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Sample records for angularly adaptive p1-double

  1. Angularly Adaptive P1--Double P0 Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems in Planar Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2005-06-06

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. The standard P{sub 1} angular approximation represents the angular dependence of the radiation specific intensity using a linear function in the angular domain -1 {le} {mu} {le} 1. In contrast, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation represents the angular dependence as isotropic in each half angular range -1 {le} {mu} < 0 and 0 < {mu} {le} 1. Neglecting the time derivative of the radiation flux, both the P{sub 1} and DP{sub 0} equations can be written as a single diffusion equation for the radiation energy density. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near the non-equilibrium wave front. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for a test problem due to Su and Olson for which a semi-analytic transport solution exists. The numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  2. Angularly Adaptive P1 - Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2006-08-08

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  3. Angularly Adaptive P1-Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2005-12-13

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  4. Adaptive power-controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) multicasting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We report feedback-assisted adaptive multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single phase-only spatial light modulator loaded with a complex phase pattern. By designing and optimizing the complex phase pattern through the adaptive correction of feedback coefficients, the power of each multicast OAM channel can be arbitrarily controlled. We experimentally demonstrate power-controllable multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to two and six OAM modes with different target power distributions. Equalized power multicasting, “up-down” power multicasting and “ladder” power multicasting are realized in the experiment. The difference between measured power distributions and target power distributions is assessed to be less than 1 dB. Moreover, we demonstrate data-carrying OAM multicasting by employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 64-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM 64-QAM) signal. The measured bit-error rate curves and observed optical signal-to-noise ratio penalties show favorable operation performance of the proposed adaptive power-controllable OAM multicasting. PMID:25989251

  5. Unilateral adaptation of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Schubert, Michael C

    2013-02-01

    A recent study showed that the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) can be better adaptively increased using an incremental retinal image velocity error signal compared with a conventional constant large velocity-gain demand (×2). This finding has important implications for vestibular rehabilitation that seeks to improve the VOR response after injury. However, a large portion of vestibular patients have unilateral vestibular hypofunction, and training that raises their VOR response during rotations to both the ipsilesional and contralesional side is not usually ideal. We sought to determine if the vestibular response to one side could selectively be increased without affecting the contralateral response. We tested nine subjects with normal vestibular function. Using the scleral search coil and head impulse techniques, we measured the active and passive VOR gain (eye velocity / head velocity) before and after unilateral incremental VOR adaptation training, consisting of self-generated (active) head impulses, which lasted ≈ 15 min. The head impulses consisted of rapid, horizontal head rotations with peak-amplitude 15°, peak-velocity 150°/s and peak-acceleration 3,000°/s(2). The VOR gain towards the adapting side increased after training from 0.92 ± 0.18 to 1.11 ± 0.22 (+22.7 ± 20.2 %) during active head impulses and from 0.91 ± 0.15 to 1.01 ± 0.17 (+11.3 ± 7.5 %) during passive head impulses. During active impulses, the VOR gain towards the non-adapting side also increased by ≈ 8 %, though this increase was ≈ 70 % less than to the adapting side. A similar increase did not occur during passive impulses. This study shows that unilateral vestibular adaptation is possible in humans with a normal VOR; unilateral incremental VOR adaptation may have a role in vestibular rehabilitation. The increase in passive VOR gain after active head impulse adaptation suggests that the training effect is robust.

  6. The Retention of Protective Adaptation to Motion Sickness Induced by Cross - Coupled Angular Accelerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    adaptability assessed in a single session are positively and significantly correlated with both motion sickness b history and the degree of per...that a reliable measure of individual adaptability on a single session can be obtained very quickly at Mi angular velocities up to 3 rev/min. Our

  7. Goal-based angular adaptivity applied to a wavelet-based discretisation of the neutral particle transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Dargaville, Steven; Pain, Christopher C.; Smith, Paul N.; Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.

    2015-01-15

    A method for applying goal-based adaptive methods to the angular resolution of the neutral particle transport equation is presented. The methods are applied to an octahedral wavelet discretisation of the spherical angular domain which allows for anisotropic resolution. The angular resolution is adapted across both the spatial and energy dimensions. The spatial domain is discretised using an inner-element sub-grid scale finite element method. The goal-based adaptive methods optimise the angular discretisation to minimise the error in a specific functional of the solution. The goal-based error estimators require the solution of an adjoint system to determine the importance to the specified functional. The error estimators and the novel methods to calculate them are described. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods. It is shown that the methods can significantly reduce the number of unknowns and computational time required to obtain a given error. The novelty of the work is the use of goal-based adaptive methods to obtain anisotropic resolution in the angular domain for solving the transport equation. -- Highlights: •Wavelet angular discretisation used to solve transport equation. •Adaptive method developed for the wavelet discretisation. •Anisotropic angular resolution demonstrated through the adaptive method. •Adaptive method provides improvements in computational efficiency.

  8. Testing vision with angular and radial multifocal designs using Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Vinas, Maria; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Gonzalez, Veronica; Cortes, Daniel; Radhakrishnan, Aiswaryah; Marcos, Susana

    2017-03-01

    Multifocal vision corrections are increasingly used solutions for presbyopia. In the current study we have evaluated, optically and psychophysically, the quality provided by multizone radial and angular segmented phase designs. Optical and relative visual quality were evaluated using 8 subjects, testing 6 phase designs. Optical quality was evaluated by means of Visual Strehl-based-metrics (VS). The relative visual quality across designs was obtained through a psychophysical paradigm in which images viewed through 210 pairs of phase patterns were perceptually judged. A custom-developed Adaptive Optics (AO) system, including a Hartmann-Shack sensor and an electromagnetic deformable mirror, to measure and correct the eye's aberrations, and a phase-only reflective Spatial Light Modulator, to simulate the phase designs, was developed for this study. The multizone segmented phase designs had 2-4 zones of progressive power (0 to +3D) in either radial or angular distributions. The response of an "ideal observer" purely responding on optical grounds to the same psychophysical test performed on subjects was calculated from the VS curves, and compared with the relative visual quality results. Optical and psychophysical pattern-comparison tests showed that while 2-zone segmented designs (angular & radial) provided better performance for far and near vision, 3- and 4-zone segmented angular designs performed better for intermediate vision. AO-correction of natural aberrations of the subjects modified the response for the different subjects but general trends remained. The differences in perceived quality across the different multifocal patterns are, in a large extent, explained by optical factors. AO is an excellent tool to simulate multifocal refractions before they are manufactured or delivered to the patient, and to assess the effects of the native optics to their performance.

  9. Spatio-angular minimum-variance tomographic controller for multi-object adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos M; Jackson, Kate; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Andersen, David; Lardière, Olivier; Bradley, Colin

    2015-06-10

    Multi-object astronomical adaptive optics (MOAO) is now a mature wide-field observation mode to enlarge the adaptive-optics-corrected field in a few specific locations over tens of arcminutes. The work-scope provided by open-loop tomography and pupil conjugation is amenable to a spatio-angular linear-quadratic-Gaussian (SA-LQG) formulation aiming to provide enhanced correction across the field with improved performance over static reconstruction methods and less stringent computational complexity scaling laws. Starting from our previous work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A31, 101 (2014)10.1364/JOSAA.31.000101JOAOD61084-7529], we use stochastic time-progression models coupled to approximate sparse measurement operators to outline a suitable SA-LQG formulation capable of delivering near optimal correction. Under the spatio-angular framework the wavefronts are never explicitly estimated in the volume, providing considerable computational savings on 10-m-class telescopes and beyond. We find that for Raven, a 10-m-class MOAO system with two science channels, the SA-LQG improves the limiting magnitude by two stellar magnitudes when both the Strehl ratio and the ensquared energy are used as figures of merit. The sky coverage is therefore improved by a factor of ~5.

  10. Gravity-specific adaptation of the angular vestibuloocular reflex: dependence on head orientation with regard to gravity.

    PubMed

    Yakushin, Sergei B; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    The gain of the vertical angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR) was adaptively altered by visual-vestibular mismatch during rotation about an interaural axis, using steps of velocity in three head orientations: upright, left-side down, and right-side down. Gains were decreased by rotating the animal and visual surround in the same direction and increased by visual and surround rotation in opposite directions. Gains were adapted in one head position (single-state adaptation) or decreased with one side down and increased with the other side down (dual-state adaptation). Animals were tested in darkness using sinusoidal rotation at 0.5 Hz about an interaural axis that was tilted from horizontal to vertical. They were also sinusoidally oscillated from 0.5 to 4 Hz about a spatial vertical axis in static tilt positions from yaw to pitch. After both single- and dual-state adaptation, gain changes were maximal when the monkeys were in the position in which the gain had been adapted, and the gain changes progressively declined as the head was tilted away from that position. We call this gravity-specific aVOR gain adaptation. The spatial distribution of the specific aVOR gain changes could be represented by a cosine function that was superimposed on a bias level, which we called gravity-independent gain adaptation. Maximal gravity-specific gain changes were produced by 2-4 h of adaptation for both single- and dual-state adaptations, and changes in gain were similar at all test frequencies. When adapted while upright, the magnitude and distribution of the gravity-specific adaptation was comparable to that when animals were adapted in side-down positions. Single-state adaptation also produced gain changes that were independent of head position re gravity particularly in association with gain reduction. There was no bias after dual-state adaptation. With this difference, fits to data obtained by altering the gain in separate sessions predicted the modulations in gain obtained

  11. Tuning of gravity-dependent and gravity-independent vertical angular VOR gain changes by frequency of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yakushin, Sergei B

    2012-06-01

    The gain of the vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) was adaptively increased and decreased in a side-down head orientation for 4 h in two cynomolgus monkeys. Adaptation was performed at 0.25, 1, 2, or 4 Hz. The gravity-dependent and -independent gain changes were determined over a range of head orientations from left-side-down to right-side-down at frequencies from 0.25 to 10 Hz, before and after adaptation. Gain changes vs. frequency data were fit with a Gaussian to determine the frequency at which the peak gain change occurred, as well as the tuning width. The frequency at which the peak gravity-dependent gain change occurred was approximately equal to the frequency of adaptation, and the width increased monotonically with increases in the frequency of adaptation. The gravity-independent component was tuned to the adaptive frequency of 0.25 Hz but was uniformly distributed over all frequencies when the adaptation frequency was 1-4 Hz. The amplitude of the gravity-independent gain changes was larger after the aVOR gain decrease than after the gain increase across all tested frequencies. For the aVOR gain decrease, the phase lagged about 4° for frequencies below the adaptation frequency and led for frequencies above the adaptation frequency. For gain increases, the phase relationship as a function of frequency was inverted. This study demonstrates that the previously described dependence of aVOR gain adaptation on frequency is a property of the gravity-dependent component of the aVOR only. The gravity-independent component of the aVOR had a substantial tuning curve only at an adaptation frequency of 0.25 Hz.

  12. Adaptive non-collinear autocorrelation of few-cycle pulses with an angular tunable bi-mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Treffer, A. Bock, M.; König, S.; Grunwald, R.; Brunne, J.; Wallrabe, U.

    2016-02-01

    Adaptive autocorrelation with an angular tunable micro-electro-mechanical system is reported. A piezo-actuated Fresnel bi-mirror structure was applied to measure the second order autocorrelation of near-infrared few-cycle laser pulses in a non-collinear setup at tunable superposition angles. Because of enabling measurements with variable scaling and minimizing the influence of distortions by adaptive self-reconstruction, the approach extends the capability of autocorrelators. Flexible scaling and robustness against localized amplitude obscurations are demonstrated. The adaptive reconstruction of temporal frequency information by the Fourier analysis of autocorrelation data is shown. Experimental results and numerical simulations of the beam propagation and interference are compared for variable angles.

  13. Adaptive angular-velocity Vold-Kalman filter order tracking - Theoretical basis, numerical implementation and parameter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, M.-Ch.; Chu, W.-Ch.; Le, Duc-Do

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an alternative Vold-Kalman filter order tracking (VKF_OT) method, i.e. adaptive angular-velocity VKF_OT technique, to extract and characterize order components in an adaptive manner for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. The order/spectral waveforms to be tracked can be recursively solved by using Kalman filter based on the one-step state prediction. The paper comprises theoretical derivation of computation scheme, numerical implementation, and parameter investigation. Comparisons of the adaptive VKF_OT scheme with two other ones are performed through processing synthetic signals of designated order components. Processing parameters such as the weighting factor and the correlation matrix of process noise, and data conditions like the sampling frequency, which influence tracking behavior, are explored. The merits such as adaptive processing nature and computation efficiency brought by the proposed scheme are addressed although the computation was performed in off-line conditions. The proposed scheme can simultaneously extract multiple spectral components, and effectively decouple close and crossing orders associated with multi-axial reference rotating speeds.

  14. Adaptive robust image registration approach based on adequately sampling polar transform and weighted angular projection function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhao; Tao, Feng; Jun, Wang

    2013-10-01

    An efficient, robust, and accurate approach is developed for image registration, which is especially suitable for large-scale change and arbitrary rotation. It is named the adequately sampling polar transform and weighted angular projection function (ASPT-WAPF). The proposed ASPT model overcomes the oversampling problem of conventional log-polar transform. Additionally, the WAPF presented as the feature descriptor is robust to the alteration in the fovea area of an image, and reduces the computational cost of the following registration process. The experimental results show two major advantages of the proposed method. First, it can register images with high accuracy even when the scale factor is up to 10 and the rotation angle is arbitrary. However, the maximum scaling estimated by the state-of-the-art algorithms is 6. Second, our algorithm is more robust to the size of the sampling region while not decreasing the accuracy of the registration.

  15. Adaptive filtering and maximum entropy spectra with application to changes in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Cecile; Ghil, Michael; Weickmann, Klaus M.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral resolution and statistical significance of a harmonic analysis obtained by low-order MEM can be improved by subjecting the data to an adaptive filter. This adaptive filter consists of projecting the data onto the leading temporal empirical orthogonal functions obtained from singular spectrum analysis (SSA). The combined SSA-MEM method is applied both to a synthetic time series and a time series of AAM data. The procedure is very effective when the background noise is white and less so when the background noise is red. The latter case obtains in the AAM data. Nevertheless, reliable evidence for intraseasonal and interannual oscillations in AAM is detected. The interannual periods include a quasi-biennial one and an LF one, of 5 years, both related to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. In the intraseasonal band, separate oscillations of about 48.5 and 51 days are ascertained.

  16. Effects of visual reference on adaptation to motion sickness and subjective responses evoked by graded cross-coupled angular accelerations. [vestibular oculogravic effect in human acceleration adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reason, J. T.; Diaz, E.

    1973-01-01

    Three groups of 10 subjects each were exposed to stepwise increments of cross coupled angular accelerations in three visual modes: internal visual reference (IVR), external visual reference (EVR), and vision absent (VA). The subjects in the IVR condition required significantly greater amounts of stimulus exposure to neutralize their illusory subjective reactions. They also suffered a greater loss of well-being and a more marked incidence of motion sickness than did subjects in the EVR and VA conditions. The same 30 subjects were reexposed to the same graded cross coupled stimulation 1 week later. This time, however, all the subjects were tested under only the IVR condition. All three groups showed some positive transfer of adaptation, but only the IVR-IVR combination required significantly fewer head motions to achieve the same level of adaptation on the second occasion. Taken overall, however, the most efficient and least disturbing route to adaptation at the completion of the second test was via the VA-IVR combination.

  17. First Light Adaptive Optics Images from the Keck II Telescope: A New Era of High Angular Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizinowich, P.; Acton, D. S.; Shelton, C.; Stomski, P.; Gathright, J.; Ho, K.; Lupton, W.; Tsubota, K.; Lai, O.; Max, C.; Brase, J.; An, J.; Avicola, K.; Olivier, S.; Gavel, D.; Macintosh, B.; Ghez, A.; Larkin, J.

    2000-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology that corrects in real time for the blurring effects of atmospheric turbulence, in principle allowing Earth-bound telescopes to achieve their diffraction limit and to ``see'' as clearly as if they were in space. The power of AO using natural guide stars has been amply demonstrated in recent years on telescopes up to 3-4 m in diameter. The next breakthrough in astronomical resolution was expected to occur with the implementation of AO on the new generation of large, 8-10 m diameter telescopes. In this paper we report the initial results from the first of these AO systems, now coming on line on the 10 m diameter Keck II Telescope. The results include the highest angular resolution images ever obtained from a single telescope (0.022" and 0.040" at 0.85 and 1.65 μm wavelengths, respectively), as well as tests of system performance on three astronomical targets.

  18. Performance of the restoration of interferometric images from the Large Binocular Telescope: the effects of angular coverage and partial adaptive optics correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; Correia, Serge; Boccacci, Patrizia; Bertero, Mario

    2003-02-01

    This presentation reports the status of our study concerning the imaging properties of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) interferometer, and namely the effect of limited angular coverage and partial adaptive optics (AO) correction. The limitation in angular coverage, together with the correlated problem of angular smearing due to time-averaging of the interferometric images, is investigated for relevant cases depending on the declination of the observed object. Results are encouraging even in case of incomplete coverage. Partial AO-correction can result in a wide range of image quality, but can also create significant differences within a same field-of-view, especially between a suitable reference star to be used for post-observation multiple deconvolution and the observed object. Our study deals with both the problem of space-variance of the AO-corrected point-spread function, and that of global quality of the AO-correction. Uniformity, rather than global quality, is found to be the key-problem. After considering the single-conjugate AO case, we reach to some conclusions for the more interesting, and actually wide-field, case implying multi-conjugate AO. The whole study is performed on different types of object, from binary stars to diffuse objects, and a combined one with a high-dynamic range.

  19. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  20. Adaptive smoothing of high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging data by generalized cross-validation improves Q-ball orientation distribution function reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Metwalli, Nader S; Hu, Xiaoping P; Carew, John D

    2010-09-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) technique for reconstructing the orientation distribution function (ODF). Some form of smoothing or regularization is typically required in the ODF reconstruction from low signal-to-noise ratio HARDI data. The amount of smoothing or regularization is usually set a priori at the discretion of the investigator. In this article, we apply an adaptive and objective means of smoothing the raw HARDI data using the smoothing splines on the sphere method with generalized cross-validation (GCV) to estimate the diffusivity profile in each voxel. Subsequently, we reconstruct the ODF, from the smoothed data, based on the Funk-Radon transform (FRT) used in QBI. The spline method was applied to both simulated data and in vivo human brain data. Simulated data show that the smoothing splines on the sphere method with GCV smoothing reduces the mean squared error in estimates of the ODF as compared with the standard analytical QBI approach. The human data demonstrate the utility of the method for estimating smooth ODFs.

  1. The parity-adapted basis set in the formulation of the photofragment angular momentum polarization problem: the role of the Coriolis interaction.

    PubMed

    Shternin, Peter S; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2008-05-21

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating the recoil-angle dependence of the photofragment angular momentum polarization taking into account both radial and Coriolis nonadiabatic interactions in the diatomic/linear photodissociating molecules. The parity-adapted representation of the total molecular wave function has been used throughout the paper. The obtained full quantum-mechanical expressions for the photofragment state multipoles have been simplified by using the semiclassical approximation in the high-J limit and then analyzed for the cases of direct photodissociation and slow predissociation in terms of the anisotropy parameters. In both cases, each anisotropy parameter can be presented as a linear combination of the generalized dynamical functions fK(q,q',q,q') of the rank K representing contribution from different dissociation mechanisms including possible radial and Coriolis nonadiabatic transitions, coherent effects, and the rotation of the recoil axis. In the absence of the Coriolis interactions, the obtained results are equivalent to the earlier published ones. The angle-recoil dependence of the photofragment state multipoles for an arbitrary photolysis reaction is derived. As shown, the polarization of the photofragments in the photolysis of a diatomic or a polyatomic molecule can be described in terms of the anisotropy parameters irrespective of the photodissociation mechanism.

  2. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  3. The stellar mass-size relation for cluster galaxies at z = 1 with high angular resolution from the Gemini/GeMS multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Sharp, Robert; Glazebrook, Karl; Rigaut, Francois; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Brodwin, Mark; Bayliss, Matthew; Stalder, Brian; Abraham, Roberto; McGregor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present the stellar mass-size relation for 49 galaxies within the z = 1.067 cluster SPT-CL J0546-5345, with full width at half-maximum ˜80-120 mas Ks-band data from the Gemini multiconjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS/GSAOI). This is the first such measurement in a cluster environment, performed at sub-kpc resolution at rest-frame wavelengths dominated by the light of the underlying old stellar populations. The observed stellar mass-size relation is offset from the local relation by 0.21 dex, corresponding to a size evolution proportional to (1 + z)-1.25, consistent with the literature. The slope of the stellar mass-size relation β = 0.74 ± 0.06, consistent with the local relation. The absence of slope evolution indicates that the amount of size growth is constant with stellar mass. This suggests that galaxies in massive clusters such as SPT-CL J0546-5345 grow via processes that increase the size without significant morphological interference, such as minor mergers and/or adiabatic expansion. The slope of the cluster stellar mass-size relation is significantly shallower if measured in Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging at wavelengths blueward of the Balmer break, similar to rest-frame ultraviolet relations at z = 1 in the literature. The stellar mass-size relation must be measured at redder wavelengths, which are more sensitive to the old stellar population that dominates the stellar mass of the galaxies. The slope is unchanged when GeMS Ks-band imaging is degraded to the resolution of K-band HST/Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer resolution but dramatically affected when degraded to Ks-band Magellan/FourStar resolution. Such measurements must be made with adaptive optics in order to accurately characterize the sizes of compact, z = 1 galaxies.

  4. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  5. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  6. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  7. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  8. Recurrence of angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Dahlen, G

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of recurrence of angular cheilitis following a successful antimicrobial treatment was studied in 48 patients. Clinical assessments including a microbial examination were carried out 8 months and 5 yr after termination of treatment. Eighty percent of the patients reported recurrence of their angular cheilitis on one or more occasions during the observation period. Patients with cutaneous disorders associated with dry skin or intraoral leukoplakia had an increased incidence of recrudescence. Neither the presence of denture stomatitis nor the type of microorganisms isolated from the original lesions of angular cheilitis, i.e. Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus, were associated with the number of recurrences. The present observations indicate that treatment of the majority of patients with angular cheilitis should be considered in a longer perspective than previously supposed, due to the short lasting therapeutic effects of the antimicrobial therapy.

  9. [Malignant angular cheilitis].

    PubMed

    Seoane, J; Vázquez, J; Cazenave, A; de la Cruz Mera, A; Argila, F; Aguado, A

    1996-01-01

    A case of chronic angular cheilitis is reported. Candida albicans was isolated repeatedly and the process developed into epitheliomatous carcinoma. The etiopathogenic role of Candida albicans and possible mechanism of action are discussed.

  10. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  11. Angular spectrum analysis in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Muñoz Martínez, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions serve to study some features of early-universe cosmology. In this contribution we adapt data analysis frequently used to understand the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies (such as the Mollweide projection and the angular power spectrum) to heavy ion collisions at the LHC. We examine a few publicly available events of the ALICE collaboration under this light. Because the ALICE time projection chamber has limited coverage in rapidity and some blind angles in the transverse plane, the angular spectrum seems very influenced by the detector's acceptance.

  12. The Angular Momentum Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Adelheid; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In the context of the formation of spiral galaxies the evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter halos have been discussed for more than 20 years, especially the idea that the specific angular momentum of the halo can be estimated from the specific angular momentum of its disk (e.g. Fall & Efstathiou (1980), Fall (1983) and Mo et al. (1998)). We use a new set of hydrodynamic cosmological simulations called Magneticum Pathfinder which allow us to split the galaxies into spheroidal and disk galaxies via the circularity parameter ɛ, as commonly used (e.g. Scannapieco et al. (2008)). Here, we focus on the dimensionless spin parameter λ = J |E|1/2 / (G M5/2) (Peebles 1969, 1971), which is a measure of the rotation of the total halo and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution, e.g. Mo et al. (1998). The spin parameter allows one to compare the relative angular momentum of halos across different masses and different times. Fig. 1 reveals a dichotomy in the distribution of λ at all redshifts when the galaxies are split into spheroids (dashed) and disk galaxies (dash-dotted). The disk galaxies preferentially live in halos with slightly larger spin parameter compared to spheroidal galaxies. Thus, we see that the λ of the whole halo reflects the morphology of its central galaxy. For more details and a larger study of the angular momentum properties of disk and spheroidal galaxies, see Teklu et al. (in prep.).

  13. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  14. Optical orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Stephen M; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J

    2017-02-28

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  15. Optical orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  16. Optical orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  17. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  18. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  19. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  20. Angular cheilitis after tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    England, R J; Lau, M; Ell, S R

    1999-08-01

    The operation of tonsillectomy requires the oral cavity to be held open mechanically in an unconscious patient, and intra-oral instrumentation to occur. Angular cheilitis may arise as a result of this after operation. This can cause morbidity and delay the re-establishment of a normal diet. The aim of this study was to identify what factors increase the likelihood of developing this problem postoperatively. Sixty patients were randomly selected in a prospective manner. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative variables were recorded. The frequency of development of postoperative angular cheilitis was recorded. The prevalence of the condition was related to the prerecorded variables. Parametric analysis showed that the chance of developing angular cheilitis was directly related to the use of diathermy haemostasis (P = 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of developing this complication if diathermy was used is 3.5 (95% confidence intervals 0.99, 12.4) and operation difficulty may also be a relevant variable. No other recorded variables were found to be significant.

  1. Angular Momentum in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    We study the ``angular momentum catastrophe" in the framework of interaction among baryons and dark matter through dynamical friction. By means of Del Popolo (2009) model we simulate 14 galaxies similar to those investigated by van den Bosch, Burkert and Swaters (2001), and calculate the distribution of their spin parameters and the angular momenta. Our model gives the angular momentum distribution which is in agreement with the van den Bosch et al. observations. Our result shows that the ``angular momentum catastrophe" can be naturally solved in a model that takes into account the baryonic physics and the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the baryonic clumps and dark matter through dynamical friction.

  2. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  3. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  4. Angular distributions in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenner, R.W.; Klobuchar, R.L.; Haustein, P.E.; Virtes, G.J.; Cumming, J.B.; Loveland, W.

    2006-04-15

    Angular distributions are reported for {sup 37}Ar and {sup 127}Xe from 381-GeV {sup 28}Si+Au interactions and for products between {sup 24}Na and {sup 149}Gd from 28-GeV {sup 1}H+Au. Sideward peaking and forward deficits for multifragmentation products are significantly enhanced for heavy ions compared with protons. Projectile kinetic energy does not appear to be a satisfactory scaling variable. The data are discussed in terms of a kinetic-focusing model in which sideward peaking is due to transverse motion of the excited product from the initial projectile-target interaction.

  5. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  6. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B.

    1992-08-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  7. Orbital angular momentum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mary Jacquiline Romero

    Entanglement in higher dimensions is an attractive concept that is a challenge to realise experimentally. To this end, the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons holds promise. The OAM state-space is discrete and theoretically unbounded. In the work that follows, we investigate various aspects of OAM entanglement. We show how the correlations in OAM and its conjugate variable, angular position, are determined by phase- matching and the shape of the pump beam in spontaneous parametric down- conversion. We implement tests of quantum mechanics which have been previously done for other variables. We show the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox for OAM and angle, supporting the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with locality and realism. We demonstrate violations of Bell-type inequalities, thereby discounting local hidden variables for describing the correlations we observe. We show the Hardy paradox using OAM, again highlighting the nonlocal nature of quantum mechanics. We demonstrate violations of Leggett-type inequalities, thereby discounting nonlocal hidden variables for describing correlations. Lastly, we have looked into the entanglement of topological vortex structures formed from a special superposition of OAM modes and show violations of Bell-type inequalities confined to a finite, isolated volume.

  8. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  9. Switching mechanism senses angular acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Switching mechanism actuates an electrical circuit when a predetermined angular acceleration and displacement are reached. A rotor in the mechanism overcomes the restraint of a magnetic detent when the case in which the detent is mounted reaches the predetermined angular acceleration.

  10. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  11. MBL Experiment in Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Among the series of beautiful take-home experiments designed by A.P. French and J.G. King for MIT students, the one on angular momentum studies the loss and conservation of angular momentum using a small dc motor as generator. Here we describe a version of the experiment that increases its accuracy, enables students to perform detailed rotational dynamics calculations, and sharpens the ability to isolate the region where the collision occurs.

  12. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  13. Interferometric measurement of angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10-11 rad/sqrt{textrm {Hz}} from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  14. Variations in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Twice-daily values of the atmosphere's angular momentum about the polar axis during the five years from 1976 through 1980 are presented in graphs and a table. The compilation is based on a global data set, incorporating 90 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. The relationship between changes in the angular momentum of the atmosphere and changes in the length of day is described, as are the main sources of error in the data. The variability in angular momentum is revealed in a preliminary fashion by means of a spectral decomposition. The data presented should stimulate comparisons with other measures of the length of day and so provide a basis for greater understanding of Earth-atmosphere interactions.

  15. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  16. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  17. Two-dimensional angular transmission characterization of CPV modules.

    PubMed

    Herrero, R; Domínguez, C; Askins, S; Antón, I; Sala, G

    2010-11-08

    This paper proposes a fast method to characterize the two-dimensional angular transmission function of a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system. The so-called inverse method, which has been used in the past for the characterization of small optical components, has been adapted to large-area CPV modules. In the inverse method, the receiver cell is forward biased to produce a Lambertian light emission, which reveals the reverse optical path of the optics. Using a large-area collimator mirror, the light beam exiting the optics is projected on a Lambertian screen to create a spatially resolved image of the angular transmission function. An image is then obtained using a CCD camera. To validate this method, the angular transmission functions of a real CPV module have been measured by both direct illumination (flash CPV simulator and sunlight) and the inverse method, and the comparison shows good agreement.

  18. Determining spacecraft and airplane angular orientation from star photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbakyan, K. I.

    1974-01-01

    The advantages of determining spacecraft angular orientation from star photographs include the documental nature and objectivity of the photographic image and also the high accuracy of construction of the reference system based on the stars. Use of the method presupposes installation aboard the vehicle of a specialized photographic camera adapted for photographing the stellar sky. From the mathematical viewpoint, the essence of the method amounts to: (1) Certain directions in space are identified and their direction cosines are determined in a specified coordinate system. (2) The direction cosines of these same directions are determined relative to a coordinate system fixed with the vehicle. (3) The sought angular orientation of the vehicle is calculated using the coupling equations between the specified and vehicle-fixed coordinate systems. In principle, vehicle angular orientation can be determined relative to any given reference system.

  19. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  20. High angular resolution at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, A.; Arcidiacono, C.; Bertero, M.; Boccacci, P.; Davies, A. G.; Defrere, D.; de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.; Hinz, P.; Hofmann, K. H.; La Camera, A.; Leisenring, J.; Kürster, M.; Rathbun, J. A.; Schertl, D.; Skemer, A.; Skrutskie, M.; Spencer, J. R.; Veillet, C.; Weigelt, G.; Woodward, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    High angular resolution from ground-based observatories stands as a key technology for advancing planetary science. In the window between the angular resolution achievable with 8-10 meter class telescopes, and the 23-to-40 meter giants of the future, LBT provides a glimpse of what the next generation of instruments providing higher angular resolution will provide. We present first ever resolved images of an Io eruption site taken from the ground, images of Io's Loki Patera taken with Fizeau imaging at the 22.8 meter LBT [Conrad, et al., AJ, 2015]. We will also present preliminary analysis of two data sets acquired during the 2015 opposition: L-band fringes at Kurdalagon and an occultation of Loki and Pele by Europa (see figure). The light curves from this occultation will yield an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution along the path of ingress and egress. We will conclude by providing an overview of the overall benefit of recent and future advances in angular resolution for planetary science.

  1. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  2. Angular velocity estimation from measurement vectors of star tracker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jun-cai; Yi, Wen-jun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Yang, Jian-kun; Li, Xiu-jian; Tan, Ji-chun

    2012-06-01

    In most spacecraft, there is a need to know the craft's angular rate. Approaches with least squares and an adaptive Kalman filter are proposed for estimating the angular rate directly from the star tracker measurements. In these approaches, only knowledge of the vector measurements and sampling interval is required. The designed adaptive Kalman filter can filter out noise without information of the dynamic model and inertia dyadic. To verify the proposed estimation approaches, simulations based on the orbit data of the challenging minisatellite payload (CHAMP) satellite and experimental tests with night-sky observation are performed. Both the simulations and experimental testing results have demonstrated that the proposed approach performs well in terms of accuracy, robustness, and performance.

  3. On Dunkl angular momenta algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Misha; Hakobyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    We consider the quantum angular momentum generators, deformed by means of the Dunkl operators. Together with the reflection operators they generate a subalgebra in the rational Cherednik algebra associated with a finite real reflection group. We find all the defining relations of the algebra, which appear to be quadratic, and we show that the algebra is of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) type. We show that this algebra contains the angular part of the Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian and that together with constants it generates the centre of the algebra. We also consider the gl( N ) version of the subalge-bra of the rational Cherednik algebra and show that it is a non-homogeneous quadratic algebra of PBW type as well. In this case the central generator can be identified with the usual Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian associated with the Coxeter group in the harmonic confinement.

  4. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  5. Angular Momentum Decomposition for an Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias; BC, Hikmat

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the orbital angular momentum of the `quark' in the scalar diquark model as well as that of the electron in QED (to order $\\alpha$). We compare the orbital angular momentum obtained from the Jaffe-Manohar decomposition to that obtained from the Ji relation and estimate the importance of the vector potential in the definition of orbital angular momentum.

  6. Two-dimensional angular filter array for angular domain imaging with 3D printed angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) is a technique that is capable of generating two dimensional shadowgrams of attenuating targets embedded in a scattering medium. In ADI, an angular filter array (AFA) is positioned between the sample and the detector to distinguish between quasi-ballistic photons and scattered photons. An AFA is a series of micro-channels with a high aspect ratio. Previous AFAs from our group were constructed by micro-machining the micro-channels into a silicon wafer, limiting the imaging area to a one dimensional line. Two dimensional images were acquired via scanning. The objective of this work was to extend the AFA design to two dimensions to allow for two dimensional imaging with minimal scanning. The second objective of this work was to perform an initial characterization of the imaging capabilities of the 2D AFA. Our approach was to use rapid 3D prototyping techniques to generate an array of micro-channels. The imaging capabilities were then evaluated by imaging a 0.9 mm graphite rod submerged in a scattering media. Contrast was observed to improve when a second angular filter array was placed in front of the sample to mask the incoming light.

  7. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  8. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  9. An optical filter with angular selectivity of the light transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirullin, Rustam S.

    2015-09-01

    Features of the application of a novel optical filter with angular selectivity of the light transmission to architectural glazing are considered. The filter consists of a sheet transparent substrate with thin-film grating layers on both surfaces. The gratings formed by directionally transmissive strips, alternating with absorptive, reflective, or scattering strips. Their relative position on the input and output surfaces provides angular selectivity of the directional light transmission - as the incidence angle changes, the proportion of radiation that passes through both gratings of the filter also changes. Chromogenic materials currently used in the laminated smart windows, providing control over the intensity and spectrum of the transmitted solar radiation, cannot achieve the selective regulation on the ranges of incidence angles. Such a regulation requires the use of additional daylight-redirecting devices, especially blinds, to dynamically adapt to the position of the sun. The grating optical filter provides angular selectivity of the light transmission of a window without such devices. The features of using this filter in the single and double glazed windows are described. A graphic analytical calculation method is proposed for estimating the effect of geometrical and optical parameters of the filter on the angular characteristics of the light transmission. An algorithm to optimize filtering solar radiation taking into account the geographical coordinates of terrain, time of day and year and the orientation of the window to the cardinal is set. An algorithm to calculating geometrical parameters of the filter with pre-specified characteristics of the light transmission is obtained.

  10. A Missile-Borne Angular Velocity Sensor Based on Triaxial Electromagnetic Induction Coils.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Wu, Dan; Han, Yan

    2016-09-30

    Aiming to solve the problem of the limited measuring range for angular motion parameters of high-speed rotating projectiles in the field of guidance and control, a self-adaptive measurement method for angular motion parameters based on the electromagnetic induction principle is proposed. First, a framework with type bent "I-shape" is used to design triaxial coils in a mutually orthogonal way. Under the condition of high rotational speed of a projectile, the induction signal of the projectile moving across a geomagnetic field is acquired by using coils. Second, the frequency of the pulse signal is adjusted self-adaptively. Angular velocity and angular displacement are calculated in the form of periodic pulse counting and pulse accumulation, respectively. Finally, on the basis of that principle prototype of the sensor is researched and developed, performance of measuring angular motion parameters are tested on the sensor by semi-physical and physical simulation experiments, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a wide measuring range of angular velocity from 1 rps to 100 rps with a measurement error of less than 0.3%, and the angular displacement measurement error is lower than 0.2°. The proposed method satisfies measurement requirements for high-speed rotating projectiles with an extremely high dynamic range of rotational speed and high precision, and has definite value to engineering applications in the fields of attitude determination and geomagnetic navigation.

  11. A Missile-Borne Angular Velocity Sensor Based on Triaxial Electromagnetic Induction Coils

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Wu, Dan; Han, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Aiming to solve the problem of the limited measuring range for angular motion parameters of high-speed rotating projectiles in the field of guidance and control, a self-adaptive measurement method for angular motion parameters based on the electromagnetic induction principle is proposed. First, a framework with type bent “I-shape” is used to design triaxial coils in a mutually orthogonal way. Under the condition of high rotational speed of a projectile, the induction signal of the projectile moving across a geomagnetic field is acquired by using coils. Second, the frequency of the pulse signal is adjusted self-adaptively. Angular velocity and angular displacement are calculated in the form of periodic pulse counting and pulse accumulation, respectively. Finally, on the basis of that principle prototype of the sensor is researched and developed, performance of measuring angular motion parameters are tested on the sensor by semi-physical and physical simulation experiments, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a wide measuring range of angular velocity from 1 rps to 100 rps with a measurement error of less than 0.3%, and the angular displacement measurement error is lower than 0.2°. The proposed method satisfies measurement requirements for high-speed rotating projectiles with an extremely high dynamic range of rotational speed and high precision, and has definite value to engineering applications in the fields of attitude determination and geomagnetic navigation. PMID:27706039

  12. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies.

  13. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  14. Angular Deformities of the Lower Limb in Children

    PubMed Central

    Espandar, Ramin; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad-Javad; Baghdadi, Taghi

    2010-01-01

    Angular deformities of the lower limbs are common during childhood. In most cases this represents a variation in the normal growth pattern and is an entirely benign condition. Presence of symmetrical deformities and absence of symptoms, joint stiffness, systemic disorders or syndromes indicates a benign condition with excellent long-term outcome. In contrast, deformities which are asymmetrical and associated with pain, joint stiffness, systemic disorders or syndromes may indicate a serious underlying cause and require treatment. Little is known about the relationship between sport participation and body adaptations during growth. Intense soccer participation increases the degree of genu varum in males from the age of 16. Since, according to some investigations, genu varum predisposes individuals to more injuries, efforts to reduce the development of genu varum in soccer players are warranted. In this article major topics of angular deformities of the knees in pediatric population are practically reviewed. PMID:22375192

  15. Angular deformities of the lower limb in children.

    PubMed

    Espandar, Ramin; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad-Javad; Baghdadi, Taghi

    2010-03-01

    Angular deformities of the lower limbs are common during childhood. In most cases this represents a variation in the normal growth pattern and is an entirely benign condition. Presence of symmetrical deformities and absence of symptoms, joint stiffness, systemic disorders or syndromes indicates a benign condition with excellent long-term outcome. In contrast, deformities which are asymmetrical and associated with pain, joint stiffness, systemic disorders or syndromes may indicate a serious underlying cause and require treatment.Little is known about the relationship between sport participation and body adaptations during growth. Intense soccer participation increases the degree of genu varum in males from the age of 16. Since, according to some investigations, genu varum predisposes individuals to more injuries, efforts to reduce the development of genu varum in soccer players are warranted. In this article major topics of angular deformities of the knees in pediatric population are practically reviewed.

  16. Adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Roorda, A

    2000-01-01

    Retinal images in the human eye are normally degraded because we are forced to use the optical system of the human eye--which is fraught with aberrations--as the objective lens. The recent application of adaptive optics technology to measure and compensate for these aberrations has produced retinal images in human eyes with unprecedented resolution. The adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is used to take pictures of photoreceptors and capillaries and to study spectral and angular tuning properties of individual photoreceptors. Application of adaptive optics technology for ophthalmoscopy promises continued progress toward understanding the basic properties of the living human retina and also for clinical applications.

  17. Angular Positioning Sensor for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Nicolas; Chapuis, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Angular position sensors are used on various rotating mechanisms such as solar array drive mechanisms, antenna pointing mechanisms, scientific instruments, motors or actuators.Now a days, potentiometers and encoders are mainly used for angular measurement purposes. Both of them have their own pros and cons.As alternative, Ruag Space Switzerland Nyon (RSSN) is developing and qualifying two innovative technologies of angular position sensors which offer easy implementation, medium to very high lifetime and high flexibility with regards to the output signal shape/type.The Brushed angular position sensor uses space qualified processes which are already flying on RSSN's sliprings for many years. A large variety of output signal shape can be implemented to fulfill customer requirements (digital, analog, customized, etc.).The contactless angular position sensor consists in a new radiation hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) based on the Hall effect and providing the angular position without complex processing algorithm.

  18. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  19. Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-16

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS TR-2014-0045 TR-2014-0045 Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum David Voelz Klipsch...Orbital Angular Momentum FA9451-13-1-0261 GR0004113 David Voelz Klipsch School of ECE New Mexico State University MSC 3-O, PO Box 30001 Las Cruces, NM...1026 . Government Purpose Rights. A light beam carry Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) has typical wave front and singularity at the optical axis. The

  20. Chirality and the angular momentum of light.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Robert P; Götte, Jörg B; Barnett, Stephen M; Yao, Alison M

    2017-02-28

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  1. Orbital angular momentum in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L.L.; Klimov, A.B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2011-02-15

    Research Highlights: > We propose a comprehensive Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum. > We present a simple and useful toolkit for the practitioner. > We derive simple evolution equations in terms of a star product in the semiclassical limit. - Abstract: A comprehensive theory of the Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum is presented. Special attention is paid to the problems linked to rotational periodicity and angular-momentum discreteness.

  2. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  3. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  4. Holographic Imaging: A Versatile Tool for High Angular Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, R.; Girard, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Speckle holography can be used to reconstruct high angular resolution images from long series of short exposures if the point spread function (PSF) from each frame can be measured reliably. We show that through use of multiple reference stars and iterative PSF subtraction, we can obtain highly accurate PSFs. The technique is optimised for crowded fields and results in images with excellent cosmetics and high Strehl ratio from the optical to the mid-infrared regimes. With examples from NACO, VISIR, and HAWK-I we show that holography opens up novel and unforeseen possibilities and can be an attractive alternative to adaptive optics.

  5. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Allen, L

    2017-02-28

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  6. Stellar angular diameters from occultation observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, B.-C.

    This paper reviews the history of measuring stellar angular diameters from lunar occultation observations and the techniques of data analysis. Several effects which can affect the results of measurement are discussed. The author finds that there may be systematic errors in angular diameters measured by various observatories for Aldebaran.

  7. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  8. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.

    2017-02-01

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. Angular Momentum of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kirsty M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Oh, Se-Heon

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of baryonic mass {M}{{b}} and specific angular momentum (sAM) {j}{{b}} in 14 rotating dwarf Irregular (dIrr) galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS sample. These measurements, based on 21 cm kinematic data from the Very Large Array and stellar mass maps from the Spitzer Space Telescope, extend previous AM measurements by more than two orders of magnitude in {M}{{b}}. The dwarf galaxies show systematically higher {j}{{b}} values than expected from the {j}{{b}}\\propto {M}{{b}}2/3 scaling of spiral galaxies, representative of a scale-free galaxy formation scenario. This offset can be explained by decreasing baryon mass fractions {f}{{M}}={M}{{b}}/{M}{dyn} (where {M}{dyn} is the dynamical mass) with decreasing {M}{{b}} (for {M}{{b}}< {10}11 {M}ȯ ). We find that the sAM of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) alone is about 2.5 times higher than that of the stars. The M–j relation of H i is significantly steeper than that of the stars, as a direct consequence of the systematic variation of the H i fraction with {M}{{b}}.

  10. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  11. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  12. Angular momentum desaturation for Skylab using gravity gradient torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    An angular momentum desaturation method for momentum exchange devices of orbiting spacecraft is described. The specific application of the method is to the Skylab which contains three double-gimbaled control moment gyros for precise attitude control and maneuvering. It is assumed that the attitude reference is inertially fixed and that two of the vehicle principal moments of inertia are much larger than the third. Gravity gradient torques and resultant angular momentum accumulation are developed for small deviations from the reference. The assumed moment-of-inertia distribution allows desaturation about all axes with only two attitude angles each for the two axes with large moments of inertia. The necessary desaturation maneuvers can be decoupled for a special set of orbital coordinates. All maneuvers are made during the night portion of the orbit, and the percentage utilized for desaturation is selectable. Expressions for the attitude angle commands are developed assuming infinite vehicle rates. The effect of finite rates introduces an efficiency into the desaturation. Expressions for this efficiency are developed and means for compensation are treated. Arbitrary misalignments between geometric vehicle axes and principal moment-of-inertia axes are permissible. An angle bias about the sun line minimizes the angular momentum accumulation about the sun line projection into the orbital plane. Adaptive desaturation maneuver limiting consistent with the available maneuver momentum is included.

  13. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    PubMed Central

    Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light–matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069764

  14. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  15. Bayesian Angular Power Spectrum Analysis of Interferometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Malu, Siddarth S.

    2012-09-01

    We present a Bayesian angular power spectrum and signal map inference engine which can be adapted to interferometric observations of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), 21 cm emission line mapping of galactic brightness fluctuations, or 21 cm absorption line mapping of neutral hydrogen in the dark ages. The method uses Gibbs sampling to generate a sampled representation of the angular power spectrum posterior and the posterior of signal maps given a set of measured visibilities in the uv-plane. We use a mock interferometric CMB observation to demonstrate the validity of this method in the flat-sky approximation when adapted to take into account arbitrary coverage of the uv-plane, mode-mode correlations due to observations on a finite patch, and heteroschedastic visibility errors. The computational requirements scale as {O}(n_p log n_p) where np measures the ratio of the size of the detector array to the inter-detector spacing, meaning that Gibbs sampling is a promising technique for meeting the data analysis requirements of future cosmology missions.

  16. Supernovae at the Highest Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyk, S. Van; Weiler, K.; Sramek, R.; Panagia, N.; Lacey, C.; Montes, M.; Mercaide, J.; Lewin, W.; Fox, D.; Filippenko, A.; Peng, C.

    2000-01-01

    The study of supernovae (SNe) and their environments in host galaxies at the highest possible angular resolution in a number of wavelength regimes is providing vital clues to the nature of their progenitor stars.

  17. Radially dependent angular acceleration of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jason; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-02-15

    While photons travel in a straight line at constant velocity in free space, the intensity profile of structured light may be tailored for acceleration in any degree of freedom. Here we propose a simple approach to control the angular acceleration of light. Using Laguerre-Gaussian modes as our twisted beams carrying orbital angular momentum, we show that superpositions of opposite handedness result in a radially dependent angular acceleration as they pass through a focus (waist plane). Due to conservation of orbital angular momentum, we find that propagation dynamics are complex despite the free-space medium: the outer part of the beam (rings) rotates in an opposite direction to the inner part (petals), and while the outer part accelerates, the inner part decelerates. We outline the concepts theoretically and confirm them experimentally. Such exotic structured light beams are topical due to their many applications, for instance in optical trapping and tweezing, metrology, and fundamental studies in optics.

  18. Angular performance measure for tighter uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Hradil, Z.; Rehacek, J.; Klimov, A. B.; Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.

    2010-01-15

    The uncertainty principle places a fundamental limit on the accuracy with which we can measure conjugate quantities. However, the fluctuations of these variables can be assessed in terms of different estimators. We propose an angular performance that allows for tighter uncertainty relations for angle and angular momentum. The differences with previous bounds can be significant for particular states and indeed may be amenable to experimental measurement with the present technology.

  19. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-01

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  20. Trunk rotation monitor using angular velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, A; Uda, S

    1997-04-01

    To monitor the low back risk imposed by asymmetric postures at workplaces, a method using angular velocity sensors was studied. According to a simple model analysis, trunk rotation could be calculated from the angular velocities measured at both the waist and shoulder and from the inclination of each angular velocity sensor. We thus developed a new detector consisting of an angular velocity sensor (ENC-05D, Murata, Japan) for detecting angular velocity and an acceleration sensor (ADXL05, Analog Devices, USA) for measuring inclination. The precision of the angular velocity sensor was high as the correlation coefficient between the output of the sensor and the true value was 0.9996. When the detectors were affixed to a subject and compared with data measured by a Vicon System 370 (Oxford Metrics, UK), the correlation coefficients between the two methods were 0.949 and 0.815 during model tasks of box transfer and box lifting, respectively. In a model of lifting boxes at different rates, the mean and standard deviation increased according to the task speed. This method was shown to be of practical use for monitoring trunk rotation.

  1. Measures and models for angular correlation and angular-linear correlation. [correlation of random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Wehrly, T.

    1976-01-01

    Population models for dependence between two angular measurements and for dependence between an angular and a linear observation are proposed. The method of canonical correlations first leads to new population and sample measures of dependence in this latter situation. An example relating wind direction to the level of a pollutant is given. Next, applied to pairs of angular measurements, the method yields previously proposed sample measures in some special cases and a new sample measure in general.

  2. Orbital angular momentum in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozinovic, Nenad

    Internet data traffic capacity is rapidly reaching limits imposed by nonlinear effects of single mode fibers currently used in optical communications. Having almost exhausted available degrees of freedom to orthogonally multiplex data in optical fibers, researchers are now exploring the possibility of using the spatial dimension of fibers, via multicore and multimode fibers, to address the forthcoming capacity crunch. While multicore fibers require complex manufacturing, conventional multi-mode fibers suffer from mode coupling, caused by random perturbations in fibers and modal (de)multiplexers. Methods that have been developed to address the problem of mode coupling so far, have been dependent on computationally intensive digital signal processing algorithms using adaptive optics feedback or complex multiple-input multiple-output algorithms. Here we study the possibility of using the orbital angular momentum (OAM), or helicity, of light, as a means of increasing capacity of future optical fiber communication links. We first introduce a class of specialty fibers designed to minimize mode coupling and show their potential for OAM mode generation in fibers using numerical analysis. We then experimentally confirm the existence of OAM states in these fibers using methods based on fiber gratings and spatial light modulators. In order to quantify the purity of created OAM states, we developed two methods based on mode-image analysis, showing purity of OAM states to be 90% after 1km in these fibers. Finally, in order to demonstrate data transmission using OAM states, we developed a 4-mode multiplexing and demultiplexing systems based on free-space optics and spatial light modulators. Using simple coherent detection methods, we successfully transmit data at 400Gbit/s using four OAM modes at a single wavelength, over 1.1 km of fiber. Furthermore, we achieve data transmission at 1.6Tbit/s using 10 wavelengths and two OAM modes. Our study indicates that OAM light can exist

  3. Ultrafast angular momentum transfer in multisublattice ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; López-Flores, V; Halté, V; Hehn, M; Stamm, C; Pontius, N; Beaurepaire, E; Boeglin, C

    2014-03-11

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to induce ultrafast changes of the magnetization in magnetic materials. However, one of the unsolved questions is that of conservation of the total angular momentum during the ultrafast demagnetization. Here we report the ultrafast transfer of angular momentum during the first hundred femtoseconds in ferrimagnetic Co0.8Gd0.2 and Co0.74Tb0.26 films. Using time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism allowed for time-resolved determination of spin and orbital momenta for each element. We report an ultrafast quenching of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and show that at early times the demagnetization in ferrimagnetic alloys is driven by the local transfer of angular momenta between the two exchange-coupled sublattices while the total angular momentum stays constant. In Co0.74Tb0.26 we have observed a transfer of the total angular momentum to an external bath, which is delayed by ~150 fs.

  4. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  5. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  6. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  7. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  8. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect.

  9. Improved numerical projection of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Kevin; Johnson, Calvin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear many-body states have good angular momenta, but many theoretical building blocks such as deformed Slater determinants do not. Hence one must numerically project out states of good angular momenta, usually through a computationally taxing three-dimensional integral. We took an existing code for angular-momentum projected Hartree-Fock and improved its performance, partly through judicious ordering of the loops, precomputing arrays of important combinatorics, and careful application of parallelization. We also investigated a novel inversion scheme. This work is potentially applicable to multiple approaches in many-body calculations, and should also be generalizable to particle number projection. Supported by SDSU Summer Undergraduate Research Program and by DOE Award Number DE-FG02-96ER40985.

  10. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  11. Angular resolution of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifazi, C.

    2005-08-01

    We studied the angular resolution of the Pierre Auger Detector using data collected from January 2004 to May 2005. The detector consists of two independent components, the fluorescence detector and the surface detector. Hybrid events, observed simultaneously by both components, have smaller reconstruction uncertainties than the events observed with only one component. The hybrid resolution is extracted from artificial showers generated by laser shots, while the surface detector angular accuracy is then determined from the comparison of the hybrid geometrical fit with the one obtained from the surface detector alone. We used adjacent surface detector stations to cross check our methods. The angular reconstruction accuracy of the surface detector events is given as a function of station multiplicity.

  12. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions.

  13. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  14. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  15. Angular gyrus syndrome mimicking depressive pseudodementia.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, Nages; Phan, Tai Anh; Barnett, Claire; Ibrahim, Neamat

    2002-09-01

    A 67-year-old left-handed woman with a diagnosis of pseudodementia was being treated for depression with little benefit. Neuropsychological evaluations revealed features of angular gyrus syndrome, namely, agraphia, alexia, Gerstmann's syndrome and behavioural manifestations such as depression, poor memory, frustration and irritability. A computed tomographic scan showed a right occipito-temporal infarction, which had occurred 18 months earlier. The patient demonstrated aspects of language dysfunction associated with the syndrome and showed reversed lateralization of cerebral functions. Recognizing and distinguishing between angular gyrus syndrome and depression is important because the appropriate therapies differ. The use of the term pseudodementia can be misleading.

  16. Angular and Linear Momentum of Excited Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Kamra, Akashdeep; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions. However, spin and orbital angular momentum are not conserved separately anymore. We also define the linear momentum of ferromagnetic textures. We illustrate the general principles with special reference to spin transfer torques and identify the emergence of a non-adiabatic effective field acting on domain walls in ferromagnetic insulators

  17. On the vector model of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  18. Pioneering high angular resolution at GTC: FRIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    FRIDA imager and integral-field spectrograph will provide the GTC community with the first diffraction-limited angular resolutions of a 10 m telescope: 25 - 40 mas in the 1 - 2.5 um range. These angular resolutions are a factor 15 improvement with respect to those of current and/or planned instruments for GTC, factor 1.5 superior to that of JWST. In this talk I will develop on science paths for FRIDA, with natural and laser guide star that illustrate the potential and unique capabilities of GTCAO+FRIDA till the arrival of the ELTs.

  19. Development of a High Accuracy Angular Measurement System for Langley Research Center Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett; Yu, Si-bok; Rhew, Ray D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern experimental and test activities demand innovative and adaptable procedures to maximize data content and quality while working within severely constrained budgetary and facility resource environments. This report describes development of a high accuracy angular measurement capability for NASA Langley Research Center hypersonic wind tunnel facilities to overcome these deficiencies. Specifically, utilization of micro-electro-mechanical sensors including accelerometers and gyros, coupled with software driven data acquisition hardware, integrated within a prototype measurement system, is considered. Development methodology addresses basic design requirements formulated from wind tunnel facility constraints and current operating procedures, as well as engineering and scientific test objectives. Description of the analytical framework governing relationships between time dependent multi-axis acceleration and angular rate sensor data and the desired three dimensional Eulerian angular state of the test model is given. Calibration procedures for identifying and estimating critical parameters in the sensor hardware is also addressed.

  20. Optimal method for exoplanet detection by angular differential imaging.

    PubMed

    Mugnier, Laurent M; Cornia, Alberto; Sauvage, Jean-François; Rousset, Gérard; Fusco, Thierry; Védrenne, Nicolas

    2009-06-01

    We propose a novel method for the efficient direct detection of exoplanets from the ground using angular differential imaging. The method combines images appropriately, then uses the combined images jointly in a maximum-likelihood framework to estimate the position and intensity of potential planets orbiting the observed star. It takes into account the mixture of photon and detector noises and a positivity constraint on the planet's intensity. A reasonable detection criterion is also proposed based on the computation of the noise propagation from the images to the estimated intensity of the potential planet. The implementation of this method is tested on simulated data that take into account static aberrations before and after the coronagraph, residual turbulence after adaptive optics correction, and noise.

  1. Inclusion of angular momentum in FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    2015-05-18

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  2. γ - γ Angular Correlation Measurements With GRIFFIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Andrew; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    When an excited nuclear state emits successive γ-rays causing a γ - γ cascade an anisotropy is found in the spatial distribution of γ2 with respect to γ1. Defining the direction of γ1 as the z-axis, the intermediate level, in general will have an uneven distribution of m-states. This causes an anisotropy in the angular correlation of the second γ-ray with respect to the first. These angular correlations are expressed by the W (θ) that depends on numerical coefficients described by the sequence of spin-parity values for the nuclear states involved, the multipolarities and mixing ratios. Angular correlations can be used for the assignment of spins and parities for the nuclear states, and thus provide a powerful means to elucidate the structure of nuclei far from stability through β - γ - γ coincidence measurements. In order to explore the sensitivity of the new 16 clover-detector GRIFFIN γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC to such γ - γ angular correlations, and to optimize its performance for these measurements we have studied a well known γ - γ cascade from 60Co decay through both experimental measurements and Geant4 simulation. Results will be shown in this talk. Work supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  3. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael F.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Cook, Philip A.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:23333416

  4. Optical angular momentum: Multipole transitions and photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, David L.

    2010-03-15

    The premise that multipolar decay should produce photons uniquely imprinted with a measurably corresponding angular momentum is shown in general to be untrue. To assume a one-to-one correlation between the transition multipoles involved in source decay and detector excitation is to impose a generally unsupportable one-to-one correlation between the multipolar form of emission transition and a multipolar character for the detected field. It is specifically proven impossible to determine without ambiguity, by use of any conventional detector, and for any photon emitted through the nondipolar decay of an atomic excited state, a unique multipolar character for the transition associated with its generation. Consistent with the angular quantum uncertainty principle, removal of a detector from the immediate vicinity of the source produces a decreasing angular uncertainty in photon propagation direction, reflected in an increasing range of integer values for the measured angular momentum. In such a context it follows that when the decay of an electronic excited state occurs by an electric quadrupolar transition, for example, any assumption that the radiation so produced is conveyed in the form of 'quadrupole photons' is experimentally unverifiable. The results of the general proof based on irreducible tensor analysis invite experimental verification, and they signify certain limitations on quantum optical data transmission.

  5. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-07-03

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s(-2)). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  6. Angular radiation transfer in inhomogeneous dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, E. A.; El Ghazaly, A. A.; Krim, M. S. Abdel

    1988-10-01

    The equation of radiative transfer for an inhomogeneous dispersive finite medium subject to general boundary conditions is solved. The Padé approximation technique is used to calculate the angular distribution of radiation. Numerical results for the [0/1] Padé approximant lead to numerical results that compare with the exact results.

  7. Oral medicine in practice: angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Lamey, P J; Lewis, M A

    1989-07-08

    In a series of twelve articles the authors aim to cover the more common oral medicine problems likely to be encountered in dental practice. Whenever possible, clinical photographs have been used to illustrate important points, and the text is deliberately succinct and without references. In the first article, the pathogenesis, investigation and management of angular cheilitis is reviewed.

  8. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Multi-state complex angular momentum residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylwe, Karl-Erik

    2006-09-01

    A relation between a multi-state complex angular momentum (CAM) pole residue and the corresponding CAM-state wavefunction is derived for a real symmetric potential matrix. The result generalizes a residue formula available for single-channel atomical collision systems and it is based on a diagonalization of the S matrix together with the use of exact Wronskian relations.

  10. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  11. Miniaturized photoelectric angular sensor with simplified design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Schiaua, Silviu

    1999-09-01

    In building the movable elements of robots, peripheral devices and measuring apparata, increasing the resolution of the angular sensor systems, based on incremental rotary encoders, is essential, together with decreasing the complexity, dimensions and weight. Especially when the angular sensor is integrated in a measuring system, belonging to a programmed light airplane for surveillance, the key issue is to reduce both dimensions and weight. This can be done using a simplified design, which consists in the following solutions: replacement of the fragile Cr on glass substrate, 1.5 mm thick (normally used for the fabrication of incremental disks), with light Cr on polycarbonate substrate, with only 0.15 mm thick; the absence of collimating optics (based on microlenses, used in IR emitter-photocell receiver assembly), as a result of the good coupling efficiency (due to the possible approaching of these elements at minimum 0.45 mm); the shrinkage of the disk's diameters to only 14 mm; the use of surface mounting devices and the related surface mounting technology, enabling to reduce dimensions and weight. The maximum number of slits on a 14 mm diameter dividing disk, usually obtained in a Cr on polycarbonate version, being approx. 1000, no problem occurs in our case, for 360 slits. The requested angular resolution (only 0.5 degrees for the light airplane), using the whole classical '4x digital multiplication' is not necessary, but a lower one of only 2x, resulting in a simplified electronics. The proposed design permitted, that an original arrangement, for building a small size, lightweight, heavy-duty incremental transducer based angular sensor system, to be obtained, useful not only in avionics, but also in robotics, or other special applications. Besides, extending the number of fixed gratings (masks) allows, that many primary signals to be derived, and a further increase in resolution of even 6 angular minutes to be obtained from the initial 360 slits.

  12. Angular vibration measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration standard is developed by CIMM to generate standard rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain amplitude sensitivity and phase shift by sinusoidal vibration. The measurement systems based on grating and laser interferometers are introduced in this paper. The measurement system based on PXI bus instrument is used to control the angular exciter, measure the output signal of the laser interferometers and the transducer to be calibrated synchronously. The methods for calculating the amplitude and phase of sinusoidal angular movement are investigated and high performance has been achieved. It shows the standard can be used in angular movement calibration in the frequency range from 0.1Hz to 200Hz.

  13. Calibrating angular transducer using sinusoidal and shock excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Primary angular vibration calibration system and primary angular shock calibration system are developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). The both systems using laser interferometer and grating measure rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). This paper will study the dynamic performance of an angular accelerometer and a gyro under the excitation of sinusoidal and shock using the calibration systems. It shows that the angular transducers should be calibrated using both sinusoidal and shock excitation to obtain more detailed dynamic information.

  14. Development of a primary angular shock calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Primary angular shock calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology & Measurement (CIMM). It uses brushless servo motor driving the air bearing system to generate rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration. Both grating and heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is used to measure the angular movement, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain sensitivity by angular shock or other kinds of excitation. Heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is successfully used in the measurement of angular acceleration. The method of using grating and scanning heads measure angular acceleration is developed. One characteristic of this system is that it could generate different kind of excitation signals, which include half sine, trapezoidal, sinusoidal, etc. and it can work as a high performance rate table to generate constant angular velocity. The preliminary test shows the uncertainty in calibrating angular accelerometer should be better than 2%. This paper introduces the mechanic system, control system and measurement system of the angular shock calibration system.

  15. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss.

  16. Performance criteria for dosimeter angular response

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R. A.; Cummings, F. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Jones, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides criteria for evaluating the response of personnel dosimeters to radiation at nonperpendicular incidence. The US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) ensures that dosimetry systems at DOE facilities meet acceptable standards for precision and accuracy. In the past, these standards were limited to tests for system variability, energy dependence, and level of detection. The proposed criteria will broaden the scope of DOELAP to include the angular response of personnel dosimeters. Because occupational exposures in the workplace are rarely due to radiation from only one direction, dosimeters must accurately assign individual dose equivalent from irradiation at any forward angle of incidence. Including an angular response criterion in DOELAP would improve the quality of personnel monitoring provided that the criterion is developed from appropriate dose quantities. This report provides guidance for assigning individual dose equivalents for radiation fields at nonperpendicular incidence to the dosimeter. 21 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Angular MET sensor for precise azimuth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Antonov, Alexander; Krishtop, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes using a MET-based low-noise angular motion sensor to precisely determine azimuth direction in a dynamic-scheme method of measuring Earth's rotation velocity vector. The scheme includes installing a sensor on a rotating platform so that it could scan a space and seek for the position of highest Earth's rotation vector projection on its axis. This method is very efficient provided a low-noise sensor is used. We take a low-cost angular sensor based on MET (molecular electronic transduction) technology. Sensors of this kind were originally developed for the seismic activity monitoring and are well-known for very good noise performance and high sensitivity. This approach, combined with use of special signal processing algorithms, allowed for reaching the accuracy of 0.07° for a measurement time of 200 seconds.

  18. Satellite Angular Rate Estimation From Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the angular rate vector of a satellite which is based on the time derivatives of vector measurements expressed in a reference and body coordinate. The computed derivatives are fed into a spacial Kalman filter which yields an estimate of the spacecraft angular velocity. The filter, named Extended Interlaced Kalman Filter (EIKF), is an extension of the Kalman filter which, although being linear, estimates the state of a nonlinear dynamic system. It consists of two or three parallel Kalman filters whose individual estimates are fed to one another and are considered as known inputs by the other parallel filter(s). The nonlinear dynamics stem from the nonlinear differential equation that describes the rotation of a three dimensional body. Initial results, using simulated data, and real Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data indicate that the algorithm is efficient and robust.

  19. Angular quadratures for improved transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.

    1999-07-22

    This paper introduces new octant-range, composite-type Gauss and mid-point rule angular quadrature formulas for neutron and photon transport computations. A generalization to octant-range quadratures is also introduced in order to allow for discontinuities at material interfaces for two- and three-dimensional transport problems which can be modeled with 60-degree triangular or hexagonal mesh subdivisions in the x-y plane.

  20. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  1. Angular cheilitis, part 1: local etiologies.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K; Brodell, Robert T; Helms, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    Angular cheilitis (AC) is a common condition characterized by erythema, moist maceration, ulceration, and crusting at the corners of the mouth. This article focuses on the common local factors that act alone and in combination to produce AC. These factors are categorized as irritant, allergic, and infectious causes. Identifying the underlying etiology of AC is a critical step in developing an effective treatment plan for this condition.

  2. Calculated angular distributions of energetic atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, M.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated angular distributions of atmospheric leakage neutron fluxes from 19 MeV to 1 GeV are presented. Comparisons with the balloon measurements of Preszler et al. and Kanbach et al. are made and show substantial agreement, strengthening the belief in the importance of the CRAND (cosmic-ray albedo-neutron decay) contribution to the high-energy protons in the earth's inner radiation belt. The calculation is presented as a means for investigating features of atmospheric flux distributions.

  3. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  4. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  5. Angular craniometry in craniocervical junction malformation.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ricardo Vieira; Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi

    2013-10-01

    The craniometric linear dimensions of the posterior fossa have been relatively well studied, but angular craniometry has been poorly studied and may reveal differences in the several types of craniocervical junction malformation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate craniometric angles compared with normal subjects and elucidate the main angular differences among the types of craniocervical junction malformation and the correlation between craniocervical and cervical angles. Angular craniometries were studied using primary cranial angles (basal and Boogard's) and secondary craniocervical angles (clivus canal and cervical spine lordosis). Patients with basilar invagination had significantly wider basal angles, sharper clivus canal angles, larger Boogard's angles, and greater cervical lordosis than the Chiari malformation and control groups. The Chiari malformation group does not show significant differences when compared with normal controls. Platybasia occurred only in basilar invagination and is suggested to be more prevalent in type II than in type I. Platybasic patients have a more acute clivus canal angle and show greater cervical lordosis than non-platybasics. The Chiari group does not show significant differences when compared with the control, but the basilar invagination groups had craniometric variables significantly different from normal controls. Hyperlordosis observed in the basilar inavagination group was associated with craniocervical kyphosis conditioned by acute clivus canal angles.

  6. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  7. Envelope Modes of Beams with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Losic, B

    2000-08-21

    For a particle beam propagating in an alternating gradient focusing system, envelope equations are often employed to describe the evolution of the beam radii in the two directions transverse to the direction of propagation, and aligned with the principle axes of the alternating gradient system. When the beams have zero net angular momentum and when the alternating gradient focusing is approximated by a continuous focusing system, there are two normal modes to the envelope equations: the 'breathing' mode and a 'quadrupole' mode. In the former, the two radii oscillate in phase, and in the latter the radii oscillate 180 degrees out of phase. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include beams that have a finite angular momentum. We perturb the moment equations of ref. [1], wherein it was assumed that space charge is a distributed in a uniform density ellipse. Two additional modes are obtained. The breathing mode remains, but the quadrupole mode is split into two modes, and a new low frequency mode appears. We calculate the frequencies and eigenmodes of these four modes as a function of tune depression and a dimensionless net angular momentum. These modes can be excited by rotational errors of the quadrupoles in an alternating gradient focusing channel.

  8. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies in EAGLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Cortese, Luca; Padilla, Nelson D.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Croton, Darren

    2017-02-01

    We use the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulation suite to study the specific angular momentum of galaxies, j, with the aims of (i) investigating the physical causes behind the wide range of j at fixed mass and (ii) examining whether simple, theoretical models can explain the seemingly complex and non-linear nature of the evolution of j. We find that j of the stars, jstars, and baryons, jbar, are strongly correlated with stellar and baryon mass, respectively, with the scatter being highly correlated with morphological proxies such as gas fraction, stellar concentration, (u-r) intrinsic colour, stellar age and the ratio of circular velocity to velocity dispersion. We compare with available observations at z = 0 and find excellent agreement. We find that jbar follows the theoretical expectation of an isothermal collapsing halo under conservation of specific angular momentum to within ≈50 per cent, while the subsample of rotation-supported galaxies are equally well described by a simple model in which the disc angular momentum is just enough to maintain marginally stable discs. We extracted evolutionary tracks of the stellar spin parameter of EAGLE galaxies and found that the fate of their jstars at z = 0 depends sensitively on their star formation and merger histories. From these tracks, we identified two distinct physical channels behind low jstars galaxies at z = 0: (i) galaxy mergers, and (ii) early star formation quenching. The latter can produce galaxies with low jstars and early-type morphologies even in the absence of mergers.

  9. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan T.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián.; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  10. Angular cheilitis: a clinical and microbial study.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Dahlén, G; Möller, A; Ohman, A

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to re-examine the relative importance of various factors in the pathogenesis of angular cheilitis. Sixty-four patients with cheilitis were examined clinically and microbiologically. In addition, a subsample of 23 patients was examined for serum iron and transferrin. The clinical appearance of the lip lesions fell into 4 categories. A ground rhagad at the corner of the mouth involving adjacent skin, was the most frequent type among dentate patients, whereas among denture wearers a deep lesion following the labial marginal sulcus was frequently observed. Dentate patients and denture wearers with cheilitis often had atopic constitution or cutaneous diseases. Pathogenic microorganisms were cultured from the lesions in all 64 patients; Staphylococcus aureus in 40 patients and Candida albicans in 45. The results of this study indicate a correlation between angular cheilitis and pathogenic microorganisms. Furthermore, among dentate patients, a correlation exists between cutaneous discomfort and angular cheilitis. Other etiological factors suggested for this disorder were found to be of subordinate importance.

  11. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  12. Comparison of angular movement measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM) to generate angular vibration and shock, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer. Two kinds of system are used in the measurement of angular movement, one is based on circular grating and scanning heads, another is based on laser interferometer with diffraction grating. This paper introduce the comparison results of the two measurement systems in the measurement of angular movement under sinusoidal and shock excitation. The results of the investigations show a good accordance of the newly developed method of using grating and scanning heads measuring angular acceleration in comparison with the laser interferometer method.

  13. A Fast Method of Fully Characterizing Sputtering Angular Dependence (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-17

    A new method has been demonstrated in which a single experiment is used to fully define the sputtering angular dependence of a given material. The...profilometry; the full sputtering angular dependence curve is then extracted using a numerical approach.

  14. Resolution analysis of an angular domain imaging system with two dimensional angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter to distinguish between quasi-ballistic and scattered photons based on trajectory. A 2D angular filter array was constructed using 3D printing technology to generate an array of micro-channels 500 μm x 500 μm with a length of 12 cm. The main barrier to 2D imaging with the 2D angular filter array was the shadows cast on the image by the 500 μm walls of the angular filter. The objective of this work was to perform a resolution analysis of the 2D angular filter array. The approach was to position the AFA with a two dimensional positioning stage to obtain images of areas normally obstructed by the walls of the AFA. A digital light processor was also incorporated to generate various light patterns to improve the contrast of the images. A resolution analysis was completed by imaging a knife edge submerged in various uniform scattering media (Intralipid® dilutions with water). The edge response functions obtained were then used to compute the line spread function and the theoretical resolution of the imaging system. The theoretical system resolution was measured to be between 110 μm - 180 μm when the scattering level was at or below 0.7% Intralipid®. The theoretical resolution was in agreement with a previous resolution analysis of a silicon-based angular filter with a similar aspect ratio. The measured resolution was also found to be smaller than the size of an individual channel, suggesting that the resolution of an AFA based ADI system is not dependent on the size of the micro-channel.

  15. Coherent Detection of Orbital Angular Momentum in Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The angular momentum propagated by a beam of radiation has two contributions: spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital ...Coherent detection of orbital angular momentum in radio The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and...MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 photon orbital angular

  16. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; Marriage, Tobias; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2017-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveryor (CLASS) is a ground based telescope array designed to measure the large-angular scale polarization signal of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The large-angular scale CMB polarization measurement is essential for a precise determination of the optical depth to reionization (from the E-mode polarization) and a characterization of inflation from the predicted polarization pattern imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves in the early universe (from the B-mode polarization). CLASS will characterize the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, to 0.01 (95% CL).CLASS is uniquely designed to be sensitive to the primordial B-mode signal across the entire range of angular scales where it could possibly dominate over the lensing signal that converts E-modes to B-modes while also making multi-frequency observations both high and low of the frequency where the CMB-to-foreground signal ratio is at its maximum. The design enables CLASS to make a definitive cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to scattering from reionization.CLASS is an array of 4 telescopes operating at approximately 40, 90, 150, and 220 GHz. CLASS is located high in the Andes mountains in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The location of the CLASS site at high altitude near the equator minimizes atmospheric emission while allowing for daily mapping of ~70% of the sky.A rapid front end Variable-delay Polarization Modulator (VPM) and low noise Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detectors allow for a high sensitivity and low systematic error mapping of the CMB polarization at large angular scales. The VPM, detectors and their coupling structures were all uniquely designed and built for CLASS.We present here an overview of the CLASS scientific strategy, instrument design, and current progress. Particular attention is given to the development and status of the Q-band receiver currently surveying the sky from the Atacama Desert and the development of

  17. Angular Goos-Hänchen effect in curved dielectric microstructures.

    PubMed

    Tran, N H; Dutriaux, L; Balcou, P; Floch, A L; Bretenaker, F

    1995-06-01

    A macroscopic angular Goos-Hänchen effect at total reflection on curved interfaces is studied experimentally. The results are compared with the complex-angular-momentum model of quasi-critical scattering. An extremum in angular deflection, which has not yet been predicted by any theory other than exact Mie scattering computations, is identified at low size parameters.

  18. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  19. Angular Momentum and Galaxy Formation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j sstarf and mass M sstarf (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j sstarf reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j sstarf in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ~100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j sstarf versus M sstarf. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j sstarf-M sstarf tracks, with log-slopes of ~0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ~3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ~7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j sstarf-M sstarf trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j sstarf

  20. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  1. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent.

  2. Angular Momentum Sensitive Two-Center Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Walter, P.; Deinert, S.; Rothkirch, A.; Seltmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Decleva, P.; Langer, B.; Knie, A.; Ehresmann, A.; Al-Dossary, O. M.; Braune, M.; Hartmann, G.; Meissner, A.; Tribedi, L. C.; AlKhaldi, M.; Becker, U.

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  3. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Deepak; Onikeri, Pratibha B.; Murgod, Lakshmi P.

    2017-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the accuracy in the arrival direction of particles estimated using a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We also present a theoretical estimate of angular resolution of such a setup. In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  4. New relativistic Hamiltonian: the angular magnetoelectric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillard, Charles; Mondal, Ritwik; Berritta, Marco; Dkhil, Brahim; Singh, Surendra; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Bellaiche, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Spin-Orbit Coupling (SOC) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the spintronics area, as it plays a major role in allowing for enhancing many well-known phenomena, such as the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the Rashba effect, etc. However, the usual expression of the SOC interaction ħ/4m2c2 [E×p] • σ (1) where p is the momentum operator, E the electric field, σ the vector of Pauli matrices, breaks the gauge invariance required by the electronic Hamiltonian. On the other hand, very recently, a new phenomenological interaction, coupling the angular momentum of light and magnetic moments, has been proposed based on symmetry arguments: ξ/2 [r × (E × B)] M, (2) with M the magnetization, r the position, and ξ the interaction strength constant. This interaction has been demonstrated to contribute and/or give rise, in a straightforward way, to various magnetoelectric phenomena,such as the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), the planar Hall effect and Rashba-like effects, or the spin-current model in multiferroics. This last model is known to be the origin of the cycloidal spin arrangement in bismuth ferrite for instance. However, the coupling of the angular momentum of light with magnetic moments lacked a fundamental theoretical basis. Starting from the Dirac equation, we derive a relativistic interaction Hamiltonian which linearly couples the angular momentum density of the electromagnetic (EM) field and the electrons spin. We name this coupling the Angular MagnetoElectric (AME) coupling. We show that in the limit of uniform magnetic field, the AME coupling yields an interaction exactly of the form of Eq. (2), thereby giving a firm theoretical basis to earlier works. The AME coupling can be expressed as: ξ [E × A] • σ (3) with A being the vector potential. Interestingly, the AME coupling was shown to be complementary to the traditional SOC, and together they restore the gauge invariance of the

  5. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  6. Angular momentum sensitive two-center interference.

    PubMed

    Ilchen, M; Glaser, L; Scholz, F; Walter, P; Deinert, S; Rothkirch, A; Seltmann, J; Viefhaus, J; Decleva, P; Langer, B; Knie, A; Ehresmann, A; Al-Dossary, O M; Braune, M; Hartmann, G; Meissner, A; Tribedi, L C; AlKhaldi, M; Becker, U

    2014-01-17

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  7. Linear and angular retroreflecting interferometric alignment target

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L. Curtis

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for measuring both the linear displacement and angular displacement of an object using a linear interferometer system and an optical target comprising a lens, a reflective surface and a retroreflector. The lens, reflecting surface and retroreflector are specifically aligned and fixed in optical connection with one another, creating a single optical target which moves as a unit that provides multi-axis displacement information for the object with which it is associated. This displacement information is useful in many applications including machine tool control systems and laser tracker systems, among others.

  8. Measurement and analysis of angular velocity variations of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatović, Ž. M.; Štavljanin, M. S.; Tomić, M. V.; Knežević, D. M.; Biočanin, S. Lj.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the procedures for measuring and analyzing the angular velocity variation of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft on its free end and on the power-output end. In addition, the paper deals with important aspects of the measurement of crankshaft torsional oscillations. The method is based on digital encoders placed at two distances, and one of them is a sensor not inserted directly on the shaft, i.e. a non-contact method with a toothed disc is used. The principle based on toothed disc is also used to measure the actual camshaft angular velocity of in-line compact high-pressure pump the engine is equipped with, and this paper aims to demonstrate the possibility of measuring the actual angular velocity of any rotating shaft in the engine, on which it is physically possible to mount a toothed disc. The method was created completely independently during long-range development and research tests of V46 family engines. This method is specific for its particular adaptability for use on larger engines with extensive vibrations and torsional oscillations. The main purpose of this paper is a practical contribution to all the more interesting research of the use of engine crankshaft angular velocity as a diagnostic tool for identifying the engine irregular running.

  9. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.

  10. Maximum magnetic moment to angular momentum conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Gibbons, G. W.

    2017-03-01

    Conjectures play a central role in theoretical physics, especially those that assert an upper bound to some dimensionless ratio of physical quantities. In this paper we introduce a new such conjecture bounding the ratio of the magnetic moment to angular momentum in nature. We also discuss the current status of some old bounds on dimensionless and dimensional quantities in arbitrary spatial dimension. Our new conjecture is that the dimensionless Schuster-Wilson-Blackett number, c μ /J G1/2 , where μ is the magnetic moment and J is the angular momentum, is bounded above by a number of order unity. We verify that such a bound holds for charged rotating black holes in those theories for which exact solutions are available, including the Einstein-Maxwell theory, Kaluza-Klein theory, the Kerr-Sen black hole, and the so-called STU family of charged rotating supergravity black holes. We also discuss the current status of the maximum tension conjecture, the Dyson luminosity bound, and Thorne's hoop conjecture.

  11. Angular Momentum Redistribution in Turbulent Compressible Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal; Brummell, Nicholas; Toomre, Juri

    1997-08-01

    We consider the dynamics of turbulent compressible convection within a curved local segment of a rotating spherical shell. We aim to understand the disparity between the observed solar differential rotation and previous numerical simulations. The angular extent of the curved domain is limited to a small solid angle in order to exploit fully the available spatial degrees of freedom on current supercomputers and attain the highest possible Reynolds numbers. Here we present simulations with Rayleigh numbers in excess of 10^7, and Prandtl numbers less than 0.1. This computational domain takes the form of a curved, periodic channel in longitude with stress-free sidewalls in latitude and radius. The numerical solutions are obtained using high-order accuracy explicit code. It evaluates spatial derivatives using sixth-order compact finite differences in radius and latitude and psuedospectral methods in longitude and advances the solutions in time using a fourth-order Bulirsch-Stoer integrator. The surface flows form broad, laminar networks which mask the much more turbulent flows of the interior. The dynamics within this turbulent region is controlled by the interactions of a tangled web of strong vortex tubes. These tubes and their interactions redistrubute the angular momentum, generating azimuthal flows with strong shear in both radius and latitude. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab

  12. Imaging transient events at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Gail H.

    2016-08-01

    Resolving the spatial structure of transient events provides insights into their physical nature and origin. Recent observations using long baseline optical/infrared interferometry have revealed the size, shape, and angular expansion of bright novae within a few days after their outbursts. This has implications for understanding the timescale for the development of asymmetric features in novae ejecta. Additionally, combining spectroscopic measurements of the expansion velocity with the angular expansion rate provides a way to measure a geometric distance to the nova. In this paper, I provide a review of interferometric observations of novae, with a focus on recent results on the expansion and spatial structure of nova V339 Del in 2013. I also discuss other promising applications of interferometry to transient sources, such as measuring the image size and centroid displacements to measure planetary masses in gravitational microlensing events. Given the timescales of transient events, it is critical for interferometric arrays to respond rapidly to targets of opportunity in order to optimize the instrumental sensitivity and baselines required to resolve the source while its brightness and size change over time.

  13. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  14. Detection and recognition of angular frequency patterns.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hugh R; Propp, Roni

    2015-05-01

    Previous research has extensively explored visual encoding of smoothly curved, closed contours described by sinusoidal variation of pattern radius as a function of polar angle (RF patterns). Although the contours of many biologically significant objects are curved, we also confront shapes with a more jagged and angular appearance. To study these, we introduce here a novel class of visual stimuli that deform smoothly from a circle to an equilateral polygon with N sides (AF patterns). Threshold measurements reveal that both AF and RF patterns can be discriminated from circles at the same deformation amplitude, approximately 18.0arcsec, which is in the hyperacuity range. Thresholds were slightly higher for patterns with 3.0 cycles than for those with 5.0 cycles. Discrimination between AF and RF patterns was 75% correct at an amplitude that was approximately 3.0 times the threshold amplitude, which implies that AF and RF patterns activate different neural populations. Experiments with jittered patterns in which the contour was broken into several pieces and shifted inward or outward had much less effect on AF patterns than on RF patterns. Similarly, thresholds for single angles of AF patterns showed no significant difference from thresholds for the entire AF pattern. Taken together, these results imply that the visual system incorporates angles explicitly in the representation of closed object contours, but it suggests that angular contours are represented more locally than are curved contours.

  15. Muscle activities during asymmetric trunk angular accelerations.

    PubMed

    Marras, W S; Mirka, G A

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize trunk muscle and intra-abdominal pressure behavior during extensions of the trunk when angular trunk acceleration levels and trunk twist were varied during lifting exertions. Since force is related to acceleration, it was believed that changes in trunk acceleration would cause activity changes in the muscles and abdominal cavity pressurization mechanics that load the spine during manual materials handling tasks. The electromyographic activity of 10 trunk muscles and intra-abdominal pressure were studied in 39 subjects as they moved their trunks under high, medium, and low constant angular acceleration conditions. The results indicated that almost all the muscles were affected by acceleration and asymmetry. Muscle activities of up to 50% of maximum were observed even though a minimal amount of torque was being produced by the back. Coactivation of muscles was also apparent. Muscles located at the greatest distances from the spine, such as the latissimus dorsi and oblique groups, increased their activities the most as trunk acceleration increased. Muscles located farthest from the spine also played an important role as the trunk became more asymmetric. Intra-abdominal pressure changed minimally over the test conditions. The nature of these responses and their impact on spine loading are discussed.

  16. An EM Induction Hi-Speed Rotation Angular Rate Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuan; Han, Yan

    2017-01-01

    A hi-speed rotation angular rate sensor based on an electromagnetic induction signal is proposed to provide a possibility of wide range measurement of high angular rates. An angular rate sensor is designed that works on the principle of electromagnetism (EM) induction. In addition to a zero-phase detection technique, this sensor uses the feedback principle of magnetic induction coils in response to a rotating magnetic field. It solves the challenge of designing an angular rate sensor that is suitable for both low and high rotating rates. The sensor was examined for angular rate measurement accuracy in simulation tests using a rotary table. The results show that it is capable of measuring angular rates ranging from 1 rps to 100 rps, with an error within 1.8‰ of the full scale (FS). The proposed sensor is suitable to measurement applications where the rotation angular rate is widely varied, and it contributes to design technology advancements of real-time sensors measuring angular acceleration, angular rate, and angular displacement of hi-speed rotary objects. PMID:28304348

  17. An EM Induction Hi-Speed Rotation Angular Rate Sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuan; Han, Yan

    2017-03-17

    A hi-speed rotation angular rate sensor based on an electromagnetic induction signal is proposed to provide a possibility of wide range measurement of high angular rates. An angular rate sensor is designed that works on the principle of electromagnetism (EM) induction. In addition to a zero-phase detection technique, this sensor uses the feedback principle of magnetic induction coils in response to a rotating magnetic field. It solves the challenge of designing an angular rate sensor that is suitable for both low and high rotating rates. The sensor was examined for angular rate measurement accuracy in simulation tests using a rotary table. The results show that it is capable of measuring angular rates ranging from 1 rps to 100 rps, with an error within 1.8‰ of the full scale (FS). The proposed sensor is suitable to measurement applications where the rotation angular rate is widely varied, and it contributes to design technology advancements of real-time sensors measuring angular acceleration, angular rate, and angular displacement of hi-speed rotary objects.

  18. CHARRON: Code for High Angular Resolution of Rotating Objects in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Zorec, J.; Vakili, F.

    2012-12-01

    Rotation is one of the fundamental physical parameters governing stellar physics and evolution. At the same time, spectrally resolved optical/IR long-baseline interferometry has proven to be an important observing tool to measure many physical effects linked to rotation, in particular, stellar flattening, gravity darkening, differential rotation. In order to interpret the high angular resolution observations from modern spectro-interferometers, such as VLTI/AMBER and VEGA/CHARA, we have developed an interferometry-oriented numerical model: CHARRON (Code for High Angular Resolution of Rotating Objects in Nature). We present here the characteristics of CHARRON, which is faster (≃q10-30 s per model) and thus more adapted to model-fitting than the first version of the code presented by Domiciano de Souza et al. (2002).

  19. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  20. Protostellar disk formation and transport of angular momentum during magnetized core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, M.; Hennebelle, P.; Ciardi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Context. Theoretical studies of collapsing clouds have found that even a relatively weak magnetic field may prevent the formation of disks and their fragmentation. However, most previous studies have been limited to cases where the magnetic field and the rotation axis of the cloud are aligned. Aims: We study the transport of angular momentum, and its effects on disk formation, for non-aligned initial configurations and a range of magnetic intensities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional, adaptive mesh, numerical simulations of magnetically supercritical collapsing dense cores using the magneto-hydrodynamic code Ramses. We compute the contributions of all the relevant processes transporting angular momentum, in both the envelope and the region of the disk. We clearly define centrifugally supported disks and thoroughly study their properties. Results: At variance with earlier analyses, we show that the transport of angular momentum acts less efficiently in collapsing cores with non-aligned rotation and magnetic field. Analytically, this result can be understood by taking into account the bending of field lines occurring during the gravitational collapse. For the transport of angular momentum, we conclude that magnetic braking in the mean direction of the magnetic field tends to dominate over both the gravitational and outflow transport of angular momentum. We find that massive disks, containing at least 10% of the initial core mass, can form during the earliest stages of star formation even for mass-to-flux ratios as small as three to five times the critical value. At higher field intensities, the early formation of massive disks is prevented. Conclusions: Given the ubiquity of Class I disks, and because the early formation of massive disks can take place at moderate magnetic intensities, we speculate that for stronger fields, disks will form later, when most of the envelope will have been accreted. In addition, we speculate that some observed early massive disks

  1. Creating high-harmonic beams with controlled orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T J; Frumker, E; Boyd, Robert W; Corkum, P B

    2014-10-10

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ = ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ| = 1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  2. Creating High-Harmonic Beams with Controlled Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T. J.; Frumker, E.; Boyd, Robert W.; Corkum, P. B.

    2014-10-01

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ =ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ|=1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  3. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus.

  4. Angular momentum of dark matter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2017-04-01

    We provide strongly suggestive evidence that the halo constituents of dark matter are Primordial Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (PIMBHs). PIMBHs are described by a Kerr metric with two parameters, mass M and angular momentum J. There has been little discussion of J since it plays no role in the upcoming attempt at PIMBH detection by microlensing. Nevertheless J does play a central role in understanding their previous lack of detection, especially by CMB distortion. We explain why bounds previously derived from lack of CMB distortion are too strong for PIMBHs with J non-vanishing and that, provided almost no dark matter black holes originate from stellar collapse, excessive CMB distortion is avoided.

  5. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  6. Angular response of hot wire probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mare, L.; Jelly, T. O.; Day, I. J.

    2017-03-01

    A new equation for the convective heat loss from the sensor of a hot-wire probe is derived which accounts for both the potential and the viscous parts of the flow past the prongs. The convective heat loss from the sensor is related to the far-field velocity by an expression containing a term representing the potential flow around the prongs, and a term representing their viscous effect. This latter term is absent in the response equations available in the literature but is essential in representing some features of the observed response of miniature hot-wire probes. The response equation contains only four parameters but it can reproduce, with great accuracy, the behaviour of commonly used single-wire probes. The response equation simplifies the calibration the angular response of rotated slanted hot-wire probes: only standard King’s law parameters and a Reynolds-dependent drag coefficient need to be determined.

  7. Angular Flow in Toroid Cavity Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Peter; Woelk, Klaus; Bargon, Joachim; Gerald, Rex E.

    2001-08-01

    NMR signals from samples that rotate uniformly about the central conductor of a TCD (toroid cavity detector) exhibit frequency shifts that are directly proportional to the sample's angular velocity. This newly observed effect is based on the unique radiofrequency field inside TCDs, which is variable in direction. If a liquid sample is pumped through a capillary tube wound about the central conductor, the frequency shift is proportional to the flow rate. A mathematical relationship between a volumetric flow rate and the frequency shift is established and experimentally verified to high precision. Additionally, two-dimensional flow-resolved NMR spectroscopy for discrimination between components with different flow velocities yet retaining chemical shift information for structural analysis is presented. The application of the two-dimensional method in chromatographic NMR is suggested. Furthermore, utilization of the frequency-shift effect for rheologic studies if combined with toroid-cavity rotating-frame imaging is proposed.

  8. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  9. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  10. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  11. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Angular-momentum distributions sigma/sub L/ for the compound nucleus /sup 164/Yb were deduced from measurements of ..gamma..-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of /sup 64/Ni and /sup 100/Mo at and below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation functions can be reproduced with coupled-channels calculations only if additional coupling beyond the known inelastic strengths is included. Even with this augmented coupling, however, at the lowest bombarding energies the experimental sigma/sub L/ extend to higher L values than the predictions. Single-barrier penetration models for a potential with an energy-dependent depth and shape fitted to the excitation function likewise underestimate the role of high-L partial waves. Somewhat better success is achieved with models in which fission is allowed to occur at distances comparable with or even larger than the Coulomb barrier radius. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. High Orbital Angular Momentum Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Alves, E. P.; Fonseca, R. A.; Mendonça, J. T.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-12-01

    We identify and explore a high orbital angular momentum (OAM) harmonics generation and amplification mechanism that manipulates the OAM independently of any other laser property, by preserving the initial laser wavelength, through stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. The high OAM harmonics spectra can extend at least up to the limiting value imposed by the paraxial approximation. We show with theory and particle-in-cell simulations that the orders of the OAM harmonics can be tuned according to a selection rule that depends on the initial OAM of the interacting waves. We illustrate the high OAM harmonics generation in a plasma using several examples including the generation of prime OAM harmonics. The process can also be realized in any nonlinear optical Kerr media supporting three-wave interactions.

  13. Angular relation of axes in perceptual space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, Urs

    1992-01-01

    The geometry of perceptual space needs to be known to model spatial orientation constancy or to create virtual environments. To examine one main aspect of this geometry, the angular relation between the three spatial axes was measured. Experiments were performed consisting of a perceptual task in which subjects were asked to set independently their apparent vertical and horizontal plane. The visual background provided no other stimuli to serve as optical direction cues. The task was performed in a number of different body tilt positions with pitches and rolls varied in steps of 30 degs. The results clearly show the distortion of orthogonality of the perceptual space for nonupright body positions. Large interindividual differences were found. Deviations from orthogonality up to 25 deg were detected in the pitch as well as in the roll direction. Implications of this nonorthogonality on further studies of spatial perception and on the construction of virtual environments for human interaction is also discussed.

  14. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  15. Angular reduction in multiparticle matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, D. R.; Parke, W. C.

    1989-12-01

    A general method for reduction of coupled spherical harmonic products is presented. When the total angular coupling is zero, the reduction leads to an explicitly real expression in the scalar products of the unit vector arguments of the spherical harmonics. For nonscalar couplings, the reduction gives Cartesian tensor forms for the spherical harmonic products; tensors built from the physical vectors in the original expression. The reduction for arbitrary couplings is given in closed form, making it amenable to symbolic manipulation on a computer. The final expressions do not depend on a special choice of coordinate axes, nor do they contain azimuthal quantum number summations, or do they have complex tensor terms for couplings to a scalar; consequently, they are easily interpretable from the properties of the physical vectors they contain.

  16. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  17. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, C; Rheault, F; Boulay, R; Tremblay, R

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  18. Angular dependence of a simple accident dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, R. T.; Romero, L. L.; Olsher, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    A simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. Studies of the model without phantom or other confounding factors have shown that the cross sections and fluence-to-dose factors generated by the Monte Carlo method agree with those generated by analytic expressions for the high energy component. The threshold cross sections for the detectors on a phantom were calculated. The resulting doses assigned agree well with exposures made to three critical assemblies. In this study the angular dependence on a phantom is studied and compared with measurements taken on the GODIVA reactor. The dosimeter positions on the phantom are facing the source, on the back and the side. In previous papers the modeling of a simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. The conclusion made was that most of the neutron dose from criticality assemblies results from the high energy neutron fluences determined by the sulfur and indium detectors. The results using doses measured from the GODIVA, SHEBA, and bare and lead shielded SILENE reactors confirmed this. The angular dependence of an accident dosemeter is of interest in evaluating the exposure of personnel. To investigate this effect accident dosemeters were placed on a phantom and exposed to the GODIVA reactor at phantom orientations of 0{sup o}, 45{sup o}, 90{sup o}, 135{sup o}, and 180{sup o} to the assembly center line.

  19. Interpretation of quantum and classical angular momentum polarization moments.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F Javier

    2004-08-20

    This Letter presents a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization. The results involve an "uncertainty broadening" term that directly expresses the restrictions imposed by the uncertainty principle. It is argued that neglect of this term can lead to error in the interpretation of theoretical or experimental angular momentum polarization data. Functions that take the uncertainty broadening into account, appropriate for use in quantum or quasiclassical descriptions of spatial distributions of angular momenta, are defined.

  20. Calculating Sputter Rate Angular Dependence Using Optical Profilometry (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-26

    This work attempts to determine angular dependence curves for sputter rates of a material based on a single experimental measurement. An aluminum...angular dependence curve to match the given erosion profile. The calculated profile matched well with the experimental profile; however, neither matched...the optimization routine, the angular dependence curve was input to the COLISEUM plasma modeling code, which generated the same erosion profile as the experimental data.

  1. Whole-body angular momentum in incline and decline walking.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Wilken, Jason M; Sinitski, Emily H; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-04-05

    Angular momentum is highly regulated over the gait cycle and is important for maintaining dynamic stability and control of movement. However, little is known regarding how angular momentum is regulated on irregular surfaces, such as slopes, when the risk of falling is higher. This study examined the three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum patterns of 30 healthy subjects walking over a range of incline and decline angles. The range of angular momentum was either similar or reduced on decline surfaces and increased on incline surfaces relative to level ground, with the greatest differences occurring in the frontal and sagittal planes. These results suggest that angular momentum is more tightly controlled during decline walking when the risk of falling is greater. In the frontal plane, the range of angular momentum was strongly correlated with the peak hip and knee abduction moments in early stance. In the transverse plane, the strongest correlation occurred with the knee external rotation peak in late stance. In the sagittal plane, all external moment peaks were correlated with the range of angular momentum. The peak ankle plantarflexion, knee flexion and hip extension moments were also strongly correlated with the sagittal-plane angular momentum. These results highlight how able-bodied subjects control angular momentum differently on sloped surfaces relative to level walking and provide a baseline for comparison with pathological populations that are more susceptible to falling.

  2. Angular dynamics of small crystals in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, J.; Einarsson, J.; Mehlig, B.

    2017-01-01

    The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, namely that of axisymmetric particles with a continuous rotation symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotation symmetry and certain mirror symmetries but do not have a continuous rotation symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. However, there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion.

  3. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  4. An Adaptive Critic Approach to Reference Model Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, G.; Gundy-Burlet, K.; Bryant, D.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks have been successfully used for implementing control architectures for different applications. In this work, we examine a neural network augmented adaptive critic as a Level 2 intelligent controller for a C- 17 aircraft. This intelligent control architecture utilizes an adaptive critic to tune the parameters of a reference model, which is then used to define the angular rate command for a Level 1 intelligent controller. The present architecture is implemented on a high-fidelity non-linear model of a C-17 aircraft. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of the C-17 under degraded conditions such as control failures and battle damage. Pilot ratings using a motion based simulation facility are included in this paper. The benefits of using an adaptive critic are documented using time response comparisons for severe damage situations.

  5. Observing angular deviations in light-beam reflection via weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Jayaswal, G; Mistura, G; Merano, M

    2014-11-01

    An optical analog of the quantum weak measurement scheme proved to be very useful for the observation of optical beam shifts. Here we adapt the weak value amplification method to the observation of the angular Goos-Hänchen shift. We observe this effect in the case of external air-dielectric reflection, the more fundamental case in which it occurs. We show that weak measurements allow for a faithful amplification of the effect at any angle of incidence, even at Brewster's angle of incidence.

  6. Non-negative Wigner functions for orbital angular momentum states

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Klimov, A. B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2010-01-15

    The Wigner function of a pure continuous-variable quantum state is non-negative if and only if the state is Gaussian. Here we show that for the canonical pair angle and angular momentum, the only pure states with non-negative Wigner functions are the eigenstates of the angular momentum. Some implications of this surprising result are discussed.

  7. Measurement of angular momentum flux in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Asavei, Theodor; Preece, Daryl; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2011-03-01

    It is well established that a light beam can carry angular momentum and therefore when using optical tweezers it is possible to exert torques to twist or rotate microscopic objects. Both spin and orbital angular momentum can be transferred. This transfer can be achieved using birefringent particles exposed to a Gaussian circularly polarized beam. In this case, a transfer of spin angular momentum will occur. The change in spin, and hence the torque, can be readily measured optically. On the other hand, it is much more challenging to measure orbital angular momentum and torque. Laguerre-Gauss mode decomposition, as used for orbital angular momentum encoding for quantum communication, and rotational frequency shift can be used, and are effective methods in a macro-environment. However, the situation becomes more complicated when a measurement is done on microscale, especially with highly focused laser beams. We review the methods for the measurement of the angular momentum of light in optical tweezers, and the challenges faced when measuring orbital angular momentum. We also demonstrate one possible simple method for a quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum in optical tweezers.

  8. One particularity of energy-angular secondary electrons spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. S.; Zaitsev, S. I.

    2006-05-01

    In this work we discuss the problems of the energy-angular spectrum of backscattered and true secondary electrons simulation using the discrete (DLA) and the continuous (CLA) loss approximations. The presence of an angular spectrum artefact - the deviation from the sinusoidal distribution over the range of 177-18O° from the beam direction is shown.

  9. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  10. Student understanding of the angular momentum of classical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Hunter G.; Heron, Paula R. L.

    2011-10-01

    Students in introductory calculus-based physics were asked about the angular momentum of a particle traveling in a straight line. The tendency to state that the angular momentum is identically zero was widespread, and few students applied l = r × p correctly. The common errors reflect a tendency to conflate angular momentum with angular velocity or with linear momentum. Many students assume that linear and angular momentum are jointly conserved, an error that appears to be linked to their thinking about energy. A tutorial was developed to help students recognize that linear momentum and angular momentum are separately conserved. The results suggest that helping students understand why angular momentum is attributed to a particle moving in a straight line may be more effective in helping them to apply the concept than instructing them only on its correct use. In addition to providing insights into student learning of the concept of angular momentum, we illustrate how students' own ideas can be the basis for more effective instruction.

  11. Iron deficiency: an overlooked predisposing factor in angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, N C; Bissada, N F

    1979-10-01

    Clinicians who recommend the use of antifungal agents for angular cheilitis may be treating the symptoms and not the predisposing cause of the disease. Iron deficiency should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis whenever angular cheilitis is encountered, especially in women of child-bearing age.

  12. Angular cheilitis occurring during orthodontic treatment: a case series.

    PubMed

    Cross, David L; Short, Laura J

    2008-12-01

    Clinical experience has shown that angular cheilitis can occur during orthodontic treatment and may persist into retention, but the incidence of the condition is unknown. The purpose of this paper is to increase the awareness among clinicians of angular cheilitis occurring during orthodontic treatment. It also proposes a treatment regime which may be used.

  13. Distilling angular momentum nonclassical states in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Militello, B.; Messina, A.

    2004-09-01

    In the spirit of quantum nondemolition measurements, we show that by exploiting suitable vibronic couplings and repeatedly measuring the atomic population of a confined ion, it is possible to distill center-of-mass vibrational states with a well-defined square of angular momentum or, alternatively, angular momentum projection Schroedinger cat states.

  14. Orbital Angular Momentum-Entanglement Frequency Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Shi-Long; Li, Yan; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Shuai; Dong, Ming-Xin; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-09-01

    Entanglement is a vital resource for realizing many tasks such as teleportation, secure key distribution, metrology, and quantum computations. To effectively build entanglement between different quantum systems and share information between them, a frequency transducer to convert between quantum states of different wavelengths while retaining its quantum features is indispensable. Information encoded in the photon's orbital angular momentum (OAM) degrees of freedom is preferred in harnessing the information-carrying capacity of a single photon because of its unlimited dimensions. A quantum transducer, which operates at wavelengths from 1558.3 to 525 nm for OAM qubits, OAM-polarization hybrid-entangled states, and OAM-entangled states, is reported for the first time. Nonclassical properties and entanglements are demonstrated following the conversion process by performing quantum tomography, interference, and Bell inequality measurements. Our results demonstrate the capability to create an entanglement link between different quantum systems operating in a photon's OAM degrees of freedom, which will be of great importance in building a high-capacity OAM quantum network.

  15. Semiclassical model for attosecond angular streaking.

    PubMed

    Smolarski, M; Eckle, P; Keller, U; Dörner, R

    2010-08-16

    Attosecond angular streaking is a new technique to achieve unsurpassed time accuracy of only a few attoseconds. Recently this has been successfully used to set an upper limit on the electron tunneling delay time in strong laser field ionization. The measurement technique can be modeled with either the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) or a more simple semiclassical approach that describes the process in two steps in analogy to the three-step model in high harmonic generation (HHG): step one is the tunnel ionization and step two is the classical motion in the strong laser field. Here we describe in detail a semiclassical model which is based on the ADK theory for the tunneling step, with subsequent classical propagation of the electron in the laser field. We take into account different ellipticities of the laser field and a possible wavelength-dependent ellipticity that is typically observed for pulses in the two-optical-cycle regime. This semiclassical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental result.

  16. Cyclic transformation of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlederer, Florian; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Malik, Mehul; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states.

  17. Angular velocity and centripetal acceleration relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, the growing boom of smartphones has given rise to a considerable number of applications exploiting the functionality of the sensors incorporated in these devices. A sector that has unexpectedly taken advantage of the power of these tools is physics teaching, as reflected in several recent papers. In effect, the use of smartphones has been proposed in several physics experiments spanning mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, oscillations, and waves, among other subjects. Although mechanical experiments have received considerable attention, most of them are based on the use of the accelerometer. An aspect that has received less attention is the use of rotation sensors or gyroscopes. An additional advance in the use of these devices is given by the possibility of obtaining data using the accelerometer and the gyroscope simultaneously. The aim of this paper is to consider the relation between the centripetal acceleration and the angular velocity. Instead of using a formal laboratory setup, in this experiment a smartphone is attached to the floor of a merry-go-round, found in many playgrounds. Several experiments were performed with the roundabout rotating in both directions and with the smart-phone at different distances from the center. The coherence of the measurements is shown.

  18. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  19. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  20. Tracing the Angular Dependence of the CGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattinger, Michael; Christensen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The circumgalactic media (CGM) is enriched with metals through a process called the baryon cycle, which may play a significant role in the regulation of star formation. While the relationship between the CGM’s baryonic makeup and impact parameter is well documented, the relationship between the baryonic distribution of the CGM and the azimuthal angle out of the plane of the galaxy remains an open question. We investigated the angular distribution of baryons in the CGM by creating mock-absorption line spectra for a high-resolution simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy at redshift zero. By comparison with data from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph-Halos survey, we determined that our equivalent widths of HI, MgII, CIII, SiII, and SiIII are consistent with observations. Using our data, we found that low ionization state material is more prevalent at low azimuthal angles and that high ionization state material is more prevalent at high angles within the virial radius. We attributed this increased ionization to higher temperatures at high angles. We also found that the highest metallicity levels appear at high and low azimuthal angles, with lower metallicities at middle angles. This evidence supports the recycled accretion model of CGM baryon flow.

  1. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission.

  2. Optical communications beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Trichili, Abderrahmen; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Current optical communication technologies are predicted to face a bandwidth capacity limit in the near future. The nature of the limitation is fundamental rather than technological and is set by nonlinearities in optical fibers. One solution, suggested over 30 years ago, comprises the use of spatial modes of light as information carriers. Along this direction, light beams endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been demonstrated as potential information carriers in both, free space and fibres. However, recent studies suggest that purely OAM modes does not increase the bandwidth of optical communication systems. In fact, in all work to date, only the azimuthal component of transverse spatial modes has been used. Crucially, all transverse spatial modes require two degrees of freedom to be described; in the context of Laguerre-Gaussian (LGp`) beams these are azimuthal (l) and radial (p), the former responsible for OAM. Here, we demonstrate a technique where both degrees of freedom of LG modes are used as information carrier over free space. We transfer images encoded using 100 spatial modes in three wavelengths as our basis, and employ a spatial demultiplexing scheme that detects all 100 modes simultaneously. Our scheme is a hybrid of MIMO and SMM, and serves as a proof-of-principle demonstration. The cross-talk between the modes is small and independent of whether OAM modes are used or not.

  3. Energy and Angular Correlations of Fission Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S. D.; Febbraro, M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Jones, K. L.; Smith, K.; Grzywacz, R.; Temanson, E.; Cizewski, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    Despite the discovery of fission nearly 80 years ago and its importance to nuclear energy, national security, and astrophysics; there are very few measurements that correlate multiple fission products. A proof-of-principle experiment is underway at Oak Ridge National Lab to measure the energy and angle correlation between prompt fission neutrons, gamma rays, and fragments in time-coincidence. The angular and energy spectrum of the prompt neutrons and /or gamma rays with respect to fragment mass, could reveal new details concerning the energy balance between these products and will be essential for benchmarking advanced fission models. An array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors is positioned opposite dual time-of-flight detectors and a total-energy detector to determine one fragment mass. Preliminary results from a spontaneous 252Cf source will be presented, along with plans for future improvements. Research sponsored in part by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Angular displacement perception modulated by force background.

    PubMed

    Lackner, James R; DiZio, Paul

    2009-05-01

    We had recumbent subjects (n = 7) indicate the amplitude of imposed, passive yaw-axis body rotations in the 0, 1, and 1.8 g background force levels generated during parabolic flight maneuvers. The blindfolded subject, restrained in a cradle, aligned a gravity-neutral pointer with the subjective vertical while in an initial position and then tried to keep it aligned with the same external direction during a body rotation, lasting less than 1.5 s about the z-axis 30 degrees, 60 degrees, or 120 degrees in amplitude. All the rotations were above semicircular threshold levels for eliciting perception of angular displacement under terrestrial test conditions. In 1 and 1.8 g test conditions, subjects were able to indicate both the subjective vertical and the amplitude of the body rotation reasonably accurately. By contrast in 0 g, when indicating the subjective vertical, they aligned the pointer with the body midline and kept it nearly aligned with their midline during the subsequent body tilts. They also reported feeling supine throughout the 0 g test periods. The attenuation of apparent self-displacement in 0 g is discussed in terms of (1) a possible failure of integration of semicircular canal velocity signals, (2) a contribution of somatosensory pressure and contact cues, and (3) gravicentric versus body-centric reference frames. The significance of the findings for predicting and preventing motion sickness and disorientation in orbital space flight and in rotating artificial gravity environments is discussed.

  5. Angular correlations near the Fermi energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D.; Cebra, D.A.; Karn, J.; Parks, C.; Pradhan, A.; Vander Molen, A.; van der Plicht, J.; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K.; Tickle, R.S.; and others

    1988-07-01

    Angular correlations between light particles have been studied to probe the extent to which a thermally equilibrated system is formed in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy. Single-light-particle inclusive energy spectra and two-particle large-angle correlations were measured for 40 and 50 MeV/nucleon C+C, Ag, and Au. The single-particle inclusive energy spectra are well fit by a three moving source parametrization. Two-particle large-angle correlations are shown to be consistent with emission from a thermally equilibrated source when the effects of momentum conservation are considered. Single-particle inclusive spectra and light-particle correlations at small relative momentum were measured for 35 MeV/nucleon N+Ag. Source radii were extracted from the two-particle correlation functions and were found to be consistent with previous measurements using two-particle correlations and the coalescence model. The temperature of the emitting source was extracted from the relative populations of states using the quantum statistical model and was found to be 4.8/sub -2.4//sup +2.8/ MeV, compared to the 14 MeV temperature extracted from the slopes of the kinetic energy spectra.

  6. The High Angular Resolution Multiplicity of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Helsel, John W.

    2009-02-01

    We present the results of a speckle interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars that complements and expands upon a similar survey made over a decade ago. The speckle observations were made with the Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 4 m telescopes and USNO speckle camera, and they are sensitive to the detection of binaries in the angular separation regime between 0farcs03 and 5'' with relatively bright companions (ΔV < 3). We report on the discovery of companions to 14 OB stars. In total we resolved companions of 41 of 385 O-stars (11%), 4 of 37 Wolf-Rayet stars (11%), and 89 of 139 B-stars (64%; an enriched visual binary sample that we selected for future orbital determinations). We made a statistical analysis of the binary frequency among the subsample that are listed in the Galactic O Star Catalog by compiling published data on other visual companions detected through adaptive optics studies and/or noted in the Washington Double Star Catalog and by collecting published information on radial velocities and spectroscopic binaries. We find that the binary frequency is much higher among O-stars in clusters and associations compared to the numbers for field and runaway O-stars, consistent with predictions for the ejection processes for runaway stars. We present a first orbit for the O-star δ Orionis; a linear solution of the close, apparently optical, companion of the O-star ι Orionis; and an improved orbit of the Be star δ Scorpii. Finally, we list astrometric data for another 249 resolved and 221 unresolved targets that are lower mass stars that we observed for various other science programs.

  7. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  8. Modeling gravity-dependent plasticity of the angular vestibuloocular reflex with a physiologically based neural network.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yongqing; Yakushin, Sergei B; Cohen, Bernard; Raphan, Theodore

    2006-12-01

    A neural network model was developed to explain the gravity-dependent properties of gain adaptation of the angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR). Gain changes are maximal at the head orientation where the gain is adapted and decrease as the head is tilted away from that position and can be described by the sum of gravity-independent and gravity-dependent components. The adaptation process was modeled by modifying the weights and bias values of a three-dimensional physiologically based neural network of canal-otolith-convergent neurons that drive the aVOR. Model parameters were trained using experimental vertical aVOR gain values. The learning rule aimed to reduce the error between eye velocities obtained from experimental gain values and model output in the position of adaptation. Although the model was trained only at specific head positions, the model predicted the experimental data at all head positions in three dimensions. Altering the relative learning rates of the weights and bias improved the model-data fits. Model predictions in three dimensions compared favorably with those of a double-sinusoid function, which is a fit that minimized the mean square error at every head position and served as the standard by which we compared the model predictions. The model supports the hypothesis that gravity-dependent adaptation of the aVOR is realized in three dimensions by a direct otolith input to canal-otolith neurons, whose canal sensitivities are adapted by the visual-vestibular mismatch. The adaptation is tuned by how the weights from otolith input to the canal-otolith-convergent neurons are adapted for a given head orientation.

  9. Angular momentum projection with quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ching-Yun; Banerjee, M. K.

    1991-04-01

    We have improved a simple and rapid method of calculating expectation values of operators in states of good angular momentum projected from a hedgehog baryon state introduced by Birse et al. We have included the contributions of quantum mesons, while in the original method only classical meson fields were included. The method has been applied to models where the mean-field approximation does not include loop terms. Hence, for reasons of consistency, contributions of quantum loops to the matrix elements have been dropped. The symmetry of the hedgehog state under grand reversal (the combined operation of time reversal and eiπI^2, where I^ is the isospin operator) introduces remarkable simplification in the calculation of matrix elements of operators which do not contain time derivatives of meson fields. The quantum meson contributions turn out to be 3/2/ times the classical meson-field contributions, with ||B> being the hedgehog state. Such operators are encountered in the calculation of nucleon magnetic moments, gA(0) and gπNN(0)/2M. Calculation of charge radii involves operators containing time derivatives of meson fields and requires the knowledge of wave functions of quantum mesons. Proper nonperturbative treatment, even though at the tree level, requires that these wave functions describe the motion of the mesons in the potential generated by the baryon. Fortunately, because of the neglect of the loop terms, one needs only the even-parity, grand-spin-1 states which are purely pionic. The Goldberger-Treiman relations, an exact result for the model, serves as a partial test of the method of calculation discussed here. This has been used to demonstrate the remarkable improvement in the results produced by the inclusion of quantum effects of the mesons.

  10. The Angular Momentum Distribution within Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Jing, Y.

    We study the angular momentum profile of dark matter halos for a statistical sample drawn from a set of high-resolution cosmological simulations of 2563 particles. Two typical Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models have been analyzed, and the halos are selected to have at least 3× 104 particles in order to reliably measure the angular momentum profile. In contrast with the recent claims of Bullock et al. (2001), we find that the degree of misalignment of angular momentum within a halo is very high. About 50 percent of halos have more than 10 percent of halo mass in the mass of negative angular momentum j. After the mass of negative j is excluded, the cumulative mass function M(angular momentum profile of halos in a Warm Dark Matter (WDM) model and a Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) model. We find that the angular momentum profile of halos in the WDM is statistically indistinguishable from that in the CDM model, but the angular momentum of halos in the SIDM is reduced by the self-interaction of dark matter.

  11. Measurement of angular velocity in the perception of rotation.

    PubMed

    Barraza, José F; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2002-09-01

    Humans are sensitive to the parameters of translational motion, namely, direction and speed. At the same time, people have special mechanisms to deal with more complex motions, such as rotations and expansions. One wonders whether people may also be sensitive to the parameters of these complex motions. Here, we report on a series of experiments that explore whether human subjects can use angular velocity to evaluate how fast a rotational motion is. In four experiments, subjects were required to perform a task of speed-of-rotation discrimination by comparing two annuli of different radii in a temporal 2AFC paradigm. Results showed that humans could rely on a sensitive measurement of angular velocity to perform this discrimination task. This was especially true when the quality of the rotational signal was high (given by the number of dots composing the annulus). When the signal quality decreased, a bias towards linear velocity of 5-80% appeared, suggesting the existence of separate mechanisms for angular and linear velocity. This bias was independent from the reference radius. Finally, we asked whether the measurement of angular velocity required a rigid rotation, that is, whether the visual system makes only one global estimate of angular velocity. For this purpose, a random-dot disk was built such that all the dots were rotating with the same tangential speed, irrespectively of radius. Results showed that subjects do not estimate a unique global angular velocity, but that they perceive a non-rigid disk, with angular velocity falling inversely proportionally with radius.

  12. Generation and detection of orbital angular momentum via metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jinjin; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Hui; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Beams carrying orbital angular momentum possess a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. In this paper, we theoretically design and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact array of elliptical nanoholes, which could convert the circularly polarized light into the cross-polarized vortex beam. To measure the topological charges of orbital angular momentum in a simple manner, another elliptical nanoholes array is designed to generate reference beam as a reference light. This approach may provide a new way for the generation and detection of orbital angular momentum in a compact device. PMID:27052796

  13. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  14. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2011-05-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  15. Optical method of measuring angular displacement using a diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Ami, M; Sato, K; Yamamoto, S; Kamada, O; Shibanuma, H

    1987-10-01

    We investigate a method of measuring the angular displacement of an aperture when the diffraction pattern rotates. The data that are on a rectangular coordinate are transformed into the data on a polar coordinate. We calculate a cross-correlation function between the diffraction pattern that is rotated and the reference pattern. When the angular displacement is within +/-5 degrees , the error is <0.050. Then, we calculated the angular displacement of the pattern on a spherical coordinate system by personal computer simulation. Consequently, when the azimuth and the elevation of its rotation axis are within +/-6 degrees , the error is <0.1 degrees .

  16. Angular momentum evolution during star and planetary system formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Claire L.; Greaves, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    We focused on analysing the role played by protoplanetary disks in the evolution of angular momentum during star formation. If all the angular momentum contained within collapsing pre-stellar cores was conserved during their formation, proto-stars would reach rotation rates exceeding their break-up velocities before they reached the main sequence (Bodenheimer 1995). In order to avoid this occuring, methods by which proto-stars can lose angular momentum must exist. Angular momentum can be transferred from star to disk via stellar magnetic field lines through a process called magnetic braking (Camenzind 1990; Königl 1991). Alternatively, the stellar angular momentum can be lost from the star-disk system entirely via stellar- or disk-winds (e.g. Pelletier & Pudritz 1992; Matt & Pudritz 2005). The proportion of lost stellar angular momentum retained within the protoplanetary disk is important to studies of planetary system formation. If the bulk motion within the disk remains Keplerian, any increase of angular momentum in the disk causes an outward migration of disk material and an expansion of the disk. Therefore, an increase in disk angular momentum may cause a reduction in the disk surface density, often used to indicate the disk's ability to form planets. We made use of multi-wavelength data available in the literature to directly calculate the stellar and disk angular momenta for two nearby regions of star formation. Namely, these were the densely populated and highly irradiated Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the comparitively sparse Taurus-Auriga region. Due to the limited size of the ONC dataset, we produced an average surface density profile for the region. We modelled the stars as solid body rotators due to their fully convective nature (Krishnamurthi et al. 1997) and assumed the disks are flat and undergo Keplerian rotation about the same rotation axis as the star. We observed the older disks within each of the two star forming regions to be preferentially

  17. Plasmons carrying orbital angular momentum in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shabbir A.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.; Mendonca

    2013-10-01

    The existence of plasmons with orbital angular momentum due to the Laguerre-Gaussian-type density and potential perturbations is studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Starting from appropriate hydrodynamic equations for the electrostatic electron dynamics, a dispersion equation is derived in paraxial approximation. The Laguerre-Gaussian beam solutions are obtained and the properties of electric field components, energy flux, and corresponding angular momentum density of plasmons are investigated. The electric field lines are found to form helical structures with a dominant axial component. The results are analyzed numerically and the influence of radial and angular mode numbers on potential and electric field components is illustrated.

  18. Indirect precise angular control using four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Yun-Kun

    2014-04-28

    Here, we show indirect precise angular control using a four-wave mixing (FWM) process. This was performed with a superposition of light with orbital angular momentum in an M-Type configuration of a hot {sup 85}Rb atomic ensemble. A gear-shaped interference pattern is observed at FWM light with a donut-shaped input signal. The gear could be rotated and is controlled through the change of the polarization of the pump laser. Our experimental results that are based on nonlinear coherent interactions have applications in image processing and precise angular control.

  19. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  20. Maximal power output by solar cells with angular confinement.

    PubMed

    Höhn, Oliver; Kraus, Tobias; Bauhuis, Gerard; Schwarz, Ulrich T; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2014-05-05

    Angularly selective filters can increase the efficiency of radiatively limited solar cells. A restriction of the acceptance angle is linked to the kind of utilizable solar spectrum (global or direct radiation). This has to be considered when calculating the potential enhancement of both the efficiency and the power output. In this paper, different concepts to realize angularly selective filters are compared regarding their limits for efficiency and power output per unit area. First experimental results of a promising system based on a thin-film filter as the angularly selective element are given to demonstrate the practical relevance of such systems.

  1. How orbital angular momentum affects beam shifts in optical reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Merano, M.; Hermosa, N.; Woerdman, J. P.; Aiello, A.

    2010-08-15

    It is well known that reflection of a Gaussian light beam (TEM{sub 00}) by a planar dielectric interface leads to four beam shifts when compared to the geometrical-optics prediction. These are the spatial Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift, the angular GH shift, the spatial Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shift, and the angular IF shift. We report here, theoretically and experimentally, that endowing the beam with orbital angular momentum leads to coupling of these four shifts; this is described by a 4x4 mixing matrix.

  2. Angular Distributions of Synchrotron Radiation in the Nonrelativistic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Loginov, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    The angular distribution functions of the polarized components of synchrotron radiation in the nonrelativistic approximation are investigated using methods of classical and quantum theory. Particles of zero spin (bosons) and spin 1/2 (electrons) are considered in the quantum theory. It is shown that in the first nonzero approximation the angular distribution functions, calculated by methods of classical and quantum theory, coincide identically. Quantum corrections to the angular distribution functions appear only in the subsequent approximation whereas the total radiated power contains quantum and spin corrections already in the first approximation.

  3. Detection of a spinning object using light's orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Martin P J; Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M; Padgett, Miles J

    2013-08-02

    The linear Doppler shift is widely used to infer the velocity of approaching objects, but this shift does not detect rotation. By analyzing the orbital angular momentum of the light scattered from a spinning object, we observed a frequency shift proportional to product of the rotation frequency of the object and the orbital angular momentum of the light. This rotational frequency shift was still present when the angular momentum vector was parallel to the observation direction. The multiplicative enhancement of the frequency shift may have applications for the remote detection of rotating bodies in both terrestrial and astronomical settings.

  4. LCD-based digital eyeglass for modulating spatial-angular information.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zichao; Liao, Jun; Guo, Kaikai; Heng, Xin; Zheng, Guoan

    2015-05-04

    Using programmable aperture to modulate spatial-angular information of light field is well-known in computational photography and microscopy. Inspired by this concept, we report a digital eyeglass design that adaptively modulates light field entering human eyes. The main hardware includes a transparent liquid crystal display (LCD) and a mini-camera. The device analyzes the spatial-angular information of the camera image in real time and subsequently sends a command to form a certain pattern on the LCD. We show that, the eyeglass prototype can adaptively reduce light transmission from bright sources by ~80% and retain transparency to other dim objects meanwhile. One application of the reported device is to reduce discomforting glare caused by vehicle headlamps. To this end, we report the preliminary result of using the reported device in a road test. The reported device may also find applications in military operations (sniper scope), laser counter measure, STEM education, and enhancing visual contrast for visually impaired patients and elderly people with low vision.

  5. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  6. Rate of change of angular bearing as the relevant property in a horizontal interception task during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Matthieu; Musch, Eliane; Thiery, Evert; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2002-12-01

    The authors ran 3 experiments to investigate how catchers deal with the horizontal component of the ball's trajectory in an interception task during locomotion. The experiments were built upon the finding that velocity adaptations are based upon changes in the horizontal angular position or velocity of the ball with respect to the observer (M. Lenoir, M. Janssens, E. Musch, E. Thiery, J. Uyttenhove, 1999) a potential underlying information source for that strategy is described. In Experiment 1, actor (N = 10 participants)and ball approached each other along the legs of a V-shaped track. When the velocity and the initial angular bearing of the ball were varied, the observed behavior fitted with nulling the horizontal angular velocity of the ball: A positive or negative angular velocity was compensated by a velocity change. Evidence was obtained that those adaptations are modulated by a critical change in, rather than by a critical state of, the environment-actor system. In Experiment 2, the distance between the head and an artificial end-effector was varied. Irrespective of that distance, participants (N = 7) accelerated and decelerated in order to keep the angular velocity of the ball with respect to the end-effector close to constant. The ecological relevance of that constant bearing angle strategy was confirmed in Experiment 3: Participants (N = 7) in that experiment freely ran to catch fly balls. The present results support the concept that one can explain with a limited number of control variables an actor's behavior in an interception task during self-motion.

  7. Effect of angular momentum conservation on hydrodynamic simulations of colloids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Theers, Mario; Hu, Jinglei; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G; Ripoll, Marisol

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to most real fluids, angular momentum is not a locally conserved quantity in some mesoscopic simulation methods. Here we quantify the importance of this conservation in the flow fields associated with different colloidal systems. The flow field is analytically calculated with and without angular momentum conservation for the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method, and simulations are performed to verify the predictions. The flow field generated around a colloidal particle moving under an external force with slip boundary conditions depends on the conservation of angular momentum, and the amplitude of the friction force is substantially affected. Interestingly, no dependence on the angular momentum conservation is found for the flow fields generated around colloids under the influence of phoretic forces. Moreover, circular Couette flow between a no-slip and a slip cylinder is investigated, which allows us to validate one of the two existing expressions for the MPC stress tensor.

  8. Application of instantaneous angular acceleration to diesel engine fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yunpeng; Hu, Tianyou; Liu, Xin

    2005-12-01

    Diesel engine is a kind of important power generating machine, of which the running state monitoring and fault diagnosis attracts increasing attention. The theory and the method of diesel engine fault diagnosis based on angular acceleration measurement were studied, since angular acceleration contains a lot of information for diesel engine fault diagnosing and its power balance evaluating. USB data acquisition system was designed for the angular acceleration measurement, and it was composed with AVRAT09S8515 micro-processor and PDIUSBD12 USB interface IC. At the same time, the high speed micro-processor AVRAT09S8515 with unique function of automatically capturing the rising or falling edge of square wave was studied, and it was utilized in the diesel engine's crankshaft angular acceleration measuring system. The software and hardware of the whole system was designed, which supplied a whole solution to diesel engine fault diagnosis and power balance evaluation between each cylinder.

  9. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; McElwaine, J. N.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

  10. The INCAS Project: An Innovative Contact-Less Angular Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghislanzoni, L.; Di Cintio, A.; Solimando, M.; Parzianello, G.

    2013-09-01

    Angular Positions sensors are widely used in all spacecrafts, including re-entry vehicles and launchers, where mechanisms and pointing-scanning devices are required. The main applications are on mechanisms for TeleMeasure (TM) related to the release and deployment of devices, or on rotary mechanisms such as Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) and Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM). Longer lifetime (up to 7- 10 years) is becoming a new driver for the coming missions and contact technology sensors often incur in limitations due to the wear of the contacting parts [1].A Self-Compensating Absolute Angular Encoder was developed and tested in the frame of an ESA's ARTES 5.2 project, named INCAS (INnovative Contact-less Angular Sensor). More in particular, the INCAS sensor addresses a market need for contactless angular sensors aimed at replacing the more conventional rotary potentiometers, while featuring the same level of accuracy performances and extending the expected lifetime.

  11. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  12. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  13. Angular Momentum Evolution of Young Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amard, Louis; Palacios, Ana; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    We present stellar evolution models of young solar-type stars including self consistent treatment of rotational mixing and extraction of angular momentum (AM) by magnetized wind including the most up-to-date physic of AM transport.

  14. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  15. A Diels-Alder Route to Angularly Functionalized Bicyclic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Han; Lee, Jun Hee; Aussedat, Baptiste; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    A Diels-Alder based route to trans-fused angularly functionalized bicyclic structures has been developed. This transformation features the use of a tetrasubstituted dienophile in the cycloaddition step. PMID:20717474

  16. Angular dynamics of small crystals in viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Johan; Einarsson, Jonas; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics, and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, that of axisymmetric particles, with a continuous rotational symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotational symmetry and certain mirror symmetries, but that do not have a continuous rotational symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. But there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion. Vetenskapsrådet [Grant Number 2013-3992], Formas [Grant Number 2014-585], "Bottlenecks for particle growth in turbulent aerosols" from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Dnr. KAW 2014.0048, MPNS COST Action MP1305 "Flowing matter".

  17. Surface Roughness Metrology By Angular Distributions Of Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilsinn, David E.; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Teague, E. Clayton; MeLay, Michael J.; Giauque, Charles; Scire, Fredric E.

    1985-09-01

    On-line industrial inspection of batch manufactured parts requires fast measurement techniques for surface finish quality. In order to develop the measurement basis for these techniques, a system has been built to determine surface roughness by measuring the angular distributions of scattered light. The system incorporates data gathered from the angular distribution instrument and traditional surface stylus instruments. These data are used both as input and as comparison data in order to test various mathematical models of optical scattering phenomena. The object is to develop a mathematical model that uses the angular distribution of scattered light to deduce surface roughness parameters such as Ra and surface wavelength. This paper describes the results of an experiment in which angular scattered data from surfaces with sinusoidal profiles was used to compute the surface R and wavelength. Stylus measurements of these parameters were made separately. A comparative table is given of the computed and measured values. Estimates of uncertainties are also given.

  18. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-09-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics classrooms, the direction of an angular velocity vector is taught by the right-hand rule, a mnemonic tool intended to aid memory. A setup constructed for instructional purposes may provide students with a more easily understood and concrete method to observe the direction of the angular velocity. This article attempts to demonstrate the angular velocity vector using the observable motion of a screw mounted to a remotely operated toy car.

  19. A model of visual detection of angular speed for bees.

    PubMed

    Riabinina, Olena; Philippides, Andrew O

    2009-03-07

    A fly or bee's responses to widefield image motion depend on two basic parameters: temporal frequency and angular speed. Rotational optic flow is monitored using temporal frequency analysers, whereas translational optic flow seems to be monitored in terms of angular speed. Here we present a possible model of an angular speed detector which processes input signals through two parallel channels. The output of the detector is taken as the ratio of the two channels' outputs. This operation amplifies angular speed sensitivity and depresses temporal frequency tuning. We analyse the behaviour of two versions of this model with different filtering properties in response to a variety of input signals. We then embody the detector in a simulated agent's visual system and explore its behaviour in experiments on speed control and odometry. The latter leads us to suggest a new algorithm for optic flow driven odometry.

  20. Relevance of angular momentum conservation in mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Götze, Ingo O; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2007-10-01

    The angular momentum is conserved in fluids with a few exceptions such as ferrofluids. However, it can be violated locally in fluid simulations to reduce computational costs. The effects of this violation are investigated using a particle-based simulation method, multiparticle collision dynamics, which can switch on or off angular-momentum conservation. To this end, we study circular Couette flows between concentric and eccentric cylinders, where nonphysical torques due to the lack of the angular-momentum conservation are found whereas the velocity field is not affected. In addition, in simulations of fluids with different viscosities in contact and star polymers in solvent, incorrect angular velocities occur. These results quantitatively agree with the theoretical predictions based on the macroscopic stress tensor.

  1. Automating the Modeling of the SEE Cross Section's Angular Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Edmonds, L. D.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm that automates the application of the alpha law in any SEE analysis is presented. This automation is essential for the widespread acceptance of the sophisticated cross section angular dependence model.

  2. Coriolis effects are principally caused by gyroscopic angular acceleration.

    PubMed

    Isu, N; Yanagihara, M; Mikuni, T; Koo, J

    1994-07-01

    A cause of nausea evoked by cross-coupled rotation (termed Coriolis stimulus) was determined. Subjects were provided with two types of cross-coupled rotations: neck-forward flexion (Neck Flx) and upper body-forward flexion (Body Flx) during horizontal whole body rotation at a constant angular velocity. These Coriolis stimuli were given alternatively in an experimental sequence, and the severity of the nausea they evoked was compared by the subjects. The results indicated that the same quality of nausea was evoked by a slightly higher angular velocity during Body Flx (100.5 degrees/s) than during Neck Flx (90 degrees/s). While Body Flx generated Coriolis linear acceleration several times larger than Neck Flx, both the stimuli generated a similar magnitude of gyroscopic angular acceleration in this condition. Therefore, it was inferred that the nausea evoked by a Coriolis stimulus is principally caused by gyroscopic angular acceleration.

  3. Angular momentum relaxation in atom-diatom dilute gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Glenn T.

    1987-04-01

    The angular momentum relaxation cross sections for a diatomic molecule in a dilute atomic gas are estimated subject to the assumption that the intermolecular torque is dominated by the hard, impulsive contribution (evaluated using Boltzmann kinetic theory for nonspherical molecules). For carbon monoxide in a variety of gases, the kinetic theory derived contribution to the angular momentum cross section is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results of Jameson, Jameson, and Buchi.

  4. Characterization of quantum angular-momentum fluctuations via principal components

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, Angel; Luis, Alfredo

    2008-02-15

    We elaborate an approach to quantum fluctuations of angular momentum based on the diagonalization of the covariance matrix in two versions: real symmetric and complex Hermitian. At difference with previous approaches this is SU(2) invariant and avoids any difficulty caused by nontrivial commutators. Meaningful uncertainty relations are derived which are nontrivial even for vanishing mean angular momentum. We apply this approach to some relevant states.

  5. Orbital and angular motion construction for low thrust interplanetary flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelnikov, R. V.; Mashtakov, Y. V.; Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Tkachev, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Low thrust interplanetary flight is considered. Firstly, the fuel-optimal control is found. Then the angular motion is synthesized. This motion provides the thruster tracking of the required by optimal control direction. And, finally, reaction wheel control law for tracking this angular motion is proposed and implemented. The numerical example is given and total operation time for thrusters is found. Disturbances from solar pressure, thrust eccentricity, inaccuracy of reaction wheels installation and errors of inertia tensor are taken into account.

  6. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-01

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  7. Inherent Angular Tracking Error in an Amplitude Comparison Monopulse Radar.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    antennas is assumed. It is demonstrated that the cross over angle of the rantenna assembly and the target angular span are essential parameters for...Gaussian radiation pattern for the antennas is assumed. It is demonstrated that the cross over angle of the antenna assembly and the target angular...spherically symmetric in either amplitude or phase. A phase comparison tracking radar is constrained to have individual feeds in its antenna assembly at

  8. Analysis of Flow Angularity Repeatability Tests in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive data base of flow angularity repeatability measurements from four NTF check standard model tests is analyzed for statistical consistency and to characterize the results for prediction of angle-of-attack uncertainty for customer tests. A procedure for quality assurance for flow angularity measurements during customer tests is also presented. The efficacy of the procedure is tested using results from a customer test.

  9. Emittance compensation studies of photoinjector beams with angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven

    2003-05-19

    Beam dynamics studies on the FNPL photo injector that seek to optimize the transport of intense electron beams with large values of canonical angular momentum have been performed. These studies investigate the effect of solenoid emittance compensation on beams that evolve under the combined influence of intense space charge forces and large angular momentum. We present details of experimental measurements and supporting simulations of beam envelope evolution.

  10. Duality between spatial and angular shift in optical reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, A.; Merano, M.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2009-12-15

    We report a unified representation of the spatial and angular Goos-Haenchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts that occur when a light beam reflects from a plane interface. We thus reveal the dual nature of spatial and angular shifts in optical beam reflection. In the Goos-Haenchen case we show theoretically and experimentally that this unification naturally arises in the context of reflection from a lossy surface (e.g., a metal).

  11. Fractional Zero-Point Angular Momenta in Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si-Jia; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Long, Zheng-Wen; Jing, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The charged particle confined by a harmonic potential in a noncommutative planar phase space interacting with a homogeneous dynamical magnetic field and Aharonov-Bohm potentials is studied. We find that the canonical orbital angular momenta of the reduced models, which are obtained by setting the mass and a dimensionless parameter to zero, take fractional values. These fractional angular momenta are not only determined by the flux inside the thin long solenoid but also affected by the noncommutativities of phase space.

  12. Characterization of quantum angular-momentum fluctuations via principal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Ángel; Luis, Alfredo

    2008-02-01

    We elaborate an approach to quantum fluctuations of angular momentum based on the diagonalization of the covariance matrix in two versions: real symmetric and complex Hermitian. At difference with previous approaches this is SU(2) invariant and avoids any difficulty caused by nontrivial commutators. Meaningful uncertainty relations are derived which are nontrivial even for vanishing mean angular momentum. We apply this approach to some relevant states.

  13. Alignment of angular velocity sensors for a vestibular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Digiovanna, Jack; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Micera, Silvestro; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2012-02-13

    Vestibular prosthetics transmit angular velocities to the nervous system via electrical stimulation. Head-fixed gyroscopes measure angular motion, but the gyroscope coordinate system will not be coincident with the sensory organs the prosthetic replaces. Here we show a simple calibration method to align gyroscope measurements with the anatomical coordinate system. We benchmarked the method with simulated movements and obtain proof-of-concept with one healthy subject. The method was robust to misalignment, required little data, and minimal processing.

  14. Asymmetric angular dependence of domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2013-03-01

    An angular dependence of domain wall (DW) motion is studied in a magnetic wire consisting of a giant-magnetoresistance spin-valve. A DW pinning site is formed by a single notch, where a conventional linear one and a specially designed tilted one are compared. The asymmetric angular dependence was found in the DW depinning behavior with the tilted notch. The geometry control of the pinning site can be useful for DW diode devices using a rotating magnetic field.

  15. Aldebaran's angular diameter: How well do we know it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Roccatagliata, V.

    2005-04-01

    The bright, well-known K5 giant Aldebaran, α Tau, is probably the star with the largest number of direct angular diameter determinations, achieved over a long time by several authors using various techniques. In spite of this wealth of data, or perhaps as a direct result of it, there is not a very good agreement on a single angular diameter value. This is particularly unsettling if one considers that Aldebaran is also used as a primary calibrator for some angular resolution methods, notably for optical and infrared long baseline interferometry. Directly connected to Aldebaran's angular diameter and its uncertainties is its effective temperature, which also has been used for several empirical calibrations. Among the proposed explanations for the elusiveness of an accurate determination of the angular diameter of Aldebaran are the possibility of temporal variations as well as a possible dependence of the angular diameter on the wavelength. We present here a few, very accurate new determinations obtained by means of lunar occultations and long baseline interferometry. We derive an average value of 19.96±0.03 milliarcsec for the uniform disk diameter. The corresponding limb-darkened value is 20.58±0.03 milliarcsec, or 44.2±0.9 R⊙. We discuss this result, in connection with previous determinations and with possible problems that may affect such measurements. Based on observations collected at TIRGO (Gornergrat, Switzerland). TIRGO is operated by CNR - CAISMI Arcetri, Italy.

  16. Effects of angular confinement and concentration to realistic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Höhn, O. Kraus, T.; Bläsi, B.; Schwarz, U. T.

    2015-01-21

    In standard solar cells, light impinges under a very small angular range, whereas the solar cell emits light into the whole half space. Due to this expansion of etendué, entropy is generated, which limits the maximal efficiency of solar cells. This limit can be overcome by either increasing the angle of incidence by concentration or by decreasing the angle of emission by an angularly confining element or by a combination of both. In an ideal solar cell with radiative recombination as the only loss mechanism, angular confinement and concentration are thermodynamically equivalent. It is shown that concentration in a device, where non-radiative losses such as Shockley-Read-Hall and Auger recombination are considered, is not equivalent to angular confinement. As soon as non-radiative losses are considered, the gain in efficiency due to angular confinement drops significantly in contrast to the gain caused by concentration. With the help of detailed balance calculations, it is furthermore shown that angular confinement can help to increase the efficiency of solar cells under concentrated sunlight even if no measurable gain is expected for the solar cell under 1-sun-illumination. Our analysis predicts a relative gain of 3.14% relative in efficiency for a realistic solar cell with a concentration factor of 500.

  17. Generation of angular momentum in cold gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaiem, D.; Joyce, M.; Sylos Labini, F.; Worrakitpoonpon, T.

    2016-01-01

    During the violent relaxation of a self-gravitating system, a significant fraction of its mass may be ejected. If the time-varying gravitational field also breaks spherical symmetry, this mass can potentially carry angular momentum. Thus, starting initial configurations with zero angular momentum can, in principle, lead to a bound virialised system with non-zero angular momentum. Using numerical simulations we explore here how much angular momentum can be generated in a virialised structure in this way, starting from configurations of cold particles that are very close to spherically symmetric. For the initial configurations in which spherical symmetry is broken only by the Poissonian fluctuations associated with the finite particle number N, with N in range 103 to 105, we find that the relaxed structures have standard "spin" parameters λ ~ 10-3, and decreasing slowly with N. For slightly ellipsoidal initial conditions, in which the finite-N fluctuations break the residual reflection symmetries, we observe values λ ~ 10-2, i.e. of the same order of magnitude as those reported for elliptical galaxies. The net angular momentum vector is typically aligned close to normal to the major semi-axis of the triaxial relaxed structure and of the ejected mass. This simple mechanism may provide an alternative, or complement, to the so-called tidal torque theory for understanding the origin of angular momentum in astrophysical structures.

  18. Spatial distributions of angular momenta in quantum and quasiclassical stereodynamics.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F Javier; Sáez-Rábanos, V; Brouard, Mark

    2004-11-22

    We have recently reported a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization [M. P. de Miranda and F. Javier Aoiz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083201 (2004)]. This paper presents a detailed account of the derivation outlined in that paper, and discusses the implications of the new results. These include (i) a new expression of the role of the uncertainty principle in the broadening of angular momentum distributions, (ii) the attribution of azimuthal fluctuations of angular momentum distributions to spatial quantum beats, (iii) the definition of a new Fourier transform of the density matrix, distinct from those suggested in the past, that provides an alternative view of how the quantum description of angular momentum polarization approaches the classical one in the correspondence principle limit, (iv) a prescription for the determination of a quasiclassical angular momentum distribution function that does not suffer from problems encountered with its purely classical counterpart, and (v) a description of how angular momentum distributions commonly visualized with recourse to the classical vector model can be depicted with exact and well-defined quantum mechanics.

  19. Spatial distributions of angular momenta in quantum and quasiclassical stereodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miranda, Marcelo P.; Aoiz, F. Javier; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Brouard, Mark

    2004-11-01

    We have recently reported a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization [M. P. de Miranda and F. Javier Aoiz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083201 (2004)]. This paper presents a detailed account of the derivation outlined in that paper, and discusses the implications of the new results. These include (i) a new expression of the role of the uncertainty principle in the broadening of angular momentum distributions, (ii) the attribution of azimuthal fluctuations of angular momentum distributions to spatial quantum beats, (iii) the definition of a new Fourier transform of the density matrix, distinct from those suggested in the past, that provides an alternative view of how the quantum description of angular momentum polarization approaches the classical one in the correspondence principle limit, (iv) a prescription for the determination of a quasiclassical angular momentum distribution function that does not suffer from problems encountered with its purely classical counterpart, and (v) a description of how angular momentum distributions commonly visualized with recourse to the classical vector model can be depicted with exact and well-defined quantum mechanics.

  20. Two methods for examining angular response of personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Leib, R.; Miklos, J.

    1988-06-01

    The American National Standard ANSI N13.11-1983 is used to test the accuracy (bias plus precision) of dosimetry processors as part of the dosimetry accreditation program of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard requires that a study of the angular response of a dosimeter be carried out once, although no pass/fail criterion is given for angular response. The NVLAP accreditation program excluded Section 3.8, and thus no angular response data have been generated in an organized fashion. The objective of this project is to examine the feasibility of two alternative methods to test the angular response of personnel dosimeters. The first alternative involves static irradiations with the dosimeters at fixed angles to a radiation source. The second alternative involves dynamic irradiations with the dosimeters mounted on a rotating phantom. A Panasonic UD-802 personnel dosimetry system** was used to generate data to examine both alternatives. The results lead to two major conclusions. Firstly, Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard should be amended to require a pass/fail test for angular response. Secondly, a comparison between angular response data generated with a fixed or a rotating phantom shows that the rotating phantom is the more cost-effective method.

  1. Angular Momentum Profiles of Warm Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James S.; Kravtsov, and Andrey V.; Colín, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    We compare the specific angular momentum profiles of virialized dark halos in cold dark matter (CDM) and warm dark matter (WDM) models, using high-resolution dissipationless simulations. The simulations were initialized using the same set of modes, except on small scales, where the power was suppressed in WDM below the filtering length. Remarkably, WDM as well as CDM halos are well described by the two-parameter angular momentum profile of Bullock and coworkers, even though the halo masses are below the filtering scale of the WDM. Although the best-fit shape parameters change quantitatively for individual halos in the two simulations, we find no systematic variation in profile shapes as a function of the dark matter type. The scatter in shape parameters is significantly smaller for the WDM halos, suggesting that substructure and/or merging history plays a role in producing scatter about the mean angular momentum distribution, but that the average angular momentum profiles of halos originate from larger scale phenomena or a mechanism associated with the virialization process. The known mismatch between the angular momentum distributions of dark halos and disk galaxies is, therefore, present in WDM as well as CDM models. Our WDM halos tend to have a less coherent (more misaligned) angular momentum structure and smaller spin parameters than do their CDM counterparts, although we caution that this result is based on a small number of halos.

  2. Angular-velocity control approach for stance-control orthoses.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward D; Goudreau, Louis; Yakimovich, Terris; Kofman, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Currently, stance-control knee orthoses require external control mechanisms to control knee flexion during stance and allow free knee motion during the swing phase of gait. A new angular-velocity control approach that uses a rotary-hydraulic device to resist knee flexion when the knee angular velocity passes a preset threshold is presented. This angular-velocity approach for orthotic stance control is based on the premise that knee-flexion angular velocity during a knee-collapse event, such as a stumble or fall, is greater than that during walking. The new hydraulic knee-flexion control device does not require an external control mechanism to switch from free motion to stance control mode. Functional test results demonstrated that the hydraulic angular-velocity activated knee joint provided free knee motion during walking, engaged upon knee collapse, and supported body weight while the end-user recovered to a safe body position. The joint was tested to 51.6 Nm in single loading tests and passed 200,000 repeated loading cycles with a peak load of 88 Nm per cycle. The hydraulic, angular velocity activation approach has potential to improve safety and security for people with lower extremity weakness or when recovering from joint trauma.

  3. Adaptive Nulling with Multiple-Beam Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-30

    are determined. iii CONTENTS Abstract iii I. Introduction 1 II. Antenna Modeling 4 III. Basic Properties of the Modified Applebaum-Howells...niques are considered. II. Antenna Modeling Since the quality of the adapted radiation pattern is inherently related to the properties of the... model , the beams are positioned in a hexagonal array defined by the angular positions 0 = sinŕ i(-\\) a /u 2 + v *" \\ (la) n,m (\\TTD

  4. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  5. Adaptation to rotating artificial gravity environments.

    PubMed

    Lackner, James R; DiZio, Paul A

    2003-01-01

    A series of pioneering experiments on adaptation to rotating artificial gravity environments was conducted in the 1960s. The results of these experiments led to the general belief that humans with normal vestibular function would not be able to adapt to rotating environments with angular velocities above 3 or 4 rpm. By contrast, our recent work has shown that sensory-motor adaptation to 10 rpm can be achieved relatively easily and quickly if subjects make the same movement repeatedly. This repetition allows the nervous system to gauge how the Coriolis forces generated by movements in a rotating reference frame are deflecting movement paths and endpoints and to institute corrective adaptations. Independent mechanisms appear to underlie restoration of straight movement paths and of accurate movement endpoints. Control of head movements involves adaptation of vestibulo-collic and vestibulo-spinal mechanisms as well as adaptation to motor control of the head as an inertial mass. The vestibular adaptation has a long time constant and the motor adaptation a short one. Surprisingly, Coriolis forces generated by natural turning and reaching movements in our normal environment are typically larger than those elicited in rotating artificial gravity environments. They are not recognized as such because self-generated Coriolis forces during voluntary trunk rotation are perceptually transparent. After adaptation to a rotating environment is complete, the Coriolis forces generated by movements within it also become transparent and are not felt although they are still present.

  6. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Kathrin Fedosov, Dmitry A. Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  7. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kathrin; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier-Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor-Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  8. Solar adaptive optics at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltau, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Schmidt, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2013-10-01

    Observing the Sun with high angular resolution is difficult because the turbulence in the atmosphere is strongest during day time. In this paper we describe the principles of solar adaptive optics exemplified by the two German solar telescopes VTT and GREGOR at the Observatorio del Teide. With theses systems we obtain near diffraction limited images of the Sun. Ways to overcome the limits of conventional AO by applying multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) are shown.

  9. Functional phases and angular momentum characteristics of Tkatchev and Kovacs.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Gareth; Exell, Timothy A; Manning, Michelle L; Kerwin, David G

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the technical requirements and underlying biomechanics of complex release and re-grasp skills on high bar allows coaches and scientists to develop safe and effective training programmes. The aim of this study was to examine the differences in the functional phases between the Tkatchev and Kovacs skills and to explain how the angular momentum demands are addressed. Images of 18 gymnasts performing 10 Tkatchevs and 8 Kovacs at the Olympic Games were recorded (50 Hz), digitised and reconstructed (3D Direct Linear Transformation). Orientation of the functional phase action, defined by the rapid flexion to extension of the shoulders and extension to flexion of the hips as the performer passed through the lower vertical, along with shoulder and hip angular kinematics, angular momentum and key release parameters (body angle, mass centre velocity and angular momentum about the mass centre and bar) were compared between skills. Expected differences in the release parameters of angle, angular momentum and velocity were observed and the specific mechanical requirement of each skill were highlighted. Whilst there were no differences in joint kinematics, hip and shoulder functional phase were significantly earlier in the circle for the Tkatchev. These findings highlight the importance of the orientation of the functional phase in the preceding giant swing and provide coaches with further understanding of the critical timing in this key phase.

  10. Energy and daylight performance of angular selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Beltran,; Lee, E.S.; Rubin, M.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy and daylight performance of anisotropic angular selective glazings. The DOE-2.1E energy simulation program was used to determine the annual cooling, lighting and total electricity use, and peak electric demand. RADIANCE, a lighting simulation program, was used to determine daylight illuminance levels and distribution. We simulated a prototypical commercial office building module located in Blythe, California. We chose three hypothetical conventional windows for comparison: a single-pane tinted window, a double-pane low-E window, and a double-pane spectrally selective window. Daylighting controls were used. No interior shades were modeled in order to isolate the energy effects of the angular selective glazing. Our results show that the energy performance of the prototype angular selective windows is about the same as conventional windows for a 9.14 m (30 ft) deep south-facing perimeter zone with a large-area window in the hot, sunny climate of Blythe. It is theoretically possible to tune the angular selectivity of the glazing to achieve annual cooling energy reductions of 18%, total electricity use reductions of 15%, and peak electric demand reductions of 11% when compared to a conventional glazing with the same solar-optical properties at normal incidence. Angular selective glazings can provide more uniformly distributed daylight, particularly in the area next to the window, which will result in a more visually comfortable work environment.

  11. Energy and angular distributions of sputtered atoms at normal incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Y.; Takiguchi, T.; Ishida, M.

    1991-12-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT has been applied to investigate the angular distribution and the energy distribution of atoms sputtered from Cu and Nb targets by normally incident Ar+ ions. It is found that there are two important effects which affect the angular distributions and the energy distributions of sputtered atoms, i.e., the anisotropic effect and the bulk recoil effect. The former effects means that the recoil flux keeps the memory of the incident ion-beam direction because of the incomplete cascade, while the latter one means the contributions of recoils generated at the deeper layer to the angular and the energy distributions of sputtered atoms. The anisotropic effect is important in the low energy region, and it makes the angular distribution under-cosine and the high energy tail of the energy distribution fall off faster than the Thompson distribution. The bulk recoil effect makes angular distribution be over-cosine and the peak position of the energy distribution be shifted to somewhat higher energies.

  12. Bizarre Parosteal Osteochondromatous Proliferation causing angular deformities: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohamed Musheer; Arif, K. Salauddin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There have been fewer than 150 cases of Bizarre Parosteal Osteochondromatous proliferation (Nora Lesions) reported in the literature to date and no significant reports on angular deformities caused by this lesion. Nora’s lesion can easily be misdiagnosed as osteochondroma or chondrosarcoma and therefore inappropriately managed. Although this condition classically appears in the second or third decade, we present to you a three year old boy who presented with multiple bony swellings over the hand and feet that caused an angular deformity of the involved digits. In the case report we have detailed the angular deformities and its treatment outcome. Case Report: A three year old boy presented with valgus deformity of middle finger of right upper limb with an associated ulnar bony swelling at the level of middle phalanx which was noticed two years before and was progressing rapidly since last three months. On physical examination the swellings were found to be bony hard, midly tender and found to have been causing an angulare deformity of the digits. The initial suspicion was of osteochondromatous lesion however the excision biopsy showed the lesion to be of the rare entity of bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation. 1 year follow up showed no progression of angular deformity of the operated digits. Conclusion: Bizarre osteochondromatous proliferation is an entity that can rarely present in children which needs to be identified and tackled early to prevent the onset of deformities. Almost all cases warrant surgical intervention and the type of excision varies with the type of lesion. PMID:27299019

  13. Correction of angular deformities of the knee by percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis.

    PubMed

    Inan, Muharrem; Chan, Gilbert; Bowen, J Richard

    2007-03-01

    Predicting patients' remaining angular growth and timing for hemiepiphysiodesis are crucial for correcting coronal plane knee deformities in children. We asked whether the Angular Deformity Versus Growth Remaining Chart predicted correction of coronal angular deformities of the knee in children. Serial orthoroentgenograms and the predictive chart were used to time percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis, and the children were followed until skeletal maturity. Twenty-five consecutive children (35 extremities) with a mean skeletal age of 13 years (range, 9.6-16 years) had percutaneous hemiepiphysiodeses as described by Bowen and Johnson, and were followed up until skeletal maturity. At skeletal maturity, correction of varus and valgus coronal plane deformities were within 2 degrees (range, 0 degrees - 6 degrees) of the predicted value. The maximum limb-length discrepancy resulting from the procedure was 1.5 cm. The only complication was failure of a physeal bar formation hemiepiphysiodesis; this was treated successfully with a repeat percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis. The percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis is effective and has a low complication rate. Angular correction and timing for hemiepiphysiodesis can be predicted by using the Angular Deformity Versus Growth Remaining Chart in children with coronal plain knee deformities.

  14. The human ocular torsion position response during yaw angular acceleration.

    PubMed

    Smith, S T; Curthoys, I S; Moore, S T

    1995-07-01

    Recent results by Wearne [(1993) Ph.D. thesis] using the scleral search-coil method of measuring eye position indicate that changes in ocular torsion position (OTP) occur during yaw angular acceleration about an earth vertical axis. The present set of experiments, using an image processing method of eye movement measurement free from the possible confound of search coil slippage, demonstrates the generality and repeatability of this phenomenon and examines its possible causes. The change in torsion position is not a linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) response to interaural linear acceleration stimulation of the otoliths, but rather the effect is dependent on the characteristics of the angular acceleration stimulus, commencing at the onset and decaying at the offset of the angular acceleration. In the experiments reported here, the magnitude of the angular acceleration stimulus was varied and the torsion position response showed corresponding variations. We consider that the change in torsion position observed during angular acceleration is most likely to be due to activity of the semicircular canals.

  15. Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation Measurements With GRIFFIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Andrew; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work was to explore the sensitivity of the Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) 16 clover-detector γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC to such γ - γ angular correlations. The methodology was established using both experimental measurements and Geant4 simulations that were used to create angular correlation templates for the GRIFFIN geometry. Direct comparisons were made between experimental data sets and the simulated angular correlation templates. A first in-beam test of the γ - γ angular correlation measurements with GRIFFIN was performed with a radioactive beam of 66Ga. Mixing ratios of δ = - 2 . 1(2) and δ = - 0 . 08(3) were measured for the 2+ ->2+ ->0+ 833-1039 keV and 1+ ->2+ ->0+ 2752-1039 keV cascades in the daughter nucleus 66Zn. These results are in good agreement with pervious literature values and the mixing ratio for the 833-1039 keV cascade has a higher precision. Also, the sensitivity to the 1333-1039 keV cascade, with its pronounced 0+ ->2+ ->0+ angular correlation, was measured.A test measurement of the superallowed Fermi β emitter 62Ga will also be discussed. Canada Foundation of Innovation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, National Research Council of Canada and Canadian Research Chairs Program.

  16. A micromachined angular-acceleration sensor for geophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huafeng; Pike, W. T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an angular-acceleration sensor that works as either an angular accelerometer or a gravity gradiometer and is based on the micro electromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The changes in the angle of the sensor mass are sensed by a rotational capacitive array transducer that is formed by electrodes on both the stator and rotor dies of the flip-chip-bonded MEMS chip (21 mm × 12.5 mm × 1 mm). The prototype was characterized, demonstrating a fundamental frequency of 27 Hz, a quality factor of 230 in air, and a sensitivity of 6 mV/(rad/s2). The demonstrated noise floor was less than 0.003 rad/s2/ √{ Hz } within a bandwidth of 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz, which is comparable with the conventional angular accelerometer and is better than the other reported MEMS sensors in low-frequency ranges. The features of small size and low cost suggest that this MEMS angular-acceleration sensor could be mounted on a drone, a satellite or even a Mars rover, and it is promising to be used for monitoring angular accelerations, aiding seismic recording, mapping gravity anomalies, and other geophysical applications for large-scale terrestrial and space deployments.

  17. Estimates of mass and angular momentum in the oort cloud.

    PubMed

    Marochnik, L S; Mukhin, L M; Sagdeev, R Z

    1988-10-28

    Estimates can be made of unseen mass (in the form of cometary nuclei) at the heliocentric distances between 3 x 10(3) and 2 x 10(4) astronomical units(AU) under the assumptions (i) that the Oort cloud is a rarefied halo surrounding the core (dense, inner cometary cloud) and (ii) that the mass and albedo of comet Halley is typical for comets both in the core and the Oort cloud populations. The mass appears to be approximately 0.03 solar masses, with angular momentum of the order of 10(52) to 10(53) g-cm(2)/s. This mass is of the order of the total mass of the planetary system before the loss of volatiles. This leads to an estimate of a mass M(o) approximately 100 M( plus sign in circle) (where M( plus sign in circle) is the mass of Earth) concentrated in the Oort cloud (r > 2 x 10(4) AU) with an angular momentum that may exceed the present angular momentum of the whole planetary system by one order of magnitude. The present angular momentum of the Oort cloud appears to be of the same order as the total angular momentum of the planetary system before the loss of volatiles.

  18. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  19. A Computational Technique to Determine the Angular Displacement, Velocity and Momentum of a Human Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, James G.; Wilson, Barry D.

    The angular momentum of a human body derived from both the angular velocity and angular displacement, utilizing cinematographic records has not been adequately assessed, prior to this study. Miller (1970) obtained the angular momentum but only during the airborne phase of activity. The method used by Ramey (1973) involved a force platform, but…

  20. Origins and demonstrations of electrons with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Benjamin J; Agrawal, Amit; Ercius, Peter A; Grillo, Vincenzo; Herzing, Andrew A; Harvey, Tyler R; Linck, Martin; Pierce, Jordan S

    2017-02-28

    The surprising message of Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)) was that photons could possess orbital angular momentum in free space, which subsequently launched advancements in optical manipulation, microscopy, quantum optics, communications, many more fields. It has recently been shown that this result also applies to quantum mechanical wave functions describing massive particles (matter waves). This article discusses how electron wave functions can be imprinted with quantized phase vortices in analogous ways to twisted light, demonstrating that charged particles with non-zero rest mass can possess orbital angular momentum in free space. With Allen et al. as a bridge, connections are made between this recent work in electron vortex wave functions and much earlier works, extending a 175 year old tradition in matter wave vortices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  1. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light–matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems. PMID:27694805

  2. On-chip noninterference angular momentum multiplexing of broadband light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Qiming; Gu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Angular momentum division has emerged as a physically orthogonal multiplexing method in high-capacity optical information technologies. However, the typical bulky elements used for information retrieval from the overall diffracted field, based on the interference method, impose a fundamental limit toward realizing on-chip multiplexing. We demonstrate noninterference angular momentum multiplexing by using a mode-sorting nanoring aperture with a chip-scale footprint as small as 4.2 micrometers by 4.2 micrometers, where nanoring slits exhibit a distinctive outcoupling efficiency on tightly confined plasmonic modes. The nonresonant mode-sorting sensitivity and scalability of our approach enable on-chip parallel multiplexing over a bandwidth of 150 nanometers in the visible wavelength range. The results offer the possibility of ultrahigh-capacity and miniaturized nanophotonic devices harnessing angular momentum division.

  3. Fractional angular momentum in cold-atom systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G J; Gemelke, N D; Jain, J K

    2014-10-17

    The quantum statistics of bosons or fermions are manifest through the even or odd relative angular momentum of a pair. We show theoretically that, under certain conditions, a pair of certain test particles immersed in a fractional quantum Hall state possesses, effectively, a fractional relative angular momentum, which can be interpreted in terms of fractional braid statistics. We propose that the fractionalization of the angular momentum can be detected directly through the measurement of the pair correlation function in rotating ultracold atomic systems in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Such a measurement will also provide direct evidence for the effective magnetic field resulting from Berry phases arising from attached vortices, and of excitations with a fractional particle number, analogous to the fractional charge of the electron fractional quantum Hall effect.

  4. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Flow between Independently Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, M. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the (Ω1, Ω2) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where Ω1 (Ω2) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro=(Ω1-Ω2)/Ω2 fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro=∞)≡G∞. The ratio G/G∞ is a linear function of Ro-1 in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836, 444, 343 (2006)10.1038/nature05323], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)AAEJAF0004-6361].

  5. Protostellar angular momentum transport by spiral density waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, C.; Cassen, P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of rotational stability criteria to a specific model of star formation leads to the conclusion that the growth of stellar angular momentum is limited by its transfer to the disk. Excess accreted angular momentum can be transferred by torques connected with spiral density waves induced by even a slight protostellar triaxiality. In addition, viscous damping of the density waves is likely to cause the excess angular momentum to be deposited within a small region close to the protostar. Thus, it would be appropriate to treat that part of the growing protostellar disk beyond the outer Lindblad resonance as an accretion disk with a torque applied to its inner edge. It is noted that this situation is directly relevant to certain models of the evolution of the protosun and solar nebula.

  6. Angular momentum transport in turbulent flow between independently rotating cylinders.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, M S; Lathrop, D P

    2011-01-14

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the (Ω1, Ω2) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where Ω1 (Ω2) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro = (Ω1 - Ω2)/Ω2 fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro = ∞) ≡ G∞. The ratio G/G∞ is a linear function of Ro(-1) in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London), 444, 343 (2006)], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)].

  7. Fractional Angular Momentum in Cold-Atom Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G. J.; Gemelke, N. D.; Jain, J. K.

    2014-10-01

    The quantum statistics of bosons or fermions are manifest through the even or odd relative angular momentum of a pair. We show theoretically that, under certain conditions, a pair of certain test particles immersed in a fractional quantum Hall state possesses, effectively, a fractional relative angular momentum, which can be interpreted in terms of fractional braid statistics. We propose that the fractionalization of the angular momentum can be detected directly through the measurement of the pair correlation function in rotating ultracold atomic systems in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Such a measurement will also provide direct evidence for the effective magnetic field resulting from Berry phases arising from attached vortices, and of excitations with a fractional particle number, analogous to the fractional charge of the electron fractional quantum Hall effect.

  8. Origins and demonstrations of electrons with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Benjamin J.; Agrawal, Amit; Ercius, Peter A.; Grillo, Vincenzo; Herzing, Andrew A.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Linck, Martin; Pierce, Jordan S.

    2017-02-01

    The surprising message of Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)) was that photons could possess orbital angular momentum in free space, which subsequently launched advancements in optical manipulation, microscopy, quantum optics, communications, many more fields. It has recently been shown that this result also applies to quantum mechanical wave functions describing massive particles (matter waves). This article discusses how electron wave functions can be imprinted with quantized phase vortices in analogous ways to twisted light, demonstrating that charged particles with non-zero rest mass can possess orbital angular momentum in free space. With Allen et al. as a bridge, connections are made between this recent work in electron vortex wave functions and much earlier works, extending a 175 year old tradition in matter wave vortices. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  10. Angular two-point correlation of NVSS galaxies revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the angular two-point correlation and angular power spectrum from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) of radio galaxies. They are found to be consistent with the best-fit cosmological model from the Planck analysis, and with the redshift distribution obtained from the Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources (CENSORS). Our analysis is based on an optimal estimation of the two-point correlation function and makes use of a new mask that takes into account direction dependent effects of the observations, sidelobe effects of bright sources and galactic foreground. We also set a flux threshold and take the cosmic radio dipole into account. The latter turns out to be an essential step in the analysis. This improved cosmological analysis of the NVSS emphasizes the importance of a flux calibration that is robust and stable on large angular scales for future radio continuum surveys.

  11. Isotropy of Angular Frequencies and Weak Chimeras with Broken Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The notion of a weak chimeras provides a tractable definition for chimera states in networks of finitely many phase oscillators. Here, we generalize the definition of a weak chimera to a more general class of equivariant dynamical systems by characterizing solutions in terms of the isotropy of their angular frequency vector—for coupled phase oscillators the angular frequency vector is given by the average of the vector field along a trajectory. Symmetries of solutions automatically imply angular frequency synchronization. We show that the presence of such symmetries is not necessary by giving a result for the existence of weak chimeras without instantaneous or setwise symmetries for coupled phase oscillators. Moreover, we construct a coupling function that gives rise to chaotic weak chimeras without symmetry in weakly coupled populations of phase oscillators with generalized coupling.

  12. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well. PMID:27649199

  13. Angular Alignment Testing of Laser Mirror Mounts Under Temperature Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, K. T.; DeYoung, R. J.; Sandford, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    A number of commercial and custom-built laser mirror mounts were tested for angular alignment sensitivity during temperature cycling from room temperature (20 C) to 40 C. A Nd:YAG laser beam was reflected off a mirror that was held by the mount under test and was directed to a position-sensitive detector. Horizontal and vertical movement of the reflected beam was recorded, and the angular movement, as a function of temperature (coefficient of thermal tilt (CTT)) was calculated from these data. In addition, the amount of hysteresis in the movement after cycling from room temperature to 40 C and back was determined. All commercial mounts showed greater angular movement than the simpler National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (NASA LASE) custom mirror mounts.

  14. Angular distribution of particles sputtered from metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wucher, A.; Reuter, W.

    1988-07-01

    The angular distributions of atoms sputtered from pure Cu and Be as well as Cu/sub 98/Be/sub 2/, Cu/sub 71/Zn/sub 29/, Co/sub 3/Au, and WSi/sub 2.3/ were investigated for bombardment with Ar/sup +/ ions of 250 eV and 2 keV under normal incidence. Between polar emission angles theta = 0/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/, for the higher bombarding energy all observed angular distributions look very much alike and follow essentially a cos/sup 3/ theta law. For the low bombarding energy, however, significant differences between the angular distributions of the alloy constituents are found. The effect, which is most pronounced for CuBe, seems to scale with the atomic mass in the way that the lower mass particles are sputtered preferentially along the surface normal.

  15. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well.

  16. Investigation of fluctuations in angular velocity in magnetic memory devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkis, Y. A.; Potsyus, Z. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The fluctuations in the angular velocity of individual assemblies of a precision mechanical system were analyzed. The system was composed of an electric motor and a magnetic drum which were connected by a flexible coupling. A dynamic model was constructed which took into account the absence of torsion in the rigid shafts of the electric motor drive rotor and the magnetic drum. The motion was described by Lagrange differential equations of the second kind. Curves are developed to show the nature of amplitude fluctuation of the magnetic drum angular velocity at a specific excitation frequency. Additional curves show the amplitudes of fluctuation of the magnetic drum angular velocity compared to the quantity of damping at specific frequencies.

  17. Zebra tape identification for the instantaneous angular speed computation and angular resampling of motorbike valve train measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivola, Alessandro; Troncossi, Marco

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign was performed on the valve train of a racing motorbike engine in order to get insight into the dynamic of the system. In particular the valve motion was acquired in cold test conditions by means of a laser vibrometer able to acquire displacement and velocity signals. The valve time-dependent measurements needed to be referred to the camshaft angular position in order to analyse the data in the angular domain, as usually done for rotating machines. To this purpose the camshaft was fitted with a zebra tape whose dark and light stripes were tracked by means of an optical probe. Unfortunately, both manufacturing and mounting imperfections of the employed zebra tape, resulting in stripes with slightly different widths, precluded the possibility to directly obtain the correct relationship between camshaft angular position and time. In order to overcome this problem, the identification of the zebra tape was performed by means of the original and practical procedure that is the focus of the present paper. The method consists of three main steps: namely, an ad-hoc test corresponding to special operating conditions, the computation of the instantaneous angular speed, and the final association of the stripes with the corresponding shaft angular position. The results reported in the paper demonstrate the suitability of the simple procedure for the zebra tape identification performed with the final purpose to implement a computed order tracking technique for the data analysis.

  18. Optimizations in angular dispersive neutron powder diffraction using divergent beam geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchsteiner, Alexandra; Stüßer, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Angular dispersive neutron powder diffractometers are usually built using beam divergencies defined by Soller type collimators. To account for the needs of resolution for crystal structure refinement a good in-pile collimation α1, a high take-off angle above 90∘ at the monochromator and a good collimation α3 in front of the detector bank are chosen whereas the value of α2 for the collimation between monochromator and sample is less crucial. During the last years new strategies were developed at our institute using wide divergent beam geometries defined by fan collimators or slit-type diaphragms which correlate ray direction and wavelength within the beam. Here we present the performance of a newly developed fan collimator, which enables one to adjust the opening of the collimator channels on both sides independently. This fan collimator is positioned in front of the monochromator at the instrument E6 at the Helmholtz Centre Berlin (formerly Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin). It will be shown that control of the beam divergency allows optimization of the resolution in a large angular diffraction range. Hence the resolution and intensity can be adapted to the needs of powder diffraction. Monte Carlo simulations using McStas are used to check and prove the optimal setting of the instrument. We obtain a very good agreement between experimental and simulated data and demonstrate the superior outcome of the new instrument configuration with respect to Soller type instruments.

  19. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  20. Drawing Trees with Perfect Angular Resolution and Polynomial Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    ized. Fig. 7: Placing a single disk D′ in the ex- tended small zone of Di (shaded gray). C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 v1 v2 v4 v3 v5 v6 v7 Fig. 8: Drawing a heavy...behavior when required to have perfect angular resolution. This tree has as its spine a k-vertex path, each vertex of which has 3 additional leaf nodes...embedded on the same side of the spine . When drawn with straight-line edges, no crossings, and with perfect angular resolution, the caterpillar is forced

  1. High Angular Resolution Microwave Sensing with Large, Sparse, Random Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    b.cnuainas saldaatv an quired at microwaves to achieve the rec0n(pwro cam’ forming or seti -colternng or phas. synchronzing. After the moo optical...AD A126 866 HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTICN MICROWAVE SENSING WITH LARGE 1/ SPARSE RANDOM ARRAYS..U) MOORE SCHOOL OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PHILADELPHIAPA...RESOLUTION TEST CHART N4ATIONAL BUREAU Of SrANDARDS 1963 A iOSR-TR- 83-0225 HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION MICROWAVE SENSING WITH LARGE, SPARSE, RANDOM ARRAYS Annual

  2. Effect of slow rotational diffusion on angular correlations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, A. G.; Meares, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    The theory for perturbed angular correlations of gamma radiation has been extended to include the possibility of adiabatic variation in the interaction Hamiltonian, K, for the intermediate state. The calculation begins from a polycrystalline model. It is shown that adiabatic variation in K introduces a time dependence into the angles which express the orientation of the molecular frame. The relevance of the adiabatic limit to the use of perturbed angular correlations of gamma radiation for study of the motion of radioactive species in viscous media is discussed.

  3. The angular momentum of condensations within elephant trunks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, V.; Raga, A. C.; Esquivel, A.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: The radiation from newly born stars photoevaporates their parental neutral cloud, leading to the formation of dense clumps that will eventually form stars. Methods: We present 3D simulations of the interaction of a neutral cloud with an external ionising radiation field, and compute the angular momenta of these collapsing clumps. Results: The angular momenta of these collapsing clumps show that they have preferential orientations mostly perpendicular to the direction of the incident ionising photon field. Therefore, the axes of the jet systems that will be eventually ejected (from the star + accretion disk systems that will form) will be oriented approximately perpendicular to the direction to the photoionising source.

  4. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-01

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  5. Angular Momentum of a Magnetically Trapped Atomic Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Jen, H. H.; Sun, C. P.; You, L.

    2007-01-19

    For an atomic condensate in an axially symmetric magnetic trap, the sum of the axial components of the orbital angular momentum and the hyperfine spin is conserved. Inside an Ioffe-Pritchard trap (IPT) whose magnetic field (B field) is not axially symmetric, the difference of the two becomes surprisingly conserved. In this Letter we investigate the relationship between the values of the sum or difference angular momentums for an atomic condensate inside a magnetic trap and the associated gauge potential induced by the adiabatic approximation. Our result provides significant new insight into the vorticity of magnetically trapped atomic quantum gases.

  6. Electron vortex beams with high quanta of orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Benjamin J; Agrawal, Amit; Anderson, Ian M; Herzing, Andrew A; Lezec, Henri J; McClelland, Jabez J; Unguris, John

    2011-01-14

    Electron beams with helical wavefronts carrying orbital angular momentum are expected to provide new capabilities for electron microscopy and other applications. We used nanofabricated diffraction holograms in an electron microscope to produce multiple electron vortex beams with well-defined topological charge. Beams carrying quantized amounts of orbital angular momentum (up to 100ħ) per electron were observed. We describe how the electrons can exhibit such orbital motion in free space in the absence of any confining potential or external field, and discuss how these beams can be applied to improved electron microscopy of magnetic and biological specimens.

  7. Video-analysis Interface for Angular Joint Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondani, M.; Ghersi, I.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    Real-time quantification of joint articular movement is instrumental in the comprehensive assessment of significant biomechanical gestures. The development of an interface, based on an automatic algorithm for 3D-motion analysis, is presented in this work. The graphical interface uses open-source libraries for video processing, and its use is intuitive. The proposed method is low-cost, of acceptable precision (|εθ| < 1°), and minimally invasive. It allows to obtain angular movement of joints in different planes, synchronized with the video of the gesture, as well as to make comparisons and calculate parameters of interest from the acquired angular kinematics.

  8. Lower extremity rotational and angular issues in children.

    PubMed

    Mooney, James F

    2014-12-01

    Familial concern regarding perceived rotational and angular deformities is a common part of any primary care practice. It is essential for the medical practitioner to understand the wide normal range in children and the natural history of lower extremity development over time. Most lower extremity rotational and angular issues in young children resolve spontaneously over time, and require little or no intervention. In the current atmosphere of medical cost containment, coupled with the shortage of pediatric orthopedic surgeons, many of these patients should be managed by the primary care provider and do not require referral for more specialized care.

  9. Angular momentum algebra for symbolic expansions in atomic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulioniene, Rasa

    Computer programs based on multiconfiguration methods have become standard tools in atomic structure theory. Reliable predictions of atomic properties require very large configuration expansions. The computational resources required often exceed the capabilities of conventional computers. There is a need to restructure existing computer programs to take advantage of modern high-performance computational technology. This dissertation deals with one important aspect of the effort to implement two widely used atomic structure packages (MCHF and GRASP92) on distributed memory parallel computers: the method for handling the angular momentum algebra. In the existing algorithms, the angular integrations required for the Hamiltonian matrix elements are computed for each pair of configurations, even though the results may be identical or very similar for all configurations of a given type. This redundancy leads to a significant increase in computer resource requirements, because the angular matrix elements, which are repeatedly reused in the calculation, need to be stored in computer memory or on disk. At present, the size (and, therefore, accuracy) of the calculations is limited by the large amounts of angular data produced. The aim of the research reported in this dissertation is to provide the theoretical basis for a computational method to curtail the growth of stored angular data with the size of the calculation. The multiconfiguration basis is often generated by one- and two-particle replacements from a reference set to correlation orbitals. The redundancy in the stored angular data could be removed by reformulating the algorithm to treat simultaneously all angular matrix elements that differ only in the quantum numbers of the correlation orbitals. To accomplish this, we expand N- electron matrix elements of a general symmetric two-body scalar operator, an example of which is the Hamiltonian, in terms of two-electron matrix elements. Using diagrammatic methods of

  10. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Steven S.-L. Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-07

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  11. Diffraction effects on angular response of X-ray collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.; Barrus, D. M.; Fenimore, E.

    1976-01-01

    Angular responses have been measured for X-ray collimators with half-widths ranging from minutes of arc down to 10 arcsec. In the seconds-of-arc range, diffraction peaks at off-axis angles can masquerade as side lobes of the collimator angular response. Measurements and qualitative physical arguments lead to a rule of thumb for collimator design; namely, the angle of first minimum in the Fraunhofer single-slit diffraction pattern should be less than one-fourth of the collimator geometrical full-width at half-maximum intensity.

  12. Investigation of the dynamics of angular motion and construction of algorithms for controlling the angular momentum of spacecraft using a magnetic attitude control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Yu. G.; Kulkov, V. M.; Terentyev, V. V.; Firsyuk, S. O.; Shemyakov, A. O.

    2016-11-01

    The problem of controlling the angular momentum of spacecraft using magnetic attitude control systems interacting with the Earth's magnetic field is considered. A mathematical model for the angular motion dynamics of a spacecraft has been constructed. An approach to determining the parameters of the control law for a spacecraft attitude control and stabilization system that ensures angular momentum dissipation is proposed.

  13. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  14. Calibration of the head direction network: a role for symmetric angular head velocity cells.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Peter; Wyeth, Gordon; Wiles, Janet

    2010-06-01

    Continuous attractor networks require calibration. Computational models of the head direction (HD) system of the rat usually assume that the connections that maintain HD neuron activity are pre-wired and static. Ongoing activity in these models relies on precise continuous attractor dynamics. It is currently unknown how such connections could be so precisely wired, and how accurate calibration is maintained in the face of ongoing noise and perturbation. Our adaptive attractor model of the HD system that uses symmetric angular head velocity (AHV) cells as a training signal shows that the HD system can learn to support stable firing patterns from poorly-performing, unstable starting conditions. The proposed calibration mechanism suggests a requirement for symmetric AHV cells, the existence of which has previously been unexplained, and predicts that symmetric and asymmetric AHV cells should be distinctly different (in morphology, synaptic targets and/or methods of action on postsynaptic HD cells) due to their distinctly different functions.

  15. Spatial perception and adaptive sonar behavior.

    PubMed

    Aytekin, Murat; Mao, Beatrice; Moss, Cynthia F

    2010-12-01

    Bat echolocation is a dynamic behavior that allows for real-time adaptations in the timing and spectro-temporal design of sonar signals in response to a particular task and environment. To enable detailed, quantitative analyses of adaptive sonar behavior, echolocation call design was investigated in big brown bats, trained to rest on a stationary platform and track a tethered mealworm that approached from a starting distance of about 170 cm in the presence of a stationary sonar distracter. The distracter was presented at different angular offsets and distances from the bat. The results of this study show that the distance and the angular offset of the distracter influence sonar vocalization parameters of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. Specifically, the bat adjusted its call duration to the closer of two objects, distracter or insect target, and the magnitude of the adjustment depended on the angular offset of the distracter. In contrast, the bat consistently adjusted its call rate to the distance of the insect, even when this target was positioned behind the distracter. The results hold implications for understanding spatial information processing and perception by echolocation.

  16. Spin-Orbit Coupling and the Conservation of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2012-01-01

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, the total (i.e. orbital plus spin) angular momentum of a charged particle with spin that moves in a Coulomb plus spin-orbit-coupling potential is conserved. In a classical nonrelativistic treatment of this problem, in which the Lagrange equations determine the orbital motion and the Thomas equation yields the…

  17. Earth Rotation and Coupling to Changes in Atmospheric Angular Momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Richard D.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The research supported under the contract dealt primarily with: (a) the mechanisms responsible for the exchange of angular momentum between the solid Earth and atmosphere; (b) the quality of the data sets used to estimate atmospheric angular momentum; and (c) the ability of these data and of global climate models to detect low-frequency signals in the momentum and, hence, circulation of the atmosphere. Three scientific papers reporting on the results of this research were produced during the course of the contract. These papers identified the particular torques responsible for the peak in atmospheric angular momentum and length-of-day during the 1982-93 El Nino event, and, more generally, the relative roles of torques over land and ocean in explaining the broad spectrum of variability in the length-of-day. In addition, a tendency for interannual variability in atmospheric angular momentum to increase during the last several decades of the 20th century was found in both observations and a global climate model experiment.

  18. Muscle contributions to frontal plane angular momentum during walking.

    PubMed

    Neptune, Richard R; McGowan, Craig P

    2016-09-06

    The regulation of whole-body angular momentum is important for maintaining dynamic balance during human walking, which is particularly challenging in the frontal plane. Whole-body angular momentum is actively regulated by individual muscle forces. Thus, understanding which muscles contribute to frontal plane angular momentum will further our understanding of mediolateral balance control and has the potential to help diagnose and treat balance disorders. The purpose of this study was to identify how individual muscles and gravity contribute to whole-body angular momentum in the frontal plane using a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation analysis. A three-dimensional simulation was developed that emulated the average walking mechanics of a group of young healthy adults (n=10). The results showed that a finite set of muscles are the primary contributors to frontal plane balance and that these contributions vary throughout the gait cycle. In early stance, the vasti, adductor magnus and gravity acted to rotate the body towards the contralateral leg while the gluteus medius acted to rotate the body towards the ipsilateral leg. In late stance, the gluteus medius continued to rotate the body towards the ipsilateral leg while the soleus and gastrocnemius acted to rotate the body towards the contralateral leg. These results highlight those muscles that are critical to maintaining dynamic balance in the frontal plane during walking and may provide targets for locomotor therapies aimed at treating balance disorders.

  19. Spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in dielectric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Robert Charles; Ambrosio, Antonio; Wintz, Daniel; Oscurato, Stefano Luigi; Zhu, Alexander Yutong; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Oh, Jaewon; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Capasso, Federico

    2017-01-09

    Vortex beams are characterized by a helical wavefront and a phase singularity point on the propagation axis that results in a doughnut-like intensity profile. These beams carry orbital angular momentum proportional to the number of intertwined helices constituting the wavefront. Vortex beams have many applications in optics, such as optical trapping, quantum optics and microscopy. Although beams with such characteristics can be generated holographically, spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion has attracted considerable interest as a tool to create vortex beams. In this process, the geometrical phase is exploited to create helical beams whose handedness is determined by the circular polarization (left/right) of the incident light, that is by its spin. Here we demonstrate high-efficiency Spin-to-Orbital angular momentum-Converters (SOCs) at visible wavelengths based on dielectric metasurfaces. With these SOCs we generate vortex beams with high and fractional topological charge and show for the first time the simultaneous generation of collinear helical beams with different and arbitrary orbital angular momentum. This versatile method of creating vortex beams, which circumvents the limitations of liquid crystal SOCs and adds new functionalities, should significantly expand the applications of these beams.

  20. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  1. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics…

  2. Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Focal Plane Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Colazo, F.; Denis, K. L.; Dunner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Eimer, J.; Fluxa, P.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Iuliano, J.; Marriage, T. A.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Mumby, G.; Petroff, M.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; U-yen, K.; Watts, D.; Wagner, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background to search for and characterize the polarized signature of inflation. CLASS will operate from the Atacama Desert and observe approx.70% of the sky. A variable-delay polarization modulator provides modulation of the polarization at approx.10Hz to suppress the 1/f noise of the atmosphere and enable the measurement of the large angular scale polarization modes. The measurement of the inflationary signal across angular scales that spans both the recombination and reionization features allows a test of the predicted shape of the polarized angular power spectra in addition to a measurement of the energy scale of inflation. CLASS is an array of telescopes covering frequencies of 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. These frequencies straddle the foreground minimum and thus allow the extraction of foregrounds from the primordial signal. Each focal plane contains feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensors that simultaneously detect two orthogonal linear polarizations. The use of single-crystal silicon as the dielectric for the on-chip transmission lines enables both high efficiency and uniformity in fabrication. Integrated band definition has been implemented that both controls the bandpass of the single-mode transmission on the chip and prevents stray light from coupling to the detectors.

  3. Possible Angular Momentum Dependence of Dissipation in Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Toke, Jan; Udo Schroeder, W.

    2008-04-01

    A comparative analysis of the pre-scission neutron multiplicities observed in a new experiment [1] and one reported earlier [2] suggests that, besides known deformation [3] and temperature [4] dependencies, nuclear dissipation in fission may have an angular momentum dependence. The analysis based on a Langevin equation coupled with a statistical decay model [3] considers angular momentum effects on fission dynamics. Pre-saddle reduced dissipation coefficients of β = 2 x10^21s-1 and 3 x10^21s-1 have been extracted for the matched reactions ^16O + ^181Ta and ^19F + ^178Hf [1],respectively. The difference in the extracted β values is attributed to the difference in the angular momenta contributing to the fission process in the two reactions. Work attempting to derive a quantitative expression for an angular momentum dependence of the dissipation strength is in progress. [1] H.Singh et al., Phys. Rev. C76 (2007) 044610 [2] L.G.Moretto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1995) 4186; Phys. Rev. C54 (1996) 3062 [3] P.Frobrich and I.I.Gontchar, Phys. Rep. 292(1998) 131 [4] P.Paul and M.Thoennessen, Ann. Rev. Part. Sci. 44(1994) 65

  4. Alignment of gold nanorods by angular photothermal depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Adam B.; Chow, Timothy T. Y.; Chon, James W. M.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a high degree of alignment can be imposed upon randomly oriented gold nanorod films by angular photothermal depletion with linearly polarized laser irradiation. The photothermal reshaping of gold nanorods is observed to follow quadratic melting model rather than the threshold melting model, which distorts the angular and spectral hole created on 2D distribution map of nanorods to be an open crater shape. We have accounted these observations to the alignment procedures and demonstrated good agreement between experiment and simulations. The use of multiple laser depletion wavelengths allowed alignment criteria over a large range of aspect ratios, achieving 80% of the rods in the target angular range. We extend the technique to demonstrate post-alignment in a multilayer of randomly oriented gold nanorod films, with arbitrary control of alignment shown across the layers. Photothermal angular depletion alignment of gold nanorods is a simple, promising post-alignment method for creating future 3D or multilayer plasmonic nanorod based devices and structures.

  5. Lamb wave detection with a fiber optic angular displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marlon R.; Sakamoto, João. M. S.; Higuti, Ricardo T.; Kitano, Cláudio

    2015-09-01

    In this work we show that the fiber optic angular displacement sensor is capable of Lamb wave detection, with results comparable to a piezoelectric transducer. Therefore, the fiber optic sensor has a great potential to be used as the Lamb wave ultrasonic receiver and to perform non-destructive and non-contact testing.

  6. Optical fibers for the transmission of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Charles; Rusch, Leslie A.

    2017-02-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light is a promising means for exploiting the spatial dimension of light to increase the capacity of optical fiber links. We summarize how OAM enables efficient mode multiplexing for optical communications, with emphasis on the design of OAM fibers.

  7. 14. ANGULAR QUARTZITE ROCK REINFORCEMENT ON INTERIOR OF OUTSIDE CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ANGULAR QUARTZITE ROCK REINFORCEMENT ON INTERIOR OF OUTSIDE CANAL BANK, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. CANAL ROUTE VISIBLE ALONG HILLSIDE NEAR TOP LEFT. NOTE DILLON RESERVOIR, HIGHWAY 6, AND NEW RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION AT RIGHT AND CENTER. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  8. Angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. T.; Kennedy, D. J.; Starace, A. F.; Dill, D.

    1974-01-01

    The angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen is investigated using Hartree-Fock (HF) wave functions. The correct formulation is used to compare HS and HF results. Agreement between these results is good and the HS calculations have been extended to atomic nitrogen and carbon as well.

  9. Multichannel Polarization-Controllable Superpositions of Orbital Angular Momentum States.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fuyong; Wen, Dandan; Zhang, Chunmei; Gerardot, Brian D; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2017-04-01

    A facile metasurface approach is shown to realize polarization-controllable multichannel superpositions of orbital angular momentum (OAM) states with various topological charges. By manipulating the polarization state of the incident light, four kinds of superpositions of OAM states are realized using a single metasurface consisting of space-variant arrays of gold nanoantennas.

  10. The oceanic contribution to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Johns, C. M.; Hide, R.; Thompson, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the speed of the Earth's rotation manifest themselves as fluctuations in the length of the day (LOD) with an amplitude of about 1000 microseconds. We know from previous work that at least 95% of these variations can be accounted for in terms of angular momentum exchanged between the atmosphere and the solid Earth. Here we examine the respective contributions of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the global oceans to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, using in situ data from the Drake Passage and results from both the oceanic regional model (Fine Resolution Antarctic Model -- FRAM) of Webb et al. (1991) and the global ocanic model of Maier-Reimer et al. (1993) as analyzed by Brosche et al. (1990). The estimated annual contribution of the ACC (2-4 microsec) is much smaller than the total variation in the oceanic models or the existing LOD-AAM residual (both approximately 15-20 microsec). The estimated semi-annual ACC contribution (3-8 microsec) is offset by counter-current further north in both oceanic models, which exhibit larger semi-annual variations in planetary angular momentum. Further refinements in the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, therefore, will require the full (planetary plus relative) contribution of the global oceans in addition to that of the ACC.

  11. Interplay of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anthony W

    2008-09-05

    We derive the consequences of the Myhrer-Thomas explanation of the proton spin problem for the distribution of orbital angular momentum on the valence and sea quarks. After QCD evolution, these results are found to be in very good agreement with both recent lattice QCD calculations and the experimental constraints from Hermes and JLab.

  12. Measuring orbital angular momentum superpositions of light by mode transformation.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Gregorius C G; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Beijersbergen, Marco W

    2011-05-15

    We recently reported on a method for measuring orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light based on the transformation of helically phased beams to tilted plane waves [Phys. Rev. Lett.105, 153601 (2010)]. Here we consider the performance of such a system for superpositions of OAM states by measuring the modal content of noninteger OAM states and beams produced by a Heaviside phase plate.

  13. Measurement of the Angular Distributions of Drell-Yan Dimuons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Brandon; Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The angular differential cross section for the Drell-Yan (DY) process can be parametrized by dσ/dΩ ~ 1 + λcos2 θ + μsin 2 θcosφ +ν/2sin2 θcos 2 φ , where λ, μ, and ν are the angular distribution parameters vs pT. θ and φ denote the polar and azimuthal angles, respectively for the positive lepton produced. The Lam-Tung relation, 1 - λ = 2 ν , was validated by Fermilab E-866 for proton induced Drell-Yan scattering; However pion induced DY shows a much stronger cos2 θ angular dependence and a violation of the Lam-Tung relation. In pion induced DY the antiquark is a valance quark, whereas in proton induced DY (in a forward acceptance spectrometer) it is a sea quark, so E-866 probed the antiquark sea of the nucleon. The SeaQuest experiment, also using proton induced DY, will improve on the measurement of the angular dependencies at a lower energy (120 GeV), taking advantage lower backgrounds and an increase in Drell-Yan cross section at lower energies. The Boer-Mulders correlates the quark correlates between the quark transverse spin and momentum. Improved data from SeaQuest will help determine the Boer-Mulders function. Funding for this work was provided in part by the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  14. Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Colazo, F.; Denis, K. L.; Dünner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Eimer, J.; Fluxa, P.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Iuliano, J.; Marriage, T. A.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Mumby, G.; Petroff, M.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Watts, D.; Wagner, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2016-08-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background to search for and characterize the polarized signature of inflation. CLASS will operate from the Atacama Desert and observe ˜ 70 % of the sky. A variable-delay polarization modulator provides modulation of the polarization at ˜ 10 Hz to suppress the 1/ f noise of the atmosphere and enable the measurement of the large angular scale polarization modes. The measurement of the inflationary signal across angular scales that spans both the recombination and reionization features allows a test of the predicted shape of the polarized angular power spectra in addition to a measurement of the energy scale of inflation. CLASS is an array of telescopes covering frequencies of 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. These frequencies straddle the foreground minimum and thus allow the extraction of foregrounds from the primordial signal. Each focal plane contains feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensors that simultaneously detect two orthogonal linear polarizations. The use of single-crystal silicon as the dielectric for the on-chip transmission lines enables both high efficiency and uniformity in fabrication. Integrated band definition has been implemented that both controls the bandpass of the single-mode transmission on the chip and prevents stray light from coupling to the detectors.

  15. Full Angular Profile of the Coherent Polarization Opposition Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Luck, Jean-Marc; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    1999-01-01

    We use the rigorous vector theory of weak photon localization for a semi-infinite medium composed of nonabsorbing Rayleigh scatterers to compute the full angular profile of the polarization opposition effect. The latter is caused by coherent backscattering of unpolarized incident light and accompanies the renowned backscattering intensity peak.

  16. Angular cheilitis: a case for the oral physician?

    PubMed

    Williams, M

    1995-03-01

    It has been suggested that in the future the role of the dental practitioner increasingly will be that of the oral physician. This case report describes the difficulties encountered by a general dental practitioner while investigating and treating a patient with angular cheilitis.

  17. Low Angular Momentum in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andrew W.; McGregor, Peter J.; Damjanov, Ivana; Popping, Attila; Jørgensen, Inger

    2015-12-01

    We measure the stellar specific angular momentum {j}s={J}s/{M}s in four nearby (z ≈ 0.1) disk galaxies that have stellar masses {M}s near the break {M}s* of the galaxy mass function but look like typical star-forming disks at z ≈ 2 in terms of their low stability (Q ≈ 1), clumpiness, high ionized gas dispersion (40-50 {km} {{{s}}}-1), high molecular gas fraction (20%-30%), and rapid star formation (˜ 20{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). Combining high-resolution (Keck-OSIRIS) and large-radius (Gemini-GMOS) spectroscopic maps, only available at low z, we discover that these targets have ˜ 3 times less stellar angular momentum than typical local spiral galaxies of equal stellar mass and bulge fraction. Theoretical considerations show that this deficiency in angular momentum is the main cause of their low stability, while the high gas fraction plays a complementary role. Interestingly, the low {j}s values of our targets are similar to those expected in the {M}s* population at higher z from the approximate theoretical scaling {j}s\\propto {(1+z)}-1/2 at fixed {M}s. This suggests that a change in angular momentum, driven by cosmic expansion, is the main cause for the remarkable difference between clumpy {M}s* disks at high z (which likely evolve into early-type galaxies) and mass-matched local spirals.

  18. A test of galaxy evolutionary models via angular sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Myungshin; Casertano, Stefano; Griffiths, Richard E.; Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Tyson, J. Anthony

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between angular size, magnitude, and redshift of faint galaxies is explored as a potential tool to distinguish between galaxy evolutionary models. Different models, based on merging, mild luminosity evolution, and no evolution, lead to different predictions of the angular size distribution, redshift- size relation, and magnitude-size relation. The merging model predicts significantly smaller sizes for faint galaxies than the standard model, because of the requirement for more intrinsically small faint objects at high redshift. A dwarf-rich no-evolution model also predicts small sizes for faint galaxies. The mild luminosity evolution model predicts more luminous galaxies of large angular size at high redshift, as does a standard no-evolution model. Prefurbishment Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey observations of magnitudes and sizes of faint galaxies indicate an excess of small versus large faint galaxies, favoring the dwarf rich, no evolution model with respect to the merging model; the other two models are more discrepant with the data. While these results cannot yet rule out with certainty any of the proposed models, they demonstrate the potential of angular size to discriminate between models of galaxy evolution, especially with the high-resolution HST wide field/planetary camera-2 (WFPC2) data.

  19. Angular default mode network connectivity across working memory load.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, D; Manktelow, A E; Sahakian, B J; Menon, D K; Stamatakis, E A

    2017-01-01

    Initially identified during no-task, baseline conditions, it has now been suggested that the default mode network (DMN) engages during a variety of working memory paradigms through its flexible interactions with other large-scale brain networks. Nevertheless, its contribution to whole-brain connectivity dynamics across increasing working memory load has not been explicitly assessed. The aim of our study was to determine which DMN hubs relate to working memory task performance during an fMRI-based n-back paradigm with parametric increases in difficulty. Using a voxel-wise metric, termed the intrinsic connectivity contrast (ICC), we found that the bilateral angular gyri (core DMN hubs) displayed the greatest change in global connectivity across three levels of n-back task load. Subsequent seed-based functional connectivity analysis revealed that the angular DMN regions robustly interact with other large-scale brain networks, suggesting a potential involvement in the global integration of information. Further support for this hypothesis comes from the significant correlations we found between angular gyri connectivity and reaction times to correct responses. The implication from our study is that the DMN is actively involved during the n-back task and thus plays an important role related to working memory, with its core angular regions contributing to the changes in global brain connectivity in response to increasing environmental demands. Hum Brain Mapp 38:41-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ARS-12G inertial angular vibration sensor provides nanoradian measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughlin, Darren R.; Smith, Dennis

    2001-08-01

    Applied Technology Associates' ARS-12 is the most sensitive inertial angular vibration sensor available in the market today. The sensing mechanism is based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles. This sensor has a bandwidth from 1-1000 Hz and a noise-equivalent angle of less than 35 nanoradians from 2-1000 Hz. The ARS-12 can measure inertial angular motions of less than 10 nanoradians at discrete frequencies. Their solid state design makes these sensors smaller and more rugged than any previous angular vibration sensor. In addition, the ARS-12 is essentially impervious to linear acceleration and angular cross-axis sensitivity is limited to incorrect physical alignment. The ARS-12 has recently undergone several design changes in order to survive the space environment. This new model, the ARS-12G, also has increased reliability and tighter performance specifications. The ARS-12G design, testing, and performance will be reviewed in this paper. Several ARS-12G sensor packages are currently being tested and space-qualified for Boeing(HSC) and Japan's space agency, NASDA.

  1. Modified hydraulic braking system limits angular deceleration to safe values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, R. S.; Council, M.; Green, P. M.

    1966-01-01

    Conventional spring actuated, hydraulically released, fail-safe disk braking system is modified to control the angular deceleration of a massive antenna. The hydraulic system provides an immediate preset pressure to the spring-loaded brake shoes and holds it at this value to decelerate the antenna at the desired rate.

  2. Alignment of gold nanorods by angular photothermal depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Adam B.; Chow, Timothy T. Y.; Chon, James W. M.

    2014-02-24

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a high degree of alignment can be imposed upon randomly oriented gold nanorod films by angular photothermal depletion with linearly polarized laser irradiation. The photothermal reshaping of gold nanorods is observed to follow quadratic melting model rather than the threshold melting model, which distorts the angular and spectral hole created on 2D distribution map of nanorods to be an open crater shape. We have accounted these observations to the alignment procedures and demonstrated good agreement between experiment and simulations. The use of multiple laser depletion wavelengths allowed alignment criteria over a large range of aspect ratios, achieving 80% of the rods in the target angular range. We extend the technique to demonstrate post-alignment in a multilayer of randomly oriented gold nanorod films, with arbitrary control of alignment shown across the layers. Photothermal angular depletion alignment of gold nanorods is a simple, promising post-alignment method for creating future 3D or multilayer plasmonic nanorod based devices and structures.

  3. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  4. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  5. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  6. Simplified Generation of High-Angular-Momentum Light Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Grudinin, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    A simplified method of generating a beam of light having a relatively high value of angular momentum (see figure) involves the use of a compact apparatus consisting mainly of a laser, a whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) resonator, and optical fibers. The method also can be used to generate a Bessel beam. ( Bessel beam denotes a member of a class of non-diffracting beams, so named because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have high values of angular momentum.) High-angular-momentum light beams are used in some applications in biology and nanotechnology, wherein they are known for their ability to apply torque to make microscopic objects rotate. High-angular-momentum light beams could also be used to increase bandwidths of fiber-optic communication systems. The present simplified method of generating a high-angular-momentum light beam was conceived as an alternative to prior such methods, which are complicated and require optical setups that include, variously, holograms, modulating Fabry-Perot cavities, or special microstructures. The present simplified method exploits a combination of the complex structure of the electromagnetic field inside a WGM resonator, total internal reflection in the WGM resonator, and the electromagnetic modes supported by an optical fiber. The optical fiber used to extract light from the WGM resonator is made of fused quartz. The output end of this fiber is polished flat and perpendicular to the fiber axis. The input end of this fiber is cut on a slant and placed very close to the WGM resonator at an appropriate position and orientation. To excite the resonant whispering- gallery modes, light is introduced into the WGM resonator via another optical fiber that is part of a pigtailed fiber-optic coupler. Light extracted from the WGM resonator is transformed into a high-angular- momentum beam inside the extraction optical fiber and this beam is emitted from the

  7. Power calculation of linear and angular incremental encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofev, Aleksandr V.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.; Mednikov, Sergey V.; Sycheva, Elena A.

    2016-04-01

    Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and transmit the measured values back to the control unit. The capabilities of these systems are undergoing continual development in terms of their resolution, accuracy and reliability, their measuring ranges, and maximum speeds. This article discusses the method of power calculation of linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders, to find the optimum parameters for its components, such as light emitters, photo-detectors, linear and angular scales, optical components etc. It analyzes methods and devices that permit high resolutions in the order of 0.001 mm or 0.001°, as well as large measuring lengths of over 100 mm. In linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders optical beam is usually formulated by a condenser lens passes through the measuring unit changes its value depending on the movement of a scanning head or measuring raster. Past light beam is converting into an electrical signal by the photo-detecter's block for processing in the electrical block. Therefore, for calculating the energy source is a value of the desired value of the optical signal at the input of the photo-detecter's block, which reliably recorded and processed in the electronic unit of linear and angular incremental optoelectronic encoders. Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and

  8. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B{sub 0}. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B{sub 0} are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field

  9. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B0. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B0. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B0 are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field topologies. The work will

  10. Optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from plasmonic vortex lens to light.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Yang, Haifang; Xu, Xiangang; Wang, Zhengping; Petrov, V; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-11-12

    We demonstrate the optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from subwavelength plasmonic vortex lens (PVLs) to light and the generating process of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Illuminating plasmonic vortex lenses with beams carrying optical orbital angular momentum, the SP vortices with orbital angular momentum were generated and inherit the optical angular momentum of light beams and PVLs. The angular momentum of twisting SP electromagnetic field is tunable by the twisted metal/dielectric interfaces of PVLs and angular momentum of illuminating singular light. This work may open the door for several possible applications of SP vortices in subwavelength region.

  11. Fission fragment angular distributions in pre-actinide nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Jhingan, A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Dubey, R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Laveen, P. V.; Shamlath, A.; Shareef, M.; Gehlot, J.; Saneesh, N.; Prasad, E.; Sugathan, P.; Pal, Santanu

    2016-10-01

    Background: Complete fusion of two nuclei leading to formation of a heavy compound nucleus (CN) is known to be hindered by various fission-like processes, in which the composite system reseparates after capture of the target and the projectile inside the potential barrier. As a consequence of these non-CN fission (NCNF) processes, fusion probability (PCN) starts deviating from unity. Despite substantial progress in understanding, the onset and the experimental signatures of NCNF and the degree of its influence on fusion have not yet been unambiguously identified. Purpose: This work aims to investigate the presence of NCNF, if any, in pre-actinide nuclei by systematic study of fission angular anisotropies and fission cross sections (σfis) in a number of nuclear reactions carried out at and above the Coulomb barrier (VB) . Method: Fission fragment angular distributions were measured for six 28Si-induced reactions involving isotopically enriched targets of 169Tm,176Yb,175Lu,180Hf,181Ta, and 182W leading to probable formation of CN in the pre-actinide region, at a laboratory energy (Elab) range of 129-146 MeV. Measurements were performed with large angular coverage (θlab=41∘ -170∘) in which fission fragments (FFs) were detected by nine hybrid telescope (E -Δ E ) detectors. Extracted fission angular anisotropies and σfis were compared with statistical model (SM) predictions. Results: Barring two reactions involving targets with large non-zero ground state spin (J ) , viz., 175Lu(7/2+) and 181Ta(7/2+) , experimental fission angular anisotropies were found to be higher in comparison with predictions of the statistical saddle point model (SSPM), at Ec .m . near VB. Comparison of present results with those from neighboring systems revealed that experimental anisotropies increasingly deviated from SSPM predictions as one moved from pre-actinide to actinide nuclei. For reactions involving targets with large nonzero J , this deviation was subdued. Comparison between

  12. Measurement and limitations of optical orbital angular momentum through corrected atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Neo, Richard; Goodwin, Michael; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-02-08

    In recent years, there have been a series of proposals to exploit the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for astronomical applications. The OAM of light potentially represents a new way in which to probe the universe. The study of this property of light entails the development of new instrumentation and problems which must be addressed. One of the key issues is whether we can overcome the loss of the information carried by OAM due to atmospheric turbulence. We experimentally analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the OAM content of a signal over a range of realistic turbulence strengths typical for astronomical observations. With an adaptive optics system we are able to recover up to 89% power in an initial non-zero OAM mode (ℓ = 1) at low turbulence strengths (0.30" FWHM seeing). However, for poorer seeing conditions (1.1" FWHM seeing), the amount of power recovered is significantly lower (5%), showing that for the terrestrial detection of astronomical OAM, a careful design of the adaptive optics system is needed.

  13. Analogies between optical and quantum mechanical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Gerard

    2017-02-28

    The insight that a beam of light can carry orbital angular momentum (AM) in its propagation direction came up in 1992 as a surprise. Nevertheless, the existence of momentum and AM of an electromagnetic field has been well known since the days of Maxwell. We compare the expressions for densities of AM in general three-dimensional modes and in paraxial modes. Despite their classical nature, these expressions have a suggestive quantum mechanical appearance, in terms of linear operators acting on mode functions. In addition, paraxial wave optics has several analogies with real quantum mechanics, both with the wave function of a free quantum particle and with a quantum harmonic oscillator. We discuss how these analogies can be applied.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  14. Angular line scanning deflectometry using a laser pico projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hao-Xun; Liang, Chao-Wen; Chien, Shih-Che

    2016-08-01

    In our previous publications, we had successfully made a deflectometry measurement by using a portable laser projector. In this research, we propose the beam weighting centroid method rather than previous the phase shifting method for quantification of the angular direction of the testing beam in the tested optics entrance pupil. By projecting the angular sequential lines on tested optics entrance pupil, the wavefront aberration is reconstructed from two orthogonal directions measurements, in a similar way to the line scanning deflectometry. The limited gray scale problem of laser projector during the phase shifting measurement is therefore eliminated. The reconstructed wavefront is proven to yield a more accurate result than the phase shifting methods at the cost of more image frames and acquisition time.

  15. High angular sensitivity thin film tin oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Davinder; Madaan, Divya; Sharma, V. K.; Kapoor, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present theoretical anlaysis of a thin film SnO2 (Tin Oxide) sensor for the measurement of variation in the refractive index of the bulk media. It is based on lossy mode resonance between the absorbing thin film lossy modes and the evanescent wave. Also the addition of low index dielectric matching layer between the prism and the lossy waveguiding layer future increase the angular sensitivity and produce an efficient refractive index sensor. The angular interrogation is done and obtained sensitivity is 110 degree/RIU. Theoretical analysis of the proposed sensor based on Fresnel reflection coefficients is presented. This enhanced sensitivity will further improve the monitoring of biomolecular interactions and the higher sensitivity of the proposed configurations makes it to be a much better option to be employed for biosensing applications.

  16. Angular distribution of electrons elastically scattered from water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyn, T. W.; Grafe, Alan

    1992-10-01

    The angular distributions of electrons elastically scattered from H2O have been measured by electron impact using a modulated crossed-beam method. The energy and angular range measured were from 30 to 200 eV and 12° to 156°, respectively. The present results show a high backward scattering for low incident energies, but this falls off for high incident energies. The present results are in qualitative agreement with the measurements of Danjo and Nishimura [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 54, 1224 (1985)] and in quantitative agreement with the measurements of Katase et al. [J. Phys. B 19, 2715 (1986)]. Agreement between the present results and the calculation of Jain, Tripathi, and Jain [Phys. Rev. A 37, 2893 (1988)] is good except at 200-eV impact.

  17. Measurement of polarization with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, E. M.; Kovac, J. M.; Pryke, C.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Dragovan, M.; Reddall, B.; Sandberg, E. S.

    2002-12-01

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can reveal with remarkable precision the conditions of the Universe when it was ~400,000 years old. The three most fundamental properties of the CMB are its frequency spectrum (which determines the temperature), and the fluctuations in both the temperature and polarization across a range of angular scales. The frequency spectrum has been well determined, and considerable progress has been made in measuring the power spectrum of the temperature fluctuations. But despite many efforts to measure the polarization, detection of this property of the CMB has hitherto been beyond the reach of even the most sensitive observations. Here we describe the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), an array of radio telescopes, which for the past two years has conducted polarization-sensitive observations of the CMB from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station.

  18. Angular domain fluorescence imaging for small animal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Belton, Michelle; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel macroscopic fluorescent imaging technique called angular domain fluorescence imaging (ADFI) applicable to the detection of fluorophores embedded in biological tissues. The method exploits the collimation detection capabilities of an angular filter array (AFA). The AFA uses the principle of acceptance angle filtration to extract minimally scattered photons emitted from fluorophores deep within tissue. Our goal was to develop an ADFI system for imaging near-infrared fluorescent markers for small animal imaging. According to the experimental results, the ADFI system offered higher resolution and contrast compared to a conventional lens and lens-pinhole fluorescent detection system. Furthermore, ADFI of a hairless mouse injected with a fluorescent bone marker revealed vertebral structural and morphometric data that correlated well with data derived from volumetric x-ray computed tomography images. The results suggested that ADFI is a useful technique for submillimeter mapping of the distribution of fluorescent biomarkers in small animals.

  19. A New Shape Description Method Using Angular Radial Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Whoi-Yul

    Shape is one of the primary low-level image features in content-based image retrieval. In this paper we propose a new shape description method that consists of a rotationally invariant angular radial transform descriptor (IARTD). The IARTD is a feature vector that combines the magnitude and aligned phases of the angular radial transform (ART) coefficients. A phase correction scheme is employed to produce the aligned phase so that the IARTD is invariant to rotation. The distance between two IARTDs is defined by combining differences in the magnitudes and aligned phases. In an experiment using the MPEG-7 shape dataset, the proposed method outperforms existing methods; the average BEP of the proposed method is 57.69%, while the average BEPs of the invariant Zernike moments descriptor and the traditional ART are 41.64% and 36.51%, respectively.

  20. Laser-polarization-dependent photoelectron angular distributions from polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Lu, Peixiang; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-11-21

    Photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of oriented polar molecules in response to different polarized lasers are systematically investigated. It is found that the PADs of polar CO molecules show three distinct styles excited by linearly, elliptically and circularly polarized lasers respectively. In the case of elliptical polarization, a deep suppression is observed along the major axis and the distribution concentrates approximately along the minor axis. Additionally, it is also found that the concentrated distributions rotate clockwise as the ellipticity increases. Our investigation presents a method to manipulate the motion and angular distribution of photoelectrons by varying the polarization of the exciting pulses, and also implies the possibility to control the processes in laser-molecule interactions in future work.

  1. Time and 'angular' dependent backgrounds from stationary axisymmetric solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Obregon, Octavio; Quevedo, Hernando; Ryan, Michael P.

    2004-09-15

    Backgrounds depending on time and on angular variable, namely, polarized and unpolarized S{sup 1}xS{sup 2} Gowdy models, are generated as the sector inside the horizons of the manifold corresponding to axisymmetric solutions. As is known, an analytical continuation of ordinary D-branes, iD-branes allow one to find S-brane solutions. Simple models have been constructed by means of analytic continuation of the Schwarzschild and the Kerr metrics. The possibility of studying the i-Gowdy models obtained here is outlined with an eye toward seeing if they could represent some kind of generalized S-branes depending not only on time but also on an angular variable.

  2. Resolving enantiomers using the optical angular momentum of twisted light

    PubMed Central

    Brullot, Ward; Vanbel, Maarten K.; Swusten, Tom; Verbiest, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Circular dichroism and optical rotation are crucial for the characterization of chiral molecules and are of importance to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, proteins, DNA, and many others. These techniques are based on the different interactions of enantiomers with circularly polarized components of plane wave light that carries spin angular momentum (SAM). For light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), for example, twisted or helical light, the consensus is that it cannot engage with the chirality of a molecular system as previous studies failed to demonstrate an interaction between optical OAM and chiral molecules. Using unique nanoparticle aggregates, we prove that optical OAM can engage with materials’ chirality and discriminate between enantiomers. Further, theoretical results show that compared to circular dichroism, mainly based on magnetic dipole contributions, the OAM analog helical dichroism (HD) is critically dependent on fundamentally different chiral electric quadrupole contributions. Our work opens new venues to study chirality and can find application in sensing and chiral spectroscopy. PMID:26998517

  3. Cholesteric polymers and the orbital angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, W.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    The interaction of light's orbital angular momentum (OAM) with matter has still several unexplored aspects. In particular, it is unknown if there exists for OAM an effect analogous to spin angular momentum-based optical activity. Here we study experimentally the influence of OAM on the interaction of light with a cholesteric liquid crystal polymer. We use strongly focussed light where the polarization and the orbital degrees of freedom are coupled. Two possible manifestations of an OAM-sensitive interaction are investigated: (i) the modification of circular dichroism, and (ii) the occurrence of intermodal dispersion of the {l = +1, l = -1} modes. We conclude that such an interaction does not exist within the experimental parameter range studied here.

  4. Angular diameter distances reconsidered in the Newman and Penrose formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Thomas P.; Aly, Aly

    2016-02-01

    Using the Newman and Penrose spin coefficient (NP) formalism, we provide a derivation of the Dyer-Roeder equation for the angular diameter distance in cosmological space-times. We show that the geodesic deviation equation written in NP formalism is precisely the Dyer-Roeder equation for a general Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, and then we examine the angular diameter distance to redshift relation in the case that a flat FRW metric is perturbed by a gravitational potential. We examine the perturbation in the case that the gravitational potential exhibits the properties of a thin gravitational lens, demonstrating how the weak lensing shear and convergence act as source terms for the perturbed Dyer-Roeder equation.

  5. Possibility of high gradient magnetic separation in angular steps

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, G.; Rezlescu, N.

    1997-11-01

    Using a rotating HGMS ordered matrix in a quasi-transversal configuration, experiments have been performed to study the dependence of the captured mass m{sub S} on the angle {alpha} between the direction of the applied field H{sub 0} and the ferromagnetic wires. The ordered dependence of m{sub S} on {alpha} registered experimentally reveals the possibility to successively separate a granular mixture by an adequate choice of the inclination angles (angular steps) without modifying the applied field H{sub 0} or the average flow velocity v{sub a}. Relationships were derived connecting the magnetic susceptibilities of the mixture components with the inclination angle {alpha} in order to accomplish such a separation in angular steps.

  6. Angular output of hollow, metal-lined, waveguide Raman sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Biedrzycki, Stephen; Buric, Michael P.; Falk, Joel; Woodruff, Steven D.

    2012-04-20

    Hollow, metal-lined waveguides used as gas sensors based on spontaneous Raman scattering are capable of large angular collection. The collection of light from a large solid angle implies the collection of a large number of waveguide modes. An accurate estimation of the propagation losses for these modes is required to predict the total collected Raman power. We report a theory/experimental comparison of the Raman power collected as a function of the solid angle and waveguide length. New theoretical observations are compared with previous theory appropriate only for low-order modes. A cutback experiment is demonstrated to verify the validity of either theory. The angular distribution of Raman light is measured using aluminum and silver-lined waveguides of varying lengths.

  7. Teleoperator control for passivation of satellites possessing angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Certain space shuttle missions may require the retrieval of passive spinning and processing satellites. One proposed means of retrieval utilizes a free-flying teleoperator launched from the shuttle. The feasibility of nulling the combined spin and precession (passivation) of a typical rigid satellite is first established using a Lagrangian formulation. It is shown that a proposed asymmetric teleoperator cannot be used for passivation in its present form because it would quickly tumble over after being spun-up to synchronize with the angular rates of the satellite. In addition, a dynamic analysis is made of the combined teleoperator-satellite system where an initial misalignment of their respective angular momentum vectors is assumed.

  8. Optomechanics based on angular momentum exchange between light and matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, H.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2016-08-01

    The subject of optomechanics involves interactions between optical and mechanical degrees of freedom, and is currently of great interest as an enabler of fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, as well as a platform for ultrasensitive measurement devices. The majority of optomechanical configurations rely on the exchange of linear momentum between light and matter. We will begin this tutorial with a brief description of such systems. Subsequently, we will introduce optomechanical systems based on angular momentum exchange. In this context, optical fields carrying polarization and orbital angular momentum will be considered, while for the mechanics, torsional and free rotational motion will be of relevance. Our overall aims will be to supply basic analyses of some of the existing theoretical proposals, to provide functional descriptions of some of the experiments conducted thus far, and to consider some directions for future research. We hope this tutorial will be useful to both theorists and experimentalists interested in the subject.

  9. A seasonal budget of the earth's axial angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Isao; Kikuchi, Naokichi

    1990-04-01

    The seasonal variation of the earth's axial angular momentum budget is discussed with an error on the order of a few percent. The budget is based on the core-mantle decoupling (CMD) hypothesis. The atmospheric relative angular momentum changes due to zonal wind account for an additional 23 percent contribution over the annual budget. However, this is counterbalanced by the effects of the redistributions of air and water masses. About 16 percent is accounted for by the redistribution of air mass, and remained about 7 percent agrees with the contribution from surface water storage estimate on continents by Chao and O'Connor (1988). These facts demonstrate a confirmation of the CMD hypothesis on time scale of a year. At the semiannual period, however, there still is a shortage of about 6 percent in atmospheric and hydrospheric contributions to the budget.

  10. Properties of Angular Distributions in Drell-Yan Dilepton Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, R. Evan; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Chang, Wen-Chen; Teryaev, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    We present a simple geometric model of the Drell-Yan process based on the unobserved `natural axis' (quark-anti-quark axis) in the dilepton rest frame. We utilize this model to interpret the recent high-precision Z-boson ``Drell-Yan'' angular distributions data from CMS. We find good agreement with the pT-dependence of the angular parameters, and extract the relative contributions from the quark-anti-quark and quark-gluon subprocesses, as well as the average degree of `non-coplanarity' between the quark axis and the hadron plane. We interpret the non-coplanarity as a result of higher-order QCD contributions, and as the cause of the observed Lam-Tung violation. Supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF PHY 15-06416) and the National Science Council of the Republic of China.

  11. Properties of Angular Distributions in Drell-Yan Dilepton Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, R. Evan; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Chang, Wen-Chen; Teryaev, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    We present a simple geometric model of the Drell-Yan process based on the unobserved `natural axis' (quark-anti-quark axis) in the dilepton rest frame. We utilize this model to interpret the recent high-precision Z-boson ``Drell-Yan'' angular distributions data from CMS. We find good agreement with the pT-dependence of the angular parameters, and extract the relative contributions from the quark-anti-quark and quark-gluon subprocesses, as well as the average degree of `non-coplanarity' between the quark axis and the hadron plane. We interpret the non-coplanarity as a result of higher-order QCD contributions, and as the cause of the observed Lam-Tung violation.

  12. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  13. Analogies between optical and quantum mechanical angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Gerard

    2017-02-01

    The insight that a beam of light can carry orbital angular momentum (AM) in its propagation direction came up in 1992 as a surprise. Nevertheless, the existence of momentum and AM of an electromagnetic field has been well known since the days of Maxwell. We compare the expressions for densities of AM in general three-dimensional modes and in paraxial modes. Despite their classical nature, these expressions have a suggestive quantum mechanical appearance, in terms of linear operators acting on mode functions. In addition, paraxial wave optics has several analogies with real quantum mechanics, both with the wave function of a free quantum particle and with a quantum harmonic oscillator. We discuss how these analogies can be applied. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  14. Incremental non-equal channel angular pressing - FE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosochowski, Andrzej; Olejnik, Lech

    2016-10-01

    Equal channel angular pressing is the most popular process of severe plastic deformation used to refine grain structure in metals in order to improve their properties. One of the features of severe plastic deformation is lack of change of billet's shape and dimensions. However, for practical reasons, departure from this pure definition might be useful. This paper considers a possibility of changing billet's cross section in the first pass of the incremental version of equal channel angular pressing from round to rectangular to avoid material loss when machining the initial billet. The process has been simulated using a finite element program Abaqus. This simulation showed feasibility of the process and provided information regarding tool geometry and required forces.

  15. Zombie Vortices: Angular Momentum Transport and Planetesimal Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Joseph; Marcus, Philip; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Lecoanet, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Zombie vortices may fill the dead zones of protoplanetary disks, where they may play important roles in star and planet formation. We will investigate this new, purely hydrodynamic instability and explore the conditions necessary to resurrect the dead zone and fill it with large amplitude vortices that may transport angular momentum and allow mass to accrete onto the protostar. One unresolved issue is whether angular momentum transport is mediated via asymmetries in the vortices, vortex-vortex interactions, or acoustic waves launched by the vortices. Vortices may also play a crucial role in the formation of planetesimals, the building blocks of planets. It is still an open question how grains grow to kilometer-size. We will investigate the interactions of dust with vortices generated via our new hydrodynamic instability, and bridge the gap between micron-sized grains and kilometer-sized planetesimals. Supported by NSF AST-1010052.

  16. Measurement of polarization with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Leitch, E M; Kovac, J M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Dragovan, M; Reddall, B; Sandberg, E S

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can reveal with remarkable precision the conditions of the Universe when it was approximately 400,000 years old. The three most fundamental properties of the CMB are its frequency spectrum (which determines the temperature), and the fluctuations in both the temperature and polarization across a range of angular scales. The frequency spectrum has been well determined, and considerable progress has been made in measuring the power spectrum of the temperature fluctuations. But despite many efforts to measure the polarization, detection of this property of the CMB has hitherto been beyond the reach of even the most sensitive observations. Here we describe the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), an array of radio telescopes, which for the past two years has conducted polarization-sensitive observations of the CMB from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station.

  17. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P.; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  18. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence.

    PubMed

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-12

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  19. Unveiling pseudospin and angular momentum in photonic graphene.

    PubMed

    Song, Daohong; Paltoglou, Vassilis; Liu, Sheng; Zhu, Yi; Gallardo, Daniel; Tang, Liqin; Xu, Jingjun; Ablowitz, Mark; Efremidis, Nikolaos K; Chen, Zhigang

    2015-02-17

    Pseudospin, an additional degree of freedom inherent in graphene, plays a key role in understanding many fundamental phenomena such as the anomalous quantum Hall effect, electron chirality and Klein paradox. Unlike the electron spin, the pseudospin was traditionally considered as an unmeasurable quantity, immune to Stern-Gerlach-type experiments. Recently, however, it has been suggested that graphene pseudospin is a real angular momentum that might manifest itself as an observable quantity, but so far direct tests of such a momentum remained unfruitful. Here, by selective excitation of two sublattices of an artificial photonic graphene, we demonstrate pseudospin-mediated vortex generation and topological charge flipping in otherwise uniform optical beams with Bloch momentum traversing through the Dirac points. Corroborated by numerical solutions of the linear massless Dirac-Weyl equation, we show that pseudospin can turn into orbital angular momentum completely, thus upholding the belief that pseudospin is not merely for theoretical elegance but rather physically measurable.

  20. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  1. Angular momentum and tidal evolution of the Uranian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursa, Milan

    1992-08-01

    The basic parameters describing the angular momentum distribution within the Uranus system and of its tidal evolution have been estimated. The nine satellites orbiting under the synchronous zone of Uranus is the maximum number in the solar system and it makes the Uranus system different compared with any other in solar system, however the satellites in question are relatively small and their contribution of the tidal dynamics of the system is small. The time for existence of the nine satellites as integrated bodies can be estimated as 1.4 billion y and more. The total tidal decrease in the Uranus angular velocity of rotation is estimated as 7 x 10 to the -9th/sec.

  2. Angular distance constraints calibration for outdoor zoom camera.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuehan; Wei, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-10-17

    Based on 2-D protractor property of camera, we proposed a flexible calibration method for zoom camera that used outdoors. It only requires the camera to observe control points once for given zooming settings, when there are several control points at infinity and known the angular distances. Under constraints of image points, the angular distance between their re-projecting vectors and the image of absolute conic (IAC), nonlinear optimization is used to solve parameters of IAC. Then IAC can be uniquely decomposed by the Cholesky factorization, and consequently the intrinsic parameters can be obtained. Towards the factors that affect the accuracy of the calibration, theoretical analysis and computer simulation are carried out respectively consequence in qualitative analysis and quantitative result. On the issues of inaccuracy of principal point, the zooming center is selected to improve the accuracy of calibration. Real data demonstrated the effectiveness of the techniques.

  3. Do waves carrying orbital angular momentum possess azimuthal linear momentum?

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M

    2013-09-06

    All beams are a superposition of plane waves, which carry linear momentum in the direction of propagation with no net azimuthal component. However, plane waves incident on a hologram can produce a vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum that seems to require an azimuthal linear momentum, which presents a paradox. We resolve this by showing that the azimuthal momentum is not a true linear momentum but the azimuthal momentum density is a true component of the linear momentum density.

  4. Single beam optical vortex tweezers with tunable orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Drevinskas, Rokas Beresna, Martynas; Kazansky, Peter G.

    2014-06-09

    We propose a single beam method for generating optical vortices with tunable optical angular momentum without altering the intensity distribution. With the initial polarization state varying from linear to circular, we gradually control the torque transferred to the trapped non-absorbing and non-birefringent silica beads. The continuous transition from the maximum rotation speed to zero without changing the trapping potential gives a way to study the complex tribological interactions.

  5. Orbital angular momentum in twisted and rotating cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    We use an algebraic method to derive explicit expressions for the structure of paraxial modes in a cavity consisting of astigmatic mirrors. The algebra is based upon the use of ladder operators that raise or lower the mode indices, when acting on a mode function. We show that the method is also applicable when the mirrors perform a uniform rotation about their axes. We also find expressions for the orbital angular momentum in these modes.

  6. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  7. Intrinsic spin and orbital angular momentum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yang, Z

    2005-02-18

    A generalized definition of intrinsic and extrinsic transport coefficients is introduced. We show that transport coefficients from the intrinsic origin are solely determined by local electronic structure, and thus the intrinsic spin Hall effect is not a transport phenomenon. The intrinsic spin Hall current is always accompanied by an equal but opposite intrinsic orbital angular momentum Hall current. We prove that the intrinsic spin Hall effect does not induce a spin accumulation at the edge of the sample or near the interface.

  8. Precision optical angular position marker system for rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barranger, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    An optical system is described which generates one or more markers of the angular shaft position of rotating machinery. The system consists of a light source, an optical cable, a machinery mounted lens assembly, a light detector, and a signal conditioner. Light reflected by targets on the rotor is converted to a digital output signal. The system is highly immune to extreme environments of vibration and temperature and achieved a 0.002 percent precision under operational test conditions.

  9. Angular Rate Estimation for Gyroless Satellite Attitude Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    momentum of the spacecraft by neglecting the contribution by the relative motion of the receive telescope and reaction wheels with respect to transmit...momentum due to relative motion of the reaction wheels . The next step in the derivation is to determine these angular momentums. Inertia Let IT be...spacecraft attitude control, reaction wheels are used as actuators with magnetic torque rods to desaturate the reaction wheels . The primary sensors are

  10. Dynamical horizons: energy, angular momentum, fluxes, and balance laws.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Krishnan, Badri

    2002-12-23

    Dynamical horizons are considered in full, nonlinear general relativity. Expressions of fluxes of energy and angular momentum carried by gravitational waves across these horizons are obtained. Fluxes are local, the energy flux is positive, and change in the horizon area is related to these fluxes. The flux formulas also give rise to balance laws analogous to the ones obtained by Bondi and Sachs at null infinity and provide generalizations of the first and second laws of black-hole mechanics.

  11. Shape evolution with angular momentum in Lu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, Azam; Sayyah, Sepideh

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear potential energies of Lu isotopes with neutron number N = 90 - 98 up to high spins are computed within the framework of the unpaired cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky method. The potential and the macroscopic Lublin-Strasbourg drop (LSD) energy-surface diagrams are analyzed in terms of quadrupole deformation and triaxiality parameter. The shape evolution of these isotopes with respect to angular momentum, as well as the neutron number is studied.

  12. Multiwavelength parallel phase-shifting digital holography using angular multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Ito, Yasunori; Lee, Yonghee; Xia, Peng; Inoue, Junichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Kubota, Toshihiro; Matoba, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We propose a single-shot digital holography for recording multiwavelength and complex amplitude information by using a single monochromatic image sensor. The zeroth-order wave and conjugate image in each wavelength are removed from a recorded single hologram by applying parallel phase-shifting interferometry. Angular multiplexing is utilized to record the complex amplitude of an object wave in each wavelength separately, and no color filter is required. The effectiveness of the proposed technique was experimentally verified.

  13. Grain refinement of aluminum using equal-channel angular pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Z.; Furukawa, M.; Nemoto, M.; Langdon, T.G.

    2000-07-01

    Using the technique of equal-channel angular (ECA) pressing, it is possible to reduce the grain size of polycrystalline materials to the submicrometer level. Thus, this processing technique has the potential for producing materials which may exhibit superplasticity. This paper describes various factors affecting the development and evolution of the microstructure produced by ECA pressing. Optimization of such factors is then presented for the advent of superplasticity.

  14. Orbital angular momentum exchange in an optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, M.; Nussenzveig, P.; Huguenin, J. A.O.; Khoury, A.Z.

    2004-07-01

    We present a study of orbital angular momentum transfer from pump to down-converted beams in a type-II optical parametric oscillator. Cavity and anisotropy effects are investigated and demonstrated to play a central role in the transverse mode dynamics. While the idler beam can oscillate in a Laguerre-Gauss mode, the crystal birefringence induces an astigmatic effect in the signal beam that prevents the resonance of such a mode.

  15. Monitoring Location and Angular Orientation of a Pill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schipper, John F.

    2012-01-01

    A mobile pill transmitter system moves through, or adjacent to, one or more organs in an animal or human body, while transmitting signals from its present location and/or present angular orientation. The system also provides signals from which the present roll angle of the pill, about a selected axis, can be determined. When the location coordinates angular orientation and the roll angle of the pill are within selected ranges, an aperture on the pill container releases a selected chemical into, or onto, the body. Optionally, the pill, as it moves, provides a sequence of visually perceptible images. The times for image formation may correspond to times at which the pill transmitter system location or image satisfies one of at least four criteria. This invention provides and supplies an algorithm for exact determination of location coordinates and angular orientation coordinates for a mobile pill transmitter (PT), or other similar device that is introduced into, and moves within, a GI tract of a human or animal body. A set of as many as eight nonlinear equations has been developed and applied, relating propagation of a wireless signal between either two, three, or more transmitting antennas located on the PT, to four or more non-coplanar receiving antennas located on a signal receiver appliance worn by the user. The equations are solved exactly, without approximations or iterations, and are applied in several environments: (1) association of a visual image, transmitted by the PT at each of a second sequence of times, with a PT location and PT angular orientation at that time; (2) determination of a position within the body at which a drug or chemical substance or other treatment is to be delivered to a selected portion of the body; (3) monitoring, after delivery, of the effect(s) of administration of the treatment; and (4) determination of one or more positions within the body where provision and examination of a finer-scale image is warranted.

  16. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (zL=0.6304) and RXJ1131-1231 (zL=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ2, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in DA per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ2 at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ2 with 5% precision.

  17. 35. VERTICAL AND TORSIONAL MOTION FROM EAST TOWER SHOWING ANGULAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. VERTICAL AND TORSIONAL MOTION FROM EAST TOWER SHOWING ANGULAR DISTORTION APPROACHING 45 DEGREES WITH LAMP POSTS APPEARING TO BE AT EIGHT ANGLES, 7 NOVEMBER 1940, FROM 16MN FILM SHOT BY PROFESSOR F.B. FARQUHARSON, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON. (LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, AT UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SEATTLE: UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1941) - Tacoma Narrows Bridge, Spanning Narrows at State Route 16, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  18. Angular-momentum nonclassicality by breaking classical bounds on statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo; Rivas, Angel

    2011-10-15

    We derive simple practical procedures revealing the quantum behavior of angular momentum variables by the violation of classical upper bounds on the statistics. Data analysis is minimum and definite conclusions are obtained without evaluation of moments, or any other more sophisticated procedures. These nonclassical tests are very general and independent of other typical quantum signatures of nonclassical behavior such as sub-Poissonian statistics, squeezing, or oscillatory statistics, being insensitive to the nonclassical behavior displayed by other variables.

  19. Black hole mass and angular momentum in topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchareb, Adel; Clément, Gérard

    2007-11-01

    We extend the Abbott Deser Tekin approach to the computation of the Killing charge for a solution of topologically massive gravity (TMG) linearized around an arbitrary background. This is then applied to evaluate the mass and angular momentum of black hole solutions of TMG with non-constant curvature asymptotics. The resulting values, together with the appropriate black hole entropy, fit nicely into the first law of black hole thermodynamics.

  20. Characterization of the bell-shaped vibratory angular rate gyro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Su, Zhong; Li, Qing; Fu, MengYin; Liu, Hong; Fan, JunFang

    2013-08-07

    The bell-shaped vibratory angular rate gyro (abbreviated as BVG) is a novel shell vibratory gyroscope, which is inspired by the Chinese traditional bell. It sensitizes angular velocity through the standing wave precession effect. The bell-shaped resonator is a core component of the BVG and looks like the millimeter-grade Chinese traditional bell, such as QianLong Bell and Yongle Bell. It is made of Ni43CrTi, which is a constant modulus alloy. The exciting element, control element and detection element are uniformly distributed and attached to the resonator, respectively. This work presents the design, analysis and experimentation on the BVG. It is most important to analyze the vibratory character of the bell-shaped resonator. The strain equation, internal force and the resonator's equilibrium differential equation are derived in the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. When the input angular velocity is existent on the sensitive axis, an analysis of the vibratory character is performed using the theory of thin shells. On this basis, the mode shape function and the simplified second order normal vibration mode dynamical equation are obtained. The coriolis coupling relationship about the primary mode and secondary mode is established. The methods of the signal processing and control loop are presented. Analyzing the impact resistance property of the bell-shaped resonator, which is compared with other shell resonators using the Finite Element Method, demonstrates that BVG has the advantage of a better impact resistance property. A reasonable means of installation and a prototypal gyro are designed. The gyroscopic effect of the BVG is characterized through experiments. Experimental results show that the BVG has not only the advantages of low cost, low power, long work life, high sensitivity, and so on, but, also, of a simple structure and a better impact resistance property for low and medium angular velocity measurements.

  1. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S.H. E-mail: komatsu@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (z{sub L}=0.6304) and RXJ1131−1231 (z{sub L}=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ{sup 2}, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in D{sub A} per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ{sup 2} at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ{sup 2} with 5% precision.

  2. Dynamic Fluid in a Porous Transducer-Based Angular Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Siyuan; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Meiling; Ming, Li; Fu, Huijin; Wang, Tonglei

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of the dynamics of liquid flow in an angular accelerometer comprising a porous transducer in a circular tube of liquid. Wave speed and dynamic permeability of the transducer are considered to describe the relation between angular acceleration and the differential pressure on the transducer. The permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient of the transducer are determined in the experiments, and special prototypes are utilized to validate the theoretical model in both the frequency and time domains. The model is applied to analyze the influence of structural parameters on the frequency response and the transient response of the fluidic system. It is shown that the radius of the circular tube and the wave speed affect the low frequency gain, as well as the bandwidth of the sensor. The hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer and the cross-section radius of the circular tube can be used to control the transient performance. The proposed model provides the basic techniques to achieve the optimization of the angular accelerometer together with the methodology to control the wave speed and the hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer. PMID:28230793

  3. Angular momentum transport via internal gravity waves in evolving stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jim; Lecoanet, Daniel; Cantiello, Matteo; Brown, Ben

    2014-11-20

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many subgiant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low-mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into subgiants, however, low-frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen-burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the subgiant branch when stars have surface temperatures of T ≈ 5500 K. However, gravity waves can still spin down the upper radiative region, implying that the observed differential rotation is likely confined to the deep core near the hydrogen-burning shell. The torque on the upper radiative region may also prevent the core from accreting high angular momentum material and slow the rate of core spin-up. The observed spin-down of cores on the red giant branch cannot be totally attributed to gravity waves, but the waves may enhance shear within the radiative region and thus increase the efficacy of viscous/magnetic torques.

  4. Wigner functions for the pair angle and orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastrup, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    The problem of constructing physically and mathematically well-defined Wigner functions for the canonical pair angle θ and angular momentum p is solved. While a key element for the construction of Wigner functions for the planar phase space {(q ,p ) ∈R2} is the Heisenberg-Weyl group, the corresponding group for the cylindrical phase space {(θ ,p ) ∈S1×R } is the Euclidean group E (2 ) of the plane and its unitary representations. Here the angle θ is replaced by the pair (cosθ ,sinθ ) , which corresponds uniquely to the points on the unit circle. The main structural properties of the Wigner functions for the planar and the cylindrical phase spaces are strikingly similar. A crucial role is played by the s i n c function, which provides the interpolation for the discontinuous quantized angular momenta in terms of the continuous classical ones, in accordance with the famous Whittaker cardinal function well known from interpolation and sampling theories. The quantum mechanical marginal distributions for the angle (continuous) and angular momentum (discontinuous) are, as usual, uniquely obtained by appropriate integrations of the (θ ,p ) Wigner function. Among the examples discussed is an elementary system of simple cat states.

  5. Hydrodynamic turbulence cannot transport angular momentum effectively in astrophysical disks.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael; Schartman, Ethan; Goodman, Jeremy

    2006-11-16

    The most efficient energy sources known in the Universe are accretion disks. Those around black holes convert 5-40 per cent of rest-mass energy to radiation. Like water circling a drain, inflowing mass must lose angular momentum, presumably by vigorous turbulence in disks, which are essentially inviscid. The origin of the turbulence is unclear. Hot disks of electrically conducting plasma can become turbulent by way of the linear magnetorotational instability. Cool disks, such as the planet-forming disks of protostars, may be too poorly ionized for the magnetorotational instability to occur, and therefore essentially unmagnetized and linearly stable. Nonlinear hydrodynamic instability often occurs in linearly stable flows (for example, pipe flows) at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers. Although planet-forming disks have extreme Reynolds numbers, keplerian rotation enhances their linear hydrodynamic stability, so the question of whether they can be turbulent and thereby transport angular momentum effectively is controversial. Here we report a laboratory experiment, demonstrating that non-magnetic quasi-keplerian flows at Reynolds numbers up to millions are essentially steady. Scaled to accretion disks, rates of angular momentum transport lie far below astrophysical requirements. By ruling out purely hydrodynamic turbulence, our results indirectly support the magnetorotational instability as the likely cause of turbulence, even in cool disks.

  6. Angular momentum transport within evolved low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Mankovich, Christopher; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2014-06-10

    Asteroseismology of 1.0-2.0 M {sub ☉} red giants by the Kepler satellite has enabled the first definitive measurements of interior rotation in both first ascent red giant branch (RGB) stars and those on the helium burning clump. The inferred rotation rates are 10-30 days for the ≈0.2 M {sub ☉} He degenerate cores on the RGB and 30-100 days for the He burning core in a clump star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Evolution code, we calculate state-of-the-art stellar evolution models of low mass rotating stars from the zero-age main sequence to the cooling white dwarf (WD) stage. We include transport of angular momentum due to rotationally induced instabilities and circulations, as well as magnetic fields in radiative zones (generated by the Tayler-Spruit dynamo). We find that all models fail to predict core rotation as slow as observed on the RGB and during core He burning, implying that an unmodeled angular momentum transport process must be operating on the early RGB of low mass stars. Later evolution of the star from the He burning clump to the cooling WD phase appears to be at nearly constant core angular momentum. We also incorporate the adiabatic pulsation code, ADIPLS, to explicitly highlight this shortfall when applied to a specific Kepler asteroseismic target, KIC8366239.

  7. Performance optimization of lateral displacement estimation with spatial angular compounding.

    PubMed

    He, Qiong; Tong, Ling; Huang, Lingyun; Liu, Jing; Chen, Yinran; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-01-01

    Elastography provides tissue mechanical information to differentiate normal and disease states. Nowadays, axial displacement and strain are usually estimated in clinical practice whereas lateral estimation is rarely used given that its accuracy is typically one order of magnitude worse than that of axial estimation. To improve the performance of lateral estimation, spatial angular compounding of multiple axial displacements along ultrasound beams transmitting in different steering angles was previously proposed. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate the influence of key factors such as grating lobe noise (GLN), the number of steering angles (NSA) and maximum steering angle (MSA) in terms of performance optimization. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the effects of these factors through both computer simulations and phantom experiments. Only lateral rigid motion was considered in this study to separate its effects from those of axial and lateral strains on lateral displacement estimation. The performance as indicated by the root mean square error (RMSE) and standard deviation (SD) of the estimated lateral displacements validates the capability of spatial angular compounding in improving the performance of lateral estimation. It is necessary to filter the GLN for better estimation, and better performance is associated with a larger NSA and bigger MSA in both simulations and experiments, which is in agreement with the theoretical analysis. As indicated by the RMSE and SD, two steering angles with a larger steering angle are recommended. These results could provide insights into the performance optimization of lateral displacement estimation with spatial angular compounding.

  8. Shocks in the low angular momentum accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suková, Petra; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    We address the variability of low luminous galactic nuclei including the Sgr A* or other transient accreting systems, e.g. the black hole X-ray binaries, such as GX 339-4 or IGR J17091. These sources exhibit bright X-ray flares and quasi-periodical oscillations and are theoretically interpreted as the quasi-spherical accretion flows, formed instead of or around Keplerianaccretion disks. In low angular momentum flows the existence of shocks for some range of leading parameters (energy, angular momentum and adiabatic constant of the gas) was studied semi-analytically. The possible hysteresis effect, caused by the fact that the evolution of the flow and the formation of the shock depends on its own history, was discovered. The presence of the shock in the accreted material is important for the observable properties of the out-coming radiation. In the shocked region the gas is dense and hot, thus much more luminous than in the other case. We study the appearance of standing shocks in low angular momentum gas accreting onto a black hole with numerical hydrodynamicalsimulations, using the ZEUS code with Paczynski-Wiitapseudo-Newtonian potential.

  9. Micro-optical designs for angular confinement in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Feuermann, Daniel; Mashaal, Heylal

    2015-01-01

    We identify and evaluate a variety of efficient and feasible micro-optics for confining the radiative emission of solar cells. The key criteria used for assessing viable designs are (1) high optical efficiency for both the transmission of impinging solar beam radiation and the external recycling of isotropic cell luminescent emission; (2) liberal optical tolerance; (3) compactness and (4) being amenable to fabrication from existing materials and manufacturing processes. Both imaging and nonimaging candidate designs are presented, and their superiority to previous proposals is quantified. The strategy of angular confinement for boosting cell open-circuit voltage-thereby enhancing conversion efficiency-is limited to cells where radiative recombination is the dominant carrier recombination pathway. Optical systems that restrict the angular range for emission of cell luminescence must, by reciprocity, commensurately restrict the angular range for the collection of solar radiation. This, in turn, mandates the introduction of concentrators, but not for the objective of delivering concentrated flux onto the cell. Rather, the optical system must project an acceptably uniform spatial distribution of solar flux onto the cell surface at a nominal averaged irradiance of 1 sun.

  10. Energy Extraction from Fluid Flow Via Vortex Induced Angular Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Sorathiya, Shahajhan H.

    2015-11-01

    Using Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, we study angular oscillations of an elliptical cylinder attached to a torsional spring, with the axis placed perpendicular to a uniform flow, at low Reynolds numbers (Re=100 and Re=200). The equilibrium angle and stiffness of the torsional spring is chosen such that the ellipse reaches stable equilibrium at an angle of roughly 45° with respect to the incoming flow. This configuration leads to large unsteady torque due to vortex shedding, which in turn can lead to large oscillations of the ellipse, with several frequency modes. Along with measuring the angular oscillations of the ellipse, we also measure the potential for power-extraction from this setup, by attaching an external angular damper to the axis of the ellipse. For low density ratios, the ellipse tends to oscillate within the first quadrant, while, for higher density ratios, the ellipse, due to its tendency to auto-rotate, undergoes very large oscillations. The ellipse locks on to primary and secondary vortex shedding modes over the range of density ratios studied here. The power output of this setup increases with increasing Reynolds number and density ratio, with peak efficiency of 1.7%.

  11. Angular-Similarity-Preserving Binary Signatures for Linear Subspaces.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianqiu; Li, Jianmin; Tian, Qi; Yan, Shuicheng; Zhang, Bo

    2015-11-01

    We propose a similarity-preserving binary signature method for linear subspaces. In computer vision and pattern recognition, linear subspace is a very important representation for many kinds of data, such as face images, action and gesture videos, and so on. When there is a large amount of subspace data and the ambient dimension is high, the cost of computing the pairwise similarity between the subspaces would be high and it requires a large storage space for storing the subspaces. In this paper, we first define the angular similarity and angular distance between the subspaces. Then, based on this similarity definition, we develop a similarity-preserving binary signature method for linear subspaces, which transforms a linear subspace into a compact binary signature, and the Hamming distance between two signatures provides an unbiased estimate of the angular similarity between the two subspaces. We also provide a lower bound of the signature length sufficient to guarantee uniform distance-preservation between every pair of subspaces in a set. Experiments on face recognition, gesture recognition, and action recognition verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Quark orbital angular momentum in the MIT bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtoy, A.; Miramontes, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results for the generalized transverse momentum distribution related to quark orbital angular momentum, i.e., F14, in the MIT bag model. This model has been modified to include the Peierls-Yoccoz projection to restore translational invariance. Such a modification allows us to fulfil more satisfactorily basic sum rules that would otherwise be less elegantly carried out with the original version. Using the same model, we have calculated the twist-3 generalized parton distribution (GPD) that corresponds to orbital angular momentum à la Ji, through the Penttinen-Polyakov-Shuvaev-Strikman sum rule. Recently, a new relation between the two definitions of the quark orbital angular momentum at the density level has been proposed, which we illustrate here within the model. The sum rule is fulfilled. Still within the framework of the MIT bag model, we analyze the Wandzura-Wilczek expression for the GPD of interest. The genuine quark-gluon contribution is evaluated directly thanks to the equation of motion of the bag, which allows for a direct control of the kinematical contributions to the twist-3 GPD.

  13. Unexpected angular or rotational deformity after corrective osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Codman’s paradox reveals a misunderstanding of geometry in orthopedic practice. Physicians often encounter situations that cannot be understood intuitively during orthopedic interventions such as corrective osteotomy. Occasionally, unexpected angular or rotational deformity occurs during surgery. This study aimed to draw the attention of orthopedic surgeons toward the concepts of orientation and rotation and demonstrate the potential for unexpected deformity after orthopedic interventions. This study focused on three situations: shoulder arthrodesis, femoral varization derotational osteotomy, and femoral derotation osteotomy. Methods First, a shoulder model was generated to calculate unexpected rotational deformity to demonstrate Codman’s paradox. Second, femoral varization derotational osteotomy was simulated using a cylinder model. Third, a reconstructed femoral model was used to calculate unexpected angular or rotational deformity during femoral derotation osteotomy. Results Unexpected external rotation was found after forward elevation and abduction of the shoulder joint. In the varization and derotation model, closed-wedge osteotomy and additional derotation resulted in an unexpected extension and valgus deformity, namely, under-correction of coxa valga. After femoral derotational osteotomy, varization and extension of the distal fragment occurred, although the extension was negligible. Conclusions Surgeons should be aware of unexpected angular deformity after surgical procedure involving bony areas. The degree of deformity differs depending on the context of the surgical procedure. However, this study reveals that notable deformities can be expected during orthopedic procedures such as femoral varization derotational osteotomy. PMID:24886469

  14. Anomalous contours and illusion of angularity: phenomenal and theoretical comparisons.

    PubMed

    Pinna, B

    1991-01-01

    Many experimental comparisons between real and anomalous contours have proven the functional equivalence of the two conditions; however, there are some contradictory findings. One of these is obtained by analyzing the anomalous contours in the light of a new illusion, called the 'illusion of angularity'. A circle becomes a polygon when it covers the centre of a radial arrangement of black stripes, and a polygon changes its perceptual shape depending on its orientation with respect to the same radial arrangement. Phenomenally, it appears like a very pointed polygon, in which every side is concave or, alternatively, a shape that looks like a circle with angles added in the spaces between the radial stripes, or a polygonal shape in which every side is convex. The reciprocal anomalous counterparts of these conditions, obtained by removing the geometrical/polygonal contours, reveal different results. In the first case, one sees a perfect circle; in the second case, a polygon with blunted vertices, or a circular shape with angular protrusions; in the third case, a deformed circle. These results are inconsistent with some theoretical models proposed to explain the emergence of anomalous contours, namely, all the top-down models expressed in terms of cognitive constructions and perceptual hypotheses, or in terms of global figural organizations. Rather, these comparisons suggest a different interpretation for the two phenomena (the illusion of angularity and anomalous contours). This interpretation is based on dynamic interactions or on network computations that synthesize both real and anomalous contours.

  15. Gyrokinetic theory and simulation of angular momentum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F. L.

    2007-12-15

    A gyrokinetic theory of turbulent toroidal angular momentum transport as well as modifications to neoclassical poloidal rotation from turbulence is formulated starting from the fundamental six-dimensional kinetic equation. The gyro-Bohm scaled transport is evaluated from toroidal delta-f gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The simulations recover two pinch mechanisms in the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum: The slab geometry ExB shear pinch [Dominguez and Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5, 387 (1993)] and the toroidal geometry 'Coriolis' pinch [Peeters, Angioni, and Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. The pinches allow the steady state null stress (or angular momentum transport flow) condition required to understand intrinsic (or spontaneous) toroidal rotation in heated tokamak without an internal source of torque [Staebler, Kinsey, and Waltz, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46, 221 (2001)]. A predicted turbulent shift in the neoclassical poloidal rotation [Staebler, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1064 (2004)] appears to be small at the finite relative gyroradius (rho-star) of current experiments.

  16. A Novel Single-Excitation Capacitive Angular Position Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Bo; Zhou, Bin; Song, Mingliang; Lin, Zhihui; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a high-precision capacitive angular position sensor (CAPS). The CAPS is designed to be excited by a single voltage to eliminate the matching errors of multi-excitations, and it is mainly composed of excitation electrodes, coupling electrodes, petal-form sensitive electrodes and a set of collection electrodes. A sinusoidal voltage is applied on the excitation electrodes, then the voltage couples to the coupling electrodes and sensitive electrodes without contact. The sensitive electrodes together with the set of collection electrodes encode the angular position to amplitude-modulated signals, and in order to increase the scale factor, the sensitive electrodes are patterned in the shape of petal-form sinusoidal circles. By utilizing a resolver demodulation method, the amplitude-modulated signals are digitally decoded to get the angular position. A prototype of the CAPS is fabricated and tested. The measurement results show that the accuracy of the sensor is 0.0036°, the resolution is 0.0009° and the nonlinearity over the full range is 0.008° (after compensation), indicating that the CAPS has great potential to be applied in high-precision applications with a low cost. PMID:27483278

  17. Angular Declination and the Dynamic Perception of Egocentric Distance

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Daniel A.; Philbeck, John W.; Wirtz, Philip W.; Chichka, David

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of the distance between an object and an observer is fast when angular declination is informative, as it is with targets placed on the ground. To what extent does angular declination drive performance when viewing time is limited? Participants judged target distances in a real-world environment with viewing durations ranging from 36–220 ms. An important role for angular declination was supported by experiments showing that the cue provides information about egocentric distance even on the very first glimpse, and that it supports a sensitive response to distance in the absence of other useful cues. Performance was better at 220 ms viewing durations than for briefer glimpses, suggesting that the perception of distance is dynamic even within the time frame of a typical eye fixation. Critically, performance in limited viewing trials was better when preceded by a 15 second preview of the room without a designated target. The results indicate that the perception of distance is powerfully shaped by memory from prior visual experience with the scene. A theoretical framework for the dynamic perception of distance is presented. PMID:24099588

  18. GR angular momentum in the quadratic spinor Lagrangian formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siao-Jing

    2016-08-01

    We inquire into the question of whether the quadratic spinor Lagrangian (QSL) formulation can describe the angular momentum for a general-relativistic system. The QSL Hamiltonian has previously been shown to be able to yield an energy-momentum quasilocalization which brings a proof of the positive gravitational energy when the spinor satisfies the conformal Witten equation. After inspection, we find that, under the constraint that the spinor on the asymptotic boundary is a constant, the QSL Hamiltonian is successful in giving an angular momentum quasilocalization. We also make certain the spinor in the Hamiltonian plays the role of a gauge field, a warrant of our permission to impose constraints on the spinor. Then, by some adjustment of the QSL Hamiltonian, we gain a covariant center-of-mass moment quasilocalization only under the condition that the displacement on the asymptotic boundary is a Killing boost vector. We expect the spinor expression will bring a proof of some connection between the gravitational energy and angular momentum.

  19. Limitations of fitting angular scattering from single cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xing; Cannaday, Ashley E.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    The literature contains several reports of Mie-like fits to angular-domain elastic scattering measurements from multiple cells or isolated mitochondria. In these studies, the sampling volume typically contains hundreds or thousands of mitochondria, allowing for the size distribution of mitochondria to be modeled as a smooth function, (e.g. Gaussian or log-normal) with a small number of free parameters. In the case of a single-cell volume containing significantly fewer mitochondria, the true size distribution will no longer be as smooth. Increasing the number of free parameters can lead to unstable fits, however, as the forward-directed angular scattering pattern from such a population illuminated with 785 nm light is a monotonically decaying radial function with few distinct features. Using simulations, we have investigated the limitations of modeling single-cell mitochondrial scattering using smooth population distributions of Mie scatterers. In different instances, the fidelity of the estimated size information can be limited by the number of organelles, the angular detection range, or the non-ideality of the data (both speckle and shot noise). We will describe the conditions under which each of these effects dominates. We will also discuss whether mean and standard deviation are the best sizes to report from such Mie modeling, or if there are other size parameters that have greater fidelity to the true, non-smooth size distributions.

  20. Photonic polarization gears for ultra-sensitive angular measurements.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Del Re, Lorenzo; Slussarenko, Sergei; Li, Ying; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P; Aolita, Leandro; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Quantum metrology bears a great promise in enhancing measurement precision, but is unlikely to become practical in the near future. Its concepts can nevertheless inspire classical or hybrid methods of immediate value. Here we demonstrate NOON-like photonic states of m quanta of angular momentum up to m=100, in a setup that acts as a 'photonic gear', converting, for each photon, a mechanical rotation of an angle θ into an amplified rotation of the optical polarization by mθ, corresponding to a 'super-resolving' Malus' law. We show that this effect leads to single-photon angular measurements with the same precision of polarization-only quantum strategies with m photons, but robust to photon losses. Moreover, we combine the gear effect with the quantum enhancement due to entanglement, thus exploiting the advantages of both approaches. The high 'gear ratio' m boosts the current state of the art of optical non-contact angular measurements by almost two orders of magnitude.

  1. Generation and detection of neutron beams with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry A.; Barankov, Roman A.; Clark, Charles W.; Huber, Michael G.; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G.

    2015-05-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, in which photons carry lℏ units of angular momentum along their direction of propagation, are of interest in a variety of applications. The Schrödinger equation for massive particles also supports OAM solutions, and OAM states have been demonstrated with ultracold atoms and electrons. Here we report the first generation and detection of OAM states of neutrons, with l up to 7. These are made using spiral phase plates (SPP), milled out of 6061 aluminum alloy dowels with a high-resolution computer-controlled milling machine. When a SPP is placed in one arm of a Mach-Zehnder neutron interferometer, the interferogram reveals the characteristic patterns of OAM states. Addition of angular momenta is effected by concatenation of SPPs with different values of l; we have found the experimental result 1 + 2 = 3 , in reasonable agreement with theory. The advent of OAM provides an additional, quantized, degree of freedom to neutron interferometry, enlarging the qubit structure available for tests of quantum information processing and foundations of quantum physics.

  2. Angular Momentum in the Formation of Disc Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Jian; Shu, Cheng-Gang

    2004-03-01

    Within the current framework of disc galaxy formation, we discuss the resulted surface-density profiles according to the theoretical angular momentum distributions (AMDs) presented by Bullock et al. [Astrophys. J. 555 (2001) 240(B01)] for the LambdaCDM cosmology in both spherical and cylindrical coordinates. It is found that the derived surface density distribution of a disc in the outer region is in general similar to an exponential disc for both the theoretical AMDs. In the central region, the results from both the theoretical AMDs are inconsistent with observations whether the disc bar-instability is taken into account or not. The cylindrical form of the theoretical AMD leads to the bar-instability more easily for a galaxy than that for spherical AMD, which could result in a more massive bulge. After comparing the model predictions with our Milky Way Galaxy, we find that the theoretical AMDs predict larger mass fractions of baryons with low angular momentum than the observed ones, which would lead to the disc sizes being smaller. Two possible processes which could solve the angular momentum problem are discussed. EHPRG Award Lecture.

  3. Graphical analysis of angular momentum for collision products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danos, Michael; Fano, Ugo

    1998-10-01

    The complexity of atomic and nuclear structures and their collision processes involves conservation laws, bearing mainly on angular momenta; indeed angular momentum treatments prove most laborious. The analytic treatments, preferably carried out in Racah’s calculus, combine initially independent elements stepwise into structures branching out into resulting products. Graphical procedures that ensure phase and amplitude control of their manifold elements, illustrate these sequential steps and provide their results. The present report should familiarize readers with these procedures through examples of reactions of increasing complexity, bearing of course on structure calculations as well. The report has thus two aims: (i) computing correlation functions for reactions yielding several emitted particles (hence of arbitrary complexity) in terms of a novel method of computation, and (ii), describing the mathematical techniques relevant to solve high-complexity angular momentum problems, including the computation of many-body systems’ bound states. The complexity reflects the symmetries of the reaction products, and, more generally, of many-body system. The basic mathematical tool for such treatments is the Racah calculus which employs recoupling transformations, thus avoiding the many summations required by expansions in terms of vector coupling coefficients. The application of the Racah calculus is greatly aided by appropriate definitions and graphical procedures ensuring phase and amplitude control of their manifold elements, as well as illustrating the physical content. Beginning with photon absorption by discrete states, our examples progress to an Auger process yielding a correlation function with seven direction and polarization parameters.

  4. Radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The frequency splittings of intermediate-degree (3 to 170 deg) p-mode oscillations obtained from a 16-day subset of observations were analyzed. Results show evidence for both radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity. From 0.6 to 0.95 solar radii, the solar internal angular velocity increases systematically from 440 to 463 nHz, corresponding to a positive radial gradient of 66 nHz/solar radius for that portion of the solar interior. Analysis also indicates that the latitudinal differential rotation gradient which is seen at the solar surface persists throughout the convection zone, although there are indications that the differential rotation might disappear entirely below the base of the convection zone. The analysis was extended to include comparisons with additional observational studies and between earlier results and the results of additional inversions of several of the observational datasets. All the comparisons reinforce conclusions regarding the existence of radial and latitudinal gradients in the internal angular velocity.

  5. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  6. Angular momentum blockade in nanoscale high-Tc superconducting grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancarella, Francesco; Balatsky, Alexander; Wallin, Mats; Rosengren, Anders; Nordita-Condensed Matter Collaboration; KTH-Theoretical Physics Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the angular momentum blockade in small d-wave SC grains in an external magnetic field. We find abrupt changes in angular momentum state of the condensate (''angular momentum blockade'') as a result of the variation of the external field. The effect represents a direct analog of the Coulomb blockade. We use the Ginzburg-Landau theory to illustrate how the field turns a d-wave order parameter (OP) into a(dx2 -y2 + idxy)-OP. We derive the volume magnetic susceptibility as a function of the field, and corresponding small jumps in magnetization at critical values of the field that should be experimentally observable in SC grains. The observation of these jumps requires a small grain, since their extent is inversely proportional to the number of Cooper pairs in the sample. The general source of instability of the pure d-wave gap is the presence of gap nodes, completely lifted by the secondary OP component. A d + id' -state is chiral and hence has an orbital moment carried by Cooper pairs. We consider fields H <

  7. Evidence for the distribution of angular velocity inside the sun and stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A round table discussion of problems of solar and stellar spindown and theory is presented. Observational evidence of the angular momentum of the solar wind is included, emphasizing the distribution of angular velocity inside the sun and stars.

  8. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  9. Adaptive control of a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungsu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control algorithm for realizing a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope so that rotation angle can be directly measured without integration of angular rate, thus eliminating the accumulation of numerical integration errors. The proposed control algorithm uses a trajectory following approach and the reference trajectory is generated by an ideal angle measuring gyroscope driven by the estimate of angular rate and the auxiliary sinusoidal input so that the persistent excitation condition is satisfied. The developed control algorithm can compensate for all types of fabrication imperfections such as coupled damping and stiffness, and mismatched stiffness and un-equal damping term in an on-line fashion. The simulation results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed control algorithm that is capable of directly measuring rotation angle without the integration of angular rate.

  10. Speckle image reconstruction of the adaptive optics solar images.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Libo; Tian, Yu; Rao, Changhui

    2014-11-17

    Speckle image reconstruction, in which the speckle transfer function (STF) is modeled as annular distribution according to the angular dependence of adaptive optics (AO) compensation and the individual STF in each annulus is obtained by the corresponding Fried parameter calculated from the traditional spectral ratio method, is used to restore the solar images corrected by AO system in this paper. The reconstructions of the solar images acquired by a 37-element AO system validate this method and the image quality is improved evidently. Moreover, we found the photometric accuracy of the reconstruction is field dependent due to the influence of AO correction. With the increase of angular separation of the object from the AO lockpoint, the relative improvement becomes approximately more and more effective and tends to identical in the regions far away the central field of view. The simulation results show this phenomenon is mainly due to the disparity of the calculated STF from the real AO STF with the angular dependence.

  11. Implementation of the dynamic laser goniometer for noncontact measurement of angular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohkman, Eugene; Burnashev, Mikhail; Filatov, Yuri; Pavlov, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic laser goniometer (LG) implementation for noncontact measurements of an object's angular position is presented. One of the possible implementations involves determining the time dependence of the scanning mirror's angular position. Another application is aimed at determining the oscillatory movement parameters on the test table. The results obtained in the course of the research show that the dynamic LG makes it possible to calibrate various kinds of test beds making angular oscillations or angular movement of arbitrary law.

  12. Singularity in the Laboratory Frame Angular Distribution Derived in Two-Body Scattering Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory (lab) frame angular distribution derived in two-body scattering theory exhibits a singularity at the maximum lab scattering angle. The singularity appears in the kinematic factor that transforms the centre of momentum (cm) angular distribution to the lab angular distribution. We show that it is caused in the transformation by the…

  13. The distribution of mass and angular momentum in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Marochnik, L.S.; Mukhin, L.M.; Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1989-01-01

    This book describes the contribution of the comets in the Oort cloud to the angular momentum of the solar system. Topics covered include: Nuclear mass of the new comets observed, Mass of the Oort cloud, Mass distribution in the solar system, Zone of comet formation, Angular momentum of the Oort cloud, and Angular momentum of the Hills cloud.

  14. Linear and angular control of circular walking in healthy older adults and subjects with cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Adam D; Paquette, Caroline; Jones, Geoffrey Melvill; Block, Edward W; Fletcher, William A; Hu, Bin; Horak, Fay B

    2012-05-01

    Linear and angular control of trunk and leg motion during curvilinear navigation was investigated in subjects with cerebellar ataxia and age-matched control subjects. Subjects walked with eyes open around a 1.2-m circle. The relationship of linear to angular motion was quantified by determining the ratios of trunk linear velocity to trunk angular velocity and foot linear position to foot angular position. Errors in walking radius (the ratio of linear to angular motion) also were quantified continuously during the circular walk. Relative variability of linear and angular measures was compared using coefficients of variation (CoV). Patterns of variability were compared using power spectral analysis for the trunk and auto-covariance analysis for the feet. Errors in radius were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar damage as compared to controls. Cerebellar subjects had significantly larger CoV of feet and trunk in angular, but not linear, motion. Control subjects also showed larger CoV in angular compared to linear motion of the feet and trunk. Angular and linear components of stepping differed in that angular, but not linear, foot placement had a negative correlation from one stride to the next. Thus, walking in a circle was associated with more, and a different type of, variability in angular compared to linear motion. Results are consistent with increased difficulty of, and role of the cerebellum in, control of angular trunk and foot motion for curvilinear locomotion.

  15. Semiclassical complex angular momentum theory and Pade reconstruction for resonances, rainbows, and reaction thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolovski, D.; Msezane, A.Z.

    2004-09-01

    A semiclassical complex angular momentum theory, used to analyze atom-diatom reactive angular distributions, is applied to several well-known potential (one-particle) problems. Examples include resonance scattering, rainbow scattering, and the Eckart threshold model. Pade reconstruction of the corresponding matrix elements from the values at physical (integral) angular momenta and properties of the Pade approximants are discussed in detail.

  16. New procedure for gear fault detection and diagnosis using instantaneous angular speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Zhang, Xining; Wu, Jili

    2017-02-01

    Besides the extreme complexity of gear dynamics, the fault diagnosis results in terms of vibration signal are sometimes easily misled and even distorted by the interference of transmission channel or other components like bearings, bars. Recently, the research field of Instantaneous Angular Speed (IAS) has attracted significant attentions due to its own advantages over conventional vibration analysis. On the basis of IAS signal's advantages, this paper presents a new feature extraction method by combining the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Autocorrelation Local Cepstrum (ALC) for fault diagnosis of sophisticated multistage gearbox. Firstly, as a pre-processing step, signal reconstruction is employed to address the oversampled issue caused by the high resolution of the angular sensor and the test speed. Then the adaptive EMD is used to acquire a number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs). Nevertheless, not all the IMFs are needed for the further analysis since different IMFs have different sensitivities to fault. Hence, the cosine similarity metric is introduced to select the most sensitive IMF. Even though, the sensitive IMF is still insufficient for the gear fault diagnosis due to the weakness of the fault component related to the gear fault. Therefore, as the final step, ALC is used for the purpose of signal de-noising and feature extraction. The effectiveness and robustness of the new approach has been validated experimentally on the basis of two gear test rigs with gears under different working conditions. Diagnosis results show that the new approach is capable of effectively handling the gear fault diagnosis i.e., the highlighted quefrency and its rahmonics corresponding to the rotary period and its multiple are displayed clearly in the cepstrum record of the proposed method.

  17. A new low-complexity angular spread estimator in the presence of line-of-sight with angular distribution selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousnina, Inès; Stéphenne, Alex; Affes, Sofiène; Samet, Abdelaziz

    2011-12-01

    This article treats the problem of angular spread (AS) estimation at a base station of a macro-cellular system when a line-of-sight (LOS) is potentially present. The new low-complexity AS estimator first estimates the LOS component with a moment-based K-factor estimator. Then, it uses a look-up table (LUT) approach to estimate the mean angle of arrival (AoA) and AS. Provided that the antenna geometry allows it, the new algorithm can also benefit from a new procedure that selects the angular distribution of the received signal from a set of possible candidates. For this purpose, a nonlinear antenna configuration is required. When the angular distribution is known, any antenna structure could be used a priori; hence, we opt in this case for the simple uniform linear array (ULA). We also compare the new estimator with other low-complexity estimators, first with Spread Root-MUSIC, after we extend its applicability to nonlinear antenna array structures, then, with a recently proposed two-stage algorithm. The new AS estimator is shown, via simulations, to exhibit lower estimation error for the mean AoA and AS estimation.

  18. A novel adaptive sliding mode control with application to MEMS gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Fei, Juntao; Batur, Celal

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive sliding mode controller for MEMS gyroscope; an adaptive tracking controller with a proportional and integral sliding surface is proposed. The adaptive sliding mode control algorithm can estimate the angular velocity and the damping and stiffness coefficients in real time. A proportional and integral sliding surface, instead of a conventional sliding surface is adopted. An adaptive sliding mode controller that incorporates both matched and unmatched uncertainties and disturbances is derived and the stability of the closed-loop system is established. The numerical simulation is presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. It is shown that the proposed adaptive sliding mode control scheme offers several advantages such as the consistent estimation of gyroscope parameters including angular velocity and large robustness to parameter variations and external disturbances.

  19. Dependence of the roll angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR) on gravity.

    PubMed

    Yakushin, Sergei B; Xiang, Yongqing; Cohen, Bernard; Raphan, Theodore

    2009-11-01

    Little is known about the dependence of the roll angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR) on gravity or its gravity-dependent adaptive properties. To study gravity-dependent characteristics of the roll aVOR, monkeys were oscillated about a naso-occipital axis in darkness while upright or tilted. Roll aVOR gains were largest in the upright position and decreased by 7-15% as animals were tilted from the upright. Thus the unadapted roll aVOR gain has substantial gravitational dependence. Roll gains were also decreased or increased by 0.25 Hz, in- or out-of-phase rotation of the head and the visual surround while animals were prone, supine, upright, or in side-down positions. Gain changes, determined as a function of head tilt, were fit with a sinusoid; the amplitudes represented the amount of the gravity-dependent gain change, and the bias, the gravity-independent gain change. Gravity-dependent gain changes were absent or substantially smaller in roll (approximately 5%) than in yaw (25%) or pitch (17%), whereas gravity-independent gain changes were similar for roll, pitch, and yaw (approximately 20%). Thus the high-frequency roll aVOR gain has an inherent dependence on head orientation re gravity in the unadapted state, which is different from the yaw/pitch aVORs. This inherent gravitational dependence may explain why the adaptive circuits are not active when the head is tilted re gravity during roll aVOR adaptation. These behavioral differences support the idea that there is a fundamental difference in the central organization of canal-otolith convergence of the roll and yaw/pitch aVORs.

  20. Angular momentum and torque described with the complex octonion

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2014-08-15

    The paper aims to adopt the complex octonion to formulate the angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields. Applying the octonionic representation enables one single definition of angular momentum (or torque, force) to combine some physics contents, which were considered to be independent of each other in the past. J. C. Maxwell used simultaneously two methods, the vector terminology and quaternion analysis, to depict the electromagnetic theory. It motivates the paper to introduce the quaternion space into the field theory, describing the physical feature of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The spaces of electromagnetic field and of gravitational field can be chosen as the quaternion spaces, while the coordinate component of quaternion space is able to be the complex number. The quaternion space of electromagnetic field is independent of that of gravitational field. These two quaternion spaces may compose one octonion space. Contrarily, one octonion space can be separated into two subspaces, the quaternion space and S-quaternion space. In the quaternion space, it is able to infer the field potential, field strength, field source, angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the gravitational field. In the S-quaternion space, it is capable of deducing the field potential, field strength, field source, current continuity equation, and electric (or magnetic) dipolar moment etc in the electromagnetic field. The results reveal that the quaternion space is appropriate to describe the gravitational features, including the torque, force, and mass continuity equation etc. The S-quaternion space is proper to depict the electromagnetic features, including the dipolar moment and current continuity equation etc. In case the field strength is weak enough, the force and the continuity equation etc can be respectively reduced to that in the classical field theory.

  1. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  2. Angular domain optical projection tomography in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Jordan, Kevin; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2009-02-01

    Most high-resolution optical tomography techniques employ coherence domain or time domain methodologies to capture non-scattered photons in turbid media. Angular Domain Optical Projection Tomography (ADOPT) uses an angular filter array (AFA) to observe photons that propagate through a specimen with small angular deviation. We constructed an ADOPT system consisting of an AFA micro-machined silicon micro-tunnel array with each micro-tunnel 60 μm wide, 60 μm high, 10 mm long, and separated by 5 μm thick walls. The range of acceptance angles was 0° to 0.5°. The system also included an 808 nm CW diode laser, beam shaping optics, a sample cuvette, a Keplerian lens system, and a CMOS camera. Testing was performed with a target consisting of two graphite rods (0.9 mm diameter) suspended in the cuvette by a rotation stage. The target was placed in a manner that the line of laser light was perpendicular to the long axis of the rods. A multitude of projections were collected at increments of 1.8° and compiled into a sinogram. A transverse image was reconstructed from the sinogram using filtered backprojection. The submillimeter targets embedded in the 2 cm thick scattering medium (reduced scattering coefficient <= 2.4 cm-1) were discernable in both the sinograms and the reconstructed images. The results suggest that ADOPT may be a useful technique for tomographic imaging of thick biological specimens (i.e. up to 8 mm across).

  3. Angular momenta, dynamical masses, and mergers of brightest cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Brough, Sarah; Gebhardt, Karl; Von der Linden, Anja; Couch, Warrick J.; Sharp, Rob

    2013-12-01

    Using the VIMOS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope, we have spatially mapped the kinematic properties of 10 nearby brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and 4 BCG companion galaxies located within a redshift of z = 0.1. In the hierarchical formation model, these massive galaxies (10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} < M {sub dyn} < 10{sup 11.9} M {sub ☉}) are expected to undergo more mergers than lower mass galaxies, and simulations show that dry minor mergers can remove angular momentum. We test whether BCGs have low angular momenta by using the λ {sub Re} parameter developed by the SAURON and ATLAS{sup 3D} teams and combine our kinematics with Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry to analyze the BCGs' merger status. We find that 30% (3/10) of the BCGs and 100% of the companion galaxies (4/4) are fast rotators as defined by the ATLAS{sup 3D} criteria. Our fastest rotating BCG has a λ {sub Re} = 0.35 ± 0.05. We increase the number of BCGs analyzed from 1 in the combined SAURON and ATLAS{sup 3D} surveys to 11 BCGs total and find that above M {sub dyn} ∼ 11.5 M {sub ☉}, virtually all galaxies, regardless of environment, are slow rotators. To search for signs of recent merging, we analyze the photometry of each system and use the G – M {sub 20} selection criteria to identify mergers. We find that 40% ± 20% of our BCGs are currently undergoing or have recently undergone a merger (within 0.2 Gyr). Surprisingly, we find no correlation between galaxies with high angular momentum and morphological signatures of merging.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETING GAS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM ONTO CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate gas accretion flow onto a circumplanetary disk from a protoplanetary disk in detail by using high-resolution three-dimensional nested-grid hydrodynamic simulations, in order to provide a basis of formation processes of satellites around giant planets. Based on detailed analyses of gas accretion flow, we find that most of gas accretion onto circumplanetary disks occurs nearly vertically toward the disk surface from high altitude, which generates a shock surface at several scale heights of the circumplanetary disk. The gas that has passed through the shock surface moves inward because its specific angular momentum is smaller than that of the local Keplerian rotation, while gas near the midplane in the protoplanetary disk cannot accrete to the circumplanetary disk. Gas near the midplane within the planet's Hill sphere spirals outward and escapes from the Hill sphere through the two Lagrangian points L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}. We also analyze fluxes of accreting mass and angular momentum in detail and find that the distributions of the fluxes onto the disk surface are well described by power-law functions and that a large fraction of gas accretion occurs at the outer region of the disk, i.e., at about 0.1 times the Hill radius. The nature of power-law functions indicates that, other than the outer edge, there is no specific radius where gas accretion is concentrated. These source functions of mass and angular momentum in the circumplanetary disk would provide us with useful constraints on the structure and evolution of the circumplanetary disk, which is important for satellite formation.

  5. Statistical mechanics of collisionless orbits. IV. Distribution of angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Liliya L. R.; Hjorth, Jens; Wojtak, Radosław E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown in previous work that DARKexp, which is a theoretically derived, maximum entropy, one shape parameter model for isotropic collisionless systems, provides very good fits to simulated and observed dark matter halos. Specifically, it fits the energy distribution, N(E), and the density profiles, including the central cusp. Here, we extend DARKexp N(E) to include the distribution in angular momentum, L {sup 2}, for spherically symmetric systems. First, we argue, based on theoretical, semi-analytical, and simulation results, that while dark matter halos are relaxed in energy, they are not nearly as relaxed in angular momentum, which precludes using maximum entropy to uniquely derive N(E, L {sup 2}). Instead, we require that when integrating N(E, L {sup 2}) over squared angular momenta one retrieves the DARKexp N(E). Starting with a general expression for N(E, L {sup 2}) we show how the distribution of particles in L {sup 2} is related to the shape of the velocity distribution function, VDF, and velocity anisotropy profile, β(r). We then demonstrate that astrophysically realistic halos, as judged by the VDF shape and β(r), must have linear or convex distributions in L {sup 2}, for each separate energy bin. The distribution in energy of the most bound particles must be nearly flat, and become more tilted in favor of radial orbits for less bound particles. These results are consistent with numerical simulations and represent an important step toward deriving the full distribution function for spherically symmetric dark matter halos.

  6. Angular Structure of the Radio Sources at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Inyutin, G. A.; Koshovyy, V. V.; Lozins'kyy, A. B.; Lytvinenko, O. A.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Shepelyev, V. A.; Vaschishin, R. V.

    2006-08-01

    The world biggest decameter radio telescope UTR-2 and four smaller arrays forms the Ukrainian VLBI network URAN with an angular resolution up to 1" operated at decameter wavelengths. A number of galactic and extragalactic radio sources were studed with the URAN interferometers. At decimeter and centimeter wavelengths the studied extragalactic radio sources usually possess compact components and a total size of the sources is of about or less than a resolving power of the shortest baseline of the network. The obtained results allow us to affirm that the structure of the studied extragalactic radio sources changes at the decameter wavelengths. The reason of the changes usually is a combination of various phenomena of radio wave generation and propagation. The peculiarities of the brightness distribution in the range are: - The compact details (hot spots and sources associated with AGN) in the radio galaxies and quasars are usually less prominent at the decameter wavelengths because of synchrotron self-absorption. Their angular diameters are equal to those at higher frequencies or enlarged by the interstellar scattering. - Dimensions of lobes are enlarged as a rule. - A characteristic feature of the quasars structure at lower frequencies is extended components with steep spectra producing the main part of a flux of the sources at the decameter wavelengths. Their angular diameters exceed the total size of the source measured at higher frequencies. Such halos have been revealed in some radio galaxies too. The galactic supernova remnants studied with the URAN mainly possess the same features of their structure as at higher frequencies. Some modificatios of their structure at lower frequencies are caused by interstellar scattering, which increases a size of their compact details and difference of spectral indexes that changes relative fluxes of source parts at the decameters.

  7. Orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Ji, Zhiyue; Ru, Guoyun

    2016-07-01

    Based on the vectorial Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral formulae, the analytical expression of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam with an arbitrary topological charge is derived in free space. By using the analytical expressions of the electromagnetic field beyond the paraxial approximation, the orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam can be calculated. The effects of the linearly polarized angle and the topological charge on the three components of the orbital angular momentum density are investigated in the reference plane. The two transversal components of the orbital angular momentum are composed of two lobes with the same areas and opposite signs. The longitudinal component of the orbital angular momentum density is composed of four lobes with the same areas. The sign of the orbital angular momentum density in a pair of lobes is positive, and that of the orbital angular momentum density in the other pair of lobes is negative. Moreover, the negative magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density is larger than the positive magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density. The linearly polarized angle affects not only the shape and the location of the lobes, but also the magnitude of the three components of the orbital angular momentum density. With increasing the topological charge, the distribution of the orbital angular momentum density expands, the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density increases, and the shape of the lobe also slightly changes.

  8. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-06

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. Lastly, the OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasmamore » physics and accelerator physics.« less

  9. Young's Interference Experiment with Electron Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yuya; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanimura, Shogo; Uchida, Masaya

    2013-03-01

    A Young's-type double-slit experiment using electron beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is demonstrated in a transmission electron microscope. Each of the slits is replaced by a grating mask with a fork dislocation, which generates electron beams with OAM as diffracted beams. Interference fringes produced by two diffracted electron beams with OAM appear at the observation screen. The interference fringe patterns exhibit dislocation features depending on the topological charges of the two electron beams. The experimental results clearly show the wave nature of the electron beams with OAM and gives potential applications in electron physics and quantum mechanics.

  10. Radio pumping of ionospheric plasma with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Leyser, T B; Norin, L; McCarrick, M; Pedersen, T R; Gustavsson, B

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results are presented of pumping ionospheric plasma with a radio wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), using the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Optical emissions from the pumped plasma turbulence exhibit the characteristic ring-shaped morphology when the pump beam carries OAM. Features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) that are attributed to cascading Langmuir turbulence are well developed for a regular beam but are significantly weaker for a ring-shaped OAM beam in which case upper hybrid turbulence dominates the SEE.

  11. Radio Pumping of Ionospheric Plasma with Orbital Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Leyser, T. B.; Norin, L.; McCarrick, M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Gustavsson, B.

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results are presented of pumping ionospheric plasma with a radio wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), using the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Optical emissions from the pumped plasma turbulence exhibit the characteristic ring-shaped morphology when the pump beam carries OAM. Features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) that are attributed to cascading Langmuir turbulence are well developed for a regular beam but are significantly weaker for a ring-shaped OAM beam in which case upper hybrid turbulence dominates the SEE.

  12. Area-angular-momentum inequality for axisymmetric black holes.

    PubMed

    Dain, Sergio; Reiris, Martin

    2011-07-29

    We prove the local inequality A≥8π|J|, where A and J are the area and angular momentum of any axially symmetric closed stable minimal surface in an axially symmetric maximal initial data. From this theorem it is proved that the inequality is satisfied for any surface on complete asymptotically flat maximal axisymmetric data. In particular it holds for marginal or event horizons of black holes. Hence, we prove the validity of this inequality for all dynamical (not necessarily near equilibrium) axially symmetric black holes.

  13. Impulsive control for angular momentum management of tumbling spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoji; Yamada, Katsuhiko

    2007-05-01

    We discuss an angular momentum control of a tumbling spacecraft. The proposed control method is to apply an impulse by a space robot arm, to measure and control the relative position and attitude between the target spacecraft, and then to apply another impulse until the rotational motion of the target spacecraft is well damped. A discrete controller is designed using the simplified equations of rotational motion through appropriate coordinate transformation. The stationary response under contact model uncertainty is investigated and stability condition is analytically derived. Numerical simulations are given to validate the proposed approach.

  14. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics. PMID:28164998

  15. Angular momentum transport in thin accretion disks and intermittent accretion.

    PubMed

    Coppi, B; Coppi, P S

    2001-07-30

    The plasma modes, transporting angular momentum in accretion disks, under minimally restrictive conditions when the magnetic energy density is significant relative to the thermal energy density, are shown to be singular if the ideal MHD approximation is adopted. A similarity with the modes producing magnetic reconnection in current carrying plasmas is established. The combined effects of finite plasma temperature, of plasma compressibility, of the gradient of the rotation frequency, and of appropriate transport processes (outside ideal MHD) are involved in the onset of these nonaxisymmetric and locally corotating modes.

  16. Classical and quantum chaotic angular-momentum pumps.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, T; Dubeibe, F L

    2015-03-06

    We study directed transport of charge and intrinsic angular momentum by periodically driven scattering in the regime of fast and strong driving. A spin-orbit coupling through a kicked magnetic field confined to a compact region in space leads to irregular scattering and triggers spin flips in a spatially asymmetric manner which allows us to generate polarized currents. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the spin separation carry over to the quantum level and give rise to spin pumping. Our theory based on the Floquet formalism is confirmed by numerical solutions of the time-dependent inhomogeneous Schrödinger equation with a continuous source term.

  17. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  18. Depth and latitude dependence of the solar internal angular velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.J. Jr.; Cacciani, A.; Korzennik, S.; Tomczyk, S.; Ulrich, R.K.; Woodard, M.F. JPL, Pasadena, CA Roma I Universita California Univ., Los Angeles )

    1990-03-01

    One of the design goals for the dedicated helioseismology observing state located at Mount Wilson Observatory was the measurement of the internal solar rotation using solar p-mode oscillations. In this paper, the first p-mode splittings obtained from Mount Wilson are reported and compared with those from several previously published studies. It is demonstrated that the present splittings agree quite well with composite frequency splittings obtained from the comparisons. The splittings suggest that the angular velocity in the solar equatorial plane is a function of depth below the photosphere. The latitudinal differential rotation pattern visible at the surface appears to persist at least throughout the solar convection zone. 43 refs.

  19. Efficient sorting of free electron orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Benjamin J.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Lavery, Martin P. J.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method for sorting electrons by orbital angular momentum (OAM). Several methods now exist to prepare electron wavefunctions in OAM states, but no technique has been developed for efficient, parallel measurement of pure and mixed electron OAM states. The proposed technique draws inspiration from the recent demonstration of the sorting of OAM through modal transformation. We show that the same transformation can be performed on electrons with electrostatic optical elements. Specifically, we show that a charged needle and an array of electrodes perform the transformation and phase correction necessary to sort OAM states. This device may enable the analysis of the spatial mode distribution of inelastically scattered electrons.

  20. Absolute configuration determination of angular dihydrocoumarins from Peucedanum praeruptorum.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hong-Xiang; Sun, Long-Ru; Yu, Wen-Tao; Fan, Pei-Hong; Cui, Lei; Gao, Yan-Hui; Ma, Bin; Ren, Dong-Mei; Ji, Mei

    2004-09-01

    From Peucedanum praeruptorum, one new khellactone ester (3'R)-O-acetyl-(4'S)-O-angeloylkhellactone (3), as well as four known angular dihydropyranocoumarins (1, 2, 4, 5) have been isolated. On the basis of NMR spectra and X-ray crystallography, their structures were determined. We have elucidated their absolute configuration by either chiral separation of their alkaline hydrolysis products with Rp-18 HPLC eluted with 5% hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-HCD) or by measurement of their CD spectra. A general rule relating the position and absolute streochemistry of the khellactone esters to the sign of their Cotton effects in CD curves is proposed.

  1. Two-body scattering without angular-momentum decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Deltuva, A.; Cravo, E.; Fonseca, A. C.; Crespo, R.

    2008-09-15

    Two-body scattering is studied by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in momentum space without angular-momentum decomposition for a local spin-dependent short-range interaction plus Coulomb. The screening and renormalization approach is employed to treat the Coulomb interaction. Benchmark calculations are performed by comparing our procedure with partial-wave calculations in configuration space for p-{sup 10}Be,p-{sup 16}O, and {sup 12}C-{sup 10}Be elastic scattering, using a simple optical potential model.

  2. Teleportation of a controllable orbital angular momentum generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; She Weilong

    2009-12-15

    We report on a teleportation scheme, in which a controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) generator is teleported. Via our scheme, Alice is able to--according to another independent photon's spin state (polarization) sent by Carol--electrically control the remote OAM generation on Bob's photon. To this end, we introduce a local electrically tunable and spin-dependent OAM generator to transfer a preliminary OAM-OAM entanglement to a spin-OAM hybrid entanglement, which then makes a joint Bell-state measurement on Alice and Carol's photons play its role. We show that the quantum state tomography can be introduced to evaluate the performance of the teleportation.

  3. New model for holographic storage by simultaneous angular multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, J. C.; Urzua, D.; Olivares-Peréz, A.; Ortiz-Gutierrez, M.

    2006-05-01

    We describe a technique for holographic storage by simultaneous angular multiplexing to obtain a large-scale holographic memory. We recorded 72 objects at the same time in one point on holographic plate PFG-03M from Slavich Co., using a He-Ne laser (λ = 633 nm). Each object is placed on a circular photographic transparency, separate 0.94 degree each one. The technique allows us simultaneous reconstruction of the 72 images without cross-talk. The diffraction efficiency obtained at order one is 6%. Experimental results are shown.

  4. Angular distribution of electrons elastically scattered from hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shyn, T. W.; Cho, S. Y.

    1989-08-01

    Absolute elastic differential cross sections of atomic hydrogen have been measured by a modulated crossed-beam method. The energy and angular range covered were from 5 to 30 eV and from 12/degree/ to 156/degree/, respectively. The present results agree with the previous measurements within the experimental uncertainty below 15 eV, but it is found that the present results show stronger backward scattering (/gt/120/degree/) than the previous measurement and theoretical results by more than a factor of 2 above 20 eV.

  5. Espectroscopia integrada de cumulos abiertos galacticos de pequeno diametro angular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, M. A.; Palma, T.; Clariá, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.

    The present work is part of an ongoing project of integrated spectroscopic observations of Galactic open clusters (OCs) of the southern hemisphere. We here present preliminary results (basically reddening and age) for five small angular diameter OCs projected in the third and fourth Galactic quadrants. The spectra were obtained with the ``Jorge Sahade'' 2.15 m telescope at the Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito (CASLEO); using the REOSC spectrograph in the simple dispersion mode. These spectra will be used to improve the actual available libraries of solar metallicity template spectra. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  6. The two rigid body interaction using angular momentum theory formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, Gwenaël

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an elegant formalism to model the evolution of the full two rigid body problem. The equations of motion, given in a Cartesian coordinate system, are expressed in terms of spherical harmonics and Wigner D-matrices. The algorithm benefits from the numerous recurrence relations satisfied by these functions allowing a fast evaluation of the mutual potential. Moreover, forces and torques are straightforwardly obtained by application of ladder operators taken from the angular momentum theory and commonly used in quantum mechanics. A numerical implementation of this algorithm is made. Tests show that the present code is significantly faster than those currently available in literature.

  7. Efficient sorting of orbital angular momentum states of light.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Gregorius C G; Lavery, Martin P J; Courtial, Johannes; Beijersbergen, Marco W; Padgett, Miles J

    2010-10-08

    We present a method to efficiently sort orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light using two static optical elements. The optical elements perform a Cartesian to log-polar coordinate transformation, converting the helically phased light beam corresponding to OAM states into a beam with a transverse phase gradient. A subsequent lens then focuses each input OAM state to a different lateral position. We demonstrate the concept experimentally by using two spatial light modulators to create the desired optical elements, applying it to the separation of eleven OAM states.

  8. Correlation steering in the angularly multimode Raman atomic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazelanik, Mateusz; Dąbrowski, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the possibility of steering the direction of correlations between the off-resonant Raman scattered photons from the angularly multimode atomic memory based on warm rubidium vapors. Using acousto-optic deflectors (AOD) driven by different modulation frequencies we experimentally change the angle of incidence of the laser beams on the atomic ensemble. Performing correlations measurements for various deflection angles we verify that we can choose the anti-Stokes light propagation direction independently of the correlated Stokes scattered light in the continuous way. As a result we can select the spatial mode of photons retrieved from the memory, which may be important for future development of quantum information processing.

  9. The Angular Momentum Dilemma and Born-Jordan Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2017-01-01

    The rigorous equivalence of the Schrödinger and Heisenberg pictures requires that one uses Born-Jordan quantization in place of Weyl quantization. We confirm this by showing that the much discussed " angular momentum dilemma" disappears if one uses Born-Jordan quantization. We argue that the latter is the only physically correct quantization procedure. We also briefly discuss a possible redefinition of phase space quantum mechanics, where the usual Wigner distribution has to be replaced with a new quasi-distribution associated with Born-Jordan quantization, and which has proven to be successful in time-frequency analysis.

  10. Nonstandard Higgs couplings from angular distributions in [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Buchalla, Gerhard; Catà, Oscar; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo

    We compute the fully differential rate for the Higgs-boson decay [Formula: see text], with [Formula: see text]. For these processes we assume the most general matrix elements within an effective Lagrangian framework. The electroweak chiral Lagrangian we employ assumes minimal particle content and Standard Model gauge symmetries, but it is otherwise completely general. We discuss how information on new physics in the decay form factors may be obtained that is inaccessible in the dilepton-mass spectrum integrated over angular variables. The form factors are related to the coefficients of the effective Lagrangian, which are used to estimate the potential size of new-physics effects.

  11. Angular structure of extragalactic radio sources at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Koshovy, V. V.; Lozynsky, A. R.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovsky, S. L.; Shepelev, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    The low frequency VLBI of URAN network operated in the decameter range has been designed in Ukraine to study cosmic radio sources. The network consists of five radio telescopes making up of four interferometers with baselines range from 42 to 913 km with UTR-2 radio telescope operated as the main antenna of the interferometers. The angular resolution of the network amount to 1 arcsec at the highest frequency of the range, and its sensitivity is about 20 Jy. Regular observations of galactic and extragalactic radio sources are performed with the network. Some results of studies are presented here.

  12. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics.

  13. Fluerics 40: LJARS, The Laminar Jet Angular Rate Sensor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    0.5. Using this criterion and the fact that the boundary layer grows as the square root of downstream distance, we obtain (’Lxt- kit t -(X (Xn)1/j (s...nontrivial integration, Yr hs c Xore s 2Ps/ 1/2 l~ pcr 2 4 Xvo (sp - core) r.x 7/3 , l sp - core+ X~o + ) - j (19) which reduces to 20 7= . YrI be X FS (x...control channel plus the 19G. Roe, Fluidic Laminar Angular Rate Sensor Research Program, McDonnell Douglas, Titusville, FL, HDL-CR-75-020-1 (November

  14. Depth and latitude dependence of the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1990-01-01

    One of the design goals for the dedicated helioseismology observing state located at Mount Wilson Observatory was the measurement of the internal solar rotation using solar p-mode oscillations. In this paper, the first p-mode splittings obtained from Mount Wilson are reported and compared with those from several previously published studies. It is demonstrated that the present splittings agree quite well with composite frequency splittings obtained from the comparisons. The splittings suggest that the angular velocity in the solar equatorial plane is a function of depth below the photosphere. The latitudinal differential rotation pattern visible at the surface appears to persist at least throughout the solar convection zone.

  15. Angular Dynamics of a Small Particle in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Candelier, F; Einarsson, J; Mehlig, B

    2016-11-11

    We compute the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant nearly spherical particle immersed in an unsteady fluid. We assume that the particle is small, that its translational slip velocity is negligible, and that unsteady and convective inertia are small perturbations. We derive an approximation for the torque on the particle that determines the first inertial corrections to Jeffery's equation. These corrections arise as a consequence of local vortex stretching and can be substantial in turbulence, where local vortex stretching is strong and closely linked to the irreversibility of turbulence.

  16. Ultrasonic Inspection With Angular-Power-Spectrum Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1994-01-01

    Principal advantage of angular-power-spectrum scanning (APSS) is that, unlike x-radiography and prior ultrasonic techniques, it reveals subtle distributions of microstructural features; e.g., variations in densities of micropores or regions in which fibers and matrices are poorly bonded to each other. Potential applications include development and characterization of composite-material components of large structures, such as buildings and bridges; determination of quality and detection of damage in fiberglass hulls, surfboards, ladders, and scaffolds; and development of porous prosthetic skins and complicated "smart" materials. Superposed diffraction patterns give clues to internal structural features of ceramic composites.

  17. Simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum modes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple scheme to perform simultaneous demultiplexing and steering of multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single complex phase mask. By designing the phase mask, the propagation directions of demultiplexed beams can be arbitrarily steered. System experiments using orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 32-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM-32QAM) signals over two OAM modes are carried out by using a two-mode complex phase mask. Moreover, demultiplexing of sixteen OAM modes and arbitrary demultiplexed beam steering are also demonstrated in the experiment. PMID:26503167

  18. HIGH-EFFICIENCY AUTONOMOUS LASER ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-07-20

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  19. Content adaptive illumination for Fourier ptychography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Zheng, Guoan; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-12-01

    Fourier ptychography (FP) is a recently reported technique, for large field-of-view and high-resolution imaging. Specifically, FP captures a set of low-resolution images, under angularly varying illuminations, and stitches them together in the Fourier domain. One of FP's main disadvantages is its long capturing process, due to the requisite large number of incident illumination angles. In this Letter, utilizing the sparsity of natural images in the Fourier domain, we propose a highly efficient method, termed adaptive Fourier ptychography (AFP), which applies content adaptive illumination for FP, to capture the most informative parts of the scene's spatial spectrum. We validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the reported framework, with both simulated and real experiments. Results show that the proposed AFP could shorten the acquisition time of conventional FP, by around 30%-60%.

  20. High-efficiency Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-07-01

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.