receiver appliance worn by the user. The equations are solved exactly, without approximations or iterations, and are applied in several environments: (1) association of a visual image, transmitted by the PT at each of a second sequence of times, with a PT location and PT angular orientation at that time; (2) determination of a position within the body at which a drug or chemical substance or other treatment is to be delivered to a selected portion of the body; (3) monitoring, after delivery, of the effect(s) of administration of the treatment; and (4) determination of one or more positions within the body where provision and examination of a finer-scale image is warranted.

  4. Electrowetting-on-dielectric actuation of a vertical translation and angular manipulation stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Anders, Ariel; Barabadi, Banafsheh; Tio, Evelyn; Zhu, Yangying; Dai, DingRan Annie; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-12-01

    Adhesion and friction during physical contact of solid components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) often lead to device failure. Translational stages that are fabricated with traditional silicon MEMS typically face these tribological concerns. This work addresses these concerns by developing a MEMS vertical translation, or focusing, stage that uses electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) as the actuating mechanism. EWOD has the potential to eliminate solid-solid contact by actuating through deformation of liquid droplets placed between the stage and base to achieve stage displacement. Our EWOD stage is capable of linear spatial manipulation with resolution of 10 μm over a maximum range of 130 μm and angular deflection of approximately ±1°, comparable to piezoelectric actuators. We also developed a model that suggests a higher intrinsic contact angle on the EWOD surface can further improve the translational range, which was validated experimentally by comparing different surface coatings. The capability to operate the stage without solid-solid contact offers potential improvements for applications in micro-optics, actuators, and other MEMS devices.

  5. Radially dependent angular acceleration of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jason; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-02-15

    While photons travel in a straight line at constant velocity in free space, the intensity profile of structured light may be tailored for acceleration in any degree of freedom. Here we propose a simple approach to control the angular acceleration of light. Using Laguerre-Gaussian modes as our twisted beams carrying orbital angular momentum, we show that superpositions of opposite handedness result in a radially dependent angular acceleration as they pass through a focus (waist plane). Due to conservation of orbital angular momentum, we find that propagation dynamics are complex despite the free-space medium: the outer part of the beam (rings) rotates in an opposite direction to the inner part (petals), and while the outer part accelerates, the inner part decelerates. We outline the concepts theoretically and confirm them experimentally. Such exotic structured light beams are topical due to their many applications, for instance in optical trapping and tweezing, metrology, and fundamental studies in optics.

  6. Countably QC-Approximating Posets

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuxin; Xu, Luoshan

    2014-01-01

    As a generalization of countably C-approximating posets, the concept of countably QC-approximating posets is introduced. With the countably QC-approximating property, some characterizations of generalized completely distributive lattices and generalized countably approximating posets are given. The main results are as follows: (1) a complete lattice is generalized completely distributive if and only if it is countably QC-approximating and weakly generalized countably approximating; (2) a poset L having countably directed joins is generalized countably approximating if and only if the lattice σc(L)op of all σ-Scott-closed subsets of L is weakly generalized countably approximating. PMID:25165730

  7. Angular performance measure for tighter uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Hradil, Z.; Rehacek, J.; Klimov, A. B.; Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.

    2010-01-15

    The uncertainty principle places a fundamental limit on the accuracy with which we can measure conjugate quantities. However, the fluctuations of these variables can be assessed in terms of different estimators. We propose an angular performance that allows for tighter uncertainty relations for angle and angular momentum. The differences with previous bounds can be significant for particular states and indeed may be amenable to experimental measurement with the present technology.

  8. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-01

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  9. Electron angular distributions above the dayside auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    An electrostatic analyzer was employed on the Ariel 4 satellite to determine pitch angle distributions of electron intensities over the dayside auroral oval. Two major precipitation zones were encountered: an equatorward zone of broad spectra with intensities of approximately 1000 electrons/(sq cm-sec-sr-eV) and a poleward zone, the polar cusp, with intensities typical of those of the magnetosheath. Angular distributions within the equatorward zone are generally isotropic outside of the atmospheric backscatter cone. The precipitation mechanism appears to be pitch angle scattering near the distant magnetic equator. In contrast, pitch angle distributions within the polar cusp are often found to be strongly field aligned with intensities within the atmospheric loss cone greater by factors of approximately 10 than the mirroring intensities. These distributions are qualititatively similar to those for the inverted V precipitation events at later local times, and probably share a common acceleration mechanism with the inverted V phenomenon.

  10. Trunk rotation monitor using angular velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, A; Uda, S

    1997-04-01

    To monitor the low back risk imposed by asymmetric postures at workplaces, a method using angular velocity sensors was studied. According to a simple model analysis, trunk rotation could be calculated from the angular velocities measured at both the waist and shoulder and from the inclination of each angular velocity sensor. We thus developed a new detector consisting of an angular velocity sensor (ENC-05D, Murata, Japan) for detecting angular velocity and an acceleration sensor (ADXL05, Analog Devices, USA) for measuring inclination. The precision of the angular velocity sensor was high as the correlation coefficient between the output of the sensor and the true value was 0.9996. When the detectors were affixed to a subject and compared with data measured by a Vicon System 370 (Oxford Metrics, UK), the correlation coefficients between the two methods were 0.949 and 0.815 during model tasks of box transfer and box lifting, respectively. In a model of lifting boxes at different rates, the mean and standard deviation increased according to the task speed. This method was shown to be of practical use for monitoring trunk rotation.

  11. Femtolensing: Beyond the semiclassical approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Andrew; Goodman, Jeremy

    1995-01-01

    Femtolensoing is a gravitational lensing effect in which the magnification is a function not only of the position and sizes of the source and lens, but also of the wavelength of light. Femtolensing is the only known effect of 10(exp -13) - 10(exp -16) solar mass) dark-matter objects and may possibly be detectable in cosmological gamma-ray burst spectra. We present a new and efficient algorithm for femtolensing calculation in general potentials. The physical optics results presented here differ at low frequencies from the semiclassical approximation, in which the flux is attributed to a finite number of mutually coherent images. At higher frequencies, our results agree well with the semicalssical predictions. Applying our method to a point-mass lens with external shear, we find complex events that have structure at both large and small spectral resolution. In this way, we show that femtolensing may be observable for lenses up to 10(exp -11) solar mass, much larger than previously believed. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of a search femtolensing of white dwarfs in the Large Magellanic Cloud at optical wavelengths.

  12. Measures and models for angular correlation and angular-linear correlation. [correlation of random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Wehrly, T.

    1976-01-01

    Population models for dependence between two angular measurements and for dependence between an angular and a linear observation are proposed. The method of canonical correlations first leads to new population and sample measures of dependence in this latter situation. An example relating wind direction to the level of a pollutant is given. Next, applied to pairs of angular measurements, the method yields previously proposed sample measures in some special cases and a new sample measure in general.

  13. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  14. Coded multi-angular illumination for Fourier ptychography based on Hadamard codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Yuzhen; Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jialin

    2015-07-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a newly developed super-resolution technique, which employs angularly varying illumination and a phase retrieval algorithm to surpass the diffraction limit of the objective lens. Specifically, FP captures a set of low-resolution (LR) images, under angularly varying illuminations, and stitches them together in the Fourier domain. However, because the requisite large number of incident illumination angles, the long capturing process becomes an obvious limiting factor. Furthermore, in order to acquire high-dynamic range images, the time can be increased several times over. In this work, utilizing the Hadamard code principle, we propose a highly efficient method, which applies coded multi-angular illumination for FPM, to shorten the exposure time of each raw image. High acquisition efficiency is achieved by employing an optimal multi-angular illumination scheme by using two set of Hadamard coded multiplexing patterns. Both simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed multi-angular illumination process could shorten the acquisition time of conventional FPM.

  15. Extension of the angular spectrum method to calculate pressure from a spherically curved acoustic source.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Urvi; Christensen, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    The angular spectrum method is an accurate and computationally efficient method for modeling acoustic wave propagation. The use of the typical 2D fast Fourier transform algorithm makes this a fast technique but it requires that the source pressure (or velocity) be specified on a plane. Here the angular spectrum method is extended to calculate pressure from a spherical transducer-as used extensively in applications such as magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery-to a plane. The approach, called the Ring-Bessel technique, decomposes the curved source into circular rings of increasing radii, each ring a different distance from the intermediate plane, and calculates the angular spectrum of each ring using a Fourier series. Each angular spectrum is then propagated to the intermediate plane where all the propagated angular spectra are summed to obtain the pressure on the plane; subsequent plane-to-plane propagation can be achieved using the traditional angular spectrum method. Since the Ring-Bessel calculations are carried out in the frequency domain, it reduces calculation times by a factor of approximately 24 compared to the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld method and about 82 compared to the Field II technique, while maintaining accuracies of better than 96% as judged by those methods for cases of both solid and phased-array transducers.

  16. Laplace equation, magnetic recording and the Karlqvist approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic recording head theory is based on the Karlqvist approximation to solve the Laplace equation over a polygonal domain that originates from a magnetostatic approach to describe the magnetic field produced by the read/write head in the recording medium. The approximation is reviewed and compared to various approaches dealing with solving the Laplace equation using different boundary conditions. The solution is obtained by the Green function, Fourier transform, Fourier series and finally by conformal mapping methods that allow us, on one hand, to comply with the Sommerfeld edge condition required at angular points and on the other, to obtain exact results.

  17. An ellipsoidal mirror display analyzer system for electron energy and angular measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, D. E.; Donelon, J. J.; Hien, N. C.; Himpsel, F. J.

    1980-05-01

    A new electron imaging analyzer is described which consists of a retarding field ellipsoidal mirror low pass energy filter, a retarding field spherical grid high pass filter, and an area detector which consists of a CEMA multiplier, phosphor screen, and data acquisition system. This analyzer system energy analyzes and directly displays and measures all angular (momentum) directions within a ˜85° cone (˜1.8 sr). Angular resolutions of δθ ⋍ 2° and energy resolutions ΔE ⪅ 100 meV are obtained for angle-resolved photoemission measurements using synchrotron radiation. It has a very high throughput when used as an angle-integrated analyzer, with a resolution ΔE ⪅ 0.2 eV which can be achieved for a wide range of energies through the use of a spherical pre-retard lens. Descriptions are given of the ellipsoidal mirror design, system design, and system performance.

  18. Nodal collocation approximation for the multidimensional PL equations applied to transport source problems

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu, G.; Capilla, M.; Talavera, C. F.; Ginestar, D.

    2012-07-01

    PL equations are classical high order approximations to the transport equations which are based on the expansion of the angular dependence of the angular neutron flux and the nuclear cross sections in terms of spherical harmonics. A nodal collocation method is used to discretize the PL equations associated with a neutron source transport problem. The performance of the method is tested solving two 1D problems with analytical solution for the transport equation and a classical 2D problem. (authors)

  19. Molecular collisions. 11: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    In a paper of this series a distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed which is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  20. Equipment for Static Characterization of Angular Transmission and Misalignments of CPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, R.; Askins, S.; Domínguez, C.; Antón, I.; Sala, G.

    2011-12-01

    An equipment aims to perform a static angular transmission measurement based on the electroluminescence inverse method is presented. With this machine it is possible to fully characterize the two-dimensional angular transmittance of a concentration photovoltaic (CPV) module at high resolution, without the need for mechanical module rotation or flashes. Also the misalignment angles between the individual optical units in a CPV module are obtained, a useful metric for manufacturers in improving their assembly processes. A first prototype based on liquid crystal (LC) shutters has been designed to be used in parallel with the Helios 3198 CPV solar simulator.

  1. Ultrafast angular momentum transfer in multisublattice ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; López-Flores, V; Halté, V; Hehn, M; Stamm, C; Pontius, N; Beaurepaire, E; Boeglin, C

    2014-03-11

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to induce ultrafast changes of the magnetization in magnetic materials. However, one of the unsolved questions is that of conservation of the total angular momentum during the ultrafast demagnetization. Here we report the ultrafast transfer of angular momentum during the first hundred femtoseconds in ferrimagnetic Co0.8Gd0.2 and Co0.74Tb0.26 films. Using time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism allowed for time-resolved determination of spin and orbital momenta for each element. We report an ultrafast quenching of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and show that at early times the demagnetization in ferrimagnetic alloys is driven by the local transfer of angular momenta between the two exchange-coupled sublattices while the total angular momentum stays constant. In Co0.74Tb0.26 we have observed a transfer of the total angular momentum to an external bath, which is delayed by ~150 fs.

  2. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  3. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  4. Angular scattering of sound from solid particles in turbulent suspension.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephanie A; Hay, Alex E

    2009-09-01

    Sound scattering by solid particles suspended in a turbulent jet is investigated. Measurements of the scattered amplitude were made in a bistatic geometry at frequencies between 1.5 and 4.0 MHz, and at scattering angles from 95 degrees to 165 degrees relative to the forward direction. Two types of particle were used: nearly spherical lead-glass beads and aspherical natural sand grains. For each particle type, experiments were carried out using approximately 200 and approximately 500 microm median diameter grain sizes, corresponding to 0.7 < or approximately ka < or approximately 4. The sphericity of the sand grains, defined as the ratio of projected perimeter size to projected area size, was 1.08. The lead-glass bead results are consistent with an elastic sphere model. A rigid movable sphere model provides the best fit to the sand data, and the best-fit diameter is within 4% of the equivalent volume size. However, the scattering pattern for sand is systematically smoother than predicted: that is, the undulations in the angular scattering pattern predicted by spherical scatterer theory are present, but muted. This observed departure from spherical scatterer theory is attributed to disruption of the interference among creeping waves by the irregular surfaces of natural sand grains.

  5. Angular domain optical projection tomography in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Jordan, Kevin; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2009-02-01

    Most high-resolution optical tomography techniques employ coherence domain or time domain methodologies to capture non-scattered photons in turbid media. Angular Domain Optical Projection Tomography (ADOPT) uses an angular filter array (AFA) to observe photons that propagate through a specimen with small angular deviation. We constructed an ADOPT system consisting of an AFA micro-machined silicon micro-tunnel array with each micro-tunnel 60 μm wide, 60 μm high, 10 mm long, and separated by 5 μm thick walls. The range of acceptance angles was 0° to 0.5°. The system also included an 808 nm CW diode laser, beam shaping optics, a sample cuvette, a Keplerian lens system, and a CMOS camera. Testing was performed with a target consisting of two graphite rods (0.9 mm diameter) suspended in the cuvette by a rotation stage. The target was placed in a manner that the line of laser light was perpendicular to the long axis of the rods. A multitude of projections were collected at increments of 1.8° and compiled into a sinogram. A transverse image was reconstructed from the sinogram using filtered backprojection. The submillimeter targets embedded in the 2 cm thick scattering medium (reduced scattering coefficient <= 2.4 cm-1) were discernable in both the sinograms and the reconstructed images. The results suggest that ADOPT may be a useful technique for tomographic imaging of thick biological specimens (i.e. up to 8 mm across).

  6. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETING GAS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM ONTO CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate gas accretion flow onto a circumplanetary disk from a protoplanetary disk in detail by using high-resolution three-dimensional nested-grid hydrodynamic simulations, in order to provide a basis of formation processes of satellites around giant planets. Based on detailed analyses of gas accretion flow, we find that most of gas accretion onto circumplanetary disks occurs nearly vertically toward the disk surface from high altitude, which generates a shock surface at several scale heights of the circumplanetary disk. The gas that has passed through the shock surface moves inward because its specific angular momentum is smaller than that of the local Keplerian rotation, while gas near the midplane in the protoplanetary disk cannot accrete to the circumplanetary disk. Gas near the midplane within the planet's Hill sphere spirals outward and escapes from the Hill sphere through the two Lagrangian points L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}. We also analyze fluxes of accreting mass and angular momentum in detail and find that the distributions of the fluxes onto the disk surface are well described by power-law functions and that a large fraction of gas accretion occurs at the outer region of the disk, i.e., at about 0.1 times the Hill radius. The nature of power-law functions indicates that, other than the outer edge, there is no specific radius where gas accretion is concentrated. These source functions of mass and angular momentum in the circumplanetary disk would provide us with useful constraints on the structure and evolution of the circumplanetary disk, which is important for satellite formation.

  7. Angular Structure of the Radio Sources at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Inyutin, G. A.; Koshovyy, V. V.; Lozins'kyy, A. B.; Lytvinenko, O. A.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Shepelyev, V. A.; Vaschishin, R. V.

    2006-08-01

    The world biggest decameter radio telescope UTR-2 and four smaller arrays forms the Ukrainian VLBI network URAN with an angular resolution up to 1" operated at decameter wavelengths. A number of galactic and extragalactic radio sources were studed with the URAN interferometers. At decimeter and centimeter wavelengths the studied extragalactic radio sources usually possess compact components and a total size of the sources is of about or less than a resolving power of the shortest baseline of the network. The obtained results allow us to affirm that the structure of the studied extragalactic radio sources changes at the decameter wavelengths. The reason of the changes usually is a combination of various phenomena of radio wave generation and propagation. The peculiarities of the brightness distribution in the range are: - The compact details (hot spots and sources associated with AGN) in the radio galaxies and quasars are usually less prominent at the decameter wavelengths because of synchrotron self-absorption. Their angular diameters are equal to those at higher frequencies or enlarged by the interstellar scattering. - Dimensions of lobes are enlarged as a rule. - A characteristic feature of the quasars structure at lower frequencies is extended components with steep spectra producing the main part of a flux of the sources at the decameter wavelengths. Their angular diameters exceed the total size of the source measured at higher frequencies. Such halos have been revealed in some radio galaxies too. The galactic supernova remnants studied with the URAN mainly possess the same features of their structure as at higher frequencies. Some modificatios of their structure at lower frequencies are caused by interstellar scattering, which increases a size of their compact details and difference of spectral indexes that changes relative fluxes of source parts at the decameters.

  8. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  9. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  10. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  11. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect.

  12. Improved numerical projection of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Kevin; Johnson, Calvin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear many-body states have good angular momenta, but many theoretical building blocks such as deformed Slater determinants do not. Hence one must numerically project out states of good angular momenta, usually through a computationally taxing three-dimensional integral. We took an existing code for angular-momentum projected Hartree-Fock and improved its performance, partly through judicious ordering of the loops, precomputing arrays of important combinatorics, and careful application of parallelization. We also investigated a novel inversion scheme. This work is potentially applicable to multiple approaches in many-body calculations, and should also be generalizable to particle number projection. Supported by SDSU Summer Undergraduate Research Program and by DOE Award Number DE-FG02-96ER40985.

  13. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions.

  14. Intrinsic unsharpness and approximate repeatability of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinonen, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2007-02-01

    The intrinsic unsharpness of a quantum observable is studied by introducing the notion of resolution width. This quantification of accuracy is shown to be closely connected with the possibility of making approximately repeatable measurements. As a case study, the intrinsic unsharpness and approximate repeatability of position and momentum measurements are examined in detail.

  15. Annihilation of angular momentum bias during thrusting and spinning-up maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longuski, J. M.; Kia, T.; Breckenridge, W. G.

    1989-01-01

    During spinning-up and thrusting maneuvers of rockets and spacecraft, undesired transverse torques (from error sources such as thruster misalignment, center-of-mass offset and thruster mismatch) perturb the angular momentum vector from its original orientation. In this paper a maneuver scheme is presented which virtually annihilates the angular momentum vector bias, even though the magnitude and direction of the perturbing body-fixed torques are unknown. In the analysis it is assumed that the torques are small and constant and that the spacecraft or rocket can be approximated by a rigid body, which may be asymmetric. Typical maneuvers of the Galileo spacecraft are simulated to demonstrate the technique.

  16. DALI: Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellentin, Elena

    2015-07-01

    DALI (Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods) is a fast approximation of non-Gaussian likelihoods. It extends the Fisher Matrix in a straightforward way and allows for a wider range of posterior shapes. The code is written in C/C++.

  17. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  18. Angular gyrus syndrome mimicking depressive pseudodementia.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, Nages; Phan, Tai Anh; Barnett, Claire; Ibrahim, Neamat

    2002-09-01

    A 67-year-old left-handed woman with a diagnosis of pseudodementia was being treated for depression with little benefit. Neuropsychological evaluations revealed features of angular gyrus syndrome, namely, agraphia, alexia, Gerstmann's syndrome and behavioural manifestations such as depression, poor memory, frustration and irritability. A computed tomographic scan showed a right occipito-temporal infarction, which had occurred 18 months earlier. The patient demonstrated aspects of language dysfunction associated with the syndrome and showed reversed lateralization of cerebral functions. Recognizing and distinguishing between angular gyrus syndrome and depression is important because the appropriate therapies differ. The use of the term pseudodementia can be misleading.

  19. Angular and Linear Momentum of Excited Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Kamra, Akashdeep; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions. However, spin and orbital angular momentum are not conserved separately anymore. We also define the linear momentum of ferromagnetic textures. We illustrate the general principles with special reference to spin transfer torques and identify the emergence of a non-adiabatic effective field acting on domain walls in ferromagnetic insulators

  20. On the vector model of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  1. Angular spectrum analysis in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Muñoz Martínez, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions serve to study some features of early-universe cosmology. In this contribution we adapt data analysis frequently used to understand the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies (such as the Mollweide projection and the angular power spectrum) to heavy ion collisions at the LHC. We examine a few publicly available events of the ALICE collaboration under this light. Because the ALICE time projection chamber has limited coverage in rapidity and some blind angles in the transverse plane, the angular spectrum seems very influenced by the detector's acceptance.

  2. Exploring the orbital angular momentum of betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Joana; Hehmann, Guenda; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Betatron radiation from laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can be used as a broadband X-ray source. Betatron x-rays have attracted great interest and have applications in biological imaging which have been demonstrated experimentally (see for instance). Endowing betatron radiation with well defined states of orbital angular momentum (OAM), a fundamental property of light by which its wave fronts become twisted, could further enhance the imaging spatial resolution. However, the conditions for the generation of betatron x-rays with OAM, and the fundamental mechanisms underlying the transfer of OAM from electron trajectories to the radiation they emit, remain outstanding open questions. To explore these exciting open challenges, we investigate the OAM spectral content of betatron x-rays in LWFA. We explore the conditions and laser driver characteristics (with/without orbital and spin angular momentum) that can enable the emission of OAM x-rays. We support our studies by 3D numerical modelling, using the particle-in-cell code Osiris and using the post processing radiation code jRad. also at DCTI/ISCTE Instituto Universitario de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

  3. Taylor Approximations and Definite Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of approximating the value of a definite integral by approximating the integrand rather than using numerical methods to approximate the value of the definite integral. Particular cases considered include examples where the integral is improper, such as an elliptic integral. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  4. Establishing an IERS Sub-Center for Ocean Angular Momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    2001-01-01

    With the objective of establishing the Special Bureau for the Oceans (SBO), a new archival center for ocean angular momentum (OAM) products, we have computed and analyzed a number of OAM products from several ocean models, with and without data assimilation. All three components of OAM (axial term related to length of day variations and equatorial terms related to polar motion) have been examined in detail, in comparison to the respective Earth rotation parameters. An 11+ year time series of OAM given at 5-day intervals has been made publicly available. Other OAM products spanning longer periods and with higher temporal resolution, as well as products calculated from ocean model/data assimilation systems, have been prepared and should become part of the SBO archives in the near future.

  5. Measurements and implications of the SDSS DR7 galaxy angular power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Brett P.

    We calculate the angular power spectrum of galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) by using a quadratic estimation method with KLcompression. The primary data sample includes over 18 million galaxies covering more than 5,700 square degrees after masking areas with bright objects, reddening greater than 0.2 magnitudes, and seeing of more than 1.5 arcseconds. We also construct a volume-limited sample of 3.2 million galaxies in the same area, consisting of galaxies with absolute r-band magnitudes Mr < --21.2 and photometric redshifts z < 0.4. We test for systematic effects by calculating the angular power spectrum on simulated data and by SDSS stripe, and we find that these measurements are minimally affected by seeing and reddening. We calculate the angular power spectrum for ℓ ≤ 200 multipoles by using 40 bands for the full area data, ℓ ≤ 1000 multipoles using 50 bands for individual stripes, and ℓ ≤ 1600 multipoles using 64 bands for a selected area near the North Galactic Pole at high resolution. We also calculate the angular power spectra for the main galaxy sample separated into 3 magnitude bins, as well as the volume-limited sample separated into 2 redshift shells and early- and late-type galaxies to examine the evolution of the angular power spectrum. We determine the theoretical linear angular power spectrum by projecting the 3D power spectrum to two dimensions for a basic comparison to our observational results for the SDSS DR7 main galaxy sample and subsamples separated by magnitude. For our high resolution and volume-limited samples, we generate nonlinear angular power spectra using CAMB nonlinear 3D matter power spectra for our projections. By minimizing the chi2 fit between these data and the theoretical angular power spectra, we measure a fit of Om = +0.18-0.11 with a linear bias of b = 0.94 +/- 0.04 for the entire SDSS DR7 main galaxy sample, Om = 0.267 +/- 0.038, Ob = 0.045 +/- 0.012, and b = 1

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy and the dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O.; Hansen, D.L.; Wang, H.

    1997-04-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is a powerful technique because it directly probes, via the measurement of photoelectron kinetic energies, orbital and band structure in valence and core levels in a wide variety of samples. The technique becomes even more powerful when it is performed in an angle-resolved mode, where photoelectrons are distinguished not only by their kinetic energy, but by their direction of emission as well. Determining the probability of electron ejection as a function of angle probes the different quantum-mechanical channels available to a photoemission process, because it is sensitive to phase differences among the channels. As a result, angle-resolved photoemission has been used successfully for many years to provide stringent tests of the understanding of basic physical processes underlying gas-phase and solid-state interactions with radiation. One mainstay in the application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is the well-known electric-dipole approximation for photon interactions. In this simplification, all higher-order terms, such as those due to electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole interactions, are neglected. As the photon energy increases, however, effects beyond the dipole approximation become important. To best determine the range of validity of the dipole approximation, photoemission measurements on a simple atomic system, neon, where extra-atomic effects cannot play a role, were performed at BL 8.0. The measurements show that deviations from {open_quotes}dipole{close_quotes} expectations in angle-resolved valence photoemission are observable for photon energies down to at least 0.25 keV, and are quite significant at energies around 1 keV. From these results, it is clear that non-dipole angular-distribution effects may need to be considered in any application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that uses x-ray photons of energies as low as a few hundred eV.

  7. Optimization of Angular-Momentum Biases of Reaction Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Clifford; Lee, Allan

    2008-01-01

    RBOT [RWA Bias Optimization Tool (wherein RWA signifies Reaction Wheel Assembly )] is a computer program designed for computing angular momentum biases for reaction wheels used for providing spacecraft pointing in various directions as required for scientific observations. RBOT is currently deployed to support the Cassini mission to prevent operation of reaction wheels at unsafely high speeds while minimizing time in undesirable low-speed range, where elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication films in bearings become ineffective, leading to premature bearing failure. The problem is formulated as a constrained optimization problem in which maximum wheel speed limit is a hard constraint and a cost functional that increases as speed decreases below a low-speed threshold. The optimization problem is solved using a parametric search routine known as the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. To increase computational efficiency for extended operation involving large quantity of data, the algorithm is designed to (1) use large time increments during intervals when spacecraft attitudes or rates of rotation are nearly stationary, (2) use sinusoidal-approximation sampling to model repeated long periods of Earth-point rolling maneuvers to reduce computational loads, and (3) utilize an efficient equation to obtain wheel-rate profiles as functions of initial wheel biases based on conservation of angular momentum (in an inertial frame) using pre-computed terms.

  8. Large angular scale CMB anisotropy from an excited initial mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojasi, A.; Mohsenzadeh, M.; Yusofi, E.

    2016-07-01

    According to inflationary cosmology, the CMB anisotropy gives an opportunity to test predictions of new physics hypotheses. The initial state of quantum fluctuations is one of the important options at high energy scale, as it can affect observables such as the CMB power spectrum. In this study a quasi-de Sitter inflationary background with approximate de Sitter mode function built over the Bunch-Davies mode is applied to investigate the scale-dependency of the CMB anisotropy. The recent Planck constraint on spectral index motivated us to examine the effect of a new excited mode function (instead of pure de Sitter mode) on the CMB anisotropy at large angular scales. In so doing, it is found that the angular scale-invariance in the CMB temperature fluctuations is broken and in the limit ℓ < 200 a tiny deviation appears. Also, it is shown that the power spectrum of CMB anisotropy is dependent on a free parameter with mass dimension H << M * < M p and on the slow-roll parameter ɛ. Supported by the Islamic Azad University, Rasht Branch, Rasht, Iran

  9. Three-dimensional angular domain optical projection tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Vasefi, Fartash; Roumeliotis, Michael; Kaminska, Bozena; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2011-03-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) has been previously demonstrated to generate projection images of attenuating targets embedded within a turbid medium. The imaging system employs a silicon micro-tunnel array positioned between the sample and the detection system to reject scattered photons that have deviated from the initial propagation direction and to select for ballistic and quasi-ballistic photons that have retained their forward trajectory. Two dimensional tomographic images can be reconstructed from ADI projections collected at a multitude of angles. The objective of this work was to extend the system to three dimensions by collecting several tomographic images and stacking the reconstructed slices to generate a three dimensional volume representative of the imaging target. A diode laser (808nm, CW) with a beam expander was used to illuminate the sample cuvette. An Angular Filter Array (AFA) of 80 μm × 80 μm square-shaped tunnels 2 cm in length was used to select for image forming quasi-ballistic photons. Images were detected with a linear CCD. Our approach was to use a SCARA robot to rotate and translate the sample to collect sufficient projections to reconstruct a three dimensional volume. A custom designed 3D target consisting of 4 truncated cones was imaged and reconstructed with filtered backprojection and iterative methods. A 0.5 mm graphite rod was used to collect the forward model, while a truncated pseudoinverse was used to approximate the backward model for the iterative algorithm.

  10. Bayesian Angular Power Spectrum Analysis of Interferometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Malu, Siddarth S.

    2012-09-01

    We present a Bayesian angular power spectrum and signal map inference engine which can be adapted to interferometric observations of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), 21 cm emission line mapping of galactic brightness fluctuations, or 21 cm absorption line mapping of neutral hydrogen in the dark ages. The method uses Gibbs sampling to generate a sampled representation of the angular power spectrum posterior and the posterior of signal maps given a set of measured visibilities in the uv-plane. We use a mock interferometric CMB observation to demonstrate the validity of this method in the flat-sky approximation when adapted to take into account arbitrary coverage of the uv-plane, mode-mode correlations due to observations on a finite patch, and heteroschedastic visibility errors. The computational requirements scale as {O}(n_p log n_p) where np measures the ratio of the size of the detector array to the inter-detector spacing, meaning that Gibbs sampling is a promising technique for meeting the data analysis requirements of future cosmology missions.

  11. Inclusion of angular momentum in FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    2015-05-18

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  12. γ - γ Angular Correlation Measurements With GRIFFIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Andrew; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    When an excited nuclear state emits successive γ-rays causing a γ - γ cascade an anisotropy is found in the spatial distribution of γ2 with respect to γ1. Defining the direction of γ1 as the z-axis, the intermediate level, in general will have an uneven distribution of m-states. This causes an anisotropy in the angular correlation of the second γ-ray with respect to the first. These angular correlations are expressed by the W (θ) that depends on numerical coefficients described by the sequence of spin-parity values for the nuclear states involved, the multipolarities and mixing ratios. Angular correlations can be used for the assignment of spins and parities for the nuclear states, and thus provide a powerful means to elucidate the structure of nuclei far from stability through β - γ - γ coincidence measurements. In order to explore the sensitivity of the new 16 clover-detector GRIFFIN γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC to such γ - γ angular correlations, and to optimize its performance for these measurements we have studied a well known γ - γ cascade from 60Co decay through both experimental measurements and Geant4 simulation. Results will be shown in this talk. Work supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  13. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael F.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Cook, Philip A.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:23333416

  14. Optical angular momentum: Multipole transitions and photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, David L.

    2010-03-15

    The premise that multipolar decay should produce photons uniquely imprinted with a measurably corresponding angular momentum is shown in general to be untrue. To assume a one-to-one correlation between the transition multipoles involved in source decay and detector excitation is to impose a generally unsupportable one-to-one correlation between the multipolar form of emission transition and a multipolar character for the detected field. It is specifically proven impossible to determine without ambiguity, by use of any conventional detector, and for any photon emitted through the nondipolar decay of an atomic excited state, a unique multipolar character for the transition associated with its generation. Consistent with the angular quantum uncertainty principle, removal of a detector from the immediate vicinity of the source produces a decreasing angular uncertainty in photon propagation direction, reflected in an increasing range of integer values for the measured angular momentum. In such a context it follows that when the decay of an electronic excited state occurs by an electric quadrupolar transition, for example, any assumption that the radiation so produced is conveyed in the form of 'quadrupole photons' is experimentally unverifiable. The results of the general proof based on irreducible tensor analysis invite experimental verification, and they signify certain limitations on quantum optical data transmission.

  15. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-07-03

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s(-2)). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  16. Oral medicine in practice: angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Lamey, P J; Lewis, M A

    1989-07-08

    In a series of twelve articles the authors aim to cover the more common oral medicine problems likely to be encountered in dental practice. Whenever possible, clinical photographs have been used to illustrate important points, and the text is deliberately succinct and without references. In the first article, the pathogenesis, investigation and management of angular cheilitis is reviewed.

  17. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Multi-state complex angular momentum residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylwe, Karl-Erik

    2006-09-01

    A relation between a multi-state complex angular momentum (CAM) pole residue and the corresponding CAM-state wavefunction is derived for a real symmetric potential matrix. The result generalizes a residue formula available for single-channel atomical collision systems and it is based on a diagonalization of the S matrix together with the use of exact Wronskian relations.

  19. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  20. Spin-to-orbital angular momentum exchange via reflection from a cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis R.; Wright, Ewan M.

    2011-10-01

    In a recent paper we explored the novel reflection properties of several conical optical elements using numerical simulations based on Maxwell's equations. For example, in the case of a hollow metallic cone having an apex angle of 90°, a circularly-polarized incident beam acquires, upon reflection, the opposite spin angular momentum in addition to an orbital angular momentum twice as large as the spin, whereas a 90° cone made of a transparent material in which the incident light suffers two total internal reflections before returning, may be designed to endow the retro-reflected beam with different mixtures of orbital and spin angular momenta. In the present paper we introduce an approximate analysis based on the Jones calculus to elucidate the physics underlying the reflection properties, and we point to the strengths and weaknesses of the approach.

  1. Angular distribution of emitted electrons in sodium clusters: A semiclassical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Giglio, E.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2003-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the angular distribution of emitted electrons of a sodium cluster, irradiated by short and intense laser pulses. While the polarization of the excitation field tends to focus a directional emission, the dynamical correlations tend to thermalize the electrons, giving rise to a more isotropic ionization. The competition between these processes is investigated using a semiclassical model Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck, where the dynamical correlations are taken in account by the electron-electron correlations in the Markovian approximation, the widely known Uehling-Uhlenbeck collision term. The results are compared to a semiclassical pure mean-field propagation (Vlasov equation) to work out the influence of dynamical correlations on the angular distribution of the electron emission. The trends with laser intensity and frequency are explored. The time evolution of the angular distributions shows that direct emission processes are stronger in the early phase of the processs, while isotropic thermal emission dominates later.

  2. The coupled states approximation for scattering of two diatoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heil, T. G.; Kouri, D. J.; Green, S.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed development of the coupled-states approximation for the general case of two colliding diatomic molecules. The high-energy limit of the exact Lippman-Schwinger equation is applied, and the analysis follows the Shimoni and Kouri (1977) treatment of atom-diatom collisions where the coupled rotor angular momentum and projection replace the single diatom angular momentum and projection. Parallels to the expression for the differential scattering amplitude, the opacity function, and the nondiagonality of the T matrix are reported. Symmetrized expressions and symmetrized coupled equations are derived. The present correctly labeled coupled-states theory is tested by comparing its calculated results with other computed results for three cases: H2-H2 collisions, ortho-para H2-H2 scattering, and H2-HCl.

  3. Three-body hyperspherical method with infinite angular expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Han Huili; Tang Liyan; Shi Tingyun

    2011-12-15

    The hyperspherical method based on infinite angular expansions is introduced. We approximate the cusp behavior of a wave function using B-spline techniques. Calculations for the ground-state energies of the atomic helium and the e{sup +}Li system are presented as two examples for testing this method. The computed ground-state energy of He is -2.903 724 a.u. with single particle orbitals l{sub max}=8. For the e{sup +}Li system, with l{sub max}=9, the ground-state energy is -0.250 83 a.u., which is better than the configuration interaction result of -0.250 107 82 a.u. with l{sub max}=30.

  4. Effects of Angular Scattering on Ion Velocity Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir; Kaganovich, Igor; Mustafaev, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    An approximation model for total elastic and charge exchange ion-atom angular differential scattering cross sections is developed for simulations of the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF), which is validated by the experiment data of mobility and diffusion. IVDFs are simulated using the developed model and compared with recently published experimental data. The IVDFs obtained with this model are compared to that from two other conventional models of less accurate differential cross sections. The simulation results show the necessity to take into account the accurate differential cross sections, especially for strong E/ N. The study reveals that IVDF cannot be separated into product of two independent IVDFs in the transverse and parallel to the electric field directions due to the significant effect of scattering.

  5. Angular vibration measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration standard is developed by CIMM to generate standard rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain amplitude sensitivity and phase shift by sinusoidal vibration. The measurement systems based on grating and laser interferometers are introduced in this paper. The measurement system based on PXI bus instrument is used to control the angular exciter, measure the output signal of the laser interferometers and the transducer to be calibrated synchronously. The methods for calculating the amplitude and phase of sinusoidal angular movement are investigated and high performance has been achieved. It shows the standard can be used in angular movement calibration in the frequency range from 0.1Hz to 200Hz.

  6. SUB-M-RAD ANGULAR STABILITY MEASUREMENTS BY USE OF LONG TRACE PROFILER BASED SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN,S.

    1999-07-23

    High accuracy angle measurement at the sub-{mu}rad level requires extremely high instrument stability. In order to reach sub-{mu}rad stability (0.1 arc second or less) over long time periods, it is necessary to maintain the test object and almost all of the optical components in the measuring instrument in very steady positions. However, mechanical force relaxation, thermal expansion, and asymmetric structures produce angular and linear displacements in the system resulting in angular measurement error. A Long-Trace-Profiler (LTP)-based stable equipment is used to test precision angular stability with sub-{mu}rad resolution. Long term stability over 15 hours has been measured on different kind of mechanical structures. Temperature monitoring during the tests is extremely important. Some test results showing the effects of thermal variations are presented, which indicate that temperature stability on the order of 0.1 C is absolutely necessary for repeatable sub-{mu}rad measurements. The optical method, using optics with an even number of reflecting surfaces (for example, a right angle prism, pentaprism, or rhomboid prism) to reduce the influence of existing angular displacement, is introduced and the comparison measurement is presented. An optical fiber transfer line is able to reduce the laser angular shift from about 10 {mu}rad to a level of 0.3 {mu}rad rms. Careful system configuration, design and operation are very important for the sub-{mu}rad angle stability.

  7. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  8. Evaluation of the table Mountain Ronchi telescope for angular tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, G.; Purcell, G.; Treuhaft, R.; Buffington, A.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Table Mountain telescope was evaluated to determine the potential of such an instrument for optical angular tracking. This telescope uses a Ronchi ruling to measure differential positions of stars at the meridian. The Ronchi technique is summarized and the operational features of the Table Mountain instrument are described. Results from an analytic model, simulations, and actual data are presented that characterize the telescope's current performance. For a star pair of visual magnitude 7, the differential uncertainty of a 5-min observation is about 50 nrad (10 marcsec), and tropospheric fluctuations are the dominant error source. At magnitude 11, the current differential uncertainty is approximately 800 nrad (approximately 170 marcsec). This magnitude is equivalent to that of a 2-W laser with a 0.4-m aperture transmitting to Earth from a spacecraft at Saturn. Photoelectron noise is the dominant error source for stars of visual magnitude 8.5 and fainter. If the photoelectron noise is reduced, ultimately tropospheric fluctuations will be the limiting source of error at an average level of 35 nrad (7 marcsec) for stars approximately 0.25 deg apart. Three near-term strategies are proposed for improving the performance of the telescope to the 10-nrad level: improving the efficiency of the optics, masking background starlight, and averaging tropospheric fluctuations over multiple observations.

  9. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, M. V.; Braeuninger, H.; Ondrusch, A.; Predehl, P.

    1982-01-01

    The results of high angular resolution grazing incidence scattering measurements of highly polished, coated optical flats in the X-ray spectral range of 1.5 to 6.4 keV are reported. The interpretation of these results in terms of surface microtopography is presented and the implications for grazing incidence X-ray imaging are discussed.

  10. Small angular displacement measurement based on an autocollimator and a common-path compensation principle

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ke; Kuang Cuifang; Liu Xu

    2013-01-15

    A novel method for small angular displacement measurement based on an autocollimator and a common-path compensation principle by using single CCD detector was proposed. The principles of the angular displacement measurement and the common-path compensation were analyzed. The feasibility of measurement method was verified and the experimental results revealed that the linear correlativity between the relative displacement of the measuring beam spot and the angular displacement is 0.99996. And the measurement resolution is about 0.03 arcsec. To test the compensation's effect, a series of experiments introducing three different interferences from system and external environment were performed. The experimental results indicated that the standard deviations of the measuring beam spot's angular drift were improved by at least 25.0% to at most 80.0% in x direction while by at least 28.2% to at most 95.6% in y direction. Thus, the stability of the system and the measurement resolution were improved.

  11. Small angular displacement measurement based on an autocollimator and a common-path compensation principle.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for small angular displacement measurement based on an autocollimator and a common-path compensation principle by using single CCD detector was proposed. The principles of the angular displacement measurement and the common-path compensation were analyzed. The feasibility of measurement method was verified and the experimental results revealed that the linear correlativity between the relative displacement of the measuring beam spot and the angular displacement is 0.99996. And the measurement resolution is about 0.03 arcsec. To test the compensation's effect, a series of experiments introducing three different interferences from system and external environment were performed. The experimental results indicated that the standard deviations of the measuring beam spot's angular drift were improved by at least 25.0% to at most 80.0% in x direction while by at least 28.2% to at most 95.6% in y direction. Thus, the stability of the system and the measurement resolution were improved.

  12. A POD reduced order model for resolving angular direction in neutron/photon transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, A.G.; Calloo, A.A.; Goffin, M.G.; Dargaville, S.; Fang, F.; Pain, C.C.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the first Reduced Order Model (ROM) that efficiently resolves the angular dimension of the time independent, mono-energetic Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). It is based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and uses the method of snapshots to form optimal basis functions for resolving the direction of particle travel in neutron/photon transport problems. A unique element of this work is that the snapshots are formed from the vector of angular coefficients relating to a high resolution expansion of the BTE's angular dimension. In addition, the individual snapshots are not recorded through time, as in standard POD, but instead they are recorded through space. In essence this work swaps the roles of the dimensions space and time in standard POD methods, with angle and space respectively. It is shown here how the POD model can be formed from the POD basis functions in a highly efficient manner. The model is then applied to two radiation problems; one involving the transport of radiation through a shield and the other through an infinite array of pins. Both problems are selected for their complex angular flux solutions in order to provide an appropriate demonstration of the model's capabilities. It is shown that the POD model can resolve these fluxes efficiently and accurately. In comparison to high resolution models this POD model can reduce the size of a problem by up to two orders of magnitude without compromising accuracy. Solving times are also reduced by similar factors.

  13. Novel method to evaluate angular stiffness of prosthetic feet from linear compression tests.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Peter G; Roland, Michelle; Hahn, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Lower limb amputee gait during stance phase is related to the angular stiffness of the prosthetic foot, which describes the dependence of ankle torque on angular progression of the shank. However, there is little data on angular stiffness of prosthetic feet, and no method to directly measure it has been described. The objective of this study was to derive and evaluate a method to estimate the angular stiffness of prosthetic feet using a simple linear compression test. Linear vertical compression tests were performed on nine configurations of an experimental multicomponent foot (with known component stiffness properties and geometry), which allowed for parametric adjustment of hindfoot and forefoot stiffness properties and geometries. Each configuration was loaded under displacement control at distinct pylon test angles. Angular stiffness was calculated as a function of the pylon angle, normal force, and center of pressure (COP) rate of change with respect to linear displacement. Population root mean square error (RMSE) between the measured and predicted angular stiffness values for each configuration of the multicomponent foot was calculated to be 4.1 N-m/deg, dominated by a bias of the estimated values above the predicted values of 3.8 ± 1.6 N-m/deg. The best-fit line to estimated values was approximately parallel to the prediction, with R2 = 0.95. This method should be accessible for a variety of laboratories to estimate angular stiffness of experimental and commercially available prosthetic feet with minimal equipment.

  14. Combining global and local approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method based on a linear approximation to a scaling factor, designated the 'global-local approximation' (GLA) method, is presented and shown capable of extending the range of usefulness of derivative-based approximations to a more refined model. The GLA approach refines the conventional scaling factor by means of a linearly varying, rather than constant, scaling factor. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated for a simple beam example with a crude and more refined FEM model.

  15. Combining global and local approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Haftka, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    A method based on a linear approximation to a scaling factor, designated the 'global-local approximation' (GLA) method, is presented and shown capable of extending the range of usefulness of derivative-based approximations to a more refined model. The GLA approach refines the conventional scaling factor by means of a linearly varying, rather than constant, scaling factor. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated for a simple beam example with a crude and more refined FEM model. 6 refs.

  16. Calibrating angular transducer using sinusoidal and shock excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Primary angular vibration calibration system and primary angular shock calibration system are developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). The both systems using laser interferometer and grating measure rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). This paper will study the dynamic performance of an angular accelerometer and a gyro under the excitation of sinusoidal and shock using the calibration systems. It shows that the angular transducers should be calibrated using both sinusoidal and shock excitation to obtain more detailed dynamic information.

  17. Phenomenological applications of rational approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzàlez-Solís, Sergi; Masjuan, Pere

    2016-08-01

    We illustrate the powerfulness of Padé approximants (PAs) as a summation method and explore one of their extensions, the so-called quadratic approximant (QAs), to access both space- and (low-energy) time-like (TL) regions. As an introductory and pedagogical exercise, the function 1 zln(1 + z) is approximated by both kind of approximants. Then, PAs are applied to predict pseudoscalar meson Dalitz decays and to extract Vub from the semileptonic B → πℓνℓ decays. Finally, the π vector form factor in the TL region is explored using QAs.

  18. Angular momentum role in the hypercritical accretion of binary-driven hypernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, L.; Cipolletta, F.; Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-10-12

    Here, the induced gravitational collapse paradigm explains a class of energetic, ${E}_{{\\rm{iso}}}\\gtrsim {10}^{52}$ erg, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with Ic supernovae, recently named binary-driven hypernovae. The progenitor is a tight binary system formed of a carbon–oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta of the exploding CO core trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS, which reaches the critical mass in a few seconds, and gravitationally collapses to a black hole, emitting a GRB. In our previous simulations of this process, we adopted a spherically symmetric approximation to compute the features of the hypercritical accretion process. We here present the first estimates of the angular momentum transported by the supernova ejecta, ${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}},$ and perform numerical simulations of the angular momentum transfer to the NS during the hyperaccretion process in full general relativity. We show that the NS (1) reaches either the mass-shedding limit or the secular axisymmetric instability in a few seconds depending on its initial mass, (2) reaches a maximum dimensionless angular momentum value, ${[{cJ}/({{GM}}^{2})]}_{{\\rm{max}}}\\approx 0.7$, and (3) can support less angular momentum than the one transported by supernova ejecta, ${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}}\\gt {J}_{{\\rm{NS,max}}},$ hence there is an angular momentum excess that necessarily leads to jetted emission.

  19. Angular momentum role in the hypercritical accretion of binary-driven hypernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Becerra, L.; Cipolletta, F.; Fryer, Chris L.; ...

    2015-10-12

    Here, the induced gravitational collapse paradigm explains a class of energetic,more » $${E}_{{\\rm{iso}}}\\gtrsim {10}^{52}$$ erg, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with Ic supernovae, recently named binary-driven hypernovae. The progenitor is a tight binary system formed of a carbon–oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta of the exploding CO core trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS, which reaches the critical mass in a few seconds, and gravitationally collapses to a black hole, emitting a GRB. In our previous simulations of this process, we adopted a spherically symmetric approximation to compute the features of the hypercritical accretion process. We here present the first estimates of the angular momentum transported by the supernova ejecta, $${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}},$$ and perform numerical simulations of the angular momentum transfer to the NS during the hyperaccretion process in full general relativity. We show that the NS (1) reaches either the mass-shedding limit or the secular axisymmetric instability in a few seconds depending on its initial mass, (2) reaches a maximum dimensionless angular momentum value, $${[{cJ}/({{GM}}^{2})]}_{{\\rm{max}}}\\approx 0.7$$, and (3) can support less angular momentum than the one transported by supernova ejecta, $${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}}\\gt {J}_{{\\rm{NS,max}}},$$ hence there is an angular momentum excess that necessarily leads to jetted emission.« less

  20. Angular momentum flux of nonparaxial acoustic vortex beams and torques on axisymmetric objects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    An acoustic vortex in an inviscid fluid and its radiation torque on an axisymmetric absorbing object are analyzed beyond the paraxial approximation to clarify an analogy with an optical vortex. The angular momentum flux density tensor from the conservation of angular momentum is used as an efficient description of the transport of angular momentum. Analysis of a monochromatic nonparaxial acoustic vortex beam indicates that the local ratio of the axial (or radial) flux density of axial angular momentum to the axial (or radial) flux density of energy is exactly equal to the ratio of the beam's topological charge l to the acoustic frequency ω. The axial radiation torque exerted by the beam on an axisymmetric object centered on the beam's axis due to the transfer of angular momentum is proportional to the power absorbed by the object with a factor l/ω, which can be understood as a result of phonon absorption from the beam. Depending on the vortex's helicity, the torque is parallel or antiparallel to the beam's axis.

  1. Mechanical and biomechanical analysis of a linear piston design for angular-velocity-based orthotic control.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward D; Samadi, Reza; Goudreau, Louis; Kofman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A linear piston hydraulic angular-velocity-based control knee joint was designed for people with knee-extensor weakness to engage knee-flexion resistance when knee-flexion angular velocity reaches a preset threshold, such as during a stumble, but to otherwise allow free knee motion. During mechanical testing at the lowest angular-velocity threshold, the device engaged within 2 degrees knee flexion and resisted moment loads of over 150 Nm. The device completed 400,000 loading cycles without mechanical failure or wear that would affect function. Gait patterns of nondisabled participants were similar to normal at walking speeds that produced below-threshold knee angular velocities. Fast walking speeds, employed purposely to attain the angular-velocity threshold and cause knee-flexion resistance, reduced maximum knee flexion by approximately 25 degrees but did not lead to unsafe gait patterns in foot ground clearance during swing. In knee collapse tests, the device successfully engaged knee-flexion resistance and stopped knee flexion with peak knee moments of up to 235.6 Nm. The outcomes from this study support the potential for the linear piston hydraulic knee joint in knee and knee-ankle-foot orthoses for people with lower-limb weakness.

  2. Determination of Optimum Viewing Angles for the Angular Normalization of Land Surface Temperature over Vegetated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Huazhong; Yan, Guangjian; Liu, Rongyuan; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Nerry, Françoise; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Multi-angular observation of land surface thermal radiation is considered to be a promising method of performing the angular normalization of land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from remote sensing data. This paper focuses on an investigation of the minimum requirements of viewing angles to perform such normalizations on LST. The normally kernel-driven bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is first extended to the thermal infrared (TIR) domain as TIR-BRDF model, and its uncertainty is shown to be less than 0.3 K when used to fit the hemispheric directional thermal radiation. A local optimum three-angle combination is found and verified using the TIR-BRDF model based on two patterns: the single-point pattern and the linear-array pattern. The TIR-BRDF is applied to an airborne multi-angular dataset to retrieve LST at nadir (Te-nadir) from different viewing directions, and the results show that this model can obtain reliable Te-nadir from 3 to 4 directional observations with large angle intervals, thus corresponding to large temperature angular variations. The Te-nadir is generally larger than temperature of the slant direction, with a difference of approximately 0.5~2.0 K for vegetated pixels and up to several Kelvins for non-vegetated pixels. The findings of this paper will facilitate the future development of multi-angular thermal infrared sensors. PMID:25825975

  3. Angular spectrum detection instrument for label-free photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longju; Xu, Zhen; Dong, Liang; Lu, Meng

    2014-05-01

    An angular spectrum analysis system was demonstrated to monitor the optical resonant mode of a photonic crystal (PC) sensor comprised of a one-dimensional grating structure. Exposed to solutions with different refractive indices or adsorbed with biomaterials, the PC sensor exhibited changes of the optical resonant modes. The developed detection system utilized a focused laser beam to detect shifts of the resonant angle, and thereby allowed a kinetic analysis of chemical absorption. Such a detection apparatus offers an adjustable angular resolution and a tunable detection range for a wide variety of refractometric sensing applications. A limit of detection of 6.57×10(-5) refractive index unit has been observed. The instrument also offers an imaging capability of rapidly characterizing low-contrast samples deposited on the PC surface with a spatial resolution of 10 μm.

  4. Revealing the subfemtosecond dynamics of orbital angular momentum in nanoplasmonic vortices.

    PubMed

    Spektor, G; Kilbane, D; Mahro, A K; Frank, B; Ristok, S; Gal, L; Kahl, P; Podbiel, D; Mathias, S; Giessen, H; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, F-J; Orenstein, M; Aeschlimann, M

    2017-03-17

    The ability of light to carry and deliver orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the form of optical vortices has attracted much interest. The physical properties of light with a helical wavefront can be confined onto two-dimensional surfaces with subwavelength dimensions in the form of plasmonic vortices, opening avenues for thus far unknown light-matter interactions. Because of their extreme rotational velocity, the ultrafast dynamics of such vortices remained unexplored. Here we show the detailed spatiotemporal evolution of nanovortices using time-resolved two-photon photoemission electron microscopy. We observe both long- and short-range plasmonic vortices confined to deep subwavelength dimensions on the scale of 100 nanometers with nanometer spatial resolution and subfemtosecond time-step resolution. Finally, by measuring the angular velocity of the vortex, we directly extract the OAM magnitude of light.

  5. THE ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} RESONANT PHOTONS EMERGING FROM AN OPTICALLY THICK MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang; Roy, Ishani; Fang Lizhi

    2013-07-20

    We investigate the angular distribution of Ly{alpha} photons scattering or emerging from an optically thick medium. Since the evolution of specific intensity I in frequency space and angular space are coupled with each other, we first develop the WENO numerical solver to find the time-dependent solutions of the integro-differential equation of I in frequency and angular space simultaneously. We first show that the solutions with the Eddington approximation, which assume that I is linearly dependent on the angular variable {mu}, yield similar frequency profiles of the photon flux as those without the Eddington approximation. However, the solutions of the {mu} distribution evolution are significantly different from those given by the Eddington approximation. First, the angular distribution of I is found to be substantially dependent on the frequency of the photons. For photons with the resonant frequency {nu}{sub 0}, I contains only a linear term of {mu}. For photons with frequencies at the double peaks of the flux, the {mu}-distribution is highly anisotropic; most photons are emitted radially forward. Moreover, either at {nu}{sub 0} or at the double peaks, the {mu} distributions actually are independent of the initial {mu} distribution of photons of the source. This is because the photons with frequencies either at {nu}{sub 0} or the double peaks undergo the process of forgetting their initial conditions due to resonant scattering. We also show that the optically thick medium is a collimator of photons at the double peaks. Photons from the double peaks form a forward beam with a very small opening angle.

  6. Development of a primary angular shock calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Primary angular shock calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology & Measurement (CIMM). It uses brushless servo motor driving the air bearing system to generate rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration. Both grating and heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is used to measure the angular movement, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain sensitivity by angular shock or other kinds of excitation. Heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is successfully used in the measurement of angular acceleration. The method of using grating and scanning heads measure angular acceleration is developed. One characteristic of this system is that it could generate different kind of excitation signals, which include half sine, trapezoidal, sinusoidal, etc. and it can work as a high performance rate table to generate constant angular velocity. The preliminary test shows the uncertainty in calibrating angular accelerometer should be better than 2%. This paper introduces the mechanic system, control system and measurement system of the angular shock calibration system.

  7. A New Automatic System for Angular Measurement and Calibration in Radiometric Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements. PMID:22319320

  8. A new automatic system for angular measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  9. Approximating Functions with Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of approximating a function with a linear combination of exponential functions of the form e[superscript x], e[superscript 2x], ... is considered as a parallel development to the notion of Taylor polynomials which approximate a function with a linear combination of power function terms. The sinusoidal functions sin "x" and cos "x"…

  10. Performance criteria for dosimeter angular response

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R. A.; Cummings, F. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Jones, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides criteria for evaluating the response of personnel dosimeters to radiation at nonperpendicular incidence. The US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) ensures that dosimetry systems at DOE facilities meet acceptable standards for precision and accuracy. In the past, these standards were limited to tests for system variability, energy dependence, and level of detection. The proposed criteria will broaden the scope of DOELAP to include the angular response of personnel dosimeters. Because occupational exposures in the workplace are rarely due to radiation from only one direction, dosimeters must accurately assign individual dose equivalent from irradiation at any forward angle of incidence. Including an angular response criterion in DOELAP would improve the quality of personnel monitoring provided that the criterion is developed from appropriate dose quantities. This report provides guidance for assigning individual dose equivalents for radiation fields at nonperpendicular incidence to the dosimeter. 21 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Angular MET sensor for precise azimuth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Antonov, Alexander; Krishtop, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes using a MET-based low-noise angular motion sensor to precisely determine azimuth direction in a dynamic-scheme method of measuring Earth's rotation velocity vector. The scheme includes installing a sensor on a rotating platform so that it could scan a space and seek for the position of highest Earth's rotation vector projection on its axis. This method is very efficient provided a low-noise sensor is used. We take a low-cost angular sensor based on MET (molecular electronic transduction) technology. Sensors of this kind were originally developed for the seismic activity monitoring and are well-known for very good noise performance and high sensitivity. This approach, combined with use of special signal processing algorithms, allowed for reaching the accuracy of 0.07° for a measurement time of 200 seconds.

  12. Satellite Angular Rate Estimation From Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the angular rate vector of a satellite which is based on the time derivatives of vector measurements expressed in a reference and body coordinate. The computed derivatives are fed into a spacial Kalman filter which yields an estimate of the spacecraft angular velocity. The filter, named Extended Interlaced Kalman Filter (EIKF), is an extension of the Kalman filter which, although being linear, estimates the state of a nonlinear dynamic system. It consists of two or three parallel Kalman filters whose individual estimates are fed to one another and are considered as known inputs by the other parallel filter(s). The nonlinear dynamics stem from the nonlinear differential equation that describes the rotation of a three dimensional body. Initial results, using simulated data, and real Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data indicate that the algorithm is efficient and robust.

  13. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-12-22

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  14. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-08-18

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  15. Angular quadratures for improved transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.

    1999-07-22

    This paper introduces new octant-range, composite-type Gauss and mid-point rule angular quadrature formulas for neutron and photon transport computations. A generalization to octant-range quadratures is also introduced in order to allow for discontinuities at material interfaces for two- and three-dimensional transport problems which can be modeled with 60-degree triangular or hexagonal mesh subdivisions in the x-y plane.

  16. Angular cheilitis, part 1: local etiologies.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K; Brodell, Robert T; Helms, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    Angular cheilitis (AC) is a common condition characterized by erythema, moist maceration, ulceration, and crusting at the corners of the mouth. This article focuses on the common local factors that act alone and in combination to produce AC. These factors are categorized as irritant, allergic, and infectious causes. Identifying the underlying etiology of AC is a critical step in developing an effective treatment plan for this condition.

  17. Calculated angular distributions of energetic atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, M.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated angular distributions of atmospheric leakage neutron fluxes from 19 MeV to 1 GeV are presented. Comparisons with the balloon measurements of Preszler et al. and Kanbach et al. are made and show substantial agreement, strengthening the belief in the importance of the CRAND (cosmic-ray albedo-neutron decay) contribution to the high-energy protons in the earth's inner radiation belt. The calculation is presented as a means for investigating features of atmospheric flux distributions.

  18. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  19. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  20. Angular craniometry in craniocervical junction malformation.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ricardo Vieira; Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi

    2013-10-01

    The craniometric linear dimensions of the posterior fossa have been relatively well studied, but angular craniometry has been poorly studied and may reveal differences in the several types of craniocervical junction malformation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate craniometric angles compared with normal subjects and elucidate the main angular differences among the types of craniocervical junction malformation and the correlation between craniocervical and cervical angles. Angular craniometries were studied using primary cranial angles (basal and Boogard's) and secondary craniocervical angles (clivus canal and cervical spine lordosis). Patients with basilar invagination had significantly wider basal angles, sharper clivus canal angles, larger Boogard's angles, and greater cervical lordosis than the Chiari malformation and control groups. The Chiari malformation group does not show significant differences when compared with normal controls. Platybasia occurred only in basilar invagination and is suggested to be more prevalent in type II than in type I. Platybasic patients have a more acute clivus canal angle and show greater cervical lordosis than non-platybasics. The Chiari group does not show significant differences when compared with the control, but the basilar invagination groups had craniometric variables significantly different from normal controls. Hyperlordosis observed in the basilar inavagination group was associated with craniocervical kyphosis conditioned by acute clivus canal angles.

  1. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  2. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies in EAGLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Cortese, Luca; Padilla, Nelson D.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Croton, Darren

    2017-02-01

    We use the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulation suite to study the specific angular momentum of galaxies, j, with the aims of (i) investigating the physical causes behind the wide range of j at fixed mass and (ii) examining whether simple, theoretical models can explain the seemingly complex and non-linear nature of the evolution of j. We find that j of the stars, jstars, and baryons, jbar, are strongly correlated with stellar and baryon mass, respectively, with the scatter being highly correlated with morphological proxies such as gas fraction, stellar concentration, (u-r) intrinsic colour, stellar age and the ratio of circular velocity to velocity dispersion. We compare with available observations at z = 0 and find excellent agreement. We find that jbar follows the theoretical expectation of an isothermal collapsing halo under conservation of specific angular momentum to within ≈50 per cent, while the subsample of rotation-supported galaxies are equally well described by a simple model in which the disc angular momentum is just enough to maintain marginally stable discs. We extracted evolutionary tracks of the stellar spin parameter of EAGLE galaxies and found that the fate of their jstars at z = 0 depends sensitively on their star formation and merger histories. From these tracks, we identified two distinct physical channels behind low jstars galaxies at z = 0: (i) galaxy mergers, and (ii) early star formation quenching. The latter can produce galaxies with low jstars and early-type morphologies even in the absence of mergers.

  3. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan T.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián.; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  4. Angular cheilitis: a clinical and microbial study.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Dahlén, G; Möller, A; Ohman, A

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to re-examine the relative importance of various factors in the pathogenesis of angular cheilitis. Sixty-four patients with cheilitis were examined clinically and microbiologically. In addition, a subsample of 23 patients was examined for serum iron and transferrin. The clinical appearance of the lip lesions fell into 4 categories. A ground rhagad at the corner of the mouth involving adjacent skin, was the most frequent type among dentate patients, whereas among denture wearers a deep lesion following the labial marginal sulcus was frequently observed. Dentate patients and denture wearers with cheilitis often had atopic constitution or cutaneous diseases. Pathogenic microorganisms were cultured from the lesions in all 64 patients; Staphylococcus aureus in 40 patients and Candida albicans in 45. The results of this study indicate a correlation between angular cheilitis and pathogenic microorganisms. Furthermore, among dentate patients, a correlation exists between cutaneous discomfort and angular cheilitis. Other etiological factors suggested for this disorder were found to be of subordinate importance.

  5. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  6. Comparison of angular movement measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM) to generate angular vibration and shock, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer. Two kinds of system are used in the measurement of angular movement, one is based on circular grating and scanning heads, another is based on laser interferometer with diffraction grating. This paper introduce the comparison results of the two measurement systems in the measurement of angular movement under sinusoidal and shock excitation. The results of the investigations show a good accordance of the newly developed method of using grating and scanning heads measuring angular acceleration in comparison with the laser interferometer method.

  7. A Fast Method of Fully Characterizing Sputtering Angular Dependence (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-17

    A new method has been demonstrated in which a single experiment is used to fully define the sputtering angular dependence of a given material. The...profilometry; the full sputtering angular dependence curve is then extracted using a numerical approach.

  8. Coherent Detection of Orbital Angular Momentum in Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The angular momentum propagated by a beam of radiation has two contributions: spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital ...Coherent detection of orbital angular momentum in radio The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and...MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 photon orbital angular

  9. X-ray Reflectivity Measurements of Nanoscale Structures: Limits of the Effective Medium Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-Jeong; Soles, Christopher L.; Kang, Shuhui; Wook Ro, Hyun; Lin, Eric K.; Wu, Wen-li

    2007-09-26

    Specular X-ray reflectivity (SXR) can be used, in the limit of the effective medium approximation (EMA), as a high-resolution shape metrology for periodic patterns on a smooth substrate. The EMA means that the density of the solid patterns and the spaces separating the periodic patterns are averaged together. In this limit the density profile as a function of pattern height obtained by SXR can be used to extract quantitative pattern profile information. Here we explore the limitations of SXR as a pattern shape metrology by studying a series of linear grating structures with periodicities ranging from 300 nm to 16 {mu}m and determining at which length scales the EMA breaks down. We also study the angular dependence of the grating orientation with respect to the incident X-ray beam. The gratings systematically are rotated through a series of azimuthal angles with the incident X-ray beams ranging from 0 deg. to 90 deg. . The applicability of the EMA is related to the coherence length of the X-ray source. When the coherence length of beam is larger than the physical dimension of grating periodicities, EMA can be applied for characterizing nanostructures. For our slit-collimated X-ray source, the coherence length in the direction parallel to the long axis of the slit is on the order of 900 nm while the coherence length along the main axis of the beam appears to be in the range of (22 to 26) {mu}m.

  10. Approximating subtree distances between phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Maria Luisa; St John, Katherine; Mahindru, Ruchi; Amenta, Nina

    2006-10-01

    We give a 5-approximation algorithm to the rooted Subtree-Prune-and-Regraft (rSPR) distance between two phylogenies, which was recently shown to be NP-complete. This paper presents the first approximation result for this important tree distance. The algorithm follows a standard format for tree distances. The novel ideas are in the analysis. In the analysis, the cost of the algorithm uses a "cascading" scheme that accounts for possible wrong moves. This accounting is missing from previous analysis of tree distance approximation algorithms. Further, we show how all algorithms of this type can be implemented in linear time and give experimental results.

  11. Angular Goos-Hänchen effect in curved dielectric microstructures.

    PubMed

    Tran, N H; Dutriaux, L; Balcou, P; Floch, A L; Bretenaker, F

    1995-06-01

    A macroscopic angular Goos-Hänchen effect at total reflection on curved interfaces is studied experimentally. The results are compared with the complex-angular-momentum model of quasi-critical scattering. An extremum in angular deflection, which has not yet been predicted by any theory other than exact Mie scattering computations, is identified at low size parameters.

  12. Linear force and moment equations for an annular smooth shaft seal perturbed both angularly and laterally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J.; Dijulio, R.; Ek, M. C.; Ehrgott, R.

    1982-01-01

    Coefficients are derived for equations expressing the lateral force and pitching moments associated with both planar translation and angular perturbations from a nominally centered rotating shaft with respect to a stationary seal. The coefficients for the lowest order and first derivative terms emerge as being significant and are of approximately the same order of magnitude as the fundamental coefficients derived by means of Black's equations. Second derivative, shear perturbation, and entrance coefficient variation effects are adjudged to be small.

  13. Accuracy analysis of a mobile tracking system for angular position determination of flying targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Andreas; Buske, Ivo; Riede, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Lasers arouse an increasing interest in remote sensing applications. In order to deliver as much as possible of the available laser power onto a flying object the subsystems of a beam control system have to operate precisely together. One important subsystem is responsible for determination of the target's angular position. Here, we focus on an optical system for measuring precisely the angular position of flying objects. We designed this subunit of a beam control system exclusively from readily available commercial-off-the-shelf components. Two industrial cameras were used for angle measuring and for guiding the system to the position of the flying object. Both cameras are mounted on a modified astronomical mount with high-precision angle encoders. To achieve a high accuracy we temporally synchronize the acquisition of the angle from the pan tilt unit with the exposure of the camera. Therefore, a FPGA-based readout device for the rotary encoders was designed and implemented. Additionally, we determined and evaluated the influence of the distortion of the lenses to the measurement. We investigated various scenarios to determine the accuracy and the limitations of our system for angular position determination of flying targets. Performance tests were taken indoor and outdoor at our test sites. A target can be mounted on a fast moving linear stage. The position of this linear stage is continuously read out by a high resolution encoder so we know the target's position with a dynamic accuracy in the range of a few μm. With this setup we evaluated the spatial resolution of our tracking system. We showed that the presented system can determine the angular position of fast flying objects with an uncertainty of only 2 μrad RMS. With this mobile tracking system for angular position determination of flying targets we designed an accurate cost-efficient opportunity for further developments.

  14. Angular momentum exchange in white dwarf binaries accreting through direct impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sepinsky, J. F.; Kalogera, V. E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu

    2014-04-20

    We examine the exchange of angular momentum between the component spins and the orbit in semi-detached double white dwarf binaries undergoing mass transfer through direct impact of the transfer stream. We approximate the stream as a series of discrete massive particles ejected in the ballistic limit at the inner Lagrangian point of the donor toward the accretor. This work improves upon similar earlier studies in a number of ways. First, we self-consistently calculate the total angular momentum of the orbit at all times. This includes changes in the orbital angular momentum during the ballistic trajectory of the ejected mass, as well as changes during the ejection/accretion due to the radial component of the particle's velocity. Second, we calculate the particle's ballistic trajectory for each system, which allows us to determine the precise position and velocity of the particle upon accretion. We can then include specific information about the radius of the accretor as well as the angle of impact. Finally, we ensure that the total angular momentum is conserved, which requires the donor star spin to vary self-consistently. With these improvements, we calculate the angular momentum change of the orbit and each binary component across the entire parameter space of direct impact double white dwarf binary systems. We find a significant decrease in the amount of angular momentum removed from the orbit during mass transfer, as well as cases where this process increases the angular momentum of the orbit at the expense of the spin angular momentum of the donor. We conclude that, unlike earlier claims in the literature, mass transfer through direct impact need not destabilize the binary and that the quantity and sign of the orbital angular momentum transfer depends on the binary properties, particularly the masses of the double white dwarf binary component stars. This stabilization may significantly impact the population synthesis calculations of the expected numbers of

  15. Threshold photoneutron angular distribution and polarization studies of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The photoneutron method was applied to the study of: (1) deuteron photodisintegration; (2) giant magnetic dipole resonances in heavy nuclei; (3) mechanism of radiative capture in light nuclei; and (4) isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance in /sup 60/Ni. These studies were performed with the pulsed bremsstrahlung beam and high-resolution spectrometer available at the Argonne high-current electron linac. A threshold photoneutron polarization method was developed in order to search for the giant M1 resonance in heavy nuclei. A surprisingly small amount of M1 strength was found in /sup 208/Pb. Furthermore, the M1 strength for the 5.08-MeV excitation in /sup 17/O, the best example of a single-particle M1 resonance in nuclei, was found to be strongly quenched. In addition, the /sup 17/O(..gamma..,n/sub 0/)/sup 16/O reaction was found to provide an ideal example of the Lane-Lynn theory of radiative capture. The interplay among the three components of the theory, internal, channel and potential capture, were evident from the data. An electron beam transport system was developed which allows the bremsstrahlung to impinge on the photoneutron target on an axis perpendicular to the usual reaction plane. This system provides an accurate method for the measurement of relative angular distributions in (..gamma..,n) reactions. This system was applied to a high-accuracy measurement of the relative angular distribution for the D(..gamma..,n)H reaction. The question of isospin-splitting of the giant dipole resonance in /sup 60/Ni was studied by using the unique pico-pulse from the accelerator and the newly installed 25-m, neutron flight paths. The results provide clear evidence for the effect of isospin splitting.

  16. Dual approximations in optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, W. W.; Ianculescu, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    A dual approximation for the solution to an optimal control problem is analyzed. The differential equation is handled with a Lagrange multiplier while other constraints are treated explicitly. An algorithm for solving the dual problem is presented.

  17. Mathematical algorithms for approximate reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, John H.; Chay, Seung C.; Downs, Mary M.

    1988-01-01

    Most state of the art expert system environments contain a single and often ad hoc strategy for approximate reasoning. Some environments provide facilities to program the approximate reasoning algorithms. However, the next generation of expert systems should have an environment which contain a choice of several mathematical algorithms for approximate reasoning. To meet the need for validatable and verifiable coding, the expert system environment must no longer depend upon ad hoc reasoning techniques but instead must include mathematically rigorous techniques for approximate reasoning. Popular approximate reasoning techniques are reviewed, including: certainty factors, belief measures, Bayesian probabilities, fuzzy logic, and Shafer-Dempster techniques for reasoning. A group of mathematically rigorous algorithms for approximate reasoning are focused on that could form the basis of a next generation expert system environment. These algorithms are based upon the axioms of set theory and probability theory. To separate these algorithms for approximate reasoning various conditions of mutual exclusivity and independence are imposed upon the assertions. Approximate reasoning algorithms presented include: reasoning with statistically independent assertions, reasoning with mutually exclusive assertions, reasoning with assertions that exhibit minimum overlay within the state space, reasoning with assertions that exhibit maximum overlay within the state space (i.e. fuzzy logic), pessimistic reasoning (i.e. worst case analysis), optimistic reasoning (i.e. best case analysis), and reasoning with assertions with absolutely no knowledge of the possible dependency among the assertions. A robust environment for expert system construction should include the two modes of inference: modus ponens and modus tollens. Modus ponens inference is based upon reasoning towards the conclusion in a statement of logical implication, whereas modus tollens inference is based upon reasoning away

  18. Exponential approximations in optimal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Rajan, S. D.; Rajgopal, J.

    1990-01-01

    One-point and two-point exponential functions have been developed and proved to be very effective approximations of structural response. The exponential has been compared to the linear, reciprocal and quadratic fit methods. Four test problems in structural analysis have been selected. The use of such approximations is attractive in structural optimization to reduce the numbers of exact analyses which involve computationally expensive finite element analysis.

  19. Approximating random quantum optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, B.; Laumann, C. R.; Läuchli, A. M.; Moessner, R.; Sondhi, S. L.

    2013-06-01

    We report a cluster of results regarding the difficulty of finding approximate ground states to typical instances of the quantum satisfiability problem k-body quantum satisfiability (k-QSAT) on large random graphs. As an approximation strategy, we optimize the solution space over “classical” product states, which in turn introduces a novel autonomous classical optimization problem, PSAT, over a space of continuous degrees of freedom rather than discrete bits. Our central results are (i) the derivation of a set of bounds and approximations in various limits of the problem, several of which we believe may be amenable to a rigorous treatment; (ii) a demonstration that an approximation based on a greedy algorithm borrowed from the study of frustrated magnetism performs well over a wide range in parameter space, and its performance reflects the structure of the solution space of random k-QSAT. Simulated annealing exhibits metastability in similar “hard” regions of parameter space; and (iii) a generalization of belief propagation algorithms introduced for classical problems to the case of continuous spins. This yields both approximate solutions, as well as insights into the free energy “landscape” of the approximation problem, including a so-called dynamical transition near the satisfiability threshold. Taken together, these results allow us to elucidate the phase diagram of random k-QSAT in a two-dimensional energy-density-clause-density space.

  20. Electrodynamics of interacting point charges: Excellence of the 1865 clausius approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa de Beauregard, O.

    1996-04-01

    Clausius force as equivalent to a time-instant Lorentz force. Action-reaction opposition expressed with the help of potential momenta QA. Conservation of a system's total mass, linear, angular and barycentric momenta. Automatic rendering of the 1967 “hidden momentum in magnets” effect. Clausius formalism as the low velocity approximation to the Wheeler-Feynman electrodyanmics.

  1. Angular momentum redistribution by mixed modes in evolved low-mass stars. I. Theoretical formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, K.; Marques, J. P.; Goupil, M. J.; Sonoi, T.; Ouazzani, R. M.; Dupret, M. A.; Mathis, S.; Mosser, B.; Grosjean, M.

    2015-07-01

    Seismic observations by the space-borne mission Kepler have shown that the core of red giant stars slows down while evolving, requiring an efficient physical mechanism to extract angular momentum from the inner layers. Current stellar evolution codes fail to reproduce the observed rotation rates by several orders of magnitude and instead predict a drastic spin-up of red giant cores. New efficient mechanisms of angular momentum transport are thus required. In this framework, our aim is to investigate the possibility that mixed modes extract angular momentum from the inner radiative regions of evolved low-mass stars. To this end, we consider the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) formalism, which allows us to consider the combined effect of both the wave momentum flux in the mean angular momentum equation and the wave heat flux in the mean entropy equation as well as their interplay with the meridional circulation. In radiative layers of evolved low-mass stars, the quasi-adiabatic approximation, the limit of slow rotation, and the asymptotic regime can be applied for mixed modes and enable us to establish a prescription for the wave fluxes in the mean equations. The formalism is finally applied to a 1.3 M⊙ benchmark model, representative of observed CoRoT and Kepler oscillating evolved stars. We show that the influence of the wave heat flux on the mean angular momentum is not negligible and that the overall effect of mixed modes is to extract angular momentum from the innermost region of the star. A quantitative and accurate estimate requires realistic values of mode amplitudes. This is provided in a companion paper. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  3. Angular Momentum and Galaxy Formation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j sstarf and mass M sstarf (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j sstarf reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j sstarf in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ~100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j sstarf versus M sstarf. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j sstarf-M sstarf tracks, with log-slopes of ~0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ~3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ~7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j sstarf-M sstarf trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j sstarf

  4. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  5. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent.

  6. Angular Momentum Sensitive Two-Center Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Walter, P.; Deinert, S.; Rothkirch, A.; Seltmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Decleva, P.; Langer, B.; Knie, A.; Ehresmann, A.; Al-Dossary, O. M.; Braune, M.; Hartmann, G.; Meissner, A.; Tribedi, L. C.; AlKhaldi, M.; Becker, U.

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  7. New relativistic Hamiltonian: the angular magnetoelectric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillard, Charles; Mondal, Ritwik; Berritta, Marco; Dkhil, Brahim; Singh, Surendra; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Bellaiche, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Spin-Orbit Coupling (SOC) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the spintronics area, as it plays a major role in allowing for enhancing many well-known phenomena, such as the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the Rashba effect, etc. However, the usual expression of the SOC interaction ħ/4m2c2 [E×p] • σ (1) where p is the momentum operator, E the electric field, σ the vector of Pauli matrices, breaks the gauge invariance required by the electronic Hamiltonian. On the other hand, very recently, a new phenomenological interaction, coupling the angular momentum of light and magnetic moments, has been proposed based on symmetry arguments: ξ/2 [r × (E × B)] M, (2) with M the magnetization, r the position, and ξ the interaction strength constant. This interaction has been demonstrated to contribute and/or give rise, in a straightforward way, to various magnetoelectric phenomena,such as the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), the planar Hall effect and Rashba-like effects, or the spin-current model in multiferroics. This last model is known to be the origin of the cycloidal spin arrangement in bismuth ferrite for instance. However, the coupling of the angular momentum of light with magnetic moments lacked a fundamental theoretical basis. Starting from the Dirac equation, we derive a relativistic interaction Hamiltonian which linearly couples the angular momentum density of the electromagnetic (EM) field and the electrons spin. We name this coupling the Angular MagnetoElectric (AME) coupling. We show that in the limit of uniform magnetic field, the AME coupling yields an interaction exactly of the form of Eq. (2), thereby giving a firm theoretical basis to earlier works. The AME coupling can be expressed as: ξ [E × A] • σ (3) with A being the vector potential. Interestingly, the AME coupling was shown to be complementary to the traditional SOC, and together they restore the gauge invariance of the

  8. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  9. Angular momentum sensitive two-center interference.

    PubMed

    Ilchen, M; Glaser, L; Scholz, F; Walter, P; Deinert, S; Rothkirch, A; Seltmann, J; Viefhaus, J; Decleva, P; Langer, B; Knie, A; Ehresmann, A; Al-Dossary, O M; Braune, M; Hartmann, G; Meissner, A; Tribedi, L C; AlKhaldi, M; Becker, U

    2014-01-17

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  10. Linear and angular retroreflecting interferometric alignment target

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L. Curtis

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for measuring both the linear displacement and angular displacement of an object using a linear interferometer system and an optical target comprising a lens, a reflective surface and a retroreflector. The lens, reflecting surface and retroreflector are specifically aligned and fixed in optical connection with one another, creating a single optical target which moves as a unit that provides multi-axis displacement information for the object with which it is associated. This displacement information is useful in many applications including machine tool control systems and laser tracker systems, among others.

  11. Interstellar scattering and resolution limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Brian

    Density irregularities in both the interplanetary medium and the ionized component of the interstellar medium scatter radio waves, resulting in limitations on the achievable resolution. Interplanetary scattering (IPS) is weak for most observational situations, and in principle the resulting phase corruption can be corrected for when observing with sufficiently many array elements. Interstellar scattering (ISS), on the other hand, is usually strong at frequencies below about 8 GHz, in which case intrinsic structure information over a range of angular scales is irretrievably lost. With the earth-space baselines now planned, it will be possible to search directly for interstellar refraction, which is suspected of modulating the fluxes of background sources.

  12. Polarization-Dependent Measurements of Molecular Super Rotors with Oriented Angular Momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Matthew J.; Toro, Carlos; Liu, Qingnan; Mullin, Amy S.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling molecular motion would enable manipulation of energy flow between molecules. Here we have used an optical centrifuge to investigate energy transfer between molecular super rotors with oriented angular momenta. The polarizable electron cloud of the molecules interacts with the electric field of linearly polarized light that angularly accelerates over the time of the optical pulse. This process drives molecules into high angular momentum states that are oriented with the optical field and have energies far from equilibrium. High resolution transient IR spectroscopy reveals the dynamics of collisional energy transfer for these super excited rotors. The results of this study leads to a more fundamental understanding of energy balance in non-equilibrium environments and the physical and chemical properties of gases in a new regime of energy states. Results will be presented for several super rotor species including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and acetylene. Polarization-dependent measurements reveal the extent to which the super rotors maintain spatial orientation of high angular momentum states.

  13. Searches for Angular Extension in High Latitude Fermi-LAT Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Regina; di Mauro, Mattia; Meyer, Manuel; Wells, Brendan; Wood, Matthew; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present a comprehensive search for angular extension in high-latitude gamma-ray sources detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) using the 4-year LAT Point Source Catalog (3FGL). The majority of high-latitude LAT sources are extragalactic blazars that appear point-like within the LAT angular resolution. However, there are physics scenarios that predict populations of spatially extended sources. In one scenario, electron-positron pair cascades from gamma rays produced in blazars are deflected in the Intergalactic Magnetic Field (IGMF) producing extended emission, or ``pair halos''. The detection of a pair halo component around a LAT-detected blazar would provide a measurement of the strength and coherence length scale of the IGMF. In another scenario, the annihilation or decay of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, a candidate for dark matter (DM), in Milky Way subhalos would appear as a population of unassociated gamma-ray sources with an angular extension. The detection of spatial extension in nearby sub halos could provide compelling evidence for a DM interpretation and would serve as an independent cross-check against other DM searches. We report on the angular extension catalog based on 7.5 years of Pass 8 data and discuss the implications of these results.

  14. Extreme Ultraviolet Fractional Orbital Angular Momentum Beams from High Harmonic Generation

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Alex; Rego, Laura; Picón, Antonio; San Román, Julio; Hernández-García, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) beams carrying fractional orbital angular momentum. To this end, we drive high-order harmonic generation with infrared conical refraction (CR) beams. We show that the high-order harmonic beams emitted in the EUV/soft x-ray regime preserve the characteristic signatures of the driving beam, namely ringlike transverse intensity profile and CR-like polarization distribution. As a result, through orbital and spin angular momentum conservation, harmonic beams are emitted with fractional orbital angular momentum, and they can be synthesized into structured attosecond helical beams –or “structured attosecond light springs”– with rotating linear polarization along the azimuth. Our proposal overcomes the state of the art limitations for the generation of light beams far from the visible domain carrying non-integer orbital angular momentum and could be applied in fields such as diffraction imaging, EUV lithography, particle trapping, and super-resolution imaging. PMID:28281655

  15. Gadgets, approximation, and linear programming

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, L.; Sudan, M.; Sorkin, G.B.; Williamson, D.P.

    1996-12-31

    We present a linear-programming based method for finding {open_quotes}gadgets{close_quotes}, i.e., combinatorial structures reducing constraints of one optimization problems to constraints of another. A key step in this method is a simple observation which limits the search space to a finite one. Using this new method we present a number of new, computer-constructed gadgets for several different reductions. This method also answers a question posed by on how to prove the optimality of gadgets-we show how LP duality gives such proofs. The new gadgets improve hardness results for MAX CUT and MAX DICUT, showing that approximating these problems to within factors of 60/61 and 44/45 respectively is N P-hard. We also use the gadgets to obtain an improved approximation algorithm for MAX 3SAT which guarantees an approximation ratio of .801. This improves upon the previous best bound of .7704.

  16. Adaptive approximation models in optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A.N.

    1995-05-01

    The paper proposes a method for optimization of functions of several variables that substantially reduces the number of objective function evaluations compared to traditional methods. The method is based on the property of iterative refinement of approximation models of the optimand function in approximation domains that contract to the extremum point. It does not require subjective specification of the starting point, step length, or other parameters of the search procedure. The method is designed for efficient optimization of unimodal functions of several (not more than 10-15) variables and can be applied to find the global extremum of polymodal functions and also for optimization of scalarized forms of vector objective functions.

  17. Approximating spatially exclusive invasion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Joshua V.; Binder, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    A number of biological processes, such as invasive plant species and cell migration, are composed of two key mechanisms: motility and reproduction. Due to the spatially exclusive interacting behavior of these processes a cellular automata (CA) model is specified to simulate a one-dimensional invasion process. Three (independence, Poisson, and 2D-Markov chain) approximations are considered that attempt to capture the average behavior of the CA. We show that our 2D-Markov chain approximation accurately predicts the state of the CA for a wide range of motility and reproduction rates.

  18. Heat pipe transient response approximation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and concise routine that approximates the response of an alkali metal heat pipe to changes in evaporator heat transfer rate is described. This analytically based routine is compared with data from a cylindrical heat pipe with a crescent-annular wick that undergoes gradual (quasi-steady) transitions through the viscous and condenser boundary heat transfer limits. The sonic heat transfer limit can also be incorporated into this routine for heat pipes with more closely coupled condensers. The advantages and obvious limitations of this approach are discussed. For reference, a source code listing for the approximation appears at the end of this paper.

  19. Second Approximation to Conical Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-12-01

    Public Release WRIGHT AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER AF-WP-(B)-O-29 JUL 53 100 NOTICES ’When Government drawings, specifications, or other data are used V...so that the X, the approximation always depends on the ( "/)th, etc. Here the second approximation, i.e., the terms in C and 62, are computed and...the scheme shown in Fig. 1, the isentropic equations of motion are (cV-X2) +~X~C 6 +- 4= -x- 1 It is assumed that + Ux !E . $O’/ + (8) Introducing Eqs

  20. High resolution study of isovector negative parity states in the {sup 16}O({sup 3}He,t){sup 16}F reaction at 140 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, H.; Berg, G. P. A.; Fujimura, H.; Fujita, K.; Hara, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Shimbara, Y.; Yoshifuku, M.; Rapaport, J.; Botha, N. T.; Kawabata, T.; Neveling, R.

    2009-02-15

    The isovector transitions from the ground state (g.s.) of {sup 16}O to the negative parity states in {sup 16}F, i.e., the J{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} g.s., the 0.193 MeV, 1{sup -} state, the 0.424 MeV, 2{sup -} state, the 0.721 MeV, 3{sup -} state, and the 4{sup -}''stretched'' state at 6.372 MeV, were studied by using a high resolution {sup 16}O({sup 3}He,t){sup 16}F reaction at 140 MeV/nucleon. With the help of high energy resolution, these states were, for the first time, clearly resolved in a charge exchange reaction at an intermediate energy, which favorably excites spin-flip states. Angular distributions of the reaction cross sections were measured in the laboratory frame from 0 deg. to 14 deg. Parameters of phenomenological effective interactions were derived so as to reproduce these angular distributions in distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations. The angular distribution of the 0{sup -} state could be reproduced well at {theta}{sub c.m.}<10 deg. The empirical values, however, are larger by a factor of 2-2.5 in the larger angle region, where the contribution of the so-called 'condensed pion field' is expected. The high resolution also enabled the decay widths of these states to be measured.

  1. Maximum magnetic moment to angular momentum conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Gibbons, G. W.

    2017-03-01

    Conjectures play a central role in theoretical physics, especially those that assert an upper bound to some dimensionless ratio of physical quantities. In this paper we introduce a new such conjecture bounding the ratio of the magnetic moment to angular momentum in nature. We also discuss the current status of some old bounds on dimensionless and dimensional quantities in arbitrary spatial dimension. Our new conjecture is that the dimensionless Schuster-Wilson-Blackett number, c μ /J G1/2 , where μ is the magnetic moment and J is the angular momentum, is bounded above by a number of order unity. We verify that such a bound holds for charged rotating black holes in those theories for which exact solutions are available, including the Einstein-Maxwell theory, Kaluza-Klein theory, the Kerr-Sen black hole, and the so-called STU family of charged rotating supergravity black holes. We also discuss the current status of the maximum tension conjecture, the Dyson luminosity bound, and Thorne's hoop conjecture.

  2. Angular Momentum Redistribution in Turbulent Compressible Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal; Brummell, Nicholas; Toomre, Juri

    1997-08-01

    We consider the dynamics of turbulent compressible convection within a curved local segment of a rotating spherical shell. We aim to understand the disparity between the observed solar differential rotation and previous numerical simulations. The angular extent of the curved domain is limited to a small solid angle in order to exploit fully the available spatial degrees of freedom on current supercomputers and attain the highest possible Reynolds numbers. Here we present simulations with Rayleigh numbers in excess of 10^7, and Prandtl numbers less than 0.1. This computational domain takes the form of a curved, periodic channel in longitude with stress-free sidewalls in latitude and radius. The numerical solutions are obtained using high-order accuracy explicit code. It evaluates spatial derivatives using sixth-order compact finite differences in radius and latitude and psuedospectral methods in longitude and advances the solutions in time using a fourth-order Bulirsch-Stoer integrator. The surface flows form broad, laminar networks which mask the much more turbulent flows of the interior. The dynamics within this turbulent region is controlled by the interactions of a tangled web of strong vortex tubes. These tubes and their interactions redistrubute the angular momentum, generating azimuthal flows with strong shear in both radius and latitude. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab

  3. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  4. Muscle activities during asymmetric trunk angular accelerations.

    PubMed

    Marras, W S; Mirka, G A

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize trunk muscle and intra-abdominal pressure behavior during extensions of the trunk when angular trunk acceleration levels and trunk twist were varied during lifting exertions. Since force is related to acceleration, it was believed that changes in trunk acceleration would cause activity changes in the muscles and abdominal cavity pressurization mechanics that load the spine during manual materials handling tasks. The electromyographic activity of 10 trunk muscles and intra-abdominal pressure were studied in 39 subjects as they moved their trunks under high, medium, and low constant angular acceleration conditions. The results indicated that almost all the muscles were affected by acceleration and asymmetry. Muscle activities of up to 50% of maximum were observed even though a minimal amount of torque was being produced by the back. Coactivation of muscles was also apparent. Muscles located at the greatest distances from the spine, such as the latissimus dorsi and oblique groups, increased their activities the most as trunk acceleration increased. Muscles located farthest from the spine also played an important role as the trunk became more asymmetric. Intra-abdominal pressure changed minimally over the test conditions. The nature of these responses and their impact on spine loading are discussed.

  5. A quantum relaxation-time approximation for finite fermion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2015-03-15

    We propose a relaxation time approximation for the description of the dynamics of strongly excited fermion systems. Our approach is based on time-dependent density functional theory at the level of the local density approximation. This mean-field picture is augmented by collisional correlations handled in relaxation time approximation which is inspired from the corresponding semi-classical picture. The method involves the estimate of microscopic relaxation rates/times which is presently taken from the well established semi-classical experience. The relaxation time approximation implies evaluation of the instantaneous equilibrium state towards which the dynamical state is progressively driven at the pace of the microscopic relaxation time. As test case, we consider Na clusters of various sizes excited either by a swift ion projectile or by a short and intense laser pulse, driven in various dynamical regimes ranging from linear to strongly non-linear reactions. We observe a strong effect of dissipation on sensitive observables such as net ionization and angular distributions of emitted electrons. The effect is especially large for moderate excitations where typical relaxation/dissipation time scales efficiently compete with ionization for dissipating the available excitation energy. Technical details on the actual procedure to implement a working recipe of such a quantum relaxation approximation are given in appendices for completeness.

  6. Phantom vortices: hidden angular momentum in ultracold dilute Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Storm E; Tsatsos, Marios C; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Lode, Axel U J

    2017-01-16

    Vortices are essential to angular momentum in quantum systems such as ultracold atomic gases. The existence of quantized vorticity in bosonic systems stimulated the development of the Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field approximation. However, the true dynamics of angular momentum in finite, interacting many-body systems like trapped Bose-Einstein condensates is enriched by the emergence of quantum correlations whose description demands more elaborate methods. Herein we theoretically investigate the full many-body dynamics of the acquisition of angular momentum by a gas of ultracold bosons in two dimensions using a standard rotation procedure. We demonstrate the existence of a novel mode of quantized vorticity, which we term the phantom vortex. Contrary to the conventional mean-field vortex, can be detected as a topological defect of spatial coherence, but not of the density. We describe previously unknown many-body mechanisms of vortex nucleation and show that angular momentum is hidden in phantom vortices modes which so far seem to have evaded experimental detection. This phenomenon is likely important in the formation of the Abrikosov lattice and the onset of turbulence in superfluids.

  7. Phantom vortices: hidden angular momentum in ultracold dilute Bose-Einstein condensates

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Storm E.; Tsatsos, Marios C.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Lode, Axel U. J.

    2017-01-01

    Vortices are essential to angular momentum in quantum systems such as ultracold atomic gases. The existence of quantized vorticity in bosonic systems stimulated the development of the Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field approximation. However, the true dynamics of angular momentum in finite, interacting many-body systems like trapped Bose-Einstein condensates is enriched by the emergence of quantum correlations whose description demands more elaborate methods. Herein we theoretically investigate the full many-body dynamics of the acquisition of angular momentum by a gas of ultracold bosons in two dimensions using a standard rotation procedure. We demonstrate the existence of a novel mode of quantized vorticity, which we term the phantom vortex. Contrary to the conventional mean-field vortex, can be detected as a topological defect of spatial coherence, but not of the density. We describe previously unknown many-body mechanisms of vortex nucleation and show that angular momentum is hidden in phantom vortices modes which so far seem to have evaded experimental detection. This phenomenon is likely important in the formation of the Abrikosov lattice and the onset of turbulence in superfluids. PMID:28091520

  8. Dangerous angular Kaluza-Klein/glueball relics in string theory cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dufaux, J. F.; Kofman, L.; Peloso, M.

    2008-07-15

    The presence of Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles in the universe is a potential manifestation of string theory cosmology. In general, they can be present in the high temperature bath of the early universe. In particular examples, string theory inflation often ends with brane-antibrane annihilation followed by the energy cascading through massive closed string loops to KK modes which then decay into lighter standard model particles. However, massive KK modes in the early universe may become dangerous cosmological relics if the inner manifold contains warped throat(s) with approximate isometries. In the complimentary picture, in the AdS/CFT dual gauge theory with extra isometries, massive glueballs of various spins become the dangerous cosmological relics. The decay of these angular KK modes/glueballs, located around the tip of the throat, is caused by isometry breaking which results from gluing the throat to the compact Calabi-Yau (CY) manifold. We address the problem of these angular KK particles/glueballs, studying their interactions and decay channels, from the theory side, and the resulting cosmological constraints on the warped compactification parameters, from the phenomenology side. The abundance and decay time of the long-lived nonrelativistic angular KK modes depend strongly on the parameters of the warped geometry, so that observational constraints rule out a significant fraction of the parameter space. In particular, the coupling of the angular KK particles can be weaker than gravitational.

  9. Integrated accretion disk angular momentum removal and astrophysical jet acceleration mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A model has been developed for how accretion disks discard angular momentum while powering astrophysical jets. The model depends on the extremely weak ionization of disks. This causes disk ions to be collisionally locked to adjacent disk neutrals so a clump of disk ions and neutrals has an effective cyclotron frequency αωci where α is the fractional ionization. When αωci is approximately twice the Kepler orbital frequency, conservation of canonical momentum shows that the clump spirals radially inwards producing a radially inward disk electric current as electrons cannot move radially in the disk. Upon reaching the jet radius, this current then flows axially away from the disk plane along the jet, producing a toroidal magnetic field that drives the jet. Electrons remain frozen to poloidal flux surfaces everywhere and electron motion on flux surfaces in the ideal MHD region outside the disk completes the current path. Angular momentum absorbed from accreting material in the disk by magnetic counter-torque -JrBz is transported by the electric circuit and ejected at near infinite radius in the disk plane. This is like an electric generator absorbing angular momentum and wired to a distant electric motor that emits angular momentum. Supported by USDOE/NSF Partnership in Plasma Science.

  10. Phantom vortices: hidden angular momentum in ultracold dilute Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Storm E.; Tsatsos, Marios C.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Lode, Axel U. J.

    2017-01-01

    Vortices are essential to angular momentum in quantum systems such as ultracold atomic gases. The existence of quantized vorticity in bosonic systems stimulated the development of the Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field approximation. However, the true dynamics of angular momentum in finite, interacting many-body systems like trapped Bose-Einstein condensates is enriched by the emergence of quantum correlations whose description demands more elaborate methods. Herein we theoretically investigate the full many-body dynamics of the acquisition of angular momentum by a gas of ultracold bosons in two dimensions using a standard rotation procedure. We demonstrate the existence of a novel mode of quantized vorticity, which we term the phantom vortex. Contrary to the conventional mean-field vortex, can be detected as a topological defect of spatial coherence, but not of the density. We describe previously unknown many-body mechanisms of vortex nucleation and show that angular momentum is hidden in phantom vortices modes which so far seem to have evaded experimental detection. This phenomenon is likely important in the formation of the Abrikosov lattice and the onset of turbulence in superfluids.

  11. Polynomial force approximations and multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Forchheimer, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Haviland, David B

    2013-01-01

    We present polynomial force reconstruction from experimental intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) data. We study the tip-surface force during a slow surface approach and compare the results with amplitude-dependence force spectroscopy (ADFS). Based on polynomial force reconstruction we generate high-resolution surface-property maps of polymer blend samples. The polynomial method is described as a special example of a more general approximative force reconstruction, where the aim is to determine model parameters that best approximate the measured force spectrum. This approximative approach is not limited to spectral data, and we demonstrate how it can be adapted to a force quadrature picture.

  12. Optical imaging through non-transparent small aquatic creatures with angular-domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rongen L. K.; Tsui, Polly B. L.; Chiang, Gary; Chapman, Glenn H.

    2011-03-01

    When imaging through small aquatic creatures, scattered photons produce problems in image quality and resolution. Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) reduces scattered photons and improves the image quality and resolution. ADI is an imaging technique which utilizes the angular spectrum of photons to filter multiple-scattered photons and accept only photons with small angular deviation from their original trajectory. Advantages of the ADI technique are that it is insensitive to wavelength and the sources are not required to be high optical quality, coherent, or pulsed, as with OCT or time domain. Our target is to image a small species called Branchiostoma lanceolatum, a lancet that is 5-8cm long and 5mm thick, by using ADI to remove the scattering in order to image internal structures. A laser illuminates the lancelet in a water-filled container and a spatiofrequency filter removes the scattered photons before the imager. Experimentally, a coherent Nd:Yag second harmonic (533nm) laser creates images but also optical interference occuring within the internal structures of the lancelet. Conversely, an incoherent broad-band white light source eliminates the structural interference effect; however, the wavelength variation of the scattering coefficient combined with the limitation of the image sensor's dynamic range limit the ability to distinguish the internal structures in many areas. Thus, an IR diode laser (780nm) is used to lower the scattering coefficient as compared to conventional visible light source and to diminish the interference effects due to its shorter coherence length.

  13. Spline Approximation of Thin Shell Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delRosario, R. C. H.; Smith, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    A spline-based method for approximating thin shell dynamics is presented here. While the method is developed in the context of the Donnell-Mushtari thin shell equations, it can be easily extended to the Byrne-Flugge-Lur'ye equations or other models for shells of revolution as warranted by applications. The primary requirements for the method include accuracy, flexibility and efficiency in smart material applications. To accomplish this, the method was designed to be flexible with regard to boundary conditions, material nonhomogeneities due to sensors and actuators, and inputs from smart material actuators such as piezoceramic patches. The accuracy of the method was also of primary concern, both to guarantee full resolution of structural dynamics and to facilitate the development of PDE-based controllers which ultimately require real-time implementation. Several numerical examples provide initial evidence demonstrating the efficacy of the method.

  14. Pythagorean Approximations and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Javier

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we will show that the Pythagorean approximations of [the square root of] 2 coincide with those achieved in the 16th century by means of continued fractions. Assuming this fact and the known relation that connects the Fibonacci sequence with the golden section, we shall establish a procedure to obtain sequences of rational numbers…

  15. An EM Induction Hi-Speed Rotation Angular Rate Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuan; Han, Yan

    2017-01-01

    A hi-speed rotation angular rate sensor based on an electromagnetic induction signal is proposed to provide a possibility of wide range measurement of high angular rates. An angular rate sensor is designed that works on the principle of electromagnetism (EM) induction. In addition to a zero-phase detection technique, this sensor uses the feedback principle of magnetic induction coils in response to a rotating magnetic field. It solves the challenge of designing an angular rate sensor that is suitable for both low and high rotating rates. The sensor was examined for angular rate measurement accuracy in simulation tests using a rotary table. The results show that it is capable of measuring angular rates ranging from 1 rps to 100 rps, with an error within 1.8‰ of the full scale (FS). The proposed sensor is suitable to measurement applications where the rotation angular rate is widely varied, and it contributes to design technology advancements of real-time sensors measuring angular acceleration, angular rate, and angular displacement of hi-speed rotary objects. PMID:28304348

  16. An EM Induction Hi-Speed Rotation Angular Rate Sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuan; Han, Yan

    2017-03-17

    A hi-speed rotation angular rate sensor based on an electromagnetic induction signal is proposed to provide a possibility of wide range measurement of high angular rates. An angular rate sensor is designed that works on the principle of electromagnetism (EM) induction. In addition to a zero-phase detection technique, this sensor uses the feedback principle of magnetic induction coils in response to a rotating magnetic field. It solves the challenge of designing an angular rate sensor that is suitable for both low and high rotating rates. The sensor was examined for angular rate measurement accuracy in simulation tests using a rotary table. The results show that it is capable of measuring angular rates ranging from 1 rps to 100 rps, with an error within 1.8‰ of the full scale (FS). The proposed sensor is suitable to measurement applications where the rotation angular rate is widely varied, and it contributes to design technology advancements of real-time sensors measuring angular acceleration, angular rate, and angular displacement of hi-speed rotary objects.

  17. Angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment topolyatomic molecules: application to the 2B1 metastable state of the H2Oand H2S anions

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2006-01-12

    The angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to polyatomic targets is formulated in the local complex potential model, under the assumption that the axial recoil approximation describes the dissociation dynamics. An additional approximation, which is found to be valid in the case of H2O but not in the case of H2S, makes it possible to describe the angular dependence of DEA solely from an analysis of the fixed-nuclei entrance amplitude, without carrying out nuclear dynamics calculations. For H2S, the final-vibrational-state-specific angular dependence of DEA is obtained by incorporating the variation of the angular dependence of the entrance amplitude with nuclear geometry into the nuclear dynamics. Scattering calculations using the complex Kohn method and, for H2S, full quantum calculations of the nuclear dynamics using the Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree method, are performed.

  18. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  19. Passive Acoustic Mapping with the Angular Spectrum Method.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Crake, Calum; McDannold, Nathan; Clement, Gregory T

    2017-04-01

    In the present proof of principle study, we evaluated the homogenous angular spectrum method for passive acoustic mapping (AS-PAM) of microbubble oscillations using simulated and experimental data. In the simulated data we assessed the ability of AS-PAM to form 3D maps of a single and multiple point sources. Then, in the two dimensional limit, we compared the 2D maps from AS-PAM with alternative frequency and time domain passive acoustic mapping (FD- and TD-PAM) approaches. Finally, we assessed the ability of AS-PAM to visualize microbubble activity in vivo with data obtained during 8 different experiments of FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption in 3 nonhuman primates, using a clinical MR-guided FUS system. Our in silico results demonstrate AS-PAM can be used to perform 3D passive acoustic mapping. 2D AS-PAM as compared to FD- PAM and TD-PAM is 10 and 200 times faster respectively and has similar sensitivity, resolution, and localization accuracy, even when the noise was 10-fold higher than the signal. In-vivo, the AS-PAM reconstructions of emissions at frequency bands pertinent to the different types of microbubble oscillations were also found to be more sensitive than TD-PAM. AS-PAM of harmonic-only components predicted safe blood-brain barrier disruption, whereas AS-PAM of broadband emissions correctly identified MR-evident tissue damage. The disparity (3.2 mm) in the location of the cavitation activity between the three methods was within their resolution limits. These data clearly demonstrate that AS-PAM is a sensitive and fast approach for PAM, thus providing a clinically relevant method to guide therapeutic ultrasound procedures.

  20. ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I. THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Imara, Nia; Blitz, Leo

    2011-05-10

    We present a detailed analysis comparing the velocity fields in molecular clouds and the atomic gas that surrounds them in order to address the origin of the gradients. To that end, we present first-moment intensity-weighted velocity maps of the molecular clouds and surrounding atomic gas. The maps are made from high-resolution {sup 13}CO observations and 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic H I Survey. We find that (1) the atomic gas associated with each molecular cloud has a substantial velocity gradient-ranging from 0.02 to 0.07 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1}-whether or not the molecular cloud itself has a substantial linear gradient. (2) If the gradients in the molecular and atomic gas were due to rotation, this would imply that the molecular clouds have less specific angular momentum than the surrounding H I by a factor of 1-6. (3) Most importantly, the velocity gradient position angles in the molecular and atomic gas are generally widely separated-by as much as 130 deg. in the case of the Rosette molecular cloud. This result argues against the hypothesis that molecular clouds formed by simple top-down collapse from atomic gas.

  1. A novel instrument for generating angular increments of 1 nanoradian.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Simon G; Bugnar, Alex; Nistea, Ioana; Sawhney, Kawal; Scott, Stewart; Hillman, Michael; Grindrod, Jamie; Johnson, Iain

    2015-12-01

    Accurate generation of small angles is of vital importance for calibrating angle-based metrology instruments used in a broad spectrum of industries including mechatronics, nano-positioning, and optic fabrication. We present a novel, piezo-driven, flexure device capable of reliably generating micro- and nanoradian angles. Unlike many such instruments, Diamond Light Source's nano-angle generator (Diamond-NANGO) does not rely on two separate actuators or rotation stages to provide coarse and fine motion. Instead, a single Physik Instrumente NEXLINE "PiezoWalk" actuator provides millimetres of travel with nanometre resolution. A cartwheel flexure efficiently converts displacement from the linear actuator into rotary motion with minimal parasitic errors. Rotation of the flexure is directly measured via a Magnescale "Laserscale" angle encoder. Closed-loop operation of the PiezoWalk actuator, using high-speed feedback from the angle encoder, ensures that the Diamond-NANGO's output drifts by only ∼0.3 nrad rms over ∼30 min. We show that the Diamond-NANGO can reliably move with unprecedented 1 nrad (∼57 ndeg) angular increments over a range of >7000 μrad. An autocollimator, interferometer, and capacitive displacement sensor are used to independently confirm the Diamond-NANGO's performance by simultaneously measuring the rotation of a reflective cube.

  2. A novel instrument for generating angular increments of 1 nanoradian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, Simon G.; Bugnar, Alex; Nistea, Ioana; Sawhney, Kawal; Scott, Stewart; Hillman, Michael; Grindrod, Jamie; Johnson, Iain

    2015-12-01

    Accurate generation of small angles is of vital importance for calibrating angle-based metrology instruments used in a broad spectrum of industries including mechatronics, nano-positioning, and optic fabrication. We present a novel, piezo-driven, flexure device capable of reliably generating micro- and nanoradian angles. Unlike many such instruments, Diamond Light Source's nano-angle generator (Diamond-NANGO) does not rely on two separate actuators or rotation stages to provide coarse and fine motion. Instead, a single Physik Instrumente NEXLINE "PiezoWalk" actuator provides millimetres of travel with nanometre resolution. A cartwheel flexure efficiently converts displacement from the linear actuator into rotary motion with minimal parasitic errors. Rotation of the flexure is directly measured via a Magnescale "Laserscale" angle encoder. Closed-loop operation of the PiezoWalk actuator, using high-speed feedback from the angle encoder, ensures that the Diamond-NANGO's output drifts by only ˜0.3 nrad rms over ˜30 min. We show that the Diamond-NANGO can reliably move with unprecedented 1 nrad (˜57 ndeg) angular increments over a range of >7000 μrad. An autocollimator, interferometer, and capacitive displacement sensor are used to independently confirm the Diamond-NANGO's performance by simultaneously measuring the rotation of a reflective cube.

  3. Angular dependence of photoemission time delay in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, Sebastian; Jiménez Galán, Álvaro; Cirelli, Claudio; Marante, Carlos; Sabbar, Mazyar; Boge, Robert; Lucchini, Matteo; Gallmann, Lukas; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli S.; Dahlström, J. Marcus; Lindroth, Eva; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Keller, Ursula

    2016-12-01

    Time delays of electrons emitted from an isotropic initial state with the absorption of a single photon and leaving behind an isotropic ion are angle independent. Using an interferometric method involving XUV attosecond pulse trains and an IR-probe field in combination with a detection scheme, which allows for full three-dimensional momentum resolution, we show that measured time delays between electrons liberated from the 1 s2 spherically symmetric ground state of helium depend on the emission direction of the electrons relative to the common linear polarization axis of the ionizing XUV light and the IR-probing field. Such time delay anisotropy, for which we measure values as large as 60 as, is caused by the interplay between final quantum states with different symmetry and arises naturally whenever the photoionization process involves the exchange of more than one photon. With the support of accurate theoretical models, the angular dependence of the time delay is attributed to small phase differences that are induced in the laser-driven continuum transitions to the final states. Since most measurement techniques tracing attosecond electron dynamics involve the exchange of at least two photons, this is a general and significant effect that must be taken into account in all measurements of time delays involving photoionization processes.

  4. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus.

  5. Angular momentum of dark matter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2017-04-01

    We provide strongly suggestive evidence that the halo constituents of dark matter are Primordial Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (PIMBHs). PIMBHs are described by a Kerr metric with two parameters, mass M and angular momentum J. There has been little discussion of J since it plays no role in the upcoming attempt at PIMBH detection by microlensing. Nevertheless J does play a central role in understanding their previous lack of detection, especially by CMB distortion. We explain why bounds previously derived from lack of CMB distortion are too strong for PIMBHs with J non-vanishing and that, provided almost no dark matter black holes originate from stellar collapse, excessive CMB distortion is avoided.

  6. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  7. Angular response of hot wire probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mare, L.; Jelly, T. O.; Day, I. J.

    2017-03-01

    A new equation for the convective heat loss from the sensor of a hot-wire probe is derived which accounts for both the potential and the viscous parts of the flow past the prongs. The convective heat loss from the sensor is related to the far-field velocity by an expression containing a term representing the potential flow around the prongs, and a term representing their viscous effect. This latter term is absent in the response equations available in the literature but is essential in representing some features of the observed response of miniature hot-wire probes. The response equation contains only four parameters but it can reproduce, with great accuracy, the behaviour of commonly used single-wire probes. The response equation simplifies the calibration the angular response of rotated slanted hot-wire probes: only standard King’s law parameters and a Reynolds-dependent drag coefficient need to be determined.

  8. Angular Flow in Toroid Cavity Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Peter; Woelk, Klaus; Bargon, Joachim; Gerald, Rex E.

    2001-08-01

    NMR signals from samples that rotate uniformly about the central conductor of a TCD (toroid cavity detector) exhibit frequency shifts that are directly proportional to the sample's angular velocity. This newly observed effect is based on the unique radiofrequency field inside TCDs, which is variable in direction. If a liquid sample is pumped through a capillary tube wound about the central conductor, the frequency shift is proportional to the flow rate. A mathematical relationship between a volumetric flow rate and the frequency shift is established and experimentally verified to high precision. Additionally, two-dimensional flow-resolved NMR spectroscopy for discrimination between components with different flow velocities yet retaining chemical shift information for structural analysis is presented. The application of the two-dimensional method in chromatographic NMR is suggested. Furthermore, utilization of the frequency-shift effect for rheologic studies if combined with toroid-cavity rotating-frame imaging is proposed.

  9. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  10. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  11. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  12. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Angular-momentum distributions sigma/sub L/ for the compound nucleus /sup 164/Yb were deduced from measurements of ..gamma..-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of /sup 64/Ni and /sup 100/Mo at and below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation functions can be reproduced with coupled-channels calculations only if additional coupling beyond the known inelastic strengths is included. Even with this augmented coupling, however, at the lowest bombarding energies the experimental sigma/sub L/ extend to higher L values than the predictions. Single-barrier penetration models for a potential with an energy-dependent depth and shape fitted to the excitation function likewise underestimate the role of high-L partial waves. Somewhat better success is achieved with models in which fission is allowed to occur at distances comparable with or even larger than the Coulomb barrier radius. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Angular relation of axes in perceptual space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, Urs

    1992-01-01

    The geometry of perceptual space needs to be known to model spatial orientation constancy or to create virtual environments. To examine one main aspect of this geometry, the angular relation between the three spatial axes was measured. Experiments were performed consisting of a perceptual task in which subjects were asked to set independently their apparent vertical and horizontal plane. The visual background provided no other stimuli to serve as optical direction cues. The task was performed in a number of different body tilt positions with pitches and rolls varied in steps of 30 degs. The results clearly show the distortion of orthogonality of the perceptual space for nonupright body positions. Large interindividual differences were found. Deviations from orthogonality up to 25 deg were detected in the pitch as well as in the roll direction. Implications of this nonorthogonality on further studies of spatial perception and on the construction of virtual environments for human interaction is also discussed.

  14. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  15. Angular reduction in multiparticle matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, D. R.; Parke, W. C.

    1989-12-01

    A general method for reduction of coupled spherical harmonic products is presented. When the total angular coupling is zero, the reduction leads to an explicitly real expression in the scalar products of the unit vector arguments of the spherical harmonics. For nonscalar couplings, the reduction gives Cartesian tensor forms for the spherical harmonic products; tensors built from the physical vectors in the original expression. The reduction for arbitrary couplings is given in closed form, making it amenable to symbolic manipulation on a computer. The final expressions do not depend on a special choice of coordinate axes, nor do they contain azimuthal quantum number summations, or do they have complex tensor terms for couplings to a scalar; consequently, they are easily interpretable from the properties of the physical vectors they contain.

  16. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  17. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, C; Rheault, F; Boulay, R; Tremblay, R

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  18. Alignment of the angular momentum vectors of planetary nebulae in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, B.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    We use high-resolution Hα images of 130 planetary nebulae (PNe) to investigate whether there is a preferred orientation for PNe within the Galactic Bulge. The orientations of the full sample have a uniform distribution. However, at a significance level of 0.01, there is evidence for a non-uniform distribution for those PNe with evident bipolar morphology. If we assume that the bipolar PNe have a unimodal distribution of the polar axis in Galactic coordinates, the mean Galactic position angle is consistent with 90°, i.e. along the Galactic Plane, and the significance level is better than 0.001 (the equivalent of a 3.7σ significance level for a Gaussian distribution). The shapes of PNe are related to angular momentum of the original star or stellar system, where the long axis of the nebula measures the angular momentum vector. In old, low-mass stars, the angular momentum is largely in binary orbital motion. Consequently, the alignment of bipolar nebulae that we have found indicates that the orbital planes of the binary systems are oriented perpendicular to the Galactic Plane. We propose that strong magnetic fields aligned along the Galactic Plane acted during the original star formation process to slow the contraction of the star-forming cloud in the direction perpendicular to the Plane. This would have produced a propensity for wider binaries with higher angular momentum with orbital axes parallel to the Galactic Plane. Our findings provide the first indication of a strong, organized magnetic field along the Galactic Plane that impacted on the angular momentum vectors of the resulting stellar population.

  19. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  20. Ab initio dynamical vertex approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Anna; Thunström, Patrik; Gunacker, Patrik; Tomczak, Jan M.; Held, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Diagrammatic extensions of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) such as the dynamical vertex approximation (DΓ A) allow us to include nonlocal correlations beyond DMFT on all length scales and proved their worth for model calculations. Here, we develop and implement an Ab initio DΓ A approach (AbinitioDΓ A ) for electronic structure calculations of materials. The starting point is the two-particle irreducible vertex in the two particle-hole channels which is approximated by the bare nonlocal Coulomb interaction and all local vertex corrections. From this, we calculate the full nonlocal vertex and the nonlocal self-energy through the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The AbinitioDΓ A approach naturally generates all local DMFT correlations and all nonlocal G W contributions, but also further nonlocal correlations beyond: mixed terms of the former two and nonlocal spin fluctuations. We apply this new methodology to the prototypical correlated metal SrVO3.