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Sample records for animal spect system

  1. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  2. Integration of AdaptiSPECT, a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Kovalsky, Stephen; Kosmider, Matthew; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical adaptive SPECT imaging system under final development at the Center for Gamma-ray Imaging. The system incorporates multiple adaptive features: an adaptive aperture, 16 detectors mounted on translational stages, and the ability to switch between a non-multiplexed and a multiplexed imaging configuration. In this paper, we review the design of AdaptiSPECT and its adaptive features. We then describe the on-going integration of the imaging system. PMID:26347197

  3. Design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Hugg, James W.; Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Meier, Dirk; Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a continuing design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals. A first generation prototype SPECT system was designed and constructed to fit inside a MRI system with a gradient bore inner diameter of 12 cm. It consists of 3 angularly offset rings of 8 detectors (1"x1", 16x16 pixels MR-compatible solid-state CZT). A matching 24-pinhole collimator sleeve, made of a tungsten-compound, provides projections from a common FOV of ~25 mm. A birdcage RF coil for MRI data acquisition surrounds the collimator. The SPECT system was tested inside a clinical 3T MRI system. Minimal interference was observed on the simultaneously acquired SPECT and MR images. We developed a sparse-view image reconstruction method based on accurate modeling of the point response function (PRF) of each of the 24 pinholes to provide artifact-free SPECT images. The stationary SPECT system provides relatively low resolution of 3-5 mm but high geometric efficiency of 0.5- 1.2% for fast dynamic acquisition, demonstrated in a SPECT renal kinetics study using Tc-99m DTPA. Based on these results, a second generation prototype MR-compatible SPECT system with an outer diameter of 20 cm that fits inside a mid-sized preclinical MRI system is being developed. It consists of 5 rings of 19 CZT detectors. The larger ring diameter allows the use of optimized multi-pinhole collimator designs, such as high system resolution up to ~1 mm, high geometric efficiency, or lower system resolution without collimator rotation. The anticipated performance of the new system is supported by simulation data.

  4. Development of a Germanium Small-Animal SPECT System

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C.; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in fabrication techniques, electronics, and mechanical cooling systems have given rise to germanium detectors suitable for biomedical imaging. We are developing a small-animal SPECT system that uses a double-sided Ge strip detector. The detector’s excellent energy resolution may help to reduce scatter and simplify processing of multi-isotope imaging, while its ability to measure depth of interaction has the potential to mitigate parallax error in pinhole imaging. The detector’s energy resolution is <1% FWHM at 140 keV and its spatial resolution is approximately 1.5 mm FWHM. The prototype system described has a single-pinhole collimator with a 1-mm diameter and a 70-degree opening angle with a focal length variable between 4.5 and 9 cm. Phantom images from the gantry-mounted system are presented, including the NEMA NU-2008 phantom and a hot-rod phantom. Additionally, the benefit of energy resolution is demonstrated by imaging a dual-isotope phantom with 99mTc and 123I without cross-talk correction. PMID:26755832

  5. Design and simulation of a high-resolution stationary SPECT system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, Freek J.; Vastenhouw, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Exciting new SPECT systems can be created by combining pinhole imaging with compact high-resolution gamma cameras. These new systems are able to solve the problem of the limited sensitivity-resolution trade-off that hampers contemporary small animal SPECT. The design presented here (U-SPECT-III) uses a set of detectors placed in a polygonal configuration and a cylindrical collimator that contains 135 pinholes arranged in nine rings. Each ring contains 15 gold pinhole apertures that focus on the centre of the cylinder. A non-overlapping projection is acquired via each pinhole. Consequently, when a mouse brain is placed in the central field-of-view, each voxel in the cerebrum can be observed via 130 to 135 different pinholes simultaneously. A method for high-resolution scintillation detection is described that eliminates the depth-of-interaction problem encountered with pinhole cameras, and is expected to provide intrinsic detector resolutions better than 150 µm. By means of simulations U-SPECT-III is compared to a simulated dual pinhole SPECT (DP-SPECT) system with a pixelated array consisting of 2.0 × 2.0 mm NaI crystals. Analytic calculations indicate that the proposed U-SPECT-III system yields an almost four times higher linear and about sixty times higher volumetric system resolution than DP-SPECT, when the systems are compared at matching system sensitivity. In addition, it should be possible to achieve a 15 up to 30 times higher sensitivity with U-SPECT-III when the systems are compared at equal resolution. Simulated images of a digital mouse-brain phantom show much more detail with U-SPECT-III than with DP-SPECT. In a resolution phantom, 0.3 mm diameter cold rods are clearly visible with U-SPECT-III, whereas with DP-SPECT the smallest visible rods are about 0.6-0.8 mm. Furthermore, with U-SPECT-III, the image deformations outside the central plane of reconstruction that hamper conventional pinhole SPECT are strongly suppressed. Simulation results indicate

  6. System design and development of a pinhole SPECT system for quantitative functional imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Toshiyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Deloar, Hossain M; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Iida, Hidehiro

    2006-04-01

    Recently, small animal imaging by pinhole SPECT has been widely investigated by several researchers. We developed a pinhole SPECT system specially designed for small animal imaging. The system consists of a rotation unit for a small animal and a SPECT camera attached with a pinhole collimator. In order to acquire complete data of the projections, the system has two orbits with angles of 90 degrees and 45 degrees with respect to the object. In this system, the position of the SPECT camera is kept fixed, and the animal is rotated in order to avoid misalignment of the center of rotation (COR). We implemented a three dimensional OSEM algorithm for the reconstruction of data acquired by the system from both the orbitals. A point source experiment revealed no significant COR misalignment using the proposed system. Experiments with a line phantom clearly indicated that our system succeeded in minimizing the misalignment of the COR. We performed a study with a rat and 99mTc-HMDP, an agent for bone scan, and demonstrated a dramatic improvement in the spatial resolution and uniformity achieved by our system in comparison with the conventional Feldkamp algorithm with one set of orbital data.

  7. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  8. A restraint-free small animal SPECT imaging system with motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Gleason, S.S.; Goddard, J.; Kross, B.; Majewski, S.; Meikle, S.R.; Paulus, M.J.; Pomper, M.; Popov, V.; Smith, M.F.; Welch, B.L.; Wojcik, R.

    2005-06-01

    We report on an approach toward the development of a high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers such as Tc-99m and I-125 in unrestrained/unanesthetized mice. An infrared (IR)-based position tracking apparatus has been developed and integrated into a SPECT gantry. The tracking system is designed to measure the spatial position of a mouse's head at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with submillimeter accuracy. The high-resolution, gamma imaging detectors are based on pixellated NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator arrays, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes, and novel readout circuitry requiring fewer analog-digital converter (ADC) channels while retaining high spatial resolution. Two SPECT gamma camera detector heads based upon position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes have been built and installed onto the gantry. The IR landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system is under development to provide animal position data during a SPECT scan. The animal position and orientation data acquired by the tracking system will be used for motion correction during the tomographic image reconstruction.

  9. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingshan

    Modern advances in the biomedical sciences have placed increased attention on small animals such as mice and rats as models of human biology and disease in biological research and pharmaceutical development. Their small size and fast breeding rate, their physiologic similarity to human, and, more importantly, the availability of sophisticated genetic manipulations, all have made mice and rats the laboratory mammals of choice in these experimental studies. However, the increased use of small animals in biomedical research also calls for new instruments that can measure the anatomic and metabolic information noninvasively with adequate spatial resolution and measurement sensitivity to facilitate these studies. This dissertation describes the engineering development of a combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for small animals imaging. The system aims to obtain both the anatomic and metabolic images with submillimeter spatial resolution in a way that the data can be correlated to provide improved image quality and to offer more complete biological evaluation for biomedical studies involving small animals. The project requires development of complete microSPECT and microCT subsystems. Both subsystems are configured with a shared gantry and animal bed with integrated instrumentation for data acquisition and system control. The microCT employs a microfocus X-ray tube and a CCD-based detector for low noise, high resolution imaging. The microSPECT utilizes three semiconductor detectors coupled with pinhole collimators. A significant contribution of this dissertation project is the development of iterative algorithms with geometrical compensation that allows radionuclide images to be reconstructed at submillimeter spatial resolution, but with significantly higher detection efficiency than conventional methods. Both subsystems are capable of helical scans, offering lengthened field of view and improved

  10. Molecular imaging of small animals with a triple-head SPECT system using pinhole collimation.

    PubMed

    Metzler, S D; Jaszczak, R J; Patil, N H; Vemulapalli, S; Akabani, G; Chin, B B

    2005-07-01

    Pinhole collimation yields high sensitivity when the distance from the object to the aperture is small, as in the case of imaging small animals. Fine-resolution images may be obtained when the magnification is large since this mitigates the effect of detector resolution. Large magnifications in pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) may be obtained by using a collimator whose focal length is many times the radius of rotation. This may be achieved without truncation if the gamma camera is large. We describe a commercially available clinical scanner mated with pinhole collimation and an external linear stage. The pinhole collimation gives high magnification. The linear stage allows for helical pinhole SPECT. We have used the system to image radiolabeled molecules in phantoms and small animals.

  11. A SPECT Camera for Combined MRI and SPECT for Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Meier, D; Wagenaar, D J; Chen, S; Xu, J; Yu, J; Tsui, B M W

    2011-10-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI.

  12. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  13. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  14. Resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction for a high-resolution animal SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Sajedi, Salar; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Arabi, Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    The small-animal High-Resolution SPECT (HiReSPECT) is a dedicated dual-head gamma camera recently designed and developed in our laboratory for imaging of murine models. Each detector is composed of an array of 1.2 × 1.2 mm(2) (pitch) pixelated CsI(Na) crystals. Two position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) are coupled to each head's crystal. In this paper, we report on a resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction code applicable to the system and present the experimental results achieved using different phantoms and mouse scans. Collimator-detector response functions (CDRFs) were measured via a pixel-driven method using capillary sources at finite distances from the head within the field of view (FOV). CDRFs were then fitted by independent Gaussian functions. Thereafter, linear interpolations were applied to the standard deviation (σ) values of the fitted Gaussians, yielding a continuous map of CDRF at varying distances from the head. A rotation-based maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was used for reconstruction. A fast rotation algorithm was developed to rotate the image matrix according to the desired angle by means of pre-generated rotation maps. The experiments demonstrated improved resolution utilizing our resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction. While the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) radial and tangential resolution measurements of the system were over 2 mm in nearly all positions within the FOV without resolution recovery, reaching around 2.5 mm in some locations, they fell below 1.8 mm everywhere within the FOV using the resolution-recovery algorithm. The noise performance of the system was also acceptable; the standard deviation of the average counts per voxel in the reconstructed images was 6.6% and 8.3% without and with resolution recovery, respectively.

  15. Design of a high-resolution small-animal SPECT-CT system sharing a CdTe semiconductor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Young-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Cho, Hyo-Min; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-07-01

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a co-registered X-y computed tomography (CT) system allows the convergence of functional information and morphologic information. The localization of radiopharmaceuticals on a SPECT can be enhanced by combining the SPECT with an anatomical modality, such as X-ray CT. Gamma-ray imaging for nuclear medicine devices and X-ray imaging systems for diagnostics has recently been developed based on semiconductor detectors, and semiconductor detector materials such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are available for both X-ray and gamma-ray systems for small-animal imaging. CdTe or CZT detectors provide strong absorption and high detection efficiency of high energy X-ray and gamma-ray photons because of their large atomic numbers. In this study, a pinhole collimator SPECT system sharing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a CT was designed. The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v.6.1 was used for the simulation. The pinhole collimator was designed to obtain a high spatial resolution of the SPECT system. The acquisition time for each projection was 40 seconds, and 60 projections were obtained for tomographic image acquisition. The reconstruction was performed using ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) algorithms. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution were measured on the GATE simulation to evaluate the system characteristics. The spatial resolution of the system calculated from the FWHM of Gaussian fitted PSF curve was 0.69 mm, and the sensitivity of the system was measured to be 0.354 cps/kBq by using a Tc-99m point source of 1 MBq for 800 seconds. A phantom study was performed to verify the design of the dual imaging modality system. The system will be built as designed, and it can be applied as a pre-clinical imaging system.

  16. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Mejia, J; Galvis-Alonso, O Y; Castro, A A de; Braga, J; Leite, J P; Simões, M V

    2010-12-01

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology.

  17. Small animal imaging with multi-pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Nuyts, Johan; Vunckx, Kathleen; Defrise, Michel; Vanhove, Christian

    2009-06-01

    With Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), images of minute concentrations of tracer molecules can be acquired, allowing in vivo molecular imaging. For human imaging, the SPECT system has a modest spatial resolution of 5-15 mm, a large field of view and a high sensitivity. Using multi-pinhole SPECT, one can trade in field of view for resolution with preserved sensitivity, which enables the implementation of a small animal SPECT system with an improved resolution, currently ranging from 0.3 to 2 mm, in a much smaller field of view. The unconventional collimation and the more stringent resolution requirements pose problems that are not present in clinical SPECT imaging. This paper discusses how these problems can be solved to implement micro-SPECT imaging on a rotating gamma camera.

  18. [Development of a high-resolution pinhole SPECT system using dual-head gamma camera for small animal studies].

    PubMed

    Yokoi, T; Kishi, H

    1998-11-01

    We developed a high-resolution pinhole SPECT system using dual-head gamma camera (PRISM-2000XP) for small animal, and evaluated the performance of this system. Two pinhole-inserts (Pb) were mounted on the same unit, and it was not attached to the detector but the gantry of gamma camera. We designed two kinds of pinhole collimators with different rotating radii, 40 mm (Type-I) and 50 mm (Type-II). The diameter of the pinhole is 1 mm for both types. The field of view (FOV) and magnification were 45.8 mm phi and 4.25 for Type-I, 57.4 mm phi and 3.40 for Type-II, respectively. We measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) of line spread function using a 99mTc line source. Measured FWHM values were 1.65 mm using Type-I and 1.91 mm using Type-II at the center of FOV in the center slice. The volume sensitivity of this system was 8.54 kcps/MBq/ml (Type-I) and 5.68 kcps/MBq/ml (Type-II). We could observed 1.2 mm phi cold spot in the resolution phantom using Type-I. In conclusion, this system is available for SPECT measurement of small animal studies.

  19. SemiSPECT: A Small-animal Imaging System Based on Eight CdZnTe Pixel Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Kim, Hyunki; Crawford, Michael J.; Gershman, Benjamin M.; Hunter, William C.J.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a SPECT system for small animals that utilizes eight CdZnTe pixel detectors. The eight detectors are arranged in a single octagonal ring, where each views the object to be imaged through a single pinhole. Additional projections are obtained via rotation of the animal. Each CdZnTe detector is approximately 2 mm in thickness and is patterned on one surface into a 64×64 array of pixels with 380 micron pitch. We have designed an electronic readout system capable of collecting data from the eight detectors in listmode. In this scheme each event entry for a gamma-ray hit includes the pulse height of the pixel with the largest signal and the pulse height for each of its eight nearest neighbors. We present details of the overall design, the electronics, and system performance. PMID:26568674

  20. MR-based keyhole SPECT for small animal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keum Sil; Roeck, Werner W; Gullberg, Grant T; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for multi-modality imaging is to integrate the strengths of different imaging technologies while reducing the shortcomings of an individual modality. The work presented here proposes a limited-field-of-view (LFOV) SPECT reconstruction technique that can be implemented on a multi-modality MR/SPECT system that can be used to obtain simultaneous MRI and SPECT images for small animal imaging. The reason for using a combined MR/SPECT system in this work is to eliminate any possible misregistration between the two sets of images when MR images are used as a priori information for SPECT. In nuclear imaging the target area is usually smaller than the entire object; thus, focusing the detector on the LFOV results in various advantages including the use of a smaller nuclear detector (less cost), smaller reconstruction region (faster reconstruction) and higher spatial resolution when used in conjunction with pinhole collimators with magnification. The MR/SPECT system can be used to choose a region of interest (ROI) for SPECT. A priori information obtained by the full field-of-view (FOV) MRI combined with the preliminary SPECT image can be used to reduce the dimensions of the SPECT reconstruction by limiting the computation to the smaller FOV while reducing artifacts resulting from the truncated data. Since the technique is based on SPECT imaging within the LFOV it will be called the keyhole SPECT (K-SPECT) method. At first MRI images of the entire object using a larger FOV are obtained to determine the location of the ROI covering the target organ. Once the ROI is determined, the animal is moved inside the radiofrequency (rf) coil to bring the target area inside the LFOV and then simultaneous MRI and SPECT are performed. The spatial resolution of the SPECT image is improved by employing a pinhole collimator with magnification >1 by having carefully calculated acceptance angles for each pinhole to avoid multiplexing. In our design all the pinholes are focused to

  1. Real-time landmark-based unrestrained animal tracking system for motion-corrected PET/SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Goddard; S.S. Gleason; M.J. Paulus; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Mark Smith; Andrew Weisenberger; Benjamin Welch; Randolph Wojcik

    2003-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Jefferson Lab and are collaborating to develop a new high-resolution single photon emission tomography (SPECT) instrument to image unrestrained laboratory animals. This technology development will allow functional imaging studies to be performed on the animals without the use of anesthetic agents. This technology development could have eventual clinical applications for performing functional imaging studies on patients that cannot remain still (Parkinson's patients, Alzheimer's patients, small children, etc.) during a PET or SPECT scan. A key component of this new device is the position tracking apparatus. The tracking apparatus is an integral part of the gantry and designed to measure the spatial position of the animal at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with sub-millimeter accuracy. Initial work focuses on brain studies where anesthetic agents or physical restraint can significantly impact physiologic processes.

  2. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lee, B. Kross, D. Weisenberger, J. McKisson, J.S. Goddard, J.S. Baba, M.S. Smith

    2012-02-01

    Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  3. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Smith, M F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  4. Multiple-pinhole SPECT/CBCT system and its application on animal model on tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Shanglian; Li, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Characterized by wisdom and creativity, human beings are huge, complex, giant systems. Each person's life is experienced the process of birth, growth, aging and death. The genetic stability keeps human beings no change, and the mutation keeps the human beings in progress. The balance between stability and mutation are controlled by the nature laws automatically. But the balance often broken because the body's biochemical processes is out of order in vivo, which is scaled by quantitative concentrations for all molecular in human body. Now day, the biomedical imaging tools can investigate these process quantitatively.

  5. Singular Value Decomposition of Pinhole SPECT Systems.

    PubMed

    Palit, Robin; Kupinski, Matthew A; Barrett, Harrison H; Clarkson, Eric W; Aarsvold, John N; Volokh, Lana; Grobshtein, Yariv

    2009-03-12

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system can be modeled by a linear operator H that maps from object space to detector pixels in image space. The singular vectors and singular-value spectra of H provide useful tools for assessing system performance. The number of voxels used to discretize object space and the number of collection angles and pixels used to measure image space make the matrix dimensions H large. As a result, H must be stored sparsely which renders several conventional singular value decomposition (SVD) methods impractical. We used an iterative power methods SVD algorithm (Lanczos) designed to operate on very large sparsely stored matrices to calculate the singular vectors and singular-value spectra for two small animal pinhole SPECT imaging systems: FastSPECT II and M(3)R. The FastSPECT II system consisted of two rings of eight scintillation cameras each. The resulting dimensions of H were 68921 voxels by 97344 detector pixels. The M(3)R system is a four camera system that was reconfigured to measure image space using a single scintillation camera. The resulting dimensions of H were 50864 voxels by 6241 detector pixels. In this paper we present results of the SVD of each system and discuss calculation of the measurement and null space for each system.

  6. Intrinsic Feature Pose Measurement for Awake Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    New developments have been made in optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging that measures 3D position and orientation (pose) for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system. Ongoing SPECT imaging research has been directed towards head motion measurement for brain studies in awake, unrestrained mice. In contrast to previous results using external markers, this work extracts and tracks intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computes relative pose from the tracked features over time. Motion tracking thus far has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to the mouse s head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the additional animal handling required to attach the markers is undesirable. A significant improvement in the procedure is achieved by measuring the pose of the head without extrinsic markers using only the external surface appearance. This approach is currently being developed with initial results presented here. The intrinsic features measurement extracts discrete, sparse natural features from 2D images such as eyes, nose, mouth and other visible structures. Stereo correspondence between features for a camera pair is determined for calculation of 3D positions. These features are also tracked over time to provide continuity for surface model fitting. Experimental results from live images are presented.

  7. Design of multipinhole collimators for small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Smith; Steve Meikle; Stanislaw Majewski; Andrew Weisenberger

    2003-10-01

    High resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of small animals with pinhole collimators is hampered by poor sensitivity. For the target application of imaging the brain of an unanesthetized, unrestrained mouse, the design of multipinhole collimators for small, compact gamma cameras was studied using numerical simulations. The collimators were designed to image the mouse at different axial positions inside a tube aligned with the axis of rotation (AOR) of the SPECT system. The proposed system consisted of a 10 cm/spl times/20 cm pixelated detector with 2 cm from the AOR to the collimator mask and a focal length of 7 cm for a magnification of 3.5 on the AOR. A digital mouse phantom was created with a brain:background activity concentration ratio of 8:1. The brain region contained small disks and hot and cool cylinders for contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) quantitation. SPECT projection data were simulated at 120 angles for four pinhole masks having 1, 5 and two arrangements of 13 pinholes. Projections were scaled to model a 30 min study with doses of 0.3, 1 and 3 mCi in the mouse. Images were reconstructed with an iterative ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm. The peak SNR improved with multipinhole collimation compared with single pinhole imaging when there was no increased activity in the liver or bladder. With such activity, peak SNR was about the same for all collimators. For all cases peak SNR occurred at higher contrast values with multipinhole collimation. The extended axial range of multipinhole arrays enabled the mouse brain to be imaged with decreased axial blurring when the mouse was translated axially. These results suggest that mouse brains can be successfully imaged at realistic activity levels with multipinhole arrays and projection data multiplexing.

  8. Dual SPECT/MR imaging in small animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, E.; Choquet, P.; Goetz, C.; Kintz, J.; Erbs, P.; Rooke, R.; Constantinesco, A.

    2007-02-01

    ObjectiveTo demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT/MRI in small animal using a dual device. Material and methodsA small animal pinhole camera (1.5 mm in diameter) coupled together with a dedicated low-field (0.1 T) small MR imager (imaging volume of 10×10×6 cm 3) was used. SPECT consisted of acquiring 48 projections after intra-venous injections of 0.2 ml and 700 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi and was immediately followed by MRI with 3D isotropic T 1 and T 2 weighted imaging sequences. Two adult Swiss nude mice with stereotaxic brain implanted human glioblastoma cells and maintained under isoflurane 1.5% and air 0.3 L min -1 in a warmed-up and non-magnetic imaging cell for both modalities were used in this study. ResultsFusion images of SPECT/low-field MRI were obtained with isotropic voxel resolutions of 1×1×1 mm 3 for SPECT and 0.5×0.5×0.5 mm 3 for MRI. Total acquisition time for both imaging modalities was 2.5 h. ConclusionA low magnetic field strength of 0.1 T is a potential solution for a small animal dual imaging device combining pinhole SPECT and MRI in a single machine.

  9. Design for a high-resolution small-animal spect system usingpixellated Si(Li) detectors for in vivo Iodine-125 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Tindall, Craig S.; Luke,Paul N.

    2004-08-01

    We propose a design for a high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system for in vivo {sup 125}I imaging in small animal using pixellated lithium-drifted silicon (Si(Li)) detectors. The proposed detectors are expected to have high interaction probability (>90%), good energy resolution (<15% FWHM), and good intrinsic spatial resolution ({approx}1 mm FWHM). The SPECT system will consist of a dual head detector geometry with the distance between the detectors ranging 30-50 mm to minimize the imaging distance between the mouse and the detectors. The detectors, each with an active area of 64 mm x 40 mm (64 x 40 array of 1 mm{sup 2} pixels and a 6 mm thick Si(Li) detector), will be mounted on a rotating gantry with an axial field-of-view of 64 mm. The detector signals will be read out by custom application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs). Using a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator, the expected spatial resolution is 1.6 mm FWHM at an imaging distance of 20 mm, and sensitivity is 6.7 cps/{micro}Ci. {sup 125}I is a readily available radioisotope with a long half-life of 59.4 days and it is commonly used to label biological compounds in molecular biology. Conventional gamma cameras are not optimized to detect the low emission energies (27 to 35 keV) of {sup 125}I. However, Si(Li) detector provides an ideal solution for detecting the low-energy emissions of {sup 125}I. In addition to presenting the design of the system, this paper presents a feasibility study of using Si(Li) detectors to detect the emissions of {sup 125}I.

  10. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  11. A review of small animal imaging planar and pinhole spect Gamma camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Cornelissen, Bart; Van Den Bossche, Bieke; Audenaert, Kurt; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy (positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques) allows qualitative and quantitative measurement of physiologic processes as well as alterations secondary to various disease states. With the use of specific radioligands, molecular pathways and pharmaco-kinetic processes can be investigated. Radioligand delivery can be (semi)quantified in the region of interest in cross-sectional and longitudinal examinations, which can be performed under the same conditions or after physiologic or pharmacologic interventions. Most preclinical pharmacokinetic studies on physiological and experimentally altered physiological processes are performed in laboratory animals using high-resolution imaging systems. Single photon emission imaging has the disadvantage of decreased spatial and temporal resolution compared with PET. The advantage of SPECT is that equipment is generally more accessible and commonly used radionuclides have a longer physical half-life allowing for investigations over a longer time interval. This review will focus on single photon emission scintigraphy. An overview of contemporary techniques to measure biodistribution and kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in small animal in vivo is presented. Theoretical as well as practical aspects of planar gamma camera and SPECT pinhole (PH) imaging are discussed. Current research is focusing on refining PH SPECT methodology, so specific regarding technical aspects and applications of PH SPECT will be reviewed.

  12. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT-CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Difilippo, Frank P

    2008-08-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high-resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners.

  13. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  14. High Sensitivity SPECT for Small Animals and Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Gregory S.

    2015-02-28

    Imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes typically implement collimators in order to form the images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in thin objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments.

  15. Combined SPECT and x-ray CT medical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalki, Kathrin; Brown, J. Keenan; Blankespoor, Stephen C.; Heanue, Joseph A.; Wu, Xiang; Cann, Christopher E.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Chin, Michael; Stillson, Carol A.; Dae, Michael W.; Carver, James M.

    1995-05-01

    We have designed and built a system for correlated x ray CT transmission and SPECT emission imaging with an array of photon counting detectors. The scanner operates in a third generation fan beam geometry by translating a 23 element high purity germanium detector across the fan to image phantoms and small animals. The x ray CT image is used to obtain an object specific, i.e., anatomically accurate, attenuation map for the reconstruction of the SPECT image. SPECT images are reconstructed with an MLEM code and the pixel values are scaled in physical units by determining a scaling factor from a uniform water phantom with homogeneous and known attenuation. Single myocardial slices of several pigs were imaged with a 99mTc sestamibi imaging agent which is taken up in proportion to regional myocardial blood flow. The results show that 99mTc uptake and regional myocardial blood flow, determined in vivo from reconstructed SPECT images, correlate with the measured in vitro data. Furthermore, the correlation is markedly improved by reconstructing the images with an object specific attenuation map obtained from the coregistered x ray CT image. We were also able to restore the 99mTc sestamibi uptake from the reconstructed images to an accuracy between 40% and 90% of the true in vitro value, depending on the selection of maximum or mean pixel values in the regions of interest.

  16. Effect of geometric and motion tracking errors on awake small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Baba, Justin S; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    A series of simulation studies were performed to evaluate the effects of geometric and motion tracking errors on reconstruction image quality for a single pinhole collimator awake animal imaging SPECT system. List-mode SPECT data generated using a custom Monte Carlo program that incorporated experimental mouse motion data were reconstructed by MLEM with Siddon's ray tracing. To better understand the impact of motion tracking and system geometric parameter errors on reconstructed system data, an offset of up to 1 mm or degree was separately applied to each for evaluation. In the absence of motion tracking or system geometric error, the applied motion compensation algorithm successfully reconstructed volumes without any degradation or distortion. Presented results reveal that motion tracking errors propagate through the SPECT reconstruction process. However, it is confirmed that the impact of tracking errors in the currently employed motion tracking system, is minimal because of their accuracy. The results also reveal the direct and indirect impact of geometric errors to motion compensated reconstruction quality and that a wrong assumption of pinhole transaxial position produces the most amount of distortion of all the investigated errors. Finally, system geometric errors are shown to have a greater impact on reconstruction quality than equivalent tracking errors.

  17. Effect of geometric and motion tracking error for awake small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Lee, J.S. Baba, J. S. Goddard, A. Stolin, J. McKisson, A.G. Weisenberger, M.F. Smith

    2010-01-01

    A series of simulation studies were performed to evaluate the effects of geometric and motion tracking errors on reconstruction image quality for a single pinhole collimator awake animal imaging SPECT system. List-mode SPECT data generated using a custom Monte Carlo program that incorporated experimental mouse motion data were reconstructed by MLEM with Siddon's ray tracing. To better understand the impact of motion tracking and system geometric parameter errors on reconstructed system data, an offset of up to 1 mm or degree was separately applied to each for evaluation. In the absence of motion tracking or system geometric error, the applied motion compensation algorithm successfully reconstructed volumes without any degradation or distortion. Presented results reveal that motion tracking errors propagate through the SPECT reconstruction process. However, it is confirmed that the impact of tracking errors in the currently employed motion tracking system, is minimal because of their accuracy. The results also reveal the direct and indirect impact of geometric errors to motion compensated reconstruction quality and that a wrong assumption of pinhole transaxial position produces the most amount of distortion of all the investigated errors. Finally, system geometric errors are shown to have a greater impact on reconstruction quality than equivalent tracking errors.

  18. Design and assessment of cardiac SPECT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chih-Jie

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a modality widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. Objectively assessing and comparing different SPECT systems is important so that the best detectability of cardiac defects can be achieved. Whitaker, Clarkson, and Barrett's study on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses overall hardware performance independent by any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, we will show that the run time of image-quality studies is significantly reduced. Several systems derived from the GE CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, were assessed using the performance of the SLO for the task of detecting cardiac defects and estimating the properties of the defects. Clinically, hearts can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA). One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can correctly predict in which territory the defect exists. A good estimation of the defect extent from the images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this dissertation, both locations and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and system performance was assessed using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) / estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) curves. Area under LROC curve (AULC) / area under EROC curve (AUEC) and true positive fraction (TPF) at specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the gures of merit (FOMs). As the results will show, a

  19. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C.J.; Liu Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2006-02-15

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cmx2.7 cmx{approx}0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64x64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using {sup 99m}Tc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3x3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5x10{sup -4} with the energy window of {+-}10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT.

  20. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C. J.; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm × ~ 0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 × 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of −180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 × 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 × 10−4 with the energy window of ±10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  1. SemiSPECT: a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R; Crawford, Michael J; Wilson, Donald W; Barber, H Bradford; Peterson, Todd E; Hunter, William C J; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M; Barrett, Harrison H

    2006-02-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm x 2.7 cm x -0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 x 10(-4) with the energy window of +/-10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  2. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  3. Position mapping and a uniformity correction method for small-animal SPECT based on connected regional recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiushi; Lu, Yanye; Yang, Kun; Ren, Qiushi

    2013-03-01

    We describe a novel position mapping and the uniformity correction method to improve the performance of small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. The SPECT system consists of a cerium doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal (22×22 pixel array, 2 mm×2 mm×3 mm pixel size), a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (H8500c, Hamamatsu Photonics Co., Ltd., Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan), and a parallel-hole collimator (Nuclear Fields Pty. Ltd., St. Marys, Australia). The position mapping method was based on a connected regional recognition algorithm. We present the algorithm and step-by-step details of image boundary detection, dynamic binarization, connected regional recognition, center-of-gravity computing, and look-up table establishment. The position mapping and uniformity correction tables were generated and applied to the SPECT projection data. The corrected projection images demonstrated that this correction method improved the uniformity of the raw projection image by ˜16%. The preliminary SPECT reconstruction results (using algebraic reconstruction technology) are also presented. A comparison between the reconstructed images before and after correction further confirms the performance of this correction method.

  4. Performance evaluation of advanced industrial SPECT system with diverging collimator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    An advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-fold-array diverging collimator was developed for flow visualization in industrial reactors and was discussed in the previous study. The present paper describes performance evaluation of the SPECT system under both static- and dynamic- flow conditions. Under static conditions, the movement of radiotracer inside the test reactor was compared with that of color tracer (blue ink) captured with a high-speed camera. The comparison of the reconstructed images obtained with the radiotracer and the SPECT system showed fairly good agreement with video-frames of the color tracer obtained with the camera. Based on the results of the performance evaluation, it is concluded that the SPECT system is suitable for investigation and visualization of flows in industrial flow reactors.

  5. Performance evaluation of advanced industrial SPECT system with diverging collimator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    An advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-fold-array diverging collimator was developed for flow visualization in industrial reactors and was discussed in the previous study. The present paper describes performance evaluation of the SPECT system under both static- and dynamic- flow conditions. Under static conditions, the movement of radiotracer inside the test reactor was compared with that of color tracer (blue ink) captured with a high-speed camera. The comparison of the reconstructed images obtained with the radiotracer and the SPECT system showed fairly good agreement with video-frames of the color tracer obtained with the camera. Based on the results of the performance evaluation, it is concluded that the SPECT system is suitable for investigation and visualization of flows in industrial flow reactors. PMID:25169132

  6. Bayesian reconstruction strategy of fluorescence-mediated tomography using an integrated SPECT-CT-OT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liji; Peter, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    Following the assembly of a triple-modality SPECT-CT-OT small animal imaging system providing intrinsically co-registered projection data of all three submodalities and under the assumption and investigation of dual-labeled probes consisting of both fluorophores and radionuclides, a novel multi-modal reconstruction strategy is presented in this paper aimed at improving fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT). The following reconstruction procedure is proposed: firstly, standard x-ray CT image reconstruction is performed employing the FDK algorithm. Secondly, standard SPECT image reconstruction is performed using OSEM. Thirdly, from the reconstructed CT volume data the surface boundary of the imaged object is extracted for finite element definition. Finally, the reconstructed SPECT data are used as a priori information within a Bayesian reconstruction framework for optical (FMT) reconstruction. We provide results of this multi-modal approach using phantom experimental data and illustrate that this strategy does suppress artifacts and facilitates quantitative analysis for optical imaging studies.

  7. Small animal SPECT and its place in the matrix of molecular imaging technologies.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Steven R; Kench, Peter; Kassiou, Michael; Banati, Richard B

    2005-11-21

    Molecular imaging refers to the use of non-invasive imaging techniques to detect signals that originate from molecules, often in the form of an injected tracer, and observe their interaction with a specific cellular target in vivo. Differences in the underlying physical principles of these measurement techniques determine the sensitivity, specificity and length of possible observation of the signal, characteristics that have to be traded off according to the biological question under study. Here, we describe the specific characteristics of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) relative to other molecular imaging technologies. SPECT is based on the tracer principle and external radiation detection. It is capable of measuring the biodistribution of minute (<10(-10) molar) concentrations of radio-labelled biomolecules in vivo with sub-millimetre resolution and quantifying the molecular kinetic processes in which they participate. Like some other imaging techniques, SPECT was originally developed for human use and was subsequently adapted for imaging small laboratory animals at high spatial resolution for basic and translational research. Its unique capabilities include (i) the ability to image endogenous ligands such as peptides and antibodies due to the relative ease of labelling these molecules with technetium or iodine, (ii) the ability to measure relatively slow kinetic processes (compared with positron emission tomography, for example) due to the long half-life of the commonly used isotopes and (iii) the ability to probe two or more molecular pathways simultaneously by detecting isotopes with different emission energies. In this paper, we review the technology developments and design tradeoffs that led to the current state-of-the-art in SPECT small animal scanning and describe the position SPECT occupies within the matrix of molecular imaging technologies.

  8. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-09-21

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axes. Finally, a flood-corrected flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT.

  9. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically-cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axis. Finally, a flood-corrected-flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT. PMID:21852723

  10. Thick Silicon Double-Sided Strip Detectors for Low-Energy Small-Animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 μm strip pitch is attainable. Good trigger uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD (Double-sided strip detector) shows high potential for small-animal SPECT. PMID:20686626

  11. Multimodal imaging with hybrid semiconductor detectors Timepix for an experimental MRI-SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajicek, J.; Jakubek, J.; Burian, M.; Vobecky, M.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical applications are being based on multimodal imaging systems (MIS), including anatomical (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT) techniques to provide complex information in a single image. CT with one of the scintigraphic methods (PET or SPECT) is nowadays a combination of choice for clinical practice and it is mostly used in cardiography and tumour diagnostics. Combination with MRI is also being implemented as no radiation dose is imparted to the patient and it is possible to gain higher structural resolution of soft tissues (brain imaging). A major disadvantage of such systems is inability to operate scintillators with photomultipliers (used for detection of γ rays) in presence of high magnetic fields. In this work we present the application of the semiconductor pixel detector for SPECT method in combination with MR imaging. We propose a novel approach based on MRI compatible setup with CdTe pixel sensor Timepix and non-conductive collimator. Measurements were performed on high proton-density (PD) phantom (1H) with an embedded radioisotopic source inside the shielded RF coil by MRI animal scanner (4.7 T). Our results pave the way for a combined MRI-SPECT system. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  12. Indium-Labeling of siRNA for Small Animal SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven; Merkel, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi), therapeutic delivery of siRNA has attracted a lot of interest. However, due to the nature and structure of siRNA, a carrier is needed for any mode of systemic treatment. Furthermore, specific imaging techniques are required to trace where the deposition of the siRNA occurs throughout the body after treatment. Tracking in vivo siRNA biodistribution allows understanding and interpreting therapeutics effects and side effects. A great advantage of noninvasive imaging techniques such as SPECT imaging is that several time points can be assessed in the same subject. Thus, the time course of biodistribution or metabolic processes can be followed. Therefore, we have described an approach to modify siRNA with a DTPA (Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid) chelator in order to utilize an indium labeled siRNA for SPECT imaging. Here, we explain the details of the labeling and purification procedures.

  13. Recent advances in cardiac SPECT instrumentation and system design.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark F

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in clinical cardiac SPECT instrumentation are reviewed from a systems perspective. New hardware technologies include pixelated scintillator and semiconductor detector elements; photodetectors such as position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), avalanche photodiodes (APD) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM); and novel cardiac collimation methods. There are new approaches for positioning detectors and controlling their motion during cardiac imaging. Software technology advances include iterative image reconstruction with modeling of Poisson statistics and depth-dependent collimator response. These new technologies enable faster acquisitions, the lowering of administered activity and radiation dose, and improved image resolution. Higher sensitivity collimators are a significant factor enabling faster acquisitions. Several clinical systems incorporating new technologies are discussed and different system designs can achieve similar performance. With detector elements such as APDs, SiPMs and semiconductors that are insensitive to magnetic fields, the potential for cardiac SPECT imagers that are MRI compatible opens up new frontiers in clinical cardiac research and patient care. PMID:23832650

  14. Evaluation of attenuation and scatter correction requirements in small animal PET and SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Arda Bekir

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are two nuclear emission-imaging modalities that rely on the detection of high-energy photons emitted from radiotracers administered to the subject. The majority of these photons are attenuated (absorbed or scattered) in the body, resulting in count losses or deviations from true detection, which in turn degrades the accuracy of images. In clinical emission tomography, sophisticated correction methods are often required employing additional x-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scans. Having proven their potential in both clinical and research areas, both PET and SPECT are being adapted for small animal imaging. However, despite the growing interest in small animal emission tomography, little scientific information exists about the accuracy of these correction methods on smaller size objects, and what level of correction is required. The purpose of this work is to determine the role of attenuation and scatter corrections as a function of object size through simulations. The simulations were performed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) and a Monte Carlo based package, Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE). In IDL simulations, PET and SPECT data acquisition were modeled in the presence of attenuation. A mathematical emission and attenuation phantom approximating a thorax slice and slices from real PET/CT data were scaled to 5 different sizes (i.e., human, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse). The simulated emission data collected from these objects were reconstructed. The reconstructed images, with and without attenuation correction, were compared to the ideal (i.e., non-attenuated) reconstruction. Next, using GATE, scatter fraction values (the ratio of the scatter counts to the total counts) of PET and SPECT scanners were measured for various sizes of NEMA (cylindrical phantoms representing small animals and human), MOBY (realistic mouse/rat model) and XCAT (realistic human model

  15. Impact of extraneous mispositioned events on motion-corrected brain SPECT images of freely moving animals

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, Georgios I. Ryder, William J.; Bashar, Rezaul; Meikle, Steven R.; Fulton, Roger R.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging of freely moving small animals would allow a wide range of important neurological processes and behaviors to be studied, which are normally inhibited by anesthetic drugs or precluded due to the animal being restrained. While rigid body motion of the head can be tracked and accounted for in the reconstruction, activity in the torso may confound brain measurements, especially since motion of the torso is more complex (i.e., nonrigid) and not well correlated with that of the head. The authors investigated the impact of mispositioned events and attenuation due to the torso on the accuracy of motion corrected brain images of freely moving mice. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a realistic voxelized mouse phantom and a dual compartment phantom were performed. Each phantom comprised a target and an extraneous compartment which were able to move independently of each other. Motion correction was performed based on the known motion of the target compartment only. Two SPECT camera geometries were investigated: a rotating single head detector and a stationary full ring detector. The effects of motion, detector geometry, and energy of the emitted photons (hence, attenuation) on bias and noise in reconstructed brain regions were evaluated. Results: The authors observed two main sources of bias: (a) motion-related inconsistencies in the projection data and (b) the mismatch between attenuation and emission. Both effects are caused by the assumption that the orientation of the torso is difficult to track and model, and therefore cannot be conveniently corrected for. The motion induced bias in some regions was up to 12% when no attenuation effects were considered, while it reached 40% when also combined with attenuation related inconsistencies. The detector geometry (i.e., rotating vs full ring) has a big impact on the accuracy of the reconstructed images, with the full ring detector being more

  16. Quantification of the Multiplexing Effects in Multi-Pinhole Small Animal SPECT: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Mok, Greta S P; Wang, Yuchuan; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2009-01-01

    number was 7 for a compact camera with size of 12 cm × 12 cm and 9 for a standard gamma camera with size of 40 cm × 40 cm in this scheme. We conclude that the gains in improved detection efficiency and resolution by increased multiplexing are offset by increased image degradations. All the aforementioned factors must be considered in the optimum MPH collimator design for small animal SPECT imaging.

  17. Automatic estimation of detector radial position for contoured SPECT acquisition using CT images on a SPECT/CT system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruijie Rachel; Erwin, William D

    2006-08-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate noncircular orbit (NCO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detector radius on a SPECT/CT imaging system using the CT images, for incorporation into collimator resolution modeling for iterative SPECT reconstruction. Simulated male abdominal (arms up), male head and neck (arms down) and female chest (arms down) anthropomorphic phantom, and ten patient, medium-energy SPECT/CT scans were acquired on a hybrid imaging system. The algorithm simulated inward SPECT detector radial motion and object contour detection at each projection angle, employing the calculated average CT image and a fixed Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold. Calculated radii were compared to the observed true radii, and optimal CT threshold values, corresponding to patient bed and clothing surfaces, were found to be between -970 and -950 HU. The algorithm was constrained by the 45 cm CT field-of-view (FOV), which limited the detected radii to < or = 22.5 cm and led to occasional radius underestimation in the case of object truncation by CT. Two methods incorporating the algorithm were implemented: physical model (PM) and best fit (BF). The PM method computed an offset that produced maximum overlap of calculated and true radii for the phantom scans, and applied that offset as a calculated-to-true radius transformation. For the BF method, the calculated-to-true radius transformation was based upon a linear regression between calculated and true radii. For the PM method, a fixed offset of +2.75 cm provided maximum calculated-to-true radius overlap for the phantom study, which accounted for the camera system's object contour detect sensor surface-to-detector face distance. For the BF method, a linear regression of true versus calculated radius from a reference patient scan was used as a calculated-to-true radius transform. Both methods were applied to ten patient scans. For -970 and -950 HU thresholds, the combined overall average root-mean-square (rms

  18. Final Report: A CdZnTe detector for MRI-compatible SPECT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2012-12-27

    The key objective of this project is to develop the enabling technology for future MRI-compatible nuclear (e.g. SPECT) imaging system, and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous MR and SPECT imaging studies of the same object. During the past three years, we have developed (a) a MRI-compatible ultrahigh resolution gamma ray detector and associated readout electronics, (b) a theoretical approach for modeling the effect of strong magnetic field on SPECT image quality, and (c) a maximum-likelihood (ML) based reconstruction routine with correction for the MR-induced distortion. With this support, we have also constructed a four-head MR-compatible SPECT system and tested the system inside a 3-T clinical MR-scanner located on UI campus. The experimental results obtained with this system have clearly demonstrated that sub-500um spatial resolution can be achieved with a SPECT system operated inside a 3-T MRI scanner. During the past three years, we have accomplished most of the major objectives outlined in the original proposal. These research efforts have laid out a solid foundation the development of future MR-compatible SPECT systems for both pre-clinical and clinical imaging applications.

  19. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  20. [Neurological diseases and SPECT--analysis using easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS)].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    We developed a method for automated diagnosis of brain perfusion SPECT and designated this method as an easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS). In this software program, voxel-by-voxel Z-score analysis after voxel normalization to global mean or cerebellar values; Z-score = ( [control mean] - [individual value] )/ (control SD) is performed. These Z-score maps are displayed by overlay on tomographic sections and by projection with averaged Z-score of 14mm thickness to surface rendering of the anatomically standardized MRI template. Anatomical standardization of SPECT images into a stereotactic space is performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 2. This program has an advantage of capability of incorporation of SPM results into automated analysis of Z-score values as a volume of interest (VOI). A specific VOI can be determined by group comparison of SPECT images for patients with a neuropsychiatric disease with those for healthy volunteers using SPM. Even if a center can construct a normal database with good quality comprising a large number of healthy volunteers, other centers have not been able to use this normal database because of differences between the used gamma cameras, collimators and physical correction algorithms. Since SPECT exhibits greater variations in image quality among different centers than PET, conversion of SPECT images may be necessary for sharing a normal database. In this eZIS software, we incorporated a newly developed program for making it possible to share a normal database in SPECT studies. A Hoffman 3-dimensional brain phantom experiment was conducted to determine systematic differences between SPECT scanners. SPECT images for the brain phantom were obtained using two different scanners. Dividing these two phantom images after anatomical standardization by SPM created a 3-dimensional conversion map. The use of a conversion map obtained from SPECT images of the same phantom provided very similar SPECT data despite extreme differences

  1. Development of advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-gonal diverging-collimator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-07-01

    Industrial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a promising diagnosis technique to investigate the dynamic behavior of process media. In the present study, a 12-gonal industrial SPECT system was developed using diverging collimators, and its performance was compared with those of hexagonal and 24-gonal systems. Of all of the systems, the 12-gonal type showed the best performance, providing (1) a detection-efficiency map without edge artifacts, (2) the best image resolution, and (3) reconstruction images that correctly furnish multi-source information. Based on the performance of the three different types of configurations, a SPECT system with 12-gonal type configuration was found most suitable for investigating and visualization of flow dynamics in industrial process systems.

  2. Development of advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-gonal diverging-collimator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-07-01

    Industrial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a promising diagnosis technique to investigate the dynamic behavior of process media. In the present study, a 12-gonal industrial SPECT system was developed using diverging collimators, and its performance was compared with those of hexagonal and 24-gonal systems. Of all of the systems, the 12-gonal type showed the best performance, providing (1) a detection-efficiency map without edge artifacts, (2) the best image resolution, and (3) reconstruction images that correctly furnish multi-source information. Based on the performance of the three different types of configurations, a SPECT system with 12-gonal type configuration was found most suitable for investigating and visualization of flow dynamics in industrial process systems. PMID:24636865

  3. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Tough, MengHeng; Cheng, Lin; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT PhantomTM), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole

  4. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu Tough, MengHeng; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the

  5. Feasibility and Initial Performance of Simultaneous SPECT-CT Imaging Using a Commercial Multi-Modality Preclinical Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Dustin R.; Austin, Derek W.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging provides coregistered PET-CT and SPECT-CT images; however such multi-modality workflows usually consist of sequential scans from the individual imaging components for each modality. This typical workflow may result in long scan times limiting throughput of the imaging system. Conversely, acquiring multi-modality data simultaneously may improve correlation and registration of images, improve temporal alignment of the acquired data, increase imaging throughput, and benefit the scanned subject by minimizing time under anesthetic. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility and procedure for modifying a commercially available preclinical SPECT-CT platform to enable simultaneous SPECT-CT acquisition. We also evaluate the performance of simultaneous SPECT-CT tomographic imaging with this modified system. Performance was accessed using a 57Co source and image quality was evaluated with 99mTc phantoms in a series of simultaneous SPECT-CT scans. PMID:26146568

  6. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p<0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p<0.05) compared to EXG SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the

  7. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on

  8. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-21

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise

  9. Assessment of hybrid rotation-translation scan schemes for in vivo animal SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Yao, Rutao; Deng, Xiao; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu

    2013-02-01

    To perform in vivo animal single photon emission computed tomography imaging on a stationary detector gantry, we introduced a hybrid rotation-translation (HRT) tomographic scan, a combination of translational and limited angle rotational movements of the image object, to minimize gravity-induced animal motion. To quantitatively assess the performance of ten HRT scan schemes and the conventional rotation-only scan scheme, two simulated phantoms were first scanned with each scheme to derive the corresponding image resolution (IR) in the image field of view. The IR results of all the scan schemes were visually assessed and compared with corresponding outputs of four scan scheme evaluation indices, i.e. sampling completeness (SC), sensitivity (S), conventional system resolution (SR), and a newly devised directional spatial resolution (DR) that measures the resolution in any specified orientation. A representative HRT scheme was tested with an experimental phantom study. Eight of the ten HRT scan schemes evaluated achieved a superior performance compared to two other HRT schemes and the rotation-only scheme in terms of phantom image resolution. The same eight HRT scan schemes also achieved equivalent or better performance in terms of the four quantitative indices than the conventional rotation-only scheme. As compared to the conventional index SR, the new index DR appears to be a more relevant indicator of system resolution performance. The experimental phantom image obtained from the selected HRT scheme was satisfactory. We conclude that it is feasible to perform in vivo animal imaging with a HRT scan scheme and SC and DR are useful predictors for quantitatively assessing the performance of a scan scheme.

  10. Monte Carlo methods for the simulation of positron emitters in SPECT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrzeniecki, A.B.; Selcow, E.C.; Yanch, J.C.; Belanger, M.J.; Lu, A.; Esser, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear medical systems are being widely used to better understand the characteristics of the acquired images. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an imaging modality that provides a physician with a nuclear medical image of function in an organ. In SPECT systems, the patient is injected with a radiopharmaceutical that is labeled with a photon-emitting radioisotope. A collimated gamma camera revolves around the patient, providing a series of planar images, which are then reconstructed to produce a three-dimensional image of the radiotracer distribution in the patient or phantom. The usage of positron emission computed tomography (PET) systems with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an important mechanism for quantitating tumor glucose metabolism. This may facilitate the detection of primary and metastatic malignancies and the distinction between tissue regions that are normal, fibrous, necrotic, or cancerous. However, PET facilities are implemented in significantly fewer hospitals in the United States than SPECT systems. To address this issue and provide similar functional information to a clinician, there is a growing interest in imaging the 511-keV photons associated with PET agents in SPECT imaging systems. Note that the clinical utility of FDG as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical cannot be replicated by known radiotracers emitting single photons. The authors are extending their simulations of SPECT systems to higher photon energies, where at present there is more disagreement between simulations and actual data. They discuss here possible reasons for this and steps being taken to address this discrepancy in the development of the modeling.

  11. A flexible high-rate USB2 data acquisition system for PET and SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. Proffitt, W. Hammond, S. Majewski, V. Popov, R.R. Raylman, A.G. Weisenberger, R. Wojcik

    2006-02-01

    A new flexible data acquisition system has been developed to instrument gamma-ray imaging detectors designed by the Jefferson Lab Detector and Imaging Group. Hardware consists of 16-channel data acquisition modules installed on USB2 carrier boards. Carriers have been designed to accept one, two, and four modules. Application trigger rate and channel density determines the number of acquisition boards and readout computers used. Each channel has an independent trigger, gated integrator and a 2.5 MHz 12-bit ADC. Each module has an FPGA for analog control and signal processing. Processing includes a 5 ns 40-bit trigger time stamp and programmable triggering, gating, ADC timing, offset and gain correction, charge and pulse-width discrimination, sparsification, event counting, and event assembly. The carrier manages global triggering and transfers module data to a USB buffer. High-granularity time-stamped triggering is suitable for modular detectors. Time stamped events permit dynamic studies, complex offline event assembly, and high-rate distributed data acquisition. A sustained USB data rate of 20 Mbytes/s, a sustained trigger rate of 300 kHz for 32 channels, and a peak trigger rate of 2.5 MHz to FIFO memory were achieved. Different trigger, gating, processing, and event assembly techniques were explored. Target applications include >100 kHz coincidence rate PET detectors, dynamic SPECT detectors, miniature and portable gamma detectors for small-animal and clinical use.

  12. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  13. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, Dong-Wei; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Dae, Michael W; Franc, Benjamin L

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of 99mTc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with 99mTc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of 99mTc-exametazime. Time activity curve of 99mTc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  14. MicroSPECT and MicroPET Imaging of Small Animals for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The process of drug discovery and development requires substantial resources and time. The drug industry has tried to reduce costs by conducting appropriate animal studies together with molecular biological and genetic analyses. Basic science research has been limited to in vitro studies of cellular processes and ex vivo tissue examination using suitable animal models of disease. However, in the past two decades new technologies have been developed that permit the imaging of live animals using radiotracer emission, Xrays, magnetic resonance signals, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. The main objective of this review is to provide an overview of small animal molecular imaging, with a focus on nuclear imaging (single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography). These technologies permit visualization of toxicodynamics as well as toxicity to specific organs by directly monitoring drug accumulation and assessing physiological and/or molecular alterations. Nuclear imaging technology has great potential for improving the efficiency of the drug development process. PMID:24278622

  15. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, Francisco; Roé, Nuria; Aguiar, Pablo; Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec; Pavía, Javier

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  16. Performance evaluation of a pinhole SPECT system for myocardial perfusion imaging of mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Max C; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Dae, Michael W

    2002-12-01

    The increasing use of transgenic mice as models of human physiology and disease has motivated the development of dedicated in vivo imaging systems for anatomic and functional characterization of mice as an adjunct to or a replacement for established ex vivo techniques. We have developed a pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system for high resolution imaging of mice with cardiovascular imaging as the primary application. In this work, we characterize the system performance through phantom studies. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured from images of a line source and point source, respectively, and were reported for a range of object-to-pinhole distances and pinhole diameters. Tomographic images of a uniform cylindrical phantom, Defrise phantom, and grid phantom were used to characterize the image uniformity and spatial linearity. The uniform phantom image did not contain any ring or reconstruction artifacts, but blurring in the axial direction was evident in the Defrise phantom images. The grid phantom images demonstrated excellent spatial linearity. A novel phantom modeling perfusion of the left ventricle of a mouse was designed and built with perfusion defects of varying sizes to evaluate the system performance for myocardial perfusion imaging of mice. The defect volumes were measured from the pinhole SPECT images and correlated to the actual defect volumes calculated according to geometric formulas. Linear regression analysis produced a correlation coefficient of r = 0.995 (p < 0.001), demonstrating the feasibility for measurement of perfusion defect size in mice using pinhole SPECT. We have performed phantom studies to characterize the spatial resolution, sensitivity, image uniformity, and spatial linearity of the pinhole SPECT system. Measurement of the perfusion defect size is a valuable phenotypic assessment and will be useful for hypothesis testing in murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Design and evaluation of a mobile bedside PET/SPECT imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenski, Matthew Thomas

    Patients confined to an intensive care unit, the emergency room, or a surgical suite are managed without nuclear medicine procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). These studies have diagnostic value which can greatly benefit the physician's treatment of the patient but require that the patient is moved to a scanner. This dissertation examines the feasibility of an economical PET/SPECT system that can be brought to the bedside of an immobile patient for imaging. We chose to focus on cardiac SPECT imaging including perfusion imaging using 99mTc tracers and viability imaging using 18F tracers first because of problems arising from positioning a detector beneath a patient's bed, a requirement for the opposed detector orientation in PET imaging. Second, SPECT imaging acquiring over the anterior 180 degrees of the patient results in reduced attenuation effects due to the heart's location in the anterior portion of the body. Four studies were done to assess the clinical feasibility of the mobile system; 1) the performance of the system was evaluated in SPECT mode at both 140 keV (99mTc tracers) and 511 keV (positron emitting tracers), 2) a dynamic cardiac phantom was used to develop and test image acquisition and processing methods for the system at both energies, 3) a high energy pinhole collimator was designed to reduce the effects of high energy photon penetration through the parallel hole collimator, and 4) we estimated the radiation dose to persons that would be in the vicinity of a patient to ensure that the effective dose is below the regulatory limit. With these studies, we show that the mobile system provides an economical means of bringing nuclear medicine to an immobile patient while staying below the regulatory dose limit to other persons. The system performed well at both 140 keV and 511 keV and provided viable images of a phantom myocardium at both energies. The system does not achieve the

  18. A line-source method for aligning on-board and other pinhole SPECT systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In order to achieve functional and molecular imaging as patients are in position for radiation therapy, a robotic multipinhole SPECT system is being developed. Alignment of the SPECT system—to the linear accelerator (LINAC) coordinate frame and to the coordinate frames of other on-board imaging systems such as cone-beam CT (CBCT)—is essential for target localization and image reconstruction. An alignment method that utilizes line sources and one pinhole projection is proposed and investigated to achieve this goal. Potentially, this method could also be applied to the calibration of the other pinhole SPECT systems. Methods: An alignment model consisting of multiple alignment parameters was developed which maps line sources in three-dimensional (3D) space to their two-dimensional (2D) projections on the SPECT detector. In a computer-simulation study, 3D coordinates of line-sources were defined in a reference room coordinate frame, such as the LINAC coordinate frame. Corresponding 2D line-source projections were generated by computer simulation that included SPECT blurring and noise effects. The Radon transform was utilized to detect angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the line-source projections. Alignment parameters were then estimated by a nonlinear least squares method, based on the α and ρ values and the alignment model. Alignment performance was evaluated as a function of number of line sources, Radon transform accuracy, finite line-source width, intrinsic camera resolution, Poisson noise, and acquisition geometry. Experimental evaluations were performed using a physical line-source phantom and a pinhole-collimated gamma camera attached to a robot. Results: In computer-simulation studies, when there was no error in determining angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the measured projections, six alignment parameters (three translational and three rotational) were estimated perfectly using three line sources. When angles (α) and offsets (ρ) were provided by

  19. A line-source method for aligning on-board and other pinhole SPECT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: In order to achieve functional and molecular imaging as patients are in position for radiation therapy, a robotic multipinhole SPECT system is being developed. Alignment of the SPECT system—to the linear accelerator (LINAC) coordinate frame and to the coordinate frames of other on-board imaging systems such as cone-beam CT (CBCT)—is essential for target localization and image reconstruction. An alignment method that utilizes line sources and one pinhole projection is proposed and investigated to achieve this goal. Potentially, this method could also be applied to the calibration of the other pinhole SPECT systems.Methods: An alignment model consisting of multiple alignment parameters was developed which maps line sources in three-dimensional (3D) space to their two-dimensional (2D) projections on the SPECT detector. In a computer-simulation study, 3D coordinates of line-sources were defined in a reference room coordinate frame, such as the LINAC coordinate frame. Corresponding 2D line-source projections were generated by computer simulation that included SPECT blurring and noise effects. The Radon transform was utilized to detect angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the line-source projections. Alignment parameters were then estimated by a nonlinear least squares method, based on the α and ρ values and the alignment model. Alignment performance was evaluated as a function of number of line sources, Radon transform accuracy, finite line-source width, intrinsic camera resolution, Poisson noise, and acquisition geometry. Experimental evaluations were performed using a physical line-source phantom and a pinhole-collimated gamma camera attached to a robot.Results: In computer-simulation studies, when there was no error in determining angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the measured projections, six alignment parameters (three translational and three rotational) were estimated perfectly using three line sources. When angles (α) and offsets (ρ) were provided by

  20. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs.

    PubMed

    Mejia, J; Reis, M A; Miranda, A C C; Batista, I R; Barboza, M R F; Shih, M C; Fu, G; Chen, C T; Meng, L J; Bressan, R A; Amaro, E

    2013-11-01

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s-1·MBq-1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99mTc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity. PMID:24270908

  1. Animal models of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morin, Florence; Kavian, Niloufar; Batteux, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a systemic connective tissue disorder characterized by the fibrosis of the skin and certain visceral organs, vasculopathy, and immunological abnormalities. Several genetic and inducible animal models of SSc have been developed and are available for research studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize the various animal models of systemic sclerosis and describe the various contributions of these models in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of the condition and searching for new therapeutic strategies for this incurable disease.

  2. Evaluation of a low-dose/slow-rotating SPECT-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, M.; Aldridge, M.; Dickson, J.; Endozo, R.; Lozhkin, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2008-05-01

    The 4-slice CT that forms part of the GE Infinia Hawkeye-4 SPECT-CT scanner (Hawkeye) is evaluated against the diagnostic 16-slice CT that is incorporated in the GE Discovery ST PET-CT system (DST). The x-ray tube of the slow-rotating Hawkeye system (23 s/rotation) operates at approximately a third of the dose of diagnostic systems as used for conventional diagnostic imaging. Image reconstruction is optimized for low noise. High-contrast spatial resolution significantly falls behind diagnostic figures: the average of MTF50 and MTF10 (resolution where the MTF has fallen to 50% and 10%) is 2.8 ± 0.1 cm-1 for Hawkeye and 5.3 ± 0.1 cm-1 for the DST (standard reconstruction filters). Resolution in the direction of the couch movement (z coordinate) is governed by the fixed Hawkeye slice width of 5 mm. Reconstruction accuracy is found to be increased by reducing the default z increment from 4.4 mm to 2.2 mm. Low-contrast object detectability is superior compared with diagnostic systems operating in the Hawkeye dose range. In the diagnostic dose regime, however, small low-contrast details remain visible in DST that are not detectable with Hawkeye. Although not of diagnostic quality, the low-dose Hawkeye provides appropriate data for SPECT attenuation correction and anatomical localization capability. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  3. Space Launch System Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is ready to move forward with the development of the Space Launch System -- an advanced heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new national capability for human exploration be...

  4. A SPECT system simulator built on the SolidWorksTM 3D-Design package

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a GPU-accelerated SPECT system simulator that integrates into instrument-design workflow [1]. This simulator includes a gamma-ray tracing module that can rapidly propagate gamma-ray photons through arbitrary apertures modeled by SolidWorksTM-created stereolithography (.STL) representations with a full complement of physics cross sections [2, 3]. This software also contains a scintillation detector simulation module that can model a scintillation detector with arbitrary scintillation crystal shape and light-sensor arrangement. The gamma-ray tracing module enables us to efficiently model aperture and detector crystals in SolidWorksTM and save them as STL file format, then load the STL-format model into this module to generate list-mode results of interacted gamma-ray photon information (interaction positions and energies) inside the detector crystals. The Monte-Carlo scintillation detector simulation module enables us to simulate how scintillation photons get reflected, refracted and absorbed inside a scintillation detector, which contributes to more accurate simulation of a SPECT system. PMID:26190885

  5. A SPECT system simulator built on the SolidWorksTM 3D design package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a GPU-accelerated SPECT system simulator that integrates into instrument-design work flow [1]. This simulator includes a gamma-ray tracing module that can rapidly propagate gamma-ray photons through arbitrary apertures modeled by SolidWorksTM-created stereolithography (.STL) representations with a full com- plement of physics cross sections [2, 3]. This software also contains a scintillation detector simulation module that can model a scintillation detector with arbitrary scintillation crystal shape and light-sensor arrangement. The gamma-ray tracing module enables us to efficiently model aperture and detector crystals in SolidWorksTM and save them as STL file format, then load the STL-format model into this module to generate list-mode results of interacted gamma-ray photon information (interaction positions and energies) inside the detector crystals. The Monte-Carlo scintillation detector simulation module enables us to simulate how scintillation photons get reflected, refracted and absorbed inside a scintillation detector, which contributes to more accurate simulation of a SPECT system.

  6. Multidivergent-beam stationary cardiac SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Gengsheng L; Stevens, Andrew M

    2009-07-01

    This article develops a stationary cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system using a novel multidivergent-beam collimator. This stationary SPECT system is inexpensive to build, small, and able to acquire true dynamic SPECT data. Stationary cardiac SPECT systems with multipinhole technology already exist. The proposed approach is to replace the multipinhole collimators with the originally designed multidivergent-beam collimators. The motivation for replacing the pinhole technology by divergent-beam technology is based on the following facts. The resolution/sensitivity trade-off for the pinhole is excellent (good resolution and good sensitivity) only in small object (e.g., small animal) imaging when it operates in the image magnifying mode. However, in large object (e.g., human) imaging, the resolution/sensitivity trade-off is poor (poor resolution and poor sensitivity) when the pinhole operates in the image reducing mode. In a stationary system, the number of angular views is limited; thus, image reduction is necessary to obtain more view angles. In this image reducing situation, divergent-beam collimation is able to provide better resolution and detection sensitivity than pinhole collimation. Computer simulations are carried out to verified the claims. PMID:19673185

  7. System matrix for OSEM SPECT with attenuation compensation in mesh domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsang, Levon; Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Lipson, Edward

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement an accurate and computationally efficient method for determination of the mesh-domain ssssssystem matrix including attenuation compensation for Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OSEM) Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). The mesh-domain system matrix elements were estimated by first partitioning the object domain into strips parallel to detector face and with width not exceeding the size of a detector unit. This was followed by approximating the integration over the strip/mesh-element union. This approximation is product of: (i) strip width, (ii) intersection length of a ray central to strip with a mesh element, and (iii) the response and expansion function evaluated at midpoint of the intersection length. Reconstruction was performed using OSEM without regularization and with exact knowledge of the attenuation map. The method was evaluated using synthetic SPECT data generated using SIMIND Monte Carlo simulation software. Comparative quantitative and qualitative analysis included: bias, variance, standard deviation and line-profiles within three different regions of interest. We found that no more than two divisions per detector bin were needed for good quality reconstructed images when using a high resolution mesh.

  8. The feasibility of using CT-guided ROI for semiquantifying striatal dopamine transporter availability in a hybrid SPECT/CT system.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien-Chin; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Che; Tang, Shu-Wen; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Chiu, Nan-Tsing

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid SPECT/CT system provides accurate coregistration of functional and morphological images. CT-guided region of interest (ROI) for semiquantifying striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability may be a feasible method. We therefore assessed the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of manual SPECT and CT-guided ROI methods and compared their semiquantitative data with data from MRI-guided ROIs. We enrolled twenty-eight patients who underwent Tc-99m TRODAT-1 brain SPECT/CT and brain MRI. ROIs of the striatal, caudate, putamen, and occipital cortex were manually delineated on the SPECT, CT, and MRI. ROIs from CT and MRI were transferred to the coregistered SPECT for semiquantification. The striatal, caudate, and putamen nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) were calculated. Using CT-guided ROIs had higher intra- and interobserver concordance correlation coefficients, closer Bland-Altman biases to zero, and narrower limits of agreement than using manual SPECT ROIs. The correlation coefficients of striatal, caudate, and putamen BPND were good between manual SPECT and MRI-guided ROI methods and even better between CT-guided and MRI-guided ROI methods. Conclusively, CT-guided ROI delineation for semiquantifying striatal DAT availability in a hybrid SPECT/CT system is highly reproducible, and the semiquantitative data correlate well with data from MRI-guided ROIs.

  9. Analytical, experimental, and Monte Carlo system response matrix for pinhole SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Pablo; Pino, Francisco; Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús; Pavía, Javier; Ros, Doménec; Ruibal, Álvaro; and others

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance of two approaches to the system response matrix (SRM) calculation in pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction. Methods: Evaluation was performed using experimental data from a low magnification pinhole SPECT system that consisted of a rotating flat detector with a monolithic scintillator crystal. The SRM was computed following two approaches, which were based on Monte Carlo simulations (MC-SRM) and analytical techniques in combination with an experimental characterization (AE-SRM). The spatial response of the system, obtained by using the two approaches, was compared with experimental data. The effect of the MC-SRM and AE-SRM approaches on the reconstructed image was assessed in terms of image contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, image quality, and spatial resolution. To this end, acquisitions were carried out using a hot cylinder phantom (consisting of five fillable rods with diameters of 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 mm and a uniform cylindrical chamber) and a custom-made Derenzo phantom, with center-to-center distances between adjacent rods of 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 mm. Results: Good agreement was found for the spatial response of the system between measured data and results derived from MC-SRM and AE-SRM. Only minor differences for point sources at distances smaller than the radius of rotation and large incidence angles were found. Assessment of the effect on the reconstructed image showed a similar contrast for both approaches, with values higher than 0.9 for rod diameters greater than 1 mm and higher than 0.8 for rod diameter of 1 mm. The comparison in terms of image quality showed that all rods in the different sections of a custom-made Derenzo phantom could be distinguished. The spatial resolution (FWHM) was 0.7 mm at iteration 100 using both approaches. The SNR was lower for reconstructed images using MC-SRM than for those reconstructed using AE-SRM, indicating that AE-SRM deals better with the

  10. Dynamic molecular imaging of cardiac innervation using a dual headpinhole SPECT system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jicun; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Reutter, BryanW.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-03-29

    Typically 123I-MIBG is used for the study of innervation andfunction of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. The protocolinvolves two studies: first a planar or SPECT scan is performed tomeasure initial uptake of the tracer, followed some 3-4 hours later byanother study measuring the wash-out of the tracer from the heart. A fastwash-out is indicative of a compromised heart. In this work, a dual headpinhole SPECT system was used for imaging the distribution and kineticsof 123I-MIBG in the myocardium of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) andnormotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The system geometry was calibratedbased on a nonlinear point projection fitting method using a three-pointsource phantom. The angle variation effect of the parameters was modeledwith a sinusoidal function. A dynamic acquisition was performed byinjecting 123I-MIBG into rats immediately after starting the dataacquisition. The detectors rotated continuously performing a 360o dataacquisition every 90 seconds. We applied the factor analysis (FA)methodand region of interest (ROI) sampling method to obtain time activitycurves (TACs)in the blood pool and myocardium and then appliedtwo-compartment modeling to estimate the kinetic parameters. Since theinitial injection bolus is too fast for obtaining a consistenttomographic data set in the first few minutes of the study, we appliedthe FA method directly to projections during the first rotation. Then thetime active curves for blood and myocardial tissue were obtained from ROIsampling. The method was applied to determine if there were differencesin the kinetics between SHR and WKY rats and requires less time byreplacing the delayed scan at 3-4 hours after injection with a dynamicacquisition over 90 to 120 minutes. The results of a faster washout and asmaller distribution volume of 123IMIBG near the end of life in the SHRmodel of hypertrophic cardiomyopthy may be indicative of a failing heartin late stages of heart failure.

  11. Parallel-hole collimator concept for stationary SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pato, Lara R. V.; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Zedda, Tiziana; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-11-01

    Parallel-hole SPECT collimators have traditionally been manufactured by stacking sheets of lead foil or by casting. These techniques significantly restrict our options in terms of collimator geometry. However, recent developments in metal additive manufacturing are making novel collimator designs possible, giving rise to new opportunities in SPECT imaging. In this paper we propose an innovative type of collimator for stationary SPECT, using parallel-holes whose collimation direction depends on their axial position. Its main advantage compared to current stationary SPECT systems (which are based on pinholes) is that, using only axial bed translations, we can achieve complete angular sampling of an increased portion of the transaxial area of the collimator bore. This allows the system to be much more compact than current stationary SPECT systems that image objects of the same size. We describe three possible designs, for full-body, brain and small-animal imaging, respectively, and test their feasibility using simulations. The system modeling method is validated against realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and then used in the evaluation of the systems’ performances and reconstructions. The simulations show that the system is able to reconstruct objects occupying the predicted field of view (75% of the transaxial area of the bore) without sampling artifacts. In particular, we perform reconstructions from noisy projection data obtained for an activity and scanning time similar to standard protocols for the three applications, and the resulting images indicate the possibility of using the proposed systems in practice.

  12. Cerebral hypoperfusion detected by SPECT in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is related to clinical activity and cumulative tissue damage.

    PubMed

    López-Longo, F J; Carol, N; Almoguera, M I; Olazarán, J; Alonso-Farto, J C; Ortega, A; Monteagudo, I; González, C Manuel; Carreño, L

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a sensitive technique for the detection of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective was to determine whether a relationship exists between cerebral hypoperfusion as detected by cerebral SPECT, cumulative tissue damage and the clinical activity of SLE. Cerebral technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) SPECT was performed in two groups of patients: 10 women with SLE (Group A) who had no previous history of major neuropsychiatric (NPS) manifestations and no minor NPS symptoms in the last six months, and 57 unselected women with SLE (Group B). In the same week that SPECT was performed, the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), SLICC/ACR damage index, native anti-DNA antibodies (ELISA) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were determined. In Group A, cerebral SPECT showed moderate or severe hypoperfusion (abnormal SPECT) in five patients without NPS symptoms, unrelated to age (mean 24.8 versus 27.8 years) or disease duration (mean 6.8 versus 9 years). Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had greater clinical disease activity (mean SLEDAI 13.6 versus 7.6) (SLEDAI > 7 in 5/5 versus 1/5; Fisher: 0.023; OR: 33; 95% CI: 2.3-469.8) and ESR (mean 43.6 versus 9.8; P < 0.05). In Group B, the mean age of the 57 unselected women with SLE was 37 years (SD 6.3) and the mean duration of the disease was 9.7 years (SD 6.3). Cerebral SPECT revealed normal perfusion or mild hypoperfusion (normal SPECT) in 30 patients (52.6%), and moderate or severe hypoperfusion in 27 (47.4%). Hypoperfusion was unrelated to age, duration of SLE or concentrations of anti-DNA antibodies and C3 and C4 fractions. Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had more active clinical disease (mean SLEDAI 13.92; SD 8.44 versus 4.56; SD 4.15) (Mann-Whitney, P < 0.005), more cumulative tissue damage (mean SLICC 2.66; SD 2.84 versus 1.03; SD 1.51) (Mann-Whitney, P = 0

  13. SU-C-201-02: Quantitative Small-Animal SPECT Without Scatter Correction Using High-Purity Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, A; Peterson, T; Johnson, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of the exceptional energy resolution of germanium detectors for preclinical SPECT in comparison to conventional detectors. Methods: A cylindrical water phantom was created in GATE with a spherical Tc-99m source in the center. Sixty-four projections over 360 degrees using a pinhole collimator were simulated. The same phantom was simulated using air instead of water to establish the true reconstructed voxel intensity without attenuation. Attenuation correction based on the Chang method was performed on MLEM reconstructed images from the water phantom to determine a quantitative measure of the effectiveness of the attenuation correction. Similarly, a NEMA phantom was simulated, and the effectiveness of the attenuation correction was evaluated. Both simulations were carried out using both NaI detectors with an energy resolution of 10% FWHM and Ge detectors with an energy resolution of 1%. Results: Analysis shows that attenuation correction without scatter correction using germanium detectors can reconstruct a small spherical source to within 3.5%. Scatter analysis showed that for standard sized objects in a preclinical scanner, a NaI detector has a scatter-to-primary ratio between 7% and 12.5% compared to between 0.8% and 1.5% for a Ge detector. Preliminary results from line profiles through the NEMA phantom suggest that applying attenuation correction without scatter correction provides acceptable results for the Ge detectors but overestimates the phantom activity using NaI detectors. Due to the decreased scatter, we believe that the spillover ratio for the air and water cylinders in the NEMA phantom will be lower using germanium detectors compared to NaI detectors. Conclusion: This work indicates that the superior energy resolution of germanium detectors allows for less scattered photons to be included within the energy window compared to traditional SPECT detectors. This may allow for quantitative SPECT without implementing scatter

  14. Molecular SPECT Imaging: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Magdy M.; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Bayomy, Tamer B.; Gsell, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging has witnessed a tremendous change over the last decade. Growing interest and emphasis are placed on this specialized technology represented by developing new scanners, pharmaceutical drugs, diagnostic agents, new therapeutic regimens, and ultimately, significant improvement of patient health care. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have their signature on paving the way to molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. The former will be the topic of the current paper where the authors address the current position of the molecular SPECT imaging among other imaging techniques, describing strengths and weaknesses, differences between SPECT and PET, and focusing on different SPECT designs and detection systems. Radiopharmaceutical compounds of clinical as well-preclinical interest have also been reviewed. Moreover, the last section covers several application, of μSPECT imaging in many areas of disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:21603240

  15. An Assessment of a Low-Cost Visual Tracking System (VTS) to Detect and Compensate for Patient Motion during SPECT

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Joseph E.; Bruyant, Philippe; Johnson, Karen; Feng, Bing; Lehovich, Andre; Gu, Songxiang; Gennert, Michael A.; King, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Patient motion is inevitable in SPECT and PET due to the lengthy period of time patients are imaged and patient motion can degrade diagnostic accuracy. The goal of our studies is to perfect a methodology for tracking and correcting patient motion when it occurs. In this paper we report on enhancements to the calibration, camera stability, accuracy of motion tracking, and temporal synchronization of a low-cost visual tracking system (VTS) we are developing. The purpose of the VTS is to track the motion of retro-reflective markers on stretchy bands wrapped about the chest and abdomen of patients. We have improved the accuracy of 3D spatial calibration by using a MATLAB optical camera calibration package with a planar calibration pattern. This allowed us to determine the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters for stereo-imaging with our CCD cameras. Locations in the VTS coordinate system are transformed to the SPECT coordinate system by a VTS/SPECT mapping using a phantom of 7 retro-reflective spheres each filled with a drop of Tc99m. We switched from pan, tilt and zoom (PTZ) network cameras to fixed network cameras to reduce the amount of camera drift. The improved stability was verified by tracking the positions of fixed retro-reflective markers on a wall. The ability of our VTS to track movement, on average, with sub-millimeter and sub-degree accuracy was established with the 7-sphere phantom for 1 cm vertical and axial steps as well as for an arbitrary rotation and translation. The difference in the time of optical image acquisition as decoded from the image headers relative to synchronization signals sent to the SPECT system was used to establish temporal synchrony between optical and list-mode SPECT acquisition. Two experiments showed better than 100 ms agreement between VTS and SPECT observed motion for three axial translations. We were able to track 3 reflective markers on an anthropomorphic phantom with a precision that allowed us to correct motion such that no

  16. The performance of a hybrid analytical-Monte Carlo system response matrix in pinhole SPECT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Z; Pino, F; Candela, C; Ros, D; Pavía, J; Rannou, F R; Ruibal, A; Aguiar, P

    2014-12-21

    It is well-known that in pinhole SPECT (single-photon-emission computed tomography), iterative reconstruction methods including accurate estimations of the system response matrix can lead to submillimeter spatial resolution. There are two different methods for obtaining the system response matrix: those that model the system analytically using an approach including an experimental characterization of the detector response, and those that make use of Monte Carlo simulations. Methods based on analytical approaches are faster and handle the statistical noise better than those based on Monte Carlo simulations, but they require tedious experimental measurements of the detector response. One suggested approach for avoiding an experimental characterization, circumventing the problem of statistical noise introduced by Monte Carlo simulations, is to perform an analytical computation of the system response matrix combined with a Monte Carlo characterization of the detector response. Our findings showed that this approach can achieve high spatial resolution similar to that obtained when the system response matrix computation includes an experimental characterization. Furthermore, we have shown that using simulated detector responses has the advantage of yielding a precise estimate of the shift between the point of entry of the photon beam into the detector and the point of interaction inside the detector. Considering this, it was possible to slightly improve the spatial resolution in the edge of the field of view.

  17. Comparative immune systems in animals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Tao, Xin; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2014-02-01

    Animal immune systems can be classified into those of innate immunity and those of adaptive immunity. It is generally thought that the former are universal for all animals and depend on germline-encoded receptors that recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), whereas the latter are vertebrate specific and are mediated primarily by lymphocytes bearing a unique antigen receptor. However, novel adaptive or adaptive-like immunities have been found in invertebrates and jawless vertebrates, and extraordinarily complex innate immunities, created through huge expansions of many innate gene families, have recently been found in the cephalochordate amphioxus and the echinoderm sea urchin. These studies not only inspire immunologists to seek novel immune mechanisms in invertebrates but also raise questions about the origin and evolution of vertebrate immunities.

  18. Optimization of an adaptive SPECT system with the scanning linear estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Nasrin; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Li, Xin

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system studied here acquires an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the object. Then the configuration is adjusted by selecting the size of the pinhole and the magnification that optimize system performance on an ensemble of virtual objects generated to be consistent with the scout data. In this study the object is a lumpy background that contains a Gaussian signal with a variable width and amplitude. The virtual objects in the ensemble are imaged by all of the available configurations and the subsequent images are evaluated with the scanning linear estimator to obtain an estimate of the signal width and amplitude. The ensemble mean squared error (EMSE) on the virtual ensemble between the estimated and the true parameters serves as the performance figure of merit for selecting the optimum configuration. The results indicate that variability in the original object background, noise and signal parameters leads to a specific optimum configuration in each case. A statistical study carried out for a number of objects show that the adaptive system on average performs better than its nonadaptive counterpart.

  19. Development of a fully 3D system model in iterative expectation-maximization reconstruction for cone-beam SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hongwei; Vogelsang, Levon; Feiglin, David H.; Lipson, Edward D.; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    In order to improve reconstructed image quality for cone-beam collimator SPECT, we have developed and implemented a fully 3D reconstruction, using an ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm, along with a volumetric system model - cone-volume system model (CVSM), a modified attenuation compensation, and a 3D depth- and angle-dependent resolution and sensitivity correction. SPECT data were acquired in a 128×128 matrix, in 120 views with a single circular orbit. Two sets of numerical Defrise phantoms were used to simulate CBC SPECT scans, and low noise and scatter-free projection datasets were obtained using the SimSET Monte Carlo package. The reconstructed images, obtained using OSEM with a line-length system model (LLSM) and a 3D Gaussian post-filter, and OSEM with FVSM and a 3D Gaussian post-filter were quantitatively studied. Overall improvement in the image quality has been observed, including better transaxial resolution, higher contrast-to-noise ratio between hot and cold disks, and better accuracy and lower bias in OSEM-CVSM, compared with OSEM-LLSM.

  20. Rapid construction of pinhole SPECT system matrices by distance-weighted Gaussian interpolation method combined with geometric parameter estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Wei; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2014-02-01

    In pinhole SPECT applied to small-animal studies, it is essential to have an accurate imaging system matrix, called H matrix, for high-spatial-resolution image reconstructions. Generally, an H matrix can be obtained by various methods, such as measurements, simulations or some combinations of both methods. In this study, a distance-weighted Gaussian interpolation method combined with geometric parameter estimations (DW-GIMGPE) is proposed. It utilizes a simplified grid-scan experiment on selected voxels and parameterizes the measured point response functions (PRFs) into 2D Gaussians. The PRFs of missing voxels are interpolated by the relations between the Gaussian coefficients and the geometric parameters of the imaging system with distance-weighting factors. The weighting factors are related to the projected centroids of voxels on the detector plane. A full H matrix is constructed by combining the measured and interpolated PRFs of all voxels. The PRFs estimated by DW-GIMGPE showed similar profiles as the measured PRFs. OSEM reconstructed images of a hot-rod phantom and normal rat myocardium demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method. The detectability of a SKE/BKE task on a synthetic spherical test object verified that the constructed H matrix provided comparable detectability to that of the H matrix acquired by a full 3D grid-scan experiment. The reduction in the acquisition time of a full 1.0-mm grid H matrix was about 15.2 and 62.2 times with the simplified grid pattern on 2.0-mm and 4.0-mm grid, respectively. A finer-grid H matrix down to 0.5-mm spacing interpolated by the proposed method would shorten the acquisition time by 8 times, additionally.

  1. Correlation between clinical severity of central nervous system (CNS) lupus and findings on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of the brain; preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, I.E.; Zeit, R.M.; Von Feldt, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosis (SLE) commonly causes significant neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the brain SPECT studies of SLE patients with clinical evidence of CNS involvement and determine whether there is a correlation between the findings on SPECT images and the clinical manifestations of this serious phase of the disease. We enrolled 19 SLE patients and 12 normal controls in this study. The level of each patient`s disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), an established method of scoring disease severity which is heavily weighted toward neuropsychiatric symptomatology, for 15 of the 19 SLE patients. The SLEDAI was calculated within a 10 day window of the date when the SPECT scan was obtained. SPECT scans were performed 30 minutes following the intravenous administration of 99mTc-HMPAO. Results are discussed.

  2. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  3. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Endres, Christopher; Foss, Catherine; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  4. C-SPECT - a Clinical Cardiac SPECT/Tct Platform: Design Concepts and Performance Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei; Ordonez, Caesar E.; Liang, Haoning; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Jingai

    2013-01-01

    Because of scarcity of photons emitted from the heart, clinical cardiac SPECT imaging is mainly limited by photon statistics. The sub-optimal detection efficiency of current SPECT systems not only limits the quality of clinical cardiac SPECT imaging but also makes more advanced potential applications difficult to be realized. We propose a high-performance system platform - C-SPECT, which has its sampling geometry optimized for detection of emitted photons in quality and quantity. The C-SPECT has a stationary C-shaped gantry that surrounds the left-front side of a patient’s thorax. The stationary C-shaped collimator and detector systems in the gantry provide effective and efficient detection and sampling of photon emission. For cardiac imaging, the C-SPECT platform could achieve 2 to 4 times the system geometric efficiency of conventional SPECT systems at the same sampling resolution. This platform also includes an integrated transmission CT for attenuation correction. The ability of C-SPECT systems to perform sequential high-quality emission and transmission imaging could bring cost-effective high-performance to clinical imaging. In addition, a C-SPECT system could provide high detection efficiency to accommodate fast acquisition rate for gated and dynamic cardiac imaging. This paper describes the design concepts and performance potential of C-SPECT, and illustrates how these concepts can be implemented in a basic system. PMID:23885129

  5. Efficient determination of the uncertainty for the optimization of SPECT system design: a subsampled fisher information matrix.

    PubMed

    Fuin, Niccolo; Pedemonte, Stefano; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hutton, Brian F

    2014-03-01

    System designs in single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can be evaluated based on the fundamental trade-off between bias and variance that can be achieved in the reconstruction of emission tomograms. This trade off can be derived analytically using the Cramer-Rao type bounds, which imply the calculation and the inversion of the Fisher information matrix (FIM). The inverse of the FIM expresses the uncertainty associated to the tomogram, enabling the comparison of system designs. However, computing, storing and inverting the FIM is not practical with 3-D imaging systems. In order to tackle the problem of the computational load in calculating the inverse of the FIM, a method based on the calculation of the local impulse response and the variance, in a single point, from a single row of the FIM, has been previously proposed for system design. However this approximation (circulant approximation) does not capture the global interdependence between the variables in shift-variant systems such as SPECT, and cannot account e.g., for data truncation or missing data. Our new formulation relies on subsampling the FIM. The FIM is calculated over a subset of voxels arranged in a grid that covers the whole volume. Every element of the FIM at the grid points is calculated exactly, accounting for the acquisition geometry and for the object. This new formulation reduces the computational complexity in estimating the uncertainty, but nevertheless accounts for the global interdependence between the variables, enabling the exploration of design spaces hindered by the circulant approximation. The graphics processing unit accelerated implementation of the algorithm reduces further the computation times, making the algorithm a good candidate for real-time optimization of adaptive imaging systems. This paper describes the subsampled FIM formulation and implementation details. The advantages and limitations of the new approximation are explored, in comparison with the circulant

  6. Biosynthesis of Fluorescent Bi2S3 Nanoparticles and their Application as Dual-Function SPECT-CT Probe for Animal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Imran; Ahmad, Absar; Siddiqui, Ejaz Ahmad; Rahaman, Sk Hasanur; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth sulphide (Bi2S3) is an excellent semiconductor and its nanoparticles have numerous significant applications including photovoltaic materials, photodiode arrays, bio-imaging, etc. Nevertheless, these nanoparticles when fabricated by chemical and physical routes tend to easily aggregate in colloidal solutions, are eco-unfriendly, cumbrous and very broad in size distribution. The aim of the present manuscript was to ecologically fabricate water dispersible, safe and stable Bi2S3 nanoparticles such that these may find use in animal imaging, diagnostics, cell labeling and other biomedical applications. Herein, we for the first time have biosynthesized highly fluorescent, natural protein capped Bi2S3 nanoparticles by subjecting the fungus Fusarium oxysporum to bismuth nitrate pentahydrate [Bi(NO3)3.5H2O] alongwith sodium sulphite (Na2SO3) as precursor salts under ambient conditions of temperature, pressure and pH. The nanoparticles were completely characterized using recognized standard techniques. These natural protein capped Bi2S3 nanoparticles are quasi-spherical in shape with an average particle size of 15 nm, maintain long term stability and show semiconductor behavior having blue shift with a band gap of 3.04 eV. Semiconductor nanocrystals are fundamentally much more fluorescent than the toxic fluorescent chemical compounds (fluorophores) which are presently largely employed in imaging, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, etc. Biologically fabricated fluorescent nanoparticles may replace organic fluorophores and aid in rapid development of biomedical nanotechnology. Thus, biodistribution study of the so-formed Bi2S3 nanoparticles in male Sprague Dawley rats was done by radiolabelling with Technitium-99m (Tc-99m) and clearance time from blood was calculated. The nanoparticles were then employed in SPECT-CT probe for animal imaging where these imparted iodine equivalent contrast. PMID:26876521

  7. The SPECT imaging shows the accumulation of neural progenitor cells into internal organs after systemic administration in middle cerebral artery occlusion rats.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Riikka S; Narkilahti, Susanna; Huhtala, Tuulia; Liimatainen, Timo; Suuronen, Tiina; Närvänen, Ale; Suuronen, Riitta; Hovatta, Outi; Jolkkonen, Jukka

    2008-08-01

    The regenerative potential of stem cells from various sources has been under intense investigation in the experimental models of cerebral ischemia. To end up with a restorative therapeutic treatment, it is crucial to get the cell transplants to the site of injury. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of small animal SPECT/CT in assessing the definite accumulation of (111)In-oxine-labeled human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitors and rat hippocampal progenitors after intravenous or intra-arterial administration (femoral vein vs. common carotid artery) in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and sham-operated rats. Cell detection was carried out immediately and 24h after the infusion using a SPECT/CT device. The results showed that after intravenous injections both cell types accumulated primarily into internal organs, instead of brain. In contrast, after intra-arterial injection, a weak signal was detected in the ischemic hemisphere. Additional studies showed that the detection sensitivity of SPECT/CT device was approximately 1000 (111)In-oxine-labeled cells and labeling did not affect the cell viability. In conclusion, a small animal SPECT is powerful technique to study the whole body biodistribution of cell-based therapies. Our data showed that intravenous administration is not an optimal route to deliver neural progenitor cell-containing transplants into the brain after MCAO in rats. PMID:18572314

  8. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  9. MO-G-17A-02: Computer Simulation Studies for On-Board Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Prostate Using a Robotic Multi-Pinhole SPECT System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L; Bowsher, J; Yin, F; Yan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate prostate imaging onboard radiation therapy machines using a novel robotic, 49-pinhole Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. Methods: Computer-simulation studies were performed for region-of-interest (ROI) imaging using a 49-pinhole SPECT collimator and for broad cross-section imaging using a parallel-hole SPECT collimator. A male XCAT phantom was computersimulated in supine position with one 12mm-diameter tumor added in the prostate. A treatment couch was added to the phantom. Four-minute detector trajectories for imaging a 7cm-diameter-sphere ROI encompassing the tumor were investigated with different parameters, including pinhole focal length, pinhole diameter and trajectory starting angle. Pseudo-random Poisson noise was included in the simulated projection data, and SPECT images were reconstructed by OSEM with 4 subsets and up to 10 iterations. Images were evaluated by visual inspection, profiles, and Root-Mean- Square-Error (RMSE). Results: The tumor was well visualized above background by the 49-pinhole SPECT system with different pinhole parameters while it was not visible with parallel-hole SPECT imaging. Minimum RMSEs were 0.30 for 49-pinhole imaging and 0.41 for parallelhole imaging. For parallel-hole imaging, the detector trajectory from rightto- left yielded slightly lower RMSEs than that from posterior to anterior. For 49-pinhole imaging, near-minimum RMSEs were maintained over a broader range of OSEM iterations with a 5mm pinhole diameter and 21cm focal length versus a 2mm diameter pinhole and 18cm focal length. The detector with 21cm pinhole focal length had the shortest rotation radius averaged over the trajectory. Conclusion: On-board functional and molecular prostate imaging may be feasible in 4-minute scan times by robotic SPECT. A 49-pinhole SPECT system could improve such imaging as compared to broadcross-section parallel-hole collimated SPECT imaging. Multi-pinhole imaging can be improved by

  10. A guide to SPECT equipment for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.B.; Zubal, G.

    1991-12-31

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was started by Kuhl and Edwards about 30 years ago. Their original instrument consisted of four focused Nal probes mounted on a moving gantry. During the 1980s, clinical SPECT imaging was most frequently performed using single-headed Anger-type cameras which were modified for rotational as well as static imaging. Such instruments are still available and may be useful in settings where there are few patients and SPECT is used only occasionally. More frequently, however, dedicated SPECT devices are purchased which optimize equipment potential while being user-friendly. Modern SPECT instrumentation incorporates improvements in the detector, computers, mathematical formulations, electronics and display systems. A comprehensive discussion of all aspects of SPECT is beyond the scope of this article. The authors, however, discuss general concepts of SPECT, the current state-of-the-art in clinical SPECT instrumentation, and areas of common misunderstanding. 9 refs.

  11. [Development and clinical application of an expert system for supporting diagnosis of 201Tl stress myocardial SPECT].

    PubMed

    Horino, M; Hosoba, M; Wani, H; Oriuchi, N; Tateno, M; Inoue, T; Sasaki, Y; Igarashi, H; Iizuka, T

    1990-02-01

    A consultation expert system which supports our computer aided reporting system was developed. The system was used for the evaluation of the two dimensional polar (bull's eye) display of 201Tl myocardial SPECT. The system consists of patients management (PM) and consultation expert systems (ES). The former is connected to image processors coupled with scinticameras. The bull's eye display of myocardial SPECT is transferred from image processor to the data base of PM. When inference request is made, the feature extraction program extracts information on localization, extent and severity of focal defects comparing count-rates pixel by pixel with the reference obtained from seven normal controls. The inference engine is activated to determine presence of focal defects utilizing diagnostic rules in the knowledge base. The results are sent back to PM and reported with the probability of assurance. Fifty eight patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI), angina pectoris (AP) and other diseases as well as normal controls were included in the study. The decision for presence or absence of focal defects by ES agreed with that by nuclear physicians (NP) in 301 segments among 330 (91%) in stress images. The presence of redistribution in delayed images agreed in 43 segments among 67 (64%). Image interpretation by ES agreed well with that of NP in patients with OMI (19/20) and AP (9/11). Seven were interpreted as normal by both ES and NP. The system is useful, as it provides NP with complementary and supportive information applicable to decision making and reporting. Further clinical experiences can improve knowledge base for better ES function.

  12. Simulation of the expected performance of INSERT: A new multi-modality SPECT/MRI system for preclinical and clinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Fiorini, C.; Butt, A. D.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Trigilio, P.; Nemeth, G.; Major, P.; Erlandsson, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2014-01-01

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (INtegrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus, that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems such as 3 T MRI with 59 cm bore diameter. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes will be developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging, the second one dedicated to clinical imaging. The basic building block of the SPECT detector ring is a small 5 cm×5 cm gamma camera, based on the well-established Anger architecture with a continuous scintillator readout by an array of silicon photodetectors. Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM) are being considered as possible scintillator readout, considering that the detector choice plays a predominant role for the final performance of the system, such as energy and spatial resolution, as well as the useful field of view of the camera. Both solutions are therefore under study to evaluate their performances in terms of field of view (FOV), spatial and energy resolution. Preliminary simulations for both the preclinical and clinical systems have been carried out to evaluate resolution and sensitivity.

  13. SU-E-I-79: Effect of Number of Pinholes in Onboard Robotic Multi-Pinhole SPECT System

    SciTech Connect

    Touch, M; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of number of pinholes for a novel Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system for onboard molecular and functional imaging. Methods: Comparison studies were performed using simulation for the 49-pinhole SPECT system and a series of reductions in number of pinholes. Trajectories about the breast of a supine patient were considered. Minimum distances, radii of rotation (RORs), were determined by requirements to fully view the region of interest (ROI) and to avoid collision between the detector and the patient. Reductions in RORs translate into improvements in sensitivity. Starting from the 49-pinhole system, pinholes were removed pod by pod. The furthest two end pods in the Sup-Inf direction were removed first for their higher likelihood of alleviating the collision avoidance criteria. After iterating through different combinations of pinhole pods, and selecting three combinations, the corresponding RORs were used to analytically calculate sensitivities. Results: Based on the Methods procedure, 3 combination of pods removal were identified: 1) Superior peripheral pod 2) Inferior peripheral pod 3) both pods. RORs were reduced at only one multi-pinhole stop. Analytic calculation showed that sensitivities were reduced from 0.032 for the 49-pinhole system to 0.028 for 42-pinhole and to 0.023 for 39-pinhole system respectively. The sensitivity per pinhole detector was approximately the same for all three cases. Conclusion: For the trajectories considered, only minimal improvements in RORs were identified by removing pinhole pods. Consequently, sensitivities decreased in proportion to the number of pinholes. Studies of other anatomical sites are needed to determine if in some cases sensitivity per pinhole can be improved by removing some pinholes. PHS/NIH/NCI grant R21-CA156390-01A1.

  14. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  15. A systems approach to animal communication.

    PubMed

    Hebets, Eileen A; Barron, Andrew B; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Hauber, Mark E; Mason, Paul H; Hoke, Kim L

    2016-03-16

    Why animal communication displays are so complex and how they have evolved are active foci of research with a long and rich history. Progress towards an evolutionary analysis of signal complexity, however, has been constrained by a lack of hypotheses to explain similarities and/or differences in signalling systems across taxa. To address this, we advocate incorporating a systems approach into studies of animal communication--an approach that includes comprehensive experimental designs and data collection in combination with the implementation of systems concepts and tools. A systems approach evaluates overall display architecture, including how components interact to alter function, and how function varies in different states of the system. We provide a brief overview of the current state of the field, including a focus on select studies that highlight the dynamic nature of animal signalling. We then introduce core concepts from systems biology (redundancy, degeneracy, pluripotentiality, and modularity) and discuss their relationships with system properties (e.g. robustness, flexibility, evolvability). We translate systems concepts into an animal communication framework and accentuate their utility through a case study. Finally, we demonstrate how consideration of the system-level organization of animal communication poses new practical research questions that will aid our understanding of how and why animal displays are so complex.

  16. A systems approach to animal communication

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Andrew B.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Hauber, Mark E.; Hoke, Kim L.

    2016-01-01

    Why animal communication displays are so complex and how they have evolved are active foci of research with a long and rich history. Progress towards an evolutionary analysis of signal complexity, however, has been constrained by a lack of hypotheses to explain similarities and/or differences in signalling systems across taxa. To address this, we advocate incorporating a systems approach into studies of animal communication—an approach that includes comprehensive experimental designs and data collection in combination with the implementation of systems concepts and tools. A systems approach evaluates overall display architecture, including how components interact to alter function, and how function varies in different states of the system. We provide a brief overview of the current state of the field, including a focus on select studies that highlight the dynamic nature of animal signalling. We then introduce core concepts from systems biology (redundancy, degeneracy, pluripotentiality, and modularity) and discuss their relationships with system properties (e.g. robustness, flexibility, evolvability). We translate systems concepts into an animal communication framework and accentuate their utility through a case study. Finally, we demonstrate how consideration of the system-level organization of animal communication poses new practical research questions that will aid our understanding of how and why animal displays are so complex. PMID:26936240

  17. Animal production systems in the industrialised world.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, J T; Edwards, S; Noordhuizen, J; Gunnarsson, S

    2006-08-01

    The production of food from animal origin is relatively stable in the industrialised world. However, animal production systems are changing dramatically with respect to location, herd size and specialisation. Increased pressure from a critical public is moving animal-based production towards systems such as organic production and loose-housing systems which allow the animals to better express normal behaviour. The focus on food safety promotes systems with a high degree of biosecurity, often associated with an increase in herd size and self-containment. The globalisation of agricultural trade and increased competition also favours an increase in herd size and specialisation. These trends also lead to regions with livestock-dense areas, giving rise to environmental concerns. Therefore, good farming practice regulations and systems to provide a higher level of transparency, such as quality risk management programmes, are being developed.

  18. Zinc fate in animal husbandry systems.

    PubMed

    Romeo, A; Vacchina, V; Legros, S; Doelsch, E

    2014-11-01

    Zinc (Zn) is considered in animal production systems as both an essential nutrient and a possible pollutant. While it is generally supplemented at low levels in animal diets, with less than 200 mg kg(-1) in complete feeds, it is under scrutiny due to potential accumulation in the environment. This explains why international regulations limit maximum supplementation levels in animal feeds in a stricter way. This article gives an overview of the current knowledge on the fate of zinc in animal production systems, from animal diets to animal wastes. Some analytical methods can be used for the quantification and qualification of Zn chemical forms: X-ray crystallography, electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, separation techniques, hyphenated techniques… Analysis of chelated forms issued from complex matrices, like hydrolysed proteins, remains difficult, and the speciation of Zn in diluted carriers (premix and feed) is a challenge. Our understanding of Zn absorption has made progress with recent research on ZnT/Zip families and metallothioneins. However, fine-tuned approaches towards the nutritional and metabolic interactions for Zn supplementation in farm conditions still require further studies. The speciation of zinc in pig manure and poultry litter has been a priority as monogastric animals are usually raised under intensive conditions and fed with high quantities of trace minerals, leading to high animal density and elevated quantities of zinc from animal wastes.

  19. Theory and realization of a 2D high resolution and high sensitivity SPECT system with an angle-encoding attenuator pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2016-04-01

    The camera of the conventional SPECT system requires a collimator to allow incoming photons from a specific range of incident angle to reach the detector. It is the major factor that determines the spatial resolution of the camera. Moreover, it also greatly reduces the number of detected photons and hence increases statistical fluctuations in the acquired image data. The goal of this paper is to propose a theory and design for a novel high resolution and high sensitivity SPECT system without conventional collimators. The key is to resolve the incident photons from all directional angles and detected by every detector bin. Special ‘attenuators’ were designed to ‘encode’ the incoming photons from different directions similar to coded aperture to form projection data for image reconstruction. Each encoded angular pattern of detected photons was recorded as one measurement. Different angular patterns were achieved by changing the configurations of the attenuators so that angular pattern of different measurements or measurement matrix (MM) is invertible, which guarantee a unique reconstructed image. In simulation, the attenuators were fitted on a virtual full-ring gamma camera, as an alternative to the collimators in conventional SPECT systems. To evaluate the performance of the new SPECT system, analytical simulated projection data in 2D scenario were generated from the XCAT phantom. Noisy simulation using 100 noise realizations suggests that the new attenuator design provides much improved image quality in terms of contrast-noise trade-offs (~30% improvement). The results suggest that the new design of using attenuators to replace collimator is feasible and could potentially improve sensitivity without sacrificing resolution in today’s SPECT systems.

  20. Core systems of geometry in animal minds

    PubMed Central

    Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Lee, Sang Ah

    2012-01-01

    Research on humans from birth to maturity converges with research on diverse animals to reveal foundational cognitive systems in human and animal minds. The present article focuses on two such systems of geometry. One system represents places in the navigable environment by recording the distance and direction of the navigator from surrounding, extended surfaces. The other system represents objects by detecting the shapes of small-scale forms. These two systems show common signatures across animals, suggesting that they evolved in distant ancestral species. As children master symbolic systems such as maps and language, they come productively to combine representations from the two core systems of geometry in uniquely human ways; these combinations may give rise to abstract geometric intuitions. Studies of the ontogenetic and phylogenetic sources of abstract geometry therefore are illuminating of both human and animal cognition. Research on animals brings simpler model systems and richer empirical methods to bear on the analysis of abstract concepts in human minds. In return, research on humans, relating core cognitive capacities to symbolic abilities, sheds light on the content of representations in animal minds. PMID:22927577

  1. Core systems of geometry in animal minds.

    PubMed

    Spelke, Elizabeth S; Lee, Sang Ah

    2012-10-01

    Research on humans from birth to maturity converges with research on diverse animals to reveal foundational cognitive systems in human and animal minds. The present article focuses on two such systems of geometry. One system represents places in the navigable environment by recording the distance and direction of the navigator from surrounding, extended surfaces. The other system represents objects by detecting the shapes of small-scale forms. These two systems show common signatures across animals, suggesting that they evolved in distant ancestral species. As children master symbolic systems such as maps and language, they come productively to combine representations from the two core systems of geometry in uniquely human ways; these combinations may give rise to abstract geometric intuitions. Studies of the ontogenetic and phylogenetic sources of abstract geometry therefore are illuminating of both human and animal cognition. Research on animals brings simpler model systems and richer empirical methods to bear on the analysis of abstract concepts in human minds. In return, research on humans, relating core cognitive capacities to symbolic abilities, sheds light on the content of representations in animal minds. PMID:22927577

  2. SPECT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Brian F.

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is widely used as a means of imaging the distribution of administered radiotracers that have single-photon emission. The most widely used SPECT systems are based on the Anger gamma camera, usually involving dual detectors that rotate around the patient. Several factors affect the quality of SPECT images (e.g., resolution and noise) and the ability to perform absolute quantification (e.g., attenuation, scatter, motion, and resolution). There is a trend to introduce dual-modality systems and organ-specific systems, both developments that enhance diagnostic capability.

  3. Application of polarization for optical motion-registered SPECT functional imaging of tumors in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Justin S.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Goddard, James S.; Paulus, Michael J.

    2005-03-01

    The use of small animal models to investigate human diseases is an integral part of the development of new diagnostic and treatment regimens. Consequently, functional imaging modalities such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are increasingly being utilized to streamline the screening of animal phenotypes and to monitor disease states, progressions, and therapies. This paper focuses on the utilization of polarization filtering to minimize specular reflection from a glass tube used for holding live human-tumor-mice during functional imaging in a dedicated small animal SPECT system. The system presented is potentially useful for the real-time non-invasive investigation of diseases, such as cancer, and drug therapies in small animals because it utilizes optical motion-registered functional imaging that minimizes the effects of motion artifacts.

  4. [Acceptance check and quality control of SPECT].

    PubMed

    Sun, L M; Liu, C B

    2001-05-01

    This paper explains the testing of SPECT, especially the new SPECT with double digital detector and spiral scanning frames that has been introduced to China recently, in the acceptance check, proceeding from the physical functions of the system to its mechanical functions, to the NEMA standard functions, and then to the computer hardware specified in the contract. A brief introduction is also given of the quality control of SPECT in terms of its spatial resolution, energy resolution, spatial linearity, sensitivity, and center of rotation. PMID:12583289

  5. Innovative ventilation system for animal anatomy laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, D.R.; Smith, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    A unique ventilation system was designed and built to reduce formaldehyde fumes in the large animal anatomy lab at the Vet Medical Center at Cornell University. The laboratory includes four rooms totaling 5,500 ft{sup 2}. The main room has 2,300 ft{sup 2} and houses the laboratory where up to 60 students dissect as many as 12 horses at a time. Other rooms are a cold storage locker, an animal preparation room and a smaller lab for specialized instruction. The large animal anatomy laboratory has a history of air quality complaints despite a fairly high ventilation rate of over 10 air changes/hour. The horses are embalmed, creating a voluminous source of formaldehyde and phenol vapors. Budget constraints and increasingly stringent exposure limits for formaldehyde presented a great challenge to design a ventilation system that yields acceptable air quality. The design solution included two innovative elements: air-to-air heat recovery, and focused ventilation.

  6. Brain SPECT quantitation in clinical diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    Methods to quantitate SPECT data for clinical diagnosis should be chosen so that they take advantage of the lessons learned from PET data. This is particularly important because current SPECT high-resolution brain imaging systems now produce images that are similar in resolution to those generated by the last generation PET equipment (9 mm FWHM). These high-resolution SPECT systems make quantitation of SPECT more problematic than earlier. Methodology validated on low-resolution SPECT systems may no longer be valid for data obtained with the newer SPECT systems. For example, in patients with dementia, the ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity often was studied. However, with new instruments, the cerebellum appears very different: discrete regions are more apparent. The large cerebellar regions usually used with older instrumentation are of an inappropriate size for the new equipment. The normal range for any method of quantitation determined using older equipment probably changes for data obtained with new equipment. It is not surprising that Kim et al. in their simulations demonstrated that because of the finite resolution of imaging systems, the ability to measure pure function is limited, with {open_quotes}anatomy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}function{close_quotes} coupled in a {open_quotes}complex nonlinear way{close_quotes}. 11 refs.

  7. A new reconstruction strategy for image improvement in pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Kim, Kyeong Min; Teramoto, Noboru; Hayashi, Takuya; Sohlberg, Antti; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2004-08-01

    Pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is able to provide information on the biodistribution of several radioligands in small laboratory animals, but has limitations associated with non-uniform spatial resolution or axial blurring. We have hypothesised that this blurring is due to incompleteness of the projection data acquired by a single circular pinhole orbit, and have evaluated a new strategy for accurate image reconstruction with better spatial resolution uniformity. A pinhole SPECT system using two circular orbits and a dedicated three-dimensional ordered subsets expectation maximisation (3D-OSEM) reconstruction method were developed. In this system, not the camera but the object rotates, and the two orbits are at 90 degrees and 45 degrees relative to the object's axis. This system satisfies Tuy's condition, and is thus able to provide complete data for 3D pinhole SPECT reconstruction within the whole field of view (FOV). To evaluate this system, a series of experiments was carried out using a multiple-disk phantom filled with 99mTc solution. The feasibility of the proposed method for small animal imaging was tested with a mouse bone study using 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate. Feldkamp's filtered back-projection (FBP) method and the 3D-OSEM method were applied to these data sets, and the visual and statistical properties were examined. Axial blurring, which was still visible at the edge of the FOV even after applying the conventional 3D-OSEM instead of FBP for single-orbit data, was not visible after application of 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data. 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data dramatically reduced the resolution non-uniformity and statistical noise, and also demonstrated considerably better image quality in the mouse scan. This system may be of use in quantitative assessment of bio-physiological functions in small animals.

  8. Lipid-Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Delivery to the Lymphatic System and SPECT/CT Imaging of Lymph Node Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Cheng; Xu, Zhenghong; Guley, Kevin; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    A lipid/calcium/phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle (NP) formulation (particle diameter ~25 nm) with superior siRNA delivery efficiency was developed and reported previously. Here, we describe the successful formulation of 111In into LCP for SPECT/CT imaging. Imaging and biodistribution studies showed that, polyethylene glycol grafted 111In-LCP preferentially accumulated in the lymph nodes at ~70% ID/g in both C57BL/6 and nude mice when the improved surface coating method was used. Both the liver and spleen accumulated only ~25% ID/g. Larger LCP (diameter ~67 nm) was less lymphotropic. These results indicate that 25 nm LCP was able to penetrate into tissues, enter the lymphatic system, and accumulate in the lymph nodes via lymphatic drainage due to 1) small size, 2) a well-PEGylated lipid surface, and 3) a slightly negative surface charge. The capability of intravenously injected 111In-LCP to visualize an enlarged, tumor-loaded sentinel lymph node was demonstrated using a 4T1 breast cancer lymph node metastasis model. Systemic gene delivery to the lymph nodes after IV injection was demonstrated by the expression of red fluorescent protein cDNA. The potential of using LCP for lymphatic drug delivery is discussed. PMID:24613050

  9. Rapid radiotracer washout from the heart: effect on image quality in SPECT performed with a single-headed gamma camera system.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M K; Cho, D S

    1992-06-01

    Technetium-99m-teboroxime demonstrates high extraction and rapid washout from the myocardium. To evaluate the feasibility of performing SPECT with this agent using a single-headed gamma camera system, a series of phantom studies were performed that simulated varying degrees of washout from normal and "ischemic" regions of the myocardium. In the absence of ischemic regions, short axis profiles were relatively unaffected by washout of less than 50% of activity over the duration of a SPECT acquisition. However, significant corruption of the SPECT data was observed when large (greater than a factor of 2) differences existed in the washout of activity from normal and "ischemic" myocardium. This corruption was observed with 30%-40% washout of activity from normal regions of the heart. Based on published washout rates, these results indicate that clinical studies with 99mTc-teboroxime may need to be completed within 2-4 min to order to prevent degradation of image quality due to differential washout effects.

  10. Technological Development and Advances in SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youngho; Aparici, Carina Mari; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    SPECT/CT has emerged over the past decade as a means of correlating anatomical information from CT with functional information from SPECT. The integration of SPECT and CT in a single imaging device facilitates anatomical localization of the radiopharmaceutical to differentiate physiological uptake from that associated with disease and patient-specific attenuation correction to improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of the SPECT image. The first clinically available SPECT/CT systems performed emission-transmission imaging using a dual-headed SPECT camera and a low-power x-ray CT sub-system. Newer SPECT/CT systems are available with high-power CT sub-systems suitable for detailed anatomical diagnosis, including CT coronary angiography and coronary calcification that can be correlated with myocardial perfusion measurements. The high-performance CT capabilities also offer the potential to improve compensation of partial volume errors for more accurate quantitation of radionuclide measurement of myocardial blood flow and other physiological processes and for radiation dosimetry for radionuclide therapy. In addition, new SPECT technologies are being developed that significantly improve the detection efficiency and spatial resolution for radionuclide imaging of small organs including the heart, brain, and breast, and therefore may provide new capabilities for SPECT/CT imaging in these important clinical applications. PMID:18396178

  11. Unique features of animal mitochondrial translation systems

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kimitsuna

    2010-01-01

    In animal mitochondria, several codons are non-universal and their meanings differ depending on the species. In addition, the tRNA structures that decipher codons are sometimes unusually truncated. These features seem to be related to the shortening of mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which occurred during the evolution of mitochondria. These organelles probably originated from the endosymbiosis of an aerobic eubacterium into an ancestral eukaryote. It is plausible that these events brought about the various characteristic features of animal mt translation systems, such as genetic code variations, unusually truncated tRNA and rRNA structures, unilateral tRNA recognition mechanisms by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, elongation factors and ribosomes, and compensation for RNA deficits by enlarged proteins. In this article, we discuss molecular mechanisms for these phenomena. Finally, we describe human mt diseases that are caused by modification defects in mt tRNAs. PMID:20075606

  12. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  13. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 04: An iterative triple energy window (TEW) approach to cross talk correction in quantitative small animal Tc99m and In111 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, P; Timmins, R; Wells, R G

    2014-08-15

    Dual isotope SPECT allows simultaneous measurement of two different tracers in vivo. With In111 (emission energies of 171keV and 245keV) and Tc99m (140keV), quantification of Tc99m is degraded by cross talk from the In111 photons that scatter and are detected at an energy corresponding to Tc99m. TEW uses counts recorded in two narrow windows surrounding the Tc99m primary window to estimate scatter. Iterative TEW corrects for the bias introduced into the TEW estimate resulting from un-scattered counts detected in the scatter windows. The contamination in the scatter windows is iteratively estimated and subtracted as a fraction of the scatter-corrected primary window counts. The iterative TEW approach was validated with a small-animal SPECT/CT camera using a 2.5mL plastic container holding thoroughly mixed Tc99m/In111 activity fractions of 0.15, 0.28, 0.52, 0.99, 2.47 and 6.90. Dose calibrator measurements were the gold standard. Uncorrected for scatter, the Tc99m activity was over-estimated by as much as 80%. Unmodified TEW underestimated the Tc99m activity by 13%. With iterative TEW corrections applied in projection space, the Tc99m activity was estimated within 5% of truth across all activity fractions above 0.15. This is an improvement over the non-iterative TEW, which could not sufficiently correct for scatter in the 0.15 and 0.28 phantoms.

  14. Quantitative SPECT techniques.

    PubMed

    Watson, D D

    1999-07-01

    Quantitative imaging involves first, a set of measurements that characterize an image. There are several variations of technique, but the basic measurements that are used for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion images are reasonably standardized. Quantification currently provides only relative tracer activity within the myocardial regions defined by an individual SPECT acquisition. Absolute quantification is still a work in progress. Quantitative comparison of absolute changes in tracer uptake comparing a stress and rest study or preintervention and postintervention study would be useful and could be done, but most commercial systems do not maintain the data normalization that is necessary for this. Measurements of regional and global function are now possible with electrocardiography (ECG) gating, and this provides clinically useful adjunctive data. Techniques for measuring ventricular function are evolving and promise to provide clinically useful accuracy. The computer can classify images as normal or abnormal by comparison with a normal database. The criteria for this classification involve more than just checking the normal limits. The images should be analyzed to measure how far they deviate from normal, and this information can be used in conjunction with pretest likelihood to indicate the level of statistical certainty that an individual patient has a true positive or true negative test. The interface between the computer and the clinician interpreter is an important part of the process. Especially when both perfusion and function are being determined, the ability of the interpreter to correctly assimilate the data is essential to the use of the quantitative process. As we become more facile with performing and recording objective measurements, the significance of the measurements in terms of risk evaluation, viability assessment, and outcome should be continually enhanced. PMID:10433336

  15. SPECT/NIRF Dual Modality Imaging for Detection of Intraperitoneal Colon Tumor with an Avidin/Biotin Pretargeting System

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chengyan; Yang, Sujuan; Shi, Jiyun; Zhao, Huiyun; Zhong, Lijun; Liu, Zhaofei; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    We describe herein dual-modality imaging of intraperitoneal colon tumor using an avidin/biotin pretargeting system. A novel dual-modality probe, 99mTc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin, was designed, synthesized and characterized. Single-photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging were developed using intraperitoneal LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts. Following avidin preinjection for 4 hours, 99mTc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin could successfully detect colon tumors of different sizes inside the abdominal region using both modalities, and the imaging results showed no differences. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tumors had a very high uptake of the probe 99mTc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin (12.74 ± 1.89% ID/g at 2 h p.i.), and the clearance from blood and other normal tissues occured very fast. The low tumor uptake in the non-pretargeted mice (1.63 ± 0.50% ID/g at 2 h p.i.) and tumor cell staining results showed excellent tumor binding specificity of the pretargeting system. The ability of the novel probe to show excellent imaging quality with high tumor-to-background contrast, a high degree of binding specificity with tumors and excellent in vivo biodistribution pharmacokinetics should prove that the avidin/biotin based dual-modality pretargeting probe is a promising imaging tool during the entire period of tumor diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26732543

  16. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  17. Rugged Video System For Inspecting Animal Burrows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triandafils, Dick; Maples, Art; Breininger, Dave

    1992-01-01

    Video system designed for examining interiors of burrows of gopher tortoises, 5 in. (13 cm) in diameter or greater, to depth of 18 ft. (about 5.5 m), includes video camera, video cassette recorder (VCR), television monitor, control unit, and power supply, all carried in backpack. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) poles used to maneuver camera into (and out of) burrows, stiff enough to push camera into burrow, but flexible enough to bend around curves. Adult tortoises and other burrow inhabitants observable, young tortoises and such small animals as mice obscured by sand or debris.

  18. The Roles of Mental Animations and External Animations in Understanding Mechanical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Mary; Kriz, Sarah; Cate, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The effects of computer animations and mental animation on people's mental models of a mechanical system are examined. In 3 experiments, students learned how a mechanical system works from various instructional treatments including viewing a static diagram of the machine, predicting motion from static diagrams, viewing computer animations, and…

  19. Animal biocalorimeter and waste management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, Heinz F. (Inventor); Trimailo, William R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A biocalorimeter and waste management system is provided for making metabolic heat release measurements of animals or humans in a calorimeter (enclosure) using ambient air as a low velocity source of ventilating air through the enclosure. A shroud forces ventilating air to pass over the enclosure from an end open to ambient air at the end of the enclosure opposite its ventilating air inlet end and closed around the inlet end of the enclosure in order to obviate the need for regulating ambient air temperature. Psychrometers for measuring dry- and wet-bulb temperature of ventilating air make it possible to account for the sensible and latent heat additions to the ventilating air. A waste removal system momentarily recirculates high velocity air in a closed circuit through the calorimeter wherein a sudden rise in moisture is detected in the ventilating air from the outlet.

  20. Organ volume estimation using SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidi, H.

    1996-06-01

    Knowledge of in vivo thyroid volume has both diagnostic and therapeutic importance and could lead to a more precise quantification of absolute activity contained in the thyroid gland. In order to improve single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantitation, attenuation correction was performed according to Chang`s algorithm. The dual window method was used for scatter subtraction. The author used a Monte Carlo simulation of the SPECT system to accurately determine the scatter multiplier factor k. Volume estimation using SPECT was performed by summing up the volume elements (voxels) lying within the contour of the object, determined by a fixed threshold and the gray level histogram (GLH) method. Thyroid phantom and patient studies were performed and the influence of (1) fixed thresholding, (2) automatic thresholding, (3) attenuation, (4) scatter, and (5) reconstruction filter were investigated. This study shows that accurate volume estimation of the thyroid gland is feasible when accurate corrections are performed. The relative error is within 7% for the GLH method combined with attenuation and scatter corrections.

  1. SRS Computer Animation and Drive Train System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthun, Daniel; Schachner, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The spinning rocket simulator (SRS) is an ongoing project at Oral Roberts University. The goal of the SRS is to gather crucial data concerning a spinning rocket under thrust for the purpose of analysis and correction of the coning motion experienced by this type of spacecraft maneuver. The computer animation simulates a virtual, scale model of the component of the SRS that represents the spacecraft itself. This component is known as the (VSM), or virtual spacecraft model. During actual physical simulation, this component of the SRS will experience a coning. The goal of the animation is to cone the VSM within that range to accurately represent the motion of the actual simulator. The drive system of the SRS is the apparatus that turns the actual simulator. It consists of a drive motor, motor mount and chain to power the simulator into motion. The motor mount is adjustable and rigid for high torque application. A digital stepper motor controller actuates the main drive motor for linear acceleration. The chain transfers power from the motor to the simulator via sprockets on both ends.

  2. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  3. [Ethological basis for the evaluation of animal welfare in housing systems for agricultural animals and laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Stauffacher, M

    1992-01-01

    The Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection (1978) requires the sale of mass-produced housing systems for farm animals to be authorized by the Federal Veterinary Office. Authorization is only granted for housing systems that safeguard the animals' welfare. A concept for the assessment of Animal Welfare has to provide a high forensic value. The capacity of farm animals to adapt to an intensive housing system can be directly examined, whereas the existence and extent of subjective feelings can only be assumed. In our concept the examination focuses on the interaction of individuals with their artificial environment. The main question is whether or not the individuals are able to cope with given nonspecific (e.g. temperature, humidity) and specific (e.g. drinking troughs, behaviour of conspecifics) stimuli in order to reach the immediate (e.g. drinking, make way for) and ultimate (survival, reproduction success) goals. Animals of the same breed are observed in a highly diverse environment in order to determine normal behaviour. Whether behavioural expressions which differ significantly from normal behaviour are adaptive to the restrictive housing conditions is judged by the behaviours' consequences for both, the individuals and the environment. Many studies prove the concept's high forensic value and the authorities prefer conclusions based on this concept to others referring to the animals' motivational and emotional state. However more research has to be done with respect to animal welfare in farm and laboratory animal breeding as well as in the use of laboratory animals for experimental studies.

  4. Characterization of a rotating slat collimator system dedicated to small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, F.; Bekaert, V.; El Bitar, Z.; Wurtz, J.; Steibel, J.; Brasse, D.

    2011-03-01

    Some current investigations based on small animal models are dedicated to functional cerebral imaging. They represent a fundamental tool to understand the mechanisms involved in neurodegenerative diseases. In the radiopharmaceutical development approach, the main challenge is to measure the radioactivity distribution in the brain of a subject with good temporal and spatial resolutions. Classical SPECT systems mainly use parallel hole or pinhole collimators. In this paper we investigate the use of a rotating slat collimator system for small animal brain imaging. The proposed prototype consists of a 64-channel multi-anode photomultiplier tube (H8804, Hamamatsu Corp.) coupled to a YAP:Ce crystal highly segmented into 32 strips of 0.575 × 18.4 × 10 mm3. The parameters of the rotating slat collimator are optimized using GATE Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the proposed prototype in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio is compared to that obtained with a gamma camera equipped with a parallel hole collimator. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that a spatial resolution of 1.54 mm can be achieved with a detection efficiency of 0.012% for a source located at 20 mm, corresponding to the position of the brain in the prototype field of view.

  5. UCD-SPI: Un-Collimated Detector Single-Photon Imaging System for Small Animal and Plant Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Katherine Leigh

    Medical imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes implement collimators in order to form images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in "thin" objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments. This flexible geometry un-collimated detector single-photon imaging (UCD-SPI) system consists of two large (5 cm x 10 cm), thin (3 mm and 5 mm), closely spaced, pixelated scintillation detectors of either NaI(Tl), CsI(Na), or BGO. The detectors are read out by two adjacent Hamamatsu H8500 multichannel photomultiplier tubes. The detector heads enable the interchange of scintillation detectors of different materials and thicknesses to optimize performance for a wide range of gamma-ray energies and imaging subjects. The detectors are horizontally oriented for animal imaging, and for plant imaging the system is rotated on its side to orient the detectors vertically. While this un-collimated detector system is unable to approach the sub-mm spatial resolution obtained by the most advanced preclinical pinhole SPECT systems, the high sensitivity could enable significant and new use in molecular imaging applications which do not require good spatial resolution- for example, screening applications for drug development (small animals), for material transport and sequestration studies for phytoremediation (plants), or for counting radiolabeled cells in vitro (well plates).

  6. A Distant Solar System (Artist's Concept Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation portrays an artist's concept of a distant hypothetical solar system, about the same age as our own. It begins close to the star, and then moves out past a number of planets. Though 'extrasolar' planets are too small to be seen with telescopes, astronomers have detected more than 100 gas giants like Jupiter via their gravitational tug on their parent stars.

    The view pulls back to reveal the outer fringes of the system and a ring of dusty debris that circles the star. This debris is all that remains of the planet-forming disk from which the planets evolved.

    Planets are formed when dusty material in a large disk surrounding a young star clumps together. Leftover material is eventually blown out by solar wind or pushed out by gravitational interactions with planets. Billions of years later, only an outer disk of debris remains.

    These outer debris disks are too faint to be imaged directly by visible-light telescopes. They are washed out by the glare of the Sun. However, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope can detect their heat, or excess thermal emission, in infrared light. This allows astronomers to study the aftermath of planet building in distant solar systems like our own.

  7. Fabrication of the pinhole aperture for AdaptiSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Kovalsky, Stephen; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical pinhole SPECT imaging system under final construction at the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging. The system is designed to be able to autonomously change its imaging configuration. The system comprises 16 detectors mounted on translational stages to move radially away and towards the center of the field-of-view. The system also possesses an adaptive pinhole aperture with multiple collimator diameters and pinhole sizes, as well as the possibility to switch between multiplexed and non-multiplexed imaging configurations. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of the AdaptiSPECT pinhole aperture and its controllers. PMID:26146443

  8. [The Optimal Reconstruction Parameters by Scatter and Attenuation Corrections Using Multi-focus Collimator System in Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Study].

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Funayama, Risa; Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Konishi, Takahiro; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the optimal reconstruction parameters of ordered subset conjugates gradient minimizer (OSCGM) by no correction (NC), attenuation correction (AC), and AC+scatter correction (ACSC) using IQ-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial phantom acquired two patterns, with or without defect. Myocardial images were performed 5-point scale visual score and quantitative evaluations using contrast, uptake, and uniformity about the subset and update (subset×iteration) of OSCGM and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Gaussian filter by three corrections. We decided on optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM by three corrections. The number of subsets to create suitable images were 3 or 5 for NC and AC, 2 or 3 for ACSC. The updates to create suitable images were 30 or 40 for NC, 40 or 60 for AC, and 30 for ACSC. Furthermore, the FWHM of Gaussian filters were 9.6 mm or 12 mm for NC and ACSC, 7.2 mm or 9.6 mm for AC. In conclusion, the following optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM were decided; NC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 9.6 mm, AC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 7.2 mm, ACSC: subset 3, iteration 10 and FWHM 9.6 mm. PMID:26596202

  9. [The Optimal Reconstruction Parameters by Scatter and Attenuation Corrections Using Multi-focus Collimator System in Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Study].

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Funayama, Risa; Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Konishi, Takahiro; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the optimal reconstruction parameters of ordered subset conjugates gradient minimizer (OSCGM) by no correction (NC), attenuation correction (AC), and AC+scatter correction (ACSC) using IQ-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial phantom acquired two patterns, with or without defect. Myocardial images were performed 5-point scale visual score and quantitative evaluations using contrast, uptake, and uniformity about the subset and update (subset×iteration) of OSCGM and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Gaussian filter by three corrections. We decided on optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM by three corrections. The number of subsets to create suitable images were 3 or 5 for NC and AC, 2 or 3 for ACSC. The updates to create suitable images were 30 or 40 for NC, 40 or 60 for AC, and 30 for ACSC. Furthermore, the FWHM of Gaussian filters were 9.6 mm or 12 mm for NC and ACSC, 7.2 mm or 9.6 mm for AC. In conclusion, the following optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM were decided; NC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 9.6 mm, AC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 7.2 mm, ACSC: subset 3, iteration 10 and FWHM 9.6 mm.

  10. Design optimization of multi-pinhole micro-SPECT configurations by signal detection tasks and system performance evaluations for mouse cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-W; Lin, W-T; Chen, Y-C

    2015-01-21

    An optimized configuration of multi-pinhole aperture can improve the spatial resolution and the sensitivity of pinhole SPECT simultaneously. In this study, an optimization strategy of the multi-pinhole configuration with a small detector is proposed for mouse cardiac imaging. A 14 mm-diameter spherical field-of-view (FOV) is used to accommodate the mouse heart. To accelerate the optimization process, the analytic models are applied to rapidly obtain the projection areas of the FOV, the sensitivities and the spatial resolutions of numerous system designs. The candidates of optimal multi-pinhole configuration are then decided by the preliminary evaluations with the analytic models. Subsequently, the pinhole SPECT systems equipped with the designed multi-pinhole apertures are modeled in GATE to generate the imaging system matrices (H matrices) for the system performance assessments. The area under the ROC curves (AUC) of the designed systems is evaluated by signal-known-exactly/background-known-statistically detection tasks with their corresponding H matrices. In addition, the spatial resolutions are estimated by the Fourier crosstalk approach, and the sensitivities are calculated with the H matrices of designed systems, respectively. Furthermore, a series of OSEM reconstruction images of synthetic phantoms, including the hot-rod phantom, mouse heart phantom and Defrise phantom, are reconstructed with the H matrices of designed systems. To quantify the sensitivity and resolution competition in the optimization process, the AUC from the detection tasks and the resolution estimated by the Fourier crosstalk are used as the figure of merits. A trade-off function of AUC and resolution is introduced to find the optimal multi-pinhole configuration. According to the examining results, a 22.5° rotated detector plus a 4-pinhole aperture with 22.5° rotation, 20% multiplexing and 1.52X magnification is the optimized multi-pinhole configuration for the micro pinhole-SPECT

  11. Design optimization of multi-pinhole micro-SPECT configurations by signal detection tasks and system performance evaluations for mouse cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.-W.; Lin, W.-T.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2015-01-01

    An optimized configuration of multi-pinhole aperture can improve the spatial resolution and the sensitivity of pinhole SPECT simultaneously. In this study, an optimization strategy of the multi-pinhole configuration with a small detector is proposed for mouse cardiac imaging. A 14 mm-diameter spherical field-of-view (FOV) is used to accommodate the mouse heart. To accelerate the optimization process, the analytic models are applied to rapidly obtain the projection areas of the FOV, the sensitivities and the spatial resolutions of numerous system designs. The candidates of optimal multi-pinhole configuration are then decided by the preliminary evaluations with the analytic models. Subsequently, the pinhole SPECT systems equipped with the designed multi-pinhole apertures are modeled in GATE to generate the imaging system matrices (H matrices) for the system performance assessments. The area under the ROC curves (AUC) of the designed systems is evaluated by signal-known-exactly/background-known-statistically detection tasks with their corresponding H matrices. In addition, the spatial resolutions are estimated by the Fourier crosstalk approach, and the sensitivities are calculated with the H matrices of designed systems, respectively. Furthermore, a series of OSEM reconstruction images of synthetic phantoms, including the hot-rod phantom, mouse heart phantom and Defrise phantom, are reconstructed with the H matrices of designed systems. To quantify the sensitivity and resolution competition in the optimization process, the AUC from the detection tasks and the resolution estimated by the Fourier crosstalk are used as the figure of merits. A trade-off function of AUC and resolution is introduced to find the optimal multi-pinhole configuration. According to the examining results, a 22.5° rotated detector plus a 4-pinhole aperture with 22.5° rotation, 20% multiplexing and 1.52X magnification is the optimized multi-pinhole configuration for the micro pinhole-SPECT

  12. Adaptive SPECT imaging with crossed-slit apertures

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying the progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing a continuum of imaging configurations in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector to permit ultrahigh-resolution imaging. We describe the configuration of the adjustable slit aperture imaging system and discuss its application toward adaptive imaging, and reconstruction techniques using an accurate imaging forward model, a novel geometric calibration technique, and a GPU-based ultra-high-resolution reconstruction code. PMID:26190884

  13. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography and nuclear imaging system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay; Rasmussen, John C.; Zhu, Banghe; Azhdarinia, Ali; Yan, Shikui; Smith, Anne M.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence is an alternative modality for molecular imaging that has been demonstrated in animals and recently in humans. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography (FEOT) using continuous wave or frequency domain photon migration techniques could be used to provide quantitative molecular imaging in vivo if it could be validated against "gold-standard," nuclear imaging modalities, using dual-labeled imaging agents. Unfortunately, developed FEOT systems are not suitable for incorporation with CT/PET/SPECT scanners because they utilize benchtop devices and require a large footprint. In this work, we developed a miniaturized fluorescence imaging system installed in the gantry of the Siemens Inveon PET/CT scanner to enable NIR transillumination measurements. The system consists of a CCD camera equipped with NIR sensitive intensifier, a diode laser controlled by a single board compact controller, a 2-axis galvanometer, and RF circuit modules for homodyne detection of the phase and amplitude of fluorescence signals. The performance of the FEOT system was tested and characterized. A mouse-shaped solid phantom of uniform optical properties with a fluorescent inclusion was scanned using CT, and NIR fluorescence images at several projections were collected. The method of high-order approximation to the radioactive transfer equation was then used to reconstruct the optical images. Dual-labeled agents were also used on a tumor bearing mouse to validate the results of the FEOT against PET/CT image. The results showed that the location of the fluorophore obtained from the FEOT matches the location of tumor obtained from the PET/CT images. Besides validation of FEOT, this hybrid system could allow multimodal molecular imaging (FEOT/PET/CT) for small animal imaging.

  14. SPECT-US image fusion and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Kaar, Marcus; Hoffmann, Rainer; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Beyer, Thomas; Staudenherz, Anton; Figl, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Because scintigraphic images lack anatomical information, single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography systems (PET) are combined physically with CTs to compensate for this drawback. In our work, we present a method where the CT is replaced by a 3D ultrasound device. Because in this case a mechanical linkage is not possible, we use an additional optical tracking system (OTS) for spatial correlation of the SPECT or PET information and the US. To enable image fusion between the functional SPECT and the anatomical US we first calibrate the SPECT by means of the optical tracking system. This is done by imaging a phantom with SPECT and scanning the surface of the phantom using a calibrated stylus of the OTS. Applying an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm results in the transformation between the optical coordinate system and the SPECT coordinate system. When a patient undergoes a SPECT scan, a 3D US image is taken immediately after the scan. Since the scan head of the US is also tracked by the OTS, the transformation between OTS and SPECT can be calculated straight forward. For clinical intervention, the patient is again imaged with the US and a 3D/3D registration between the two US volumes allows to transform the functional information of the SPECT to the current US image in real time. We found a mean distance between the point cloud of the optical stylus and the segmented surface of the phantom of 2.3 mm while the maximum distance was found to be 6.9 mm. The 3D3D registration between the two US images was accomplished with an error of 2.1 mm.

  15. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St.; Knapp, F.F.

    1992-03-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  16. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St. ); Knapp, F.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  17. Myocardial Infarction Area Quantification using High-Resolution SPECT Images in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; Mejia, Jorge; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Lataro, Renata Maria; Frassetto, Sarita Nasbine; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Hélio Cesar; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Simões, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-01-01

    Background Imaging techniques enable in vivo sequential assessment of the morphology and function of animal organs in experimental models. We developed a device for high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging based on an adapted pinhole collimator. Objective To determine the accuracy of this system for quantification of myocardial infarct area in rats. Methods Thirteen male Wistar rats (250 g) underwent experimental myocardial infarction by occlusion of the left coronary artery. After 4 weeks, SPECT images were acquired 1.5 hours after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi. The tomographic reconstruction was performed by using specially developed software based on the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. The analysis of the data included the correlation between the area of perfusion defects detected by scintigraphy and extent of myocardial fibrosis assessed by histology. Results The images showed a high target organ/background ratio with adequate visualization of the left ventricular walls and cavity. All animals presenting infarction areas were correctly identified by the perfusion images. There was no difference of the infarct area as measured by SPECT (21.1 ± 21.2%) and by histology (21.7 ± 22.0%; p=0.45). There was a strong correlation between individual values of the area of infarction measured by these two methods. Conclusion The developed system presented adequate spatial resolution and high accuracy for the detection and quantification of myocardial infarction areas, consisting in a low cost and versatile option for high-resolution SPECT imaging of small rodents. PMID:23917507

  18. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Analysis in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Using TC-99M Hmpao and a Three - Spect System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Maximian Felix

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with a cognitive task of semantic word retrieval (verbal fluency) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and compare with the rCBF distribution of normal controls. Two groups of patients with low and high verbal fluency scores and two groups of normal controls were selected to determine a relationship between rCBF and verbal performance. A three-detector gamma camera (TRIAD 88) was used with radiotracer Tc-99m HMPAO and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to obtain 3D rCBF maps. The performance characteristics of the camera was comprehensively studied before being utilized for clinical studies. In addition, technical improvements were implemented in the form of scatter correction and MRI-SPECT coregistration to potentially enhance the quantitative accuracy of the rCBF data. The performance analysis of the gamma camera showed remarkable consistency among the three-detector heads and yielded results that were consistent with the manufacturer's specification. Measurements of physical objects also showed excellent image quality. The coregistration of SPECT and MRI images allowed more accurate anatomical localization for extraction of regional blood flow information. The validation of the scatter correction technique with physical phantoms indicated marked improvements in quantitative accuracy. There was marked difference in activation patterns between patients and normals. In normals, individually subjects showed either an increase or a decrease in blood flow to left frontal and temporal, however, on average, there was not a statistically significant change. The lack of significant change may suggest large variability among subjects chosen or that the individual changes are not large enough to be significant. The results from MS patients showed several left cortical areas with statistically significant change in blood flow after cognitive activation

  19. Freehand SPECT in low uptake situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Tobias; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Navab, Nassir

    2011-03-01

    3D functional imaging in the operating room can be extremely useful for some procedures like SLN mapping or SLN biopsies. Freehand SPECT is an example of such an imaging modality, combining manually scanned, hand-held 1D gamma detectors with spatial positioning systems in order to reconstruct localized 3D SPECT images, for example in the breast or neck region. Standard series expansion methods are applied together with custom physical models of the acquisition process and custom filtering procedures to perform 3D tomographic reconstruction from sparse, limited-angle and irregularly sampled data. A Freehand SPECT system can easily be assembled on a mobile cart suitable for use in the operating room. This work addresses in particular the problem of objects with low uptake (like sentinel lymph nodes), where reconstruction tends to be difficult due to low signal to noise ratio. In a neck-like phantom study, we show that four simulated nodes of 250 microliter volume with 0.06% respectively 0.03% uptake of a virtual 70MBq injection of Tc99m (the typical activity for SLN procedures at our hospital) in a background of water can be reconstructed successfully using careful filtering procedures in the reconstruction pipeline. Ten independent Freehand SPECT scans of the phantom were performed by several different operators, with an average scan duration of 5.1 minutes. The resulting reconstructions show an average spatial accuracy within voxel dimensions (2.5mm) compared to CT and exhibit correct relative quantification.

  20. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  1. Effects of gravity perturbation on developing animal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacinski, G. M.; Neff, A. W.

    Developing systems provide unique opportunities for analyzing the effects of microgravity on animals. Several unusual types of cells as well as various extraordinary cellular behavior patterns characterize the embryos of most animals. Those features have been exploited as test systems for space flight. The data from previous experiments are reviewed, and considerations for the design of future experiments are presented.

  2. Making recombinant proteins in animals--different systems, different applications.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Michael K; Lacroix, Dan; Pothier, François; Sirard, Marc-André

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors represent a powerful tool to address the growing need for therapeutic recombinant proteins. The ability of transgenic animals to produce complex, biologically active recombinant proteins in an efficient and economic manner has stimulated a great deal of interest in this area. As a result, genetically modified animals of several species, expressing foreign proteins in various tissues, are currently being developed. However, the generation of transgenic animals is a cumbersome process and remains problematic in the application of this technology. The advantages and disadvantages of different transgenic systems in relation to other bioreactor systems are discussed.

  3. Animal-microbe interactions and the evolution of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Eisthen, Heather L; Theis, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Animals ubiquitously interact with environmental and symbiotic microbes, and the effects of these interactions on animal physiology are currently the subject of intense interest. Nevertheless, the influence of microbes on nervous system evolution has been largely ignored. We illustrate here how taking microbes into account might enrich our ideas about the evolution of nervous systems. For example, microbes are involved in animals' communicative, defensive, predatory and dispersal behaviours, and have likely influenced the evolution of chemo- and photosensory systems. In addition, we speculate that the need to regulate interactions with microbes at the epithelial surface may have contributed to the evolutionary internalization of the nervous system.

  4. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  5. Effects of gravity perturbation on developing animal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.; Neff, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The use of developing animal systems to analyze the effects of microgravity on animals is discussed. Some of the key features of developing systems, especially embryos, are reviewed and relevant space data are summarized. Issues to be addressed in the design of future space experiments are discussed. It is noted that an embryo which exhibits ground based gravity effects should be selected for use as a model system and individual variation in gravity response among batches of embryos should be taken into account.

  6. Systems for animal exposure in full-scale fire tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Two systems for exposing animals in full-scale fire tests are described. Both systems involve the simultaneous exposure of two animal species, mice and rats, in modular units; determination of mortality, morbidity, and behavioral response; and analysis of the blood for carboxyhemoglobin. The systems described represent two of many possible options for obtaining bioassay data from full-scale fire tests. In situations where the temperatures to which the test animals are exposed can not be controlled, analytical techniques may be more appropriate than bioassay techniques.

  7. Animal venoms/toxins and the complement system.

    PubMed

    Tambourgi, Denise V; van den Berg, Carmen W

    2014-10-01

    Nature is a wealthy source of agents that have been shown to be beneficial to human health, but nature is also a rich source of potential dangerous health damaging compounds. This review will summarise and discuss the agents from the animal kingdom that have been shown to interact with the human complement (C) system. Most of these agents are toxins found in animal venoms and animal secretions. In addition to the mechanism of action of these toxins, their contribution to the field of complement, their role in human pathology and the potential benefit to the venomous animal itself will be discussed. Potential therapeutic applications will also be discussed.

  8. Animal eyes in homeland security systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Kostrzewski, Andrew; Gertsenshteyn, Michael; Grubsky, Victor; Shnitser, Paul; Agurok, Ilya; Bennahmias, Mark; Lee, Kang; Savant, Gajendra

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, biologically-inspired optical imaging systems, including fish eye, bug eye, lobster eye, and RGB color vision, are discussed as new lensing systems for military and homeland security applications. This new area of interest includes UV, VIS, IR, and X-ray part of electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, recent progress at Physical Optics Corporation will be discussed, including such applications as hyperspectral/multi-spectral imagery, video surveillance, and X-ray inspection.

  9. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-12-06

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  10. Reducing multiplexing artifacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with a stacked silicon-germanium system: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E

    2014-12-01

    In pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), multi-pinhole collimators can increase sensitivity but may lead to projection overlap, or multiplexing, which can cause image artifacts. In this work, we explore whether a stacked-detector configuration with a germanium and a silicon detector, used with 123I (27-32, 159 keV), where little multiplexing occurs in the Si projections, can reduce image artifacts caused by highly-multiplexed Ge projections. Simulations are first used to determine a reconstruction method that combines the Si and Ge projections to maximize image quality. Next, simulations of different pinhole configurations (varying projection multiplexing) in conjunction with digital phantoms are used to examine whether additional Si projections mitigate artifacts from the multiplexing in the Ge projections. Reconstructed images using both Si and Ge data are compared to those using Ge data alone. Normalized mean-square error and normalized standard deviation provide a quantitative evaluation of reconstructed images' error and noise, respectively, and are used to evaluate the impact of the additional nonmultiplexed data on image quality. For a qualitative comparison, the differential point response function is used to examine multiplexing artifacts. Results show that in cases of highly-multiplexed Ge projections, the addition of low-multiplexed Si projections helps to reduce image artifacts both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  11. Animation of Dawn's Path Through the Solar System

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the path of NASA's Dawn spacecraft through the solar system, on its way to orbit the two most massive objects in the main asteroid belt. Dawn arrives at the protoplanet Vesta i...

  12. ACR testing of a dedicated head SPECT unit.

    PubMed

    Sensakovic, William F; Hough, Matthew C; Kimbley, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-08

    Physics testing necessary for program accreditation is rigorously defined by the ACR. This testing is easily applied to most conventional SPECT systems based on gamma camera technology. The inSPira HD is a dedicated head SPECT system based on a rotating dual clamshell design that acquires data in a dual-spiral geometry. The unique geometry and configuration force alterations of the standard ACR physics testing protocol. Various tests, such as intrinsic planar uniformity and/or resolution, do not apply. The Data Spectrum Deluxe Phantom used for conventional SPECT testing cannot fit in the inSPira HD scanner bore, making (currently) unapproved use of the Small Deluxe SPECT Phantom necessary. Matrix size, collimator type, scanning time, reconstruction method, and attenuation correction were all varied from the typically prescribed ACR instructions. Visible spheres, sphere contrast, visible rod groups, uniformity, and root mean square (RMS) noise were measured. The acquired SPECT images surpassed the minimum ACR requirements for both spatial resolution (9.5 mm spheres resolved) and contrast (6.4 mm rod groups resolved). Sphere contrast was generally high. Integral uniformity was 4% and RMS noise was 1.7%. Noise appeared more correlated than in images from a conventional SPECT scanner. Attenuation-corrected images produced from direct CT scanning of the phantom and a manufacturer supplied model of the phantom demonstrated negligible differences.

  13. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  14. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  15. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  16. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost.

  17. Un-collimated single-photon imaging system for high-sensitivity small animal and plant imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Katherine L.; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Cherry, Simon R.; Mitchell, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system development the primary objective has been to improve spatial resolution by using novel parallel-hole or multi-pinhole collimator geometries. However, such high-resolution systems have relatively poor sensitivity (typically 0.01-0.1%). In contrast, a system that does not use collimators can achieve very high-sensitivity. Here we present a high-sensitivity un-collimated detector single-photon imaging (UCD-SPI) system for the imaging of both small animals and plants. This scanner consists of two thin, closely spaced, pixelated scintillator detectors that use NaI(Tl), CsI(Na), or BGO. The performance of the system has been characterized by measuring sensitivity, spatial resolution, linearity, detection limits, and uniformity. With 99mTc (140 keV) at the center of the field of view (20 mm scintillator separation), the sensitivity was measured to be 31.8% using the NaI(Tl) detectors and 40.2% with CsI(Na). The best spatial resolution (FWHM when the image formed as the geometric mean of the two detector heads, 20 mm scintillator separation) was 19.0 mm for NaI(Tl) and 11.9 mm for CsI(Na) at 140 keV, and 19.5 mm for BGO at 1116 keV, which is somewhat degraded compared to the cm-scale resolution obtained with only one detector head and a close source. The quantitative accuracy of the system’s linearity is better than 2% with detection down to activity levels of 100 nCi. Two in vivo animal studies (a renal scan using 99mTc MAG-3 and a thyroid scan with 123I) and one plant study (a 99mTcO4- xylem transport study) highlight the unique capabilities of this UCD-SPI system. From the renal scan, we observe approximately a one thousand-fold increase in sensitivity compared to the Siemens Inveon SPECT/CT scanner. UCD-SPI is useful for many imaging tasks that do not require excellent spatial resolution, such as high-throughput screening applications, simple radiotracer uptake studies in tumor

  18. A passive integrated transponder system for tracking animal movements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boarman, W.I.; Beigel, M.L.; Goodlett, G.C.; Sazaki, M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an automated system that uses passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags to track movements of animals past specific locations. The system was designed to operate maintenance free for several months, be secure from vandalism and environmental damage, and record the identity, date, and time of passage of animals past a 2.4-m wide area. We used the system to monitor effectively the movements of 172 desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) through 2 storm drain culverts that pass beneath a state highway in the Mojave Desert, California. Four tortoises entered or passed through the culverts on 60 occasions. The system can be easily adapted to other species.

  19. Using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system technique for crosstalk correction in simultaneous 99mTc/201Tl SPECT imaging: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidary, Saeed; Setayeshi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a simulation based study by Monte Carlo which uses two adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) for cross talk compensation of simultaneous 99mTc/201Tl dual-radioisotope SPECT imaging. We have compared two neuro-fuzzy systems based on fuzzy c-means (FCM) and subtractive (SUB) clustering. Our approach incorporates eight energy-windows image acquisition from 28 keV to 156 keV and two main photo peaks of 201Tl (77±10% keV) and 99mTc (140±10% keV). The Geant4 application in emission tomography (GATE) is used as a Monte Carlo simulator for three cylindrical and a NURBS Based Cardiac Torso (NCAT) phantom study. Three separate acquisitions including two single-isotopes and one dual isotope were performed in this study. Cross talk and scatter corrected projections are reconstructed by an iterative ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm which models the non-uniform attenuation in the projection/back-projection. ANFIS-FCM/SUB structures are tuned to create three to sixteen fuzzy rules for modeling the photon cross-talk of the two radioisotopes. Applying seven to nine fuzzy rules leads to a total improvement of the contrast and the bias comparatively. It is found that there is an out performance for the ANFIS-FCM due to its acceleration and accurate results.

  20. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    PubMed

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis. PMID:25143053

  1. Coregistration of datasets from a micro-SPECT/CT and a preclinical 1.5 T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillenseger, J.-P.; Guillaud, B.; Goetz, C.; Sayeh, A.; Schimpf, R.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, P.

    2013-02-01

    An universal tool was designed for small animal SPECT/CT/MR coregistration. It was tested on a preclinical MRI (OPTImouse, RS2D, Bischwiller, France) and a micro-SPECT/CT (eXplore speCZT Vision 120, GE, Waukesha, USA), closed to each other, thanks to the short extension of the MRI magnet fringe field. The tool consists of a curved catheter describing many rigid loops, and fixed on a plastic sheet. During acquisitions, it is placed around the animal, in an isolated imaging cell, and filled with a solution containing iodine, copper sulfate and radioisotope. Multimodality imaging is achieved sequentially by moving the cell from one system to the other, in about 20 s. Acquisitions on phantom demonstrate the resolution accuracy of the coregistration process. Whole body trimodal SPECT/CT/MR acquisitions on live mice were coregistrated as well. A simple, cheap tool, easy to fill, could efficiently help for rigid coregistration of preclinical images, acquired on separate imaging apparatus.

  2. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  3. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous NaI(Tl) scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  4. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  5. Applications of penetrating radiation for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Wu, Max C.; Iwata, Koji; Hwang, Andrew B.; Wong, Kenneth H.; Barber, William C.; Dae, Michael W.; Sakdinawat, Anne E.

    2002-11-01

    than those used with microPET. High-resolution dual-modality imaging systems now are being developed that combine microPET or microSPECT with microCT in a way that facilitates more direct correlation of anatomy and physiology in the same animal. Small animal imaging allows researchers to perform experiments that are not possible with conventional invasive techniques, and thereby are becoming increasingly important tools for discovery of fundamental biological information, and development of new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in the biomedical sciences.

  6. Remote controlled bio-stimulator and animal behavior analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weiguo; Yuan, Kui; Han, Taizhen; Chai, Jie

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a surveillance and stimulation system to study the animal locomotion behavior under electrical micro-stimulations in the brain nerve, which provides a new platform and methodology for behavior experiment in neural science. The system consists of two parts: 1) micro-control based multi-channel stimulator backed by animal; 2) Computer vision based animal behavior tracking system; The performance of the micro-stimulator is validated for sciatic nerve of frog and the results show that it is reliable, stabile, compact (25×35×10 mm), light (20g with cell). The tracking speed and accuracy is improved with our new hybrid tracking algorithm based on color table looking and moving predication, and compared with the manual recording. The preliminary results of rat tracking show that it works accurately and robustly in real-time even under interference condition.

  7. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: 99m Tc, 111In and 131I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational efficiency

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  10. Training Sessions Provide Working Knowledge of National Animal Identification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaze, J. Benton, Jr.; Ahola, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    One in-service and two train-the-trainer workshops were conducted by University of Idaho Extension faculty, Idaho State Department of Agriculture personnel, and allied industry representatives to increase Extension educators' knowledge and awareness of the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) and related topics. Training sessions included…

  11. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Rutao Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. Methods: The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. Results: The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. Conclusions: The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  12. Recent developments and future prospects of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Maseeh Uz; Hashmi, Ibrahim; Fatima, Nosheen

    2010-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is the most commonly performed functional imaging for assessment of coronary artery disease. High diagnostic accuracy and incremental prognostic value are the major benefits while suboptimal spatial resolution and significant radiation exposure are the main limitations. Its ability to detect hemodynamic significance of lesions seen on multidetector CT angiogram (MDCTA) has paved the path for a successful marriage between anatomical and functional imaging modalities in the form of hybrid SPECT/MDCTA system. In recent years, there have been enormous efforts by industry and academia to develop new SPECT imaging systems with better sensitivity, resolution, compact design and new reconstruction algorithms with ability to improve image quality and resolution. Furthermore, expected arrival of Tc-99m-labeled deoxyglucose in next few years would further strengthen the role of SPECT in imaging hibernating myocardium. In view of these developments, it seems that SPECT would enjoy its pivotal role in spite of major threat to be replaced by fluorine-18-labeled positron emission tomography perfusion and glucose metabolism imaging agents. PMID:20652774

  13. An Automated Motion Detection and Reward System for Animal Training

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brad; Lim, Audrey N; Heidbreder, Arnold F

    2015-01-01

    A variety of approaches has been used to minimize head movement during functional brain imaging studies in awake laboratory animals. Many laboratories expend substantial effort and time training animals to remain essentially motionless during such studies. We could not locate an “off-the-shelf” automated training system that suited our needs.  We developed a time- and labor-saving automated system to train animals to hold still for extended periods of time. The system uses a personal computer and modest external hardware to provide stimulus cues, monitor movement using commercial video surveillance components, and dispense rewards. A custom computer program automatically increases the motionless duration required for rewards based on performance during the training session but allows changes during sessions. This system was used to train cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) for awake neuroimaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The automated system saved the trainer substantial time, presented stimuli and rewards in a highly consistent manner, and automatically documented training sessions. We have limited data to prove the training system's success, drawn from the automated records during training sessions, but we believe others may find it useful. The system can be adapted to a range of behavioral training/recording activities for research or commercial applications, and the software is freely available for non-commercial use. PMID:26798573

  14. An Automated Motion Detection and Reward System for Animal Training.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brad; Lim, Audrey N; Heidbreder, Arnold F; Black, Kevin J

    2015-12-04

    A variety of approaches has been used to minimize head movement during functional brain imaging studies in awake laboratory animals. Many laboratories expend substantial effort and time training animals to remain essentially motionless during such studies. We could not locate an "off-the-shelf" automated training system that suited our needs.  We developed a time- and labor-saving automated system to train animals to hold still for extended periods of time. The system uses a personal computer and modest external hardware to provide stimulus cues, monitor movement using commercial video surveillance components, and dispense rewards. A custom computer program automatically increases the motionless duration required for rewards based on performance during the training session but allows changes during sessions. This system was used to train cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) for awake neuroimaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The automated system saved the trainer substantial time, presented stimuli and rewards in a highly consistent manner, and automatically documented training sessions. We have limited data to prove the training system's success, drawn from the automated records during training sessions, but we believe others may find it useful. The system can be adapted to a range of behavioral training/recording activities for research or commercial applications, and the software is freely available for non-commercial use.

  15. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R.; Pike, Victor W.; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F.; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB1Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CTPLUS (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB1 receptor knock-out (CB1R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB1R-/- mice (n = 3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n = 7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [125I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6 ± 3.6 (average ± SD) in CB1R-/- mice and 22.1 ± 12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p < 0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB1R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [125I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB1R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [125I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT radioligand for

  16. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) antagonist radioligand [(125)I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB(1)Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CT(PLUS) (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB(1) receptor knock-out (CB(1)R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB(1)R-/- mice (n=3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n=7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [(125)I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6±3.6 (average±SD) in CB(1)R-/- mice and 22.1±12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p<0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB(1)R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [(125)I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB(1)R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [(125)I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT

  17. Food for thought: food systems, livestock futures and animal health.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Angela

    2013-12-01

    Global food security, livestock production and animal health are inextricably bound. However, our focus on the future tends to disaggregate food and health into largely separate domains. Indeed, much foresight work is either food systems or health-based with little overlap in terms of predictions or narratives. Work on animal health is no exception. Part of the problem is the fundamental misunderstanding of the role, nature and impact of the modern futures tool kit. Here, I outline three key issues in futures research ranging from methodological confusion over the application of scenarios to the failure to effectively integrate multiple methodologies to the gap between the need for more evidence and power and control over futures processes. At its core, however, a better understanding of the narrative and worldview framing much of the futures work in animal health is required to enhance the value and impact of such exercises. PMID:23988197

  18. A silicon early visual system as a model animal.

    PubMed

    Delbrück, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii

    2004-01-01

    Examples that show the transfer of our basic knowledge of brain function into practical electronic models are rare. Here we present a user-friendly silicon model of the early visual system that contributes to animal welfare. The silicon chip emulates the neurons in the visual system by using analog Very Large Scale Integration (aVLSI) circuits. It substitutes for a live animal in experiment design and lecture demonstrations. The neurons on this chip display properties that are central to biological vision: receptive fields, spike coding, adaptation, band-pass filtering, and complementary signaling. Unlike previous laboratory devices whose complexity was limited by the use of discrete components on printed circuit boards, this battery-powered chip is a self-contained patch of the visual system. The realistic responses of the chip's cells and the self-contained adjustment-free correct operation of the chip suggest the possibility of implementation of similar circuits for visual prosthetics.

  19. GATE simulation of a LYSO-based SPECT imager: Validation and detector optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suying; Zhang, Qiushi; Xie, Zhaoheng; Liu, Qi; Xu, Baixuan; Yang, Kun; Li, Changhui; Ren, Qiushi

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a small animal SPECT system that is based on cerium doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal, position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) and parallel hole collimator. Spatial resolution test and animal experiment were performed to demonstrate the imaging performance of the detector. Preliminary results indicated a spatial resolution of 2.5 mm at FWHM that cannot meet our design requirement. Therefore, we simulated this gamma camera using GATE (GEANT 4 Application for Tomographic Emission) aiming to make detector spatial resolution less than 2 mm. First, the GATE simulation process was validated through comparison between simulated and experimental data. This also indicates the accuracy and effectiveness of GATE simulation for LYSO-based gamma camera. Then the different detector sampling methods (crystal size with 1.5, and 1 mm) and collimator design (collimator height with 30, 34.8, 38, and 43 mm) were studied to figure out an optimized parameter set. Detector sensitivity changes were also focused on with different parameters set that generated different spatial resolution results. Tradeoff curves of spatial resolution and sensitivity were plotted to determine the optimal collimator height with different sampling methods. Simulation results show that scintillation crystal size of 1 mm and collimator height of 38 mm, which can generate a spatial resolution of ~1.8 mm and sensitivity of ~0.065 cps/kBq, can be an ideal configuration for our SPECT imager design.

  20. SPECT Perfusion Imaging Demonstrates Improvement of Traumatic Brain Injury With Transcranial Near-infrared Laser Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Theodore A; Morries, Larry D

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing health concern affecting civilians and military personnel. Near-infrared (NIR) light has shown benefits in animal models and human trials for stroke and in animal models for TBI. Diodes emitting low-level NIR often have lacked therapeutic efficacy, perhaps failing to deliver sufficient radiant energy to the necessary depth. In this case report, a patient with moderate TBI documented in anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) received 20 NIR treatments in the course of 2 mo using a high-power NIR laser. Symptoms were monitored by clinical examination and a novel patient diary system specifically designed for this patient population. Clinical application of these levels of infrared energy for this patient with TBI yielded highly favorable outcomes with decreased depression, anxiety, headache, and insomnia, whereas cognition and quality of life improved. Neurological function appeared to improve based on changes in the SPECT by quantitative analysis. NIR in the power range of 10-15 W at 810 and 980 nm can safely and effectively treat chronic symptoms of TBI. PMID:26535475

  1. NASA Workshop on Animal Gravity-Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. L. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The opportunity for space flight has brought about the need for well-planned research programs that recognize the significance of space flight as a scientific research tool for advancing knowledge of life on Earth, and that utilize each flight opportunity to its fullest. For the first time in history, gravity can be almost completely eliminated. Thus, studies can be undertaken that will help to elucidate the importance of gravity to the normal functioning of living organisms, and to determine the effects microgravity may have on an organism. This workshop was convened to organize a plan for space research on animal gravity-sensing systems and the role that gravity plays in the development and normal functioning of these systems. Scientists working in the field of animal gravity-sensing systems use a wide variety of organisms in their research. The workshop presentations dealt with topics which ranged from the indirect gravity receptor of the water flea, Daphnia (whose antennal setae apparently act as current-sensing receptors as the animal moves up and down in water), through specialized statocyst structures found in jellyfish and gastropods, to the more complex vestibular systems that are characteristic of amphibians, avians, and mammals.

  2. Animal models of systemic sclerosis: their utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Artlett, Carol M

    2014-01-01

    Without doubt, animal models have provided significant insights into our understanding of the rheumatological diseases; however, no model has accurately replicated all aspects of any autoimmune disease. Recent years have seen a plethora of knockouts and transgenics that have contributed to our knowledge of the initiating events of systemic sclerosis, an autoimmune disease. In this review, the focus is on models of systemic sclerosis and how they have progressed our understanding of fibrosis and vasculopathy, and whether they are relevant to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

  3. Progress in SPECT/CT imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Franc, Benjamin L; Hawkins, Randall A; Wong, Kenneth H; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer (other than skin cancer) among men in the United States. Although prostate cancer is one of the few cancers that grow so slowly that it may never threaten the lives of some patients, it can be lethal once metastasized. Indium-111 capromab pendetide (ProstaScint, Cytogen Corporation, Princeton, NJ) imaging is indicated for staging and recurrence detection of the disease, and is particularly useful to determine whether or not the disease has spread to distant metastatic sites. However, the interpretation of 111In-capromab pendetide is challenging without correlated structural information mostly because the radiopharmaceutical demonstrates nonspecific uptake in the normal vasculature, bowel, bone marrow, and the prostate gland. We developed an improved method of imaging and localizing 111In-Capromab pendetide using a SPECT/CT imaging system. The specific goals included: i) development and application of a novel iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm that utilizes a priori information from coregistered CT; and ii) assessment of clinical impact of adding SPECT/CT for prostate cancer imaging with capromab pendetide utilizing the standard and novel reconstruction techniques. Patient imaging studies with capromab pendetide were performed from 1999 to 2004 using two different SPECT/CT scanners, a prototype SPECT/CT system and a commercial SPECT/CT system (Discovery VH, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). SPECT projection data from both systems were reconstructed using an experimental iterative algorithm that compensates for both photon attenuation and collimator blurring. In addition, the data obtained from the commercial system were reconstructed with attenuation correction using an OSEM reconstruction supplied by the camera manufacturer for routine clinical interpretation. For 12 sets of patient data, SPECT images reconstructed using the experimental algorithm were interpreted separately and compared with interpretation of

  4. Progress in SPECT/CT imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Franc, Benjamin L; Hawkins, Randall A; Wong, Kenneth H; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer (other than skin cancer) among men in the United States. Although prostate cancer is one of the few cancers that grow so slowly that it may never threaten the lives of some patients, it can be lethal once metastasized. Indium-111 capromab pendetide (ProstaScint, Cytogen Corporation, Princeton, NJ) imaging is indicated for staging and recurrence detection of the disease, and is particularly useful to determine whether or not the disease has spread to distant metastatic sites. However, the interpretation of 111In-capromab pendetide is challenging without correlated structural information mostly because the radiopharmaceutical demonstrates nonspecific uptake in the normal vasculature, bowel, bone marrow, and the prostate gland. We developed an improved method of imaging and localizing 111In-Capromab pendetide using a SPECT/CT imaging system. The specific goals included: i) development and application of a novel iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm that utilizes a priori information from coregistered CT; and ii) assessment of clinical impact of adding SPECT/CT for prostate cancer imaging with capromab pendetide utilizing the standard and novel reconstruction techniques. Patient imaging studies with capromab pendetide were performed from 1999 to 2004 using two different SPECT/CT scanners, a prototype SPECT/CT system and a commercial SPECT/CT system (Discovery VH, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). SPECT projection data from both systems were reconstructed using an experimental iterative algorithm that compensates for both photon attenuation and collimator blurring. In addition, the data obtained from the commercial system were reconstructed with attenuation correction using an OSEM reconstruction supplied by the camera manufacturer for routine clinical interpretation. For 12 sets of patient data, SPECT images reconstructed using the experimental algorithm were interpreted separately and compared with interpretation of

  5. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour.

  6. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. PMID:26554037

  7. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako; Tsuji, Osahiko; Hanyu, Aki; Okada, Seiji; Yasuda, Akimasa; Fukano, Takashi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hirotaka James; and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  8. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  9. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, James; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  10. Bayesian learning for cardiac SPECT image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Jarosław P; Goodenday, Lucy S; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a system for automating the diagnosis of myocardial perfusion from single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images of male and female hearts. Initially we had several thousand of SPECT images, other clinical data and physician-interpreter's descriptions of the images. The images were divided into segments based on the Yale system. Each segment was described by the physician as showing one of the following conditions: normal perfusion, reversible perfusion defect, partially reversible perfusion defect, fixed perfusion defect, defect showing reverse redistribution, equivocal defect or artifact. The physician's diagnosis of overall left ventricular (LV) perfusion, based on the above descriptions, categorizes a study as showing one or more of eight possible conditions: normal, ischemia, infarct and ischemia, infarct, reverse redistribution, equivocal, artifact or LV dysfunction. Because of the complexity of the task, we decided to use the knowledge discovery approach, consisting of these steps: problem understanding, data understanding, data preparation, data mining, evaluating the discovered knowledge and its implementation. After going through the data preparation step, in which we constructed normal gender-specific models of the LV and image registration, we ended up with 728 patients for whom we had both SPECT images and corresponding diagnoses. Another major contribution of the paper is the data mining step, in which we used several new Bayesian learning classification methods. The approach we have taken, namely the six-step knowledge discovery process has proven to be very successful in this complex data mining task and as such the process can be extended to other medical data mining projects.

  11. Quantitative High-Efficiency Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride SPECT with Dedicated Parallel-Hole Collimation System in Obese Patients: Results of a Multi-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Slomka, Piotr J.; Fish, Mathews; Schwartz, Ronald G.; Hayes, Sean W.; Thomson, Louise E.J.; Friedman, John D.; Lemley, Mark; Mackin, Maria L.; Peterson, Benjamin; Schwartz, Arielle M.; Doran, Jesse A.; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a common source of artifact on conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We evaluated image quality and diagnostic performance of high-efficiency (HE) cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) parallel-hole SPECT-MPI for coronary artery disease (CAD) in obese patients. Methods and Results 118 consecutive obese patients at 3 centers (BMI 43.6±8.9 kg/m2, range 35–79.7 kg/m2) had upright/supine HE-SPECT and ICA >6 months (n=67) or low-likelihood of CAD (n=51). Stress quantitative total perfusion deficit (TPD) for upright (U-TPD), supine (S-TPD) and combined acquisitions (C-TPD) was assessed. Image quality (IQ; 5=excellent; <3 nondiagnostic) was compared among BMI 35–39.9 (n=58), 40–44.9 (n=24) and ≥45 (n=36) groups. ROC-curve area for CAD detection (≥50% stenosis) for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD were 0.80, 0.80, and 0.87, respectively. Sensitivity/specificity was 82%/57% for U-TPD, 74%/71% for S-TPD, and 80%/82% for C-TPD. C-TPD had highest specificity (P=.02). C-TPD normalcy rate was higher than U-TPD (88% vs. 75%, P=.02). Mean IQ was similar among BMI 35–39.9, 40–44.9 and ≥45 groups [4.6 vs. 4.4 vs. 4.5, respectively (P=.6)]. No patient had a non-diagnostic stress scan. Conclusions In obese patients, HE-SPECT MPI with dedicated parallel-hole collimation demonstrated high image quality, normalcy rate, and diagnostic accuracy for CAD by quantitative analysis of combined upright/supine acquisitions. PMID:25388380

  12. Definition of animal breeding goals for sustainable production systems.

    PubMed

    Olesen, I; Groen, A F; Gjerde, B

    2000-03-01

    What we do is determined by the way we "view" a complex issue and what sample of issues or events we choose to deal with. In this paper, a model based on a communal, cultural, or people-centered worldview, informed by a subjective epistemology and a holistic ontology, is considered. Definitions and interpretations of sustainable agriculture are reviewed. Common elements in published definitions of sustainable agriculture and animal production among those who seek long-term and equitable solutions for food production are resource efficiency, profitability, productivity, environmental soundness, biodiversity, social viability, and ethical aspects. Possible characteristics of future sustainable production systems and further development are presented. The impact of these characteristics on animal breeding goals is reviewed. The need for long-term biologically, ecologically, and sociologically sound breeding goals is emphasized, because animal breeding determined only by short-term market forces leads to unwanted side effects. Hence, a procedure for defining animal breeding goals with ethical priorities and weighing of market and non-market values is suggested. Implementation of non-market as well as market economic trait values in the aggregate genotype, as suggested, may allow for breeding programs that contribute to sustainable production systems. Examples of breeding goals in salmon, cattle, and pigs are given, and the resulting genetic responses are evaluated with respect to economic profit (or costs) and other criteria of sustainability. Important prerequisites for breeding programs for sustainable production are appropriate governmental policies, awareness of our way of thinking, and a more communal worldview informed by a subjective epistemology and a holistic ontology.

  13. Development of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Yusuke; Oshima, Yusuke; Komachi, Yuichi; Katagiri, Takashi; Asakura, Toru; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Tashiro, Hideo

    2006-02-01

    Development of the optical biopsy system for experimental small animals is in progress. A prototype of the system which consists of a miniaturized gastro endoscope unit and Raman probes has been completed by now. The system is developed to study a gastric cancer rat model. The endoscope is 2.5 mm in diameter and is equipped an imaging bundle fiber, illumination fibers, a channel and a mechanism to angle the probe head. The head of the Raman probe comes out through the channel and it is possible to aim the probe to the target watching on the monitor. The endoscope was inserted into the anaesthetized healthy rat under the breathing support. It was successfully observed inside of the stomach of the living rat and measured Raman spectra. The spectrum of blood vessels contains the strong contribution from lipids. The present results demonstrate high potential of the system in the in vivo Raman study using the rat model.

  14. CALOR87: HETC87, MICAP, EGS4, and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, F.S.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Bishop, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Johnson, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    A brief history of CALOR (HETC, EGS, MICAP, SPECT) is presented to indicate the evolution of this code system. Details concerning the current modifications and additions to the high-energy transport code, HETC, are also presented and new comparisons with experimental data are included to verify the new physics improvements. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Detection models for freehand SPECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Alexander; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Lasser, Tobias; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Navab, Nassir

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear imaging modalities are commonly used tools in today’s diagnostics and therapy planning. However for interventional use they suffer from drawbacks which limit their application. Freehand SPECT was developed to provide 3D functional imaging during interventions. It combines a nuclear detector with an optical tracking system to obtain its position and orientation in space and synchronizes this with the detector readings. This information can be used to compute a 3D tomographic reconstruction of an activity distribution of a nuclear tracer. As there is no fixed geometry, the system matrix has to be computed on the fly. This is done with models of the detection process for completely arbitrary freehand acquisitions. The accuracy of the reconstructions is highly dependent on the used models of the detection process. Different models of the detection process were developed and evaluated in this work, in particular two analytical models as well as lookup tables generated from either real measurements or Monte Carlo simulations. We showed that it is possible to perform acceptable reconstructions with a simple but efficient analytical model. The use of lookup tables to generate the system matrix in Freehand SPECT is a fast solution with good accuracy.

  16. Freehand SPECT reconstructions using look up tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Alexander; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Kojchev, Risto; Navab, Nassir; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Lasser, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Nuclear imaging is a commonly used tool in today's diagnostics and therapy planning. For interventional use however it suffers from drawbacks which limit its application. Freehand SPECT was developed to overcome these limitations and to provide 3D functional imaging during an intervention. It combines a nuclear probe with an optical tracking system to obtain its position and orientation in space synchronized with its reading. This information can be used to compute a 3D tomographic reconstruction of an activity distribution. However, as there is no fixed geometry the system matrix has to be computed on-the-fly, using ad-hoc models of the detection process. One solution for such a model is a reference look up table of previously acquired measurements of a single source at different angles and distances. In this work two look up tables with a one and four millimeter step size between the entries were acquired. Twelve datasets of a phantom with two hollow spheres filled with a solution of Tc99wm were acquired with the Freehand SPECT system. Reconstructions with the look up tables and two analytical models currently in use were performed with these datasets and compared with each other. The finely sampled look up table achieved the qualitatively best reconstructions, while one of the analytical models showed the best positional accuracy.

  17. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. Methods: The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. Results: The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations

  18. An ethanol vapor chamber system for small animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Jiang, Lihong; Du, Hongying; Mason, Graeme F

    2012-06-30

    Ethanol vapor chambers have been utilized widely in alcohol research since their introduction in 1971, and implementations of these systems are now available commercially. Here, we present a modification of the chamber that can be built at lower cost and greater simplicity of operation. The six-chamber system for rats has multiple air pumps. Ethanol vapor levels are adjusted with the air flow rate, ethanol drip rate, and dilution with room air, without a heater or fans. Ethanol vapor concentrations are measured with a breathalyzer, using room air to dilute the vapor chamber output into the range of the breathalyzer. Multiple pumps provide backup to ensure animal survival in the case of failure of the primary air pump. Tests in animals demonstrated comfortable and stable elevation of blood ethanol, with tight control of the ethanol vapor concentrations and the ability to select from a broad range of levels. The ethanol vapor measurement was rapid and efficient. The parts cost was a few thousand U.S. dollars. This vapor chamber system features low cost, ease of use, and convenient and inexpensive measurement of ethanol vapor concentrations. The lack of a heater and electrical components that could come into contact with ethanol in our case facilitated institutional approval. PMID:22575431

  19. An Ethanol Vapor Chamber System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Jiang, Lihong; Du, Hongying; Mason, Graeme F.

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol vapor chambers have been utilized widely in alcohol research since their introduction in 1971, and implementations of these systems are now available commercially. Here, we present a modification of the chamber that can be built at lower cost and greater simplicity of operation. The six-chamber system for rats has multiple air pumps. Ethanol vapor levels are adjusted with the air flow rate, ethanol drip rate, and dilution with room air, without a heater or fans. Ethanol vapor concentrations are measured with a breathalyzer, using room air to dilute the vapor chamber output into the range of the breathalyzer. Multiple pumps provide backup to ensure animal survival in the case of failure of the primary air pump. Tests in animals demonstrated comfortable and stable elevation of blood ethanol, with tight control of the ethanol vapor concentrations and the ability to select from a broad range of levels. The ethanol vapor measurement was rapid and efficient. The parts cost was a few thousand U.S. dollars. This vapor chamber system features low cost, ease of use, and convenient and inexpensive measurement of ethanol vapor concentrations. The lack of a heater and electrical components that could come into contact with ethanol in our case facilitated institutional approval. PMID:22575431

  20. Solar heating of integrated greenhouse-animal shelter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, N.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical procedure to determine the effectiveness of greenhouses as solar collectors was presented. This procedure was used to predict the effect of several construction parameters on solar radiation input to greenhouses. The orientation of the greenhouse was found to be the most effective construction parameter controlling solar radiation input to greenhouses. The effective albedo of the plant canopy was also found to be a significant factor. A new solar greenhouse design, suitable for high latitude regions was developed. The results showed that an internal solar collector could be incorporated as an integral part of the greenhouse design. The concept developed could be used as a free-standing greenhouse or in a combination with livestock building. The efficiency of the solar input was investigated for the conventional and the shed greenhouses, both as a free-standing unit and a greenhouse-animal shelter system, using computer simulation analyses. The results indicated that the efficiency of solar input is highly dependent on location; the effect of location on the shed type design is more profound. A typical case of a greenhouse-hog barn production system was investigated using computer simulation analyses. The results showed that such a food production system achieves a significant reduction in conventional fuel consumption due to both animal waste heat recovery and solar energy utilization.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of PET and SPECT imaging of {sup 90}Y

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihiko Sasaki, Masayuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuo; Komiya, Isao; Baba, Shingo

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Yittrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) is traditionally thought of as a pure beta emitter, and is used in targeted radionuclide therapy, with imaging performed using bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, because {sup 90}Y also emits positrons through internal pair production with a very small branching ratio, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is also available. Because of the insufficient image quality of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT, PET imaging has been suggested as an alternative. In this paper, the authors present the Monte Carlo-based simulation–reconstruction framework for {sup 90}Y to comprehensively analyze the PET and SPECT imaging techniques and to quantitatively consider the disadvantages associated with them. Methods: Our PET and SPECT simulation modules were developed using Monte Carlo simulation of Electrons and Photons (MCEP), developed by Dr. S. Uehara. PET code (MCEP-PET) generates a sinogram, and reconstructs the tomography image using a time-of-flight ordered subset expectation maximization (TOF-OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation. To evaluate MCEP-PET, simulated results of {sup 18}F PET imaging were compared with the experimental results. The results confirmed that MCEP-PET can simulate the experimental results very well. The SPECT code (MCEP-SPECT) models the collimator and NaI detector system, and generates the projection images and projection data. To save the computational time, the authors adopt the prerecorded {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photon data calculated by MCEP. The projection data are also reconstructed using the OSEM algorithm. The authors simulated PET and SPECT images of a water phantom containing six hot spheres filled with different concentrations of {sup 90}Y without background activity. The amount of activity was 163 MBq, with an acquisition time of 40 min. Results: The simulated {sup 90}Y-PET image accurately simulated the experimental results. PET image is visually

  2. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  3. [Animals (Animalia) in system of organisms. 2. Phylogenetic understanding of animals].

    PubMed

    Shatalkin, A I

    2005-01-01

    may be through different and crossed classifications. Inside the given category of groups it is possible to distinguish: (2.1) Level of the organization (grade) described by the differences on the levels of organization: for example prokaryotic and eukaryotic levels of the organization. Eukaryotes can be divided into unicellular (Protoctista, Protista) and multicelluar (tissue-specific-Histonia) forms. (2.2) Types of the organization distinguishing groups of one level: for example, amoedoid type (Sarcodina), naked (Gymnamoebia), and testate (Testacea) amoebas. (2.3) Taxonomic groups as set-theoretical approximations of taxa. (2.4) Groups of the mixed nature. For example, Haeckel has recognized Protophyta and Protozoa describing the unicellular level of the organization inside plants and animals accordingly. Protozoa in Cavalier-Smith's system (2002, 2004) is also an example of groups of the mixed nature.

  4. [Animals (Animalia) in system of organisms. 2. Phylogenetic understanding of animals].

    PubMed

    Shatalkin, A I

    2005-01-01

    may be through different and crossed classifications. Inside the given category of groups it is possible to distinguish: (2.1) Level of the organization (grade) described by the differences on the levels of organization: for example prokaryotic and eukaryotic levels of the organization. Eukaryotes can be divided into unicellular (Protoctista, Protista) and multicelluar (tissue-specific-Histonia) forms. (2.2) Types of the organization distinguishing groups of one level: for example, amoedoid type (Sarcodina), naked (Gymnamoebia), and testate (Testacea) amoebas. (2.3) Taxonomic groups as set-theoretical approximations of taxa. (2.4) Groups of the mixed nature. For example, Haeckel has recognized Protophyta and Protozoa describing the unicellular level of the organization inside plants and animals accordingly. Protozoa in Cavalier-Smith's system (2002, 2004) is also an example of groups of the mixed nature. PMID:16245570

  5. Optimization of detection geometry for industrial SPECT by Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. G.; Kim, C. H.; Han, M. C.; Jung, S. H.; Kim, J. B.; Moon, J.

    2013-04-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed an industrial SPECT to investigate the fluid flow and mixing patterns in columns. It has been found that the industrial SPECT is indeed a very powerful tool to study the hydrodynamics in multiphase reactors. One of the practical issues in the development of industrial SPECTs is to achieve a required imaging resolution of an industrial SPECT with a minimum number of component detectors, the number of which is frequently limited by both the size of the detectors and the total cost of the imaging system. In the present study, a set of different geometries of industrial SPECTs were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation using MCNPX to determine the minimum number of detectors that will provide a spatial resolution that corresponds to 10% of the cylindrical column diameter. Our results show that 11 and 12 detectors will satisfy the 10% resolution requirement for the 40 cm and 60 cm diameter columns, respectively, for the industrial SPECT and radioisotopes considered in the present study. The conclusion of this result is valid only for the case considered in the present study, but we believe that the same procedure can be applied to other industrial SPECTs for this kind of optimization.

  6. Application of SPECT/CT imaging system and radiochemical analysis for investigation of blood kinetics and tissue distribution of radiolabeled plumbagin in healthy and Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Sumsakul, W; Karbwang, J; Na-Bangchang, K

    2016-02-01

    Plumbagin is a derivative of napthoquinone which is isolated from the roots of plants in several families. These compound exhibits a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities including antimalarial, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities. The aim of the study was to investigate blood kinetics and tissue distribution of plumbagin in healthy and Plasmodium berghei-infected mice using Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and radiochemical analysis by gamma counter. Plumbagin was labeled with (99m)technetium and the reducing agent stannous chloride dihydrate (50 μg/ml) at pH 6.5. Blood kinetics and tissue distribution of the radiolabeled plumbagin were investigated in healthy and P. berghei-infected mice (2 males and 2 females for each experimental group). In vitro and in vivo stability of plumbagin complex suggested satisfactory stability profiles of (99m)Tc-plumbagin complex in plasma and normal saline (92.21-95.47%) within 24 h. Significant difference in blood kinetics parameters (Cmax, AUC, t1/2, MRT, Vd, and CL) were observed between P. berghei-infected and healthy mice. The labeled complex distributed to all organs of both healthy and infected mice but with high intensity in liver, followed by lung, stomach, large intestine and kidney. Accumulation in spleen was markedly noticeable in the infected mice. Plumbagin-labeled complex was rapidly cleared from blood and major routes of excretion were hepatobiliary and pulmonary routes. In P. berghei-infected mice, t1/2 was significantly decreased, while Vd and CL were increased compared with healthy mice. Result suggests that malaria disease state influenced the pharmacokinetics and disposition of plumbagin. SPECT/CT imaging with radiolabeled (99m)Tc is a viable non-invasive technique that can be applied for investigation of kinetics and biodistribution of plumbagin in animal models. PMID:26713669

  7. High-resolution emission tomography of small laboratory animals: physics and gamma-astronomy meet molecular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, F. J.; Colijn, A. P.; Vastenhouw, B.; Wiegant, V. M.; Gerrits, M. A. F. M.

    2003-08-01

    Molecular imaging can be defined as the characterization and measurement of biological processes in living animals, model systems and humans at the cellular and molecular level using remote imaging detectors. An example concerns the mapping of the distributions of radioactively labeled molecules in laboratory animals which is of crucial importance for life sciences. Tomographic methods like Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) offer a possibility to visualize distributions of radioactively labeled molecules in living animals. Miniature tomography systems, derived from their clinical counterparts, but with a much higher image resolution are under development in several institutes. An example is U-SPECT that will be discussed in the present paper. Such systems are expected to accelerate several biomedical research procedures, the understanding of gene and protein function, as well as pharmaceutical development.

  8. Scatter and crosstalk corrections for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging using a CZT SPECT system with pinhole collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Peng; Hutton, Brian F.; Holstensson, Maria; Ljungberg, Michael; Hendrik Pretorius, P.; Prasad, Rameshwar; Liu, Chi; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Thorn, Stephanie L.; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The energy spectrum for a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has a low energy tail due to incomplete charge collection and intercrystal scattering. Due to these solid-state detector effects, scatter would be overestimated if the conventional triple-energy window (TEW) method is used for scatter and crosstalk corrections in CZT-based imaging systems. The objective of this work is to develop a scatter and crosstalk correction method for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging for a CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT system with pinhole collimators (GE Discovery NM 530c/570c). Methods: A tailing model was developed to account for the low energy tail effects of the CZT detector. The parameters of the model were obtained using {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I point source measurements. A scatter model was defined to characterize the relationship between down-scatter and self-scatter projections. The parameters for this model were obtained from Monte Carlo simulation using SIMIND. The tailing and scatter models were further incorporated into a projection count model, and the primary and self-scatter projections of each radionuclide were determined with a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) iterative estimation approach. The extracted scatter and crosstalk projections were then incorporated into MLEM image reconstruction as an additive term in forward projection to obtain scatter- and crosstalk-corrected images. The proposed method was validated using Monte Carlo simulation, line source experiment, anthropomorphic torso phantom studies, and patient studies. The performance of the proposed method was also compared to that obtained with the conventional TEW method. Results: Monte Carlo simulations and line source experiment demonstrated that the TEW method overestimated scatter while their proposed method provided more accurate scatter estimation by considering the low energy tail effect. In the phantom study, improved defect contrasts were

  9. Development of a triple modality small animal planar imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Weisenberger, Z. Lee, S. Majewski, B. Kross, V. Popov, B. Welch, R. Wojcik, C. Zorn

    2006-02-01

    Recently small animal research utilizing nuclear medicine based imaging has been combined with structural anatomical imaging from x-ray radiography providing a powerful tool for animal researchers. The addition of a third modality is the goal of our instrumentation development. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Case Western Reserve University have been collaborating on the development of a planar imaging system which in addition to radiopharmaceutical based functional imaging and x-ray radiography structural imaging also allows for the in vivo bioluminescence imaging thus providing another functional imaging modality. For the gamma camera we use is a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier tube coupled to a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillator array with individual crystal elements 1 mm × 1 mm × 5 mm in size and a 0.25 mm septum between each element. The gamma camera has a 10 cm diameter active area and can be used for 125I, 99mT and 111In radionuclide imaging. To acquire anatomical information we are using a Rad-Icon Shad-o-Box X-ray detector that provides a field of view of 5 cm × 10 cm. The x-ray source is a Source-Ray compact x-ray generator. We are using a Princeton Instruments cooled CCD based detector for the imaging of the bio-distribution of bioluminescence. All three imaging instruments will be integrated into a single light tight / x-ray tight enclosure.

  10. Method and apparatus for animal positioning in imaging systems

    DOEpatents

    Hadjioannou, Arion-Xenofon; Stout, David B.; Silverman, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus for imaging an animal includes a first mounting surface, a bed sized to support the animal and releasably secured to or integral with the first mounting surface. The apparatus also includes a plurality of straps, each having a first end in a fixed position relative to the bed and a second end for tightening around a limb of the animal. A method for in-vivo imaging of an animal includes providing an animal that has limbs, providing a first mounting surface, and providing a bed removably secured to or integral with the mounting surface and sized to support the animal as well as being coupled to a plurality of straps. The method also includes placing the animal on the bed between the plurality of straps and tightening at least two of the plurality of straps around at least two of the limbs such that the animal is substantially secured in place relative to the bed.

  11. Comprehending emergent systems phenomena through direct-manipulation animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Priscilla Abel

    This study seeks to understand the type of interaction mode that best supports learning and comprehension of emergent systems phenomena. Given that the literature has established that students hold robust misconceptions of such phenomena, this study investigates the influence of using three types of interaction; speed-manipulation animation (SMN), post-manipulation animation (PMA) and direct-manipulation animation (DMA) for increasing comprehension and testing transfer of the phenomena, by looking at the effect of simultaneous interaction of haptic and visual channels on long term and working memories when seeking to comprehend emergent phenomena. The questions asked were: (1) Does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool (i.e., SMA, PMA or DMA), improve students' mental model construction of systems, thus increasing comprehension of this scientific concept? And (2) does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, give the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which can then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios? In an empirical study undergraduate and graduate students were asked to participate in one of three experimental conditions: SMA, PMA, or DMA. The results of the study found that it was the participants of the SMA treatment condition that had the most improvement in post-test scores. Students' understanding of the phenomena increased most when they used a dynamic model with few interactive elements (i.e., start, stop, and speed) that allowed for real time visualization of one's interaction on the phenomena. Furthermore, no indication was found that the learning of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, gave the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which could then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios

  12. 40 CFR 160.90 - Animal and other test system care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.90 Animal and other test... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Animal and other test system care. 160... care of animals and other test systems. (b) All newly received test systems from outside sources...

  13. An investigation of inconsistent projections and artefacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with axially aligned pinholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kench, P. L.; Lin, J.; Gregoire, M. C.; Meikle, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple pinholes are advantageous for maximizing the use of the available field of view (FOV) of compact small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detectors. However, when the pinholes are aligned axially to optimize imaging of extended objects, such as rodents, multiplexing of the pinhole projections can give rise to inconsistent data which leads to 'ghost point' artefacts in the reconstructed volume. A novel four pinhole collimator with a baffle was designed and implemented to eliminate these inconsistent projections. Simulation and physical phantom studies were performed to investigate artefacts from axially aligned pinholes and the efficacy of the baffle in removing inconsistent data and, thus, reducing reconstruction artefacts. SPECT was performed using a Defrise phantom to investigate the impact of collimator design on FOV utilization and axial blurring effects. Multiple pinhole SPECT acquired with a baffle had fewer artefacts and improved quantitative accuracy when compared to SPECT acquired without a baffle. The use of four pinholes positioned in a square maximized the available FOV, increased acquisition sensitivity and reduced axial blurring effects. These findings support the use of a baffle to eliminate inconsistent projection data arising from axially aligned pinholes and improve small animal SPECT reconstructions.

  14. Animation of multi-flexible body systems and its use in control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juengst, Carl; Stahlberg, Ron

    1993-01-01

    Animation can greatly assist the structural dynamicist and control system analyst with better understanding of how multi-flexible body systems behave. For multi-flexible body systems, the structural characteristics (mode frequencies, mode shapes, and damping) change, sometimes dramatically with large angles of rotation between bodies. With computer animation, the analyst can visualize these changes and how the system responds to active control forces and torques. A characterization of the type of system we wish to animate is presented. The lack of clear understanding of the above effects was a key element leading to the development of a multi-flexible body animation software package. The resulting animation software is described in some detail here, followed by its application to the control system analyst. Other applications of this software can be determined on an individual need basis. A number of software products are currently available that make the high-speed rendering of rigid body mechanical system simulation possible. However, such options are not available for use in rendering flexible body mechanical system simulations. The desire for a high-speed flexible body visualization tool led to the development of the Flexible Or Rigid Mechanical System (FORMS) software. This software was developed at the Center for Simulation and Design Optimization of Mechanical Systems at the University of Iowa. FORMS provides interactive high-speed rendering of flexible and/or rigid body mechanical system simulations, and combines geometry and motion information to produce animated output. FORMS is designed to be both portable and flexible, and supports a number of different user interfaces and graphical display devices. Additional features have been added to FORMS that allow special visualization results related to the nature of the flexible body geometric representations.

  15. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  16. Blood compatible microfluidic system for pharmacokinetic studies in small animals.

    PubMed

    Convert, Laurence; Baril, Frédérique Girard; Boisselle, Vincent; Pratte, Jean-François; Fontaine, Réjean; Lecomte, Roger; Charette, Paul G; Aimez, Vincent

    2012-11-21

    New radiotracer developments for nuclear medicine imaging require the analysis of blood as a function of time in small animal models. A microfluidic device was developed to monitor the radioactivity concentration in the blood of rats and mice in real time. The microfluidic technology enables a large capture solid angle and a reduction in the separation distance between the sample and detector, thus increasing the detection efficiency. This in turn allows a reduction of the required detection volume without compromising sensitivity, an important advantage with rodent models having a small total blood volume (a few ml). A robust fabrication process was developed to manufacture the microchannels on top of unpackaged p-i-n photodiodes without altering detector performance. The microchannels were fabricated with KMPR, an epoxy-based photoresist similar to SU-8 but with improved resistance to stress-induced fissuring. Surface passivation of the KMPR enables non-diluted whole blood to flow through the channel for up to 20 min at low speed without clotting. The microfluidic device was embedded in a portable blood counter with dedicated electronics, pumping unit and computer control software for utilisation next to a small animal nuclear imaging scanner. Experimental measurements confirmed model predictions and showed a 4- to 19-fold improvement in detection efficiency over existing catheter-based devices, enabling a commensurate reduction in sampled blood volume. A linear dose-response relationship was demonstrated for radioactivity concentrations typical of experiments with rodents. The system was successfully used to measure the blood input function of rats in real time after radiotracer injection.

  17. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  18. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation. PMID:25824018

  19. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation.

  20. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  1. Learning about Skeletons and Other Organ Systems of Vertebrate Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Reiss, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes students' (n=175) understandings of the structure of animal (including human) skeletons and the internal organs found in them. Finds that older students have a better knowledge of animals' internal anatomies, although knowledge of human internal structure is significantly better than knowledge of rat, bird, and fish internal structure.…

  2. Murine cardiac images obtained with focusing pinhole SPECT are barely influenced by extra-cardiac activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan; van der Have, Frans; Vastenhouw, Brendan; Viergever, Max A.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-high-resolution SPECT images can be obtained with focused multipinhole collimators. Here we investigate the influence of unwanted high tracer uptake outside the scan volume on reconstructed tracer distributions inside the scan volume, for 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scanning in mice. Simulated projections of a digital mouse phantom (MOBY) in a focusing multipinhole SPECT system (U-SPECT-II, MILabs, The Netherlands) were generated. With this system differently sized user-defined scan volumes can be selected, by translating the animal in 3D through the focusing collimators. Scan volume selections were set to (i) a minimal volume containing just the heart, acquired without translating the animal during scanning, (ii) a slightly larger scan volume as is typically applied for the heart, requiring only small XYZ translations during scanning, (iii) same as (ii), but extended further transaxially, and (iv) same as (ii), but extended transaxially to cover the full thorax width (gold standard). Despite an overall negative bias that is significant for the minimal scan volume, all selected volumes resulted in visually similar images. Quantitative differences in the reconstructed myocardium between gold standard and the results from the smaller scan volume selections were small; the 17 standardized myocardial segments of a bull's eye plot, normalized to the myocardial mean of the gold standard, deviated on average 6.0%, 2.5% and 1.9% for respectively the minimal, the typical and the extended scan volume, while maximum absolute deviations were respectively 18.6%, 9.0% and 5.2%. Averaged over ten low-count noisy simulations, the mean absolute deviations were respectively 7.9%, 3.2% and 1.9%. In low-count noisy simulations, the mean and maximum absolute deviations for the minimal scan volume could be reduced to respectively 4.2% and 12.5% by performing a short survey scan of the exterior activity and focusing the remaining scan time at the organ of interest. We

  3. Animals and the invention of the Phanerozoic Earth system.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Nicholas J

    2011-02-01

    Animals do not just occupy the modern biosphere, they permeate its structure and define how it works. Their unique combination of organ-grade multicellularity, motility and heterotrophic habit makes them powerful geobiological agents, imposing myriad feedbacks on nutrient cycling, productivity and environment. Most significantly, animals have 'engineered' the biosphere over evolutionary time, forcing the diversification of, for example, phytoplankton, land plants, trophic structure, large body size, bioturbation, biomineralization and indeed the evolutionary process itself. This review surveys how animals contribute to the modern world and provides a basis for reconstructing ancient ecosystems. Earlier, less animal-influenced biospheres worked quite differently from the one currently occupied, with the Ediacaran-Cambrian radiation of organ-grade animals marking a fundamental shift in macroecological and macroevolutionary expression.

  4. An isolated working heart system for large animal models.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Matthew A; Southerland, Kevin W; Feger, Bryan J; Linder, Dean; Ali, Ayyaz A; Njoroge, Linda; Milano, Carmelo A; Bowles, Dawn E

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction in the late 19(th) century, the Langendorff isolated heart perfusion apparatus, and the subsequent development of the working heart model, have been invaluable tools for studying cardiovascular function and disease(1-15). Although the Langendorff heart preparation can be used for any mammalian heart, most studies involving this apparatus use small animal models (e.g., mouse, rat, and rabbit) due to the increased complexity of systems for larger mammals(1,3,11). One major difficulty is ensuring a constant coronary perfusion pressure over a range of different heart sizes - a key component of any experiment utilizing this device(1,11). By replacing the classic hydrostatic afterload column with a centrifugal pump, the Langendorff working heart apparatus described below allows for easy adjustment and tight regulation of perfusion pressures, meaning the same set-up can be used for various species or heart sizes. Furthermore, this configuration can also seamlessly switch between constant pressure or constant flow during reperfusion, depending on the user's preferences. The open nature of this setup, despite making temperature regulation more difficult than other designs, allows for easy collection of effluent and ventricular pressure-volume data. PMID:24962492

  5. Satellite telemetry: performance of animal-tracking systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keating, Kim A.; Brewster, Wayne G.; Key, Carl H.

    1991-01-01

    t: We used 10 Telonics ST-3 platform transmitter terminals (PTT's) configured for wolves and ungulates to examine the performance of the Argos satellite telemetry system. Under near-optimal conditions, 68 percentile errors for location qualities (NQ) 1, 2, and 3 were 1,188, 903, and 361 m, respectively. Errors (rE) exceeded expected values for NQ = 2 and 3, varied greatly among PTT's, increased as the difference (HE) between the estimated and actual PTT elevations increased, and were correlated nonlinearly with maximum satellite pass height (P,). We present a model of the relationships among rE, HE, and PH. Errors were bimodally distributed along the east-west axis and tended to occur away from the satellite when HE was positive. A southeasterly bias increased with HE, probably due to the particular distribution of satellite passes and effects of HE on rE. Under near-optimal conditions, 21 sensor message was received for up to 64% of available (PH, 50) satellite passes, and a location (NQ 2 1) was calculated for up to 63% of such passes. Sampling frequencies of sensor and location data declined 13 and 70%, respectively, for PTT's in a valley bottom and 65 and 86%, respectively, for PTT's on animals that were in valley bottoms. Sampling frequencies were greater for ungulate than for wolf collars.

  6. Microchip implant system used for animal identification in laboratory rabbits, guineapigs, woodchucks and in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, M; Fischer, R; Trendelenburg, M; Zillmann, U

    1995-07-01

    Traditional methods for animal identification have a number of drawbacks. We evaluated a new system for individual identification using microchip implants in rabbits, guineapigs, woodchucks (Marmota monax) and amphibians (Xenopus laevis, Pleurodeles waltlii). Implantation procedure and long-term observations are described. Microchip implants proved to be a practicable and reliable system for animal identification without obvious adverse effects. The applicability of electronic animal identification in comparison with common methods and with regard to animal welfare and legal aspects is discussed.

  7. Automatic real-time pair-feeding system for animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Connolly, J. P.; Hitchman, M. J.; Humbert, J. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A pair feeding method and apparatus are provided for experimental animals wherein the amount of food consumed is immediately delivered to a normal or control animal so that there is a qualitative, quantitative and chronological correctness in the pair feeding of the two animals. This feeding mechanism delivers precisely measured amounts of food to a feeder. Circuitry is provided between master and slave feeders so that there is virtually no chance of a malfunction of the feeding apparatus, causing erratic results. Recording equipment is also provided so that an hourly record is kept of food delivery.

  8. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Third yearly progress report, September 1991--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  9. Anamorphic preclinical SPECT imaging with high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a 60 mm x 60 mm, millimeter-thick megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector that permits ultrahigh-resolution imaging. While the stopping power of silicon is low for many common clinical radioisotopes, its performance is sufficient in the range of 20-60 keV to allow practical imaging experiments. The low-energy emissions of 125I fall within this energy window, and the 60-day half life provides an advantage for longitudinal studies. The flexible nature of this system allows the future application of adaptive imaging techniques. We have demonstrated ˜225-mum axial and ˜175-mum transaxial resolution across a 2.65 cm3 cylindrical field of view, as well as the capability for simultaneous multi-isotope acquisitions. We describe the key advancements that have made this system operational, including bringing up a new detector readout ASIC, development of detector control software and data-processing algorithms, and characterization of operating characteristics. We describe design and fabrication of the adjustable slit aperture platform, as well as the development of an accurate imaging forward model and its application in a novel geometric calibration technique and a GPU-based ultrahigh-resolution reconstruction code.

  10. SPECT in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, J.C.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Yudd, A.P.

    1985-05-01

    Tc99m labeled red blood cell blood flow and delayed static blood pool imaging is widely accepted as a reliable, accurate method for the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomata. The purpose of this study is to assess the relative value of SPECT blood pool imaging in the evaluation of hepatic hemangionata. A total of 68 patients, including 21 patients with proven hepatic cavernous hemangiomas, were studied using both planar and SPECT imaging techniques. All patients underwent multi-phase evaluation which included a hepatic flow study, immediate planar images of the liver, followed by a 360/sup 0/ tomographic (SPECT) study and subsequent 60 minute delayed static planar hepatic blood pool images. All 21 patients with proven hepatic hemangiomas had a positive SPECT exam and 17 of the 21 (81%) patients had a positive planar exam. In the 21 patients, there were a total of 36 hemangiomas ranging in size from .7 cm to 13 cm. The SPECT imaging technique correctly identified all 36 lesions (100%) where as planar imaging detected 25 of the 36 lesions (69.4%). In all the remaining patients (10-normal, 17-metastatic disease, 12-hepatocellular disease, 6-hepatoma, 2-liver cysts), both the planar and SPECT imaging techniques were interpreted as showing no evidence of focal sequestration of red blood cells. SPECT hepatic blood pool imaging represents an improvement in the evaluation of hepatic hemangioma as a result of a reduction in imaging time (less than thirty minutes), improved spatial resolution and greater overall accuracy.

  11. 40 CFR 160.90 - Animal and other test system care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... identification shall be made. (1) Plants, invertebrate animals, aquatic vertebrate animals, and organisms that..., holding tanks, ponds, growth chambers, and other holding, rearing and breeding areas, and accessory... interfere with the study shall not be used. (j) All plant and animal test systems shall be acclimatized...

  12. 40 CFR 160.90 - Animal and other test system care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... identification shall be made. (1) Plants, invertebrate animals, aquatic vertebrate animals, and organisms that..., holding tanks, ponds, growth chambers, and other holding, rearing and breeding areas, and accessory... interfere with the study shall not be used. (j) All plant and animal test systems shall be acclimatized...

  13. SPECT reconstruction on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Christoph; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2008-03-01

    With the increasing reliance of doctors on imaging procedures, not only visualization needs to be optimized, but the reconstruction of the volumes from the scanner output is another bottleneck. Accelerating the computationally intensive reconstruction process improves the medical work flow, matches the reconstruction speed to the acquisition speed, and allows fast batch processing and interactive or near-interactive parameter tuning. Recently, much effort has been focused on using the computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs) for general purpose computations. This paper presents a GPU-accelerated implementation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on an ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm. The algorithm uses models for the point-spread-function (PSF) to improve spatial resolution in the reconstruction images. Instead of computing the PSF directly, it is modeled as efficient blurring of slabs on the GPU in order to accelerate the process. The algorithm for the calculation of accumulated attenuation factors that allows correcting the generated volume according to the attenuation properties of the volume is optimized for processing on the GPU. Since these factors can be reused between different iterations, a cache is used that is adapted to different sizes of the video memory so that only those factors have to be recomputed that do not fit onto graphics memory. These improvements make the reconstruction of typical SPECT volume near interactive.

  14. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  15. A video-based system for hand-driven stop-motion animation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoguang; Fu, Hongbo; Zheng, Hanlin; Liu, Ligang; Wang, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Stop-motion is a well-established animation technique but is often laborious and requires craft skills. A new video-based system can animate the vast majority of everyday objects in stop-motion style, more flexibly and intuitively. Animators can perform and capture motions continuously instead of breaking them into increments and shooting one still picture per increment. More important, the system permits direct hand manipulation without resorting to rigs, achieving more natural object control for beginners. The system's key component is two-phase keyframe-based capturing and processing, assisted by computer vision techniques. With this system, even amateurs can generate high-quality stop-motion animations.

  16. [Usefulness of attenuation correction with transmission source in myocardial SPECT].

    PubMed

    Murakawa, Keizo; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Naoyuki; Sago, Masayoshi; Oka, Hisashi

    2006-01-20

    Attenuation correction in SPECT has been used for uniformly absorptive objects like the head. On the other hand, it has seldom been applied to nonuniform absorptive objects like the heart and surrounding lungs because of the difficulty and inaccuracy of data processing. However, since attenuation correction using a transmission source recently became practical, we were able to apply this method to a nonuniform absorptive object. Therefore, we evaluated the usefulness of this attenuation correction system with a transmission source in myocardial SPECT. The dose linearity, defect/normal ratio using a myocardial phantom, and myocardial count distribution in clinical cases was examined with and without the attenuation correction system. We found that all data processed with attenuation correction were better than those without attenuation correction. For example, in myocardial count distribution, while there was a difference between men and women without attenuation correction, which was considered to be caused by differences in body shape, after processing with attenuation correction, myocardial count distribution was almost the same in all cases. In conclusion, these results suggested that attenuation correction with a transmission source was useful in myocardial SPECT.

  17. First use of mini gamma cameras for intra-operative robotic SPECT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Philipp; Sharma, Kanishka; Okur, Ash; Gardiazabal, José; Vogel, Jakob; Lasserl, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2013-01-01

    Different types of nuclear imaging systems have been used in the past, starting with pre-operative gantry-based SPECT systems and gamma cameras for 2D imaging of radioactive distributions. The main applications are concentrated on diagnostic imaging, since traditional SPECT systems and gamma cameras are bulky and heavy. With the development of compact gamma cameras with good resolution and high sensitivity, it is now possible to use them without a fixed imaging gantry. Mounting the camera onto a robot arm solves the weight issue, while also providing a highly repeatable and reliable acquisition platform. In this work we introduce a novel robotic setup performing scans with a mini gamma camera, along with the required calibration steps, and show the first SPECT reconstructions. The results are extremely promising, both in terms of image quality as well as reproducibility. In our experiments, the novel setup outperformed a commercial fhSPECT system, reaching accuracies comparable to state-of-the-art SPECT systems.

  18. An Intelligent Recommendation System for Animation Scriptwriters' Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shang-Te; Chang, Ting-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Producing an animation requires extensive labor, time, and money. Experienced directors and screenwriters are required to design scenes using standard props and actors in position. This study structurally analyzes the script and defines scenes, characters, positions, dialogue, etc., according to their dramatic attributes. These are entered into a…

  19. Remote Laboratory and Animal Behaviour: An Interactive Open Field System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Lorenzo; Ratti, Giovannino

    2007-01-01

    Remote laboratories can provide distant learners with practical acquisitions which would otherwise remain precluded. Our proposal here is a remote laboratory on a behavioural test (open field test), with the aim of introducing learners to the observation and analysis of stereotyped behaviour in animals. A real-time video of a mouse in an…

  20. Designing an Algorithm Animation System To Support Instructional Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton-Taylor, Ashley George; Kraemer, Eileen

    2002-01-01

    The authors are conducting a study of instructors teaching data structure and algorithm topics, with a focus on the use of diagrams and tracing. The results of this study are being used to inform the design of the Support Kit for Animation (SKA). This article describes a preliminary version of SKA, and possible usage scenarios. (Author/AEF)

  1. General Principles for the welfare of animals in production systems: the underlying science and its application.

    PubMed

    Fraser, David; Duncan, Ian J H; Edwards, Sandra A; Grandin, Temple; Gregory, Neville G; Guyonnet, Vincent; Hemsworth, Paul H; Huertas, Stella M; Huzzey, Juliana M; Mellor, David J; Mench, Joy A; Spinka, Marek; Whay, H Rebecca

    2013-10-01

    In 2012, the World Organisation for Animal Health adopted 10 'General Principles for the Welfare of Animals in Livestock Production Systems' to guide the development of animal welfare standards. The General Principles draw on half a century of scientific research relevant to animal welfare: (1) how genetic selection affects animal health, behaviour and temperament; (2) how the environment influences injuries and the transmission of diseases and parasites; (3) how the environment affects resting, movement and the performance of natural behaviour; (4) the management of groups to minimize conflict and allow positive social contact; (5) the effects of air quality, temperature and humidity on animal health and comfort; (6) ensuring access to feed and water suited to the animals' needs and adaptations; (7) prevention and control of diseases and parasites, with humane euthanasia if treatment is not feasible or recovery is unlikely; (8) prevention and management of pain; (9) creation of positive human-animal relationships; and (10) ensuring adequate skill and knowledge among animal handlers. Research directed at animal welfare, drawing on animal behaviour, stress physiology, veterinary epidemiology and other fields, complements more established fields of animal and veterinary science and helps to create a more comprehensive scientific basis for animal care and management.

  2. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  3. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Updated:Sep 11,2015 ... Persantine) or dobutamine. The tests may take between 2 and 2 1/2 hours. What happens after ...

  4. Cerebral SPECT imaging: Impact on clinical management

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, M.; Jacobs, S.; Pozniakof, T.

    1994-05-01

    Although cerebral SPECT has been reported to be of value in a variety of neurologic disorders, there is limited data available on the value of SPECT relative to clinical management decisions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cerebral SPECT imaging on patient management. A total of 94 consecutive patients referred for clinical evaluation with brain SPECT were included in this study. Patients were assigned to one of nine groups depending on the clinical indication for the study. These groups included transient ischemia (16), stroke (20), dementia (18), seizures (5), hemorrhage (13), head trauma (6), arteriovenous malformations (6), encephalopathy (6) and a miscellaneous (4) group. All patients were injected with 99mTc HMPAO in doses ranging from 15 mCi to 22 mCi (555 MBq to 814 MBq) and scanned on a triple headed SPECT gamma camera. Two weeks after completion of the study, a standardized interview was conducted between the nuclear and referring physicians to determine if the SPECT findings contributed to an alteration in patient management. Overall, patient management was significantly altered in 47% of the cases referred. The greatest impact on patient management occurred in the group evaluated for transient ischemia, where a total of 13/16 (81%) of patients had their clinical management altered as a result of the cerebral SPECT findings. Clinical management was altered in 61% of patients referred for evaluation of dementia, 67% of patients evaluated for arteriovenous malformations, and 50% of patients with head trauma. In the remainder of the patients, alteration in clinical management ranged from 17% to 50% of patients. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of cerebral SPECT imaging since in a significant number of cases clinical management was altered as a result of the examination. Long term follow up will be necessary to determine patient outcome.

  5. A resistive heating system for homeothermic maintenance in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Kersemans, Veerle; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D.; Beech, John S.; Kinchesh, Paul; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Smart, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MR-compatible resistive heater for temperature maintenance of anaesthetized animals. Materials and Methods An MR-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from a tightly-wound twisted pair wire, interfaced to a homeothermic maintenance controller. Fat-suppressed images and localized spectra were acquired with the twisted pair heater and a near-identical single strand heater during operation at maximum power. Data were also acquired in the absence of heating to demonstrate the insensitivity of MR to distortions arising from the passage of current through the heater elements. The efficacy of temperature maintenance was examined by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anesthesia and throughout and after the acquisition of a heater artifact-prone image series. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of DC current through the twisted pair heater were identical whereas the passage of current through the single strand wire created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature that is lost during anesthesia induction was recovered within approximately 10–20 minutes of induction, and a stable temperature is reached as the animal's temperature approaches the set target. Conclusion The twisted pair wire heater does not interfere with MR image quality and maintains adequate thermal input to the animal to maintain body temperature. PMID:25863135

  6. Understanding Mechanical Systems Through Computer Animation and Kinematic Imagery. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Patricia A.; Just, Marcel Adam

    One purpose of this research is to develop models of cognitive processes in understanding mechanical systems. A particular focus was on the processes in mentally animating the representation of a mechanical system, and the contribution of animation graphics in comprehension. Several studies, involving eye fixations, verbal protocols, and process…

  7. Temperature dependent operation of PSAPD-based compact gamma camera for SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtaek; McClish, Mickel; Alhassen, Fares; Seo, Youngho; Shah, Kanai S; Gould, Robert G

    2011-10-10

    We investigated the dependence of image quality on the temperature of a position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD)-based small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gamma camera with a CsI:Tl scintillator. Currently, nitrogen gas cooling is preferred to operate PSAPDs in order to minimize the dark current shot noise. Being able to operate a PSAPD at a relatively high temperature (e.g., 5 °C) would allow a more compact and simple cooling system for the PSAPD. In our investigation, the temperature of the PSAPD was controlled by varying the flow of cold nitrogen gas through the PSAPD module and varied from -40 °C to 20 °C. Three experiments were performed to demonstrate the performance variation over this temperature range. The point spread function (PSF) of the gamma camera was measured at various temperatures, showing variation of full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the PSF. In addition, a (99m)Tc-pertechnetate (140 keV) flood source was imaged and the visibility of the scintillator segmentation (16×16 array, 8 mm × 8 mm area, 400 μm pixel size) at different temperatures was evaluated. Comparison of image quality was made at -25 °C and 5 °C using a mouse heart phantom filled with an aqueous solution of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate and imaged using a 0.5 mm pinhole collimator made of tungsten. The reconstructed image quality of the mouse heart phantom at 5 °C degraded in comparision to the reconstructed image quality at -25 °C. However, the defect and structure of the mouse heart phantom were clearly observed, showing the feasibility of operating PSAPDs for SPECT imaging at 5 °C, a temperature that would not need the nitrogen cooling. All PSAPD evaluations were conducted with an applied bias voltage that allowed the highest gain at a given temperature.

  8. Satisfaction of farm animal behavioral needs in behaviorally restricted systems: reducing stressors and environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    In modern intensive husbandry, systems often restrict farm animal behavior. Behavioral needs will be generated by external stimuli such as stressors deriving from environmental factors or the method of animal care, or some internal factor in farm animals. This means that behavioral restriction would induce maladaptation to stressors or chronic stress. Such a risk of behavioral restriction degrades an animal's physical and mental health and leads to economic loss at a farm. Methods to reduce the risk of behavioral restrictions are to ameliorate the source of a stressor through adequate animal management or to carry out environmental enrichment. This review is intended to describe the relation between animal management and behavioral needs from the perspective of animal motivation.

  9. MOAB: a spatially explicit, individual-based expert system for creating animal foraging models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.; Finn, John T.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the development, structure, and corroboration process of a simulation model of animal behavior (MOAB). MOAB can create spatially explicit, individual-based animal foraging models. Users can create or replicate heterogeneous landscape patterns, and place resources and individual animals of a goven species on that landscape to simultaneously simulate the foraging behavior of multiple species. The heuristic rules for animal behavior are maintained in a user-modifiable expert system. MOAB can be used to explore hypotheses concerning the influence of landscape patttern on animal movement and foraging behavior. A red fox (Vulpes vulpes L.) foraging and nest predation model was created to test MOAB's capabilities. Foxes were simulated for 30-day periods using both expert system and random movement rules. Home range size, territory formation and other available simulation studies. A striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis L.) model also was developed. The expert system model proved superior to stochastic in respect to territory formation, general movement patterns and home range size.

  10. Systems Biology in Animal Breeding: Identifying relationships among markers, genes, and phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Breeding and Genetics Symposium titled “Systems Biology in Animal Breeding: Identifying relationships among markers, genes, and phenotypes” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in Phoenix, AZ, July 15 to 19, 201...

  11. System identification of perilymphatic fistula in an animal model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Casselbrant, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    An acute animal model has been developed in the chinchilla for the study of perilymphatic fistulas. Micropunctures were made in three sites to simulate bony, round window, and oval window fistulas. The eye movements in response to pressure applied to the external auditory canal were recorded after micropuncture induction and in preoperative controls. The main pressure stimulus was a pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) that rapidly changed between plus and minus 200 mm of water. The PRBS stimulus, with its wide frequency bandwidth, produced responses clearly above the preoperative baseline in 78 percent of the runs. The response was better between 0.5 and 3.3 Hz than it was below 0.5 Hz. The direction of horizontal eye movement was toward the side of the fistula with positive pressure applied in 92 percent of the runs. Vertical eye movements were also observed. The ratio of vertical eye displacement to horizontal eye displacement depended upon the site of the micropuncture induction. Thus, such a ratio measurement may be clinically useful in the noninvasive localization of perilymphatic fistulas in humans.

  12. Animal models for the study of the effects of spaceflight on the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    2003-10-01

    Animal models have been used to determine the effects of spaceflight on the immune system. Rats and rhesus monkeys have been the primary animals used for actual space flight studies, but mice have also been utilized for studies in ground-based models. The primary ground based model used has been hindlimb unloading of rodents, which is similar to the chronic bed-rest model for humans. A variety of immune responses have been shown to be modified when animals are hindlimb unloaded. These results parallel those observed when animals are flown in space. In general, immune responses are depressed in animals maintained in the hindlimb unloading model or flown in space. These results raise the possibility that spaceflight could result in decreased resistance to infection in animals.

  13. Telocytes in female reproductive system (human and animal).

    PubMed

    Aleksandrovych, Veronika; Walocha, Jerzy A; Gil, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a newly discovered type of cell with numerous functions. They have been found in a large variety of organs: heart (endo-, myo-, epi- and pericardium, myocardial sleeves, heart valves); digestive tract and annex glands (oesophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, liver, gallbladder, salivary gland, exocrine pancreas); respiratory system (trachea and lungs); urinary system (kidney, renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, urethra); female reproductive system (uterus, Fallopian tube, placenta, mammary gland); vasculature (blood vessels, thoracic duct); serous membranes (mesentery and pleura); and other organs (skeletal muscle, meninges and choroid plexus, neuromuscular spindles, fascia lata, skin, eye, prostate, bone marrow). Likewise, TCs are widely distributed in vertebrates (fish, reptiles, birds, mammals, including human). This review summarizes particular features of TCs in the female reproductive system, emphasizing their involvement in physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:27060783

  14. Towed Twin-Fuselage Glider Launch System (CGI Animation)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The towed glider is an element of the novel rocket-launching concept of the Towed Glider Air-Launch System (TGALS). The TGALS demonstration’s goal is to provide proof-of-concept of a towed, airborn...

  15. Report of the FELASA Working Group on evaluation of quality systems for animal units.

    PubMed

    Howard, B; van Herck, H; Guillen, J; Bacon, B; Joffe, R; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M

    2004-04-01

    This report compares and considers the merits of existing, internationally available quality management systems suitable for implementation in experimental animal facilities. These are: the Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines, ISO 9000:2000 (International Organization for Standardization) and AAALAC International (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International). Good laboratory practice (GLP) is a legal requirement for institutions undertaking non-clinical health and environmental studies for the purpose of registering or licensing for use and which have to be 'GLP-compliant'. GLP guidelines are often only relevant for and obtainable by those institutions. ISO is primarily an external business standard, which provides a management tool to master and optimize a business activity; it aims to implement and enhance 'customer satisfaction'. AAALAC is primarily a peer-reviewed system of accreditation which evaluates the organization and procedures in programmes of animal care and use to ensure the appropriate use of animals, safeguard animal well-being (ensuring state-of-the-art housing, management, procedural techniques, etc.) as well as the management of health and safety of staff. Management needs to determine, on the basis of a facility's specific goals, whether benefits would arise from the introduction of a quality system and, if so, which system is most appropriate. The successful introduction of a quality system confers peer-recognition against an independent standard, thereby providing assurance of standards of animal care and use, improving the quality of animal studies, and contributing to the three Rs-reduction, refinement and replacement.

  16. Report of the FELASA Working Group on evaluation of quality systems for animal units.

    PubMed

    Howard, B; van Herck, H; Guillen, J; Bacon, B; Joffe, R; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M

    2004-04-01

    This report compares and considers the merits of existing, internationally available quality management systems suitable for implementation in experimental animal facilities. These are: the Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines, ISO 9000:2000 (International Organization for Standardization) and AAALAC International (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International). Good laboratory practice (GLP) is a legal requirement for institutions undertaking non-clinical health and environmental studies for the purpose of registering or licensing for use and which have to be 'GLP-compliant'. GLP guidelines are often only relevant for and obtainable by those institutions. ISO is primarily an external business standard, which provides a management tool to master and optimize a business activity; it aims to implement and enhance 'customer satisfaction'. AAALAC is primarily a peer-reviewed system of accreditation which evaluates the organization and procedures in programmes of animal care and use to ensure the appropriate use of animals, safeguard animal well-being (ensuring state-of-the-art housing, management, procedural techniques, etc.) as well as the management of health and safety of staff. Management needs to determine, on the basis of a facility's specific goals, whether benefits would arise from the introduction of a quality system and, if so, which system is most appropriate. The successful introduction of a quality system confers peer-recognition against an independent standard, thereby providing assurance of standards of animal care and use, improving the quality of animal studies, and contributing to the three Rs-reduction, refinement and replacement. PMID:15070450

  17. Simultaneous SPECT imaging of multi-targets to assist in identifying hepatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Zhang, Deliang; Li, Yesen; Song, Manli; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Chen, Guibing; Liu, Ting; Liu, Pingguo; Wu, Hua; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging technique is an attractive tool to detect liver disease at early stage. This study aims to develop a simultaneous dual-isotope single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging method to assist diagnosis of hepatic tumor and liver fibrosis. Animal models of liver fibrosis and orthotopic human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were established. The tracers of 131I-NGA and 99mTc-3P-RGD2 were selected to target asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) on the hepatocytes and integrin αvβ3 receptor in tumor or fibrotic liver, respectively. SPECT imaging and biodistribution study were carried out to verify the feasibility and superiority. As expected, 99mTc-3P-RGD2 had the ability to evaluate liver fibrosis and detect tumor lesions. 131I-NGA showed that it was effective in assessing the anatomy and function of the liver. In synchronized dual-isotope SPECT/CT imaging, clear fusion images can be got within 30 minutes for diagnosing liver fibrosis and liver cancer. This new developed imaging approach enables the acquisition of different physiological information for diagnosing liver fibrosis, liver cancer and evaluating residual functional liver volume simultaneously. So synchronized dual-isotope SPECT/CT imaging with 99mTc-3P-RGD2 and 131I-NGA is an effective approach to detect liver disease, especially liver fibrosis and liver cancer. PMID:27377130

  18. ANIMATION AND VISUALIZATION OF WATER QUALITY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water may undergo a number of changes in the distribution system, making the quality of the water at the customer's tap different from the quality of the water that leaves the treatment plant. Such changes in quality may be caused by chemical or biological variations or by a loss...

  19. A Roadmap for the Development of Alternative (Non-Animal) Methods for Systemic Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new prod...

  20. Comparison of SPECT/CT and MRI in Diagnosing Symptomatic Lesions in Ankle and Foot Pain Patients: Diagnostic Performance and Relation to Lesion Type

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seunggyun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Yeon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Arya, Amitabh; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of SPECT/CT and MRI in patients with ankle and foot pain, with regard to the lesion types. Materials and Methods Fifty consecutive patients with ankle and foot pain, who underwent 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and MRI, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Symptomatic lesions were determined based on clinical examination and response to treatment. On MRI and SPECT/CT, detected lesions were classified as bone, ligament/tendon, and joint lesions. Uptake on SPECT/CT was assessed using a 4-grade system. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of SPECT/CT and MRI were evaluated in all detected lesions and each lesion type. Diagnostic value of uptake grade was analyzed using receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and diagnostic performance was compared using Chi-square or McNemar tests. Results In overall lesions, the sensitivity, PPV and NPV of SPECT/CT for symptomatic lesions were 93%, 56%, 91%, and they were 98%, 48%, 95% for MRI. There was no significant difference between SPECT/CT and MRI. However, the specificity of SPECT/CT was significantly higher than that of MRI (48% versus 24%, P = 0.016). Uptake grade on SPECT/CT was significantly higher in symptomatic lesions (P < 0.001), and its area under curve on ROC analysis was 0.787. In the analysis of each lesion type, the specificity of SPECT/CT was poor in joint lesions compared with other lesion types and MRI (P < 0.001, respectively). MRI exhibited lower specificity than SPECT/CT in bone lesions (P = 0.004) and ligament/tendon lesions (P < 0.001). Conclusions SPECT/CT has MRI-comparable diagnostic performance for symptomatic lesions in ankle and foot pain patients. SPECT/CT and MRI exhibit different diagnostic specificity in different lesion types. SPECT/CT may be used as a complementary imaging method to MRI for enhancing diagnostic specificity. PMID:25668182

  1. A reference system for animal biometrics: application to the northern leopard frog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petrovska-Delacretaz, D.; Edwards, A.; Chiasson, J.; Chollet, G.; Pilliod, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Reference systems and public databases are available for human biometrics, but to our knowledge nothing is available for animal biometrics. This is surprising because animals are not required to give their agreement to be in a database. This paper proposes a reference system and database for the northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens). Both are available for reproducible experiments. Results of both open set and closed set experiments are given.

  2. Optimal number of pinholes in multi-pinhole SPECT for mouse brain imaging—a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zixiong; Bal, Girish; Accorsi, Roberto; Acton, Paul D.

    2005-10-01

    This study simulates a multi-pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system using the Monte Carlo method, and investigates different multi-pinhole designs for quantitative mouse brain imaging. Prior approaches investigating multi-pinhole SPECT were not often optimal, as the number and geometrical arrangement of pinholes were usually chosen empirically. The present study seeks to optimize the number of pinholes for a given pinhole arrangement, and also for the specific application of quantitative neuroreceptor binding in the mouse brain. An analytical Monte Carlo simulation based method was used to generate the projection data for various count levels. A three-dimensional ordered-subsets expectation-maximization algorithm was developed and used to reconstruct the images, incorporating a realistic pinhole model for resolution recovery and noise reduction. Although artefacts arising from overlapping projections could be a major problem in multi-pinhole reconstruction, the cold-rod phantom study showed minimal loss of spatial resolution in multi-pinhole systems, compared to a single-pinhole system with the same pinhole diameter. A quantitative study of neuroreceptor binding sites using a mouse brain phantom and low activity (37 MBq) showed that the multi-pinhole system outperformed the single-pinhole system by maintaining the mean and lowering the variance in the measured uptake ratio. Multi-pinhole collimation can be used to reduce the injected dose and thereby reduce the radiation exposure to the animal. Results also suggest that the nine-pinhole configuration shown in this paper is a good choice for mouse brain imaging.

  3. Smart technologies for detecting animal welfare status and delivering health remedies for rangeland systems.

    PubMed

    Rutter, S M

    2014-04-01

    Although the emerging field of precision livestock farming (PLF) is predominantly associated with intensive animal production, there is increasing interest in applying smart technologies in extensive rangeland systems. Precision livestock farming technologies bring the possibility of closely monitoring the behaviour, liveweight and other parameters of individual animals in free-ranging systems. 'Virtual fencing', ideally based on positive reinforcement, i.e. rewarding animals for moving in a specified direction, has the potential to gently guide foraging livestock towards areas of vegetation identified by remote sensing. As well as reducing hunger, this could be integrated with weather forecasting to help ensure that animals are automatically directed to areas with appropriate shelter when adverse weather is forecast. The system could also direct animals towards handling facilities when required, reducing the fear and distress associated with being mustered. The integration of the various data collected by such a 'virtual shepherd' system should be able to rapidly detect disease and injury, and sick animals could then be automatically shepherded to an enclosure for treatment. In general, rangeland livestock already have the freedom to express normal behaviour, but PLF technologies could facilitate this. By bringing levels of monitoring and control normally associated with intensive production to rangeland systems, PLF has the potential, with appropriate adoption, to enhance the capacity of rangeland livestock production systems to meet key areas of welfare concern highlighted by the Five Freedoms.

  4. ChR2 transgenic animals in peripheral sensory system: Sensing light as various sensations.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Since the introduction of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) to neuroscience, optogenetics technology was developed, making it possible to activate specific neurons or circuits with spatial and temporal precision. Various ChR2 transgenic animal models have been generated and are playing important roles in revealing the mechanisms of neural activities, mapping neural circuits, controlling the behaviors of animals as well as exploring new strategy for treating the neurological diseases in both central and peripheral nervous system. An animal including humans senses environments through Aristotle's five senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch). Usually, each sense is associated with a kind of sensory organ (eyes, ears, nose, tongue and skin). Is it possible that one could hear light, smell light, taste light and touch light? When ChR2 is targeted to different peripheral sensory neurons by viral vectors or generating ChR2 transgenic animals, the animals can sense the light as various sensations such as hearing, touch, pain, smell and taste. In this review, we focus on ChR2 transgenic animals in the peripheral nervous system. Firstly the working principle of ChR2 as an optogenetic actuator is simply described. Then the current transgenic animal lines where ChR2 was expressed in peripheral sensory neurons are presented and the findings obtained by these animal models are reviewed.

  5. ChR2 transgenic animals in peripheral sensory system: Sensing light as various sensations.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Since the introduction of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) to neuroscience, optogenetics technology was developed, making it possible to activate specific neurons or circuits with spatial and temporal precision. Various ChR2 transgenic animal models have been generated and are playing important roles in revealing the mechanisms of neural activities, mapping neural circuits, controlling the behaviors of animals as well as exploring new strategy for treating the neurological diseases in both central and peripheral nervous system. An animal including humans senses environments through Aristotle's five senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch). Usually, each sense is associated with a kind of sensory organ (eyes, ears, nose, tongue and skin). Is it possible that one could hear light, smell light, taste light and touch light? When ChR2 is targeted to different peripheral sensory neurons by viral vectors or generating ChR2 transgenic animals, the animals can sense the light as various sensations such as hearing, touch, pain, smell and taste. In this review, we focus on ChR2 transgenic animals in the peripheral nervous system. Firstly the working principle of ChR2 as an optogenetic actuator is simply described. Then the current transgenic animal lines where ChR2 was expressed in peripheral sensory neurons are presented and the findings obtained by these animal models are reviewed. PMID:26903290

  6. Use of animal models for space flight physiology studies, with special focus on the immune system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Animal models have been used to study the effects of space flight on physiological systems. The animal models have been used because of the limited availability of human subjects for studies to be carried out in space as well as because of the need to carry out experiments requiring samples and experimental conditions that cannot be performed using humans. Experiments have been carried out in space using a variety of species, and included developmental biology studies. These species included rats, mice, non-human primates, fish, invertebrates, amphibians and insects. The species were chosen because they best fit the experimental conditions required for the experiments. Experiments with animals have also been carried out utilizing ground-based models that simulate some of the effects of exposure to space flight conditions. Most of the animal studies have generated results that parallel the effects of space flight on human physiological systems. Systems studied have included the neurovestibular system, the musculoskeletal system, the immune system, the neurological system, the hematological system, and the cardiovascular system. Hindlimb unloading, a ground-based model of some of the effects of space flight on the immune system, has been used to study the effects of space flight conditions on physiological parameters. For the immune system, exposure to hindlimb unloading has been shown to results in alterations of the immune system similar to those observed after space flight. This has permitted the development of experiments that demonstrated compromised resistance to infection in rodents maintained in the hindlimb unloading model as well as the beginning of studies to develop countermeasures to ameliorate or prevent such occurrences. Although there are limitations to the use of animal models for the effects of space flight on physiological systems, the animal models should prove very valuable in designing countermeasures for exploration class missions of the future.

  7. Impact of subcortical white matter lesions on dopamine transporter SPECT.

    PubMed

    Funke, Elisabeth; Kupsch, Andreas; Buchert, Ralph; Brenner, Winfried; Plotkin, Michail

    2013-07-01

    Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) can affect the nigrostriatal system and presumably cause vascular parkinsonism (VP). However, in patients with SAE, the differentiation of VP from idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPS) is challenging. The aim of the present study was to examine the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density in patients with parkinsonism and SAE. Fifteen consecutive patients with parkinsonian symptoms displayed SAE, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifteen retrospectively chosen, matched patients with diagnosis of IPS without any abnormalities in MRI served as a reference group. DAT SPECT was performed using the tracer ¹²³I-FP-CIT. Scans were acquired on a triple-head SPECT system (Multispect 3, Siemens) and analysed using the investigator-independent BRASS™ software (HERMES). In the SAE group, a DAT deficit was observed in 9/15 patients. In contrast, all patients from the IPS group showed a reduced DAT binding (p = 0.008). The specific binding ratios (BR) of putamen contralateral to the side of the more affected limb versus occipital lobe were in trend higher in patients with SAE versus patients in the IPS-group (p = 0.053). Indices for putaminal asymmetry (p = 0.036) and asymmetry caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.026) as well as the ratio caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in IPS patients having no SAE. DAT deficit was less pronounced in patients with SAE and parkinsonism than in patients with IPS without any abnormalities in the MRI. A potential role of DAT SPECT in the differential diagnosis of VP and IPS requires more assessments within prospective studies.

  8. Comparative systems biology between human and animal models based on next-generation sequencing methods.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Qi; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2013-04-01

    Animal models provide myriad benefits to both experimental and clinical research. Unfortunately, in many situations, they fall short of expected results or provide contradictory results. In part, this can be the result of traditional molecular biological approaches that are relatively inefficient in elucidating underlying molecular mechanism. To improve the efficacy of animal models, a technological breakthrough is required. The growing availability and application of the high-throughput methods make systematic comparisons between human and animal models easier to perform. In the present study, we introduce the concept of the comparative systems biology, which we define as "comparisons of biological systems in different states or species used to achieve an integrated understanding of life forms with all their characteristic complexity of interactions at multiple levels". Furthermore, we discuss the applications of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq technologies to comparative systems biology between human and animal models and assess the potential applications for this approach in the future studies.

  9. A Pilot System for Environmental Monitoring Through Domestic Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabe, Calvin W.; Sawyer, John; Martin, Wayne

    1971-01-01

    A pilot system for environmental monitoring is in its early phases of development in Northern California. It is based upon the existing nation wide Federal-State Market Cattle Testing (14CT) program for brucellosis in cattle. This latter program depends upon the collection of blood program at the time of identified cattle. As the cattle Population of California is broadly distributed throughout the state, we intend to utilize these blood samples to biologically monitor the distribution and intensity of selected environmental pollutants. In a 2-year preliminary trial, the feasibility of retrieving, utilizing for a purpose similar to this, and tracing back to their geographic areas of origin of MCT samples have been demonstrated.

  10. Systems integrity in health and aging - an animal model approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Human lifespan is positively correlated with childhood intelligence, as measured by psychometric (IQ) tests. The strength of this correlation is similar to the negative effect that smoking has on the life course. This result suggests that people who perform well on psychometric tests in childhood may remain healthier and live longer. The correlation, however, is debated: is it caused exclusively by social-environmental factors or could it also have a biological component? Biological traits of systems integrity that might result in correlations between brain function and lifespan have been suggested but are not well-established, and it is questioned what useful knowledge can come from understanding such mechanisms. In a recent study, we found a positive correlation between brain function and longevity in honey bees. Honey bees are highly social, but relevant social-environmental factors that contribute to cognition-survival correlations in humans are largely absent from insect colonies. Our results, therefore, suggest a biological explanation for the correlation in the bee. Here, we argue that individual differences in stress handling (coping) mechanisms, which both affect the bees’ performance in tests of brain function and their survival could be a trait of systems integrity. Individual differences in coping are much studied in vertebrates, and several species provide attractive models. Here, we discuss how pigs are an interesting model for studying behavioural, physiological and molecular mechanisms that are recruited during stress and that can drive correlations between health, cognition and longevity traits. By revealing biological factors that make individuals susceptible to stress, it might be possible to alleviate health and longevity disparities in people. PMID:24472488

  11. The impact of broiler production system practices on consumer perceptions of animal welfare.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Janneke; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2013-12-01

    This research explores the extent to which different farm management practices influence the perceived animal friendliness of broiler production systems, and how this differs between individuals. Using a conjoint design with paired comparisons, respondents evaluated broiler production systems that were described on the basis of 7 animal welfare-related practices. It was found that practices in the area of outdoor access, stocking density, and day-night rhythm were overall perceived to have a larger impact on perceptions of animal friendliness than other practices, such as transport duration or the type of breed used. However, individuals differed regarding the extent to which they believed the different farm management practices influenced the animal friendliness of the production system. Differences between individuals regarding their knowledge about and familiarity with livestock farming, degree of anthropomorphism, and their moral beliefs regarding animal welfare partly explained the relative importance individuals attached to farm management practices. The obtained insight into which welfare-related farm management practices, in consumers' minds, most strongly contribute to animal welfare, and the existence of differences between consumers, can be helpful in the development of animal welfare-based certification schemes that are appealing to consumers, as well as the positioning of welfare concepts in the market. PMID:24235215

  12. The impact of broiler production system practices on consumer perceptions of animal welfare.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Janneke; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2013-12-01

    This research explores the extent to which different farm management practices influence the perceived animal friendliness of broiler production systems, and how this differs between individuals. Using a conjoint design with paired comparisons, respondents evaluated broiler production systems that were described on the basis of 7 animal welfare-related practices. It was found that practices in the area of outdoor access, stocking density, and day-night rhythm were overall perceived to have a larger impact on perceptions of animal friendliness than other practices, such as transport duration or the type of breed used. However, individuals differed regarding the extent to which they believed the different farm management practices influenced the animal friendliness of the production system. Differences between individuals regarding their knowledge about and familiarity with livestock farming, degree of anthropomorphism, and their moral beliefs regarding animal welfare partly explained the relative importance individuals attached to farm management practices. The obtained insight into which welfare-related farm management practices, in consumers' minds, most strongly contribute to animal welfare, and the existence of differences between consumers, can be helpful in the development of animal welfare-based certification schemes that are appealing to consumers, as well as the positioning of welfare concepts in the market.

  13. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 05: Calibration of a SPECT/CT camera for quantitative SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, Émilie; Montégiani, Jean-François; Després, Philippe; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-08-15

    While quantitation is the norm in PET, it is not widely available yet in SPECT. This work's aim was to calibrate a commercially available SPECT/CT system to perform quantitative SPECT. Counting sensitivity, dead-time (DT) constant and partial volume effect (PVE) of the system were assessed. A dual-head Siemens SymbiaT6 SPECT/CT camera equipped with low energy high-resolution collimators was studied. {sup 99m}Tc was the radioisotope of interest because of its wide usage in nuclear medicine. First, point source acquisitions were performed (activity: 30–990MBq). Further acquisitions were then performed with a uniform Jaszczak phantom filled with water at high activity (25–5000MBq). PVE was studied using 6 hot spheres (diameters: 9.9–31.2 mm) filled with {sup 99m}Tc (2.8MBq/cc) in the Jaszczak phantom, which was: (1) empty, (2) water-filled and (3) water-filled with low activity (0.1MBq/cc). The data was reconstructed with the Siemens's Flash3D iterative algorithm with 4 subsets and 8 iterations, attenuation-correction (AC) and scatter-correction (SC). DT modelling was based on the total spectrum counting rate. Sensitivity was assessed using AC-SC reconstructed SPECT data. Sensitivity and DT for the sources were 99.51±1.46cps/MBq and 0.60±0.04µs. For the phantom, sensitivity and DT were 109.9±2.3cps/MBq and 0.62±0.13µs. The recovery-coefficient varied from 5% for the 9.9mm, to 80% for the 31.2mm spheres. With our calibration methods, both sensitivity and DT constant of the SPECT camera had little dependence on the object geometry and attenuation. For small objects of known size, recovery-coefficient can be applied to correct PVE. Clinical quantitative SPECT appears to be possible and has many potential applications.

  14. Segmented slant hole collimator for stationary cardiac SPECT: Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yanfei; Yu, Zhicong; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work is a preliminary study of a stationary cardiac SPECT system. The goal of this research is to propose a stationary cardiac SPECT system using segmented slant-hole collimators and to perform computer simulations to test the feasibility. Compared to the rotational SPECT, a stationary system has a benefit of acquiring temporally consistent projections. The most challenging issue in building a stationary system is to provide sufficient projection view-angles. Methods: A gate (geant4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate a two-detector stationary cardiac SPECT that uses segmented slant-hole collimators. Each detector contains seven segmented slant-hole sections that slant to a common volume at the rotation center. Consequently, 14 view-angles over 180° were acquired without any gantry rotation. The NCAT phantom was used for data generation and a tailored maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Effects of limited number of view-angles and data truncation were carefully evaluated in the paper. Results: Simulation results indicated that the proposed segmented slant-hole stationary cardiac SPECT system is able to acquire sufficient data for cardiac imaging without a loss of image quality, even when the uptakes in the liver and kidneys are high. Seven views are acquired simultaneously at each detector, leading to 5-fold sensitivity gain over the conventional dual-head system at the same total acquisition time, which in turn increases the signal-to-noise ratio by 19%. The segmented slant-hole SPECT system also showed a good performance in lesion detection. In our prototype system, a short hole-length was used to reduce the dead zone between neighboring collimator segments. The measured sensitivity gain is about 17-fold over the conventional dual-head system. Conclusions: The gate Monte Carlo simulations confirm the feasibility of the proposed stationary cardiac

  15. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly for low

  16. Anatomical-based Partial Volume Correction for Low-dose Dedicated Cardiac SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect (PVE) has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view (FOV) over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation Geometry Transfer Matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  17. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and (99m)Tc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of (99m)Tc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and (99m)Tc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  18. [The design and development of a quality system for the diagnosis of exotic animal diseases at the National Centre for Animal and Plant Health in Cuba].

    PubMed

    de Oca, N Montes; Villoch, A; Pérez Ruano, M

    2004-12-01

    A quality system for the diagnosis of exotic animal diseases was developed at the national centre for animal and plant health (CENSA), responsible for coordinating the clinical, epizootiological and laboratory diagnosis of causal agents of exotic animal diseases in Cuba. A model was designed on the basis of standard ISO 9001:2000 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), standard ISO/IEC 17025:1999 of ISO and the International Electrotechnical Commission, recommendations of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and other regulatory documents from international and national organisations that deal specifically with the treatment of emerging diseases. Twenty-nine standardised operating procedures were developed, plus 13 registers and a checklist to facilitate the evaluation of the system. The effectiveness of the quality system was confirmed in the differential diagnosis of classical swine fever at an animal virology laboratory in Cuba.

  19. [The design and development of a quality system for the diagnosis of exotic animal diseases at the National Centre for Animal and Plant Health in Cuba].

    PubMed

    de Oca, N Montes; Villoch, A; Pérez Ruano, M

    2004-12-01

    A quality system for the diagnosis of exotic animal diseases was developed at the national centre for animal and plant health (CENSA), responsible for coordinating the clinical, epizootiological and laboratory diagnosis of causal agents of exotic animal diseases in Cuba. A model was designed on the basis of standard ISO 9001:2000 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), standard ISO/IEC 17025:1999 of ISO and the International Electrotechnical Commission, recommendations of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and other regulatory documents from international and national organisations that deal specifically with the treatment of emerging diseases. Twenty-nine standardised operating procedures were developed, plus 13 registers and a checklist to facilitate the evaluation of the system. The effectiveness of the quality system was confirmed in the differential diagnosis of classical swine fever at an animal virology laboratory in Cuba. PMID:15861883

  20. The Development of a General Auxiliary Diagnosis System for Common Disease of Animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbin; Zhang, Ru; Luan, Peixian; Li, Lin; Xu, Danning

    In order to development one expert system for animal disease in china, and this expert system can help veterinary surgeon diagnose all kinds of disease of animal. The design of an intelligent medical system for diagnosis of animal diseases is presented in this paper. The system comprises three major parts: a disease case management system (DCMS), a Knowledge management system (KMS) and an Expert System (ES). The DCMS is used to manipulate patient data include all kinds of data about the animal and the symptom, diagnosis result etc. The KMS is used to acquire knowledge from disease cases and manipulate knowledge by human. The ES is used to perform diagnosis. The program is designed in N-layers system; they are data layer, security layer, business layer, appearance layer, and user interface. When diagnosis, user can select some symptoms in system group by system. One conclusion with three possibilities (final diagnosis result, suspect diagnosis result, and no diagnosis result) is output. By diagnosis some times, one most possible result can be get. By application, this system can increased the accurate of diagnosis to some extent, but the statistics result was not compute now.

  1. [The need for research to support the emergence of alternative animal health systems].

    PubMed

    Domenech, J; Bonnet, P; Renard, J F

    2004-04-01

    Animal diseases remain one of the main problems for livestock production in terms of trade development, poverty reduction and public health. Animal health systems are complex because of the diversity of the parties involved and because of various changes in the delivery of veterinary services, such as the redefinition of the roles of the public and private sectors. It is, therefore, often difficult to assess the global performance of animal health systems and sub-systems in terms of their medical, economic and social effectiveness. In addition, the necessary reliability of the health information obtained leads to certification of the status of regions and countries with regard to epizootics, which requires a high degree of standardisation and conformity with international norms. An assessment therefore needs to be made of the advantages of alternative systems compared with conventional systems. An animal health system should be seen as a whole, and when assessing its overall performance several things must be taken into account, e.g. the markets for products and the sometimes contradictory interests of all the different parties involved. There are, therefore, many research needs and avenues to be pursued, including: the methods, data and tools required for assessing the effectiveness of systems, including a definition of what constitutes a reliable indicator; the factors that determine the health of a herd; having a clearer idea of what will affect herd health will make it possible to map risk indicators and animal health care needs; the design and management of realistic and harmonised animal health information systems whose indicators provide reliable measurements of health; the function, organisation and effectiveness of participative surveillance approaches; the definition and effectiveness of animal health contracts, such as health mandates between the State and private veterinarians; the function and role of livestock auxiliaries; the establishment of

  2. The oxytocin system in drug discovery for autism: Animal models and novel therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Meera E.; Young, Larry J.

    2012-01-01

    Animal models and behavioral paradigms are critical for elucidating the neural mechanism involved in complex behaviors, including social cognition. Both genotype and phenotype based models have implicated the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) in the regulation of social behavior. Based on the findings in animal models, alteration of the OT system has been hypothesized to play a role in the social deficits associated with autism and other neuropsychiatric disorders. While the evidence linking the peptide to the etiology of the disorder is not yet conclusive, evidence from multiple animal models suggest modulation of the OT system may be a viable strategy for the pharmacological treatment of social deficits. In this review, we will discuss how animal models have been utilized to understand the role of OT in social cognition and how those findings can be applied to the conceptualization and treatment of the social impairments in ASD. Animal models with genetic alterations of the OT system, like the OT, OT receptor and CD38 knock-out mice, and those with phenotypic variation in social behavior, like BTBR inbred mice and prairie voles, coupled with behavioral paradigms with face and construct validity may prove to have predictive validity for identifying the most efficacious methods of stimulating the OT system to enhance social cognition in humans. The widespread use of strong animal models of social cognition has the potential yield pharmacological, interventions for the treatment social impairments psychiatric disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. PMID:22206823

  3. MRI compatible small animal monitoring and trigger system for whole body scanners.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Pfeiffer, Norman; Krumbein, Ines; Herrmann, Lutz; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2014-03-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments with small animals requires continuous monitoring of vital parameters, especially the respiration rate. Clinical whole-body MR scanners represent an attractive option for preclinical imaging as dedicated animal scanners are cost-intensive in both investment and maintenance, thus limiting their availability. Even though impressive image quality is achievable with clinical MR systems in combination with special coils, their built-in physiologic monitoring and triggering units are often not suited for small animal imaging. In this work, we present a simple, MRI compatible low cost solution to monitor the respiration and heart rate of small animals in a clinical whole-body MR scanner. The recording and processing of the biosignals as well as the optimisation of the respiratory trigger generation is decribed. Additionally rat and mouse in-vivo MRI experiments are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the monitoring and respiratory trigger system in suppressing motion artifacts.

  4. Potential Application of Electronic Olfaction Systems in Feedstuffs Analysis and Animal Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Campagnoli, Anna; Dell'Orto, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Olfaction Systems (EOSs) based on a variety of gas-sensing technologies have been developed to simulate in a simplified manner animal olfactory sensing systems. EOSs have been successfully applied to many applications and fields, including food technology and agriculture. Less information is available for EOS applications in the feed technology and animal nutrition sectors. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are derived from both forages and concentrate ingredients of farm animal rations, are considered and described in this review as olfactory markers for feedstock quality and safety evaluation. EOS applications to detect VOCs from feedstuffs (as analytical matrices) are described, and some future scenarios are hypothesised. Furthermore, some EOS applications in animal feeding behaviour and organoleptic feed assessment are also described. PMID:24172280

  5. Potential application of electronic olfaction systems in feedstuffs analysis and animal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Campagnoli, Anna; Dell'Orto, Vittorio

    2013-10-29

    Electronic Olfaction Systems (EOSs) based on a variety of gas-sensing technologies have been developed to simulate in a simplified manner animal olfactory sensing systems. EOSs have been successfully applied to many applications and fields, including food technology and agriculture. Less information is available for EOS applications in the feed technology and animal nutrition sectors. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are derived from both forages and concentrate ingredients of farm animal rations, are considered and described in this review as olfactory markers for feedstock quality and safety evaluation. EOS applications to detect VOCs from feedstuffs (as analytical matrices) are described, and some future scenarios are hypothesised. Furthermore, some EOS applications in animal feeding behaviour and organoleptic feed assessment are also described.

  6. Application of statistical process control charts to monitor changes in animal production systems.

    PubMed

    De Vries, A; Reneau, J K

    2010-04-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) is a method of monitoring, controlling, and improving a process through statistical analysis. An important SPC tool is the control chart, which can be used to detect changes in production processes, including animal production systems, with a statistical level of confidence. This paper introduces the philosophy and types of control charts, design and performance issues, and provides a review of control chart applications in animal production systems found in the literature from 1977 to 2009. Primarily Shewhart and cumulative sum control charts have been described in animal production systems, with examples found in poultry, swine, dairy, and beef production systems. Examples include monitoring of growth, disease incidence, water intake, milk production, and reproductive performance. Most applications describe charting outcome variables, but more examples of control charts applied to input variables are needed, such as compliance to protocols, feeding practice, diet composition, and environmental factors. Common challenges for applications in animal production systems are the identification of the best statistical model for the common cause variability, grouping of data, selection of type of control chart, the cost of false alarms and lack of signals, and difficulty identifying the special causes when a change is signaled. Nevertheless, carefully constructed control charts are powerful methods to monitor animal production systems. Control charts might also supplement randomized controlled trials. PMID:20081080

  7. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  8. An intelligent flow control system for long term fluid restriction in small animals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Kawada, Toru; Uemura, Kazunori; Inagaki, Masashi; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Fluid retention is one of the most common symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure. Although fluid restriction may be a therapeutic strategy, the degree of fluid restriction necessary for the best therapeutic outcome remains unknown partly due to the lack of proper experimental method to restrict water consumption in small animals. The traditional methods that allow animals to access water only in a limited time window or within pre-determined daily volume can be stressful because the animals may become thirsty during the time of water deprivation. To provide a less stressful water restriction paradigm, we designed a feedback-control system of drinking flow to modulate the drinking behavior of small animals. This system consisted of an infrared droplet sensor for monitoring the drinking flow and a computer controlled electric valve to regulate the water availability. A light signal which synchronized with the command for opening the valve was set to establish a conditioned reflex. An animal test indicated that rats were adaptable to a precisely programmed water supply. This system may warrant investigation into the consequences of fluid restriction in chronic experimental animal study. PMID:24110742

  9. An intelligent flow control system for long term fluid restriction in small animals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Kawada, Toru; Uemura, Kazunori; Inagaki, Masashi; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Fluid retention is one of the most common symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure. Although fluid restriction may be a therapeutic strategy, the degree of fluid restriction necessary for the best therapeutic outcome remains unknown partly due to the lack of proper experimental method to restrict water consumption in small animals. The traditional methods that allow animals to access water only in a limited time window or within pre-determined daily volume can be stressful because the animals may become thirsty during the time of water deprivation. To provide a less stressful water restriction paradigm, we designed a feedback-control system of drinking flow to modulate the drinking behavior of small animals. This system consisted of an infrared droplet sensor for monitoring the drinking flow and a computer controlled electric valve to regulate the water availability. A light signal which synchronized with the command for opening the valve was set to establish a conditioned reflex. An animal test indicated that rats were adaptable to a precisely programmed water supply. This system may warrant investigation into the consequences of fluid restriction in chronic experimental animal study.

  10. Real-time animation software for customized training to use motor prosthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, Rahman; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-03-01

    Research on control of human movement and development of tools for restoration and rehabilitation of movement after spinal cord injury and amputation can benefit greatly from software tools for creating precisely timed animation sequences of human movement. Despite their ability to create sophisticated animation and high quality rendering, existing animation software are not adapted for application to neural prostheses and rehabilitation of human movement. We have developed a software tool known as MSMS (MusculoSkeletal Modeling Software) that can be used to develop models of human or prosthetic limbs and the objects with which they interact and to animate their movement using motion data from a variety of offline and online sources. The motion data can be read from a motion file containing synthesized motion data or recordings from a motion capture system. Alternatively, motion data can be streamed online from a real-time motion capture system, a physics-based simulation program, or any program that can produce real-time motion data. Further, animation sequences of daily life activities can be constructed using the intuitive user interface of Microsoft's PowerPoint software. The latter allows expert and nonexpert users alike to assemble primitive movements into a complex motion sequence with precise timing by simply arranging the order of the slides and editing their properties in PowerPoint. The resulting motion sequence can be played back in an open-loop manner for demonstration and training or in closed-loop virtual reality environments where the timing and speed of animation depends on user inputs. These versatile animation utilities can be used in any application that requires precisely timed animations but they are particularly suited for research and rehabilitation of movement disorders. MSMS's modeling and animation tools are routinely used in a number of research laboratories around the country to study the control of movement and to develop and test

  11. Real-time animation software for customized training to use motor prosthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, Rahman; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-03-01

    Research on control of human movement and development of tools for restoration and rehabilitation of movement after spinal cord injury and amputation can benefit greatly from software tools for creating precisely timed animation sequences of human movement. Despite their ability to create sophisticated animation and high quality rendering, existing animation software are not adapted for application to neural prostheses and rehabilitation of human movement. We have developed a software tool known as MSMS (MusculoSkeletal Modeling Software) that can be used to develop models of human or prosthetic limbs and the objects with which they interact and to animate their movement using motion data from a variety of offline and online sources. The motion data can be read from a motion file containing synthesized motion data or recordings from a motion capture system. Alternatively, motion data can be streamed online from a real-time motion capture system, a physics-based simulation program, or any program that can produce real-time motion data. Further, animation sequences of daily life activities can be constructed using the intuitive user interface of Microsoft's PowerPoint software. The latter allows expert and nonexpert users alike to assemble primitive movements into a complex motion sequence with precise timing by simply arranging the order of the slides and editing their properties in PowerPoint. The resulting motion sequence can be played back in an open-loop manner for demonstration and training or in closed-loop virtual reality environments where the timing and speed of animation depends on user inputs. These versatile animation utilities can be used in any application that requires precisely timed animations but they are particularly suited for research and rehabilitation of movement disorders. MSMS's modeling and animation tools are routinely used in a number of research laboratories around the country to study the control of movement and to develop and test

  12. A dual RF resonator system for high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, R; Bodgdanov, G; King, J; Allard, A; Ferris, C F

    2004-01-30

    A new apparatus has been developed that integrates an animal restrainer arrangement for small animals with an actively tunable/detunable dual radio-frequency (RF) coil system for in vivo anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals at 4.7 T. The radio-frequency coil features an eight-element microstrip line configuration that, in conjunction with a segmented outer copper shield, forms a transversal electromagnetic (TEM) resonator structure. Matching and active tuning/detuning is achieved through fixed/variable capacitors and a PIN diode for each resonator element. These components along with radio-frequency chokes (RFCs) and blocking capacitors are placed on two printed circuit boards (PCBs) whose copper coated ground planes form the front and back of the volume coil and are therefore an integral part of the resonator structure. The magnetic resonance signal response is received with a dome-shaped single-loop surface coil that can be height-adjustable with respect to the animal's head. The conscious animal is immobilized through a mechanical arrangement that consists of a Plexiglas body tube and a head restrainer. This restrainer has a cylindrical holder with a mouthpiece and position screws to receive and restrain the head of the animal. The apparatus is intended to perform anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging in conscious animals such as mice, rats, hamsters, and marmosets. Cranial images acquired from fully conscious rats in a 4.7 T Bruker 40 cm bore animal scanner underscore the feasibility of this approach and bode well to extend this system to the imaging of other animals. PMID:14706710

  13. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Gertrud; Ayala Guardia, Fidel; Baeßler, Stefan; Borg, Michael; Glück, Ferenc; Heil, Werner; Hiebel, Stefan; Muñoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yury

    2014-12-01

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2 T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeability. The results of our simulations were checked through magnetic field measurements both with Hall and nuclear magnetic resonance probes. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated values: the mean deviation from the simulated exterior magnetic field is (-1.7±4.8)%. However, in the two critical regions, the internal magnetic field deviates by 0.2% (decay volume) and < 1 ×10-4 (analyzing plane) from the simulated values.

  14. 5-HT radioligands for human brain imaging with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Louise M; Kornum, Birgitte R; Nutt, David J; Pike, Victor W; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic system plays a key modulatory role in the brain and is the target for many drug treatments for brain disorders either through reuptake blockade or via interactions at the 14 subtypes of 5-HT receptors. This review provides the history and current status of radioligands used for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging of human brain serotonin (5-HT) receptors, the 5-HT transporter (SERT), and 5-HT synthesis rate. Currently available radioligands for in vivo brain imaging of the 5-HT system in humans include antagonists for the 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(2A), and 5-HT(4) receptors, and for SERT. Here we describe the evolution of these radioligands, along with the attempts made to develop radioligands for additional serotonergic targets. We describe the properties needed for a radioligand to become successful and the main caveats. The success of a PET or SPECT radioligand can ultimately be assessed by its frequency of use, its utility in humans, and the number of research sites using it relative to its invention date, and so these aspects are also covered. In conclusion, the development of PET and SPECT radioligands to image serotonergic targets is of high interest, and successful evaluation in humans is leading to invaluable insight into normal and abnormal brain function, emphasizing the need for continued development of both SPECT and PET radioligands for human brain imaging.

  15. [Diseases with relevance to protection of animals with an example of the musculoskeletal system of dogs].

    PubMed

    Petri, S; Distl, O; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Nolte, I

    2000-03-01

    Protection of animals needs major concern in breeding programmes especially if inherited diseases occur which cause pain, suffering and/or damages for the animals. Dogs breeders and people keeping dogs as well as veterinarians should be informed about the etiology on sequels of diseases which cause pain to the animals and from which the animals have to be protected in order to make them more conscious on these problems and to achieve changes in dog breeding programmes. The information system "Inherited Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System of Dogs" should display the already published knowledge about etiology, pathogenesis, appearance, therapy and genetics of these diseases. This information system was built up in such a way that it can be used by students as a learning programme to understand the basic relationships among animal protection, diseases, and dog breeding. The user is also supplied with support for breeding decisions as well as for interpretation of breeding values and genotype probabilities. Additionally, information can be obtained on all in the German Association for Dog Breeding (VDH) represented breeds and breeding clubs. Actions to reduce genetically caused diseases required for members of dog breeding clubs are also available. The information system ist programmed by using HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language). Publication is possible on CD-ROM and on Internet. The supplied hyperlinks allow to make use of other publications on the world wide web related to dog and diseases of dogs.

  16. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ∼10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime

  17. An environmental chamber system for prolonged metabolic studies on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Huston, L. J.; Simmons, J. B., II; Clarkson, D. P.; Martz, W. W.; Schatte, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of metabolic adaptation to marginally stressful environments requires both precise regulation of a variety of atmospheric factors for extended periods of time and the capacity to employ sensitive parameters in an undisturbed subject. This paper describes a metabolic chamber system which can simultaneously maintain groups of small animals in two completely separate closed environments having different pressures, temperatures and gas compositions for an indefinite period. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food and water consumption and animal activity cycles can be continuously monitored and quantified 24 h per day while the animals are in an unrestrained state. Each chamber can be serviced and the animals handled, injected and sacrificed without subjecting them to barometric stress. Several unique electrical and mechanical components allow semi-automated data collection on a continuous basis for indefinite periods of time.

  18. Characterization of Animal Exposure Calls Captured by the National Poison Data System, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Buttke, Danielle E.; Schier, Joshua G.; Bronstein, Alvin C.; Chang, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to characterize the data captured in all animal exposure calls reported to the National Poison Data System (NPDS), a national poison center reporting database, from 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2010 and identify Poison Center usage and needs in animal exposure calls. Design We calculated descriptive statistics characterizing animal type, exposure substance, medical outcome, year and month of call, caller location, and specific state for all animal exposure call data in NPDS from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2010. SAS version 9.2 was used for the analysis. Results There were 1,371,095 animal exposure calls out of 28,925,496 (4.7%) total human and animal exposure calls in NPDS during the study period. The majority involved companion animal exposures with 88.0% canine exposures and 10.4% feline exposures. Pesticides were the most common exposure substance (n=360,375; 26.3%), followed by prescription drugs (n=261,543; 18.6%). The most common outcome reported was ‘Not followed, judged as nontoxic exposure or minimal clinical effects possible’ (n=803,491; 58.6%), followed by ‘Not followed, judged potentially toxic exposure’ (n=263,153; 19.2%). There were 5,388 deaths reported. Pesticide exposures were responsible for the greatest number of deaths (n=1,643; 30.4%). Conclusions and clinical relevance Approximately 1 in 20 calls to PCs are regarding potentially toxic exposures to animals, suggesting a need for veterinary expertise and resources at PCs. Pesticides are one of the greatest toxic exposure threats to animals, both in numbers of exposures and severity of clinical outcomes, and is an important area for education, prevention, and treatment. PMID:26346434

  19. Brain perfusion SPECT in the mouse: normal pattern according to gender and age.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wunder, Andreas; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Michel, Roger; Stemmer, Nina; Lukas, Mathias; Derlin, Thorsten; Gregor-Mamoudou, Betina; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is a useful surrogate marker of neuronal activity and a parameter of primary interest in the diagnosis of many diseases. The increasing use of mouse models spawns the demand for in vivo measurement of rCBF in the mouse. Small animal SPECT provides excellent spatial resolution at adequate sensitivity and is therefore a promising tool for imaging the mouse brain. This study evaluates the feasibility of mouse brain perfusion SPECT and assesses the regional pattern of normal Tc-99m-HMPAO uptake and the impact of age and gender. Whole-brain kinetics was compared between Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-ECD using rapid dynamic planar scans in 10 mice. Assessment of the regional uptake pattern was restricted to the more suitable tracer, HMPAO. Two HMPAO SPECTs were performed in 18 juvenile mice aged 7.5 ± 1.5weeks, and in the same animals at young adulthood, 19.1 ± 4.0 weeks (nanoSPECT/CTplus, general purpose mouse apertures: 1.2kcps/MBq, 0.7mm FWHM). The 3-D MRI Digital Atlas Database of an adult C57BL/6J mouse brain was used for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. SPECT images were stereotactically normalized using SPM8 and a custom made, left-right symmetric HMPAO template in atlas space. For testing lateral asymmetry, each SPECT was left-right flipped prior to stereotactical normalization. Flipped and unflipped SPECTs were compared by paired testing. Peak brain uptake was similar for ECD and HMPAO: 1.8 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.6 %ID (p=0.357). Washout after the peak was much faster for ECD than for HMPAO: 24 ± 7min vs. 4.6 ± 1.7h (p=0.001). The general linear model for repeated measures with gender as an intersubject factor revealed an increase in relative HMPAO uptake with age in the neocortex (p=0.018) and the hippocampus (p=0.012). A decrease was detected in the midbrain (p=0.025). Lateral asymmetry, with HMPAO uptake larger in the left hemisphere, was detected primarily in the neocortex, both at juvenile age (asymmetry index AI=2.7 ± 1

  20. Environmental control and life support systems analysis for a Space Station life sciences animal experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Kenneth T.; Hall, John B., Jr.; Thompson, Clifford D.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Langley and Goddard facilities have evaluated the effects of animal science experiments on the Space Station's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) by means of computer-aided analysis, assuming an animal colony consisting of 96 rodents and eight squirrel monkeys. Thirteen ECLSS options were established for the reclamation of metabolic oxygen and waste water. Minimum cost and weight impacts on the ECLSS are found to accrue to the system's operation in off-nominal mode, using electrochemical CO2 removal and a static feed electrolyzer for O2 generation.

  1. SPECT studies of brain tumors with L-3-( sup 123 I) iodo-alpha-methyl tyrosine: Comparison with PET, 124IMT and first clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, K.J.; Coenen, H.H.; Roosen, N.; Kling, P.; Muzik, O.; Herzog, H.; Kuwert, T.; Stoecklin, G.F.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1990-03-01

    L-3-({sup 123}I)iodo-alpha-methyltyrosine ({sup 123}IMT) like tyrosine has been reported previously to have a high affinity for a transport system in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). We examined the kinetic behavior of {sup 124}IMT in brain and plasma in two patients with glioblastoma using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET). {sup 124}IMT accumulated in brain and tumor tissue, reaching a maximum after 15 min, with a washout of 20% to 35% at 60 min postinjection. Animal experiments confirmed the accumulation of the intact tracer in murine brain, but there was no incorporation into proteins. SPECT studies with {sup 123}IMT in patients with different types of brain tumors showed increased uptake in 26 of 32 tumors. Although nonspecific uptake in tumors must be considered, the accumulation of IMT in normal brain and in some tumors with intact BBB suggests a specific uptake of IMT. As transport is the main determinant of initial amino acid uptake, {sup 123}IMT appears to be a suitable SPECT tracer of amino acid uptake although it is not incorporated into protein.

  2. Fast 3D iterative image reconstruction for SPECT with rotating slat collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; DeBeenhouwer, Jan; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2009-02-01

    As an alternative to the use of traditional parallel hole collimators, SPECT imaging can be performed using rotating slat collimators. While maintaining the spatial resolution, a gain in image quality could be expected from the higher photon collection efficiency of this type of collimator. However, the use of iterative methods to do fully three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction is computationally much more expensive and furthermore involves slow convergence compared to a classical SPECT reconstruction. It has been proposed to do 3D reconstruction by splitting the system matrix into two separate matrices, forcing the reconstruction to first estimate the sinograms from the rotating slat SPECT data before estimating the image. While alleviating the computational load by one order of magnitude, this split matrix approach would result in fast computation of the projections in an iterative algorithm, but does not solve the problem of slow convergence. There is thus a need for an algorithm which speeds up convergence while maintaining image quality for rotating slat collimated SPECT cameras. Therefore, we developed a reconstruction algorithm based on the split matrix approach which allows both a fast calculation of the forward and backward projection and a fast convergence. In this work, an algorithm of the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) type, obtained from a split system matrix MLEM reconstruction, is proposed as a reconstruction method for rotating slat collimated SPECT data. Here, we compare this new algorithm to the conventional split system matrix MLEM method and to a gold standard fully 3D MLEM reconstruction algorithm on the basis of computational load, convergence and contrast-to-noise. Furthermore, ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) implementations of these three algorithms are compared. Calculation of computational load and convergence for the different algorithms shows a speedup for the new method of 38 and 426 compared to the

  3. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  4. Demonstration of solar/hydrothermal energy system in the Montgomery County Animal Shelter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The solar-assisted heat pump system for the animal shelter uses eight roof collector panels and a 250-gallon above ground storage tank. The system is utilized for preheating the domestic hot water system as well as preheating the well supply for the water source heat pumps. This report includes the following: cover letter; a brief technical report; Andover AC-8 program software; photo display, and ''as builts''.

  5. The use of spect/ct in the evaluation of heterotopic ossification in para/tetraplegics

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Maurício Coelho; Passarelli, Marcus Ceregati; Dario, Virgílio; Lebani, Bruno Rodrigues; Monteiro, Paulo Henrique Silva; Ramos, Celso Darío

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the stage of maturation and the metabolism of neurogenic heterotopic ossification by using SPECT/CT. Methods: A total of 12 medical records of patients with spinal cord injury, all of them classified according to the ASIA protocol (disability scale from the American Spinal Injury Association) in complete lesion (A) and partial lesions (B, C and D) and registered at the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor System, were submitted to SPECT/CT evaluation. Results: Sixteen hips with heterotopic ossification observed in X-ray were studied and only two (12.5%) had high osteoblastic activity. Five hips showed medium activity, three (18.75%) low activity and six (37.5%) did not present any activity detected by SPECT/CT. Conclusion: SPECT/CT helps to determinate which patients have a greater risk of relapse after surgical resection, proving to be a useful imaging study in preoperative evaluation that can be used to determinate the postoperative prognosis of these patients. Level of Evidence III, Investigating a Diagnostic Test. PMID:24644413

  6. Estimating farm-gate ammonia emissions from major animal production systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiling; Ma, Wenqi; Zhu, Gaodi; Roelcke, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from livestock production in China are an important contributor to the global NH3 budget. In this study, by estimating total nitrogen (N) intake based on herd structures and excreted N, a mass balance model was used to estimate NH3 losses from animal housing and manure storage facilities of dairy cattle, beef cattle, pigs, broiler and layer productions within animal farm gate and their corresponding NH3 emission intensities on the basis of animal products, N and protein in animal products. In 2009, NH3 emissions from pigs, layers, beef and dairy cattle and broiler production systems in China were 1.23, 0.52, 0.24, 0.21 and 0.09 million tons, respectively. The NH3 emission intensities were 26.6 g NH3-N kg-1 of pork, 28.1 g NH3-N kg-1 of layer eggs, 39.4 g NH3-N kg-1 of beef meat, 6.0 g NH3-N kg-1 of dairy milk and 4.6 g NH3-N kg-1 of chicken meat, or 1260 (pigs), 1514 (layers), 1297 (beef), 1107 (dairy) and 123 g NH3-N (broilers) kg-1 N in animal products. Of the sectors of NH3 emission, manure storage facilities and farmyard manure (FYM) in animal housing were the major contributors to the total NH3 emissions except for layers; housing emissions from slurry were also major contributors for dairy and pig production.

  7. [Effect of the low-frequency impulse magnetic field on the autonomic nervous system in animals].

    PubMed

    Kraiukhina, K Iu; Lobkaeva, E P; Deviatkova, N S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of weak (up to 3.5 mT) low-frequency (up to 100 Hz) impulse magnetic field on the state of the vegetative nervous system of animals has been studied by analyzing the variability of the heart rate. The effect of the magnetic field was estimated by a specially designed complex for recording cardiac signals of animals. Several specially selected regimes of impulse magnetic fields were studied. It was shown that the impulse magnetic field possesses a high biological activity at all regimes used, and the indices of the vegetative nervous system after the exposure to the impulse magnetic field approach the values typical for normotonic animals. This makes it possible to use magnetic fields at these regimes in magnetotherapy. PMID:20968088

  8. A repeater type biotelemetry system for use on wild big game animals.

    PubMed

    Cupal, J J; Ward, A L; Weeks, R W

    1975-01-01

    A repeater type telemetry system was developed and field tested on a wild elk near laramie, Wyoming, in the summer of 1973. The telemetry system consisted of the following: (a) a heat flow rate sensing implanted transmitter, (b) a repeater type neck collar and (c) a portable receiving station consisting of a receiver, decoding circuitry and analog chart recorder. The transmitter in (a) produced relatively low frequency rf pulses whose repetition rate was directly proportional to heat flow rate through the hide of the animal. In (b), the pulses from the implant are sensed and retransmitted using a relatively high power, high frequency transmitter. A second rf pulse was generated whose pulse spacing was related to animal activity. Details of circuit design and performance are given. Field experience has shown that this method is extremely useful for the monitoring of biological data from secretive big game animals such as elk.

  9. The performance of MLEM for dynamic imaging from simulated few-view, multi-pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Wolf, Paul; Clough, Anne V; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2013-02-01

    Stationary small-animal SPECT systems are being developed for rapid dynamic imaging from limited angular views. This paper quantified, through simulations, the performance of Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) for reconstructing a time-activity curve (TAC) with uptake duration of a few seconds from a stationary, three-camera multi-pinhole SPECT system. The study also quantified the benefits of a heuristic method of initializing the reconstruction with a prior image reconstructed from a conventional number of views, for example from data acquired during the late-study portion of the dynamic TAC. We refer to MLEM reconstruction initialized by a prior-image initial guess (IG) as MLEM ig . The effect of the prior-image initial guess on the depiction of contrast between two regions of a static phantom was quantified over a range of angular sampling schemes. A TAC was modeled from the experimentally measured uptake of (99m) Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) in the rat lung. The resulting time series of simulated images was quantitatively analyzed with respect to the accuracy of the estimated exponential washin and washout parameters. In both static and dynamic phantom studies, the prior-image initial guess improved the spatial depiction of the phantom, for example improved definition of the cylinder boundaries and more accurate quantification of relative contrast between cylinders. For example in the dynamic study, there was ~50% error in relative contrast for MLEM reconstructions compared to ~25-30% error for MLEM ig . In the static phantom study, the benefits of the initial guess decreased as the number of views increased. The prior-image initial guess introduced an additive offset in the reconstructed dynamic images, likely due to biases introduced by the prior image. MLEM initialized with a uniform initial guess yielded images that faithfully reproduced the time dependence of the simulated TAC; there were no statistically significant

  10. The performance of MLEM for dynamic imaging from simulated few-view, multi-pinhole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Wolf, Paul; Clough, Anne V.; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2013-01-01

    Stationary small-animal SPECT systems are being developed for rapid dynamic imaging from limited angular views. This paper quantified, through simulations, the performance of Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) for reconstructing a time-activity curve (TAC) with uptake duration of a few seconds from a stationary, three-camera multi-pinhole SPECT system. The study also quantified the benefits of a heuristic method of initializing the reconstruction with a prior image reconstructed from a conventional number of views, for example from data acquired during the late-study portion of the dynamic TAC. We refer to MLEM reconstruction initialized by a prior-image initial guess (IG) as MLEMig. The effect of the prior-image initial guess on the depiction of contrast between two regions of a static phantom was quantified over a range of angular sampling schemes. A TAC was modeled from the experimentally measured uptake of 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) in the rat lung. The resulting time series of simulated images was quantitatively analyzed with respect to the accuracy of the estimated exponential washin and washout parameters. In both static and dynamic phantom studies, the prior-image initial guess improved the spatial depiction of the phantom, for example improved definition of the cylinder boundaries and more accurate quantification of relative contrast between cylinders. For example in the dynamic study, there was ~50% error in relative contrast for MLEM reconstructions compared to ~25-30% error for MLEMig. In the static phantom study, the benefits of the initial guess decreased as the number of views increased. The prior-image initial guess introduced an additive offset in the reconstructed dynamic images, likely due to biases introduced by the prior image. MLEM initialized with a uniform initial guess yielded images that faithfully reproduced the time dependence of the simulated TAC; there were no statistically significant differences in

  11. I-123 Iofetamine SPECT scan in children with neurological disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Flamini, J.R.; Konkol, R.J.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-10-01

    I-123 Iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the brain in 42 patients (ages 14 days to 23 years) was compared with other localizing studies in children with neurological diseases. All had an EEG and at least one imaging study of the brain (computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both). Seventy-eight percent of the patients had an EEG within 24-72 hours of the IMP-SPECT scan. Thirty-five (83%) had a history of seizures, and the remainder had other neurological conditions without a history of seizures. In most cases, a normal EEG reading with normal CT or MRI result predicted a normal SPECT study. When the EEG was abnormal the majority of the IMP-SPECT scans were abnormal and localized the abnormality to the same region. A comparison with CT and MRI showed that structural abnormalities involving the cortex were usually well demonstrated with IMP-SPECT imaging. Structural lesions confined to the white matter were generally not detectable with IMP-SPECT. In a few cases, SPECT scans revealed abnormalities in deep brain areas not identified by EEG. IMP-SPECT imaging is a valuable technique for the detection and localization of abnormal cerebral metabolic activity in children with seizure disorders. A correlation with CT or MRI is essential for proper interpretation of abnormalities detected with IMP SPECT imaging.

  12. Modelling, Simulation, Animation, and Real-Time Control (Mosart) for a Class of Electromechanical Systems: A System-Theoretic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Armando A.; Metzger, Richard P.; Cifdaloz, Oguzhan; Dhirasakdanon, Thanate; Welfert, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive modelling, simulation, animation, and real-time control (MoSART) environment for a class of 'cart-pendulum' electromechanical systems that may be used to enhance learning within differential equations and linear algebra classes. The environment is useful for conveying fundamental mathematical/systems concepts…

  13. Effect of Probiotics on Central Nervous System Functions in Animals and Humans: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiying; Lee, In-Seon; Braun, Christoph; Enck, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the effects of probiotics on central nervous system function in animals and humans, to summarize effective interventions (species of probiotic, dose, duration), and to analyze the possibility of translating preclinical studies. Literature searches were conducted in Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Only randomized controlled trials were included. In total, 38 studies were included: 25 in animals and 15 in humans (2 studies were conducted in both). Most studies used Bifidobacterium (eg, B. longum, B. breve, and B. infantis) and Lactobacillus (eg, L. helveticus, and L. rhamnosus), with doses between 109 and 1010 colony-forming units for 2 weeks in animals and 4 weeks in humans. These probiotics showed efficacy in improving psychiatric disorder-related behaviors including anxiety, depression, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, and memory abilities, including spatial and non-spatial memory. Because many of the basic science studies showed some efficacy of probiotics on central nervous system function, this background may guide and promote further preclinical and clinical studies. Translating animal studies to human studies has obvious limitations but also suggests possibilities. Here, we provide several suggestions for the translation of animal studies. More experimental designs with both behavioral and neuroimaging measures in healthy volunteers and patients are needed in the future. PMID:27413138

  14. On the Use of a Simple Physical System Analogy to Study Robustness Features in Animal Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Sadoul, Bastien; Martin, Olivier; Prunet, Patrick; Friggens, Nicolas C.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental perturbations can affect the health, welfare, and fitness of animals. Being able to characterize and phenotype adaptive capacity is therefore of growing scientific concern in animal ecology and in animal production sciences. Terms borrowed from physics are commonly used to describe adaptive responses of animals facing an environmental perturbation, but no quantitative characterization of these responses has been made. Modeling the dynamic responses to an acute challenge was used in this study to facilitate the characterization of adaptive capacity and therefore robustness. A simple model based on a spring and damper was developed to simulate the dynamic responses of animals facing an acute challenge. The parameters characterizing the spring and the damper can be interpreted in terms of stiffness and resistance to the change of the system. The model was tested on physiological and behavioral responses of rainbow trout facing an acute confinement challenge. The model has proven to properly fit the different responses measured in this study and to quantitatively describe the different temporal patterns for each statistical individual in the study. It provides therefore a new way to explicitly describe, analyze and compare responses of individuals facing an acute perturbation. This study suggests that such physical models may be usefully applied to characterize robustness in many other biological systems. PMID:26322508

  15. Imaging Tobacco Smoking with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Kelly P; Esterlis, Irina; Sandiego, Christine; Petrulli, Ryan; Morris, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    Receptor imaging, including positron emission computed tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), provides a way to measure chemicals of interest, such as receptors, and neurotransmitter fluctuations, in the living human brain. Imaging the neurochemical mechanisms involved in the maintenance and recovery from tobacco smoking has provided insights into critical smoking related brain adaptations. Nicotine, the primary addictive chemical in tobacco smoke, enters the brain, activates beta2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs) and, like most drugs of abuse, elicits dopamine (DA) release in the ventral striatum. Both β2*-nAChRs and DA signaling are critical neurosubstrates underlying tobacco smoking behaviors and dependence and have been studied extensively with PET and SPECT brain imaging. We review the imaging literature on these topics and describe how brain imaging has helped inform the treatment of tobacco smoking.

  16. A Computerized Data-Capture System for Animal Biosafety Level 4 Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Bente, Dennis A; Friesen, Jeremy; White, Kyle; Koll, Jordan; Kobinger, Gary P

    2011-01-01

    The restrictive nature of an Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL4) laboratory complicates even simple clinical evaluation including data capture. Typically, clinical data are recorded on paper during procedures, faxed out of the ABSL4, and subsequently manually entered into a computer. This system has many disadvantages including transcriptional errors. Here, we describe the development of a highly customizable, tablet-PC-based computerized data-capture system, allowing reliable collection of observational and clinical data from experimental animals in a restrictive biocontainment setting. A multidisciplinary team with skills in containment laboratory animal science, database design, and software engineering collaborated on the development of this system. The goals were to design an easy-to-use and flexible user interface on a touch-screen tablet PC with user-supportable processes for recovery, full auditing capabilities, and cost effectiveness. The system simplifies data capture, reduces the necessary time in an ABSL4 environment, offers timely reporting and review of data, facilitates statistical analysis, reduces potential of erroneous data entry, improves quality assurance of animal care, and advances the use and refinement of humane endpoints. PMID:22330712

  17. Augmenting Instructional Animations with a Body Analogy to Help Children Learn about Physical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pouw, Wim T. J. L.; van Gog, Tamara; Zwaan, Rolf A.; Paas, Fred

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether augmenting instructional animations with a body analogy (BA) would improve 10- to 13-year-old children’s learning about class-1 levers. Children with a lower level of general math skill who learned with an instructional animation that provided a BA of the physical system, showed higher accuracy on a lever problem-solving reaction time task than children studying the instructional animation without this BA. Additionally, learning with a BA led to a higher speed–accuracy trade-off during the transfer task for children with a lower math skill, which provided additional evidence that especially this group is likely to be affected by learning with a BA. However, overall accuracy and solving speed on the transfer task was not affected by learning with or without this BA. These results suggest that providing children with a BA during animation study provides a stepping-stone for understanding mechanical principles of a physical system, which may prove useful for instructional designers. Yet, because the BA does not seem effective for all children, nor for all tasks, the degree of effectiveness of body analogies should be studied further. Future research, we conclude, should be more sensitive to the necessary degree of analogous mapping between the body and physical systems, and whether this mapping is effective for reasoning about more complex instantiations of such physical systems. PMID:27375538

  18. Augmenting Instructional Animations with a Body Analogy to Help Children Learn about Physical Systems.

    PubMed

    Pouw, Wim T J L; van Gog, Tamara; Zwaan, Rolf A; Paas, Fred

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether augmenting instructional animations with a body analogy (BA) would improve 10- to 13-year-old children's learning about class-1 levers. Children with a lower level of general math skill who learned with an instructional animation that provided a BA of the physical system, showed higher accuracy on a lever problem-solving reaction time task than children studying the instructional animation without this BA. Additionally, learning with a BA led to a higher speed-accuracy trade-off during the transfer task for children with a lower math skill, which provided additional evidence that especially this group is likely to be affected by learning with a BA. However, overall accuracy and solving speed on the transfer task was not affected by learning with or without this BA. These results suggest that providing children with a BA during animation study provides a stepping-stone for understanding mechanical principles of a physical system, which may prove useful for instructional designers. Yet, because the BA does not seem effective for all children, nor for all tasks, the degree of effectiveness of body analogies should be studied further. Future research, we conclude, should be more sensitive to the necessary degree of analogous mapping between the body and physical systems, and whether this mapping is effective for reasoning about more complex instantiations of such physical systems. PMID:27375538

  19. 40 CFR 160.90 - Animal and other test system care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... their test system-housing units for any reason (e.g., cage cleaning, treatment, etc.), shall receive... adequately segregated to avoid mixup and cross contamination. (2) (f) Cages, racks, pens, enclosures, aquaria... as raw data. (h) Bedding used in animal cages or pens shall not interfere with the purpose or...

  20. Courseware Development with Animated Pedagogical Agents in Learning System to Improve Learning Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Kai-Yi; Hong, Zeng-Wei; Huang, Yueh-Min; Shen, Wei-Wei; Lin, Jim-Min

    2016-01-01

    The addition of animated pedagogical agents (APAs) in computer-assisted learning (CAL) systems could successfully enhance students' learning motivation and engagement in learning activities. Conventionally, the APA incorporated multimedia materials are constructed through the cooperation of teachers and software programmers. However, the thinking…

  1. 40 CFR 160.90 - Animal and other test system care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.90 Animal and other test system care. (a) There shall be standard operating procedures for the housing, feeding, handling, and... terrestrial amphibians used in laboratory procedures that require manipulations and observations over...

  2. What's Inside Bodies? Learning about Skeletons and Other Organ Systems of Vertebrate Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Reiss, Michael

    This paper describes a study of young children's understanding of what is on the inside of animals--skeletons and other organ systems. The study uses 2-D drawings based on the idea that a drawing is the representational model and is the outward expression of the mental model. The 617 drawings made by participants in the study were awarded one of…

  3. Efficiency of a skid-mounted pyrolysis system for power production from animal manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of a skid-mounted pyrolysis system for power production from animal manures: chicken litter; swine solids; and swine solids blended with rye grass. Eight to 19 liters of dried manures were used as feedstocks for the skid-mounted pyrolysis ste...

  4. Dopamine transporter SPECT/CT and perfusion brain SPECT imaging in idiopathic basal ganglia calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Messinis, Lambros; Markaki, Elli; Constantoyannis, Constantine; Ellul, John; Vassilakos, Pavlos

    2009-07-01

    A case of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification in a 56-year-old woman with parkinsonism and cognitive impairment is described. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway and regional cerebral blood flow were evaluated using dopamine transporter (DAT) brain single photon emission tomography combined with a low-dose x-ray computerized tomography transmission (hybrid SPECT/CT) and Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT study, respectively. DAT SPECT/CT imaging revealed a reduction in DAT binding in both striatum regions coinciding with bilateral calcifications in the basal ganglia. Brain perfusion scan showed hypoperfusion in basal ganglia regions, posterior parietal cortex bilaterally, left frontopolar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left temporal lobe. These findings correlated well with the clinical condition of the patient. Mineralization may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration. Cortical perfusion changes in patients may better explain the patient's altered cognitive and motor functions.

  5. Towards adapting a normal patient database for SPECT brain perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. D.; Holmes, R. B.; Soleimani, M.; Evans, M. J.; Cade, S. C.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2012-06-01

    Single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) is a tool which can be used to image perfusion in the brain. Clinicians can use such images to help diagnose dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. Due to the intrinsic stochasticity in the photon imaging system, some form of statistical comparison of an individual image with a 'normal' patient database gives a clinician additional confidence in interpreting the image. Due to the variations between SPECT camera systems, ideally a normal patient database is required for each individual system. However, cost or ethical considerations often prohibit the collection of such a database for each new camera system. Some method of adapting existing normal patient databases to new camera systems would be beneficial. This paper introduces a method which may be regarded as a 'first-pass' attempt based on 2-norm regularization and a codebook of discrete spatially stationary convolutional kernels. Some preliminary illustrative results are presented, together with discussion on limitations and possible improvements.

  6. Reconstruction of dynamic gated cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Mingwu; Yang Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2006-11-15

    In this paper we propose an image reconstruction procedure which aims to unify gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dynamic SPECT into a single method. We divide the cardiac cycle into a number of gate intervals as in gated SPECT, but treat the tracer distribution for each gate as a time-varying signal. By using both dynamic and motion-compensated temporal regularization, our reconstruction procedure will produce an image sequence that shows both cardiac motion and time-varying tracer distribution simultaneously. To demonstrate the proposed reconstruction method, we simulated gated cardiac perfusion imaging using the gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) phantom with Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent. Our results show that the proposed method can produce more accurate reconstruction of gated dynamic images than independent reconstruction of individual gate frames with spatial smoothness alone. In particular, our results show that the former could improve the contrast to noise ratio of a simulated perfusion defect by as much as 100% when compared to the latter.

  7. Systems Approaches to Animal Disease Surveillance and Resource Allocation: Methodological Frameworks for Behavioral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Karl M.; Denwood, Matthew J.; Stott, Alistair W.; Mellor, Dominic J.; Reid, Stuart W. J.; Gunn, George J.

    2013-01-01

    While demands for animal disease surveillance systems are growing, there has been little applied research that has examined the interactions between resource allocation, cost-effectiveness, and behavioral considerations of actors throughout the livestock supply chain in a surveillance system context. These interactions are important as feedbacks between surveillance decisions and disease evolution may be modulated by their contextual drivers, influencing the cost-effectiveness of a given surveillance system. This paper identifies a number of key behavioral aspects involved in animal health surveillance systems and reviews some novel methodologies for their analysis. A generic framework for analysis is discussed, with exemplar results provided to demonstrate the utility of such an approach in guiding better disease control and surveillance decisions. PMID:24348922

  8. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays.

  9. Reasoning visualization in expert systems - The applicability of algorithm animation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, William J.; Johannes, James D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research into providing a means for users to flexibly create visualizations of the reasoning processes of forward-chaining rule-based expert systems using algorithm animation techniques. Levels of reasoning are described in order to identify the information necessary from the expert system development environment for these visualizations. A dual-process visualization environment is presented consisting of: (1) a version of CLIPS modified for the identified information access requirements; and (2) VISOR, an algorithm animation-based system for creating visualizations of arbitrary complexity which can be triggered by 'interesting event' messages from the running expert-system application. This is followed by examples from several visualizations performed during the scope of this work.

  10. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays. PMID:25096831

  11. Experience with a small animal hyperthermia ultrasound system (SAHUS): report on 83 tumours.

    PubMed

    Novák, P; Moros, E G; Parry, J J; Rogers, B E; Myerson, R J; Zeug, A; Locke, J E; Rossin, R; Straube, W L; Singh, A K

    2005-11-01

    An external local ultrasound (US) system was developed to induce controlled hyperthermia of subcutaneously implanted tumours in small animals (e.g., mice and rats). It was designed to be compatible with a small animal positron emission tomography scanner (microPET) to facilitate studies of hyperthermia-induced tumour re-oxygenation using a PET radiopharmaceutical, but it is applicable for any small animal study requiring controlled heating. The system consists of an acrylic applicator bed with up to four independent 5 MHz planar disc US transducers of 1 cm in diameter, a four-channel radiofrequency (RF) generator, a multiple thermocouple thermometry unit, and a personal computer with custom monitoring and controlling software. Although the system presented here was developed to target tumours of up to 1 cm in diameter, the applicator design allows for different piezoelectric transducers to be exchanged and operated within the 3.5-6.5 MHz band to target different tumour sizes. Temperature feedback control software was developed on the basis of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) approach when the measured temperatures were within a selectable temperature band about the target temperature. Outside this band, an on/off control action was applied. Perfused tissue-mimicking phantom experiments were performed to determine optimum controller gain constants, which were later employed successfully in animal experiments. The performance of the SAHUS (small animal hyperthermia ultrasound system) was tested using several tumour types grown in thighs of female nude (nu/nu) mice. To date, the system has successfully treated 83 tumours to target temperatures in the range of 41-43 degrees C for periods of 65 min on average.

  12. High-Efficiency SPECT MPI: Comparison of Automated Quantification, Visual Interpretation, and Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, W. Lane; Slomka, Piotr J.; Gerlach, Jim R.; Sweeny, Joseph M.; Baber, Usman; Croft, Lori B.; Guma, Krista A.; George, Titus; Henzlova, Milena J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently introduced high-efficiency (HE) SPECT cameras with solid-state CZT detectors have been shown to decrease imaging time and reduce radiation exposure to patients. An automated, computer derived quantification of HE MPI has been shown to correlate well with coronary angiography on one HE SPECT camera system (D-SPECT), but has not been compared to visual interpretation on any of the HE SPECT platforms. Methods Patients undergoing a clinically indicated Tc-99m sestamibi HE SPECT (GE Discovery 530c with supine and prone imaging) study over a one year period followed by a coronary angiogram within 2 months were included. Only patients with a history of CABG surgery were excluded. Both MPI studies and coronary angiograms were reinterpreted by blinded readers. One hundred and twenty two very low (risk of CAD < 5%) or low (risk of CAD < 10%) likelihood subjects with normal myocardial perfusion were used to create normal reference limits. Computer derived quantification of the total perfusion deficit (TPD) at stress and rest was obtained with QPS software. The visual and automated MPI quantification were compared to coronary angiography (≥ 70% luminal stenosis) by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. Results Of the 3,111 patients who underwent HE SPECT over a one year period, 160 patients qualified for the correlation study (66% male, 52% with a history of CAD). The ROC area under the curve (AUC) was similar for both the automated and visual interpretations using both supine only and combined supine and prone images (0.69-0.74). Using thresholds determined from sensitivity and specificity curves, the automated reads showed higher specificity (59-67% versus 27-60%) and lower sensitivity (71-72% versus 79-93%) than the visual reads. By including prone images sensitivity decreased slightly but specificity increased for both. By excluding patients with known CAD and cardiomyopathies, AUC and specificity increased for both techniques (0.72-0.82). The use

  13. Multi-pinhole collimator design for small-object imaging with SiliSPECT: a high-resolution SPECT.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, S; Metzler, S D; Wilson, D W; Peterson, T E

    2009-01-21

    We have designed a multi-pinhole collimator for a dual-headed, stationary SPECT system that incorporates high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors. The compact camera design of our system enables imaging at source-collimator distances between 20 and 30 mm. Our analytical calculations show that using knife-edge pinholes with small-opening angles or cylindrically shaped pinholes in a focused, multi-pinhole configuration in combination with this camera geometry can generate narrow sensitivity profiles across the field of view that can be useful for imaging small objects at high sensitivity and resolution. The current prototype system uses two collimators each containing 127 cylindrically shaped pinholes that are focused toward a target volume. Our goal is imaging objects such as a mouse brain, which could find potential applications in molecular imaging.

  14. Microbiomes: unifying animal and plant systems through the lens of community ecology theory

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Natalie; Whitaker, Briana K.; Clay, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The field of microbiome research is arguably one of the fastest growing in biology. Bacteria feature prominently in studies on animal health, but fungi appear to be the more prominent functional symbionts for plants. Despite the similarities in the ecological organization and evolutionary importance of animal-bacterial and plant–fungal microbiomes, there is a general failure across disciplines to integrate the advances made in each system. Researchers studying bacterial symbionts in animals benefit from greater access to efficient sequencing pipelines and taxonomic reference databases, perhaps due to high medical and veterinary interest. However, researchers studying plant–fungal symbionts benefit from the relative tractability of fungi under laboratory conditions and ease of cultivation. Thus each system has strengths to offer, but both suffer from the lack of a common conceptual framework. We argue that community ecology best illuminates complex species interactions across space and time. In this synthesis we compare and contrast the animal-bacterial and plant–fungal microbiomes using six core theories in community ecology (i.e., succession, community assembly, metacommunities, multi-trophic interactions, disturbance, restoration). The examples and questions raised are meant to spark discussion amongst biologists and lead to the integration of these two systems, as well as more informative, manipulatory experiments on microbiomes research. PMID:26441846

  15. Microbiomes: unifying animal and plant systems through the lens of community ecology theory.

    PubMed

    Christian, Natalie; Whitaker, Briana K; Clay, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The field of microbiome research is arguably one of the fastest growing in biology. Bacteria feature prominently in studies on animal health, but fungi appear to be the more prominent functional symbionts for plants. Despite the similarities in the ecological organization and evolutionary importance of animal-bacterial and plant-fungal microbiomes, there is a general failure across disciplines to integrate the advances made in each system. Researchers studying bacterial symbionts in animals benefit from greater access to efficient sequencing pipelines and taxonomic reference databases, perhaps due to high medical and veterinary interest. However, researchers studying plant-fungal symbionts benefit from the relative tractability of fungi under laboratory conditions and ease of cultivation. Thus each system has strengths to offer, but both suffer from the lack of a common conceptual framework. We argue that community ecology best illuminates complex species interactions across space and time. In this synthesis we compare and contrast the animal-bacterial and plant-fungal microbiomes using six core theories in community ecology (i.e., succession, community assembly, metacommunities, multi-trophic interactions, disturbance, restoration). The examples and questions raised are meant to spark discussion amongst biologists and lead to the integration of these two systems, as well as more informative, manipulatory experiments on microbiomes research.

  16. Chronic stress impacts the cardiovascular system: animal models and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Laher, Ismail

    2015-06-15

    Psychological stresses are associated with cardiovascular diseases to the extent that cardiovascular diseases are among the most important group of psychosomatic diseases. The longstanding association between stress and cardiovascular disease exists despite a large ambiguity about the underlying mechanisms. An array of possibilities have been proposed including overactivity of the autonomic nervous system and humoral changes, which then converge on endothelial dysfunction that initiates unwanted cardiovascular consequences. We review some of the features of the two most important stress-activated systems, i.e., the humoral and nervous systems, and focus on alterations in endothelial function that could ensue as a result of these changes. Cardiac and hematologic consequences of stress are also addressed briefly. It is likely that activation of the inflammatory cascade in association with oxidative imbalance represents key pathophysiological components of stress-induced cardiovascular changes. We also review some of the commonly used animal models of stress and discuss the cardiovascular outcomes reported in these models of stress. The unique ability of animals for adaptation under stressful conditions lessens the extrapolation of laboratory findings to conditions of human stress. An animal model of unpredictable chronic stress, which applies various stress modules in a random fashion, might be a useful solution to this predicament. The use of stress markers as indicators of stress intensity is also discussed in various models of animal stress and in clinical studies.

  17. Microbiomes: unifying animal and plant systems through the lens of community ecology theory.

    PubMed

    Christian, Natalie; Whitaker, Briana K; Clay, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The field of microbiome research is arguably one of the fastest growing in biology. Bacteria feature prominently in studies on animal health, but fungi appear to be the more prominent functional symbionts for plants. Despite the similarities in the ecological organization and evolutionary importance of animal-bacterial and plant-fungal microbiomes, there is a general failure across disciplines to integrate the advances made in each system. Researchers studying bacterial symbionts in animals benefit from greater access to efficient sequencing pipelines and taxonomic reference databases, perhaps due to high medical and veterinary interest. However, researchers studying plant-fungal symbionts benefit from the relative tractability of fungi under laboratory conditions and ease of cultivation. Thus each system has strengths to offer, but both suffer from the lack of a common conceptual framework. We argue that community ecology best illuminates complex species interactions across space and time. In this synthesis we compare and contrast the animal-bacterial and plant-fungal microbiomes using six core theories in community ecology (i.e., succession, community assembly, metacommunities, multi-trophic interactions, disturbance, restoration). The examples and questions raised are meant to spark discussion amongst biologists and lead to the integration of these two systems, as well as more informative, manipulatory experiments on microbiomes research. PMID:26441846

  18. The evolution of novel animal signals: silk decorations as a model system.

    PubMed

    Walter, André; Elgar, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    Contemporary animal signals may derive from an elaboration of existing forms or novel non-signalling traits. Unravelling the evolution of the latter is challenging because experiments investigating the maintenance of the signal may provide little insight into its early evolution. The web decorations, or stabilimenta of some orb web spiders represent an intriguing model system to investigate novel animal signals. For over 100 years, biologists have struggled to explain why spiders decorate their webs with additional threads of silk, producing a conspicuous signal on a construction whose function is to entangle unsuspecting prey. The numerous explanations for the maintenance of this behaviour starkly contrast with the absence of a plausible explanation for its evolutionary origin. Our review highlights the difficulties in resolving both the evolution and maintenance of animal signalling, and inferring the causative arrow-even from experimental studies. Drawing on recent research that focuses on physiological processes, we provide a model of the evolutionary progression of web-decorating behaviour.

  19. A Novel System for Recording from Single Neurons in Unrestrained Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sherk, Helen; Wilkinson, Elizabeth J.

    2008-01-01

    To observe neural activity in animals engaged in natural behavior, it is often desirable to minimize or eliminate restraint of the animal. We have developed a simple system for recording from single units in unrestrained cats. An implant with multiple guide tubes and a tiny microdrive is placed inside the recording chamber. An indwelling Pt-Ir microelectrode is advanced incrementally during recording sessions that occur over a period of weeks or months. Electrodes can be easily replaced. We obtain excellent recording stability, and also have been able to sample extensively from a region of cortex or brain stem in a single animal. The essential electronics have been miniaturized and sewn into a light-weight walking jacket, so that we can collect data from a cat who is not connected to any fixed equipment. PMID:18619491

  20. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing. PMID:19930434

  1. Assessment of national systems for the surveillance and monitoring of animal health.

    PubMed

    Hueston, W D

    1993-12-01

    Continued growth in international trade and the developing concepts of zoning and risk assessment demand effective assessment of national surveillance and monitoring systems for animal health. The ideal national epidemiological delivery system incorporates surveillance for disease agents, host monitoring and environmental assessment. An extensive veterinary infrastructure is necessary to support the ideal epidemiological delivery system. While the full spectrum of epidemiological services is represented worldwide, a standardized approach to assessing national surveillance and monitoring systems is proposed, in order to meet the emerging demand for scientifically-based import regulations.

  2. Tl-201 and Tc-99m-Sestamibi SPECT for brain tumor detection: Comparison using MRI coregistration

    SciTech Connect

    Darcourt, J.; Itti, L.; Chang, L.

    1994-05-01

    Tl-201 (Tl) brain SPECT has been validated for the differential diagnosis of high versus low grade gliomas and recurrence versus radiation necrosis. We compared this technique to Tc-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) SPECT in 9 patients (pts) with brain tumors using MRI coregistration. Pts were injected with 4 mCi of Tl and brain SPECT was performed using a dedicated brain system. This was immediately following by an injection of 20 mCi of MIBI and a brain SPECT using the same camera and with the pt in the same position. Four pts were studied for the diagnosis of radiation necrosis vs. tumor recurrence (2 had biopsy proven recurrence); 5 pts were studied for primary tumor evaluation: 2 meningiomas, 1 oligodendroglioma, 1 low-grade astrocytoma, 1 cysticercosis. Coregistration was performed for every pt by 3D surface fitting of the inner skull MIBI contour to the MRI brain surface extracted automatically. ROIs were drawn on the MRI and applied to the coregistered MIBI and Tl images for tumor to non-tumor ratios T/NT calculations. There was a tight correlation between MIBI and Tl T/NT (r-0.96) and a 1.5 threshold separated radiation necrosis from recurrence and low from high grade primary tumors. Therefore, the data already available on Tl brain tumor imaging can be used with MIBI SPECT with the advantage of a better image quality (2.5 to 4 times more counts).

  3. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquiz, Juan Manuel

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is affected by photon attenuation and image blurring due to Compton scatter and geometric detector response. Attenuation correction is important to increase diagnostic accuracy of cardiac SPECT. However, in attenuation-corrected scans, scattered photons from radioactivity in the liver could produce a spillover of counts into the inferior myocardial wall. In the clinical setting, blurring effects could be compensated by restoration with Wiener and Metz filters. Inconveniences of these procedures are that the Wiener filter depends upon the power spectra of the object image and noise, which are unknown, while Metz parameters have to be optimized by trial and error. This research develops an alternative restoration procedure based on a multiresolution denoising and regularization algorithm. It was hypothesized that this representation leads to a more straightforward and automatic restoration than conventional filters. The main objective of the research was the development and assessment of the multiresolution algorithm for compensating the liver spillover artifact. The multiresolution algorithm decomposes original SPECT projections into a set of sub-band frequency images. This allows a simple denoising and regularization procedure by discarding high frequency channels and performing inversion only in low and intermediate frequencies. The method was assessed in bull's eye polar maps and short- axis attenuation-corrected reconstructions of a realistic cardiac-chest phantom with a custom-made liver insert and different 99mTc liver-to-heart activity ratios. Inferior myocardial defects were simulated in some experiments. The cardiac phantom in free air was considered as the gold standard reference. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating contrast of short- axis slices and the normalized chi-square measure, defect size and mean and standard deviation of polar map counts. The performance of the multiresolution

  4. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  5. Characterizing the MTF in 3D for a Quantized SPECT Camera Having Arbitrary Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Madhav, Priti; Bowsher, James E; Cutler, Spencer J; Tornai, Martin P

    2009-06-01

    The emergence of application-specific 3D tomographic small animal and dedicated breast imaging systems has stimulated the development of simple methods to quantify the spatial resolution or Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the system in three dimensions. Locally determined MTFs, obtained from line source measurements at specific locations, can characterize spatial variations in the system resolution and can help correct for such variations. In this study, a method is described to measure the MTF in 3D for a compact SPECT system that uses a 16 × 20 cm(2) CZT-based compact gamma camera and 3D positioning gantry capable of moving in different trajectories. Image data are acquired for a novel phantom consisting of three radioactivity-filled capillary tubes, positioned nearly orthogonally to each other. These images provide simultaneous measurements of the local MTF along three dimensions of the reconstructed imaged volume. The usefulness of this approach is shown by characterizing the MTF at different locations in the reconstructed imaged 3D volume using various (1) energy windows; (2) iterative reconstruction parameters including number of iterations, voxel size, and number of projection views; (3) simple and complex 3D orbital trajectories including simple vertical axis of rotation, simple tilt, complex circle-plus-arc, and complex sinusoids projected onto a hemisphere; and (4) object shapes in the camera's field of view. Results indicate that the method using the novel phantom can provide information on spatial resolution effects caused by system design, sampling, energy windows, reconstruction parameters, novel 3D orbital trajectories, and object shapes. Based on these measurements that are useful for dedicated tomographic breast imaging, it was shown that there were small variations in the MTF in 3D for various energy windows and reconstruction parameters. However, complex trajectories that uniformly sample the breast volume of interest were quantitatively

  6. A small animal holding fixture system with positional reproducibility for longitudinal multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokuryo, Daisuke; Kimura, Yuichi; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga; Kawamura, Kazunori; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Kanno, Iwao; Aoki, Ichio

    2010-07-01

    This study presents a combined small animal holding fixture system, termed a 'bridge capsule', which provides for small animal re-fixation with positional reproducibility. This system comprises separate holding fixtures for the head and lower body and a connecting part to a gas anesthesia system. A mouse is fixed in place by the combination of a head fixture with a movable part made from polyacetal resin, a lower body fixture made from vinyl-silicone and a holder for the legs and tail. For re-fixation, a similar posture could be maintained by the same holding fixtures and a constant distance between the head and lower body fixtures is maintained. Artifacts caused by the bridge capsule system were not observed on magnetic resonance (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. The average position differences of the spinal column and the iliac body before and after re-fixation for the same modality were approximately 1.1 mm. The difference between the MRI and PET images was approximately 1.8 mm for the lower body fixture after image registration using fiducial markers. This system would be useful for longitudinal, repeated and multimodal imaging experiments requiring similar animal postures.

  7. Forty research issues for the redesign of animal production systems in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Dumont, B; González-García, E; Thomas, M; Fortun-Lamothe, L; Ducrot, C; Dourmad, J Y; Tichit, M

    2014-08-01

    Agroecology offers a scientific and operational framework for redesigning animal production systems (APS) so that they better cope with the coming challenges. Grounded in the stimulation and valorization of natural processes to reduce inputs and pollutions in agroecosystems, it opens a challenging research agenda for the animal science community. In this paper, we identify key research issues that define this agenda. We first stress the need to assess animal robustness by measurable traits, to analyze trade-offs between production and adaptation traits at within-breed and between-breed level, and to better understand how group selection, epigenetics and animal learning shape performance. Second, we propose research on the nutritive value of alternative feed resources, including the environmental impacts of producing these resources and their associated non-provisioning services. Third, we look at how the design of APS based on agroecological principles valorizes interactions between system components and promotes biological diversity at multiple scales to increase system resilience. Addressing such challenges requires a collection of theories and models (concept-knowledge theory, viability theory, companion modeling, etc.). Acknowledging the ecology of contexts and analyzing the rationales behind traditional small-scale systems will increase our understanding of mechanisms contributing to the success or failure of agroecological practices and systems. Fourth, the large-scale development of agroecological products will require analysis of resistance to change among farmers and other actors in the food chain. Certifications and market-based incentives could be an important lever for the expansion of agroecological alternatives in APS. Finally, we question the suitability of current agriculture extension services and public funding mechanisms for scaling-up agroecological practices and systems.

  8. Forty research issues for the redesign of animal production systems in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Dumont, B; González-García, E; Thomas, M; Fortun-Lamothe, L; Ducrot, C; Dourmad, J Y; Tichit, M

    2014-08-01

    Agroecology offers a scientific and operational framework for redesigning animal production systems (APS) so that they better cope with the coming challenges. Grounded in the stimulation and valorization of natural processes to reduce inputs and pollutions in agroecosystems, it opens a challenging research agenda for the animal science community. In this paper, we identify key research issues that define this agenda. We first stress the need to assess animal robustness by measurable traits, to analyze trade-offs between production and adaptation traits at within-breed and between-breed level, and to better understand how group selection, epigenetics and animal learning shape performance. Second, we propose research on the nutritive value of alternative feed resources, including the environmental impacts of producing these resources and their associated non-provisioning services. Third, we look at how the design of APS based on agroecological principles valorizes interactions between system components and promotes biological diversity at multiple scales to increase system resilience. Addressing such challenges requires a collection of theories and models (concept-knowledge theory, viability theory, companion modeling, etc.). Acknowledging the ecology of contexts and analyzing the rationales behind traditional small-scale systems will increase our understanding of mechanisms contributing to the success or failure of agroecological practices and systems. Fourth, the large-scale development of agroecological products will require analysis of resistance to change among farmers and other actors in the food chain. Certifications and market-based incentives could be an important lever for the expansion of agroecological alternatives in APS. Finally, we question the suitability of current agriculture extension services and public funding mechanisms for scaling-up agroecological practices and systems. PMID:24871266

  9. Mini-scale bioprocessing systems for highly parallel animal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beum Jun; Diao, Jinpian; Shuler, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Animal cells have been used extensively in therapeutic protein production. The growth of animal cells and the expression of therapeutic proteins are highly dependent on the culturing environments. A large number of experimental permutations need to be explored to identify the optimal culturing conditions. Miniaturized bioreactors are well suited for such tasks as they offer high-throughput parallel operation and reduce cost of reagents. They can also be automated and be coupled to downstream analytical units for online measurements of culture products. This review summarizes the current status of miniaturized bioreactors for animal cell cultivation based on the design categories: microtiter plates, flasks, stirred tank reactors, novel designs with active mixing, and microfluidic cell culture devices. We compare cell density and product titer, for batch or fed-batch modes for each system. Monitoring/controlling devices for engineering parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved carbon dioxide, which could be applied to such systems, are summarized. Finally, mini-scale tools for process performance evaluation for animal cell cultures are discussed: total cell density, cell viability, product titer and quality, substrates, and metabolites profiles. PMID:22522970

  10. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2006-03-01

    To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals.A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048x3072x12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 mum but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  11. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C.; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals. A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048×3072×12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 μm but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  12. Optical methods and integrated systems for brain imaging in awake, untethered animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, Kartikeya

    Imaging is a powerful tool for biomedical research offering non-contact and minimally or non-invasive means of investigating at multiple scales---from single molecules to large populations of cells. Imaging in awake, behaving animals is an emerging field that offers the additional advantage of being able to study physiological processes and structures in a more natural state than what is possible in tissue slices or even in anesthetized animals. To date, most imaging in awake animals has used optical fiber bundles or electrical cables to transfer signals to traditional imaging-system components. However, the fibers or cables tether the animal and greatly limit the kind and duration of animal behavior that can be studied using imaging methods. This work involves three distinct yet related approaches to fulfill the goal of imaging in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals---optical techniques for functional and structural imaging, development of novel photodetectors and the design of miniaturized imaging systems. I hypothesized that the flow within vessels might act as a contrast-enhancing agent and improve the visualization of vascular architecture using laser speckle imaging. When imaging rodent cerebral vasculature I saw a two to four fold increase in the contrast-to-noise ratios and was able to visualize 10--30% more vascular features over reflectance techniques. I designed a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photodetector array that was comparable in sensitivity and noise performance to cooled CCD sensors, able to image fluorescence from a single cell, while running at faster frame rates. Next, I designed an imaging system weighing under 6 grams and occupying less than 4 cm3. The system incorporated multispectral illumination, adjustable focusing optics and the high-sensitivity CMOS imager. I was able to implement a variety of optical modalities with the system and performed reflectance, fluorescence, spectroscopic and laser speckle imaging with my

  13. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  14. An Arbitrary Waveform Wearable Neuro-stimulator System for Neurophysiology Research on Freely Behaving Animals.

    PubMed

    Samani, Mohsen Mosayebi; Mahnam, Amin; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2014-04-01

    Portable wireless neuro-stimulators have been developed to facilitate long-term cognitive and behavioral studies on the central nervous system in freely moving animals. These stimulators can provide precisely controllable input(s) to the nervous system, without distracting the animal attention with cables connected to its body. In this study, a low power backpack neuro-stimulator was developed for animal brain researches that can provides arbitrary stimulus waveforms for the stimulation, while it is small and light weight to be used for small animals including rats. The system consists of a controller that uses an RF link to program and activate a small and light microprocessor-based stimulator. A Howland current source was implemented to produce precise current controlled arbitrary waveform stimulations. The system was optimized for ultra-low power consumption and small size. The stimulator was first tested for its electrical specifications. Then its performance was evaluated in a rat experiment when electrical stimulation of medial longitudinal fasciculus induced circling behavior. The stimulator is capable of delivering programmed stimulations up to ± 2 mA with adjusting steps of 1 μA, accuracy of 0.7% and compliance of 6 V. The stimulator is 15 mm × 20 mm × 40 mm in size, weights 13.5 g without battery and consumes a total power of only 5.l mW. In the experiment, the rat could easily carry the stimulator and demonstrated the circling behavior for 0.1 ms current pulses of above 400 μA. The developed system has a competitive size and weight, whereas providing a wide range of operation and the flexibility of generating arbitrary stimulation patterns ideal for long-term experiments in the field of cognitive and neuroscience research.

  15. A classic model animal in the 21st century: recent lessons from the leech nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    The medicinal leech (genus Hirudo) is a classic model animal in systems neuroscience. The leech has been central to many integrative studies that establish how properties of neurons and their interconnections give rise to the functioning of the animal at the behavioral level. Leeches exhibit several discrete behaviors (such as crawling, swimming and feeding) that are each relatively simple. Importantly, these behaviors can all be studied - at least at a basal level - in the isolated nervous system. The leech nervous system is particularly amenable to such studies because of its distributed nature; sensory processing and generation of behavior occur to a large degree in iterated segmental ganglia that each contain only ∼400 neurons. Furthermore, the neurons are relatively large and are arranged with stereotyped topography on the surface of the ganglion, which greatly facilitates their identification and accessibility. This Commentary provides an overview of recent work on the leech nervous system, with particular focus on circuits that underlie leech behavior. Studies that combine the unique features of the leech with modern optical and genetic techniques are also discussed. Thus, this Commentary aims to explain the continued appeal of the leech as an experimental animal in the 21st century. PMID:26538172

  16. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS ‘rapid fixing’ technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  17. Human-induced changes in animal populations and distributions, and the subsequent effects on fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, David R.

    2006-09-01

    Humans have profoundly altered hydrological pathways and fluvial systems through their near-extirpation of native populations of animal species that strongly influenced hydrology and removal of surface sediment, and through the introduction of now-feral populations of animals that bring to bear a suite of different geomorphic effects on the fluvial system. In the category of effects of extirpation, examples are offered through an examination of the geomorphic effects and former spatial extent of beavers, bison, prairie dogs, and grizzly bears. Beavers entrapped hundreds of billions of cubic meters of sediment in North American stream systems prior to European contact. Individual bison wallows, that numbered in the range of 100 million wallows, each displaced up to 23 m 3 of sediment. Burrowing by prairie dogs displaced more than 5000 kg and possibly up to 67,500 kg of sediment per hectare. In the category of feral populations, the roles of feral rabbits, burros and horses, and pigs are highlighted. Much work remains to adequately quantify the geomorphic effects animals have on fluvial systems, but the influence is undeniable.

  18. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  19. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder which has just begun to be studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Epilepsy usually is studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques that demonstrate the physiologic changes that occur during seizures, and with neuroimaging techniques that show the brain structures where seizures originate. Neither method alone has been adequate to describe the pathophysiology of the patient with epilepsy. EEG techniques lack anatomic sensitivity, and there are no structural abnormalities shown by neuroimaging which are specific for epilepsy. Functional imaging (FI) has developed as a physiologic tool with anatomic sensitivity, and SPECT has been promoted as a FI technique because of its potentially wide availability. However, SPECT is early in its development and its clinical utility for epilepsy still has to be demonstrated. To understand this role of SPECT, consideration must be given to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, brain physiology, types of seizure, epileptic syndromes, and the SPECT technique itself. 44 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Tomographic mesh generation for OSEM reconstruction of SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Yu, Bo; Vogelsang, Levon; Krol, Andrzej; Xu, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaofei; Feiglin, David

    2009-02-01

    To improve quality of OSEM SPECT reconstruction in the mesh domain, we implemented an adaptive mesh generation method that produces tomographic mesh consisting of triangular elements with size and density commensurate with geometric detail of the objects. Node density and element size change smoothly as a function of distance from the edges and edge curvature without creation of 'bad' elements. Tomographic performance of mesh-based OSEM reconstruction is controlled by the tomographic mesh structure, i.e. node density distribution, which in turn is ruled by the number of key points on the boundaries. A greedy algorithm is used to influence the distribution of nodes on the boundaries. The relationship between tomographic mesh properties and OSEM reconstruction quality has been investigated. We conclude that by selecting adequate number of key points, one can produce a tomographic mesh with lowest number of nodes that is sufficient to provide desired quality of reconstructed images, appropriate for the imaging system properties.

  1. Frequency weighted least squares reconstruction of truncated transmission SPECT data

    SciTech Connect

    Riddell, C.; Savi, A.; Gilardi, M.C.; Fazio, F.

    1996-08-01

    A least squares technique for reconstructing truncated data is presented. The method involves including the ramp filter into the system matrix. The sinogram is extrapolated with zeros for filtering but extrapolated values are not considered during backward and forward projections.The new matrix leads to a frequency weighted least squares criterion. Tikhonov regularization and a priori information are considered. For the 0-order regularization, the resulting images are biased but it is shown that this bias is recovered by a simple scaling process. First and second order regularizations provide true restoration. The technique is applied to simulated and real transmission SPECT data. Results show that the frequency least squares criterion is a valuable approach for efficiently reconstructing truncated sinograms.

  2. Columnar transmitter based wireless power delivery system for implantable device in freely moving animals.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kyungsik; Jeong, Joonsoo; Lee, Tae Hyung; Lee, Sung Eun; Jun, Sang Bum; Kim, Sung June

    2013-01-01

    A wireless power delivery system is developed to deliver electrical power to the neuroprosthetic devices that are implanted into animals freely moving inside the cage. The wireless powering cage is designed for long-term animal experiments without cumbersome wires for power supply or the replacement of batteries. In the present study, we propose a novel wireless power transmission system using resonator-based inductive links to increase power efficiency and to minimize the efficiency variations. A columnar transmitter coil is proposed to provide lateral uniformity of power efficiency. Using this columnar transmitter coil, only 7.2% efficiency fluctuation occurs from the maximum transmission efficiency of 25.9%. A flexible polymer-based planar type receiver coil is fabricated and assembled with a neural stimulator and an electrode. Using the designed columnar transmitter coil, the implantable device successfully operates while it moves freely inside the cage. PMID:24110073

  3. Quantitative tools for comparing animal communication systems: information theory applied to bottlenose dolphin whistle repertoires.

    PubMed

    McCOWAN; Hanser; Doyle

    1999-02-01

    Comparative analysis of nonhuman animal communication systems and their complexity, particularly in comparison to human language, has been generally hampered by both a lack of sufficiently extensive data sets and appropriate analytic tools. Information theory measures provide an important quantitative tool for examining and comparing communication systems across species. In this paper we use the original application of information theory, that of statistical examination of a communication system's structure and organization. As an example of the utility of information theory to the analysis of animal communication systems, we applied a series of information theory statistics to a statistically categorized set of bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus, whistle vocalizations. First, we use the first-order entropic relation in a Zipf-type diagram (Zipf 1949 Human Behavior and the Principle of Least Effort) to illustrate the application of temporal statistics as comparative indicators of repertoire complexity, and as possible predictive indicators of acquisition/learning in animal vocal repertoires. Second, we illustrate the need for more extensive temporal data sets when examining the higher entropic orders, indicative of higher levels of internal informational structure, of such vocalizations, which could begin to allow the statistical reconstruction of repertoire organization. Third, we propose using 'communication capacity' as a measure of the degree of temporal structure and complexity of statistical correlation, represented by the values of entropic order, as an objective tool for interspecies comparison of communication complexity. In doing so, we introduce a new comparative measure, the slope of Shannon entropies, and illustrate how it potentially can be used to compare the organizational complexity of vocal repertoires across a diversity of species. Finally, we illustrate the nature and predictive application of these higher-order entropies using a preliminary

  4. Vegetable oils and animal fats for diesel fuels: a systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinsky, E.S.; Kresovich, S.; Wagner, C.K.; Appelbaum, H.R.; McClure, T.A.; Otis, J.L.; Trayser, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper provided some information on the possible use of vegetable oils and animal fats as substitute fuels and as emergency diesel fuels in the United States. This paper is confined to using triglyceride fuels in agricultural, automotive, and highway transportation applications. Satisfactory substitution of petroleum-based diesel fuels with triglyceride-based fuels requires the development of an integrated system for the production, processing, and end use of the new fuels on a basis that is both technically attractive and economically rewarding to all of the elements of the system. The three subsystems, the farms that produce oilseed crops, the production of triglycerides and protein, and the manufacturers of the diesel engines and the owners of the present stock of auto-ignition engines, are discussed. It was concluded that vegetable oils and animal fats have substantial prospects as long-term substitutes for diesel fuels. If special auto-ignition engines were developed to handle vegetable oils, on-farm production and use might succeed. In the absence of such engine development, it is likely that large, centralized facilities to manufacture vegetable oils and their methylesters will be the successful processing route. Vegetable oils are likely to succeed first in geographical areas with benign climates. Vegetable oils and animal fats have limited prospects as diesel fuels for acute emergencies. The high viscosity of vegetable oils and the necessity to make substantial capital investments to obtain oils from oilseeds render the system relatively inflexible. 4 tables. (DP)

  5. Design and implementation of a marine animal alert system to support Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Choi, Eric Y.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-08-08

    Power extracted from fast moving tidal currents has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. Device developers and utilities are pursuing deployment of prototype tidal turbines to assess technology viability, site feasibility, and environmental interactions. Deployment of prototype turbines requires permits from a range of regulatory authorities. Ensuring the safety of marine animals, particularly those under protection of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 has emerged as a key regulatory challenge for initial MHK deployments. The greatest perceived risk to marine animals is from strike by the rotating blades of tidal turbines. Development of the marine mammal alert system (MAAS) was undertaken to support monitoring and mitigation requirements for tidal turbine deployments. The prototype system development focused on Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW), an endangered population of killer whales that frequents Puget Sound and is intermittently present in the part of the sound where deployment of prototype tidal turbines is being considered. Passive acoustics were selected as the primary means because of the vocal nature of these animals. The MAAS passive acoustic system consists of two-stage process involving the use of an energy detector and a spectrogram-based classifier to distinguish between SKRW’s calls and noise. A prototype consisting of two 2D symmetrical star arrays separated by 20 m center to center was built and evaluated in the waters of Sequim Bay using whale call playback.

  6. An MRI-compatible system for focused ultrasound experiments in small animal models.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rajiv; Curiel, Laura; Staruch, Robert; Morrison, Laetitia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-05-01

    The development of novel MRI-guided therapeutic ultrasound methods including potentiated drug delivery and targeted thermal ablation requires extensive testing in small animals such as rats and mice due to the widespread use of these species as models of disease. An MRI-compatible, computer-controlled three-axis positioning system was constructed to deliver focused ultrasound exposures precisely to a target anatomy in small animals for high-throughput preclinical drug delivery studies. Each axis was constructed from custom-made nonmagnetic linear ball stages driven by piezoelectric actuators and optical encoders. A range of motion of 5 x 5 x 2.5 cm3 was achieved, and initial bench top characterization demonstrated the ability to deliver ultrasound to the brain with a spatial accuracy of 0.3 mm. Operation of the positioning system within the bore of a clinical 3 T MR imager was feasible, and simultaneous motion and MR imaging did not result in any mutual interference. The system was evaluated in its ability to deliver precise sonications within the mouse brain, linear scanned exposures in a rat brain for blood barrier disruption, and circular scans for controlled heating under MR temperature feedback. Initial results suggest that this is a robust and precise apparatus for use in the investigation of novel ultrasound-based therapeutic strategies in small animal preclinical models. PMID:19544806

  7. Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) Design of a Small Animal Radiotherapy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, S.; Mackie, T. R.; Jeraj, R.

    2014-03-01

    Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) was initiated with the goal of facilitating medical research by developing medical technologies including both hardware and software on an open-source platform. Our first project was to develop an integrated imaging and radiotherapy device for small animals that includes computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and radiation therapy (RT) modalities for which technical specifications were defined in the first OSMD conference held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA in December 2011. This paper specifically focuses on the development of a small animal RT (micro-RT) system by designing a binary micro multileaf collimator (bmMLC) and a small animal treatment planning system (SATPS) to enable intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Both hardware and software projects are currently under development and their current progresses are described. After the development, both bmMLC and TPS will be validated and commissioned for a micro-RT system. Both hardware design and software development will be open-sourced after completion.

  8. Countering the livestock-targeted bioterrorism threat and responding with an animal health safeguarding system.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J-Y; Lee, J-H; Park, J-Y; Cho, Y S; Cho, I-S

    2013-08-01

    Attacks against livestock and poultry using biological agents constitute a subtype of agroterrorism. These attacks are defined as the intentional introduction of an animal infectious disease to strike fear in people, damage a nation's economy and/or threaten social stability. Livestock bioterrorism is considered attractive to terrorists because biological agents for use against livestock or poultry are more readily available and difficult to monitor than biological agents for use against humans. In addition, an attack on animal husbandry can have enormous economic consequences, even without human casualties. Animal husbandry is vulnerable to livestock-targeted bioterrorism because it is nearly impossible to secure all livestock animals, and compared with humans, livestock are less well-guarded targets. Furthermore, anti-livestock biological weapons are relatively easy to employ, and a significant effect can be produced with only a small amount of infectious material. The livestock sector is presently very vulnerable to bioterrorism as a result of large-scale husbandry methods and weaknesses in the systems used to detect disease outbreaks, which could aggravate the consequences of livestock-targeted bioterrorism. Thus, terrorism against livestock and poultry cannot be thought of as either a 'low-probability' or 'low-consequence' incident. This review provides an overview of methods to prevent livestock-targeted bioterrorism and respond to terrorism involving the deliberate introduction of a pathogen-targeting livestock and poultry.

  9. Good governance of animal health systems and public-private partnerships: an Australian case study.

    PubMed

    Black, P F

    2012-08-01

    The animal health system in Australia has evolved over more than 100 years and includes innovative public-private partnership arrangements. The establishment in 1996 of Animal Health Australia (AHA), a not-for-profit company, was a crucial development which formalised arrangements for shared decision-making and funding across both government and industry stakeholders. However, Federal and State governments retain legislative authority for animal health control. Accordingly, all programmes must recognise that the public sector remains an executive arm of government, accountable for its actions. Hence, much effort has been invested in ensuring that the governance arrangements within AHA are lawful and transparent. The Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA) is a very good example of governance arrangements that are sustainably financed, widely available, provided efficiently, without waste or duplication, and in a manner that is transparent and free of fraud or corruption. The benefits of EADRA include certainty and greater transparency of funding; greater efficiency through increased probability of a rapid response to an occurrence of any of 65 diseases; and industry participation in the management and financing of such a response. PMID:23413743

  10. Salmonella and antimicrobial resistance in an animal-based agriculture river system.

    PubMed

    Palhares, Julio Cesar Pascale; Kich, Jalusa D; Bessa, Marjo C; Biesus, Luiza L; Berno, Lais G; Triques, Nelise J

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the Salmonella serovars and antimicrobial resistance within an animal-based agriculture river system. The study area consisted of a 1,345 ha upper part of Pinhal catchment. A total of 384 samples were collected in four years of monitoring. Salmonella was isolated from 241 samples (62.7%), resulting in 324 isolates. The highest number of Salmonella sp. occurred in samples associated with sites with high stoking density animal unit per hectare. It was possible to demonstrate the variability of serovars in the study area: 30 different serovars were found and at least 11 per monitoring site. Thirty-three potentially related isolates were genotyped by PFGE, one major clone was observed in serovar Typhimurium, which occurred in animal feces (swine and bovine), and different sites and samplings proving the cross-contamination and persistence of this specific clone. Among 180 isolates submitted to an antimicrobial susceptibility test, 50.5% were susceptible to all 21 antimicrobials tested and 54 different profiles were found. In the current study, 49.5% of the tested isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, and multi-resistance occurred in 18% of isolates. Results indicate a close interaction between animal-based agriculture, Salmonella, and antimicrobial resistance.

  11. Good governance of animal health systems and public-private partnerships: an Australian case study.

    PubMed

    Black, P F

    2012-08-01

    The animal health system in Australia has evolved over more than 100 years and includes innovative public-private partnership arrangements. The establishment in 1996 of Animal Health Australia (AHA), a not-for-profit company, was a crucial development which formalised arrangements for shared decision-making and funding across both government and industry stakeholders. However, Federal and State governments retain legislative authority for animal health control. Accordingly, all programmes must recognise that the public sector remains an executive arm of government, accountable for its actions. Hence, much effort has been invested in ensuring that the governance arrangements within AHA are lawful and transparent. The Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA) is a very good example of governance arrangements that are sustainably financed, widely available, provided efficiently, without waste or duplication, and in a manner that is transparent and free of fraud or corruption. The benefits of EADRA include certainty and greater transparency of funding; greater efficiency through increased probability of a rapid response to an occurrence of any of 65 diseases; and industry participation in the management and financing of such a response.

  12. An automatic weighting system for wild animals based in an artificial neural network: how to weigh wild animals without causing stress.

    PubMed

    Larios, Diego Francisco; Rodríguez, Carlos; Barbancho, Julio; Baena, Manuel; Angel, Miguel Leal; Marín, Jesús; León, Carlos; Bustamante, Javier

    2013-02-28

    This paper proposes a novel and autonomous weighing system for wild animals. It allows evaluating changes in the body weight of animals in their natural environment without causing stress. The proposed system comprises a smart scale designed to estimate individual body weights and their temporal evolution in a bird colony. The system is based on computational intelligence, and offers valuable large amount of data to evaluate the relationship between long-term changes in the behavior of individuals and global change. The real deployment of this system has been for monitoring a breeding colony of lesser kestrels (Falco naumanni) in southern Spain. The results show that it is possible to monitor individual weight changes during the breeding season and to compare the weight evolution in males and females.

  13. An Automatic Weighting System for Wild Animals Based in an Artificial Neural Network: How to Weigh Wild Animals without Causing Stress

    PubMed Central

    Larios, Diego Francisco; Rodríguez, Carlos; Barbancho, Julio; Baena, Manuel; Leal, Miguel Ángel; Marín, Jesús; León, Carlos; Bustamante, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel and autonomous weighing system for wild animals. It allows evaluating changes in the body weight of animals in their natural environment without causing stress. The proposed system comprises a smart scale designed to estimate individual body weights and their temporal evolution in a bird colony. The system is based on computational intelligence, and offers valuable large amount of data to evaluate the relationship between long-term changes in the behavior of individuals and global change. The real deployment of this system has been for monitoring a breeding colony of lesser kestrels (Falco naumanni) in southern Spain. The results show that it is possible to monitor individual weight changes during the breeding season and to compare the weight evolution in males and females. PMID:23449117

  14. The Role of Routine Whole Volume SPECT Reconstruction in Comparison to Cine Raw Data in the Detection of Extracardiac Uptake on Myocardial Perfusion Scans.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Korowlay, N A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of routine whole volume reconstructed single-photon emission tomography (rSPECT) compared to cine raw data to detect extracardiac uptake of Sestamibi (MIBI). In a retrospective study, the myocardial perfusion studies of 426 patients were inspected separately for extracardiac uptake on cine raw data and rSPECT. The acquisition parameters for all the images were done according to departmental protocol. The whole volume SPECT data was selected and processed by HOSEM iterative reconstruction using the HERMES computer software system. The images were assessed by two observers, a student in training and a senior consultant nuclear medicine physician. The overall mean age and standard deviation of the 426 patients at the time of the study was 60 ± 12 years. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kappa and McNemars tests. The clinical significance of the extracardiac uptake was evaluated using hospital folders and /or laboratory results after viewing images. rSPECT detected 25 patients (5.9%) and cine raw data identified 18 patients (4.2%) with extracardiac uptake. All the areas of extracardiac uptake noted on cine raw data were seen on the rSPECT images. Only 21 of the 25 patients had complete 5-year clinical follow-up. The value of the clinical significance of the extracardiac uptake was limited due to the study being retrospective. The proportion of positives identified by rSPECT was significantly larger than those identified by cine raw data (P = 0.0082). Although our study demonstrates that rSPECT is more sensitive than cine raw data in detecting extracardiac uptake, it also shows that there is no benefit in routine whole volume rSPECT in daily clinical practice.

  15. A study on the change in image quality before and after an attenuation correction with the use of a CT image in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Kim, Woo-Hyun; Shim, Dong-Oh; Kim, Ho-Sung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2012-12-01

    This study compared the SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) images before and after applying an attenuation correction by using the CT (computed tomography) image in a SPECT/CT scan and examined depending of the change in image quality on the CT dose. A flangeless Esser PET (positron emission tomography) Phantom was used to evaluate the image quality for the Precedence 16 SPECT/CT system manufactured by Philips. The experimental method was to obtain a SPECT image and a CT image of a flangeless Esser PET Phantom to acquire an attenuation-corrected SPECT image. A ROI (region of interest) was then set up at a hot spot of the acquired image to measure the SNR (signal to noise ratio) and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) and to compare the image quality with that of an unattenuation-corrected SPECT image. To evaluate the quality of a SPECT image, we set the ROI as a cylinder diameter (25, 16, 12, and 8 mm) and the BKG (background) radioactivity of the phantom images was obtained when each CT condition was changed. Subsequently, the counts were compared to measure the SNR. The FWHM of the smallest cylinder (8 mm) was measured to compare the image quality. A comparison of the SPECT images with and without attenuation correction revealed 5.01-fold, 4.77 fold, 4.43-fold, 4.38-fold, and 5.13-fold differences in SNR for the 25-mm cylinder, 16-mm cylinder, 12-mm cylinder, 8-mm cylinder, and BKG, respectively. In the phantom image obtained when the CT dose was changed, the FWHM of the 8-mm cylinder showed almost no difference under each condition regardless of the changes in kVp and mAs.

  16. Critical windows of exposure for children's health: the reproductive system in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Pryor, J L; Hughes, C; Foster, W; Hales, B F; Robaire, B

    2000-06-01

    Drugs and environmental chemicals can adversely affect the reproductive system. Currently, available data indicate that the consequences of exposure depend on the nature of the chemical, its target, and the timing of exposure relative to critical windows in development of the reproductive system. The reproductive system is designed to produce gametes in far greater excess than would seem to be necessary for the survival of species. Ten to hundreds of millions of spermatozoa are generated daily by most adult male mammals, yet very few of these germ cells succeed in transmitting their genetic material to the next generation. Although the number of oocytes produced in mammalian females is more limited, and their production occurs only during fetal life, most ovaries contain several orders of magnitude more oocytes than ever will be fertilized. Toxicant exposures may affect critical events in the development of the reproductive system, ranging from early primordial germ cell determination to gonadal differentiation, gametogenesis, external genitalia, or signaling events regulating sexual behavior. Although there are differences between the human reproductive system and that of the usual animal models, such models have been extremely useful in assessing risks for key human reproductive and developmental processes. The objectives for future studies should include the elucidation of the specific cellular and molecular targets of known toxicants; the design of a systematic approach to the identification of reproductive toxicants; and the development of sensitive, specific, and predictive animal models, minimally invasive surrogate markers, or in vitro tests to assess reproductive system function during embryonic, postnatal, and adult life.

  17. A 3-Dimensional Absorbed Dose Calculation Method Based on Quantitative SPECT for Radionuclide Therapy: Evaluation for 131I Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen, Katarina; Liu, Xiaowei; Frey, Eric; Dewaraja, Yuni; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2009-01-01

    A general method is presented for patient-specific 3-dimensional absorbed dose calculations based on quantitative SPECT activity measurements. Methods The computational scheme includes a method for registration of the CT image to the SPECT image and position-dependent compensation for attenuation, scatter, and collimator detector response performed as part of an iterative reconstruction method. A method for conversion of the measured activity distribution to a 3-dimensional absorbed dose distribution, based on the EGS4 (electron-gamma shower, version 4) Monte Carlo code, is also included. The accuracy of the activity quantification and the absorbed dose calculation is evaluated on the basis of realistic Monte Carlo–simulated SPECT data, using the SIMIND (simulation of imaging nuclear detectors) program and a voxel-based computer phantom. CT images are obtained from the computer phantom, and realistic patient movements are added relative to the SPECT image. The SPECT-based activity concentration and absorbed dose distributions are compared with the true ones. Results Correction could be made for object scatter, photon attenuation, and scatter penetration in the collimator. However, inaccuracies were imposed by the limited spatial resolution of the SPECT system, for which the collimator response correction did not fully compensate. Conclusion The presented method includes compensation for most parameters degrading the quantitative image information. The compensation methods are based on physical models and therefore are generally applicable to other radionuclides. The proposed evaluation methodology may be used as a basis for future intercomparison of different methods. PMID:12163637

  18. Bone SPECT/CT in skeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    The utility of radionuclide bone scanning in skeletal trauma has been greatly enhanced over the last decade by hybrid technology merging multislice CT with SPECT that can take advantage of CT-based correction of attenuation and scatter. The resulting images have been particularly helpful in giving us new insights into the evaluation of foot and ankle injuries and vertebral pathology both before and after surgery. The physiological information and anatomical detail allow a better understanding of the causes of patients' pain and have proven to be particularly useful in planning surgical intervention.

  19. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Staczek, J

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovirus infections. Recent advances in biotechnology have permitted the study of many of the animal cytomegaloviruses in vitro. Consequently, animal cytomegaloviruses can be used as model systems for studying the pathogenesis, immunobiology, and molecular biology of cytomegalovirus-host and cytomegalovirus-cell interactions. PMID:2170830

  20. European organic dairy farmers' preference for animal health management within the farm management system.

    PubMed

    van Soest, F J S; Mourits, M C M; Hogeveen, H

    2015-11-01

    The expertise and knowledge of veterinary advisors on improving animal health management is key towards a better herd health status. However, veterinary advisors are not always aware of the goals and priorities of dairy farmers. To dairy farmers animal health is only one aspect of farm management and resources may be allocated to other more preferred areas. Veterinary advisors may experience this as non-compliant with their advice. To explore the preferences of European Union (EU) organic dairy farmers for improved animal health management relative to other farm management areas an adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA) was performed. A total of 215 farmers participated originating from organic dairy farms in France (n = 70), Germany (n = 60), Spain (n = 28) and Sweden (n = 57). The management areas udder health and claw health represented animal health management whereas barn, calf and pasture management represented potential conflicting management areas. Results indicate that EU organic dairy farmers differ in their preferences for improved animal health management within the farming system. In general, improved calf management was the most preferred area and improved claw health management was found to be least preferred, the remaining areas were of intermediate interest. Cluster analyses on claw health measures and udder health measures resulted in respectively seven and nine distinct preference profiles. The results indicate a high degree of variation in farmers' preference, which cannot be explained by the typical herd characteristics. With the individual preferences revealed by ACA, a veterinary advisor can now find out whether his intended advice is directed at a favourable or unfavourable management area of the farmer. If the latter is the case the veterinarian should first create awareness of the problem to the farmer. Insights in individual farmers preferences will allow veterinary advisors to better understand why farmers were incompliant with their advice

  1. High-Resolution 4D Imaging of Technetium Transport in Porous Media using Preclinical SPECT-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M.; DeVol, T. A.; Groen, H.; Moysey, S. M.; Ramakers, R.; Powell, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Preclinical SPECT-CT (single-photon emission computed tomography with integrated X-ray computed tomography) offers the potential to quantitatively image the dynamic three-dimensional distribution of radioisotopes with sub-millimeter resolution, overlaid with structural CT images (20-200 micron resolution), making this an attractive method for studying transport in porous media. A preclinical SPECT-CT system (U-SPECT4CT, MILabs BV. Utrecht, The Netherlands) was evaluated for imaging flow and transport of 99mTc (t1/2=6hrs) using a 46,5mm by 156,4mm column packed with individual layers consisting of <0.2mm diameter silica gel, 0.2-0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0mm diameter glass beads, and a natural soil sample obtained from the Savannah River Site. The column was saturated with water prior to injecting the 99mTc solution. During the injection the flow was interrupted intermittently for 10 minute periods to allow for the acquisition of a SPECT image of the transport front. Non-uniformity of the front was clearly observed in the images as well as the retarded movement of 99mTc in the soil layer. The latter is suggesting good potential for monitoring transport processes occurring on the timescale of hours. After breakthrough of 99mTc was achieved, the flow was stopped and SPECT data were collected in one hour increments to evaluate the sensitivity of the instrument as the isotope decayed. Fused SPECT- CT images allowed for improved interpretation of 99mTc distributions within individual pore spaces. With ~3 MBq remaining in the column, the lowest activity imaged, it was not possible to clearly discriminate any of the pore spaces.

  2. Real-time cine and myocardial perfusion with treadmill exercise stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients referred for stress SPECT

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To date, stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has relied on pharmacologic agents, and therefore lacked the physiologic information available only with exercise stress. Methods 43 patients age 25 to 81 years underwent a treadmill stress test incorporating both Tc99m SPECT and CMR. After rest Tc99m SPECT imaging, patients underwent resting cine CMR. Patients then underwent in-room exercise stress using a partially modified treadmill. 12-lead ECG monitoring was performed throughout. At peak stress, Tc99m was injected and patients rapidly returned to their prior position in the magnet for post-exercise cine and perfusion imaging. The patient table was pulled out of the magnet for recovery monitoring. The patient was sent back into the magnet for recovery cine and resting perfusion followed by delayed post-gadolinium imaging. Post-CMR, patients went to the adjacent SPECT lab to complete stress nuclear imaging. Each modality's images were reviewed blinded to the other's results. Results Patients completed on average 9.3 ± 2.4 min of the Bruce protocol. Stress cine CMR was completed in 68 ± 14 sec following termination of exercise, and stress perfusion CMR was completed in 88 ± 8 sec. Agreement between SPECT and CMR was moderate (κ = 0.58). Accuracy in eight patients who underwent coronary angiography was 7/8 for CMR and 5/8 for SPECT (p = 0.625). Follow-up at 6 months indicated freedom from cardiovascular events in 29/29 CMR-negative and 33/34 SPECT-negative patients. Conclusions Exercise stress CMR including wall motion and perfusion is feasible in patients with suspected ischemic heart disease. Larger clinical trials are warranted based on the promising results of this pilot study to allow comparative effectiveness studies of this stress imaging system vs. other stress imaging modalities. PMID:20624294

  3. Active walker model for the formation of human and animal trail systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk; Schweitzer, Frank; Keltsch, Joachim; Molnár, Péter

    1997-09-01

    Active walker models have recently proved their great value for describing the formation of clusters, periodic patterns, and spiral waves as well as the development of rivers, dielectric breakdown patterns, and many other structures. It is shown that they also allow one to simulate the formation of trail systems by pedestrians and ants, yielding a better understanding of human and animal behavior. A comparison with empirical material shows a good agreement between model and reality. Our trail formation model includes an equation of motion, an equation for environmental changes, and an orientation relation. It contains some model functions, which are specified according to the characteristics of the considered animals or pedestrians. Not only the kind of environmental changes differs: Whereas pedestrians leave footprints on the ground, ants produce chemical markings for their orientation. Nevertheless, it is more important that pedestrians steer towards a certain destination, while ants usually find their food sources by chance, i.e., they reach their destination in a stochastic way. As a consequence, the typical structure of the evolving trail systems depends on the respective species. Some ant species produce a dendritic trail system, whereas pedestrians generate a minimal detour system. The trail formation model can be used as a tool for the optimization of pedestrian facilities: It allows urban planners to design convenient way systems which actually meet the route choice habits of pedestrians.

  4. From animal model to human brain networking: dynamic causal modeling of motivational systems.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Tal; Admon, Roee; Podlipsky, Ilana; Hendler, Talma

    2012-05-23

    An organism's behavior is sensitive to different reinforcements in the environment. Based on extensive animal literature, the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposes three separate neurobehavioral systems to account for such context-sensitive behavior, affecting the tendency to react to punishment, reward, or goal-conflict stimuli. The translation of animal findings to complex human behavior, however, is far from obvious. To examine whether the neural networks underlying humans' motivational processes are similar to those proposed by the RST model, we conducted a functional MRI study, in which 24 healthy subjects performed an interactive game that engaged the different motivational systems using distinct time periods (states) of punishment, reward, and conflict. Crucially, we found that the different motivational states elicited activations in brain regions that corresponded exactly to the brain systems underlying RST. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling of each motivational system confirmed that the coupling strengths between the key brain regions of each system were enabled selectively by the appropriate motivational state. These results may shed light on the impairments that underlie psychopathologies associated with dysfunctional motivational processes and provide a translational validity for the RST. PMID:22623666

  5. From animal model to human brain networking: dynamic causal modeling of motivational systems.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Tal; Admon, Roee; Podlipsky, Ilana; Hendler, Talma

    2012-05-23

    An organism's behavior is sensitive to different reinforcements in the environment. Based on extensive animal literature, the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposes three separate neurobehavioral systems to account for such context-sensitive behavior, affecting the tendency to react to punishment, reward, or goal-conflict stimuli. The translation of animal findings to complex human behavior, however, is far from obvious. To examine whether the neural networks underlying humans' motivational processes are similar to those proposed by the RST model, we conducted a functional MRI study, in which 24 healthy subjects performed an interactive game that engaged the different motivational systems using distinct time periods (states) of punishment, reward, and conflict. Crucially, we found that the different motivational states elicited activations in brain regions that corresponded exactly to the brain systems underlying RST. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling of each motivational system confirmed that the coupling strengths between the key brain regions of each system were enabled selectively by the appropriate motivational state. These results may shed light on the impairments that underlie psychopathologies associated with dysfunctional motivational processes and provide a translational validity for the RST.

  6. Emotional and Interactional Prosody across Animal Communication Systems: A Comparative Approach to the Emergence of Language

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Piera

    2016-01-01

    Across a wide range of animal taxa, prosodic modulation of the voice can express emotional information and is used to coordinate vocal interactions between multiple individuals. Within a comparative approach to animal communication systems, I hypothesize that the ability for emotional and interactional prosody (EIP) paved the way for the evolution of linguistic prosody – and perhaps also of music, continuing to play a vital role in the acquisition of language. In support of this hypothesis, I review three research fields: (i) empirical studies on the adaptive value of EIP in non-human primates, mammals, songbirds, anurans, and insects; (ii) the beneficial effects of EIP in scaffolding language learning and social development in human infants; (iii) the cognitive relationship between linguistic prosody and the ability for music, which has often been identified as the evolutionary precursor of language. PMID:27733835

  7. Aluminum in the central nervous system (CNS): toxicity in humans and animals, vaccine adjuvants, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C A; Tomljenovic, L

    2013-07-01

    We have examined the neurotoxicity of aluminum in humans and animals under various conditions, following different routes of administration, and provide an overview of the various associated disease states. The literature demonstrates clearly negative impacts of aluminum on the nervous system across the age span. In adults, aluminum exposure can lead to apparently age-related neurological deficits resembling Alzheimer's and has been linked to this disease and to the Guamanian variant, ALS-PDC. Similar outcomes have been found in animal models. In addition, injection of aluminum adjuvants in an attempt to model Gulf War syndrome and associated neurological deficits leads to an ALS phenotype in young male mice. In young children, a highly significant correlation exists between the number of pediatric aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines administered and the rate of autism spectrum disorders. Many of the features of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity may arise, in part, from autoimmune reactions, as part of the ASIA syndrome. PMID:23609067

  8. Aluminum in the central nervous system (CNS): toxicity in humans and animals, vaccine adjuvants, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C A; Tomljenovic, L

    2013-07-01

    We have examined the neurotoxicity of aluminum in humans and animals under various conditions, following different routes of administration, and provide an overview of the various associated disease states. The literature demonstrates clearly negative impacts of aluminum on the nervous system across the age span. In adults, aluminum exposure can lead to apparently age-related neurological deficits resembling Alzheimer's and has been linked to this disease and to the Guamanian variant, ALS-PDC. Similar outcomes have been found in animal models. In addition, injection of aluminum adjuvants in an attempt to model Gulf War syndrome and associated neurological deficits leads to an ALS phenotype in young male mice. In young children, a highly significant correlation exists between the number of pediatric aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines administered and the rate of autism spectrum disorders. Many of the features of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity may arise, in part, from autoimmune reactions, as part of the ASIA syndrome.

  9. Development of a Position Decoding ASIC for SPECT using Silicon Photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M.; Kim, H.; Lim, K. T.; Cho, G.

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography(SPECT) is a widely used diagnosis modality for detecting metabolic diseases. In general, SPECT system is consisted of a sensor, a pre-amplifier, position decoding circuits(PDC) and a data acquisition(DAQ) system. Due to such complexity, it is quite costly to assemble SPECT system by putting discrete components together. Moreover, using discrete components would make the system rather bulky. In this work, we designed a channel module ASIC for SPECT system. This system was composed of a transimpedance amplifier(TIA), comparators and digital logics. In this particular module, a TIA was selected as a preamplifier because the decay time and the rise time are shorter than that of other preamplifier topologies. In the proposed module, the amplified pulse from the TIA was split into two separate signals and each signal was then fed into two comparators with different reference levels, e.g., a low and high level. Then an XOR gate combined the comparator outputs and the output of XOR gate was sent to the suceeding digital logic. Furthermore, the output of each component in the module is composed of a signal packet. The packet includes the information on the energy, the time and the position of the incident photon. The energy and position information of a detected radiation can be derived from the output of the D-flipflop(DFF) in the module via time-over-threshold(TOT). The timing information was measured using a delayed rising edge from the low-level referenced comparator. There are several advantages in developing the channel module ASIC. First of all, the ASIC has only digital outputs and thus a correction circuit for analog signal distortion can be neglected. In addition, it is possible to cut down the system production cost because the volume of the system can be reduced due to the compactness of ASIC. The benefits of channel module is not only limited to SPECT but also beneficial to many other radiation detecting systems.

  10. SPECT/CT Fusion in the Diagnosis of Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Yoshio; Tamura, Akihisa; Okazaki, Hajime; Kurose, Taichi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kuraoka, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed to analyze the relationship between the diagnostic ability of fused single photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images in localization of parathyroid lesions and the size of adenomas or hyperplastic glands. Methods: Five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 4 patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) were imaged 15 and 120 minutes after the intravenous injection of technetium99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI). All patients underwent surgery and 5 parathyroid adenomas and 10 hyperplastic glands were detected. Pathologic findings were correlated with imaging results. Results: The SPECT/CT fusion images were able to detect all parathyroid adenomas even with the greatest axial diameter of 0.6 cm. Planar scintigraphy and SPECT imaging could not detect parathyroid adenomas with an axial diameter of 1.0 to 1.2 cm. Four out of 10 (40%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were diagnosed, using planar and SPECT imaging and 5 out of 10 (50%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were localized, using SPECT/CT fusion images. Conclusion: SPECT/CT fusion imaging is a more useful tool for localization of parathyroid lesions, particularly parathyroid adenomas, in comparison with planar and or SPECT imaging. PMID:27408883

  11. Western Coordinating Committee-204 goals and why they are important to the future of animal production systems.

    PubMed

    Cherney, D J R

    2004-03-01

    There are scientists who believe that science is value-free and that social and ethical issues are not their concern. The birth of Dolly, the cloned lamb, greatly increased public and scientific awareness of ethical issues raised by molecular biology as they intersect with human experience. There are many other issues involving animal production systems, including animal welfare, rural community issues, and environmental concerns. Last year Germany became the first European nation to grant animals a constitutional right. Several European nations ban the use of traditional battery cages for laying hens and gestation crates for sows. In the US, 37 states have recently passed animal anticruelty laws. Times are changing, and if animal production systems are to be part of the future, animal scientists must join with society to solve these ethical issues. The Western Coordinating Committee-204 (WCC-204), Animal Bioethics, has as its goals to 1) create a forum in which animal scientists and nonanimal scientists may work together to examine and discuss contentious social issues, 2) provide a means of encouraging the development of research projects dealing with bioethics of the animal sciences, 3) develop mechanisms of outreach that would allow animal scientists to respond directly to consumers and critics, and 4) provide the means for ongoing critical analysis of the animal science professions in the context of their ability to address moral and sociopolitical issues. Animal scientists can no longer ignore social ethics, and by realizing the goals of Western Coordinating Committee-204, we can help maintain the future of animal production systems.

  12. 'I think it will eventually be done away with': Attitudes among healthcare professionals towards the current system of animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Dignon, Andrée

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a study of attitudes to the current system of animal experimentation (for the production of health interventions) among 52 UK healthcare professionals. These healthcare professionals participated in three separate focus groups (of 18, 17 and 17 participants) and were invited to respond to the question 'what is your opinion about the current system of animal testing?' The study focused specifically on their views of the current system (rather than their views of animal testing in general). The healthcare professionals were critical of the current system, particularly with regard to regulation, secrecy, validity, unnecessary suffering and welfare.

  13. MLEM algorithm adaptation for improved SPECT scintimammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Lee, Wei; Kunniyur, Vikram R.; Gangal, Kedar R.; Coman, Ioana L.; Lipson, Edward D.; Karczewski, Deborah A.; Thomas, F. Deaver

    2005-04-01

    Standard MLEM and OSEM algorithms used in SPECT Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography produce hot-spot artifacts (HSA) at the image support peripheries. We investigated a suitable adaptation of MLEM and OSEM algorithms needed to reduce HSA. Patients with suspicious breast lesions were administered 10 mCi of Tc-99m sestamibi and SPECT scans were acquired for patients in prone position with uncompressed breasts. In addition, to simulate breast lesions, some patients were imaged with a number of breast skin markers each containing 1 mCi of Tc-99m. In order to reduce HSA in reconstruction, we removed from the backprojection step the rays that traverse the periphery of the support region on the way to a detector bin, when their path length through this region was shorter than some critical length. Such very short paths result in a very low projection counts contributed to the detector bin, and consequently to overestimation of the activity in the peripheral voxels in the backprojection step-thus creating HSA. We analyzed the breast-lesion contrast and suppression of HSA in the images reconstructed using standard and modified MLEM and OSEM algorithms vs. critical path length (CPL). For CPL >= 0.01 pixel size, we observed improved breast-lesion contrast and lower noise in the reconstructed images, and a very significant reduction of HSA in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images.

  14. Measuring astatine-211 distributions with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Turkington, T G; Zalutsky, M R; Jaszczak, R J; Garg, P K; Vaidyanathan, G; Coleman, R E

    1993-08-01

    We have investigated standard SPECT techniques (rotating gamma cameras, multi-hole collimators, and filtered backprojection reconstruction) for imaging astatine-211 distributions. Since 211At emits alpha particles, this nuclide has potential for use in radiotherapy. The capability of imaging this nuclide would allow in vivo evaluation of the distribution and stability of potential 211At-labelled radiotherapeutic agents. 211At decay yields x-rays in the 77-92 keV range in addition to 500-900 keV gamma rays. This study evaluates the feasibility of SPECT imaging using the x-ray emissions of 211At. We have evaluated several collimators, with the determination that the medium-energy collimators we used are suitable, with 7% penetration (uncollimated counts versus collimated counts). Several phantoms were imaged and attenuation coefficients were measured (narrow-beam mu = 0.182 cm-1 for 77-80 keV x-rays in water). Reconstructed images demonstrate qualitative capabilities and a simple quantitative study demonstrates good correction for attenuation and scatter (approximately 10% error), at low count densities, at least for the phantom geometries used in this study.

  15. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Leist, Marcel; Hasiwa, Nina; Rovida, Costanza; Daneshian, Mardas; Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian; Clewell, Harvey; Gocht, Tilman; Goldberg, Alan; Busquet, Francois; Rossi, Anna-Maria; Schwarz, Michael; Stephens, Martin; Taalman, Rob; Knudsen, Thomas B; McKim, James; Harris, Georgina; Pamies, David; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since March 2013, animal use for cosmetics testing for the European market has been banned. This requires a renewed view on risk assessment in this field. However, in other fields as well, traditional animal experimentation does not always satisfy requirements in safety testing, as the need for human-relevant information is ever increasing. A general strategy for animal-free test approaches was outlined by the US National Research Council`s vision document for Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century in 2007. It is now possible to provide a more defined roadmap on how to implement this vision for the four principal areas of systemic toxicity evaluation: repeat dose organ toxicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity and allergy induction (skin sensitization), as well as for the evaluation of toxicant metabolism (toxicokinetics) (Fig. 1). CAAT-Europe assembled experts from Europe, America and Asia to design a scientific roadmap for future risk assessment approaches and the outcome was then further discussed and refined in two consensus meetings with over 200 stakeholders. The key recommendations include: focusing on improving existing methods rather than favoring de novo design; combining hazard testing with toxicokinetics predictions; developing integrated test strategies; incorporating new high content endpoints to classical assays; evolving test validation procedures; promoting collaboration and data-sharing of different industrial sectors; integrating new disciplines, such as systems biology and high throughput screening; and involving regulators early on in the test development process. A focus on data quality, combined with increased attention to the scientific background of a test method, will be important drivers. Information from each test system should be mapped along adverse outcome pathways. Finally, quantitative information on all factors and key events will be fed into systems biology models that allow a probabilistic risk assessment with flexible

  16. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Leist, Marcel; Hasiwa, Nina; Rovida, Costanza; Daneshian, Mardas; Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian; Clewell, Harvey; Gocht, Tilman; Goldberg, Alan; Busquet, Francois; Rossi, Anna-Maria; Schwarz, Michael; Stephens, Martin; Taalman, Rob; Knudsen, Thomas B; McKim, James; Harris, Georgina; Pamies, David; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since March 2013, animal use for cosmetics testing for the European market has been banned. This requires a renewed view on risk assessment in this field. However, in other fields as well, traditional animal experimentation does not always satisfy requirements in safety testing, as the need for human-relevant information is ever increasing. A general strategy for animal-free test approaches was outlined by the US National Research Council`s vision document for Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century in 2007. It is now possible to provide a more defined roadmap on how to implement this vision for the four principal areas of systemic toxicity evaluation: repeat dose organ toxicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity and allergy induction (skin sensitization), as well as for the evaluation of toxicant metabolism (toxicokinetics) (Fig. 1). CAAT-Europe assembled experts from Europe, America and Asia to design a scientific roadmap for future risk assessment approaches and the outcome was then further discussed and refined in two consensus meetings with over 200 stakeholders. The key recommendations include: focusing on improving existing methods rather than favoring de novo design; combining hazard testing with toxicokinetics predictions; developing integrated test strategies; incorporating new high content endpoints to classical assays; evolving test validation procedures; promoting collaboration and data-sharing of different industrial sectors; integrating new disciplines, such as systems biology and high throughput screening; and involving regulators early on in the test development process. A focus on data quality, combined with increased attention to the scientific background of a test method, will be important drivers. Information from each test system should be mapped along adverse outcome pathways. Finally, quantitative information on all factors and key events will be fed into systems biology models that allow a probabilistic risk assessment with flexible

  17. Animal mdels for the study of the effects of spaceflight on the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    Animal models have been used extensively to study the effects of spaceflight on the immune system. The rat has been the animal used most extensively, but some studies have also been carried out utilizing mice and rhesus monkeys. Hindlimb unloading of rats and mice is a ground-based model that has been utilized to determine the effects of spaceflight-type conditions on the immune systems. The results using this model have shown that hindlimb unloading results in alterations of functional rodent immune responses, including cytokine production, blastogenesis of leukocytes, response of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factors, neutrophil activity, and resistance to infection. Distribution of leukocyte subtypes was not affected by hindlimb unloading. Studies on rats flown in space have demonstrated that exposure to spaceflight results in alterations in cytokine production, alterations in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors, alterations in leukocyte subset distribution, and alterations in natural killer cell function. When pregnant rats were flown in space, although the immune responses of the pregnant mothers were altered by exposure to spaceflight, no effects of spaceflight on the immune responses of the offspring were observed. In one study, rhesus monkeys were flown in space and their immune status was evaluated upon their return to earth. Results of that study showed alterations in the ability of monkey immune cells to produce cytokines, express cytokine receptors, and respond to colony stimulating factor. Therefore, it is clear that exposure to spaceflight results in alterations in immune responses of the test animals. These changes are similar to those observed for humans that have flown in space, and demonstrate that the animal models are appropriate for studying the effects of spaceflight on the immune system. Although use of the hindlimb unloading model on the ground has indicated that exposure to the model also

  18. Evaluation of a closed loop inductive power transmission system on an awake behaving animal subject.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mehdi; Kwon, Ki Yong; Zhang, Fei; Oweiss, Karim; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents in vivo experimental results for a closed loop wireless power transmission system to implantable devices on an awake behaving animal subject. In this system, wireless power transmission takes place across an inductive link, controlled by a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency identification (RFID) transceiver (TRF7960) operating at 13.56 MHz. Induced voltage on the implantable secondary coil is rectified, digitized by a 10-bit analog to digital converter, and transmitted back to the primary via back telemetry. Transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) circuitry were mounted on the back of an adult rat with a nominal distance of ~7 mm between their coils. Our experiments showed that the closed loop system was able to maintain the Rx supply voltage at the designated 3.8 V despite changes in the coils' relative distance and alignment due to animal movements. The Tx power consumption changed between 410 ~ 560 mW in order to deliver 27 mW to the receiver. The open loop system, on the other hand, showed undesired changes in the Rx supply voltage while the Tx power consumption was constant at 660 mW. PMID:22256112

  19. The emerging animal health delivery system in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Bedard, B G; Hunt, T

    2004-04-01

    Livestock production in the People's Republic of China has expanded at an unprecedented rate over the last decade and this trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future. Government and private sector investment supports this growth, and the fact that small farmers are incorporating more animal husbandry into their work is expected to mitigate some of the concerns over recent World Trade Organization accession, particularly in the more precarious grain growing regions. Modernisation and intensification of the livestock industry in the People's Republic of China is subject to significant risks as regards both infectious and production-related diseases and within the framework of food safety and public health challenges. Although historically, the veterinary service system in the People's Republic of China has been successful in the eradication and control of major disease outbreaks, domestic and international market concerns are providing the catalyst for significant reforms in the animal health delivery system in the country. This paper provides an overview of the existing veterinary system in terms of the education and qualifications of veterinary personnel, delivery mechanisms, and future approaches to reforming the system in the context of a dynamic livestock industry in transition. PMID:15200104

  20. Use of viral infections in animal models to assess changes in the immune system.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, E R

    1982-01-01

    Viral infections in animal models appear to be ideal systems for determining toxicity to the immune system by environmental substances. Since many viral infections that are utilized in animals produce systemic disease, these models provide an opportunity to evaluate the interaction between virus and components of host resistance. In these infections it is possible to delineate the role of antibody, interferon, cell-mediated immunity, neutrophils and macrophages in response to infection. A change in any of these components responsible for resistance to a particular virus may be correlated with an alteration of mortality an pathogenesis of the viral infection. Three experimental viral infections in mice that are potential candidates for use in determining immunotoxicity are discussed in terms of the response of individual components of resistance to infection and how changes in there components result in alterations of viral pathogenesis. The resistance to encephalomyocarditis virus infection in mice appears to be primarily mediated by antibody and interferon while with herpes simplex virus, infections are mainly controlled through cell-mediated immunity, macrophages, and possible interferon. Cellular immunity also appears to be primarily responsible for resistance to cytomegalovirus infections. Therefore, it is important in the use of these systems for evaluating immunotoxicity to define the pathogenesis of the viral infection and the specific host responses to these infections and to be able to correlate a change in host resistance with an alteration of the viral infection. PMID:6174323

  1. An Implantable MEMS Micropump System for Drug Delivery in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gensler, Heidi; Sheybani, Roya; Li, Po-Ying; Lo, Ronalee; Meng, Ellis

    2012-01-01

    We present the first implantable drug delivery system for controlled dosing, timing, and location in small animals. Current implantable drug delivery devices do not provide control over these factors or are not feasible for implantation in research animals as small as mice. Our system utilizes an integrated electrolysis micropump, is refillable, has an inert drug reservoir for broad drug compatibility, and is capable of adjustment to the delivery regimen while implanted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for characterization of electrodes on glass substrate and a flexible Parylene substrate. Benchtop testing of the electrolysis actuator resulted in flow rates from 1 to 34 μL/min on glass substrate and up to 6.8 μL/min on Parylene substrate. The fully integrated system generated a flow rate of 4.72 ± 0.35 μL/min under applied constant current of 1.0 mA while maintaining a power consumption of only ~3 mW. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo application of the system for anti-cancer drug delivery in mice. PMID:22273985

  2. Type III Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Pathogens of Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hueck, Christoph J.

    1998-01-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  3. Information gain from count corrections in SPECT image reconstruction and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, L. . Dept. of Radiology); Hero, A.O. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science); Rogers, W.L.; Clinthorne, N.H. . Div. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    The authors present a method for quantifying the impact of count correction side information on the capability of a SPECT projective tomography system to perform image (emitter) reconstruction and feature classification. The method involves computing the image or feature related information gain which results from the presence of count correction side information at the detector. For image reconstruction this information gain is computed using Shannon's mutual information (MI), while for feature classification the authors use the cut-off rate of the SPECT information channel. For reconstruction the gain is proportional to the information divergence between the spatially dependent probability of deletion of a {gamma}-ray originating at a particular emitter location and the spatially independent average deletion probability. For classification the gain is proportional to the difference between the arithmetic mean and the geometric mean of the average number of {gamma}-ray deletions for each of the image classes. Results of analysis and numerical study are presented.

  4. Analysis of integrated animal-fish production system under subtropical hill agro ecosystem in India: growth performance of animals, total biomass production and monetary benefit.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Pathak, K A; Bujarbaruah, K M; Vinod, K

    2009-03-01

    The present study assessed the benefits of integration of animals with fish production in optimizing the bio mass production from unit land in subtropical hill agro ecosystem. Hampshire pigs and Khaki Campbell ducks were integrated with composite fish culture. The pig and duck excreta were directly allowed into the pond and no supplementary feed was given to fish during the period of study. The average levels of N, P and K in dried pig and duck manure were 0.9, 0.7 and 0.6 per cent and 1.3, 0.6 and 0.5 per cent, respectively. The average body weight of pig and duck at 11 months age was 90 and 1.74 kg with an average daily weight gain of 333.33 and 6.44 g, respectively. The fish production in pig-fish and duck-fish systems were 2209 and 2964 kg/ha, respectively while the fish productivity in control pond was only 820 kg/ha. The total biomass (animal and fish) production was higher (p<0.05) in commercial feeding system compared to the traditional system, however the input/output ratio was 1:1.2 and 1:1.55 for commercial and traditional systems, respectively. It was inferred that the total biomass production per unit land was high (p<0.05) when animal and fish were integrated together.

  5. Segmentation and Visual Analysis of Whole-Body Mouse Skeleton microSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Khmelinskii, Artem; Groen, Harald C.; Baiker, Martin; de Jong, Marion; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Whole-body SPECT small animal imaging is used to study cancer, and plays an important role in the development of new drugs. Comparing and exploring whole-body datasets can be a difficult and time-consuming task due to the inherent heterogeneity of the data (high volume/throughput, multi-modality, postural and positioning variability). The goal of this study was to provide a method to align and compare side-by-side multiple whole-body skeleton SPECT datasets in a common reference, thus eliminating acquisition variability that exists between the subjects in cross-sectional and multi-modal studies. Six whole-body SPECT/CT datasets of BALB/c mice injected with bone targeting tracers 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) and 99mTc-hydroxymethane diphosphonate (99mTc-HDP) were used to evaluate the proposed method. An articulated version of the MOBY whole-body mouse atlas was used as a common reference. Its individual bones were registered one-by-one to the skeleton extracted from the acquired SPECT data following an anatomical hierarchical tree. Sequential registration was used while constraining the local degrees of freedom (DoFs) of each bone in accordance to the type of joint and its range of motion. The Articulated Planar Reformation (APR) algorithm was applied to the segmented data for side-by-side change visualization and comparison of data. To quantitatively evaluate the proposed algorithm, bone segmentations of extracted skeletons from the correspondent CT datasets were used. Euclidean point to surface distances between each dataset and the MOBY atlas were calculated. The obtained results indicate that after registration, the mean Euclidean distance decreased from 11.5±12.1 to 2.6±2.1 voxels. The proposed approach yielded satisfactory segmentation results with minimal user intervention. It proved to be robust for “incomplete” data (large chunks of skeleton missing) and for an intuitive exploration and comparison of multi-modal SPECT/CT cross

  6. Effect of the Zataria multiflora on Systemic Inflammation of Experimental Animals Model of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Gholami Mhtaj, Lilla

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Zataria multiflora (Z. multiflora) on systemic inflammation in guinea pigs model of COPD were examined. Control animals, COPD (induced by exposing animals to cigarette smoke), COPD + drinking water containing three concentrations of the extract of Z. multiflora, and COPD + dexamethasone were studied (n = 6 for each group). Serum levels of IL-8 and malondialdehyde (MDA), total blood WBC (P < 0.01 for all cases), and eosinophil counts (P < 0.05) were higher and weight changes (P < 0.05) were lower in the COPD group compared to controls. IL-8 level (P < 0.001) and weight changes (P < 0.01 to P < 0.001) in all treated groups with Z. multiflora and total WBC number and MDA level in treated groups with two higher concentrations of the extract and lymphocytes percentage (P < 0.05) in the highest concentration of Z. multiflora and dexamethasone (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001) were significantly improved compared to the COPD group. Results showed a preventive effect of hydroethanolic extract from Z. multiflora on all measured parameters in animals model of COPD which was comparable or even higher (in the highest concentration) compared to the effect of dexamethasone at the concentration used. PMID:25013803

  7. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host–pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  8. Design of a multimodal fibers optic system for small animal optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Pagliazzi, Marco; Boschi, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Small animals optical imaging systems are widely used in pre-clinical research to image in vivo the bio-distribution of light emitting probes using fluorescence or bioluminescence modalities. In this work we presented a set of simulated results of a novel small animal optical imaging module based on a fibers optics matrix, coupled with a position sensitive detector, devoted to acquire bioluminescence and Cerenkov images. Simulations were performed using GEANT 4 code with the GAMOS architecture using the tissue optics plugin. Results showed that it is possible to image a 30 × 30 mm region of interest using a fiber optics array containing 100 optical fibers without compromising the quality of the reconstruction. The number of fibers necessary to cover an adequate portion of a small animal is thus quite modest. This design allows integrating the module with magnetic resonance (MR) in order to acquire optical and MR images at the same time. A detailed model of the mouse anatomy, obtained by segmentation of 3D MRI images, will improve the quality of optical 3D reconstruction.

  9. A technique using {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT for radiotherapy treatment planning for liver cancers or metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Sui; Jacob, Rojymon; Bender, Luvenia W.; Duan, Jun; Spencer, Sharon A.

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) requires a sufficient functional liver volume to tolerate the treatment. The current study extended the work of de Graaf et al. (2010) [3] on the use of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin imaging for presurgery planning to radiotherapy planning for liver cancer or metastases. Patient was immobilized and imaged in an identical position on a single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT-CT) system and a radiotherapy simulation CT system. {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT was registered to the planning CT through image registration of noncontrast CT from SPECT-CT system to the radiotherapy planning CT. The voxels with higher uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin were transferred to the planning CT as an avoidance structure in optimizing a 2-arc RapidArc plan for SBRT delivery. Excellent dose coverage to the target and sparing of the healthy remnant liver volume was achieved. This report illustrated a procedure for the use of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT for optimizing radiotherapy for liver cancers and metastases.

  10. Full modelling of the MOSAIC animal PET system based on the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merheb, C.; Petegnief, Y.; Talbot, J. N.

    2007-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) systems dedicated to animal imaging are now widely used for biological studies. The scanner performance strongly depends on the design and the characteristics of the system. Many parameters must be optimized like the dimensions and type of crystals, geometry and field-of-view (FOV), sampling, electronics, lightguide, shielding, etc. Monte Carlo modelling is a powerful tool to study the effect of each of these parameters on the basis of realistic simulated data. Performance assessment in terms of spatial resolution, count rates, scatter fraction and sensitivity is an important prerequisite before the model can be used instead of real data for a reliable description of the system response function or for optimization of reconstruction algorithms. The aim of this study is to model the performance of the Philips Mosaic™ animal PET system using a comprehensive PET simulation code in order to understand and describe the origin of important factors that influence image quality. We use GATE, a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for a realistic description of the ring PET model, the detectors, shielding, cap, electronic processing and dead times. We incorporate new features to adjust signal processing to the Anger logic underlying the Mosaic™ system. Special attention was paid to dead time and energy spectra descriptions. Sorting of simulated events in a list mode format similar to the system outputs was developed to compare experimental and simulated sensitivity and scatter fractions for different energy thresholds using various models of phantoms describing rat and mouse geometries. Count rates were compared for both cylindrical homogeneous phantoms. Simulated spatial resolution was fitted to experimental data for 18F point sources at different locations within the FOV with an analytical blurring function for electronic processing effects. Simulated and measured sensitivities differed by less than 3%, while scatter fractions agreed

  11. Dysfunctions in Dopamine Systems and ADHD: Evidence From Animals and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Davide; Vallone, Daniela; Sadile, Adolfo

    2004-01-01

    Animal models are useful for characterizing neural substrates of neuropsychiatric disorders. Several models have been proposed for the study of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The models can be divided into various groups: (i) genetically derived hyperactivity/ inattention, (ii) animal models showing symptoms after pharmacological intervention, and (iii) those based on spontaneous variations in a random population. Spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Naples High Excitability (NHE) rats show behavioral traits featuring the main aspects of ADHD in humans but show different changes in dopamine (DA) systems. In fact, the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase is hyperexpressed in NHE rats and hypoexpressed in SHR. The DA transporter is hyperexpressed in both lines, although in the SHR, DAT activity is low (reduced DA uptake). The DA levels in the striatum and prefrontal cortex are increased in the juvenile SHR, but are decreased in handled young and non-handled older animals. The mRNA of the D1 DA receptor is upregulated in the prefrontal cortex of SHR and downregulated in NHE. The D2 DA receptors are likely to be hypofunctioning in SHR, although the experimental evidence is not univocal, whereas their mRNA is hyperexpressed in NHE. Thus, in SHR both the mesocortical and mesolimbic DA pathways appear to be involved, whereas in NHE only the mesocortical system. To understand the effects of methylphenidate, the elective ADHD drug treatment in humans, in a dysfunctioning DA system, we realized a simple mathematical model of DA regulation based on experimental data from electrophysiological, cyclic voltammetry, and microdialysis studies. This model allows the estimation of a higher firing frequency of DA neurons in SHR rats and suggests that methylphenidate increases attentive processes by regulating the firing rate of DA neurons. PMID:15303308

  12. 76 FR 72897 - Privacy Act Systems of Records; APHIS Animal Health Surveillance and Monitoring System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... technical controls to prevent misuse of data by system users. These controls include the use of role-based.... Access to the system is monitored by USDA officials to ensure authorized and appropriate use of the data... last date of creation, edit, or access of the records. Incremental and full system tape backups...

  13. International trade standards for commodities and products derived from animals: the need for a system that integrates food safety and animal disease risk management.

    PubMed

    Thomson, G R; Penrith, M-L; Atkinson, M W; Thalwitzer, S; Mancuso, A; Atkinson, S J; Osofsky, S A

    2013-12-01

    A case is made for greater emphasis to be placed on value chain management as an alternative to geographically based disease risk mitigation for trade in commodities and products derived from animals. The geographic approach is dependent upon achievement of freedom in countries or zones from infectious agents that cause so-called transboundary animal diseases, while value chain-based risk management depends upon mitigation of animal disease hazards potentially associated with specific commodities or products irrespective of the locality of production. This commodity-specific approach is founded on the same principles upon which international food safety standards are based, viz. hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP). Broader acceptance of a value chain approach enables animal disease risk management to be combined with food safety management by the integration of commodity-based trade and HACCP methodologies and thereby facilitates 'farm to fork' quality assurance. The latter is increasingly recognized as indispensable to food safety assurance and is therefore a pre-condition to safe trade. The biological principles upon which HACCP and commodity-based trade are based are essentially identical, potentially simplifying sanitary control in contrast to current separate international sanitary standards for food safety and animal disease risks that are difficult to reconcile. A value chain approach would not only enable more effective integration of food safety and animal disease risk management of foodstuffs derived from animals but would also ameliorate adverse environmental and associated socio-economic consequences of current sanitary standards based on the geographic distribution of animal infections. This is especially the case where vast veterinary cordon fencing systems are relied upon to separate livestock and wildlife as is the case in much of southern Africa. A value chain approach would thus be particularly beneficial to under-developed regions of

  14. In vivo SPECT/CT imaging and biodistribution using radioactive Cd125mTe/ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Jonathan D.; Kennel, Steve J.; Mirzadeh, Saed; Dai, Sheng; Wall, Jonathan S.; Richey, Tina; Avenell, James; Rondinone, Adam J.

    2007-05-01

    Radioactive cadmium telluride/zinc sulfide (Cd125mTe/ZnS) nanoparticles were targeted to mouse lung with antibody to mouse lung endothelium and quantified using radiological histology in order to test the in vivo targeting efficacy of a nanoparticle-antibody (NP-mAb) system. The nanoparticles were linked to either a monoclonal antibody to mouse lung thrombomodulin (mAb 201B) or a control antibody (mAb 33), and injected into groups of 6-week-old Balb/C female mice. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 4, 24, 72 and 144 h post-injection, and biodistribution in major organs was determined. Full body microSPECT/CT imaging was performed on a pair of mice (experimental and control) providing visual confirmation of the biodistribution. The Cd125mTe/ZnS NPs conjugated to mAb 201B principally target the lungs while the nanoparticles coupled to mAb 33 accumulate in the liver and spleen. These data provide, for the first time, a quantitative measurement of the in vivo targeting efficacy of an inorganic nanoparticle-mAb system.

  15. A 3D- and 4D-ESR imaging system for small animals.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, K; Ogata, T; Togashi, H; Yokoyama, H; Ohya-Nishiguchi, H; Kamada, H

    1996-01-01

    A new version of in vivo ESR-CT system composed of custom-made 0.7 GHz ESR spectrometer, air-core magnet with a field-scanning coil, three field-gradient coils, and two computers enables up- and down-field, and rapid magnetic-field scanning linearly controlled by computer. 3D-pictures of distribution of nitroxide radicals injected in brains and livers of rats and mice were obtained in 1.5 min with resolution of 1 mm. We have also succeeded in obtaining spatial-time imagings of the animals.

  16. [Use of geographical information systems in parasitic diseases and the importance of animal health economics].

    PubMed

    Ciçek, Hasan; Ciçek, Hatice; Senkul, Cetin; Tandoğan, Murat

    2008-01-01

    In the world, economical losses due to the parasitic diseases reach enormous ratios in animal production. Both developed and developing countries set aside a considerable budget to control these parasitic diseases. This situation aids in the improvement of control methods of parasitic diseases. Also, it causes new ways of investigation that includes observation, evaluation and prevention of parasitic diseases. The Geographical Information System (GIS) has recently become one of the most common methods utilized to provide disease information technology with computer supported technology in many countries. The most important qualities of GIS are the formation of a powerful database, continual updating and rapid provision of coordination related to units. Many factors are evaluated at the same time by the system and also, results from analysis of data related to disease and their causes could reduce or prevent economical losses due to parasitic disease. In this study, possible uses of Geographical Information Systems against parasitic diseases and an approach in terms of animal health economics were presented.

  17. Application study of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Morita, Shin-ichi; Maruyama, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-02-01

    An optical biopsy system for small experimental animals has been developed. The system includes endoscope probe, portable probe and two kinds of miniaturized Raman probes. The micro Raman probe (MRP) is made of optical fibers and the ball lens hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) is made of hollow fiber. The former has large focal depth and suitable to measure average spectra of subsurface tissue. The latter has rather small focal depth and it is possible to control focal length by selecting ball lens attached at the probe head. It is suitable to survey materials at the fixed depth in the tissue. The system is applied to study various small animal cancer models, such as esophagus and stomach rat models and subcutaneous mouse models of pancreatic cancers. In the studies of subcutaneous tumor model mouse, it is suggested that protein conformational changes occur in the tumor tissue within few minutes after euthanasia of the mouse. No more change is observed for the following ten minutes. Any alterations in the molecular level are not observed in normal skin, muscle tissues. Since the change completes in such a short time, it is suggested that this phenomenon caused by termination of blood circulation.

  18. Error control in the set-up of stereo camera systems for 3d animal tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, A.; Creato, C.; Del Castello, L.; Giardina, I.; Melillo, S.; Parisi, L.; Viale, M.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional tracking of animal systems is the key to the comprehension of collective behavior. Experimental data collected via a stereo camera system allow the reconstruction of the 3d trajectories of each individual in the group. Trajectories can then be used to compute some quantities of interest to better understand collective motion, such as velocities, distances between individuals and correlation functions. The reliability of the retrieved trajectories is strictly related to the accuracy of the 3d reconstruction. In this paper, we perform a careful analysis of the most significant errors affecting 3d reconstruction, showing how the accuracy depends on the camera system set-up and on the precision of the calibration parameters.

  19. An animal tracking system for behavior analysis using radio frequency identification.

    PubMed

    Catarinucci, Luca; Colella, Riccardo; Mainetti, Luca; Patrono, Luigi; Pieretti, Stefano; Secco, Andrea; Sergi, Ilaria

    2014-09-01

    Evaluating the behavior of mice and rats has substantially contributed to the progress of research in many scientific fields. Researchers commonly observe recorded video of animal behavior and manually record their observations for later analysis, but this approach has several limitations. The authors developed an automated system for tracking and analyzing the behavior of rodents that is based on radio frequency identification (RFID) in an ultra-high-frequency bandwidth. They provide an overview of the system's hardware and software components as well as describe their technique for surgically implanting passive RFID tags in mice. Finally, the authors present the findings of two validation studies to compare the accuracy of the RFID system versus commonly used approaches for evaluating the locomotor activity and object exploration of mice.

  20. Breast cancer axillary lymph node metastasis detection by a high-resolution dedicated breast camera: a comparative study with SPECT and pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Spanu, Angela; Chessa, Francesca; Sanna, Daniela; Cottu, Pierina; Manca, Alessandra; Nuvoli, Susanna; Madeddu, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin planar scintigraphy acquired with a high-resolution (HR) dedicated breast camera in comparison with conventional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and pinhole-SPECT (P-SPECT) in breast cancer (BC) axillary lymph node metastasis detection in a consecutive series of 76 BC patients, 28 of whom had axillary lymph node metastases, including 9 positive at clinical examination. HR planar scintigraphy was true positive in only 7 patients with >3 palpable metastases (sensitivity: 25%), while SPECT was true positive in 23 of 28 cases (sensitivity: 82.1%) and P-SPECT in 25 of 28 (sensitivity: 89.3%). SPECT was false negative in 5 patients with nonpalpable SPECT was false negative in the latter 2 cases, and in another of the cases, false negative at SPECT with one macrometastatic node. Neither planar nor SPECT had false-positive findings (specificity: 100%), while P-SPECT had two (specificity: 95.8%). P-SPECT presented the best resolution in showing the metastatic nodes and was the only procedure able to define the number of involved nodes, thus delivering important prognostic information. HR planar scintigraphy appears an ineffective diagnostic tool in BC axillary lymph node metastasis detection, only succeeding in identifying palpable and >3 metastatic nodes. SPECT should be preferred, significantly improving the sensitivity of planar scintigraphy, especially when using a pinhole collimator.

  1. Global Positioning System: a new tool for measurement of animal bites in a rural area near Bangalore, South India.

    PubMed

    Masthi, N R Ramesh; Undi, Malatesh

    2014-10-01

    This exploratory study was conducted in villages near Bangalore, South India with the primary objective of spatial mapping animal bite cases using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. GPS technology was useful as a new tool in accurate measurement of animal bite cases.

  2. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  3. Small Animal Radionuclide Imaging With Focusing Gamma-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R; Decker, T; Epstein, M; Ziock, K; Pivovaroff, M J; Craig, W W; Jernigan, J G; Barber, W B; Christensen, F E; Funk, T; Hailey, C J; Hasegawa, B H; Taylor, C

    2004-02-27

    Significant effort currently is being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. While physiological function in small animals can be localized and imaged using conventional radionuclide imaging techniques such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), these techniques inherently are limited to spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm. For this reason, we are developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system (SARIS) using grazing incidence optics to focus gamma-rays emitted by {sup 125}I and other radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a prototype optic with sufficient accuracy and precision to focus the 27.5 keV photons from {sup 125}I onto a high-resolution imaging detector. Experimental measurements from the prototype have demonstrated that the optic can focus X-rays from a microfocus X-ray tube to a spot having physical dimensions (approximately 1500 microns half-power diameter) consistent with those predicted by theory. Our theoretical and numerical analysis also indicate that an optic can be designed and build that ultimately can achieve 100 {micro}m spatial resolution with sufficient efficiency to perform in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animal.

  4. Critical windows of exposure for children's health: the reproductive system in animals and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, J L; Hughes, C; Foster, W; Hales, B F; Robaire, B

    2000-01-01

    Drugs and environmental chemicals can adversely affect the reproductive system. Currently, available data indicate that the consequences of exposure depend on the nature of the chemical, its target, and the timing of exposure relative to critical windows in development of the reproductive system. The reproductive system is designed to produce gametes in far greater excess than would seem to be necessary for the survival of species. Ten to hundreds of millions of spermatozoa are generated daily by most adult male mammals, yet very few of these germ cells succeed in transmitting their genetic material to the next generation. Although the number of oocytes produced in mammalian females is more limited, and their production occurs only during fetal life, most ovaries contain several orders of magnitude more oocytes than ever will be fertilized. Toxicant exposures may affect critical events in the development of the reproductive system, ranging from early primordial germ cell determination to gonadal differentiation, gametogenesis, external genitalia, or signaling events regulating sexual behavior. Although there are differences between the human reproductive system and that of the usual animal models, such models have been extremely useful in assessing risks for key human reproductive and developmental processes. The objectives for future studies should include the elucidation of the specific cellular and molecular targets of known toxicants; the design of a systematic approach to the identification of reproductive toxicants; and the development of sensitive, specific, and predictive animal models, minimally invasive surrogate markers, or in vitro tests to assess reproductive system function during embryonic, postnatal, and adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10852849

  5. Fast calculation method of computer generated hologram animation for viewpoint parallel shift and rotation using Fourier transform optical system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2016-01-20

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) animations can be made by switching many CGHs on an electronic display. Some fast calculation methods for CGH animations have been proposed, but one for viewpoint movement has not been proposed. Therefore, we designed a fast calculation method of CGH animations for viewpoint parallel shifts and rotation. A Fourier transform optical system was adopted to expand the viewing angle. The results of experiments were that the calculation time of our method was over 6 times faster than that of the conventional method. Furthermore, the degradation in CGH animation quality was found to be sufficiently small.

  6. Economic contribution of draught animals to Mazahua smallholder Campesino farming systems in the highlands of Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arriaga-Jordán, C M; Pedraza-Fuentes, A M; Velázquez-Beltrán, L G; Nava-Bernal, E G; Chávez-Mejía, M C

    2005-10-01

    The economic contribution of draught animals to smallholder Mazahua campesino systems in two mountain villages of San Felipe del Progreso, in the central highlands of Mexico, was assessed. Campesinos rely on draught animals for cultivation tasks, as pack animals, and as transport for agricultural and domestic activities. The villages were San Pablo Tlalchichilpa (SPT) and La Concepción Mayorazgo (LCM). Twelve households that possessed draught animals were monitored from July 1999 to June 2000, nine in SPT and three in LCM, in terms of animal inventories and income from their draught animals, in cash and opportunity values. Equines in SPT have substituted bulls, and are recognized for their multipurpose contribution, while in LCM bulls are still used for ploughing the land. Overall total mean gross income was US dollar 490.78 per farm per year, plus US dollar 56 as opportunity value of the fertilizer value of manure for both villages. Deducting estimated costs, owning draught animals leaves a mean net margin of US dollar 412.50/year in SPT and of US dollar 285.64/year in LCM. There is a significant correlation (p < 0.05) between ownership of draught animals and incomes, with a regression coefficient of US dollar 279.16 per year per draught animal. Besides positive economic returns, having work animals alleviates drudgery for the campesino families.

  7. Economic contribution of draught animals to Mazahua smallholder Campesino farming systems in the highlands of Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arriaga-Jordán, C M; Pedraza-Fuentes, A M; Velázquez-Beltrán, L G; Nava-Bernal, E G; Chávez-Mejía, M C

    2005-10-01

    The economic contribution of draught animals to smallholder Mazahua campesino systems in two mountain villages of San Felipe del Progreso, in the central highlands of Mexico, was assessed. Campesinos rely on draught animals for cultivation tasks, as pack animals, and as transport for agricultural and domestic activities. The villages were San Pablo Tlalchichilpa (SPT) and La Concepción Mayorazgo (LCM). Twelve households that possessed draught animals were monitored from July 1999 to June 2000, nine in SPT and three in LCM, in terms of animal inventories and income from their draught animals, in cash and opportunity values. Equines in SPT have substituted bulls, and are recognized for their multipurpose contribution, while in LCM bulls are still used for ploughing the land. Overall total mean gross income was US dollar 490.78 per farm per year, plus US dollar 56 as opportunity value of the fertilizer value of manure for both villages. Deducting estimated costs, owning draught animals leaves a mean net margin of US dollar 412.50/year in SPT and of US dollar 285.64/year in LCM. There is a significant correlation (p < 0.05) between ownership of draught animals and incomes, with a regression coefficient of US dollar 279.16 per year per draught animal. Besides positive economic returns, having work animals alleviates drudgery for the campesino families. PMID:16450864

  8. 75 FR 50987 - Privacy Act System of Records; National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301-8317); Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness... aid in containing and responding to a foreign animal disease outbreak, bioterrorism, or other animal... Animal Health Protection Act, 7 U.S.C. 8301-8317; the Public Health Security and...

  9. An altered spinal serotonergic system contributes to increased thermal nociception in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Rojo, María Luisa; Pazos, Angel; Díaz, Alvaro

    2014-06-01

    The olfactory bulbectomized (OB) rat, an animal model of chronic depression with comorbid anxiety, exhibits a profound dysregulation of the brain serotonergic signalling, a neurotransmission system involved in pain transmission and modulation. We here report an increased nociceptive response of OB rats in the tail flick test which is reverted after chronic, but not acute, administration of fluoxetine. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated down-regulation of 5-HT transporters ([(3)H]citalopram binding) and decreased functionality of 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding) in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord in OB rats. Acute administration of fluoxetine (5-40 mg/kg i.p.) did not modify tail flick latencies in OB rats. However, chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day s.c., 14 days; osmotic minipumps) progressively attenuated OB-associated thermal hyperalgesia, and a total normalization of the nociceptive response was achieved at the end of the treatment with the antidepressant. In these animals, autoradiographic studies revealed further down-regulation of 5-HT transporters and normalization in the functionality of 5-HT1A receptors on the spinal cord. On the other hand, acute morphine (0.5-10 mg/kg s.c.) produced a similar analgesic effect in OB and sham and OB rats, and no changes were detected in the density ([(3)H]DAMGO binding) and functionality (DAMGO-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding) of spinal μ-opioid receptors in OB rats before and after chronic fluoxetine. Our findings demonstrate the participation of the spinal serotonergic system in the increased thermal nociception exhibited by the OB rat and the antinociceptive effect of chronic fluoxetine in this animal model of depression.

  10. An altered spinal serotonergic system contributes to increased thermal nociception in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Rojo, María Luisa; Pazos, Angel; Díaz, Alvaro

    2014-06-01

    The olfactory bulbectomized (OB) rat, an animal model of chronic depression with comorbid anxiety, exhibits a profound dysregulation of the brain serotonergic signalling, a neurotransmission system involved in pain transmission and modulation. We here report an increased nociceptive response of OB rats in the tail flick test which is reverted after chronic, but not acute, administration of fluoxetine. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated down-regulation of 5-HT transporters ([(3)H]citalopram binding) and decreased functionality of 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding) in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord in OB rats. Acute administration of fluoxetine (5-40 mg/kg i.p.) did not modify tail flick latencies in OB rats. However, chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day s.c., 14 days; osmotic minipumps) progressively attenuated OB-associated thermal hyperalgesia, and a total normalization of the nociceptive response was achieved at the end of the treatment with the antidepressant. In these animals, autoradiographic studies revealed further down-regulation of 5-HT transporters and normalization in the functionality of 5-HT1A receptors on the spinal cord. On the other hand, acute morphine (0.5-10 mg/kg s.c.) produced a similar analgesic effect in OB and sham and OB rats, and no changes were detected in the density ([(3)H]DAMGO binding) and functionality (DAMGO-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding) of spinal μ-opioid receptors in OB rats before and after chronic fluoxetine. Our findings demonstrate the participation of the spinal serotonergic system in the increased thermal nociception exhibited by the OB rat and the antinociceptive effect of chronic fluoxetine in this animal model of depression. PMID:24584836

  11. Evaluation of Mucociliary Clearance by Three Dimension Micro-CT-SPECT in Guinea Pig: Role of Bitter Taste Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Jose Luis; Ortiz, Amparo; Milara, Javier; Armengot, Miguel; Sanz, Celia; Compañ, Desamparados; Morcillo, Esteban; Cortijo, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Different image techniques have been used to analyze mucociliary clearance (MCC) in humans, but current small animal MCC analysis using in vivo imaging has not been well defined. Bitter taste receptor (T2R) agonists increase ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and cause bronchodilation but their effects in vivo are not well understood. This work analyzes in vivo nasal and bronchial MCC in guinea pig animals using three dimension (3D) micro-CT-SPECT images and evaluates the effect of T2R agonists. Intranasal macroaggreggates of albumin-Technetium 99 metastable (MAA-Tc99m) and lung nebulized Tc99m albumin nanocolloids were used to analyze the effect of T2R agonists on nasal and bronchial MCC respectively, using 3D micro-CT-SPECT in guinea pig. MAA-Tc99m showed a nasal mucociliary transport rate of 0.36 mm/min that was increased in presence of T2R agonist to 0.66 mm/min. Tc99m albumin nanocolloids were homogeneously distributed in the lung of guinea pig and cleared with time-dependence through the bronchi and trachea of guinea pig. T2R agonist increased bronchial MCC of Tc99m albumin nanocolloids. T2R agonists increased CBF in human nasal ciliated cells in vitro and induced bronchodilation in human bronchi ex vivo. In summary, T2R agonists increase MCC in vivo as assessed by 3D micro-CT-SPECT analysis. PMID:27723827

  12. Predator-scent stress, ethanol consumption and the opioid system in an animal model of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Manjoch, Hadar; Vainer, Ella; Matar, Michael; Ifergane, Gal; Zohar, Joseph; Kaplan, Zeev; Cohen, Hagit

    2016-06-01

    Emerging literature points to stress exposure as a potential contributor to the development of alcohol abuse, but animal models have yielded inconsistent results. Converging experimental data indicate that the endogenous opioid system modulates alcohol consumption and stress regulation. The aim of the present study is to examine the interplay between stress exposure, behavioral stress responses, ethanol (EtOH) consumption and the endogenous opioid system in an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder. Rats were exposed to stress and then tested in a two-bottle free choice (TBC) assay or in a conditioned place preference paradigm. In some experiments, the endogenous opioid system was pharmacologically manipulated prior to stress exposure. The behavioral outcomes of stress exposure were assessed in an elevated plus-maze, with the acoustic startle response, and by monitoring the freezing response to trauma reminder. Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated opioid receptors in hippocampal subregions was also measured. Stress significantly increased the consumption of EtOH in the TBC assay. The severity of the behavioral response to stress was associated with EtOH consumption, cue-triggered freezing response to a trauma reminder, and endogenous levels of phosphorylated opioid receptors in the hippocampus. Pharmacologically manipulating the endogenous opioid system prior to stress exposure attenuated trauma cue-triggered freezing responses and blocked predator scent stress-induced potentiation of EtOH consumption. These data demonstrate a stress-induced potentiation of EtOH self-administration and reveal a clear association between individual patterns of the behavioral response to stress and alcohol preference, while indicating a role for the endogenous opioid system in the neurobiological response to stress. PMID:26965572

  13. Computer-automated silica aerosol generator and animal inhalation exposure system

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave G.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation exposure systems are necessary tools for determining the dose response relationship of inhaled toxicants under a variety of exposure conditions. The objective of this study was to develop an automated computer controlled system to expose small laboratory animals to precise concentrations of uniformly dispersed airborne silica particles. An acoustical aerosol generator was developed which was capable of re-suspending particles from bulk powder. The aerosolized silica output from the generator was introduced into the throat of a venturi tube. The turbulent high-velocity air stream within the venturi tube increased the dispersion of the re-suspended powder. That aerosol was then used to expose small laboratory animals to constant aerosol concentrations, up to 20mg/m3, for durations lasting up to 8h. Particle distribution and morphology of the silica aerosol delivered to the exposure chamber were characterized to verify that a fully dispersed and respirable aerosol was being produced. The inhalation exposure system utilized a combination of airflow controllers, particle monitors, data acquisition devices and custom software with automatic feedback control to achieve constant and repeatable exposure environments. The automatic control algorithm was capable of maintaining median aerosol concentrations to within ±0.2 mg/m3 of a user selected target concentration during exposures lasting from 2 to 8 h. The system was able to reach 95% of the desired target value in <10min during the beginning phase of an exposure. This exposure system provided a highly automated tool for conducting inhalation toxicology studies involving silica particles. PMID:23796015

  14. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation imaging using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric C.

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about the mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region, compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator, but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator-detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single-radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter

  15. Nanosized multifunctional liposomes for tumor diagnosis and molecular imaging by SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Silindir, Mine; Erdoğan, Suna; Özer, A Yekta; Doğan, A Lale; Tuncel, Murat; Uğur, Ömer; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-03-01

    Among currently used cancer imaging methods, nuclear medicine modalities provide metabolic information, whereas modalities in radiology provide anatomical information. However, different modalities, having different acquisition times in separate machines, decrease the specificity and accuracy of images. To solve this problem, hybrid imaging modalities were developed as a new era, especially in the cancer imaging field. With widespread usage of hybrid imaging modalities, specific contrast agents are essentially needed to use in both modalities, such as single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). Liposomes are one of the most desirable drug delivery systems, depending on their suitable properties. The aim of this study was to develop a liposomal contrast agent for the diagnosis and molecular imaging of tumor by SPECT/CT. Liposomes were prepared nanosized, coated with polyethylene glycol to obtain long blood circulation, and modified with monoclonal antibody 2C5 for specific tumor targeting. Although DTPA-PE and DTPA-PLL-NGPE (polychelating amphilic polymers; PAPs) were loaded onto liposomes for stable radiolabeling for SPECT imaging, iopromide was encapsulated into liposomes for CT imaging. Liposomes [(DPPC:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:DTPA-PE), (PL 90G:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:DTPA-PE), (DPPC:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:PAPs), (PL 90G:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:PAPs), (60:0.9:39:0.1% mol ratio)] were characterized in terms of entrapment efficiency, particle size, physical stability, and release kinetics. Additionally, in vitro cell-binding studies were carried out on two tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and EL 4) by counting radioactivity. Tumor-specific antibody-modified liposomes were found to be effective multimodal contrast agents by designating almost 3-8 fold more uptake than nonmodified ones in different tumor cell lines. These results could be considered as an important step in the development of tumor-targeted SPECT/CT contrast agents for cancer imaging. PMID:23078019

  16. Multi-resolution multi-sensitivity design for parallel-hole SPECT collimators.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanzhao; Xiao, Peng; Zhu, Xiaohua; Xie, Qingguo

    2016-07-21

    Multi-resolution multi-sensitivity (MRMS) collimator offering adjustable trade-off between resolution and sensitivity, can make a SPECT system adaptive. We propose in this paper a new idea for MRMS design based on, for the first time, parallel-hole collimators for clinical SPECT. Multiple collimation states with varied resolution/sensitivity trade-offs can be formed by slightly changing the collimator's inner structure. To validate the idea, the GE LEHR collimator is selected as the design prototype and is modeled using a ray-tracing technique. Point images are generated for several states of the design. Results show that the collimation states of the design can obtain similar point response characteristics to parallel-hole collimators, and can be used just like parallel-hole collimators in clinical SPECT imaging. Ray-tracing modeling also shows that the proposed design can offer varied resolution/sensitivity trade-offs: at 100 mm before the collimator, the highest resolution state provides 6.9 mm full width at a half maximum (FWHM) with a nearly minimum sensitivity of about 96.2 cps MBq(-1), while the lowest resolution state obtains 10.6 mm FWHM with the highest sensitivity of about 167.6 cps MBq(-1). Further comparisons of the states on image qualities are conducted through Monte Carlo simulation of a hot-spot phantom which contains five hot spots with varied sizes. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the spots are calculated and compared, showing that different spots can prefer different collimation states: the larger spots obtain better CNRs by using the larger sensitivity states, and the smaller spots prefer the higher resolution states. In conclusion, the proposed idea can be an effective approach for MRMS design for parallel-hole SPECT collimators. PMID:27359049

  17. Multi-resolution multi-sensitivity design for parallel-hole SPECT collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanzhao; Xiao, Peng; Zhu, Xiaohua; Xie, Qingguo

    2016-07-01

    Multi-resolution multi-sensitivity (MRMS) collimator offering adjustable trade-off between resolution and sensitivity, can make a SPECT system adaptive. We propose in this paper a new idea for MRMS design based on, for the first time, parallel-hole collimators for clinical SPECT. Multiple collimation states with varied resolution/sensitivity trade-offs can be formed by slightly changing the collimator’s inner structure. To validate the idea, the GE LEHR collimator is selected as the design prototype and is modeled using a ray-tracing technique. Point images are generated for several states of the design. Results show that the collimation states of the design can obtain similar point response characteristics to parallel-hole collimators, and can be used just like parallel-hole collimators in clinical SPECT imaging. Ray-tracing modeling also shows that the proposed design can offer varied resolution/sensitivity trade-offs: at 100 mm before the collimator, the highest resolution state provides 6.9 mm full width at a half maximum (FWHM) with a nearly minimum sensitivity of about 96.2 cps MBq‑1, while the lowest resolution state obtains 10.6 mm FWHM with the highest sensitivity of about 167.6 cps MBq‑1. Further comparisons of the states on image qualities are conducted through Monte Carlo simulation of a hot-spot phantom which contains five hot spots with varied sizes. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the spots are calculated and compared, showing that different spots can prefer different collimation states: the larger spots obtain better CNRs by using the larger sensitivity states, and the smaller spots prefer the higher resolution states. In conclusion, the proposed idea can be an effective approach for MRMS design for parallel-hole SPECT collimators.

  18. Multi-resolution multi-sensitivity design for parallel-hole SPECT collimators.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanzhao; Xiao, Peng; Zhu, Xiaohua; Xie, Qingguo

    2016-07-21

    Multi-resolution multi-sensitivity (MRMS) collimator offering adjustable trade-off between resolution and sensitivity, can make a SPECT system adaptive. We propose in this paper a new idea for MRMS design based on, for the first time, parallel-hole collimators for clinical SPECT. Multiple collimation states with varied resolution/sensitivity trade-offs can be formed by slightly changing the collimator's inner structure. To validate the idea, the GE LEHR collimator is selected as the design prototype and is modeled using a ray-tracing technique. Point images are generated for several states of the design. Results show that the collimation states of the design can obtain similar point response characteristics to parallel-hole collimators, and can be used just like parallel-hole collimators in clinical SPECT imaging. Ray-tracing modeling also shows that the proposed design can offer varied resolution/sensitivity trade-offs: at 100 mm before the collimator, the highest resolution state provides 6.9 mm full width at a half maximum (FWHM) with a nearly minimum sensitivity of about 96.2 cps MBq(-1), while the lowest resolution state obtains 10.6 mm FWHM with the highest sensitivity of about 167.6 cps MBq(-1). Further comparisons of the states on image qualities are conducted through Monte Carlo simulation of a hot-spot phantom which contains five hot spots with varied sizes. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the spots are calculated and compared, showing that different spots can prefer different collimation states: the larger spots obtain better CNRs by using the larger sensitivity states, and the smaller spots prefer the higher resolution states. In conclusion, the proposed idea can be an effective approach for MRMS design for parallel-hole SPECT collimators.

  19. A wireless neural recording system with a precision motorized microdrive for freely behaving animals

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Taku; Fujimoto, Hisataka; Tashiro, Koichiro; Nonomura, Mayu; Tsuchiya, Akira; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    The brain is composed of many different types of neurons. Therefore, analysis of brain activity with single-cell resolution could provide fundamental insights into brain mechanisms. However, the electrical signal of an individual neuron is very small, and precise isolation of single neuronal activity from moving subjects is still challenging. To measure single-unit signals in actively behaving states, establishment of technologies that enable fine control of electrode positioning and strict spike sorting is essential. To further apply such a single-cell recording approach to small brain areas in naturally behaving animals in large spaces or during social interaction, we developed a compact wireless recording system with a motorized microdrive. Wireless control of electrode placement facilitates the exploration of single neuronal activity without affecting animal behaviors. Because the system is equipped with a newly developed data-encoding program, the recorded data are readily compressed almost to theoretical limits and securely transmitted to a host computer. Brain activity can thereby be stably monitored in real time and further analyzed using online or offline spike sorting. Our wireless recording approach using a precision motorized microdrive will become a powerful tool for studying brain mechanisms underlying natural or social behaviors. PMID:25597933

  20. A comparative study of production performance and animal health practices in organic and conventional dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jenevaldo B; Fagundes, Gisele M; Soares, João P G; Fonseca, Adivaldo H; Muir, James P

    2014-10-01

    Health and production management strategies influence environmental impacts of dairies. The objective of this paper was to measure risk factors on health and production parameters on six organic and conventional bovine, caprine, and ovine dairy herds in southeastern Brazil over six consecutive years (2006-2011). The organic operations had lower milk production per animal (P ≤ 0.05), lower calf mortality (P ≤ 0.05), less incidence of mastitis (P ≤ 0.05), fewer rates of spontaneous abortions (P ≤ 0.05), and reduced ectoparasite loads (P ≤ 0.05) compared to conventional herds and flocks. Organic herds, however, had greater prevalence of internal parasitism (P ≤ 0.05) than conventional herds. In all management systems, calves, kids, and lambs had greater oocyte counts than adults. However, calves in the organic group showed lower prevalence of coccidiosis. In addition, animals in the organic system exhibited lower parasitic resistance to anthelmintics. Herd genetic potential, nutritive value of forage, feed intake, and pasture parasite loads, however, may have influenced productive and health parameters. Thus, although conventional herds showed greater milk production and less disease prevalence, future research might quantify the potential implications of these unreported factors. PMID:25015183

  1. A comparative study of production performance and animal health practices in organic and conventional dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jenevaldo B; Fagundes, Gisele M; Soares, João P G; Fonseca, Adivaldo H; Muir, James P

    2014-10-01

    Health and production management strategies influence environmental impacts of dairies. The objective of this paper was to measure risk factors on health and production parameters on six organic and conventional bovine, caprine, and ovine dairy herds in southeastern Brazil over six consecutive years (2006-2011). The organic operations had lower milk production per animal (P ≤ 0.05), lower calf mortality (P ≤ 0.05), less incidence of mastitis (P ≤ 0.05), fewer rates of spontaneous abortions (P ≤ 0.05), and reduced ectoparasite loads (P ≤ 0.05) compared to conventional herds and flocks. Organic herds, however, had greater prevalence of internal parasitism (P ≤ 0.05) than conventional herds. In all management systems, calves, kids, and lambs had greater oocyte counts than adults. However, calves in the organic group showed lower prevalence of coccidiosis. In addition, animals in the organic system exhibited lower parasitic resistance to anthelmintics. Herd genetic potential, nutritive value of forage, feed intake, and pasture parasite loads, however, may have influenced productive and health parameters. Thus, although conventional herds showed greater milk production and less disease prevalence, future research might quantify the potential implications of these unreported factors.

  2. A wireless neural recording system with a precision motorized microdrive for freely behaving animals.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Taku; Fujimoto, Hisataka; Tashiro, Koichiro; Nonomura, Mayu; Tsuchiya, Akira; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    The brain is composed of many different types of neurons. Therefore, analysis of brain activity with single-cell resolution could provide fundamental insights into brain mechanisms. However, the electrical signal of an individual neuron is very small, and precise isolation of single neuronal activity from moving subjects is still challenging. To measure single-unit signals in actively behaving states, establishment of technologies that enable fine control of electrode positioning and strict spike sorting is essential. To further apply such a single-cell recording approach to small brain areas in naturally behaving animals in large spaces or during social interaction, we developed a compact wireless recording system with a motorized microdrive. Wireless control of electrode placement facilitates the exploration of single neuronal activity without affecting animal behaviors. Because the system is equipped with a newly developed data-encoding program, the recorded data are readily compressed almost to theoretical limits and securely transmitted to a host computer. Brain activity can thereby be stably monitored in real time and further analyzed using online or offline spike sorting. Our wireless recording approach using a precision motorized microdrive will become a powerful tool for studying brain mechanisms underlying natural or social behaviors. PMID:25597933

  3. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus. PMID:20068582

  4. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-04-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus.

  5. Differential diagnosis of regional cerebral hyperfixation of TC-99m HMPAO on SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, P.; Konopka, L.; Crayton, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate diagnostic evaluation of patients with neurologic and neuropsychiatric disease is important because early treatment may halt disease progression and prevent impairment or disability. Cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO has been ascribed to luxury perfusion following ischemic infarction. The present study sought to identify other conditions that also display radiotracer hyperfixation in order to develop a differential diagnosis of this finding on SPECT imaging. Two hundred fifty (n=250) successive cerebral SPECT images were reviewed for evidence of HMPAO hyperfixation. Hyperfixation was defined as enhanced focal perfusion surrounded by a zone of diminished or normal cerebral perfusion. All patients were scanned after intravenous injection of 25 mCi Tc-99m HMPAO. Volume-rendered and oblique images were obtained with a Trionix triple-head SPECT system using ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Thirteen (13/250; 5%) of the patients exhibited regions of HMPAO hyperfixation. CT or MRI abnormalities were detected in 6/13 cases. Clinical diagnoses in these patients included intractable psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and narcotic dependence, major depression, acute closed-head trauma, hypothyroidism, as well as subacute ischemic infarction. A wide variety of conditions may be associated with cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO. These conditions include neurologic and psychiatric diagnoses, and extend the consideration of hyperfixation beyond ischemic infarction. Consequently, a differential diagnosis of HMPAO hyperfixation may be broader than originally considered, and this may suggest a fundamental role for local cerebral hyperperfusion. Elucidation of the fundamental mechanism(s) for cerebral hyperperfusion requires further investigation.

  6. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  7. Towards Quantification of Functional Breast Images Using Dedicated SPECT With Non-Traditional Acquisition Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Kristy L.; Cutler, Spencer J.; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of radiotracer uptake in breast lesions can provide valuable information to physicians in deciding patient care or determining treatment efficacy. Physical processes (e.g., scatter, attenuation), detector/collimator characteristics, sampling and acquisition trajectories, and reconstruction artifacts contribute to an incorrect measurement of absolute tracer activity and distribution. For these experiments, a cylinder with three syringes of varying radioactivity concentration, and a fillable 800 mL breast with two lesion phantoms containing aqueous 99mTc pertechnetate were imaged using the SPECT sub-system of the dual-modality SPECT-CT dedicated breast scanner. SPECT images were collected using a compact CZT camera with various 3D acquisitions including vertical axis of rotation, 30° tilted, and complex sinusoidal trajectories. Different energy windows around the photopeak were quantitatively compared, along with appropriate scatter energy windows, to determine the best quantification accuracy after attenuation and dual-window scatter correction. Measured activity concentrations in the reconstructed images for syringes with greater than 10 µCi /mL corresponded to within 10% of the actual dose calibrator measured activity concentration for ±4% and ±8% photopeak energy windows. The same energy windows yielded lesion quantification results within 10% in the breast phantom as well. Results for the more complete complex sinsusoidal trajectory are similar to the simple vertical axis acquisition, and additionally allows both anterior chest wall sampling, no image distortion, and reasonably accurate quantification. PMID:22262925

  8. Cardiac SPECT/CCTA hybrid imaging : One answer to two questions?

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P A; Buechel, R R

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging has witnessed tremendous advances in the recent past, particularly with regard to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) where substantial improvements in image quality have been achieved while at the same time patients' radiation dose exposure has been reduced to the sub-millisievert range. Similarly, for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the introduction of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride-based semiconductor detectors has significantly improved system sensitivity and image quality, enabling fast image acquisition within less than 2-3 min or reduction of radiation dose exposure to less than 5 mSv. However, neither imaging modality alone is able to fully cover the two aspects of coronary artery disease (CAD), that is, morphology and function. Both modalities have distinct advantages and shortcomings: While CCTA may prove a superb modality for excluding CAD through its excellent negative predictive value, it does not allow for assessment of hemodynamic relevance if obstructive coronary lesions are detected. Conversely, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging cannot provide any information on the presence or absence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This article aims to highlight the great potential of cardiac hybrid imaging that allows for a comprehensive evaluation of CAD through combination of both morphological and functional information by fusing SPECT with CCTA. PMID:27286848

  9. Towards Quantification of Functional Breast Images Using Dedicated SPECT With Non-Traditional Acquisition Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kristy L; Cutler, Spencer J; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P

    2011-10-01

    Quantification of radiotracer uptake in breast lesions can provide valuable information to physicians in deciding patient care or determining treatment efficacy. Physical processes (e.g., scatter, attenuation), detector/collimator characteristics, sampling and acquisition trajectories, and reconstruction artifacts contribute to an incorrect measurement of absolute tracer activity and distribution. For these experiments, a cylinder with three syringes of varying radioactivity concentration, and a fillable 800 mL breast with two lesion phantoms containing aqueous (99m)Tc pertechnetate were imaged using the SPECT sub-system of the dual-modality SPECT-CT dedicated breast scanner. SPECT images were collected using a compact CZT camera with various 3D acquisitions including vertical axis of rotation, 30° tilted, and complex sinusoidal trajectories. Different energy windows around the photopeak were quantitatively compared, along with appropriate scatter energy windows, to determine the best quantification accuracy after attenuation and dual-window scatter correction. Measured activity concentrations in the reconstructed images for syringes with greater than 10 µCi /mL corresponded to within 10% of the actual dose calibrator measured activity concentration for ±4% and ±8% photopeak energy windows. The same energy windows yielded lesion quantification results within 10% in the breast phantom as well. Results for the more complete complex sinsusoidal trajectory are similar to the simple vertical axis acquisition, and additionally allows both anterior chest wall sampling, no image distortion, and reasonably accurate quantification.

  10. Evaluation of individually ventilated cage systems for laboratory rodents: cage environment and animal health aspects.

    PubMed

    Höglund, A U; Renström, A

    2001-01-01

    The use of individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems has become an attractive housing regime of laboratory rodents. The benefits of IVC systems are, reportedly, a high degree of containment combined with relative ease of handling, and a high degree of protection from allergenes. In the present study we tested whether two IVC systems (BioZone VentiRack, IVC1 and Techniplast SealSafe, IVC2S), in which we held mature male NMRI mice, were constructed to maintain a constant differential pressure, positive or negative, during a prolonged period of time. We also measured ammonia (NH3) concentrations after about 2 weeks of use, and CO2 build-up during a 60 min simulated power failure situation. In addition, animal weight development and bite-wound frequency were recorded (Renström et al. 2000). From the present study it is concluded that the IVC1 air handling system provides a more uniform and balanced differential pressure than the IVC2S. Both systems effectively scavenge NH3 when bedding material is not soaked by urine. Although the IVCs are dependent on the continual function of the fans to work properly, it seems unlikely that CO2 concentrations increase to hazardous levels, as a result of a one hour power failure, with the type of cages used in this study. Differences in weight development and bite-wound occurrence were noted between the two IVC systems. Causes for these differences could not be established and need more investigation. PMID:11201288

  11. A microcomputed tomography guided fluorescence tomography system for small animal molecular imaging

    SciTech C