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Sample records for animated poetry film

  1. Using Film with Poetry: A Unit Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemley, Raymond E.

    1970-01-01

    Four short, inexpensive films used in conjunction with specific poems provide the basis for individual lessons or a single unit whose theme explicates man and his relationship to other men. "Two Castles," a simple film depicting the foolhardiness of pride is recommended for use in teaching an introductory unit on poetry. "The Wall," a film…

  2. Teaching Film Animation to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Yvonne

    Under the author's direction, students from 5 to 18 years old have been making prize-winning animated films. In this guide intended for any adult who wishes to teach film animation, she describes and illustrates the techniques she has developed in her seven years of experience teaching animation to children in a workshop setting. All essential…

  3. Poetry Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanevski, Tara L.

    2004-01-01

    Poetry functions as an instructive tool across the curriculum. To use this extraordinary tool, we must engage in our own creative journey with poetry by reading it, writing poetry, and finding inspiration in a new approach. How do we read a poem? Is there a correct format to explain poetic imagery? Can young children be introduced to poetry and…

  4. Cooperative Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Pam

    1989-01-01

    Describes "cooperative poetry," a group poetry-writing exercise combining brainstorming, rehearsing, choral reading, assisted reading, memorization, sequencing, and vocabulary development, as well as providing an opportunity for group cooperation. (MM)

  5. Changing Perceptions of Unpopular Animals through Facts, Poetry, Crafts, and Puppet Plays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Zhbanova, Ksenia S.

    2012-01-01

    Today's children are often separated from the natural world, developing fear and aversion to wild creatures. This humane education program used curriculum-blended science lessons that focused on eight generally disliked animals: bat, skunk, snake, mouse, spider, centipede, cockroach, and mosquito. First and second grade students participated in 6…

  6. Poetry Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Joanne S.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author relates her teaching experience with seventh and eighth graders using poetry activities, and she describes how she teaches poetry by using "published" poems and by engaging the students in classroom activities. Though students in seventh grade usually have knowledge of poetic conventions, the author takes time to review…

  7. Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ronald V.

    Poetry therapy is the method of therapy based on the principle that a poem is a special medium for expressing emotions and that this expression can have psychotherapeutic value. A survey taken in 1973 showed there were over 400 therapists treating 3,500 drug addicts, alcoholics, and mental retardates around the country. Poetry therapists…

  8. Extending Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of the use of poetry in the classroom highlights 15 poetry books and suggests numerous activities appropriate for grades 2 through 5 in the subject areas of African Americans, birds, color, discoveries, families, food/eating, haiku, multiculturalism, Native Americans, nature, New England, Paul Revere/biographies, seasons, trains, and…

  9. Creating Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  10. A New Poetry Anew.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumman, Bob

    1994-01-01

    Classifies the various forms that exist in a type of poetry dubbed "burstnorm" poetry, a form of lyrical poetry. Differentiates burstnorm from two other types, "plaintext" and "songmode poetry." Describes three types of burstnorm poetry: surrealistic, pluraesthetic, and language poetry. Discusses further subtypes of each form. Presents a lesson in…

  11. The Kaleidoscope of Visual Poetry: New Approaches to Visual Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Tamryn

    2011-01-01

    What are the possibilities for poetry? This paper introduces approaches to creating and teaching poetry through a critical survey of contemporary practitioners within the field. Analysis of ekphrastic traditions, comics and concrete poetry, artists books, graffiti poems, film, performance and interdisciplinary collaborations reveal new…

  12. Poetry Workshop. Holiday Snapshots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Bee

    1999-01-01

    This article describes a poetry workshop to create a snapshot of unique moments in family history during the holidays. The workshop includes a working on a family photo poetry poster and participating in extension activities (e.g., writing personal poetry notebooks). A reproducible offers a holiday album of poetry snapshots. (SM)

  13. Poetry the Healer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leedy, Jack J., Ed.

    Poetry therapy is becoming a recognized psychotherapeutic modality in the healing program of a number of institutions, evidenced by the fact that there are presently over four hundred staffed and salaried poetry therapists. Contained in this book are the following essays on the healing power of poetry: "Poetry in a Cage: Therapy in a Correctional…

  14. Demonizing in Children's Television Cartoons and Disney Animated Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouts, Gregory; Callan, Mitchell; Piasentin, Kelly; Lawson, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of demonizing in the two major media that young children use (television and movies). Two content analyses were conducted using the animated feature films (n = 34) of the Walt Disney Company and after-school cartoons (n = 41). Each was coded for the modeling of the use of "evil" words when…

  15. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANIMATED FILMS TO FACILITATE CREATIVE SPACE PERCEPTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOWE, HAROLD B.; AND OTHERS

    THREE DIFFERENT METHODS OF TEACHING DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY WERE EVALUATED. AN ANALYSIS WAS MADE OF (1) THE ACHIEVEMENT OF 176 STUDENTS TAUGHT BY THE MULTIVIEW PROJECTION METHOD, (2) 172 STUDENTS TAUGHT BY THE PICTURE METHOD PLUS MULTIVIEW PROJECTION, AND (3) 188 STUDENTS TAUGHT BY THE FIRST TWO METHODS AND ANIMATED FILMS. THE BASES FOR ANALYSIS WERE…

  16. Comparing Animated Film and Newspaper Portfolio Writing Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsh, Steven J.

    Writing assignments involving newspaper portfolios or analyzing the content of a film (animated or live action) are interesting because they help students become involved with course content and improve students' critical thinking. A study examined writing assignments of these types from 21 students taking two sections of a course on child…

  17. Demonizing in children's television cartoons and Disney animated films.

    PubMed

    Fouts, Gregory; Callan, Mitchell; Piasentin, Kelly; Lawson, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of demonizing in the two major media that young children use (television and movies). Two content analyses were conducted using the animated feature films (n = 34) of the Walt Disney Company and after-school cartoons (n = 41). Each was coded for the modeling of the use of "evil" words when referring to a person, e.g., monster, devil, demon, wicked. Seventy-four percent of the Disney films contained "evil" references, with an average of 5.6 references per film. Forty-four percent of the after-school cartoons contained "evil" references, with an average of one per cartoon. The results are discussed within the context of children's repeated exposure to popular animated movies and cartoons and their learning to demonize people who engage in perceived "bad" behaviors.

  18. Demonizing in children's television cartoons and Disney animated films.

    PubMed

    Fouts, Gregory; Callan, Mitchell; Piasentin, Kelly; Lawson, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of demonizing in the two major media that young children use (television and movies). Two content analyses were conducted using the animated feature films (n = 34) of the Walt Disney Company and after-school cartoons (n = 41). Each was coded for the modeling of the use of "evil" words when referring to a person, e.g., monster, devil, demon, wicked. Seventy-four percent of the Disney films contained "evil" references, with an average of 5.6 references per film. Forty-four percent of the after-school cartoons contained "evil" references, with an average of one per cartoon. The results are discussed within the context of children's repeated exposure to popular animated movies and cartoons and their learning to demonize people who engage in perceived "bad" behaviors. PMID:16761117

  19. Poetry, The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    This comprehensive guide demystifies the world of poetry, exploring poetic forms and traditions which can at first seem bewildering. Showing how any reader can gain more pleasure from poetry, it looks at the ways in which poetry interacts with the language used in everyday lives and explores how poems use language and form to create meaning.…

  20. Poetry Activities: Good for National Poetry Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Janet; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Provides step-by-step directions for various creative writing strategies for teachers to use with their students. Illustrates each strategy: the sneak attack; the poetry cafe; videotaping a poem; and choral reading and coloring meaning. (PA)

  1. Poetry in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Linda, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on the use of poetry for study in classrooms at all levels. Titles and authors of the articles include (1) "Summoning the Poem: Several Roads to Xanadu" by Ben F. Nelms; (2) "ABC's of Reading and Writing Poetry in Junior High" by Barbara Arnold; (3) "Invitations" by Elizabeth D. Nelms; (4) "Teaching Poetry…

  2. The Pupil and Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Pupils should develop a thorough appreciation for poetry. Poetry may be correlated with different curriculum areas in elementary schools, such as science, math, and health. Students can be introduced to various poetic forms, such as couplets, triplets, limericks, haiku, and free verse. Teachers should encourage experimentation and novel ideas in…

  3. A Poetry Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mary

    Intended to impart the basic ways a poem is constructed, this concise handbook is a prose guide to writing poetry. The handbook talks about meter and rhyme, form and diction, sound and sense, iambs and trochees, couplets and sonnets, and how and why this should matter to any person writing or reading poetry. Interspersing history and analysis with…

  4. Keeping Black Poetry Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Thomas Sayers Ellis, assistant professor of creative writing at New York's Sarah Lawrence College, is one of many scholars fighting for the soul of Black poetry, a struggle that takes place largely off-campus. Unless one is accepted into a top-level graduate poetry program, such as Boston University's program or the Iowa Writing Workshop, a poet's…

  5. Why Poetry Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parini, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Poetry does not matter to most people. They go about their business as usual, rarely consulting Shakespeare, Wordsworth, or Frost. One has to wonder if poetry has any place in the 21st century, when music videos and satellite television offer daunting competition for poems, which demand a good deal of attention and considerable analytic skills, as…

  6. Notes on Teaching Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabb, Alfred L., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    The teacher can stimulate an appreciation of poetry in his students by selecting, reading aloud, and discussing only those poems to which he himself responds strongly. He can also develop students' enjoyment of poetry by encouraging them to bring in their own poetic discoveries and by alerting them to the many possible interpretations of a poem.…

  7. Poetry Therapy in Psychiatric Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Catherine J.

    Poetry therapy has been in use with adult psychiatric patients at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D.C, for 10 years. The treatment used involves reading poetry, listening to recordings, studying poets, and writing poetry. The patients' choice of poems is not restricted by the staff, but different types of poetry appeal to different types of…

  8. Poetry Goes 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Buffy

    2009-01-01

    Generating excitement about poetry is often a challenge with high school patrons. While some teens have discovered the cathartic and aesthetic qualities of poetry, many have never experienced the joy of poetry. A course the author took in 2003 at The University of Georgia with Dr. JoBeth Allen, "Poetry in the Classroom," ignited a passion for…

  9. Reading, Writing, and Performing Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kitty

    2006-01-01

    This lesson plan contains poetry-related activities that aim to help students read and interpret English poetry, and write their own poems. The activities are introduced in each of the following parts: talking about poetry, understanding poetic devices, interpreting poems, using poetry for language acquisition, writing original poems, performing…

  10. Comparative Analyses of Live-Action and Animated Film Remake Scenes: Finding Alternative Film-Based Teaching Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champoux, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    Live-action and animated film remake scenes can show many topics typically taught in organizational behaviour and management courses. This article discusses, analyses and compares such scenes to identify parallel film scenes useful for teaching. The analysis assesses the scenes to decide which scene type, animated or live-action, more effectively…

  11. "Wiki-Ed Poetry": Transforming Preservice Teachers' Preconceptions about Poetry and Poetry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Janette; Dymoke, Sue

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses specifically on teacher candidates' preconceptions about poetry and poetry teaching and how these preconceptions shift as they work through various tasks on a wiki. Through an analysis of their definitions of poetry and ideas about poetry pedagogy captured in online discussion, survey, and interview responses, the authors…

  12. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannone, John C.

    2011-05-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a point of conclusion to a lecture. This presentation will give examples of these things from the ancient literature (sacred Hebraic texts), classical literature (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey), traditional poetry (Longfellow, Tennyson and Poe) and modern literature (Frost, Kooser, and others, including the contemporary work of this author).

  13. Making Meaning from Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipson, Marcia

    1994-01-01

    Describes an activity which uses poetry to help students differentiate between literal and critical comprehension and to focus on topics, main ideas, inferences, paraphrasing, and writing in response to text. (SR)

  14. The Poetry of Meditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindholdt, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Describes how creating a poem that focuses on memory, understanding, and emotion can lead to the construction of a meditative poem. States that poetry of meditation can be modified for use in almost any writing or literature classroom environment. (PA)

  15. Poetry by Seduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostowin, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a way of getting students to write poetry through writing collaborative poems. Relates the step-by-step procedure used by a class in writing a collaborative poem, and presents their poem. (RL)

  16. Comprehending, Composing, and Celebrating Graphic Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calo, Kristine M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of graphic poetry in classrooms is encouraged as a way to engage students and motivate them to read and write poetry. This article discusses how graphic poetry can help students with their comprehension of poetry while tapping into popular culture. It is organized around three main sections--reading graphic poetry, writing graphic poetry,…

  17. A Formula for Writing Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Peter O.

    1983-01-01

    Presents the formula for writing poetry as containing three elements: the content of the poet's mind; the poetic medium--language; and the creative spark that fuses experience and language, or content and medium, into poetry. (MM)

  18. Teaching Poetry in Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Beth Solow

    Children are drawn to poetry by its rhythm, rhyme, and repetition. A poetry program in the classroom can expand children's language experience, teach listening and speaking skills, and serve as a source of ideas for discussion. One very effective poetry program involves readings, discussions, practice sessions, and recitals. In the first week, a…

  19. Using Poetry To Teach Phonics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Hearing poetry read aloud should help pupils to achieve feelings of being relaxed and reenergized. Poetry might help pupils to achieve vital objectives in reading. Phonics instruction could become an inherent part of the reading of poems. For example, a student teacher and a cooperating teacher introduced pupils to a unit on "Poetry with Rhyme"…

  20. Homelessness, Restlessness and Diasporic Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizel, Arie

    2010-01-01

    Can poetry be Diasporic? Can poetry free itself from the shackles of conformism? Can it be independent and divergent, and not seek a home? Is it capable of mustering its inner strengths and living without being enlisted by a collective that accords it power? This article argues that poetry is essentially dialectic. It has little vitality without…

  1. Teaching Literature to Adolescents: Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, Stephen

    Because most poetry education is ineffectual, this book attempts to help the teacher stimulate student interest in poetry by (1) suggesting a rationale and objectives for teaching poetry, (2) warning the teacher to avoid those poems for which he has no personal enthusiasm and to avoid overexplaining those poems he likes, (3) urging, for example,…

  2. Epilepsy in Dante's poetry.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Dante Alighieri is the greatest Italian poet and one of the most important writers in Western literature. He is best known for the epic poem "Commedia", later named "La Divina Commedia" that has profoundly influenced not only poetic imagination but also all subsequent allegorical creations of imaginary worlds in literature. This paper examines the poetic description of some episodes of loss of consciousness in Dante's poetry discussing how and why typical elements of epileptic seizures have been used. On the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth, his poetry still remains to be an inspiring source of debate and reflection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  3. Films and Videotapes on Animal Development--A Check List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, Roger; Alexander, Lynne

    1986-01-01

    Provides an updated list of films and videotapes that was initially developed in 1970 for the British Society for Developmental Biology. Includes sections on cellular and genetic aspects, invertebrates, and vertebrates. The newer films are listed by title, in alphabetical order, with details of the maker, content, and duration. (ML)

  4. Poetry-Teaching Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John J.

    1965-01-01

    Three game approaches to the teaching of poetry, designed to make the student actively involved with poems are described as "teaching tools." The semantico-dictionary or word-cross game involves programing techniques, logic, and lexicography in poetic analysis. The punched-out poem game involves filling in the blanks of a poem in which all the…

  5. Psychoanalysis as poetry.

    PubMed

    Vivona, Jeanine M

    2013-12-01

    Like psychoanalysis, poetry is possible because of the nature of verbal language, particularly its potentials to evoke the sensations of lived experience. These potentials are vestiges of the personal relational context in which language is learned, without which there would be no poetry and no psychoanalysis. Such a view of language infuses psychoanalytic writings on poetry, yet has not been fully elaborated. To further that elaboration, a poem by Billy Collins is presented to illustrate the sensorial and imagistic potentials of words, after which the interpersonal processes of language development are explored in an attempt to elucidate the original nature of words as imbued with personal meaning, embodied resonance, and emotion. This view of language and the verbal form allows a fuller understanding of the therapeutic processes of speech and conversation at the heart of psychoanalysis, including the relational potentials of speech between present individuals, which are beyond the reach of poetry. In one sense, the work of the analyst is to create language that mobilizes the experiential, memorial, and relational potentials of words, and in so doing to make a poet out of the patient so that she too can create such language.

  6. Vocabulary Extension through Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surajlal, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the notion that teaching vocabulary extension in isolation makes little impact on students, a three-part exercise, designed to develop students' vocabulary through poetry while providing meaningful enjoyment, uses the poem "The Hawk" by A. C. Benson. In the first class period, students are introduced to both the exercise and the poem and…

  7. Poetry and Patriotism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Maxine

    2006-01-01

    The author was invited to speak at a poetry slam conducted by Urban Poets, a group of teenage poets who perform their own works with the most passionate intensity. She had trouble deciding what to say to the young generation whose world differed so much from hers. She turned to Walt Whitman and a poem he wrote, "To the Young Poets," telling them…

  8. Traditional Native Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Agnes

    1985-01-01

    While Native myths and legends were educational tools to transmit tribal beliefs and history, traditional American Indian poetry served a ritualistic function in everyday life. Few traditional Native songs, which all poems were, survive; only Mayan and Aztec poems were written, and most of these were burned by a Spanish bishop. In addition, many…

  9. Poetry Workshop & Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Bee

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that Judith Nicholls'"Polar Cub" is a good wintery poem to share with students. In it, the poet invites the cub to come out of its cave and explore in the snow, just as teachers invite children to explore words and ideas in poetry. The article explains how to read the poem to students. A poster is included. (SM)

  10. Poetry of the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitani, P.

    2011-06-01

    From Homer to the Bible looking at the heavenly vault is an enchanted moment in human life. It produces that wonder which Aristotle maintains is the beginning of the love of wisdom, that is to say of philosophy, science, and philomythia-the love of myth: poetry.

  11. Developing Awareness through Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeming, Robert F., Ed.

    This booklet contains the proceedings of a seminar in which poets demonstrated through readings and analysis of their works how poetry, combining appeals to both reason and emotion, can develop and refine individual awareness of the world and nature around us. The primary participants in the program were Bruce Cutler, Dolores Kendrick, and May…

  12. The Magnus-Rademaker Scientific Film Collection: Ethical Issues on Animal Experimentation (1908-1940).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J; Lameris, Bregt

    2016-01-01

    The Magnus-Rademaker scientific film collection (1908-1940) deals with the physiology of body posture by the equilibrium of reflex musculature contractions for which experimental studies were carried out with animals (e.g., labyrinthectomies, cerebellectomies, and brain stem sections) as well as observations done on patients. The films were made for demonstrations at congresses as well as educational objectives and film stills were published in their books. The purpose of the present study is to position these films and their makers within the contemporary discourse on ethical issues and animal rights in the Netherlands and the earlier international debates. Following an introduction on animal rights and antivivisection movements, we describe what Magnus and Rademaker thought about these issues. Their publications did not provide much information in this respect, probably reflecting their adherence to implicit ethical codes that did not need explicit mentioning in publications. Newspaper articles, however, revealed interesting information. Unnecessary suffering of an animal never found mercy in Magnus' opinion. The use of cinematography was expanded to the reduction of animal experimentation in student education, at least in the case of Rademaker, who in the 1930s was involved in a governmental committee for the regulation of vivisection and cooperated with the antivivisection movement. This resulted not only in a propaganda film for the movement but also in films that demonstrate physiological experiments for students with the purpose to avert repetition and to improve the teaching of experiments. We were able to identify the pertinent films in the Magnus-Rademaker film collection. The production of vivisection films with this purpose appears to have been common, as is shown in news messages in European medical journals of the period. PMID:26684427

  13. The Magnus-Rademaker Scientific Film Collection: Ethical Issues on Animal Experimentation (1908-1940).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J; Lameris, Bregt

    2016-01-01

    The Magnus-Rademaker scientific film collection (1908-1940) deals with the physiology of body posture by the equilibrium of reflex musculature contractions for which experimental studies were carried out with animals (e.g., labyrinthectomies, cerebellectomies, and brain stem sections) as well as observations done on patients. The films were made for demonstrations at congresses as well as educational objectives and film stills were published in their books. The purpose of the present study is to position these films and their makers within the contemporary discourse on ethical issues and animal rights in the Netherlands and the earlier international debates. Following an introduction on animal rights and antivivisection movements, we describe what Magnus and Rademaker thought about these issues. Their publications did not provide much information in this respect, probably reflecting their adherence to implicit ethical codes that did not need explicit mentioning in publications. Newspaper articles, however, revealed interesting information. Unnecessary suffering of an animal never found mercy in Magnus' opinion. The use of cinematography was expanded to the reduction of animal experimentation in student education, at least in the case of Rademaker, who in the 1930s was involved in a governmental committee for the regulation of vivisection and cooperated with the antivivisection movement. This resulted not only in a propaganda film for the movement but also in films that demonstrate physiological experiments for students with the purpose to avert repetition and to improve the teaching of experiments. We were able to identify the pertinent films in the Magnus-Rademaker film collection. The production of vivisection films with this purpose appears to have been common, as is shown in news messages in European medical journals of the period.

  14. Epilepsy in Dante's poetry.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Dante Alighieri is the greatest Italian poet and one of the most important writers in Western literature. He is best known for the epic poem "Commedia", later named "La Divina Commedia" that has profoundly influenced not only poetic imagination but also all subsequent allegorical creations of imaginary worlds in literature. This paper examines the poetic description of some episodes of loss of consciousness in Dante's poetry discussing how and why typical elements of epileptic seizures have been used. On the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth, his poetry still remains to be an inspiring source of debate and reflection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". PMID:26907926

  15. Call and Responsibility: Critical Questions for Youth Spoken Word Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Susan; West, Anna

    2012-01-01

    In this article, Susan Weinstein and Anna West embark on a critical analysis of the maturing field of youth spoken word poetry (YSW). Through a blend of firsthand experience, analysis of YSW-related films and television, and interview data from six years of research, the authors identify specific dynamics that challenge young poets as they…

  16. Cartoons and Animated Films Disney Wouldn't Have Made: Five Provocative Short Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donelson, Kenneth L.

    1972-01-01

    Author provides and annotation of five short films listing, distributor, running time, rental price, summary, possible audiences, some strengths and weaknesses, thematic units it might fit, some related books and films, and a few questions students or teachers might consider in a discussion of the film or its content. (Author)

  17. Behavioral science, engineering, and poetry revisited.

    PubMed

    Michel, George F

    2010-08-01

    Forty years ago, Lehrman (1971) identified 2 orientations to the study of animal behavior. The natural history orientation conducted field and lab research designed to reveal how animals cope with the circumstances of their natural environment. Such research reveals the diversity among different types of animals and differences between the world of animals and the world of humans (i.e., "poetry"). In contrast, the anthropocentric orientation studies animals either to generate animal-derived general laws applicable to humans or to provide experimental information that, for ethical and practical reasons, cannot be acquired from human research. The primary motivation for the anthropocentric orientation is to provide workable models for investigating specifically human problems (i.e., "engineering"). Evidence is presented from the study of bird song that demonstrates the contribution that the "poetic" approach can make to anthropocentric ("engineering") concerns. PMID:20695665

  18. Tapping the Power of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    "I have become increasingly convinced that poetry offers one of the best-and often most underused--resources for developing literacy foundations," writes Timothy Rasinski. Poetry and songs are typically short and easy to learn, provide opportunities for students to play with the sounds of language, and offer an engaging way to learn…

  19. Poetry in Motion: Kevin Young

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2005-01-01

    Ten years ago, when Kevin Young mounted the stage at the 1994 Furious Flower conference, he was a baby-faced newcomer to the national poetry scene. Amid elders like Gwendolyn Brooks and Lucille Clifton, who had just selected his book for publication in the National Poetry Series, he bore only two identifying labels: "Harvard" and "the Dark Room…

  20. Poetry therapy, men and masculinities

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Rich; Dill, LeConté

    2016-01-01

    Therapists have long utilized poetry with various at risk male populations. Yet, in spite of its use, therapists have also been aware of the dilemmas associated with using poetry in a population whose behavior and identity may at times run counter to the core tenants of poetry therapy. However, the literature of poetry therapy does not fully explore what therapists need to know about men and masculinities in order to work with them. This article helps prepare therapists using poetry to become more sensitive to gender issues and utilize this understanding in their practice with men. It explores some of the key concepts from gender and masculinities studies and provides examples for how these concepts can be used in practice. PMID:27134327

  1. Word Magic: Poetry as a Shared Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVitty, Walter, Ed.

    Written by teachers and poets, this book offers insights into the nature of poetry and the ways in which children can be taught to enjoy reading and writing poetry. The book contains the following articles: "Poetry and the Magic of Words," by Colin Thiele; "Poetry and the Child," by Charles Causley; "A Verse Along the Way," by Max Fatchen; "The…

  2. Affective Realism of Animated Films in the Development of Simulation-Based Tutoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanayake, Hiran B.; Fors, Uno; Ramberg, Robert; Ziemke, Tom; Backlund, Per; Hewagamage, Kamalanath P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study focused on comparing real actors based scenarios and animated characters based scenarios with respect to their similarity in evoking psychophysiological activity for certain events by measuring galvanic skin response (GSR). In the experiment, one group (n = 11) watched the real actors' film whereas another group (n…

  3. REM sleep behavior disorder and other sleep disturbances in Disney animated films.

    PubMed

    Iranzo, Alex; Schenck, Carlos H; Fonte, Jorge

    2007-08-01

    During a viewing of Disney's animated film Cinderella (1950), one author (AI) noticed a dog having nightmares with dream-enactment that strongly resembled RBD. This prompted a study in which all Disney classic full-length animated films and shorts were analyzed for other examples of RBD. Three additional dogs were found with presumed RBD in the classic films Lady and the Tramp (1955) and The Fox and the Hound (1981), and in the short Pluto's Judgment Day (1935). These dogs were elderly males who would pant, whine, snuffle, howl, laugh, paddle, kick, and propel themselves while dreaming that they were chasing someone or running away. In Lady and the Tramp the dog was also losing both his sense of smell and his memory, two associated features of human RBD. These four films were released before RBD was first formally described in humans and dogs. In addition, systematic viewing of the Disney films identified a broad range of sleep disorders, including nightmares, sleepwalking, sleep related seizures, disruptive snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia and circadian rhythm sleep disorder. These sleep disorders were inserted as comic elements. The inclusion of a broad range of accurately depicted sleep disorders in these films indicates that the Disney screenwriters were astute observers of sleep and its disorders. PMID:17512793

  4. Media Portrayals of Love, Marriage & Sexuality for Child Audiences: A Select Content Analysis of Walt Disney Animated Family Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junn, Ellen N.

    This study examined the portrayal of love, marriage, and sexuality in 11 romantic and nonromantic Disney animated films. Results showed that four out of five of the nonromantic films had male leads, with males occupying significantly more screen time than females. Half of the romantic films had female leads, who occupied significantly more screen…

  5. Poetry in Ice and Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormiston-Smith, Helen

    1991-01-01

    Suggests using poetry such as James Maxwell's "To the Chief Musician upon Nabla: A Tyndallic Ode" as a vehicle for learning physics. Discusses the physics concepts alluded to in the verses of the poem. (MDH)

  6. Poetry through soul.

    PubMed

    Clark, Trevor

    2011-07-01

    Trevor Clark usually works as a bulk fuel truck driver. He has a passion for poetry, writing and guitar playing which he uses as a sounding board for reflective learning and development. He also believes that supportive family and friends are critical to maintaining his well-being. Sustaining recovery is a reality Trevor deals with every day and believes patients who embrace their condition fully can direct their recovery and maintain positive mental health for themselves and those involved in their lives. Currently, Trevor is working on his first novel while he recovers from physical injuries incurred on his quest for autonomy and place. Managing his mental health is of paramount importance to Trevor and even though this may be trying at times, he lives and works happily with his condition. PMID:21878024

  7. Poetry through soul.

    PubMed

    Clark, Trevor

    2011-07-01

    Trevor Clark usually works as a bulk fuel truck driver. He has a passion for poetry, writing and guitar playing which he uses as a sounding board for reflective learning and development. He also believes that supportive family and friends are critical to maintaining his well-being. Sustaining recovery is a reality Trevor deals with every day and believes patients who embrace their condition fully can direct their recovery and maintain positive mental health for themselves and those involved in their lives. Currently, Trevor is working on his first novel while he recovers from physical injuries incurred on his quest for autonomy and place. Managing his mental health is of paramount importance to Trevor and even though this may be trying at times, he lives and works happily with his condition.

  8. Historical evidence for nature disconnection in a 70-year time series of Disney animated films.

    PubMed

    Prévot-Julliard, Anne-Caroline; Julliard, Romain; Clayton, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The assumed ongoing disconnection between humans and nature in Western societies represents a profoundly challenging conservation issue. Here, we demonstrate one manifestation of this nature disconnection, via an examination of the representation of natural settings in a 70-year time series of Disney animated films. We found that natural settings are increasingly less present as a representation of outdoor environments in these films. Moreover, these drawn natural settings tend to be more and more human controlled and are less and less complex in terms of the biodiversity they depict. These results demonstrate the increasing nature disconnection of the filmmaking teams, which we consider as a proxy of the Western relation to nature. Additionally, because nature experience of children is partly based on movies, the depleted representation of biodiversity in outdoor environments of Disney films may amplify the current disconnection from nature for children. This reduction in exposure to nature may hinder the implementation of biodiversity conservation measures. PMID:24519887

  9. Historical evidence for nature disconnection in a 70-year time series of Disney animated films.

    PubMed

    Prévot-Julliard, Anne-Caroline; Julliard, Romain; Clayton, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The assumed ongoing disconnection between humans and nature in Western societies represents a profoundly challenging conservation issue. Here, we demonstrate one manifestation of this nature disconnection, via an examination of the representation of natural settings in a 70-year time series of Disney animated films. We found that natural settings are increasingly less present as a representation of outdoor environments in these films. Moreover, these drawn natural settings tend to be more and more human controlled and are less and less complex in terms of the biodiversity they depict. These results demonstrate the increasing nature disconnection of the filmmaking teams, which we consider as a proxy of the Western relation to nature. Additionally, because nature experience of children is partly based on movies, the depleted representation of biodiversity in outdoor environments of Disney films may amplify the current disconnection from nature for children. This reduction in exposure to nature may hinder the implementation of biodiversity conservation measures.

  10. Teaching Geography's Four Traditions with Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Daniel P.

    2001-01-01

    Uses four traditions of geography (spatial, area studies, human-environment interaction, and earth science) to show how poetry can be used to enhance the teaching of geography. Illustrates the explicitly spatial concepts present in selected poetry. (DAJ)

  11. Gary Snyder's Poetry and Ecological Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClintock, James I.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the impact that three ecologists had on the poetry of Gary Snyder. Provides examples of Snyder's poetry in which the ecological concepts of the food chain, succession, the biology of loops, and networks are illustrated. (MDH)

  12. Writing Poetry: A Self-Instructional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah Univ., Salt Lake City. Bureau of Educational Research.

    The general design of this book is that of a step-by-step self-instructional program leading toward the writing of poetry. It consists of 156 exercises which lead the student from writing about a picture and poems to kinds of poetry and techniques for writing poetry (alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia, metaphor, simile, rhyme, meter…

  13. Arabic Poetry: Guzzle a Ghazal! [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Bedouins of ancient Arabia and Persia made poetry a conversational art form, and several poetic forms developed from the participatory nature of tribal poetry. Today in most Arab cultures, people may still experience public storytelling and spontaneous poetry challenges in the streets. The art of turning a rhyme into sly verbal sparring is…

  14. Poetry Appreciation: Thirteen Modern Poems Discussed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, T. R.

    Poetry analysis in this book focuses on the response of the reader to modern poetry so that he may be able to perceive form and life in what at first appear to be unrelated fragments, become accustomed to new rhythmic patterns, and enlarge his experience by reading poetry which reflects the contemporary world. Poems are "Dry Loaf" by Wallace…

  15. Resolution of Sexual Identity through Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, D. Oliver

    The use of poetry as a valuable part of the psychotherapeutic experience has gained increasing acceptance and usage in recent years. Poetry provides a viable modality for releasing intense emotions and reducing anxieties and hostilities. Poetry therapy was used with an 18-year-old male who was experiencing sexual orientation disturbance to examine…

  16. Breakthroughs in Action Research through Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses how major breakthroughs in generating, analysing and disseminating action research about problem-based learning were made through the medium of poetry. I used poetry in three ways: as data, as an interpretive device and as a reflective medium. Poetry helped me to disseminate my research in provocative, memorable and…

  17. Poetry for physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Sheila; Abel, Lynne S.

    1990-09-01

    In an effort to discover what makes the humanities difficult and unpopular with some science and engineering students, 14 Cornell faculty from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, applied mathematics, geology, materials science, and engineering were invited to become ``surrogate learners'' in a junior/senior level poetry seminar designed expressly for them. Their encounter with humanistic pedagogy and scholarship was meant to be an extension of ``Peer Perspectives on Science'' [see S. Tobias and R. R. Hake, ``Professors as physics students: What can they teach us?'' Am. J. Phys. 56, 786 (1988)]. The results challenge certain assumptions about differences between scholarship and pedagogy in the humanities and science (as regards ``certainty'' and models). But the experiment uncovered other problems that affect ``marketing'' the humanities to science and engineering students. Results are some additional insights into what makes science ``hard'' for humanities students and why physical science and engineering students have difficulty with and tend to avoid courses in literature, as well as into what can make humanities courses valuable for science students.

  18. "Make It New": Introducing Poetry Through Writing Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Shirley

    One approach to introducing students to poetry is to have them write and analyze their own poems. Although this approach has some disadvantages, it does serve to tap students' experiences and expressive potential with creative projects and to give them an immediate and direct relationship with the traditional published works. By writing poems…

  19. Music in film and animation: experimental semiotics applied to visual, sound and musical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Roger A.

    2010-02-01

    The relationship of music to film has only recently received the attention of experimental psychologists and quantificational musicologists. This paper outlines theory, semiotical analysis, and experimental results using relations among variables of temporally organized visuals and music. 1. A comparison and contrast is developed among the ideas in semiotics and experimental research, including historical and recent developments. 2. Musicological Exploration: The resulting multidimensional structures of associative meanings, iconic meanings, and embodied meanings are applied to the analysis and interpretation of a range of film with music. 3. Experimental Verification: A series of experiments testing the perceptual fit of musical and visual patterns layered together in animations determined goodness of fit between all pattern combinations, results of which confirmed aspects of the theory. However, exceptions were found when the complexity of the stratified stimuli resulted in cognitive overload.

  20. Best Practices: Pass the Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bafumo, Mary Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Sharing poetry with your students will lead to a lifetime benefit of appreciating the written word If you're an early riser and listen to public radio, you've probably heard Garrison Keillor, the host of "Prairie Home Companion," sharing a reading from the latest edition of "Pretty Good Poems." Each poem invariably evokes a reaction; whether it's…

  1. Finding Geography Using Found Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Ellen J.

    2012-01-01

    Functional literacy is important in both English/language arts and geography. Using the "found poetry" strategy, students will summarize a piece of text, identify main ideas and find geographic connections. While using young adult literature is a great way to incorporate geography into English/language arts classroom, understanding of geography…

  2. Poetry Recitation for Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoger, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Poetry recitation removes the distractions of creating and organizing original material so that business students can focus on presentation skills of delivery, confidence, and memory. Delivery includes articulation, emphasis, nonverbals, and presence. Confidence and memory development are complementary. Confidence comes from trusting the memory…

  3. Exploring Friendship Loss through Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Rich

    2004-01-01

    Losing friendships are significant events for people throughout their life span. In spite of the importance of friendships to psychosocial health, studies of friendships loss are not found in the literature. This article begins to address this gap through a qualitative study utilizing autobiographical poetry as data. This study exemplifies…

  4. Modifying Students' Tastes in Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, John Edward

    To test whether student tastes in poetry could be modified by a particular method of teaching it, the poetic preferences of 751 eighth grade students were pretested and compared with the poetic choices made by a panel of English educators, 35 student teachers in English, and the students' own English teachers. Consistently, poems selected by any…

  5. Poetry Feedback That Feeds Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Pooja; Laud, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a description of three seventh grade English teachers' attempt to augment creativity, reading, and deep understanding, and the standards they used to come up with five essential questions surrounding an eight-week unit on poetry. Each of these questions helps to address the school standards and the Common Core State Standards…

  6. READING POETRY IS CREATIVE TOO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOODRICH, HOWARD B.

    A DISCUSSION OF THE PURPOSES AND PROBLEMS OF TEACHING POETRY TO SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IS PRESENTED. TEACHING TECHNIQUES ARE SUGGESTED. SPECIFIC SUGGESTIONS ARE GIVEN FOR PRESENTING "FOG,""THE HIGHWAYMAN," AND "THE BELLS." THIS ARTICLE APPEARS IN "JOURNAL OF READING," VOLUME 10, APRIL 1967. (RH)

  7. Black Poetry: Some Random Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeronis, Charles

    1969-01-01

    Although books of solely black literature are being published in abundance, an anthology representing both black and white authors is needed, for only through including the literary traditions of all Americans can the national experience be accurately reflected. The origins of Afro-American poetry are found in the late 18th century, and with the…

  8. The Synergy of Poetry and Content Areas: Reading Poetry across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Laura Purdie; Wong, Janet; Bentley-Flannery, Paige; Hahn, Mary Lee; Jules, Jacqueline; Mordhorst, Heidi; Vardell, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Poetry can enhance all content areas. This article shares highlights from the 2014 CLA Master Class focused on using poetry in math, science, social studies, the arts, and physical education/movement. Presenters and participants read poems, asked questions, and engaged in lively discussions about using poetry to enhance all content areas. Chair…

  9. Schools as "Poetry-Friendly Places": Michael Rosen on Poetry in the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xerri, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the views of children's poet Michael Rosen in relation to poetry in education. It is based on an interview in which Rosen not only discusses the significance of encouraging young people to engage with poetry at school but also analyzes a number of threats to poetry's place in the English curriculum. This article…

  10. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  11. Poetry, Media, and Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chih-Ning Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe and analyze how the graduate course: "Writing, Reading and Teaching Poetry" influenced American and international students' writing, thinking, response to poetry, teaching beliefs and English learning through their participating in the class activities. In this study, I examine…

  12. Phonics and Poetry in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2000-01-01

    Describes how some student teachers and cooperating teachers guided pupils in learning phonics through a study of rhyming poetry. Discusses class activities involved in teaching couplets, triplets, imagery in poetry, quatrains, alliteration, limericks, and onomatopoeia, and the rhyme and phonics elements involved. (SR)

  13. Exploring Poetry: The Reading and Writing Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Connecting reading and writing has become an important trend in teaching the language arts. Poetry, as a salient facet of the reading curriculum, integrates well with different purposes in writing. Poetry read aloud to students can assist learners to enjoy reading activities and develop the feeling and aesthetic dimension of learning, among other…

  14. Healing from Addictions through Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alschuler, Mari

    2000-01-01

    Describes the author's work using poetry therapy groups with chemically-dependant adults in a residential drug treatment unit and in an outpatient setting of a large drug rehabilitation program. Discusses each poetry therapy group and notes the stages of group work. (SR)

  15. Recording Students to Bring Poetry Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Poems are filled with musicality. Poetry and music are often described using similar terms: meter, cadence, phrase, form, and more. Poetry also has physical qualities recognized ever since the Greeks classified poetic meter in feet. In this article, the author presents a project that works well across the age spectrum: recording expressive poetry…

  16. Engaging Honors Students through Newspaper Blackout Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladenheim, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the author's attempt to convince her students that poetry can be "their thing," and also show them how much it can shape the way they think about the world and their place in it. In this article Melissa Ladenheim describes the technique known as "newspaper blackout" poetry. The exciting thing about this…

  17. Poetry Writing in General Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Poetry writing in the context of physics is a student-centered activity that enables students to view the world through the window of physics and make connections to everyday life scenarios. Poetry assignments provide a creative and atypical challenge to students, creating more student-centered class discussions and a fun, light-hearted approach…

  18. On Writing Poetry: Four Contemporary Poets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Examines the poetics of Richard Hugo, William Stafford, Donald Hall, and Robert Bly. Proposes that these poets are associated more with European and South American literature than with the poetry previously written in the United States and England. Discusses what these poets tell others about language and about writing poetry. (RL)

  19. Reconceptualising Poetry as a Multimodal Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newfield, Denise; D'abdon, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    This conceptual article theorises the role of poetry in English classrooms from a multimodal perspective. It discusses the gap between the practices of poetry inside and outside South African schools, particularly where English is taught as an additional language (EAL). The former is shown to be monomodal and prescriptive, while the latter is…

  20. The Women's Tradition in American Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Cheryl Lawson

    The aim of this thesis is to examine the mainstream of American women's poetry in order to establish the existence of a women's tradition. The eight chapters of the dissertation are divided into the following subjects: Anne Bradstreet and the Puritan foundations of the tradition; the women poets before Dickinson and the themes of their poetry;…

  1. Readers Response Approach to English Poetry Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Antonia Hsiu-Chen; Sher, Teresa Hsiang-Jen

    This paper describes an elective course at Taiwan's Wen Tzao Ursuline College of Modern Languages, "Concise English Poetry Appreciation and Recitation." The course is based on the reader response approach and targets third year students, leading them into the world of poetry through various stages (traditional nursery rhymes and simple, humorous,…

  2. Stylistics and the Metaphysics of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Neil

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the worth of aesthetic experience in encountering poetry, fresh perspectives are helpful. This paper introduces the reader to modern stylistics: that is linguistic examinations of "the speaker's meaning" in literature and notes such "scientific" approaches to poetry do find common metaphysical ground with leading…

  3. Teaching Poetry in Elementary Grades: A Review of Related Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amann, Theresa N.

    In order to assess current ideas, reveal their shortcomings, and suggest steps for future investigation, this review of the literature on teaching poetry discusses definitions of poetry, references on teaching poetry, teaching methods, poetic forms, experimental research, and the benefits of poetry. The paper concludes that the lack of empirical…

  4. Diving into the Letters in Poems: Creating Poetry Banners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godston, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Fifth grade students explore the public and private dimensions of poetry through the medium of poetry banners. The author maintains that poetry belongs in public spaces and serves as a counter to the "junk text" that surrounds us. A poetry banner is a nice addition to other banners and messages that students, teachers, school administrators, and…

  5. Poetic Language, Interdiscursivity and Intertextuality in Fifth Graders' Poetry: An Interpretive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Certo, Janine

    2015-01-01

    In spite of views that children's writing development is in large part a linguistic complex process involved in their engagement within and across social activities in and out of school, the literature is scant on the wide range of semiotic resources that children may draw on to animate their poetry writing and performances. Drawing from a case…

  6. Film Study Hang Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenier, Charles F.

    1969-01-01

    The interest and delight which students find in film should be preserved from a teacher's excessive zeal to analyze and explain. As the beauty of poetry is frequently diminished through exhaustive analyses of similes, rhyme schemes, and other technical devices, the value of film to high school students can be weakened through too great an emphasis…

  7. Teaching and the Pleasures of Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swardson, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Lays out a theory of utilitarian teaching (of poetry), in which a teacher gets satisfaction only from helping students get what they go for, showing them the means to the ends determined by their own values. (SR)

  8. An Approach to Poetry Through Transformational Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Charles Lamar; Weiner, Charles

    1972-01-01

    Author details why the psychological studies of Jean Piaget have specific relevance to the teaching of poetry, especially his thought matrix which consists of four transformational processes: identity, inversion, reciprocity and correlation. (Author)

  9. The Blues Poetry of Langston Hughes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Edward E.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the criteria of the blues as an American art form. He then shows how Langston Hughes captures the mood, the feeling, the rhythm and the impact of the blues in his poetry. (Author/LF)

  10. An exploration of how film portrays psychopathology: the animated documentary film Waltz with Bashir, the depiction of PTSD and cultural perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Ahmed; Agius, Mark

    2012-09-01

    With the inauguration of the UK's first ever Medical Film festival MedFest in 2011 there has been resurgence in the interest of the association between psychiatry and film. The festival in 2012 was titled "HealthScreen": Understanding Illness through Film and its aim, according to the founder Dr Kamran Ahmed, was, 'To stimulate debate of the social, political and ethical implications of portrayals of health and illness on our screens' (1). Waltz with Bashir is a 2008 Israeli animated documentary film written and directed by Ari Folman. It portrays the protagonist (Folman) in search of his lost memories of his experience as a soldier in the 1982 Lebanon War and his attempt to both decipher them and reconcile himself with them. 2012 marks the 30th year commemoration of the Sabra and Shatilla tragedies. Waltz with Bashir vividly depicts the massacres of Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatilla refugee camps in Beirut through the lens of an ex-IDF serviceman and the harrowing effects that PTSD has on him. Waltz with Bashir was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film however despite the popularity of the film and much critical acclaim it is officially banned in Lebanon. The authors are mindful of the devastating effects that the atrocities have had on the mental health of all those who were involved, the Lebanese, Palestinians and also the Israelis. The purpose of this presentation is to explore how the film Waltz with Bashir portrays PTSD and how it has influenced cultural perceptions.

  11. Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    1999-05-01

    The January and April "From Past Issues" recalled some examples of cultural forms-plays, essays, picture contests-explored by chemical educators in the early years of the Journal. In the merry month of May, we turn to poetic works- lucky finds from a finger-walk through the first nine volumes (1924-1932).

  12. The Poetry Cafe Is Open! Teaching Literary Devices of Sound in Poetry Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalcik, Beth; Certo, Janine L.

    2007-01-01

    A six-week long intervention that introduced second graders to poetry writing is described in this article, ending in a classroom "poetry cafe" culminating event. This article details the established classroom "writing workshop" structure and environment and the perceptions and observations of how students responded to the instruction. Four poetry…

  13. At Home with Poetry: Constructing Poetry Anthologies in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scimone, Anthony J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the success of a unit for tenth-grade students wherein they created a book of poetry. Provides guidelines for the unit and evaluation criteria. Claims the "books" turned out to be far superior to the "flat pro forma" poetry papers assigned in the past. (NH)

  14. Collecting Poetry for the Academic Library: An Evaluation of Poetry Prizes as Selection Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golomb, Liorah

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of poetry book prizes as a selection tool by evaluating their fairness, meaningfulness, and reliability as an indication of quality. The results of two surveys, one collecting data on poetry book prizes and the other asking librarians about their collecting practices, suggest that selecting on the basis of prizes…

  15. Beyond McPoetry: Contemporary American Poetry in the Institutionalized Creative Writing Program Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Julie LaRue

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the rise of the creative writing program in American higher education and considers its influence on contemporary American poetry. I investigate how the patronage of the university has impacted American poetry and reconfigured the contemporary literary landscape. Using Mark McGurl's (2009) groundbreaking research on…

  16. Teaching Poetry: Reading and Responding to Poetry in the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Amanda; Wood, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching Poetry" is an indispensable source of guidance, confidence and ideas for all those new to the secondary English classroom. Written by experienced teachers who have worked with the many secondary pupils who "don't get" poetry, this friendly guide will help you support pupils as they access, understand, discuss and enjoy classic and…

  17. The "Animal House" Effect: How University-Themed Comedy Films Affect Students' Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasylkiw, Louise; Currie, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from learning and attitude theories, the current investigation explores the effect of media on students' attitudes. Study 1 was a content analysis of 34 films classified as university-themed comedies and showed that such films highlighted risk-taking (e.g., alcohol consumption) and minimized the importance of academics (e.g., studying).…

  18. Making Poetry a Natural Experience for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukasevich, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Discusses specific steps teachers of young children can take to sustain and increase children's love of poetry. The discussion ranges from the music of Mother Goose, chants, and nonsense verse to implementing a planned program of poetry writing. (RH)

  19. "We're Going to Read Poetry in This Class?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    How can poetry be a resource for effective teaching of congregational life and leadership? Drawing on poetry from an array of sources, the author weaves a narrative to discuss specific strategies employed for using poetry in the classroom. Recognizing the capacity of poems to awaken latent imaginations and evoke new insights about church…

  20. Aesthetics in Geography: Ideas for Teaching Geography Using Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how poetry can be used for teaching geography. The rational for using and writing poetry, its relationship to the National Standards for Geography, grade levels, pedagogical concerns associated with poetry writing, and subject integration are discussed. There are also classroom activities, sample discussion questions, lesson…

  1. "Old Poems Have Heart": Teenage Students Reading Early Modern Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The proposals for the revised National Curriculum in English suggest limiting the pre-twentieth century poetry that GCSE pupils read to "representative Romantic poetry" (Department for Education [DFE], 2013, p. 4). This paper argues that poetry of the early modern period is challenging and enriching study for adolescent pupils and that…

  2. So Much Depends: Poetry's Place in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jane Morelli

    1997-01-01

    Recalls the pleasurable activity of listening to poetry read by a teacher in fifth grade--poems by Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, and Carl Sandburg. Relates that poetry books were in the school library and that the students wrote their own poems. Finds that, 18 years later, teaching begins each day in middle school with poetry. (PA)

  3. 'The verses of madness': schizophrenia and poetry.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Ahmed Khaldoon; Holloway, David; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2012-12-20

    In the early 19th century, Lombroso introduced the concept of hereditary taint to describe the coexistence of 'madness' and creativity. In a recent investigation, Rust et al reported a study designed to test the traditionally assumed relationship between creativity and schizophrenia. They uncovered an association between creative originality and the positive cognitive aspects of schizotypal thinking. Poetry is not only the 'product' of psychopathology but it can also be utilised as a form of therapy: "My name is David Holloway, I am a 33 year old poet/blogger with paranoid schizophrenia. A poet called Charles Bukowski has described poetry as the 'ultimate psychiatrist', and I am a firm believer in this. The strongest part of my personality is my belief in the power of love. My recovery has relied heavily on medication, diet and exercise. However it is the power of poetry that has been my true inspiration."

  4. 'The verses of madness': schizophrenia and poetry.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Ahmed Khaldoon; Holloway, David; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    In the early 19th century, Lombroso introduced the concept of hereditary taint to describe the coexistence of 'madness' and creativity. In a recent investigation, Rust et al reported a study designed to test the traditionally assumed relationship between creativity and schizophrenia. They uncovered an association between creative originality and the positive cognitive aspects of schizotypal thinking. Poetry is not only the 'product' of psychopathology but it can also be utilised as a form of therapy: "My name is David Holloway, I am a 33 year old poet/blogger with paranoid schizophrenia. A poet called Charles Bukowski has described poetry as the 'ultimate psychiatrist', and I am a firm believer in this. The strongest part of my personality is my belief in the power of love. My recovery has relied heavily on medication, diet and exercise. However it is the power of poetry that has been my true inspiration." PMID:23264155

  5. Toward an Animal Model of the Human Tear Film: Biochemical Comparison of the Mouse, Canine, Rabbit, and Human Meibomian Lipidomes

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.; Lu, Hua; McMahon, Anne; Eule, J. Corinna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Secretions that are produced by meibomian glands (also known as meibum) are a major source of lipids for the ocular surface of humans and animals alike. Many animal species have been evaluated for their meibomian lipidomes. However, there have been a very small number of studies in which the animals were compared with humans side by side. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare meibum collected from humans and three typical laboratory animals, canines, mice, and rabbits, for their meibomian lipid composition in order to determine which animal species most resembles humans. Methods. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) in combination with mass spectrometry were used to evaluate lipidomes of all tested species. Results. Among three tested animal species, mice were found to be the closest match to humans in terms of their meibomian lipidomes, while canines were the second closest species. The lipids of these three species were close to each other structurally and, for most lipid classes, quantitatively. The rabbit meibomian lipidome, on the other hand, was vastly different from lipidomes of all other tested species. Interestingly, a previously described class of lipids, acylated omega-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA), was found to be present in every tested species as the major amphiphilic component of meibum. Conclusions. Our side by side comparison of the rabbit and the human meibum demonstrated their vast differences. Thus, the rabbit seems to be a poor animal model of the human tear film, at least when studying its biochemistry and biophysics. PMID:22918629

  6. Kitchen-Tested Recipes for Reading and Writing Poetry (Modern Poetry in the Classroom).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Mark; Tilley, Janet

    1994-01-01

    Provides an account of how one English teacher fosters student appreciation of poetry by using poems dealing consistently with one theme: family relationships. Discusses student response to several poems used, including "A Daughter's House" by Norma Hope Richman. (HB)

  7. Atomic Poetry: Using Poetry To Teach Rutherford's Discovery of the Nucleus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abisdris, Gil; Casuga, Adele

    2001-01-01

    Points out how Rutherford's discovery of the nucleus changed ideas about the structure of the atom and influenced poetry. Uses Robert Frost's poems "Version" and "The Secret Sits" to teach a physical science class about atomic theory. (YDS)

  8. Nonverbal Poetry: Family Life-Space Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardill, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    Examines life-space diagrams as a form of nonverbal poetry which taps personal feelings, tells a story, and characterizes a particular life situation, forming a useful therapy technique that provides a family the opportunity to examine its internal family relationships. Offers two case studies, discusses five levels of knowing and awareness, and…

  9. The Stealth Approach: Geography and Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Diane Carver; Gregg, Madeleine

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which the poetry strand of literacy instruction can help teachers infuse geography into the elementary classroom. Teachers can use poems to target important aspects of reading instruction: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension. When the poems contain substantive geography…

  10. Poetry: A Feast to Form Fluent Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, Sheila

    In this lesson plan, grade 3 to 5 students examine elements of fluent reading through oral poetry performance. They use the Internet to identify a poem to prepare and perform for the class. The main objective of this lesson concerns improving fluency. During four hours over a span of five days, students will: be able to identify text written in…

  11. Bearing Witness: Poetry by Teachers about Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Margaret, Ed.

    The purpose of this poetry anthology is to create a positive inspirational yet realistic picture of teachers and the very challenging and complex contexts within which they "weave their magic in students' lives" and make contributions to the world. The anthology aims to show how teachers think and feel about teaching, learning, and their students.…

  12. Pain and Poetry: Facing Our Fears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Raymond Carver's "Fear" is a list poem. It follows an easily replicable structure and provides young people an opportunity to express and share feelings that often get in the way of their learning. Each line but one begins with the words "Fear of... " In this article, the author describes how poetry can become the vehicle for students to…

  13. "Harmony with Voice:" Poetry with Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassig, Ronda

    2012-01-01

    Harmony Middle School educators recently undertook a project that combined poetry and real-service action for students. The students worked with a published poet and wrote beautiful poems and then blogged with art students in the district. The art students made ceramic bowls that represented the poems. The combined project was done for True Light,…

  14. Exploring Poetry through Interactive Computer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimchinsky, Howard; Camp, Jocelyn

    The goal of a project was to design, test, and evaluate several computer programs that allow students in introductory literature and poetry courses to explore a poem in detail and, through a dialogue with the program, to develop their own interpretation of it. Computer programs were completed on poems by Robert Frost and W.H. Auden. Both programs…

  15. Nurturing Integrative Thinking: Poetry in Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginocchio, Frederick L.

    1987-01-01

    Shows how poetry can be used to bridge the gap between social studies and the humanities. Demonstrates that poems about Japan can provide a more comprehensive understanding of Japanese history, culture, and psychology than could the objective truths provided by social studies in that area. Includes a lesson outline and several poems. (AEM)

  16. Astro Poetry: Students Working as Poets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakauskas, William

    1982-01-01

    An approach to teaching the writing of poetry is presented in this brief article. AUTHOR'S COMMENT (excerpt): A poet's purpose is to amuse, to instruct, to embellish truth, or to vitalize dull reality. Poets compress, using the minimum number of words to gain the maximum effect, yoking seemingly disparate ideas into metaphors, creating poetic…

  17. MEMORY FOR POETRY: MORE THAN MEANING?

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, Rachel M.; Hare, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The assumption has become that memory for words’ sound patterns, or form, is rapidly lost in comparison to content. Memory for form is also assumed to be verbatim rather than schematic. Oral story-telling traditions suggest otherwise. The present experiment investigated if form can be remembered schematically in spoken poetry, a context in which form is important. We also explored if sleep could help preserve memory for form. We tested whether alliterative sound patterns could cue memory for poetry lines both immediately and after a delay of 12 hours that did or did not include sleep. Twelve alliterative poetry lines were modified into same alliteration, different alliteration, and no alliteration paraphrases. We predicted that memory for original poetry lines would be less accurate after 12 hours, same alliteration paraphrases would be falsely recognized as originals more often after 12 hours, and that the no-sleep group would make more errors. Different alliteration and no alliteration paraphrases were not expected to share this effect due to schematically different sound patterns. Our data support these hypotheses and provide evidence that memory for form is schematic in nature, retained in contexts in which form matters, and that sleep may help preserve memory for sound patterns. PMID:26401226

  18. Poetry Writing in General Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, William L.

    2013-02-01

    Poetry writing in the context of physics is a student-centered activity that enables students to view the world through the window of physics and make connections to everyday life scenarios. Poetry assignments provide a creative and atypical challenge to students, creating more student-centered class discussions and a fun, light-hearted approach to learning what is often perceived as a purely logical subject. In order to write poetry in the context of a physics concept, students actively unify their worldview with an expression of physical concepts, personalizing their connection to the topic. Physics and poetry are two of the great human intellectual endeavors, each producing deep insights on self-created models of the universe. Each attempts to get beneath the surface of events and actions through different domains. Just as poets create a perspective of the world, scientists and researchers use their creativity to come up with new ideas, tests, and explanations. Creative thinking is one of the most important skills scientists have, whether that creativity is used to develop an alternative hypothesis, to devise a new way of testing an idea, or to look at old data in a new light. Scientific analysis often involves alternating among different modes of reasoning and creative brainstorming. Creative thinking is becoming an increasingly valuable skill for students. A 2006 comprehensive study done by job placement professionals concluded that creative thinking has become one of the most important skill sets for recent college graduates.

  19. From Poetry to Music: "Northern Lullaby"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2011-01-01

    Nancy White Carlstrom's children's book, "Northern Lullaby," conjures through poetry the beauty of the Alaskan landscape in the evening. The book provides an opportunity for music teachers to help their students transform text and visual images to music. The author describes connections for reading comprehension in the general music classroom and…

  20. Black Poetry Writing: A Capsule Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gwendolyn; And Others

    In this handbook, four authors write on the same topics but with varying emphases. Gwendolyn Brooks sketches the background of Afro-American poetry and offers practical hints and exercises for writing. Keorapatse Kgositsile discusses the role and situation of the black writer. Haki R. Madhubuti (Don L. Lee) explains an author's commitment and…

  1. Problems of Textbook in Teaching Chinese Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Ta-hsia

    It is proposed that teachers of Chinese expose their students to traditional critical views of Chinese poetics and criticism through careful selection of poems. This approach to language study is based on the assumption that the student may gain insight and appreciation of Chinese poetry as well as a feeling for the culture. Arguments favoring…

  2. Integrating Poetry and "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Susan Arpajian

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a method of teaching "To Kill a Mockingbird" along with the study of poetry. Notes that this method allows students to consider the themes of courage and developing compassion. Concludes that teaching such a multigenre unit allows students to look for connections among fact and fiction, the past and present, their own lives and…

  3. Emotional Self-Repair and Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David; Terry, Rina

    1994-01-01

    Notes that some scholars have argued that writing poetry was harmful for psychological health of Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton. Contends that their writing probably provided cathartic benefit for them and helped them gain cognitive distance from their inner conflicts. Argues that writing may have helped both poets survive longer than they might…

  4. Slam Poetry and Cultural Experience for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Kathryn E.

    2009-01-01

    Slam poetry, being not just recitation or memorization, affords children the opportunity to express their own personal cultural experiences and values. Slam is a spoken word performance; a competition among poets. Audience commentary is ongoing during the performance and vigorous audience participation is essential in a slam format. The founders…

  5. Children and Poetry: A Selective, Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Virginia; Smith, William Jay

    This annotated bibliography of over 120 books was compiled to call attention to poetry for children that is both pleasing and rewarding. Omitted are traditional materials such as Mother Goose rhymes, textbooks, and collections designed especially for the classroom. Sample illustrations from the books noted and lines from poems are reproduced…

  6. Religion in the Poetry of Langston Hughes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Mary Beth

    1987-01-01

    Religious feeling is always interdependent with racial feeling in the poetry of Langston Hughes. He views religion in the larger context of black culture, presenting it variously as a source of strength for the oppressed, an opiate of the people, the religion of slavery, and an obstacle to emancipation. (BJV)

  7. Using Poetry with Mixed Ability Language Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Brian

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the value of using poetry to teach English as a second language to mixed ability classes. Lists the following criteria for selecting poems: (1) universal appeal; (2) surface simplicity, (3) potential depth, (4) affective potential, (5) contemporary language, (6) brevity, and (7) potential for illustration. Describes ways of using two…

  8. Images of Couples and Families in Disney Feature-Length Animated Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Litsa Renee; Haddock, Shelley A.; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Lund, Lori K.

    2003-01-01

    Examines themes about couples and families portrayed in 26 Disney animated classics and recent movies. Four overarching themes were identified: family relationships are a strong priority; families are diverse, but the diversity is often simplified; fathers are elevated, while mothers are marginalized; and couple relationships are created by "love…

  9. English 5-6, 7-8: Film Study and Film Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Gerre M.

    This one-semester English elective course offered in grades 11 and 12 allows students to examine both classical and modern short films to determine the most effective elements of communication in the medium. The course is divided into two quarters and is further divided into topical sections, i.e., Teaching Poetry through Film, The Film as Visual…

  10. Autoethnographic Poems and Narrative Reflections: A Qualitative Study on the Death of a Companion Animal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Rich

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the meaning of the death of a companion animal through autoethnographic poetry in conjunction with narrative reflections. This method expands the depth and scope of poetry in qualitative research by transforming expressive works into both the subject and product of inquiry.

  11. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Smekens, F.; Sarrut, D.; Passal, V.; Suhard, J.; Lisbona, A.; Paris, F.; Delpon, G.

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm.

  12. Erwin Schrödinger's Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofronieva, Tzveta

    2013-03-01

    Many of the major figures in the history of science have produced literary works, but the relationship between their poetic texts and their scientific work is often underestimated. This paper illuminates the poetry of Erwin Schrödinger—one of the premier figures in twentieth-century science, and an accomplished poet in both English and his native German. It discusses existing perceptions of his poetry and challenges the assumptions that his poetic work was a mere hobby unrelated to his other achievements by focusing on the interplay between poetic images and scientific ideas in his German-language poems. It emphasizes that more research is needed on the understated role of bilingualism and of—often marginalized—writing in an adopted language in science and in poetry, with the premise that this feature of Schrödinger's life deserves more study. It argues that Schrödinger's literary imagination and his bilingualism are an integral part of his approach to reality and considers Schrödinger's literary work to be an important aspect of his intellectual heritage.

  13. Erwin Schrödinger's Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofronieva, Tzveta

    2014-03-01

    Many of the major figures in the history of science have produced literary works, but the relationship between their poetic texts and their scientific work is often underestimated. This paper illuminates the poetry of Erwin Schrödinger—one of the premier figures in twentieth-century science, and an accomplished poet in both English and his native German. It discusses existing perceptions of his poetry and challenges the assumptions that his poetic work was a mere hobby unrelated to his other achievements by focusing on the interplay between poetic images and scientific ideas in his German-language poems. It emphasizes that more research is needed on the understated role of bilingualism and of—often marginalized—writing in an adopted language in science and in poetry, with the premise that this feature of Schrödinger's life deserves more study. It argues that Schrödinger's literary imagination and his bilingualism are an integral part of his approach to reality and considers Schrödinger's literary work to be an important aspect of his intellectual heritage.

  14. Physics for Animation Artists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  15. From Page to Digital Stage: Creating Digital Performances of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Janette; John, Amy

    2009-01-01

    The authors share the story of a performance-based poetry project undertaken by a class of grade 6 and 7 students. The use of new digital media for reading, writing, and representing poetry encouraged an exploration of the relationship between text and image and how images and sound might be used to mediate meaning making. New media have an…

  16. How a Haiku Project Stimulated Poetry Reading among Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geier, Denise B.

    2004-01-01

    Often, teaching poetry offers a special challenge to children and teachers alike. This author, a curriculum director at Middletown Township Public School in New Jersey, noticed that students routinely scored poorly on poetry questions, and attributed this to the lack of exposure at the elementary grades, as well as the discomfort that adults feel…

  17. "The Joy of Mere Words": Poetry and Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelden, Michael

    As a man who took great delight in "the joy of mere words," George Orwell would understandably be appalled by the growing insensitivity to language in today's world. Poetry in composition classes can keep students aware of the music of the English language. There is no guarantee that students will respond to poetry with the same enthusiasm that…

  18. On the Use of Poetry in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellbery, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    Poetry can be a powerful tool in teaching students and residents interpersonal and scientific aspects of clinical medicine. Advantages of using poetry include emotional intensity, succinct, portable formulations and communication of encompassing, "existential" truths. Limitations include learners' lack of familiarity with the medium of…

  19. The Craft, Practice, and Possibility of Poetry in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahnmann, Melisa

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on poetry as a method of discovery in educational research, examining specific techniques of poetic craft that can help increase the value and impact of qualitative data collection, analysis, and representation. Presents examples of poetic technique from research, discussing the use of poetry as a means for educational scholarship to…

  20. Poetry, Healing, and the Latin American Battered Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Marja

    1999-01-01

    Explores how poetry can be used in support groups as an adjunctive treatment technique to empower and to raise consciousness of Latina battered women. Offers examples of Latin American women's literary works to demonstrate the connections poetry has to everyday lives, and how Latina spouse-abuse survivors can gain a deeper understanding of…

  1. Celestino: A Tribute to the Healing Power of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heard, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Georgia Heard spent a week with students in New Mexico, encouraging their search for "self-portrait poetry"--poetry in which they saw themselves. She witnessed courage, pain, tragedy, and hope in the choices and writing of those struggling students, and came to learn that at least one among them had found a life-changing outlet. (Contains 7…

  2. What Is Not Said on Hearing Poetry in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, John

    2010-01-01

    This article considers an exchange between pupils in response to heard poetry, approaching it through a "conversation analytic mentality" informed by the theories of Basil Bernstein. Using his terms, it describes an existing "pedagogic device" of poetry study for schools, to which responses under discussion do not easily correlate. This is more…

  3. The Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival Welcomes Teachers and Poets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haba, Jim; Farawell, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Describes the 2000 Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival, the largest poetry event in North America. Notes the festival was designed to create opportunities for personal communication between poets and teachers, who share so many similar concerns for the future of language arts education. (RS)

  4. Reclaiming the Body: Teaching Modern Poetry by Ignoring Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Tom

    Many students think of poetry as a meaning to be figured out, a puzzle to be solved--as if poets were forever doomed to write only what they never quite mean and to mean what they never actually write. The struggle to discover meaning becomes acute with that distinctly modern poetry created by T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, and their…

  5. On the Line: Children and Poetry in the Seventies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkman, Marlene Ann

    Children's poetry no longer connotes holidays, nonsense, moral dicta, or the what's, why's, and how's of life, connotations that have frequently stereotyped poetry as sissy, baby, or boring stuff. Children's poems of the seventies suggest that any simple subject has become the province of a poem, including such topics as mud, oil slicks, sharks,…

  6. "Poems Look Like a Mathematical Equation": Assessment in Poetry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xerri, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the influence that assessment exerts on poetry education. By means of research conducted in a post-16 educational context in Malta, it shows that teachers' and students' practices in the poetry lesson are determined by the kind of examinations that candidates sit for. When the mode of assessment is constituted solely by the…

  7. Using Digital Media to Interpret Poetry: Spiderman Meets Walt Whitman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVee, Mary B.; Bailey, Nancy M.; Shanahan, Lynn E.

    2008-01-01

    Teachers and students often express an aversion to poetry based on their experiences with printbased poetry texts that typically dominate school curricula. Given this challenge and the potential affordances of new and multimodal technologies, we investigate how preservice and inservice teachers enrolled in a new literacies master's course began to…

  8. Wordplaygrounds: Reading, Writing, and Performing Poetry in the English Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John S.

    2004-01-01

    John S. O'Connor offers exciting new approaches to teaching poetry in middle school and high school classrooms with more than 25 high-interest activities designed to sharpen students' writing and self-understanding and heighten their awareness of the world around them. In the process, he demystifies poetry for teachers and students by using…

  9. A Garden of Poets: Poetry Writing in the Elementary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Mary Kenner

    Written for elementary school teachers who want to help their students delve into poetry, this book grows out of a comparison between gardening and writing poetry. Students at the alternative school founded by the book's author work and play on a plot of land near the school; inside, they work and play with words and imagery. Many examples of…

  10. The Relevance of Poetry in School Leadership Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Lystra M.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that poetry, especially in times of crisis, serves society by offering a form of reflection. Suggests that by combining poetry with reflective practice, school leaders can use aspects of the poet's craft to enhance their ability to interpret their environment and improve communication. (Contains 31 references.) (AUTH/NB)

  11. Coyote Poems: Navajo Poetry, Intertextuality, and Language Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Anthony K.

    2004-01-01

    Many literary critics describe Native American written poetry as inspired by oral tradition (namely storytelling). This seems a vacuous claim unless one can set out the features of the oral genre (tradition) and the written form, and establish a baseline for comparative purposes. It is not enough to claim that poetry is storytelling based on oral…

  12. Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandre, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    "Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry" was the title of the 2011 Master Class in Children's Literature. Woven into this session were the insights of poets Joyce Sidman and Pat Mora who shared their creative processes and the voices that inspire their poetry. In addition, Barbara Kiefer provided advice regarding how to connect…

  13. In Spring Hearts Turn to Poetry and Love.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Arthea, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Intended for use by junior or senior high school English teachers, the articles and features in this theme issue focus on romantic fiction and poetry for young adults. The articles and their authors are as follows (1) "The Gift of Poetry" (L. B. Hopkins); (2) "Maybe the Gallows, But Not a Tin Ear" (A. K. Helbig); (3) "A Report from the 1986 ALAN…

  14. Accent on Meter: A Handbook for Readers of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Joseph; Halperin, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This book offers practical ways of teaching students about the close connections between the meaning, rhythm, and meter in poetry. The major assumption of the book is that a close reading of a poem--one that explores the nuances of structure--can increase one's appreciation and enjoyment of poetry. In the words of the authors, "What the poem is…

  15. Using Poetry To Teach Humanities in the Adult Literacy Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgenthaler, Sharon

    This article provides some practical information on use of poetry to teach such subject areas as history, literature, philosophy, social studies, minority and foreign studies, and the social sciences. Reference is made to the Watershed Foundation, which has a large collection of poetry on cassette tapes that feature the original authors reading…

  16. Morbid and Insight Poetry: A Glimpse at Schizophrenia through the Window of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakare, Muideen Owolabi

    2009-01-01

    Creativity, language, and psychotic disorders may share a common neurological and evolutionary background. These processes are uniquely human and may converge in poetic expression that illuminates the inner world of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Two types of poetry that may be written by patients with schizophrenia are identified as…

  17. Poetry Workshop for Middle School: Activities That Inspire Meaningful Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosini, Michelle; Morretta, Teresa M.

    Noting that when students are immersed in reading and writing poetry they benefit from revisions in writing and learn to critically analyze text, this book outlines the ways that poetry workshops can excite students' interest. Chapter 1, "Laying a Foundation for Poetry Workshop" defines poetry workshop and explains its value in the reading and…

  18. Teaching Poetry: Dehydrated Food for the Soul (Rainbow Teachers, Rainbow Students).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, MaryCarmen; Duff, Ogle Burks

    1996-01-01

    Presents an informal dialogue on teaching poetry in diverse settings. Shares teachers' success stories in teaching poetry. Notes basic principles--students must write poetry, hear poetry read aloud, and be aware of how people of other cultures express their feelings. (RS)

  19. Darwin vs. Wallace: When Poetry Dies and When Poetry Survives in the Not-so-Natural Selection of Memetic Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Bryce

    2011-01-01

    The theory of memetic evolution--explaining the reproduction of cultural units called "memes"--illuminates the decline of poetry as a cultural presence by clarifying the contrasting attitudes towards poetry manifested by the co-discoverers of natural selection: Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace. Darwin's eventual indifference to poetry…

  20. Cognitive Process Instruction and the Comprehension of Poetry or Does the Teaching of Poetry Have a Place in Developmental Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, George

    Based upon a theory of intelligence proposed by Alfred Binet, this paper describes a cognitive process approach to poetry instruction. After discussing the suitability of the study of poetry as a means of enhancing students' reading comprehension, the paper summarizes Binet's theory, which distinguishes four successive intellectual operations: (1)…

  1. A Boy Who Would Rather Write Poetry than Throw Rocks at Cats Is Also Considered to Be Wanting in Masculinity: Poetry, Masculinity, and Baiting Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greig, Christopher; Hughes, Janette

    2009-01-01

    This paper draws on research on masculinities to examine poetry as a socially and culturally gendered genre. Situated in the context of the current "crisis" around boys' underachievement in school, attention is drawn to the problematic understanding of poetry as an unsuitable genre for boys. Attention is further drawn to the way in which poetry,…

  2. Poetry in the Classroom: The Fervor and the Fret.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salam, Kausam R.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses: poetry as a prereading activity; collaborative invention of poems; poet as gatherer of ideas; considering the poetic memory; remembering people through poetic memory; communication and creation; form and meaning; and engaging all students. (RS)

  3. A Study Guide for a Course in Poetry Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jack S.

    1977-01-01

    This paper suggests guidelines for poetry study. Studying unfamiliar vocabulary, allusions and surface and underlying meaning are the general steps, followed by specific questioning regarding poem genre, rhyme, meter, imagery and content, for an overall evaluation. (CHK)

  4. Beyond Borders: Poetry Slicing through Steel Gates and Barbed Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jocson, Korina M.

    2004-01-01

    Exchange of poems at the 2nd Annual San Quentin/Patten College poetry slam with the prisoners is reported to be an event, which was extraordinaire. It was an opportunity to understand the hidden popular culture.

  5. Shared Poetry: A Whole Language Experience Adapted for Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicklund, LaDonna K.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how a shared poetry exercise, combining whole language experiences with process writing techniques, motivates remedial readers. Notes that this technique helps remedial readers achieve success in writing, build sight and meaning vocabularies, and improve reading fluency. (MM)

  6. A Poetry Workshop In Print. Kristine O'Connell George

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Lee Bennett

    2005-01-01

    This dynamic poet never has to look any further than her own backyard for inspiration. April is a wondrous month for poetry. Alice Schertle was born in April and Young People's Poetry Week is celebrated from the 11th through the 17th this year. Kristine O'Connell George was born on May 6, 1954, in Denver, CO. She is a great admirer of teachers;…

  7. Holding emotional and linguistic rulers up to the poetry of Robert Frost.

    PubMed

    Whissell, C

    1999-12-01

    The words in a large and representative sample of Robert Frost's poetry were compared with information in several data bases which provided estimates of the poetry's pleasantness, arousal, emotionality, imagery, and linguistic complexity. Findings confirmed that Frost's poetry was linguistically simple and emotionally restrained in comparison to that of his cohort. They also highlighted the increasing variability in Frost's poetry across time and its decreasing imagery. Frost's poetry was more restrained than that of his male cohort but similar to the poetry of his female cohort in its linguistic simplicity. Frost's acknowledged death poems were in fact quite pleasant and passive in emotional tone. PMID:10672733

  8. Holding emotional and linguistic rulers up to the poetry of Robert Frost.

    PubMed

    Whissell, C

    1999-12-01

    The words in a large and representative sample of Robert Frost's poetry were compared with information in several data bases which provided estimates of the poetry's pleasantness, arousal, emotionality, imagery, and linguistic complexity. Findings confirmed that Frost's poetry was linguistically simple and emotionally restrained in comparison to that of his cohort. They also highlighted the increasing variability in Frost's poetry across time and its decreasing imagery. Frost's poetry was more restrained than that of his male cohort but similar to the poetry of his female cohort in its linguistic simplicity. Frost's acknowledged death poems were in fact quite pleasant and passive in emotional tone.

  9. Nursing reality as reflected in nurses' poetry.

    PubMed

    Oiler, C

    1983-01-01

    In this discussion, the author has described a technique used in a pilot study where the research aim was to enhance understanding of nurses and their experiences--an understanding achieved from attention to nurses' expressions in poetry. There is a growing interest in qualitative approaches to the study of nursing phenomena and the development of nursing theory (Simms, 1981; Munhall, 1982; Oiler, 1982; Omery, 1983; Swanson and Chenitz, 1982). In fact, many of the techniques and strategies used by helping professionals to know their clients can be adapted in qualitative research procedures. For persons in the helping professions, a qualitative approach is consistent with the therapeutic process of coming to know a client. Human behavior is understood to be an expression of how individuals interpret their worlds. The task of the qualitative researcher is to capture this very process of interpretation in the subject's words, gestures, expressions, acts, and creations.

  10. 76 FR 12786 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Poetry in Clay: Korean...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Poetry in Clay: Korean Buncheong... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Poetry in Clay: Korean Buncheong Ceramics from the...

  11. Gadow's romanticism: science, poetry and embodiment in postmodern nursing.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2004-07-01

    Sally Gadow's work is a sophisticated version of a familiar line of thought in nursing. She creates a chain of distinctions which is intended to differentiate cultural narratives, and particularly the 'science narrative', from imaginative narratives, especially poetry. Cultural narratives regulate and restrict; imaginative narratives are creative, liberating and potentially transcendent. These ideological effects are (supposedly) achieved through different structures of language. Scientific language, for example, is abstract and literal, while poetry is sensuous and metaphorical. In this paper, I argue that Gadow's way of discriminating between science and poetry fails. In the first place, the ideological valence she assigns to each of them is unwarranted. Science and poetry can both be harnessed to the project of emancipation, just as both can be incorporated in a strategy of oppression. In the second place, the claim that poetry and science are distinguished by their respective linguistic features--specifically, that one is metaphorical and the other literal--cannot be sustained. I illustrate this argument, as Gadow illustrates hers, by reference to the concept of embodiment, and consider whether Gadow is correct in thinking that poetry, not science, makes it possible for individuals (especially women) to 'reclaim the body'. I also suggest that Gadow's brand of postmodernism echoes Romanticism, whose defining characteristic was an insistent contrast between poetry and science. This is 'flip side' postmodernism, which merely opposes modernist values, preferring subjectivity to objectivity, feeling to rationality, and multiple realities to truth. It is less radical, and far less interesting, than 'remix' postmodernism, whose objective is not to reverse the polarities, but to reconfigure the entire circuit. PMID:15189552

  12. A Selected List of Films Related to Black Literature. WCTE Service Bulletin No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, David C., Comp.; Davis, Madeline, Comp.

    The 29 entries listed in this document cover a variety of topics and include titles of films (listed alphabetically) and titles of literary items--prose and poetry--related to film topics (listed by reading level). Some of the film topics are ancient Africans, heritage of slavery, the city in winter, diary of a Harlem family, discovering the music…

  13. Teaching Poetry Tips; Teaching English without Desks; A Brief History of Time and the "Red Clock."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gem; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This issue of "Insights into Open Education" presents three short articles dealing with teaching poetry, English instruction, and the concept of time. The first article, "Teaching Poetry Tips" (Gem Reid), discusses the author's experiences conducting a week-long poetry workshop for a class of 30 second graders. The second article, "Teaching…

  14. Enriched Upper Elementary Language Arts Unit: Poetry, Grades 5-6. Bulletin No. 346-B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeri, David

    The guide presents suggestions for enrichment activities emphasizing poetry for gifted and talented intermediate students. Information is arranged according to objectives, entry skills, teacher's approaches, student activities, and resources. The following poetry-related topics are addressed: poetic license; metaphors; poetry charades;…

  15. What One Activity Would You Recommend to Teachers Who are Nervous about Teaching Poetry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Walter H.; Sottile, Joseph; Witting, Charlotte R.

    2006-01-01

    In this brief column, three teachers submit recommendations on strategies and activities for teaching poetry. Walter H. Johnson suggests that using sonnets as an introduction to poetry can be a rewarding way to combine poetry terminology, a bit of literary history, and the search for meaning in poems. Joseph Sottile describes a classroom activity…

  16. Seeing History: Malaika Favorite's "Furious Flower Poetry Quilt" Painting and Pan-African Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Maureen G.

    2010-01-01

    Malaika Favorite's "Furious Flower Poetry Quilt" (2004) is an acrylic painting that depicts 24 portraits of leading poets of the African Diaspora. Commissioned by Dr Joanne Gabbin, English professor and director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center at James Madison University, the painting is part of a larger programme of poetry education. The…

  17. A Word Has Power: Poetry and Healing in American Indian Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaskoski, Helen

    The introduction of poetry into psychotherapy in the Western (European American) tradition and a growing interest in connections between the fine arts and the healing arts have prompted investigations of the parallel uses of poetry in other cultures. Examples of how three native American groups (Oglala Sioux, Piman, and Navaho) have used poetry in…

  18. Knock Poetry off the Pedestal: It's Time to Make Poems a Part of Children's Everyday Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    The author knows firsthand that most kids seem to like poetry, however, something amiss happens along the road to adulthood, and many of those same students end up actively disliking poetry or not relating to it. Who can blame them? Poetry is often presented as a rarefied thing that exists only to be analyzed by professorial types or as…

  19. Poems about Sandwich Cookies, Jelly, and Chocolate: Poetry in K-3 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNair, Jonda C.

    2012-01-01

    The author had presented a session on poetry at a children's literature conference sponsored by The Ohio State University, and afterward two teachers invited her to come to their school and read poetry. The children emailed their responses to her shortly after she spent the entire day conducting poetry reading sessions at an elementary school in…

  20. "Talking Walls": Presenting a Case for Social Justice Poetry in Literacy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciardiello, A. Vincent

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a case for reading and writing social justice poetry in the childhood educational curriculum. Social justice poetry uses verse to protest unfair and unjust living conditions in society. An historical case study shows how social justice poetry was used to combat social injustice in the United States. Specifically, it shows how…

  1. The Competency of the Post Graduate Teachers in Appreciating English Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muthiah, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    The Post Graduate Teachers who teach English as a second language to Higher Secondary Classes that is 11th and 12th grades need to cultivate a good sense of appreciation for poetry. They must have an inherent thirst for reading poetry aloud and competence to elucidate the essential characteristics of poetry. A study was launched to understand the…

  2. The Meaning of Poetry Therapy as Art and Science: Its Essence, Religious Quality, and Spiritual Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Hirsch Lazaar

    1997-01-01

    Examines poetry therapy as a healing force for the individual. Discusses poetry therapy as a conduit to draw out inner emotions and feelings of spirit with an emphasis on spiritual and religious values. Argues that personal growth and development of a values system can be enhanced through poetry therapy. (SR)

  3. Poetry and World War II: Creating Community through Content-Area Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friese, Elizabeth E. G.; Nixon, Jenna

    2009-01-01

    Two educators and a classroom of fifth grade students integrated poetry writing into social studies curriculum focusing on World War II. Several strategies and approaches to writing poetry are highlighted including list poems, writing from photographs and artifacts, and two voice poems. The study culminated in a poetry reading and the creation of…

  4. Portals into Poetry: Using Generative Writing Groups to Facilitate Student Engagement with Word Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The Poetry Generating Loop is a new kind of generative writing circle that offers concrete, creative ways to get students involved in and excited about poetry. By writing poems in groups, students are able to learn poetic terms and experiment with techniques through their writing--a process that can shed new light on the world of poetry. (Contains…

  5. Using Poetry Writing and Sharing to Promote Student Empathy and Caring.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mitzi M; Kowalski, Sonya L

    2015-01-01

    A poetry writing activity revealed both empathy and caring among nursing students. Using course readings to identify a topic, students created and shared their poems in an online format. The poems and students' reactions concur with existing literature that poetry writing and sharing reveals empathy and caring. Suggestions for using a poetry writing activity in nursing education are included.

  6. Sound[']s Right: Pupils' Responses to Heard Poetry and the Revised National Curriculum for English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, John

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the design of poetry within the UK National Curriculum for English, where it is conceived of primarily as a print-based medium. With reference to curricular detail, the recent Ofsted survey of poetry teaching in schools, and to original research, it describes the role the existing curricular conception of poetry can play in…

  7. Aesthetic and Emotional Effects of Meter and Rhyme in Poetry

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Christian; Menninghaus, Winfried; von Koppenfels, Martin; Raettig, Tim; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Otterbein, Sascha; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2013-01-01

    Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from nineteenth and twentieth German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted into a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with the latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal. PMID:23386837

  8. Compassionate solidarity: suffering, poetry, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Coulehan, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Suffering is the experience of distress or disharmony caused by the loss, or threatened loss, of what we most cherish. Such losses may strip away the beliefs by which we construct a meaningful narrative of human life in general and our own in particular. The vocation of physicians and other health professionals is to relieve suffering caused by illness, trauma, and bodily degeneration. However, since suffering is an existential state that does not necessarily parallel physical or emotional states, physicians cannot rely solely on knowledge and skills that address physiological dysfunction. Rather, they must learn to engage the patient at an existential level. Unfortunately, however, medical pedagogy encourages "detached concern," which devalues subjectivity, emotion, relationship, and solidarity. The term "compassionate solidarity" summarizes an alternative model, which begins with empathic listening and responding, requires reflectivity and self-understanding, and is in itself a healing act. Poetry, along with other imaginative writing, may help physicians and other health professionals grow in self-awareness and gain deeper understanding of suffering, empathy, compassion, and symbolic healing. PMID:19855127

  9. Don't Stop with Mother Goose: Making a Case for Vibrant, Well-Stocked Poetry Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardell, Sylvia M.

    2006-01-01

    Just 10 years ago the Academy of American Poets initiated the observance of National Poetry Month to celebrate poetry and its place in American culture. Since then, the movement has continued to gain momentum with the emergence of Young People's Poetry Week in 1999, a focus on poetry slams as the centerpiece for Teen Read Week in 2003, and the…

  10. ‘The verses of madness’: schizophrenia and poetry

    PubMed Central

    Hankir, Ahmed Khaldoon; Holloway, David; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    In the early 19th century, Lombroso introduced the concept of hereditary taint to describe the coexistence of ‘madness’ and creativity. In a recent investigation, Rust et al reported a study designed to test the traditionally assumed relationship between creativity and schizophrenia. They uncovered an association between creative originality and the positive cognitive aspects of schizotypal thinking. Poetry is not only the ‘product’ of psychopathology but it can also be utilised as a form of therapy: “My name is David Holloway, I am a 33 year old poet/blogger with paranoid schizophrenia. A poet called Charles Bukowski has described poetry as the ‘ultimate psychiatrist’, and I am a firm believer in this. The strongest part of my personality is my belief in the power of love. My recovery has relied heavily on medication, diet and exercise. However it is the power of poetry that has been my true inspiration.” PMID:23264155

  11. Poetry and narrative therapy for anxiety about spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Thirusha; Shabangu, Sifiso

    2015-01-01

    This case study presents the use of poetry in psychotherapy with an adolescent girl, Buhle (a pseudonym), who needed surgery to correct a curvature of her spine due to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. She experienced anxiety which prevented surgeons from doing the procedure. Psychotherapists used narrative therapy to explore issues associated with and contributing to her anxiety and encouraged her to document her experiences through poetry, after learning that she was a keen poet. During psychotherapy Buhle's poems were used to track and narrate her experiences and as an empowering method allowing her to make personal sense of challenging experiences. Buhle's poems are presented within an account of the psychotherapy leading up to the surgery. Her poetry reveals a juxtaposition of regular adolescent identity issues in the face of coping with a demanding medical condition and the prospect of invasive surgery.

  12. E-Classroom: The Art of Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Karyn

    2000-01-01

    Describes a second grade activity for the ocean-animals unit which uses the Kid Pix computer program. Students research an ocean animal, write rhyming couplets about it, discuss shape poems, draw outlines of their animals, trace the outlines onto a transparency, tape the transparency to the computer monitor, and use Kid Pix to type the poem onto…

  13. Just "Slammin!" Adolescents' Construction of Identity through Performance Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Lynn L.

    2012-01-01

    Using a case study design, this study investigated the literacy identity, both collectively and individually, of the members of "Slammin!", a slam poetry team from an urban high school. Participant observation of practices and performances was used to find how the involvement in this group uniquely impacted students' academic and personal lives.…

  14. [Poetry: Literature Curriculum, Grades Five and Six; Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Oregon Elementary English Project.

    This curriculum guide is intended to introduce fifth and sixth grade children to the study of poetry. Separate units include discussion of, suggested activities for, and questions about (1) metrics and scansion; (2) rhyme scheme and stanza; (3) diction, denotation and connotation, and onomatopoeia; (4) rhyme (end rhyme, masculine and feminine…

  15. Time Reference of Verbs in Biblical Hebrew Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwyghuizen, Jill E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation suggests that the time reference of verbs in Hebrew poetry can be determined from a combination of form (aspect) and "Aktionsart" (stative vs. fientive). Specifically, perfective forms of stative verbs have past or present time reference. Perfective forms of fientive verbs have past time reference. Imperfective forms of…

  16. Teaching Reading through Children's Books, Poetry, and Song.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Marlene J.; McCracken, Robert A.

    An approach to teaching reading and writing through the use of children's books, poetry, and songs are described. It is suggested that reading be taught by presenting in chart form the words that already have been remembered orally in song, rhyme, or story, such as "Polly Put the Kettle On" or sections from the "Little Red Hen." In this approach,…

  17. Becoming a Cultural Tourist: Explorations in Caribbean Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Tessa

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the writer's own experience as a reader, this article discusses poetry by Eric Roach, Derek Walcott, Linton Kwesi Johnson, John Agard, Edward Baugh, Michael Smith and Velma Pollard. It explores the sense of place felt by writer and reader, going on to analyse the poets' use of Nation Language, poetic metre and intertextuality in…

  18. Cultural Contact through Musical Poetry in Clara Janes's "Kampa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faszer-McMahon, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Clara Janes's "Kampa" is a love song dedicated to the renowned Czech poet Vladimir Holan. The work includes a musical and lyrical composition performed on tape, and its unconventional musical mode offers an alternative to divisions between western and non-western literary and musical forms. The poetry of "Kampa" presents musical methods of…

  19. Poetry and the Abused Child: The Forest and Tinted Plexiglass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMaria, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    Uses case vignettes to explore poetry as phenomenological access point to the world of the abused child, serving a threefold function: (1) a window into the child's world; (2) a way to track the abused child's progress along the recovery process; and (3) a tool for transforming abused children's worlds, by allowing them to find their own unique…

  20. Poetry Efforts by Aged Deaf: Expression of Life Cycle Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Teena M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a day-long Aging Awareness workshop in which a group of 12 elderly were involved in a poetry-writing exercise focusing on meaningful life change. Ramifications of this positive experience are discussed in view of the cultural/language barrier and traditional aging awareness issues such as reminiscence. (JAC)

  1. Deweyan Prophetic Pragmatism, Poetry, and the Education of Eros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the education of Eros and the allied powers of poetry and prophecy, and argues that poetic creativity and the capacity to prophesy students' best possibilities should be recognized as essential teaching competencies. The author identifies the theme of Eros and education in the work of John Dewey and explores Thomas Alexander's idea of…

  2. Poetry Writing in the Post-16 English Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xerri, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the place of poetry writing in the post-16 English curriculum in Malta. In presenting the results of a small-scale study adopting a mixed methods approach, it explores the views of teachers, students and an influential examiner. The paper proposes that while there seems to be an appreciation of what creative writing can…

  3. Telematics, Narrative and Poetry: The Parole in Jeans Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    1999-01-01

    Explains "Parole in Jeans", a computer-based project developed to promote literature and foster collaborative poetry and story writing in lower secondary schools in Italy, Topics include network-based collaborative production; integration of literary writing and network communication; email; and the organizational model for the online course that…

  4. Poetry: It's Not Just for English Class Anymore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.; Young, Art; Paul, Catherine; Murdoch, Janice W.

    2005-01-01

    Higher level thought involves both critical and creative thinking skills. Although the psychological literature is rich with research on teaching critical thinking, relatively little published work addresses ways of promoting creative thinking. In this article we describe the use of poetry writing in an abnormal psychology class to encourage…

  5. Toward a Chicano/Raza Bibliography: Drama, Prose, Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Octavio I. V. Ed.; Rios, Herminio C. Ed.

    1973-01-01

    Separated into 3 sections, this bibliography covers literature, drama, prose, and poetry (from 1965 to 1972) pertaining to Chicanos and La Raza. To obtain this material, all Chicano journals, newspapers, bulletins, and newsletters published in the Southwest were reviewed. Topics range from police brutality to the Vietnam War. The appendix gives…

  6. Assessing Student Poetry: Balancing the Demands of Two Masters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The practice of assessing student poetry is neither widespread nor widely theorised. In fact, its absence in the literature is itself worthy of comment and conjecture. This article begins with an account of a writing workshop for pre-service teachers, which highlighted the way participants found themselves tongue-tied when asked to engage in the…

  7. Handout of the Month: Creating and Understanding Concrete Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes Plus, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Teaching suggestions and questions on which to build a class discussion are presented regarding concrete poetry. An example of a poem about a bird's feather in which the words are arranged in the shape of a feather is included and is intended as a student handout. In addition to suggestions for student assignments, five sources of concrete poetry…

  8. Discovering Self-Expression through Study of Harlem Renaissance Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Raymond

    Self-expression is a key component that adolescents at a certain stage of development (eighth grade) need to be aware of and understand. Students are undergoing dramatic change during this time of their lives--they are moving from Erikson's Industry versus Inferiority stage to Identity versus Role Confusion stage. Poetry is a literary genre in…

  9. Anthologizing Transformation: Breaking Down Students'"Private Theories" about Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an assignment in which students look through a handful of poetry collections or anthologies, seeking 20 poems they like and thus understand or want to understand to some extent. Describes the benefits of this assignment, including honing students' interpretive skills, dispelling their misconceptions about the genre, and continuing their…

  10. The Sound of Violets: The Ethnographic Potency of Poetry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Saunders, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes the form of a dialogue between the two authors, and is in two halves, the first half discursive and propositional, and the second half exemplifying the rhetorical, epistemological and metaphysical affordances of poetry in critically scrutinising the rhetoric, epistemology and metaphysics of educational management discourse. The…

  11. Dreams of Possibilities: Linking Poetry to Our Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Ruth McKoy

    2003-01-01

    Notes how as a teacher educator, the author incorporates poems of Langston Hughes in hopes of preparing pre-service teachers to teach diverse students. Shares pre-service teachers' reflections to Hughes' poem "Dreams" in one literature class. Begins with an overview of poetry in children's lives, describes the setting and presents how the…

  12. Erwin Schrödinger's Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofronieva, Tzveta

    2014-01-01

    Many of the major figures in the history of science have produced literary works, but the relationship between their poetic texts and their scientific work is often underestimated. This paper illuminates the poetry of Erwin Schrödinger--one of the premier figures in twentieth-century science, and an accomplished poet in both English and his native…

  13. Chiasmus as a Stylistic Device in Donne's and Vaughan's Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'jam, Dunya Muhammad Miqdad; Fadhil, Zahraa Adnan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates chiasmus as a stylistic device in ten metaphysical poems (five for John Donne and five for Henry Vaughan). It aims at showing how both, Donne and Vaughan, utilize chiasmus at the different linguistic levels as a stylistic device in their poetry. Thus, to achieve this aim, it is hypothesized that chiasmus as used by Donne…

  14. Meaningful Literacy: Writing Poetry in the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanauer, David I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of meaningful literacy and offers a classroom methodology--poetry writing--that manifests this approach to ESL/EFL literacy instruction. The paper is divided into three sections. The first deals with the concept of meaningful literacy learning in second and foreign language pedagogy; the second summarizes empirical…

  15. Risking Intensity: Reading and Writing Poetry with High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Judith Rowe

    Aimed at junior and senior high school teachers and artists in residence, this book urges teachers and students to read and write poetry "as though their lives depended upon it," and to breathe life into classroom writing traditions that are not hands-on or intense. Each chapter is set in the classroom. Poems by students and teacher illustrate…

  16. "Picture Bride" as a Definition of "Third World" Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita, Gayle K.

    This conference paper describes how the phrase "picture bride" is used as a metaphor in ethnic poetry. It is used in poems which concern female creativity in the areas of art and housekeeping. The phrase represents the fusion of concepts and ideas which are usually thought of in juxtaposition with each other. These concepts and ideas are the…

  17. Measuring Voice in Poetry Written by Second Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanauer, David I.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing usage of creative writing in the ESL/EFL classroom based on the argument that this pedagogy develops writer's voice, emotional engagement, and ownership. Within the context of teaching poetry writing to second language learners, the current article develops a scientific approach to ways in which voice can be measured and…

  18. The Fire This Time: Renewing the Poetry Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Notes that the author/educator noticed that his efforts at teaching poetry were failing. Describes how he decided to make poets out of his students--to start by showing how they can be affected by language. Notes that students started with just a word, then wrote poems, and then began to demand forms, which the teacher then introduced to the…

  19. Five Years after the Levees Broke: Bearing Witness through Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Renee

    2010-01-01

    As a teaching artist in public schools, the author is paired with classroom teachers to teach poetry and to give students an opportunity to experience their academic curriculum through the arts. At the beginning of the school year, she gave her students the on-going, yearlong assignment to watch the news, to pay attention. Knowing many of them…

  20. Mathematics across the Curriculum: Poetry and the Haiku

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, John

    2014-01-01

    In this article, John Gough describes the "haiku" and its link to mathematics. A haiku is a short Japanese form of poetry, of three lines, with five syllables in the first, seven in the second, and five in the last. Although brief, a haiku is like a meditation on, or observation of, an experience, conveyed directly through objective…

  1. Promoting emotional health through haiku, a form of Japanese poetry.

    PubMed

    Massey, M S

    1998-02-01

    This teaching technique can be adapted to use with young children. The use of rhymes may be easier and more fun for younger students. Also, this teaching technique can be used to address numerous health issues, which makes it appropriate for all health content areas. In addition to using student selections that illustrate various emotions, other resources are available for this activity. Libraries and bookstores offer wide selections of books containing poetry and quotations. In addition to books about haiku, consider general poetry selections by Maya Angelou, e.e. cummings, Ogden Nash, and Shel Silverstein. Musical selections can represent different styles, such as the Beatles' "Yesterday"; Blind Melon's "Change"; Garth Brooks' "The Dance"; Eric Clapton's "Tears from Heaven"; Gloria Estefan's "Coming Out of the Dark"; Whitney Houston's "Emotional" and "I Will Always Love You"; and Elton John's "Circle of Life." Internet sites also can be accessed for poetry samples (see Internet Resources). An Internet resource for ordering discounted books, including selections about haiku and poetry, is Amazon.com--Earth's Largest Book store, at http:www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ subst/home/home.html/0184-8423170-571096. PMID:9571577

  2. Sonnets, High Tech, Haiku: Teaching Poetry in the CAI Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Cynthia; Nichols, Chloe

    This report emphasizes the techniques required today for effective slide construction and contains suggestions about the nuts and bolts of slide preparation. Two instructors developed a presentation at Utah Valley State College to enhance their teaching of the sonnet and the Japanese haiku. Their premise: since poetry is a highly visual art form,…

  3. How We Value Contemporary Poetry: An Empirical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad, Bob; Theune, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Although evaluation is at the core of many of the practices associated with poetry--including teaching, editing, selecting, judging, and even writing--and although there have been involved discussions of the assessment of verse, there has been no empirical investigation of the specific values which, one supposes, lie at the heart of such…

  4. Infinity and Beyond: The Poetic List in Children's Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullinger, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Amongst the wide variety of poetic forms found across children's poetry, the list is strikingly prevalent. Drawing on Umberto Eco's theory of lists, the article examines how the poetic list plays out in the work of a number of children's poets, distinguishing four sub-categories, each of which operates in a slightly different way. After a brief…

  5. Learning about Yeast through Science, Art and Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Lois; Brade, Alison

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a cross-curricular project designed to enhance learning about micro-organisms. This project includes studies in art and poetry, not subjects that teachers would think of linking with science, however research notes that scientists and poets share the ability to pay close attention to things, a key skill also…

  6. The Sky Clears; Poetry of the American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, A. Grove

    More than 200 authentic poems and lyrics of North American Indians are compiled in this anthology. The poetry was translated from tribal languages into English over the past 100 years by students of Indian language, lore, and life. The poems, taken from about 40 North American tribes, include songs of Eskimos of the Arctic coasts, totem-pole…

  7. Exploring the Options: Teaching Economic Decision-Making with Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Theresa L.

    2012-01-01

    High-stakes standardized tests in reading and limited instructional time are two powerful disincentives for teaching economics in the elementary classroom. In this article, integrating instruction in poetry and economic decision-making is presented as one way to maximize the use of scarce instructional time. Following a brief introduction to the…

  8. Evaluating a Therapeutic Poetry Group for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, Andrew; Wright, Sue; Harding, Sarah

    1999-01-01

    Describes a poetry group developed for older adults with functional mental health problems, based at a day hospital in the United Kingdom. Evaluates the group's effectiveness using both quantitative pre and post measures and qualitative feedback. Finds that all group members enjoyed the group, and that its benefits seemed to lie on a continuum…

  9. The Wreading Experiment: Performative Strategies for Teaching Women's Innovative Poetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Emily

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an upper-level, special topics English course she designed as a "workshop" in "wreading" contemporary women's innovative poetries. She was inspired to "wreading" by Charles Bernstein's essay "Creative Wreading: A Primer," in which he offers interactive and reactive responses to assigned texts as the grounds…

  10. Releasing the Dragons: Performance of Chinese Poetry in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gail

    Oral interpretation of translated Chinese poetry is both difficult and audacious. However, non-native readers are less bound by the Chinese literary canon than native readers and therefore are more free to develop their personal taste and discover new modes of expression. As a result, these performers are potentially ideal translators of Chinese…

  11. Women in Randall Jarrell's Poetry: The Myths and the Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillikin, Dure Jo

    1984-01-01

    Examines the images of women in the poetry of Randall Jarrell, focusing on poems portraying women with little chance of true fulfillment in traditional roles as wives and mothers, and who lose what status they have through the inevitable loss of sexual attractiveness. (DMM)

  12. When English Language Arts, Basketball, and Poetry Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, W. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A former high school teacher's reflections on the connections between basketball and poetry suggest the significance of extracurricular activities for teachers and students. W. Douglas Baker recounts how he guided students to make connections among "the collision of activities in their lives" by delving into the practices and discourses of three…

  13. Marrying the "Muse" and the Thinker "Poetry as Scientific Writing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette I.; Byrne, Eileen; O'Hern, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an unlikely collaboration between a high school chemistry teacher and a high school English teacher who attempted to teach scientific concepts through poetry. Inspired by poet John Updike's (1960) "Cosmic Gall," these two teachers crafted writing tasks aimed at teaching science content through literary devices. The result…

  14. Promoting emotional health through haiku, a form of Japanese poetry.

    PubMed

    Massey, M S

    1998-02-01

    This teaching technique can be adapted to use with young children. The use of rhymes may be easier and more fun for younger students. Also, this teaching technique can be used to address numerous health issues, which makes it appropriate for all health content areas. In addition to using student selections that illustrate various emotions, other resources are available for this activity. Libraries and bookstores offer wide selections of books containing poetry and quotations. In addition to books about haiku, consider general poetry selections by Maya Angelou, e.e. cummings, Ogden Nash, and Shel Silverstein. Musical selections can represent different styles, such as the Beatles' "Yesterday"; Blind Melon's "Change"; Garth Brooks' "The Dance"; Eric Clapton's "Tears from Heaven"; Gloria Estefan's "Coming Out of the Dark"; Whitney Houston's "Emotional" and "I Will Always Love You"; and Elton John's "Circle of Life." Internet sites also can be accessed for poetry samples (see Internet Resources). An Internet resource for ordering discounted books, including selections about haiku and poetry, is Amazon.com--Earth's Largest Book store, at http:www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ subst/home/home.html/0184-8423170-571096.

  15. Pedagogy for Liberation: Spoken Word Poetry in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Mia

    2015-01-01

    The Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, hip hop of the 1980s and early 1990s, and spoken word poetry have each attempted to initiate the dialogical process outlined by Paulo Freire as necessary in overturning oppression. Each art form has done this by critically engaging with the world and questioning dominant systems of power. However,…

  16. Technical Aspects of the Poetry of Langston Hughes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Theodore R.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses Hughes' poetry as it was shaped by three influences: the free verse--imagist--realist schools'' popular during the first third of this century; the African and Afro-American oral and literary folk traditions; and, the essential Hughes. (Author/JM)

  17. Teaching Film as Literature: "Places in the Heart" and "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aycock, Estelle

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the issues of finding a current film acceptable to local standards and justifying it as literature. Gives teaching suggestions for dealing with the setting, characters, themes, ending scenes, and visual poetry using the films "Places in the Heart" and "To Kill a Mockingbird." (EL)

  18. A poetry program for the very elderly—Narrative perspective on one therapeutic model

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Marvin

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this report is a poetry program that the author has been conducting at a nursing home/short-stay rehabilitation facility for the past three and a half years. The program involves reading poetry to groups of very elderly residents who have significant mental and/or physical disabilities. This article includes a description of the program and the author's observations of its beneficial effects. Poetry readings were also given to individual seniors who have significant dementia. The therapeutic value of the program to the elders and to the person reading the poetry to the elders is discussed. PMID:24899783

  19. Film-Recital and French Poems; Cultural Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nostrand, Howard L.; And Others

    Twenty chapters of commentary on the filmed poetry recitation of Pierre Viala concentrate on developing insight into the cultural and social background of French language and literature. Suggestions for teaching the poems are followed by discussion of possible elements of a plan for teaching a poem and remarks about a "backward build-up" technique…

  20. Mental pain and the cultural ointment of poetry.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S

    2000-04-01

    The author argues that mental pain consists of a wordless sense of self-rupture, longing and psychic helplessness that is vague and difficult to convey to others. It usually follows the loss of a significant object or its abrupt refusal to meet one's anaclitic needs. This results in the laceration of an unconscious, fused self-object core of the self. Abruptly precipitated discrepancies between the actual and wished-for self-states add to the genesis of mental pain. Issues of hatred, guilt, moral masochism as well as fantasies of being beaten can also be folded into the experience of mental pain. The feeling is highly disturbing and is warded off by psychic retreat, manic defence, induction of pain into others and changing the form and function of pain. Each of these can have a pathological or healthy outcome depending upon the intrapsychic and social context and upon whether they ultimately permit mourning to take place or not. Poetry serves to render mental pain bearable by enhancing empathy with one's own repudiated parts. With the help of two clinical vignettes, the multi-faceted (defensive, formal and content-based) role of poetry in reducing mental pain, enhancing mentalisation of its sources and facilitating mourning is discussed. It is suggested that through poetry, culture and affect meet and, in this encounter, both are enriched. PMID:10889957

  1. The Use of Poetry in Exploring the Concepts of Difference and Diversity for Gifted/Talented Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustavson, Cynthia Blomquist

    1999-01-01

    Lists characteristics of gifted and talented (G/T) students and analyzes how these characteristics show how G/T students can excel in writing and understanding poetry. Describes techniques for poetry writing that can help these students understand their own difference and diversity, and notes specific poetry to read about the subject. (SR)

  2. A Comparative Study of Allusions in the Poetry of English Poet John Milton and Persian Poet Hafiz Sherazi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Comparative literary studies characterize similarities and dissimilarities found in poetic works of two writers of different cultures. This study focuses on the use of allusions in poetry of John Milton particularly with reference to Paradise Lost and poetry of Persian Poet Hafiz Sherazi. Using allusions in poetry has been a common style of poets…

  3. Lights, Camera, Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan M.

    1984-01-01

    A fifth-grade class was taught how animated films are made by actually making some. Each cartoon involved four parts: title, artwork, credits, and storyboard. In addition to learning about animation, they had the experience of thinking in logical sequence and of working cooperatively. (CS)

  4. The Role of Context in Defining Adolescent Responses to Caribbean Poetry: A Comparative Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Beverley

    1995-01-01

    Relates one experience of teaching poetry in a rural high school in Jamaica. Recounts the teacher's reflections on her observations of the teaching of the same poem (Michael Smith's "Mi C-YaaN beLieVe iT" written in Jamaican Creole) taught in a poetry class in rural Jamaica and a British classroom. (RS)

  5. In Living Memory: The Dying Art of Learning Poetry and a Case for Revival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullinger, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the practice of learning poems and the value of poetry in the memory, and emerges from the Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project, a small-scale research study co-ordinated through the Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge. Drawing on the subset of findings in relation to learning and memory, the essay locates the…

  6. iPoetry: Creating Space for New Literacies in the English Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott; Cowell, Lora Lee H.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the use of digital poetry in a secondary English classroom and its implications for adolescents' multimodal composition and identity development. The authors--an English teacher and a library media specialist--collaborated over the course of three years to design, implement, and reiterate a digital poetry curriculum. Through…

  7. Burke's Dialogic Theory: An Epistemology of Interpretive Practice for Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Melissa Ann

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes K. Burke's dialogic theories and exemplifies how they describe not only Edward Burne-Jones's interpretations of his paintings, but also his painted interpretations of poetry. Discusses how Burke's epistemology of interpretive practice contributes to the discipline of poetry therapy. (SG)

  8. British Women, Chemistry, and Poetry: Some Contextual Examples from the 1870s to the 1940s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Marelene F.; Rayner-Canham, Geoff W.

    2011-01-01

    In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, British women chemists used poetry as a way of describing their work and as a means of social commentary. As far as we are aware, the chemistry-poetry interface has not previously been explored in the context of women's experience.

  9. The Conveyor Belt Curriculum? Poetry Teaching in the Secondary School: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the effects of the British National Curriculum and the SATs on teaching and changes in how poetry is examined. States that some teachers view these changes as having a detrimental effect on student poetry experiences, while others see a positive advantage in the changes. (CMK)

  10. Research for the Classroom: Playing with Difficult Poetry--High School Seniors and Arthur Sze's "Quipu"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogle, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The author had been assigned two sections of Contemporary Literature, a semester-long senior elective, and he wanted to do something new with poetry. He planned to teach Arthur Sze's "Quipu." Sze's poetry is nonlinear, adopting principles from science, anthropology, and history into a multilayered poetic texture--text unlike anything students…

  11. Powerful Students, Powerful Words: Writing and Learning in a Poetry Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Angela

    2011-01-01

    A poetry workshop can present opportunities to integrate students' knowledge and perspectives in classroom contexts, encouraging the use of language for expression, communication, learning and even empowerment. This paper describes how adolescent students respond to a poetry workshop in an English classroom centred on teaching writing that is…

  12. "There's a Better Word": Urban Youth Rewriting Their Social Worlds through Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jocson, Korina M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies undertaken with sociocultural perspectives on literacy offer a framework through which to explore poetry in youth's lives. This article draws upon works within New Literacy Studies to provide a glimpse of urban high school youth's experiences in a unique program called Poetry for the People (P4P). It identifies some ways in which…

  13. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts. PMID:21797075

  14. Remembering What Is Important: The Power of Poetry in My Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Wyhe, Tamara L. C.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author relates her experience in teaching poetry and how it shapes everything she and her students do in the classroom. As a language arts teacher for students in grades 7 to 12, she discovered poetry to be magical in many ways, for it offers such advantages as, brevity, which allows a quick reading and discussion of a…

  15. Poetry Generated by Stillbirth and Livebirth: Transgenerational Sharing of Grief and Joy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heninger, Owen E.

    1987-01-01

    Preserves, in poetry, emotional reactions of parents and grandparents to the dire event of a stillbirth and the subsequent joyous occasion of a livebirth. Discusses implications of the therapeutic benefits of writing poetry to help resolve grief and develop active mastery over traumatic events. (RS)

  16. Cold Plums and the Old Men in the Water: Let Children Read and Write Great Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Certo, Janine L.

    2004-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for using "great" poems with children and the justification for linking the reading and writing of poetry. First, the author provides tips for teachers to use when selecting adult poems and offers a brief bibliography of classic poetry collections and anthologies appropriate for children. Next, suggestions for…

  17. The Jazz and Poetry Connection: A Performance Guide for Teachers and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Jamie; Suhor, Charles

    1996-01-01

    Examines approaches and structures that students and teachers may use to explore connections between poetry and jazz. Suggests specific techniques for intermingling the two. Looks at the relationship between the two in terms of "mood,""program," and "allusion." Provides examples of paired pieces and marked-up poetry texts. (TB)

  18. From the Epic to the Allegorical Sublime: A Multilingual Reading of Spanish Civil War Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cueto Asín, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This article examines poetry written during the Spanish Civil War that reflects on the modern character of the conflict: the novel tactic of aerial bombing civilian populations as it was disseminated through the mass media. A comparative reading of this body of poetry written by Spanish, British, and American authors allows for the examination of…

  19. The Impact of Using Music on Teaching English Poetry in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijazi, Dima; Al-natour, Amal

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of using music on teaching English Poetry in Jordanian universities on students' performance. The researchers followed the equivalent pre/post T test two group designs. To achieve the aim of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' performance in English poetry. The…

  20. Sounding Sense: The Place, Problems and Potential of Performance in Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullinger, Debbie; Whitley, David

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on a strand of findings from the Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project, a small-scale research study co-ordinated through the Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge, this article examines contemporary understandings of poetry performance in teaching contexts. Positioning these understandings in relation to past practices, we…

  1. Childhood and Modernity: Dark Themes in Carol Ann Duffy's Poetry for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, David

    2007-01-01

    Carol Ann Duffy's three volumes of children's poetry are important and interesting because they emerge from the work of a writer whose adult poetry has persistently associated childhood with dark and difficult areas of experience. This article explores what happens to such challenging material when a poet of major significance changes the focus of…

  2. Infertility and Crisis: Self-Discovery and Healing through Poetry Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Offers a personal narrative on how the author's own poetry helped her cope with the crisis of infertility, serving as a tool for self-discovery and healing. Suggests that specific advantages of poetry writing within the context of psychotherapy include problem solving; expression of feelings; insight; couple communication; and individual and…

  3. A Stylistic Study on the Linguistic Deviations in E. E. Cummings' Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xin; Shi, Mengchen

    2015-01-01

    Regarded as the pioneer of experimental poetry, E. E. Cummings' unconventional treatment of poetic language has reached an unprecedented acme, which has intrigued and baffled numerous scholars, researchers and readers alike. Nevertheless, the very existence of poetry, like other types of literary texts, demonstrates the significance and value of…

  4. Fooling with Words, with Bill Moyers: Teacher's Guide. The 1998 Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirteen WNET, New York, NY.

    This teaching guide packet is designed to be used with the television documentary "Fooling with Words" hosted by Bill Moyers featuring the 1998 Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival, during which thousands of people gathered for four days to listen to, read, discuss, and celebrate contemporary poetry. The packet can be used in arts and social studies…

  5. "I Am the Book"--Deaf Poets' Views on Signed Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; de Quadros, Ronice Müller

    2014-01-01

    Despite research commenting on and analyzing signed poetry, there is little research exploring the aims and intentions of the signing poets. This paper considers the producers of signed poetry, rather than their products. Using material gathered from interviews with three established signing deaf poets, we consider what they hope to achieve when…

  6. Reassessing Pocho Poetics: Americo Paredes's Poetry and the (Trans) National Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olguin, B.V.

    2005-01-01

    Americo Paredes's first collection of poetry, Cantos de Adolescencia in 1937, alongside his second poetry anthology, Between Two Worlds in 1991 is examined. Paredes's discourses of Mexican American identity demand a reassessment of the pocho as an icon for Chicanao literary and cultural studies.

  7. On the Teaching of Poetry in "English Journal," 1912-2005: Does History Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dressman, Mark; Faust, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This study reports two stages of research into the discourses of poetry education in the United States from the early 20th to the early 21st centuries. The first is an original study that traces the history of discourses about teaching poetry, and the second is a coda or concluding analysis that raises questions about how history functions as a…

  8. Teachers' Conceptualisations of the Intuitive and the Intentional in Poetry Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The status of poetry both in the writing curriculum and in wider popular culture is best described as mixed (Wilson, 2009). In spite of a strong post-war tradition of enthusiasm for the teaching of poetry writing, it is currently felt to be marginalised in the writing curriculum (Dymoke, 2007; Ofsted, 2007). This paper reports on the beliefs,…

  9. Preparing Teachers for Diverse Classrooms: Creating Public and Private Spaces to Explore Culture through Poetry Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosaen, Cheryl L.

    2003-01-01

    Examined how one teacher educator transformed her curriculum, teaching, and assessment practices to better prepare beginning teachers for diversity by using poetry as a site for exploring one's own culture and sharing the knowledge with others in a literacy methods course. Results highlighted teacher candidates' perceptions of the poetry writing…

  10. Using Poetry in Social Studies Classes to Teach about Cultural Diversity and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Ava L.

    2004-01-01

    As a teacher educator committed to raising issues of racial, economic, and gender equality and those related to an appreciation for diversity, the author finds poetry to be a powerful resource in social studies methods classes. When preparing preservice teachers for elementary and middle school levels, she finds that poetry can often capture their…

  11. It's Something That I Feel Like Writing, Instead of Writing Because I'm Being Told To: Elementary Boys' Experiences Writing and Performing Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Lisa K.; Certo, Janine L.

    2014-01-01

    Poetry is one of the most feared and least understood literary genres in our public schools. Boys, in particular, are frequently perceived to be resistant to poetry instruction; a view that often stems from a limited vision of what poetry is and a misread of masculinity. Nevertheless, the study of poetry provides many benefits in the journey to…

  12. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Astronomy: Cosmic Fiction, Drama and Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-09-01

    I have spent four decades teaching introductory astronomy to university students whose primary subject of study is not astronomy, as well as developing activities to help the public appreciate astronomical ideas and developments. One of the more effective tools that I have found for capturing the interest of non-scientists has been approaching astronomy through its influence on the humanities. In this article I examine some examples of astronomical inspiration in the humanities, looking at plays, poetry and fiction. A second paper, devoted to music inspired by astronomy, will appear in a future issue of the CAPjournal.

  13. "I am the book"--Deaf poets' views on signed poetry.

    PubMed

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; de Quadros, Ronice Müller

    2014-10-01

    Despite research commenting on and analyzing signed poetry, there is little research exploring the aims and intentions of the signing poets. This paper considers the producers of signed poetry, rather than their products. Using material gathered from interviews with three established signing deaf poets, we consider what they hope to achieve when they perform their poetry, including who they aim their work at, and how their perceived audiences influence their performances. This allows us to understand more clearly what challenges audiences face when trying to understand the poetry and how the poets can help audiences meet those challenges. We find that signing poets understand how deaf audiences have been conditioned to respond to poetry, and create connections between themselves and deaf audiences by using the shared specific cultural and linguistic experiences of deaf people. Although deaf audiences are their ultimate preferred audiences, poets welcome hearing audiences, especially if their engagement with the poetry leads to increased understanding of Deaf culture or encourages them to learn sign language. The close, embodied relationship between the poet, poem, and audience makes them inseparable. Written poetry may be abstracted and contained in a book; in contrast, the signing poet is, in effect, the book.

  14. Finding the Words to Say It: The Healing Power of Poetry

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    My purpose in this paper is to help you experience for yourself the potential of poetry to heal by feeling its power through your own voice. Many people have an intuitive sense that voice in general and poetry in particular can be healing. We have all experienced the comfort of soothing words. Finding the words to articulate a traumatic experience can bring relief. A letter between friends who are fighting can heal a relational wound. People are frequently moved to write a poem in times of extremity. In mainstream culture there are subjects that are not talked about. They are taboo. For example, each of us is going to die, but we do not talk about dying. We are all in the dialogue of illness, death and dying, whether or not we are talking about it. Poetry gives us ways to talk about it. Multiple ways of utilizing poetry for healing, growth and transformation will be presented including the Poetry and Brain Cancer project at UCLA. Particular attention will be given to issues of Palliative care. The reader will be directed to the scientific evidence of the efficacy of utilizing expressive writing. The developing professional field of Poetry Therapy, and The National Association for Poetry Therapy will be discussed. PMID:15937556

  15. The Linear Model Research on Tibetan Six-Character Poetry's Respiratory Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonghong, Li; Yangrui, Yang; Lei, Guo; Hongzhi, Yu

    In this paper, we studied the Tibetan six-character pomes' respiratory signal during reading from the perspective of the physiological. Main contents include: 1) Selected 40 representative Tibetan six-character and four lines pomes from ldquo; The Love-songs of 6th Dalai Lama Tshang•yangGya•tsho ", and recorded speech sounds, voice and respiratory signals; 2) Designed a set of respiratory signal parameters for the study of poetry; 3) Extracted the relevant parameters of poetry respiratory signal by using the well-established respiratory signal processing platform; 4) Studied the type of breathing pattern, established the linear model of poetry respiratory signal.

  16. Getting into Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Mel

    This book describes the various aspects of the film industry and the many jobs related to filmmaking, stressing that no "formula" exists for finding a successful career in the film industry. Chapters provide information on production, writing for film, cinematography, editing, music, sound, animation and graphics, acting and modeling, the "unsung…

  17. Poetry as a Healing Force in Later Adulthood: The Case of Nezahualcoyotl.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Investigates how Nezahualcoyotl, a fifteenth-century Aztec poet, used writing as a healing force in his later adult years. Concludes that the poetry served as a therapeutic resource for him to resolve a crisis of despair. (RS)

  18. Flowering a Feminist Garden: The Writings and Poetry of Anne Spencer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Charita M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the life and poetry of Anne Spencer, one of the "lost" poets of the Harlem Renaissance. Discusses her varied and effective use of imagery and examines the Black and feminist perspectives of her work. (FMW)

  19. Poetry as a Means for the Structuring of a Social Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomringer, Eugen

    1976-01-01

    Reviews the interrelationships between concrete poetry, industrial design and the plastic arts over the past fifteen years to illustrate the sort of team work necessary if poets are to have an active voice in our contemporary society. (Author/HOD)

  20. Physics for Animation Artists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-11-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing (and now indispensable) component of their industry. Art students are keenly aware of these trends and understand that their future careers require them to have a broader exposure to science than in the past. Unfortunately, at present there is little overlap between art and science in the typical high school or college curriculum. This article describes our experience in bridging this gap at San Jose State University, with the hope that readers will find ideas that can be used in their own schools.

  1. Using a Poetry Wiki: How Can the Medium Support Pre-Service Teachers of English in Their Professional Learning about Writing Poetry and Teaching Poetry Writing in a Digital Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dymoke, Sue; Hughes, Janette

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report on one aspect of a qualitative study about an online wiki community, which was developed to build collaborative knowledge about poetry among a group of pre-service English teachers. Our paper explores pre-service teachers' experiences of writing in a digital medium and their perceptions of themselves as writers. We focus…

  2. Amazing Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Kuwari, Najat Saad

    2007-01-01

    "Animals" is a three-part lesson plan for young learners with a zoo animal theme. The first lesson is full of activities to describe animals, with Simon Says, guessing games, and learning stations. The second lesson is about desert animals, but other types of animals could be chosen depending on student interest. This lesson teaches…

  3. Poetry-in-the-Morning on WNYE FM New York Presents "There's a Soul Arising in My Mind." Prose and Poetry Collected by Jeffrey Pflaum. Part One and Part Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaum, Jeffrey, Comp.

    This paper presents 26 selections of students' prose and poetry from the anthology "There's a Soul Arising in My Mind" and as presented on a New York City radio show. The prose selections come from a form of journal writing called "contemplation writing," a pre-poetry program that uses music, writing, and discussion to guide children into journeys…

  4. Art In Movement: New Directions in Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halas, John; Manvell, Roger

    Thanks to film, graphic artists can now create over time as well as in space. An essay discusses the influence of cinema on still paintings (e.g., Duchamp's "Nude Descending a Staircase" and the increasing combination of animation and live action in films. New techniques that are available in animation and in special visual effects are explained,…

  5. Using Expansion Strategies in Making Untranslatable Areas of Poetry Translatable: Sa'di's Bustan as a Case in Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirinzadeh, Seyed Alireza; Mahadi, Tengku Sepora Tengku

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore poetry translatability and seek to see what the translators do to compensate those untranslatable areas of poetry. In doing so, the researchers chose a literary work, i.e., Bustan, by one of the well-known Iranian poets, that is, Sa'di (Wickens, 1990) and one of its translations, "The Bustan by Shaikh…

  6. The Relative Effects upon High School Students of Inductive and Programmed Instruction in the Close Reading of Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, James David

    To examine the effects of inductive and programmed instruction in the close reading of poetry, four control classes of urban 11th graders receiving inductive instruction in poetry were compared with four equivalent experimental classes using programmed textbooks. Both groups were given free response tests on two poems: one poem, included in…

  7. How to Teach Poetry Writing: Workshops for Ages 8-13. Developing Creative Literacy, 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Now in a fully revised and extended second edition, "How to Teach Poetry Writing: Workshops for Ages 8-13" is a practical and activity based resource of writing workshops to help you teach poetry in the primary classroom. Designed to help build writing, speaking and listening skills, this book contains a wide selection of workshops exemplifying a…

  8. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part I--Preliminary survey.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Didier

    2010-11-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts. PMID:21465995

  9. Lesson Plan on the Poetry of the Holocaust. Fulbright-Hayes Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Hungary and Poland).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrianos, Paul

    The poetry writing in the concentration camps during the Holocaust enabled some people to survive, not in the biological sense, but in the psychological sense because it helped preserve their self esteem. The goal of this curriculum project is to expose students to the Holocaust by reading about the tragedy through the poetry of the victims. The…

  10. SHOPTALK--A COLUMN OF BRIEF TECHNIQUES, IDEAS, GIMMICKS, AND SUNDRY THOUGHTS ABOUT THE TEACHING OF POETRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DONELSON, KENNETH L., ED.

    IDEAS FOR THE TEACHING OF POETRY ARE PRESENTED THROUGH SEVERAL BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS OF 16 SUCCESSFULLY-USED TECHNIQUES. THESE INCLUDE (1) TEACHING RUPERT BROOKE'S "THE GREAT LOVER" IN CONJUNCTION WITH CHARLES SCHULTZ'"HAPPINESS IS A WARM PUPPY," (2) USING PICTURES AND MUSIC WITH POETRY, (3) DISCUSSING PHRASES PECULIAR TO SPORTS TO LEAD INTO A…

  11. Where Does It Take You? Using the Poetry of Paz, Pacheco, Guitierrez, Blanco, and Deltoro as Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Naomi Shihab

    1997-01-01

    Notes the importance of noticing details and the precious, weird little details of neighborhoods. Uses poetry by Latin American poets to teach children and adults how to write their own poetry. Starts with basic techniques--talking, reading, discussing, and notetaking. (PA)

  12. The Development of a High School Poetry Writing Program from Selected Writings of Erik Erikson, Kenneth Koch, and Theodore Roethke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Albert Luck, Jr.

    In this study, a program for teaching poetry writing in secondary schools is derived from Kenneth Koch's and Theodore Roethke's ideas, and from Erik Erikson's model of adolescent human processes. A review of related literature defines three major approaches to the teaching of poetry writing: models, activities, and models and activities combined.…

  13. Using Poetry as a Communication Multimodality to Encourage Reading Engagement of Selected African-American Learners: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Cherie A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the use of poetry as a multimodal communicative text to encourage reading engagement in selected African-American learners with mild intellectual disabilities. Framed by critical discourse theory, genre theory, and Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, this investigation presented poetry as an alternative text…

  14. A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry: Individual Development, Psychology, and Social Reparation. Psychoanalysis, Education and Social Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry develops a poetry pedagogy that offers significant benefits to students by helping them to achieve a sense of renewal (a deeper awareness of self and potentials) and reparation (a realistic, but positive and proactive worldview). Todd O. Williams offers a thorough examination of the therapeutic potential…

  15. [Dyssocial identity disorder (double identity) in psychopathology and poetry].

    PubMed

    Tölle, R

    1996-01-01

    Identity dissociation signifies: there seem to exist two identities in one personality that take turns-apparently without knowing about each other. Descriptions of this rare state are often spectacular. As scientifically proven they depend on culturally specific conditions and iatrogeneous influences. The disorder is to be analysed in this article for the case of both psychiatry and every-day-life-experiences in a matter-of-fact way. The first description of the phenomenon is not found in psychiatric literature but in poetry. The novellas of E.T.A. Hoffmann contain at least eight descriptions of 'double life'. The 'Fräulein von Scuderi' (1820) seems to be the most interesting of these and is therefore focused on in this article. E.T.A. Hoffmann himself was at the same time well respected jurist and significant artist of great versatility: poet as well as musician, composer, painter. Hoffmann's artistic and his civic life stood in sharp contrast, which gives reason to use of the term 'double life'.

  16. Clinical careers film.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Those interested in developing clinical academic careers might be interested in a short animated film by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research. The three-minute film, a frame from which is shown below, describes the sort of opportunities that are on offer to all professionals as part of the HEE's clinical academic careers framework. You can view the film on YouTube at tinyurl.com/pelb95c. PMID:26309005

  17. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  18. The Use of Collaborative Writing To Enhance Cohesion in Poetry Therapy Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Karina M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effect of collaborative writing on cohesion in poetry therapy groups with 33 graduate students. Finds that post test scores on the Group Environment Scale indicated a significant difference in cohesion for those groups using collaborative writing compared to those without collaborative writing. (SR)

  19. Classroom Remix: Patterns of Pedagogy in a Techno-Literacies Poetry Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Meg; King, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers collaborated with two high school creative writing teachers to consider how a particular use of technology--PowerPoint poetry interpretations--would function in their creative writing classes. Their findings encouraged them to consider three kinds of "classroom remix" related to the introduction of techno-literacy practices into the…

  20. Cin(E)-Poetry: Engaging the Digital Generation in 21st-Century Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Denise H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to integrate into classroom learning the out-of-school technologies that students interact with every day. We know that reader response approaches to the study of literature engage learners, and we also know that both students and teachers have mixed attitudes about the study of poetry. In this article, a response activity with…

  1. "The Mermaid's Purse:" Looking Closely at Young Children's Art and Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Shelby A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the multimodal poems, digital photographs, and three-dimensional artistic creations of young children who live by the sea. Encouraged by their teachers and adult artists, the children learned to look closely at the sign systems of art and poetry to open up worlds of image creation and metaphor making. Teachers…

  2. Poetry Emotion or Effective Literacy Practices for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westgate Pesola, Rosanne J.

    2008-01-01

    Why use poetry to enhance the individual's ability to read and understand the text? How do we assist people with intellectual disabilities, specifically Down syndrome, with an opportunity to bring richer and deeper meaning to what they read? The special education community is waking up to the possibilities for expression which exist for…

  3. A Pedagogy of Poetry through the Poems of W.B. Yeats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, John

    2014-01-01

    Using eleven of W.B. Yeats's poems, John Gordon explores ways of thinking about and teaching poetry in secondary schools and at undergraduate level. He draws together commentary, research, and his own professional experience, to enable his readers to develop flexible pedagogical judgement that can respond to the requirements of a range of…

  4. In the First Country of Places: Nature, Poetry, and Childhood Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chawla, Louise

    This book integrates poetry and psychology to explore how people shape their childhood place memories and self-identities in conformity with their philosophies of nature. Drawing upon written work and original interviews, the book describes uses of memory through the perspectives of five contemporary American poets: William Bronk, David Ignatow,…

  5. How To Read a Poem...and Start a Poetry Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Molly

    Written to take the reader on a passionate, intuitive journey into the "deliciously bewitching" world of poetry, this book centers around a group of poems the author calls her "talismans," objects that give her a special hold on life. Arguing that such poems can illumine the paths of existence itself, the author invites readers into the worlds…

  6. Students' Attitudes towards the Use of Poetry in Second Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardeshir, Danesh; Shirkhani, Servat

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates learners' attitudes towards poetry in foreign language learning. 63 Engineering Students at Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch attended the study. The instrument used in the study was a questionnaire designed by the researchers for the purpose of this study. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions…

  7. An Examination of Digital Game-Based Situated Learning Applied to Chinese Language Poetry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hong-Ren; Lin, You-Shiuan

    2016-01-01

    By gradually placing more importance on game-based education and changing learning motivation by applying game-playing characteristics, students' learning experiences can be enhanced and a better learning effect can be achieved. When teaching the content of Chinese poetry in Taiwanese junior high schools, most teachers only explain the meaning of…

  8. Graphic Poetry: How to Help Students Get the Most out of Pictures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, River Ya-ling

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to give an account of some innovative work in paintings and modern poetry and to show how modern poets, such as Jane Flanders and Anne Sexton, the two American poets in particular, express and develop radically new conventions for their respective arts. Also elaborated are how such changes in artistic techniques are related to…

  9. "What Rough Beast?" Conceptualising the Poetry Teacher in Ireland through the Eyes of the Pupil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Jennifer; Mannix McNamara, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Pupils have a significant contribution to make in the construction of knowledge about teaching and learning in schools. Therefore, consultation with pupils should play a significant role in the pursuit of pedagogical advancement. This study explores pupils' conceptions of effective poetry teachers at Leaving Certificate level in Ireland. Taking a…

  10. Poetry and Scientific Exposition: An Analysis of Two Forms of Symbolic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Monica Wengrowicz

    2002-01-01

    Art and science are generally thought to be two different forms of human activity. When speaking of "arts," one normally uses the term to encompass diverse types of art such as painting, poetry, and music, even though the modes of symbolization in the different arts are based on different characters such as notes, lines, and words. Science,…

  11. Between the Lines: When Culture, Language and Poetry Meet in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Teaching poetry in second language (L2) classrooms raises theoretical and practical questions about how best to treat literature when target language and culture is also being negotiated. Current pedagogy derives from disparate sources, including the experientially-driven practices of individual teachers, the quantitative and qualitative research…

  12. The Effects of a High-School Poetry Competition: A Case-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Terry

    2013-01-01

    This case-study explores the effects of a school-wide writing competition and the implementation of a poetry-writing unit across all junior English classes in a rural New Zealand school. Teacher interview data were thematically analysed using a social constructionist lens. Results highlight the varied strategies adopted by teachers, while…

  13. Correspondence and Contradiction in Ancient Greek Society and Education: Homer's Epic Poetry and Plato's Early Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sichel, Betty A.

    1983-01-01

    Homer's epic poetry illustrates correspondence between society's needs and the values stressed in education, while Socrates' thought uncovers contradictions between social and educational values and seeks a new form of correspondence. Examples from the Epics and Plato's early dialogues trace changing educational attitudes among the Classical…

  14. Language Play in the Classroom: Encouraging Children's Intuitive Creativity with Words through Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    This article begins by identifying that children have a spontaneous predilection for playing with language, engaging in poetic discourse even before their first poetry lesson. Although children's language play is relatively unresearched in the classroom, in a case study of two groups of pupils aged between 10 and 11, it was observed that children…

  15. Creating Drama with Poetry: Teaching English as a Second Language through Dramatization and Improvisation. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparro, Marie; Falletta, Bernadette

    The use of poetry as drama in the English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom enables students to explore the linguistic and conceptual aspects of the written text without concentrating on the mechanics of language. Students are able to develop a sense of awareness of self in the target culture through dramatic interpretations of the poems.…

  16. The Paradox of Structure and Freedom: An Experiment in Writing Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womelsduff, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    The ninth-grade students are helped in finding their writing voices by using a traditional African poem as a model. With the teaching of this poetry project, it is observed that having a well-defined structure allows students to think and write creatively.

  17. Like Underground Water: The Poetry of Mid-Twentieth Century Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koriyama, Naoshi, Comp.; Lueders, Edward, Comp.

    With more than 240 poems selected from 80 leading poets, this anthology is the first comprehensive collection of post-World War II Japanese poetry to survey all of the major tendencies and developments directly influenced by the war. Beginning with Nishiwaki Junzaburo (1894-1982), who studied Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot, and concluding with Osada…

  18. My Sister Looks Like a Pear: Awakening the Poetry in Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Douglas

    This book, written out of the author's experiences while working with the Poets in the Schools programs in elementary schools in 10 states, contains a large assortment of student poems. It also contains specific tools which teachers may use to help their students learn to write and enjoy poetry. Forty-six chapters contain hints and observations on…

  19. From Poetry to Prose: Sophistic Rhetoric and the Epistemic Music of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Steven B.

    Much revisionist scholarship has focused on sophistic epistemology and its relationship to the current revival of epistemic rhetoric in the academy. However, few scholars have recognized the sensuous substance of words as sounds, and the role it played in sophistic philosophy and rhetoric. Before the invention of the Greek alphabet, poetry was…

  20. Daughters of the Fifth Sun: A Collection of Latina Fiction and Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Bryce, Ed.; And Others

    This anthology of contemporary fiction and poetry by Hispanic American women writers contains material ranging from national award winners to emerging talents. Noting that until recently 20th-century academic literary criticism described ethnic American literature as parochial and politically driven, the anthology's introduction discusses how the…

  1. Finding a Voice? Do Literary Forms Work Creatively in Teaching Poetry Writing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The linguistic demands of poetry writing, quite apart from the transcriptional aspects of writing, make this perhaps the most challenging form of writing children encounter in school. These would include, among others, poetic techniques such as using line breaks and chunking meaning in stanzas; invention and handling of imagery; playfulness and…

  2. Does Feeling Come First? How Poetry Can Help Readers Broaden Their Understanding of Metacognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eva-Wood, Amy L.

    2008-01-01

    Assuming that readers' emotional responses can enhance readers' metacognitive experiences and inform literary analysis, this study of 11th-grade poetry readers features instruction that models both cognitive and affective reading processes. The author: (1) Presents a case for more explicit attention to emotion in language arts classrooms; (2)…

  3. The Practice of Poetry among a Group of Heroin Addicts in India: Naturalistic Peer Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhand, Amar

    2006-01-01

    As part of an ongoing ethnographic study, this paper aims to consider the practice of poetry, "sher-o-shayari", as naturalistic peer learning among a group of heroin addicts in Yamuna Bazaar, New Delhi. By examining meanings given to "sher-o-shayari" and experiences of participating in the practice, this article makes the claim that the practice…

  4. Dandelion Seeds: Poetry as Performance and Research for Social Justice in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley, Mary Stone

    2013-01-01

    A rally in Washington, DC to transform the U. S. schools provided an example of merging poetry, performance, and research for social justice activism. The arts-based research forms of a/r/tography and performance ethnography provided the poet/performer/researcher/activist with frameworks of sense-making that were fluid, intrasubjective, and…

  5. The Myriad Forms of Magic: A Narrative on Poetry and Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, Claudia Gafford

    1995-01-01

    Presents the story of grieving nine-year-old Stephanie, who discovers her own rhythmic voice through poetry and writing. Shows how in the process, she begins to move through the intricate mass of denial, grief, and loss buried deep within her. (SR)

  6. Analysis of Questions Used in the Teaching of Non-Narrative Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, William Gilbert

    The purposes of this study were to analyze questions used in the teaching of non-narrative poetry and to ascertain whether it is possible to establish any generally useful, basic pattern of question asking that would provide the student some fundamental guidelines for the study of this type of literature. First, a detailed examination of Robert…

  7. From Keats to Kanye: Romantic Poetry and Popular Culture in the Secondary English Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowmer, Megan E.; Curwood, Jen Scott

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined a Romanticism unit within a Year 9 English class in Sydney, Australia. It considered whether popular culture could build connections between students' lives and Romanticism, and whether the process of remixing "high" Romantic poetry with "low" popular culture could foster student engagement. Thematic…

  8. Approaches to Poetry: The Teaching of English in the Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasmanian Education Dept., Hobart (Australia).

    This booklet, building on the premise that humans have a natural affinity with poetry and from an early age associate rhyme and rhythms with the joys of learning language, develops activities that enhance appreciation, engagement, response, and discrimination. The ideas presented in the booklet have been tried by practicing teachers in their…

  9. The American Poetry Wax Museum: Reality Effects, 1940-1990. Refiguring English Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasula, Jed

    Drawing upon literary criticism, cultural studies, and social history, this book examines the canonizing assumptions (and compulsions) that have fabricated an image of American poetry since World War II, foremost of which is the enshrinement of the self-expressive subject. The tone of the book oscillates between documentary and polemic in an…

  10. Music and Poetry as Social Justice Texts in the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Rebecca M.

    2007-01-01

    Although social justice education should be an ongoing process that transcends curriculum, pedagogy, and the institutional establishment of education, it is often neglected. This action research study describes how middle/high school students responded to music and poetry as social justice texts. The study documents the curricular and pedagogical…

  11. Poetic Mini-Dramas: Using Drama To Facilitate Creative Thinking and Understanding of Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heil, Lillian H.

    This paper is a how-to manual for doing poetic mini-dramas (PMD) with elementary school students. It describes the possibilities for discovery learning through the dramatization of poetry, lists initial suggestions for the teacher and the actual steps in the process, and reports the attitudes and vocabulary growth of second and third graders after…

  12. Jack the Giant Tamer: Poetry Writing in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Constance

    1993-01-01

    Provides a brief case report on the use of poetry writing in the treatment of a patient with a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Notes that, after 23 sessions in which the patient said nothing, the patient brought a poem for the therapist to read at the 24 session. (SR)

  13. We Are What We "Say" We Eat: What's on the Menu in the Poetry Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Tom

    2008-01-01

    With a nod to Shakespeare, if food be the food of love, eat on. This article discusses the great pleasure teachers can have as careful readers of poetry when sharing poems with students in which the readers are what they "say" they eat. The purpose in focusing on poetic food is to combine a pedagogy with an ethics. To accomplish this,…

  14. Poetry and Alkali Metals: Building Bridges to the Study of Atomic Radius and Ionization Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, J. L.; Morais, C.; Paiva, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Exploring chemistry through its presence in the literature in general, and poetry in particular, may increase students' curiosity, may enhance several basic skills, such as writing, reading comprehension and argumentative skills, as well as may improve the understanding of the chemistry topics covered. Nevertheless, the pedagogical potential of…

  15. Aqui y Alla: Exploring Our Lives through Poetry--Here and There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlessman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The bilingual poetry and stories of Salvadoran writer Jorge Argueta have been an invaluable resource in this author's classroom. She has used poems from "Talking with Mother Earth" for homework and class analysis during a study of ecosystems, the story "Xochitl and the Flowers" to lead into persuasive writing, and "Bean Soup" to teach…

  16. Unsayable Somethings: Modern American Poetry, Language, and the Logic of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhorter, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    By exploring the categorical similarities between popular models of science, political economy, psychology, and sexuality, this dissertation addresses modern U.S. poetry's obsession with conjuring the unsayable. Chapters 1 and 2 explore the social and conceptual landscape that came to align the sayable with the cognitive and credible, while…

  17. Echo, Not Quotation: What Conversation Analysis Reveals about Classroom Responses to Heard Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, John

    2012-01-01

    This article applies conversation analysis to classroom talk-in-interaction where pupils respond to poetry they have heard. The phenomenon of repeating in discussion details from the poem, including patterns of delivery, is considered and named echo to distinguish it from quotation in writing. The phenomenon is significant to the pedagogy of…

  18. Using a Native American Language as a Classroom Teaching Tool: Teaching Shoshoni Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crum, Beverly Lorene

    Children responded enthusiastically to a program that used Shoshoni poetry songs to teach some concepts about human languages in general. Twelve children (four Caucasian, eight Native American) in grades 1-3 and their parents met for four 1-hour sessions. The lessons focused on the sound, meaning, and word order of the Shoshoni language; Shoshoni…

  19. Real Gardens with Real Toads: A New Sort of Realism in Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Myra Cohn

    1995-01-01

    Discusses realism in children's poetry and a New Realism which dates from the 1960s. Suggests that the denial of realism occupies much of the efforts of Mother Goose reformers, who have carried on "for eons" over the violence, mayhem, and cruelty in the old nursery rhymes. (RS)

  20. A COMPARISON OF THE POETRY SELECTIONS IN SIX LITERATURE ANTHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AMES, WILBUR S.

    THE TWO PURPOSES OF THIS INVESTIGATION WERE TO TEST THE IMPLICATION THAT POEMS USED IN ANTHOLOGIES ARE SELECTED LARGELY BY CHANCE, AND TO COMPARE THE POETRY SELECTIONS IN SIX WELL-KNOWN SECONDARY SCHOOL LITERATURE ANTHOLOGIES TO DETERMINE THEIR EXTENT OF AGREEMENT ABOUT WHICH POEMS SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN THE CURRICULUM. THE SIX ANTHOLOGIES…

  1. "The Educated Imagination": Applying Instructional Research to the Teaching of Symbolic Interpretation of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peskin, Joan; Allen, Greg; Wells-Jopling, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a project in which two researchers in cognitive psychology, learning, and instruction collaborated with a high school English teacher to develop lessons that contained three scaffolds to facilitate symbolic interpretation when students read poetry. The scaffolds were based on instructional strategies that have shown to be…

  2. Learning about the World of the Student: Writing Poetry for Teacher-Student Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issitt, John; Issitt, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The authors aim to assist teachers to gain a deeper understanding of the inner lives of students especially those with special educational needs. This aim is pursued in two ways. The first is an exploration of the experience of writing poetry using the students' sentiments, actual words and phrases--a poetic engagement. The second is to argue for…

  3. An International Experience for Social Work Students: Self-Reflection through Poetry and Journal Writing Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Rich; Coyne, Ann; Negi, Nalini Junko

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive article explores the uses of poetry and journaling exercises as means of helping students develop their self-reflective capacities within the context of international social work. First, self-reflection and its importance to social work practice and education is discussed. Second, the importance of self-reflection in international…

  4. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation

    This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  5. Quantum Poetics: Science and Spirit in Twentieth Century American Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, (Mary) Patricia

    avoidance of awareness of embodiment by contemporary physicists. Waniek, working in the tradition of John of the Cross, employs sensual language to suggest relationship with the divine. Gregg, employing the tradition of Sappho, reveals identification or embodiment of the divine in her work. An autobiographical essay on the connections between science, spirituality and poetry in contemporary life concludes the work.

  6. Animal welfare and animal rights.

    PubMed

    Sumner, L W

    1988-05-01

    Animal liberationists tend to divide into two mutually antagonistic camps: animal welfarists, who share a utilitarian moral outlook, and animal rightists, who presuppose a structure of basic rights. However, the gap between these groups tends to be exaggerated by their allegiance to oversimplified versions of their favored moral frameworks. For their part, animal rightists should acknowledge that rights, however basic, are also defeasible by appeals to consequences. Contrariwise, animal welfarists should recognize that rights, however derivative, are capable of constraining appeals to consequences. If both sides move to more defensible theoretical positions, their remaining differences on that level may be compatible with a broad area of convergence on practical issues.

  7. Gedichtlektuere auf der High School: Ueberlegungen zum anspruchsvollen Gedicht im Deutschunterricht unter besonderer Beachtung von Trakls "Grodek" (Poetry Reading in High School: Considerations About Difficult Poetry in the German Class with Particular Attention to "Grodek" by Trakl)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Gerhard

    1975-01-01

    Discusses how poems, at the level of difficulty of "Grodek" by Georg Trakl, can be meaningfully incorporated into the German curriculm of high schools. A methodology for poetry analysis and interpretation is offered. (Text is in German.) (TL)

  8. MEDLI Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of MEDLI, the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument, which contains multiple sophisticated temperature sensors to measure atmospheric conditions and performance o...

  9. Animal therapy.

    PubMed

    Willis, D A

    1997-01-01

    This article explores the concept of animal therapy. The discussion includes a brief history of animal therapy, its importance, its relationship to rehabilitation, and its usefulness as a tool to influence adaptation, change, power, communication, advocacy, teaching, accountability, responsibility, and locus of control. This theoretical concept is important because of the joy and unconditional love animals can provide their owners. Relationships with animals can promote feelings of self-worth, help offset loneliness, reduce anxiety, provide contact, comfort, security, and the feeling of being needed. PMID:9110848

  10. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Staczek, J

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovirus infections. Recent advances in biotechnology have permitted the study of many of the animal cytomegaloviruses in vitro. Consequently, animal cytomegaloviruses can be used as model systems for studying the pathogenesis, immunobiology, and molecular biology of cytomegalovirus-host and cytomegalovirus-cell interactions. PMID:2170830

  11. Newspaper Scramble; Attending to Learning Styles in Academic Tasks; Integrating Vocabulary and Poetry; Developing Automatization with In-Class Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, Christine Wright; Turton, Dawn; Paulus, Trena M.; Brantner-Artenie, Donette; Norstrom, Bjorn; Crawford, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Provides four techniques for teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. These include a newspaper scramble, a focus on learning styles, learning vocabulary through poetry, and an in-class survey. (Author/VWL)

  12. A Gentle Frost: Poet Helen Frost Talks about the Healing Power of Poetry and Her Latest Novel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Rick

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with poet Helen Frost. Frost talked about how poetry can help at-risk children. She also related the challenges she faced when she wrote her latest book titled "The Braid."

  13. Kindergarten Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  14. Animal Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Bridget; Warnock, Carly

    2015-01-01

    During a two-week inquiry-based 5E learning cycle unit, children made observations and inferences to guide their explorations of animal traits and habitats (Bybee 2014). The children became "animal detectives" by studying a live-feed webcam and digital images of wolves in their natural habitat, reading books and online sources about…

  15. The Last Whole Film Catalog; A Resource for Librarians, 1976-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    Films, Incorporated provides a catalog of its 16mm films available for sale, lease, or rent. Both educational and Hollywood feature films are included, as are some books on specific films and basic film literature. Educational films in the humanities include animation, art and perception, biographies, children's short films, children's movies,…

  16. The fiery fight for animal rights.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C M

    1989-01-01

    The author, senior correspondent for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), defends the use of civil disobedience by animal rights activists. Jackson explains what motivates protestors and describes forms of exploitation to which animal rightists object. She discusses the various modes of activism that range from lifestyle changes to burning research facilities and breaking into laboratories in order to film conditions and free experimental animals.

  17. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  18. Animal learning.

    PubMed

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Pavlov and Thorndike pioneered the experimental study of animal learning and provided psychologists with powerful tools to unveil its underlying mechanisms. Today's research developments and theoretical analyses owe much to the pioneering work of these early investigators. Nevertheless, in the evolution of our knowledge about animal learning, some initial conceptions have been challenged and revised. We first review the original experimental procedures and findings of Pavlov and Thorndike. Next, we discuss critical research and consequent controversies which have greatly shaped animal learning theory. For example, although contiguity seemed to be the only condition that is necessary for learning, we now know that it is not sufficient; the conditioned stimulus (CS) also has to provide information about the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). Also, animals appear to learn different things about the same stimuli when circumstances vary. For instance, when faced with situations in which the meaning of a CS changes, as in the case of acquisition and later extinction, animals seem to preserve the original knowledge (CS-US) in addition to learning about the new conditions (CS-noUS). Finally, we discuss how parallels among Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and human causal judgment suggest that causal knowledge may lie at the root of both human and animal learning. All of these empirical findings and theoretical developments prove that animal learning is more complex and intricate than was once imagined. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  19. Animal learning.

    PubMed

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Pavlov and Thorndike pioneered the experimental study of animal learning and provided psychologists with powerful tools to unveil its underlying mechanisms. Today's research developments and theoretical analyses owe much to the pioneering work of these early investigators. Nevertheless, in the evolution of our knowledge about animal learning, some initial conceptions have been challenged and revised. We first review the original experimental procedures and findings of Pavlov and Thorndike. Next, we discuss critical research and consequent controversies which have greatly shaped animal learning theory. For example, although contiguity seemed to be the only condition that is necessary for learning, we now know that it is not sufficient; the conditioned stimulus (CS) also has to provide information about the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). Also, animals appear to learn different things about the same stimuli when circumstances vary. For instance, when faced with situations in which the meaning of a CS changes, as in the case of acquisition and later extinction, animals seem to preserve the original knowledge (CS-US) in addition to learning about the new conditions (CS-noUS). Finally, we discuss how parallels among Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and human causal judgment suggest that causal knowledge may lie at the root of both human and animal learning. All of these empirical findings and theoretical developments prove that animal learning is more complex and intricate than was once imagined. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26272842

  20. Wild Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and other resources focuses on wild animals. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines, and professional resources, as well as a class activity. (LRW)

  1. Pulsar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Pulsars are thought to emit relatively narrow radio beams, shown as green in this animation. If these beams don't sweep toward Earth, astronomers cannot detect the radio signals. Pulsar gamma-ray e...

  2. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  3. Suzaku Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the Suzaku spacecraft. Suzaku (originally known as Astro-E2) was launched July 10, 2005, and maintains a low-Earth orbit while it observes X-rays from the universe. The satel...

  4. [Dangerous animals].

    PubMed

    Koljonen, Virve; Söderlund, Tim; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Gissler, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Contacts between humans and animals inevitably involve encounters possibly resulting in the human being injured. During the period of 2000 to 2014 almost 90 people died in this kind of conflict in Finland. Of these deaths, one third were associated with horses. In addition, over the same period 85 people died in traffic accidents in which an animal was hit by a car. Accidents requiring hospitalization occurred for approx. 8 000 people. PMID:27522833

  5. Prose and Poetry Classification and Boundary Detection Using Word Adjacency Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxas, Ranzivelle Marianne; Tapang, Giovanni

    Word adjacency networks constructed from written works reflect differences in the structure of prose and poetry. We present a method to disambiguate prose and poetry by analyzing network parameters of word adjacency networks, such as the clustering coefficient, average path length and average degree. We determine the relevant parameters for disambiguation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and the effect size criterion. The accuracy of the method is 74.9 ± 2.9% for the training set and 73.7 ± 6.4% for the test set which are greater than the acceptable classifier requirement of 67.3%. This approach is also useful in locating text boundaries within a single article which falls within a window size where the significant change in clustering coefficient is observed. Results indicate that an optimal window size of 75 words can detect the text boundaries.

  6. Lean Forward and Listen: poetry as a mode of understanding in medicine.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Many claims have been made over recent years for the use of poetry (and, more broadly, literature) in the curriculum of medical students. Most often, poetry is put forward as having the potential to humanize medicine by promoting, for example, empathy, ethical sensitivity, and an appreciation for diverging interpretations. While these endpoints are all important, this essay uses the experience of a junior doctor undertaking a degree in creative writing to consider how the poetic way of seeing and thinking differs from clinical thinking, and why that might matter. In particular, the author considers the importance in medicine of the capacity to not know, as well as the possibilities for a deeper understanding of patients offered by thinking in terms of poetic voice. PMID:26657669

  7. Digital Poetry: A Narrow Relation between Poetics and the Codes of the Computational Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurentiz, Silvia

    The project "Percorrendo Escrituras" (Walking Through Writings Project) has been developed at ECA-USP Fine Arts Department. Summarizing, it intends to study different structures of digital information that share the same universe and are generators of a new aesthetics condition. The aim is to search which are the expressive possibilities of the computer among the algorithm functions and other of its specific properties. It is a practical, theoretical and interdisciplinary project where the study of programming evolutionary language, logic and mathematics take us to poetic experimentations. The focus of this research is the digital poetry, and it comes from poetics of permutation combinations and culminates with dynamic and complex systems, autonomous, multi-user and interactive, through agents generation derivations, filtration and emergent standards. This lecture will present artworks that use some mechanisms introduced by cybernetics and the notion of system in digital poetry that demonstrate the narrow relationship between poetics and the codes of computational logic.

  8. A Web 2.0 Personal Learning Environment for Classical Chinese Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiwei; Klamma, Ralf; Gao, Yan; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Jarke, Matthias

    Classical Chinese Poetry (CCP) is a valuable but almost locked treasure chest of human wisdom and civilization since 2000 years. With the advent of the Web 2.0 a renaissance of CCP is possible even outside Chinese-speaking communities world-wide. With mobile technologies and educational games we can address new learning communities for CCP and open the chest again. In this paper, we introduce a Web 2.0 personal learning environment for CCP. We have developed a generic and interoperable data model for CCP we utilize not only for mobile learning scenarios but also for educational gaming with different levels of difficulty. Learners are empowered to learn Chinese poetry, language, history, and culture. This research work shows how modern information technologies assist users to diffuse knowledge across the borderlines of communities and societies.

  9. Looking through the Eyes of Injustice: Integrating Poetry and African-American History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce-Thomas, Cassandra

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how she integrated poetry and African-American history in her lessons. She also relates how she uses the story of Emitt Tills to impart to her students the reality of racism and injustice. Emitt Tills was a black 14-year-old boy from Chicago who lived during 1950s. He was killed with a bullet wound and was…

  10. What language shall I borrow? The poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke and the care of souls.

    PubMed

    Jones, Logan C

    2004-01-01

    This article suggests that the reality of the world is socially constructed through the words and narratives chosen and used. These social constructions may be from science and technology, business and economics, or poetry and metaphors, and as such each shapes a different world. The work of the poet Rainer Maria Rilke is used to illustrate how the power of words and images shape and form the world. The implications of the use of language for the care of souls are discussed.

  11. Neurology, poetry and the first world war of 1914-1918.

    PubMed

    Gardner-Thorpe, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The First World War of 1914-1918 produced a wealth of disability and death and much has been written of this catastrophe for mankind. Prose is prolific and much poetry has been written too, some of it discussed here; it consists of works by healthcare workers and also about the effects of the war upon those who fought and those who were left behind. Some of the work is by neurologists and some deals with the neurological disorders of those who fought.

  12. Film Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Larry M.; Atwater, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Reviews four Human Sexuality films and videos. These are: "Personal Decisions" (Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1985); "The Touch Film" (Sterling Production, 1986); "Rethinking Rape" (Film Distribution Center, 1985); "Not A Love Story" (National Film Board of Canada, 1981). (AEM)

  13. Animal Bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Neville H.

    Animals rely upon their acoustic and vibrational senses and abilities to detect the presence of both predators and prey and to communicate with members of the same species. This chapter surveys the physical bases of these abilities and their evolutionary optimization in insects, birds, and other land animals, and in a variety of aquatic animals other than cetaceans, which are treated in Chap. 20. While there are many individual variations, and some animals devote an immense fraction of their time and energy to acoustic communication, there are also many common features in their sound production and in the detection of sounds and vibrations. Excellent treatments of these matters from a biological viewpoint are given in several notable books [19.1,2] and collections of papers [19.3,4,5,6,7,8], together with other more specialized books to be mentioned in the following sections, but treatments from an acoustical viewpoint [19.9] are rare. The main difference between these two approaches is that biological books tend to concentrate on anatomical and physiological details and on behavioral outcomes, while acoustical books use simplified anatomical models and quantitative analysis to model vocalization frequency scaling in animals hearing sound production animal animal biological biological bioacoustics whole-system behavior. This latter is the approach to be adopted here.

  14. Animal Identification

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, J. W.; Penner, P.

    1967-01-01

    A number of branding tools of various metals and various sizes in combination with several wetting agents were cooled with liquid nitrogen and applied for different lengths of time to calves and mature cattle. White hair appeared in the shape of the brand on the animals in place of dark hair when the application was properly carried out. Best results can be obtained by using metal irons at least 25 millimeters thick and 14 millimeters wide with xylol as a wetting agent for ten seconds in young or thin skinned animals and up to twenty seconds in mature or thick skinned animals. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 5. PMID:4229181

  15. Animal Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on, outdoor science experiments designed to teach elementary school students about animal adaptation. The experiments focus on: how color camouflage affects an insect population; how spiderlings find a home; and how chameleons camouflage themselves by changing color. (SM)

  16. Curriculum Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five teachers with reputations for artistry in curriculum planning were interviewed about their "curriculum animation" plans or how they ensured their curriculum was brought to life. Their statements indicated that much of their planning is informal and intuitive, and that the criteria they use for their curriculum includes: (1) it is…

  17. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  18. "Still, She Didn't See What I Was Trying to Say": Towards a History of Framing Navajo English in Navajo Written Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Anthony K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the ways that Navajo poetry was framed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, as "unsophisticated" and non-literary by the introductory materials written by non-Native Americans for collections of Native American poetry. At issue was a view that saw the use of Navajo English, a distinctive vernacular dialect, as a deficient form of…

  19. The Public Library Film Redefined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, Euclid

    1978-01-01

    An historical discussion of three types of film--teaching, information, and entertainment--is presented. The numbers of films in each category, especially the last, which includes the animated, unnarrated, iconographic, underground, and avant-garde, has grown substantially. Libraries have quickly accepted all except the revolutionary philosophies…

  20. Animal leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, William A

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global disease of animals, which can have a major economic impact on livestock industries and is an important zoonosis. The current knowledge base is heavily biased towards the developed agricultural economies. The disease situation in the developing economies presents a major challenge as humans and animals frequently live in close association. The severity of disease varies with the infecting serovar and the affected species, but there are many common aspects across the species; for example, the acute phase of infection is mostly sub-clinical and the greatest economic losses arise from chronic infection causing reproductive wastage. The principles of, and tests for, diagnosis, treatment, control and surveillance are applicable across the species. PMID:25388134

  1. Robotic animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretch, S. J.

    1982-08-01

    The effectiveness of the robotic systems Place and Animate at McDonnell Douglas is discussed. The systems are designed for CAD/CAM on a kinematic basis. Place allows creation, analysis, and editing of cell descriptions as part of the CAD process, and involves primitive cell configuring prior to eventual integration of the entire robot. Objects are displayed in wire frame form and movement receives an awkwardness rating automatically, indicating the percentage of the real-world joint limit that is being approached. The same program is employed in the Animate process, where verification and debugging of the robot programs proceeds. Clearances, motion limits, and correct responses to commands are checked, allowing decisions on production to be made before any robots are actually built.

  2. [The spirit of art lives on the Essence of Poetry -from C. G. Jung to M. Heidegger].

    PubMed

    Montironi, Jorge D

    2012-01-01

    Two major contemporary thinkers such as Carl Gustav Jung, Swiss physician who was born in 1875 and died in 1961 and Martin Heidegger, German philosopher born in 1889 and died in 1976, venture in their extensive research on art and poetry on two aspects which are the subjects of the spirit and the human essence and that for years, while pursuing in our work, under the name of the transmission unconscious poetry. Then we shall point out in this article the articulations we find, first deploying the key points of the magnificent work of Jung on The phenomenon of spirit in art and science and that developed by Heidegger in his lecture on Hölderlin and the Essence of Poetry. PMID:23145378

  3. [The spirit of art lives on the Essence of Poetry -from C. G. Jung to M. Heidegger].

    PubMed

    Montironi, Jorge D

    2012-01-01

    Two major contemporary thinkers such as Carl Gustav Jung, Swiss physician who was born in 1875 and died in 1961 and Martin Heidegger, German philosopher born in 1889 and died in 1976, venture in their extensive research on art and poetry on two aspects which are the subjects of the spirit and the human essence and that for years, while pursuing in our work, under the name of the transmission unconscious poetry. Then we shall point out in this article the articulations we find, first deploying the key points of the magnificent work of Jung on The phenomenon of spirit in art and science and that developed by Heidegger in his lecture on Hölderlin and the Essence of Poetry.

  4. Brain activity and connectivity during poetry composition: Toward a multidimensional model of the creative process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyuan; Erkkinen, Michael G; Healey, Meghan L; Xu, Yisheng; Swett, Katherine E; Chow, Ho Ming; Braun, Allen R

    2015-09-01

    Creativity, a multifaceted construct, can be studied in various ways, for example, investigating phases of the creative process, quality of the creative product, or the impact of expertise. Previous neuroimaging studies have assessed these individually. Believing that each of these interacting features must be examined simultaneously to develop a comprehensive understanding of creative behavior, we examined poetry composition, assessing process, product, and expertise in a single experiment. Distinct activation patterns were associated with generation and revision, two major phases of the creative process. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) was active during both phases, yet responses in dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal executive systems (DLPFC/IPS) were phase-dependent, indicating that while motivation remains unchanged, cognitive control is attenuated during generation and re-engaged during revision. Experts showed significantly stronger deactivation of DLPFC/IPS during generation, suggesting that they may more effectively suspend cognitive control. Importantly however, similar overall patterns were observed in both groups, indicating the same cognitive resources are available to experts and novices alike. Quality of poetry, assessed by an independent panel, was associated with divergent connectivity patterns in experts and novices, centered upon MPFC (for technical facility) and DLPFC/IPS (for innovation), suggesting a mechanism by which experts produce higher quality poetry. Crucially, each of these three key features can be understood in the context of a single neurocognitive model characterized by dynamic interactions between medial prefrontal areas regulating motivation, dorsolateral prefrontal, and parietal areas regulating cognitive control and the association of these regions with language, sensorimotor, limbic, and subcortical areas distributed throughout the brain.

  5. Brain activity and connectivity during poetry composition: Toward a multidimensional model of the creative process

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siyuan; Erkkinen, Michael G.; Healey, Meghan L.; Xu, Yisheng; Swett, Katherine E.; Chow, Ho Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Creativity, a multifaceted construct, can be studied in various ways, for example, investigating phases of the creative process, quality of the creative product, or the impact of expertise. Previous neuroimaging studies have assessed these individually. Believing that each of these interacting features must be examined simultaneously to develop a comprehensive understanding of creative behavior, we examined poetry composition, assessing process, product, and expertise in a single experiment. Distinct activation patterns were associated with generation and revision, two major phases of the creative process. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) was active during both phases, yet responses in dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal executive systems (DLPFC/IPS) were phase‐dependent, indicating that while motivation remains unchanged, cognitive control is attenuated during generation and re‐engaged during revision. Experts showed significantly stronger deactivation of DLPFC/IPS during generation, suggesting that they may more effectively suspend cognitive control. Importantly however, similar overall patterns were observed in both groups, indicating the same cognitive resources are available to experts and novices alike. Quality of poetry, assessed by an independent panel, was associated with divergent connectivity patterns in experts and novices, centered upon MPFC (for technical facility) and DLPFC/IPS (for innovation), suggesting a mechanism by which experts produce higher quality poetry. Crucially, each of these three key features can be understood in the context of a single neurocognitive model characterized by dynamic interactions between medial prefrontal areas regulating motivation, dorsolateral prefrontal, and parietal areas regulating cognitive control and the association of these regions with language, sensorimotor, limbic, and subcortical areas distributed throughout the brain. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3351–3372, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Human Brain

  6. Animal picobirnavirus.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Masachessi, Gisela; Mladenova, Zornitsa

    2014-01-01

    Picobirnavirus (PBV) is a small, non-enveloped, bisegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of vertebrate hosts. The name 'Picobirnavirus' derives from the prefix 'pico' (latin for 'small') in reference to the small virion size, plus the prefix 'bi' (latin for 'two') and the word 'RNA' to indicate the nature of the viral genome. The serendipitous discovery of PBV dates back to 1988 from Brazil, when human fecal samples collected during the acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were subjected for routine rotavirus surveillance by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and silver straining (S/S). The PAGE gels after silver staining showed a typical 'two RNA band' pattern, and it was identified as Picobirnavirus. Likewise, the feces of wild black-footed pigmy rice rats (Oryzomys nigripes) subjected for PAGE assay by the same research group in Brazil reported the presence of PBV (Pereira et al., J Gen Virol 69:2749-2754, 1988). PBVs have been detected in faeces of humans and wide range of animal species with or without diarrhoea, worldwide. The probable role of PBV as either a 'primary diarrhoeal agent' in 'immunocompetent children'; or a 'potential pathogen' in 'immunocompromised individuals' or an 'innocuous virus' in the intestine remains elusive and needs to be investigated despite the numerous reports of the presence of PBV in fecal samples of various species of domestic mammals, wild animals, birds and snakes; our current knowledge of their biology, etiology, pathogenicity or their transmission characteristics remains subtle. This review aims to analyse the veterinary and zoonotic aspects of animal Picobirnavirus infections since its discovery. PMID:25674589

  7. Animal behavior and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Houpt, K A

    1991-04-15

    The value of behavioral techniques in assessing animal welfare, and in particular assessing the psychological well being of animals, is reviewed. Using cats and horses as examples, 3 behavioral methods are presented: (1) comparison of behavior patterns and time budgets; (2) choice tests; and (3) operant conditioning. The behaviors of intact and declawed cats were compared in order to determine if declawing led to behavioral problems or to a change in personality. Apparently it did not. The behavior of free ranging horses was compared with that of stabled horses. Using two-choice preference tests, the preference of horses for visual contact with other horses and the preference for bedding were determined. Horses show no significant preference for locations from which they can make visual contact with other horses, but they do prefer bedding, especially when lying down. Horses will perform an operant response in order to obtain light in a darkened barn or heat in an outside shed. These same techniques can be used to answer a variety of questions about an animal's motivation for a particular attribute of its environment. PMID:2061151

  8. Animal Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Johnny; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

    The development of a new anticancer drug is a long, complex and multistep process which is supervised by regulatory authorities from the different countries all around the world [1]. Application of a new drug for admission to the market is supported by preclinical and clinical data, both including the determination of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, antitumour activity, therapeutic index, etc. As preclinical studies are associated with high cost, optimization of animal experiments is crucial for the overall development of a new anticancer agent. Moreover, in vivo efficacy studies remain a determinant panel for advancement of agents to human trials and thus, require cautious design and interpretation from experimental and ethical point of views.

  9. Reflections on the use of poetry in nurse education: Speaking a credible language of care.

    PubMed

    Hahessy, Sinead

    2016-01-01

    Based on the experience of using the poem 'The Nurse's Pockets' by Cortney Davis in reflective practice teaching sessions this paper considers the centrality of language as conveyed in poetry as a way of communicating nursing knowledge and experience. Using this poem facilitated a mutual position between the educator and the students that enhanced the reflective practice environment. An argument for using creative arts based approaches in nurse education is presented as a means of overcoming the threats to the unique nature of nursing knowledge evidenced in healthcare and higher education reform.

  10. Sylvia Plath and the failure of emotional self-repair through poetry.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M A; Will, N P

    1986-01-01

    Creativity serves not only an aesthetic function but also psychological self-repair for the creative artist. The authors examine the failure of Sylvia Plath's efforts to control her suicidal violence and to bridge her isolation from others via the shared affective experience of poetry. At first, she used traditional forms and mediated images, but when she abandoned them for a more personal expressive art, she lost the shaping, controlling devices she had been using for self-containment and self-repair. They were no longer available to her when she underwent a sweeping narcissistic regression following some very stressful life events. Her emotional deterioration ultimately cost her her life.

  11. Animal papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc

    2013-10-01

    We provide an overview of the host range, taxonomic classification and genomic diversity of animal papillomaviruses. The complete genomes of 112 non-human papillomavirus types, recovered from 54 different host species, are currently available in GenBank. The recent characterizations of reptilian papillomaviruses extend the host range of the Papillomaviridae to include all amniotes. Although the genetically diverse papillomaviruses have a highly conserved genomic lay-out, deviations from this prototypic genome organization are observed in several animal papillomaviruses, and only the core ORFs E1, E2, L2 and L1 are present in all characterized papillomavirus genomes. The discovery of papilloma-polyoma hybrids BPCV1 and BPCV2, containing a papillomaviral late region but an early region encoding typical polyomaviral nonstructural proteins, and the detection of recombination breakpoints between the early and late coding regions of cetacean papillomaviruses, could indicate that early and late gene cassettes of papillomaviruses are relatively independent entities that can be interchanged by recombination.

  12. ANIMAL COMMUNICATION.

    PubMed

    SEBEOK, T A

    1965-02-26

    Semiotics and ethology have converged in a new behavioral science, zoosemiotics. Those who are interested in the theoretical analysis of the complex problems of non-verbal behavior that arise where these two disciplines interact aim to treat comprehensively animal communication systems by the aid of representations that have proved illuminating in the study of sentences of human language. Students of zoosemiotics are concerned with codes and messages much as linguists are concerned with competence, or language, and performance, or speech. They thus face the twin tasks of constructing a model for the addresser to specify how a message is encoded and transformed into a signal carried by a variety of channels to the addressee; and of constructing a model for the addressee to specify the ways in which animals utilize their knowledge of their code to recognize the messages they receive. Finally, they assess the context of the communicative event in the hope of dissecting that which is relevant to the selection process from the rest of the background, a program for which there is as yet neither a procedural eliciting technique nor a satisfactory theoretical solution in sight.

  13. Evaluation of the Blood Film.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Terry W

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation of hemic cell morphology in stained blood film may be the most important part of the hematologic evaluation of exotic animals. The blood film provides important information regarding red blood cell abnormalities, such as changes in cell shape and color, presence of inclusions, and, in the case of lower vertebrates, changes in the position of the cell nucleus. Stained blood film also provides information about changes in leukocyte numbers and morphology, and shows important hemic features of mammalian platelets and the thrombocytes of lower vertebrates. The blood film is needed in the detection and identification of blood parasites.

  14. Medical Students' Perceptions of Dementia after Participation in Poetry Workshop with People with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Garrie, Alaina J.; Goel, Shruti; Forsberg, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Researchers assessed whether medical students' participation in a poetry workshop with people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) affected their attitudes towards persons with ADRD. Objective. To add to the growing body of research summarizing the impact of nonclinical interventions on medical students' perspectives about people with ADRD. Design. Researchers used dementia attitudes scale (DAS) and interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) to analyze participants' attitudes. Setting. Osteopathic medical school and dementia care unit in the state of New Jersey. Participants. Eleven out of fourteen medical students completed the study. Measurements. Emerging themes were classified from the postintervention semistructured interviews and descriptive statistics were used to compare the preintervention to postintervention DAS. Results. Researchers found statistically significant differences between preintervention and postintervention DAS scores. Study participants scored a preintervention DAS mean, 107.09 (SD = 11.85), that changed positively and significantly to the postintervention DAS mean, 121.82 (SD = 10.38). DAS subdomains, “comfort” (P = 0.002) and “knowledge” (P = 0.01), and eleven of the twenty DAS items underwent a positive and statistically significant shift from preintervention to postintervention. IPA of the interviews yielded five primary and five secondary themes, supporting the measured statistical outcomes. Conclusion. Medical students' participation in a poetry workshop, with people with ADRD, positively impacts their attitudes. PMID:26977333

  15. Emotional intelligence, empathy and the educative power of poetry: a Deleuzo-Guattarian perspective.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M

    2010-04-01

    The concept of emotional intelligence is gaining increasing precedence in the nursing literature, with particular emphasis placed upon its importance for various aspects of the nursing profession and the demand for greater attention to be given to its development in the education of nurses. Accordingly, this paper will seek to contribute to this emerging body of research by proposing that the employment of poetry in the education of mental health nurses provides a valuable opportunity for the development of emotional intelligence and, in particular, the development of one of the central characteristics of emotional intelligence; namely, empathy. Moreover, while the nature of the relationship between nursing and the arts is gaining increasing attention, this paper will focus upon the account of art given by Gilles Deleuze - one of the most important philosophers of the 20th century - and his long-time collaborator Felix Guattari. In particular, in order to develop a Deleuzo-Guattarian account of the educative power of poetry, and the manner in which it provides a valuable opportunity for the development of emotional intelligence, and of empathy in particular, this paper will employ their account of the 'percept' and the 'affect', introduced in their final collaborative work What is Philosophy?

  16. Bioethical Problems: Animal Welfare, Animal Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various bioethical issues and problems related to animal welfare and animal rights. Areas examined include: Aristotelian views; animal welfare legislation; Darwin and evolutionary theory; animal and human behavior; and vegetarianism. A 14-point universal declaration of the rights of animals is included. (JN)

  17. Readers' opinions of romantic poetry are consistent with emotional measures based on the Dictionary of Affect in Language.

    PubMed

    Whissell, Cynthia

    2003-06-01

    A principal components analysis of 68 volunteers' subjective ratings of 20 excerpts of Romantic poetry and of Dictionary of Affect scores for the same excerpts produced four components representing Pleasantness, Activation, Romanticism, and Nature. Dictionary measures and subjective ratings of the same constructs loaded on the same factor. Results are interpreted as providing construct validity for the Dictionary of Affect. PMID:12831280

  18. The British Schools' National Curriculum: English and the Politics of Teaching Poetry from "Different Cultures and Traditions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doug, Roshan

    2011-01-01

    This polemic paper illustrates the correlation between the original principles underpinning the British National Curriculum which was introduced in the late 1980s and the current quality of the nation's schools' poetry from a variety of poets including those "from other cultures and traditions". It argues that the conception of the National…

  19. The Effects of Music and Poetry Therapy on the Treatment of Women and Adolescents with Chemical Addictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Alisha A.

    1997-01-01

    Finds that both poetry and music therapy activities used in rehabilitation counseling sessions with clients were equally effective, evoking strong client response to both, demonstrating high goal attainment and a high percentage of on-task behaviors during the sessions. (SR)

  20. The Art of Teaching Children the Arts: Music, Dance and Poetry with Children Aged 2-8 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling; Carlsson, Maj Asplund; Olsson, Bengt; Pramling, Niklas; Wallerstedt, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the theoretical framework of developmental pedagogy is presented as a tool in studying and developing children's knowing within the arts. The domains of art focused on are music, poetry and dance/aesthetic movement. Through empirical examples from a large-scale research project, we illustrate the tools of developmental pedagogy…

  1. "Taking It to the Mic": Pedagogy of June Jordan's Poetry for the People and Partnership with an Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jocson, Korina M.

    2005-01-01

    June Jordan, a prolific and most-published African American essayist and poet and a professor in the African American Studies department at the University of California, Berkeley, ventured to challenge the institutionalized Ivory Tower traditions and subsequently established a university program called Poetry for the People (P4P) in 1991. Such…

  2. Aesthetic Alliances in Poetry and Music: T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets and String Quartets by Bela Bartok.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boaz, Mildred Meyer

    1979-01-01

    This paper argues that, although T. S. Eliot's "Four Quartets" provoke comparisons with the late quartets of Beethoven, an analysis of Four Quartets and Bela Bartok's Fourth and Fifth String Quartets produces a clearer understanding of the formal structures in the poetry and music. Symmetries offset asymmetries. (Author/KC)

  3. They Should Have Sent a Poet: Deepening Students' Understanding of History through the Use of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Though poetry can be used to examine a number of topics, this author feels that it is especially illuminating when exploring war. On its surface, war is a ludicrous spectacle of human failings. The fact that countries allow disputes to be settled by a demonstration of each nation's ability to kill citizens of the other nation defies logic. In…

  4. The Noises Made by Poems: An Exploration of the Use of Poetry in the Advanced English Language Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekdawi, Sarah

    1996-01-01

    Use of poetry in advanced college-level classes of English as a second language is discussed, focusing on the oral (acoustic) texture of poems as contrasted with their syntactic, lexical, or figurative qualities. Discussion begins with the characteristics and objectives of the learners in question and the basis in both literary and linguistic…

  5. The "Healing Process" of a Developmental Creative Poetry Therapy as Reflected by the Written Poems (Product Analysis).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Dahlia

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes spontaneous written expression (sampled from 11 workshops) according to a structured model of Creative Poetry Therapy. Finds similarity in the poetic indicators and in the expression of psychological needs, despite profound differences in the composition of the groups (children, youth, adults). Argues that the healing process of poetry…

  6. Ways with Words: Teachers' Personal Epistemologies of the Role of Metalanguage in the Teaching of Poetry Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Anthony; Myhill, Debra Ann

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the personal epistemologies of teachers in relation to the place of linguistic and literary metalanguage in the teaching of poetry writing. The data draw on 93 interviews with 31 secondary English teachers in the UK, following lesson observations, and the data are a subset of a larger study investigating the impact of…

  7. "That Is Why I Sent You to Carlisle": Carlisle Poetry and the Demands of Americanization Poetics and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanciu, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In this article the author starts from the premise that, although there were no renowned Indian poets at Carlisle and other Indian boarding schools in the United States, students in federal boarding schools read and wrote poetry. She argues that the rhetorically bold Carlisle poems--along with the letters and articles published in the Carlisle…

  8. The Quiet Revolution of Poetry Slam: The Sustainability of Cultural Capital in the Light of Changing Artistic Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Helen

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the educational and theoretical implications of an analysis into the artistic movement of poetry slam. Slam is a successful and growing global phenomenon, which both directly and indirectly sets itself against the dominant literary world. As such, it could be viewed as presenting a challenge to dominant literary conventions…

  9. Ways of knowing: Howard Stein's border-crossing use of poetry to interrogate clinical medicine, medical education, and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Johanna

    2016-09-01

    This article explores how medical anthropologist Howard Stein's poetry and his unique practice of sharing this poetry with the patients, physicians, and administrators who inspired it create ways of knowing that are at once revelatory and emancipatory. Stein's writing shows readers that poetry can be considered as a form of data and as a method of investigation into the processes of the human soul. Furthermore, it represents a kind of intervention that invites health professional readers toward connection, bridge building, and solidarity with their patients and with one another. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27632547

  10. Animal welfare: an animal science approach.

    PubMed

    Koknaroglu, H; Akunal, T

    2013-12-01

    Increasing world population and demand for animal-derived protein puts pressure on animal production to meet this demand. For this purpose animal breeding efforts were conducted to obtain the maximum yield that the genetic makeup of the animals permits. Under the influence of economics which is the driving force behind animal production, animal farming became more concentrated and controlled which resulted in rearing animals under confinement. Since more attention was given on economics and yield per animal, animal welfare and behavior were neglected. Animal welfare which can be defined as providing environmental conditions in which animals can display all their natural behaviors in nature started gaining importance in recent years. This does not necessarily mean that animals provided with good management practices would have better welfare conditions as some animals may be distressed even though they are in good environmental conditions. Consumers are willing to pay more for welfare-friendly products (e.g.: free range vs caged egg) and this will change the animal production practices in the future. Thus animal scientists will have to adapt themselves for the changing animal welfare rules and regulations that differ for farm animal species and countries. In this review paper, animal welfare is discussed from an animal science standpoint.

  11. Anime Goes Mainstream: There's Something for Everyone, so Get in on the Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsall, Jane

    2010-01-01

    "Princess Mononoke," "Akira," and "Cowboy Bebop" may not be household names. But in the world of anime, or Japanese animation, they are among the top 10 films ever made. With its complex plots and moral messages, anime is as intelligent as some of the best feature films. From the epic fantasy "Ninja Scroll" and the cyberpunk "Ghost in the Shell"…

  12. Animating Brains

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  13. "Anything That Gets Me in My Heart": Pat Parker's Poetry of Justice.

    PubMed

    Green, David B

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that love and justice are interlocking themes that undergird and motivate the poetry and activism of the Black lesbian feminist Pat Parker. Parker was a prolific working-class poet, a committed Black lesbian feminist, and an international trailblazer whose poems, like her famous "Womanslaughter" discussed in this article, document the many injustices that Black women endured in an anti-Black, rabidly homophobic, and patriarchal U.S. during the last decades of the twentieth century. In a political moment where righteous cries of #BlackLivesMatter are heard across the United States I use this article to remind us all of the historical importance that Black lesbians played and continue to play in the struggles of anti-racist justice in America. PMID:26075686

  14. Neurosurgery in Turkish poetry: three poets, two poems and two neurosurgeons.

    PubMed

    Kahilogullari, Gokmen

    2015-01-01

    Poems are essential in art and vital organs in literature. Similarly, surgery (and neurosurgery) is also regarded to be an art in medicine. From Hippocrates to nowadays, there is a debate on whether medicine -especially surgery- is a kind of an art or a field of science or a combination of both. This close relation becomes clearer during the practice of surgery, especially in neurosurgery. Herein, the relation between Turkish poetry and Turkish neurosurgery is being presented by researching the interesting and exciting stories about three poets (Can Yücel, Hasan Hüseyin Korkmazgil, Nazım Hikmet), their poems; and two Turkish neurosurgeons (Gazi Yaşargil, Yücel Kanpolat). PMID:26037173

  15. Programs in Animal Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Don R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five topics relating to programs in animal agriculture are addressed: (1) the future of animal agriculture; (2) preparing teachers in animal agriculture; (3) how animal programs help young people; (4) a nontraditional animal agriculture program; and (5) developing competencies in animal agriculture. (LRA)

  16. Feruidus Ille Canis: the Lore and Poetry of the Dog Star in Antiquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceragioli, Roger Charles

    1992-01-01

    The Dog Star, Sirius, appears in many important works of classical poetry. It also appears in numerous myths and several religious rituals. A complex body of folklore surrounds it and it had a paramount importance in agriculture. Yet no one has attempted a systematic analysis of Sirius' place in Greco-Roman art and thought. This thesis begins that analysis. The introductory chapter discusses the methodology and approach that the thesis takes to the evidence, and supplies essential background information on Sirius' place among the constellations and its relation to the physical environment of the Mediterranean. Chapter one explores Sirius' role in ancient warrior traditions. Sirius embodied the principle of cosmic heat, and through heat it was thought to cause rabies in dogs. The Greek word for rabies is lussa. But lussa also named the madness of warriors such as Achilles in the Iliad. Etymologically, lussa meant "wolfishness." Rabid dogs, wolves, and raging warriors all exhibit fiery heat as an integral part of their natures. It is argued that raging warriors, wolves, and rabid dogs were largely interchangeable entities for the Greeks. Thus when Hector and Achilles in their raging are compared to Sirius, the comparison reflects more than the likeness of their surface brilliance. Chapter two explores Sirius' connection to erotic themes in ancient poetry. Because erotic experience could be represented as a conflagration that might burn the lover into a frenzy, the fiery raging Dog Star was an appropriate symbolic accompaniment. Sirius itself experienced erotic frenzy when it became passionate for Opora (the ripe fruits of summer). Chapter three turns to Sirius' involvement in viticulture. Sirius was said to ripen the grapes, but was also conceived to have once been the faithful dog of Icarius, who first introduced wine-drinking among humans. The chapter explores Sirius' role in the myth of Icarius, and the relation of that myth to the erotic and martial sides of

  17. Film Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students created three-dimensional designs for 35mm film packages to improve graphic arts learning. Describes how the students examined and created film boxes using QuarkXPress software. (CMK)

  18. Film Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, John, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews five instructional films on: P-N junctions; crystal diodes; nuclear fusion research; Schlieren photography; and the energy crisis; including discussions of solar, nuclear, and fossil fuel energy. Also lists numerous other available films. (MLH)

  19. Poetry Extravaganza.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, L. Marvin

    Twenty-six poetic forms are discussed in this paper, with suggested activities for teaching these patterns to students in grades kindergarten through grade twelve. The forms that are discussed include the couplet, quatrain, triplet, limerick, free verse, haiku, cinquain, sijo, septolet, diamante, acrostic, sonnet, parody, dramatic monologue, and…

  20. Poetry Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricker, Patricia; Faetz, Melissa; Tracy, Kelly N.; Luke, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Over many years, the authors have inquired into the integration of science and literacy in primary grades. Students have used science notebooks as places to write and draw their scientific questions, predictions, observations, research notes, claims, reflections, and wonderings. At the same time, the authors have engaged their students in writers'…

  1. Living Poetry.

    PubMed

    Sommerer, Christa; Mignonneau, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We introduce three of our interactive artworks that translate text into artificial creatures or creatures into text by means of user interaction. These installations make use of experimental literature, media archaeology, surrealism, artificial life, and algorithmic methods. PMID:26280072

  2. Found Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    The lesson described in this article provides a wonderful opportunity for fourth graders to integrate reading and writing into a visual art experience. After an exploration of books, students create an artist's book that uses language as respiration. Through this lesson, students explore and understand prospective content for works of art.

  3. Nanocomposite films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlin, David; , Ophus, Colin; Evoy, Stephane; Radmilovic, Velimir; Mohammadi, Reza; Westra, Ken; Nelson-Fitzpatrick, Nathaniel; Lee, Zonghoon

    2010-07-20

    A thin-film composition of nanocrystal molybdenum in an amorphous metallic matrix may be formed by co-sputtering Mo with aluminum or nickel. NEMS cantilevers may be formed from the film. The films exhibit high nanoindentation hardness and a reduction in roughness and intrinsic stress, while maintaining resistivity in the metallic range.

  4. On Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Marty

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the role of window films in enhancing indoor air quality in schools. Historically, window film has been used to reduce temperatures in buildings prone to overheating. Too much solar energy entering through windows makes occupants uncomfortable and air conditioning more costly. Film has been a simple solution…

  5. Humanistic Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Maureen, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Designed for media specialists and educators, this issue includes seven articles focusing on humanistic films for children. Following a brief editorial encouraging the ideals of humanism, the first article presents an analysis of seven films with positive sex-role models. Included is a model for evaluating children's films. The second article…

  6. Sound For Animation And Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, James K.; Docter, Pete; Foster, Scott H.; Mangini, Mark; Myers, Tom; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Sound is an integral part of the experience in computer animation and virtual reality. In this course, we will present some of the important technical issues in sound modeling, rendering, and synchronization as well as the "art" and business of sound that are being applied in animations, feature films, and virtual reality. The central theme is to bring leading researchers and practitioners from various disciplines to share their experiences in this interdisciplinary field. The course will give the participants an understanding of the problems and techniques involved in producing and synchronizing sounds, sound effects, dialogue, and music. The problem spans a number of domains including computer animation and virtual reality. Since sound has been an integral part of animations and films much longer than for computer-related domains, we have much to learn from traditional animation and film production. By bringing leading researchers and practitioners from a wide variety of disciplines, the course seeks to give the audience a rich mixture of experiences. It is expected that the audience will be able to apply what they have learned from this course in their research or production.

  7. [Animal experimentation, animal welfare and scientific research].

    PubMed

    Tal, H

    2013-10-01

    Hundreds of thousands of laboratory animals are being used every year for scientific experiments held in Israel, mostly mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and a few sheep, cattle, pigs, cats, dogs, and even a few dozen monkeys. In addition to the animals sacrificed to promote scientific research, millions of animals slain every year for other purposes such as meat and fine leather fashion industries. While opening a front against all is an impossible and perhaps an unjustified task, the state of Israel enacted the Animal Welfare (Animal Experimentation) Law (1994). The law aims to regulate scientific animal experiments and to find the appropriate balance between the need to continue to perform animal experiments for the advancement of research and medicine, and at the same time to avoid unnecessary trials and minimize animal suffering. Among other issues the law deals with the phylogenetic scale according to which experimental animals should be selected, experiments for teaching and practicing, and experiments for the cosmetic industry. This article discusses bioethics considerations in animal experiments as well as the criticism on the scientific validity of such experiments. It further deals with the vitality of animal studies and the moral and legal obligation to prevent suffering from laboratory animals. PMID:24660572

  8. [Animal experimentation, animal welfare and scientific research].

    PubMed

    Tal, H

    2013-10-01

    Hundreds of thousands of laboratory animals are being used every year for scientific experiments held in Israel, mostly mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and a few sheep, cattle, pigs, cats, dogs, and even a few dozen monkeys. In addition to the animals sacrificed to promote scientific research, millions of animals slain every year for other purposes such as meat and fine leather fashion industries. While opening a front against all is an impossible and perhaps an unjustified task, the state of Israel enacted the Animal Welfare (Animal Experimentation) Law (1994). The law aims to regulate scientific animal experiments and to find the appropriate balance between the need to continue to perform animal experiments for the advancement of research and medicine, and at the same time to avoid unnecessary trials and minimize animal suffering. Among other issues the law deals with the phylogenetic scale according to which experimental animals should be selected, experiments for teaching and practicing, and experiments for the cosmetic industry. This article discusses bioethics considerations in animal experiments as well as the criticism on the scientific validity of such experiments. It further deals with the vitality of animal studies and the moral and legal obligation to prevent suffering from laboratory animals.

  9. Facial Animations: Future Research Directions & Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Rehman, Amjad; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, computer facial animation is used in a significant multitude fields that brought human and social to study the computer games, films and interactive multimedia reality growth. Authoring the computer facial animation, complex and subtle expressions are challenging and fraught with problems. As a result, the current most authored using universal computer animation techniques often limit the production quality and quantity of facial animation. With the supplement of computer power, facial appreciative, software sophistication and new face-centric methods emerging are immature in nature. Therefore, this paper concentrates to define and managerially categorize current and emerged surveyed facial animation experts to define the recent state of the field, observed bottlenecks and developing techniques. This paper further presents a real-time simulation model of human worry and howling with detail discussion about their astonish, sorrow, annoyance and panic perception.

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... 08 Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) Chinese Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) French ...

  11. Spacecraft -- Capsule Separation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Spacecraft -- Capsule Separation animation

    This animation shows the return capsule separating from the Stardust spacecraft.

  12. Anodic films

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.H.

    1983-08-01

    Surface layers are formed on many metals by anodic reaction. Such layers include the products of charge and discharge in many storage batteries, dielectric films used in electronic and optical circuits and display devices, layers responsible for passivity and corrosion protection, and films generated in metal shaping and finishing operations such as anodization, coloring, electropolishing, electrochemical machining and deburring. Anodic films are formed by solid-solid transformations or by dissolution-precipitation processes. Film properties and mechanisms of formation can be determined in situ by a number of optical techniques which have recently become available.

  13. Film ispalators

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Aleksandr V; Stoilov, Yurii Yu

    2002-05-31

    New physical objects, ispalators based on free soap films, exhibit persistent flows of the soap solution in open and closed volumes in air with additions of gases of the C{sub 8}F{sub 18} type (p = 20 Torr) at temperature drops on the films of the order of tenths and hundredths of kelvin. The flows move continuously at a velocity of 5 - 20 cm s{sup -1}. It is found that the parts of an inclined ispalator film show anomalous behaviour upon heating: their weight increases and they move downward over the film, whereas the unheated parts of the film move upward. Continuous radial vortex flows accompanied by the formation and washing of the regions of a thin black film are observed on circular films in closed volumes upon their uniform external cooling by evaporating water for 5 - 10 hours. The rapid flows make film ispalators the efficient heat carriers, which operate at small temperature drops (tenths and hundredths of kelvin) and surpass copper in the amount of thermal energy being transferred. The outlook for the further study and applications of film ispalators for detecting thermal fields and laser radiation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Making Machinima: Animation, Games, and Multimodal Participation in the Media Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burn, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In the project discussed in this article, 30 11-year olds made an animated film in the machinima style, influenced by both film and game culture, and using a 3-D animation software tool, Moviestorm. The processes and products of the project will be analysed using a social semiotic/multimodal approach, exploring the social interests behind the…

  15. Animal rights, animal minds, and human mindreading.

    PubMed

    Mameli, M; Bortolotti, L

    2006-02-01

    Do non-human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non-human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. However, the scientific studies do not by themselves solve the problem of how to map psychological similarities (and differences) between humans and animals onto a distinction between morally relevant and morally irrelevant mental properties. The current limitations of human mindreading-whether scientifically aided or not-have practical consequences for the rational justification of claims about which rights (if any) non-human animals should be accorded.

  16. Aesthetic appreciation of poetry correlates with ease of processing in event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Christian; Kotz, Sonja A; Jessen, Sarah; Raettig, Tim; von Koppenfels, Martin; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2016-04-01

    Rhetorical theory suggests that rhythmic and metrical features of language substantially contribute to persuading, moving, and pleasing an audience. A potential explanation of these effects is offered by "cognitive fluency theory," which stipulates that recurring patterns (e.g., meter) enhance perceptual fluency and can lead to greater aesthetic appreciation. In this article, we explore these two assertions by investigating the effects of meter and rhyme in the reception of poetry by means of event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Participants listened to four versions of lyrical stanzas that varied in terms of meter and rhyme, and rated the stanzas for rhythmicity and aesthetic liking. The behavioral and ERP results were in accord with enhanced liking and rhythmicity ratings for metered and rhyming stanzas. The metered and rhyming stanzas elicited smaller N400/P600 ERP responses than their nonmetered, nonrhyming, or nonmetered and nonrhyming counterparts. In addition, the N400 and P600 effects for the lyrical stanzas correlated with aesthetic liking effects (metered-nonmetered), implying that modulation of the N400 and P600 has a direct bearing on the aesthetic appreciation of lyrical stanzas. We suggest that these effects are indicative of perceptual-fluency-enhanced aesthetic liking, as postulated by cognitive fluency theory. PMID:26697879

  17. Aftermath: the implicit processes of integrating traumatic experience in the poetry of Siegfried Sassoon.

    PubMed

    Saks, Paul S

    2007-01-01

    The creation of narratives often allows individuals to bear witness to traumatic events. This study looked at connections between the processing of traumatic, affect laden experience and levels of symbolization and symmetry within the context of poetic expression. The sample for this pilot study is composed of selected works by Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967), a British soldier-poet of the Great War. The language of the poems reflected the deepening trauma of the war experience by showing a progression toward paranoid (concrete)/symmetrical experiences. As the years passed and the poet was able to process the memory of the events, the poetry reflected a more balanced shift toward integration of depressive (symbolic)/asymmetrical experience. In terms of affect, the most significant changes were seen after Sassoon left the front and witnessed the flagrant dichotomy between civilian and military life. The results suggest a way in which traumatic events are processed. The routine horror and brutality of the Western Front initially lay outside of the realm of language and symbols and were thus highly concrete and unprocessed experiences. Time, place, and identity collapsed in on itself, leading to the increase of symmetrical experience, while the extreme "us versus them experience" of the trenches can be seen in the balance of asymmetrical experience. The study has implications for the treatment of war trauma, suggesting that writing provides a vehicle through which events can be processed and an internal sense of balance can be approached. PMID:18335612

  18. Beta-ray photography of lyophilized animal sections.

    PubMed

    Baba, S; Kimata, H; Matsuzawa, T

    1997-07-01

    A new photographic method that images the density distribution of lyophilized animal sections approximately 50 microns in thickness is described. The new method involves sandwiching the animal section between a radiation sensor and a 147Pm planar radiation source. Either conventional photographic film or an imaging plate for radioluminography can be used as the sensor. The method described herein will find promising applications in whole body autoradiography as well as in the study of osteoporosis in experimental animals.

  19. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Maoka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade. PMID:21566799

  20. About Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Robert; Krockover, Gerald H.

    1984-01-01

    Lists and briefly describes 46 college-level films. Films are arranged in the following categories: volcanism and earthquakes; plate tectonics; energy, water, and environmental concerns; petroleum and coal; astronomy; space exploration, space shuttle; paleontology; geomorphology; and mineralogy, petrology, and economic geology. (BC)

  1. Thin Film?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariper, İ. Afşin

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on the critical surface tension of lead sulfite (PbSO3) crystalline thin film produced with chemical bath deposition on substrates (commercial glass).The PbSO3 thin films were deposited at room temperature at different deposition times. The structural properties of the films were defined and examined according to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the XRD results such as dislocation density, average grain size, and no. of crystallites per unit area. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the film thickness and the surface properties. The critical surface tension of the PbSO3 thin films was measured with an optical tensiometer instrument and calculated using the Zisman method. The results indicated that the critical surface tension of films changed in accordance with the average grain size and film thickness. The film thickness increased with deposition time and was inversely correlated with surface tension. The average grain size increased according to deposition time and was inversely correlated with surface tension.

  2. Animals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Angela

    1988-01-01

    Animals are indispensable to the space program. Their continued use could have many significant results. Those who are opposed to using animals in space should remember that space animals are treated humanely; they are necessary because results can be obtained from them that would be unobtainable from humans; and results from animal experiments can be applied to human systems. Therefore, NASA should continue to use animals in space research.

  3. Film Makers On Film Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geduld, Harry M., Ed.

    This collection includes essays by and interviews with more than 30 film-makers, both classic and contemporary, on the subjects of their major interests and procedures in making films. The directors are: Louis Lumiere, Cecil Hepworth, Edwin S. Porter, Mack Sennett, David W. Griffith, Robert Flaherty, Charles Chaplin, Eric von Stroheim, Dziga…

  4. Animated Graphics in Meteorological Research and Presentations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotjahn, Richard; Chervin, Robert M.

    1984-11-01

    For the past two years, the authors have been involved in the production of computer-animated movies at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The computer-generated frames are high-quality graphs of two- and three-dimensional variables featuring trajectories, contour lines, shading patterns, or three-dimensional surfaces (viewed in perspective). The original application was for comparing the FGGE dataset motion fields with satellite film loops. Applications have broadened to include model-generated data. Computer animation is particularly useful for efficiently previewing and presenting large quantities of data. Experiments with stereo images have also been made.

  5. The Metaphorical Applications of Heavenly Bodies and Phenomena in Western Armenian Poetry at the Beginning of the XX Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Karine

    2015-07-01

    The metaphorical applications of heavenly bodies and phenomena in Western Armenian poetry at the beginning of the XX century are very diverse and of great variety. Art Workers eulogize the creation of God, admire the beauty of stars, and perceive the man as a part of nature and in the close connection with all other parts. These units are often used for bringing to light one's inner life, his old gone paths, expectations and hopes, many times they become the heart and the basis of poetical image and create unique beauty.

  6. Language style matching in writing: synchrony in essays, correspondence, and poetry.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Molly E; Pennebaker, James W

    2010-09-01

    Each relationship has its own personality. Almost immediately after a social interaction begins, verbal and nonverbal behaviors become synchronized. Even in asocial contexts, individuals tend to produce utterances that match the grammatical structure of sentences they have recently heard or read. Three projects explore language style matching (LSM) in everyday writing tasks and professional writing. LSM is the relative use of 9 function word categories (e.g., articles, personal pronouns) between any 2 texts. In the first project, 2 samples totaling 1,744 college students answered 4 essay questions written in very different styles. Students automatically matched the language style of the target questions. Overall, the LSM metric was internally consistent and reliable across writing tasks. Women, participants of higher socioeconomic status, and students who earned higher test grades matched with targets more than others did. In the second project, 74 participants completed cliffhanger excerpts from popular fiction. Judges' ratings of excerpt-response similarity were related to content matching but not function word matching, as indexed by LSM. Further, participants were not able to intentionally increase style or content matching. In the final project, an archival study tracked the professional writing and personal correspondence of 3 pairs of famous writers across their relationships. Language matching in poetry and letters reflected fluctuations in the relationships of 3 couples: Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, and Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes. Implications for using LSM as an implicit marker of social engagement and influence are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  8. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  9. Piezoelectric Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities that utilize piezoelectric film to familiarize students with fundamental principles of electricity. Describes classroom projects involving chemical sensors, microbalances, microphones, switches, infrared sensors, and power generation. (MDH)

  10. Film Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, George T.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes films about the following topics: water cycles, the energy crisis, the eruption of Mt. Aetna, the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, and methods of using pine cones to determine the ages of ancient civilizations. (MLH)

  11. "Name" that Animal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a texture and pattern project. Students started by doing an outline contour drawing of an animal. With the outline drawn, the students then write one of their names to fit "inside" the animal.

  12. Ethology and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Osterhoff, D R

    1981-12-01

    Much scientific information concerning animal behaviour has become available only recently and it continues to increase rapidly. There is evidence indicating that the behavioural needs of animals have sometimes been neglected when natural life-style are replaced by artificially contrived ones. More attention to and study of animals' social and other behavioural requirements would be mutually beneficial to both man and beast. If those needs can be met more adequately, animals will be easier to handle, stress will be reduced and productivity improved. Animal welfare legislation in different countries is mentioned and ethological research as basis for new legislation discussed. The development in this critical field of Ethology and Animal Welfare is advancing fast and the South African Veterinarian must be aware of the new movement from Animal Science to Animal Rights. PMID:7341784

  13. Animals in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Andrew N.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes viewpoints on the use of animals in science experiments in the biology classroom, including those of teachers, education researchers, biomedical scientists, science education administrators, and animal welfare advocates. (Author/CS)

  14. Retainer for laboratory animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Bio-retainer holds laboratory animals in fixed position for research and clinical experiments. Retainer allows full access to animals and can be rapidly opened and closed to admit and release specimens.

  15. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  16. Animals of the Desert.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information and student activities on how desert animals have adapted to dryness and heat, how and when animals move on the desert, and nocturnal/diurnal animals. Each activity includes objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Ready-to-copy pages are included for a…

  17. Animals in Disguise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mary C.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity in which first grade students learn why camouflage is important to an animal's survival. Students see living examples of animals who use camouflage for protection, then create their own camouflaged animals and hide them around the classroom. For assessment, students write and illustrate five things they learned from the study…

  18. Pixel Palette: Palm Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Describes a project used with fifth-grade students in which they learned about animation. Explains that the students learned about animation used in art. States that they received a personal data assistant to create their own animation of a flower that was growing and pollinated by a butterfly. (CMK)

  19. Student Attitudes Towards Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Michael A. J.

    1976-01-01

    The attitudes of 127 college students toward 30 different animals was assessed via a like/dislike questionnaire. Results indicated that female students disliked more animals than did males, and that non-Biology majors disliked more animals than did Biology majors. (SL)

  20. Polyvinylpyrrolidone oral films of enrofloxacin: film characterization and drug release.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Prem; Phani, A R; Prasad, R G S V; Sanganal, Jagadeesh S; Manali, N; Gupta, R; Rashmi, N; Prabhakara, G S; Salins, C Paul; Sandeep, K; Raju, D B

    2014-08-25

    Enrofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone derivative used for treating urinary tract, respiratory and skin infections in animals. However, low solubility and low bioavailability prevented it from using on humans. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is an inert, non toxic polymer with excellent hydrophilic properties, besides it can enhance bioavailability by forming drug polymer conjugates. With the aim of increasing solubility and bioavailability, enrofloxacin thin films were prepared using PVP as a polymer matrix. The obtained oral thin films exhibited excellent uniformity and mechanical properties. Swelling properties of the oral thin films revealed that the water uptake was enhanced by 21%. The surface pH has been found to be 6.8±0.1 indicating that these films will not cause any irritation to oral mucosa. FTIR data of the oral thin films indicated physical interaction between drug and polymer. SEM analysis revealed uniform distribution of drug in polymer matrix. In vitro drug release profiles showed enhanced release profiles (which are also pH dependant) for thin films compared to pure drug. Antibacterial activity was found to be dose dependent and maximum susceptibility was found on Klebsiella pneumonia making this preparation more suitable for respiratory infections.

  1. [About animal allergy].

    PubMed

    Haahtela, Tari

    2016-01-01

    Although the opinions about animals and animal allergies may be extreme, animals can even be indispensable for the well-being of humans. The immune tolerance of many modern city dwellers is insufficiently developed, predisposing the skin and mucous membranes to allergic inflammation. There is no need in infancy to avoid animals, and animal contacts in early childhood rather protect from the development of allergies. Pet allergens are present in small amounts everywhere, not only in places where they live. General instructions on avoidance do not exist. New forms of desensitization therapy may in the future bring relief for those having strong symptoms. PMID:27522834

  2. [Animal experimentation in Israel].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram; Leshem, Micah

    2002-04-01

    In 1994 the Israeli parliament (Knesset) amended the Cruelty to Animals Act to regulate the use of experimental animals. Accordingly, animal experiments can only be carried out for the purposes of promoting health and medical science, reducing suffering, advancing scientific research, testing or production of materials and products (excluding cosmetics and cleaning products) and education. Animal experiments are only permitted if alternative methods are not possible. The National Board for Animal Experimentation was established to implement the law. Its members are drawn from government ministries, representatives of doctors, veterinarians, and industry organizations, animal rights groups, and academia. In order to carry out an animal experiment, the institution, researchers involved, and the specific experiment, all require approval by the Board. To date the Board has approved some 35 institutions, about half are public institutions (universities, hospitals and colleges) and the rest industrial firms in biotechnology and pharmaceutics. In 2000, 250,000 animals were used in research, 85% were rodents, 11% fowls, 1,000 other farm animals, 350 dogs and cats, and 39 monkeys. Academic institutions used 74% of the animals and industry the remainder. We also present summarized data on the use of animals in research in other countries.

  3. Poetry, Nature and Science: Romantic Nature Philosophy in the Works of Novalis and E. T. a. Hoffmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, Ausma Skerbele

    The nature philosophy of the early Romantic period in Germany attempted to find a synthesis of science and philosophy in a new philosophy of nature. This philosophy was first formulated by F. W. J. Schelling and influenced by the galvanic experiments of J. W. Ritter. Novalis is a unique figure in romanticism since he combines scientific expertise with philosophical insight and poetic imagination. In Lehrlinge zu Sais he explores the significance of nature's language and presents different relationships between man and nature. Novalis thinks that a synthesis of all divergent elements in nature and society is necessary to transform the world. In Klingsohrs Marchen this transformation is accomplished by poetic activation of the physical sciences and by the power of love. After 1800 the romantic movement becomes interested in the problems of subconscious and abnormal psychological states, which are seen as contacts with a more spiritual level of existence. These ideas, expressed in a popular form by G. H. Schubert, provide a rich source of materials for E. T. A. Hoffmann, who elevates the realms of poetry and music in his fairy tales, but sees only negative qualities in science. Hoffmann's protagonists find that love, music, and poetry are the greatest forces in life. The figure of the scientist becomes an evil magician with no regard for human values. The romantic movement failed to unite the values of humanities with the insights of physical sciences. The problem of autonomy isolates both modern science and modern literature from the ethical values of society.

  4. [Animals and environmentalist ethics].

    PubMed

    Guichet, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    While environmental ethics and animal ethics have a common source of inspiration, they do not agree on the question of the status of animals. Environmental ethicists criticise the narrowness of the reason, focused on pain, given by animal ethicists and their strictly individual point of view; they maintain that their ethical concept is less emotional and more informed by science, with a broad point of view taking natural networks into account. Animal ethicists respond critically, accusing the environmental ethicists of not having any ethical foundation. There are, however, prospects for reconciling the two approaches, provided that they recognise two different ethical stances for animals: one based on the integrity of wild animals and the other based on a model contract for tame animals.

  5. Let's Poem: The Essential Guide to Teaching Poetry in a High-Stakes, Multimodal World (Middle through High School). Language & Literacy Practitioners Bookshelf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dressman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This cutting-edge guide presents multiple approaches to teaching poetry at the middle and high school levels. The author provides field-tested activities with detailed how-to instructions, as well as advice for how educators can "justify" their teaching within a high-stakes curriculum environment. "Let's Poem" will show pre- and inservice teachers…

  6. "Now I Believe if I Write I Can Do Anything": Using Poetry to Create Opportunities for Engagement and Learning in the Language Arts Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes how adolescent students responded to a poetry workshop in an English classroom where the content was derived from their knowledge from their various life experiences and understanding of world events. Informed by theories of New Literacy Studies, ethnographic methods of participant-observation were used to document an eighth…

  7. "Journalism, Poetry, Stand-Up Comedy, and Academic Writing: Mapping the Interplay of Curricular and Extracurricular Literate Activities": Re-Visiting a Theoretical Lens Five Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roozen, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Published in a 2008 issue of "Journal of Basic Writing" ("JBW"), "Journalism, Poetry, Stand-Up Comedy, and Academic Writing: Mapping the Interplay of Curricular and Extracurricular Literate Activities" was Kevin Roozen's first single-authored publication. Drawn from data collected for the first case study from…

  8. A Folksonomy-Based Guidance Mechanism for Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning: A Case Study of Chinese Scenic Poetry Appreciation Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Wen-Chung; Tseng, Shian-Shyong; Yang, Che-Ching; Lin, Chih-Yu; Liang, Tyne

    2012-01-01

    In this work ubiquitous learning technologies are applied to Chinese scenic poetry appreciation. A folksonomy-based approach is proposed to accumulate knowledge about poems and their corresponding scenic spots. A user can use a "Tagging" operation by a smart phone to associate a concept (a word, a phrase or a sentence) with a scenic spot. These…

  9. Bulgarian Modern Poetry [and] Dracula - Fact and Fiction, for a Western World Literature Class. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1997. (Romania and Bulgaria).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rang, Barbara L.

    This project developed two units for secondary students, one dealing with the modern poetry of Bulgaria and one with the legend of Dracula. The first unit includes poems, discussion questions, and a background essay. The second unit includes discussion materials largely based on Brian Stoker's novel "Dracula," and an historical essay on Vlad…

  10. Lessons that Bear Repeating and Repeating that Bears Lessons: An Interdisciplinary Unit on Principles of Minimalism in Modern Music, Art, and Poetry (Grades 4-8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigel, Eric; McDonald, Nan L.

    2012-01-01

    This theory-to-practice article focuses on interdisciplinary classroom activities based on principles of minimalism in modern music, art, and poetry. A lesson sequence was designed for an inner-city Grades 4 and 5 general classroom of English language learners, where the unit was taught, assessed, and documented by the authors. Included in the…

  11. Poetry in and out of the Classroom: Essays from the ACLS Elementary and Secondary Schools Teacher Curriculum Development Project. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY.

    This volume contains five essays on the uses of poetry and one poem by elementary and secondary teachers involved in a project to encourage teachers to develop the habit of scholarship as the basis for their teaching. In the first essay, "Female Poets of the First World War: A Study in Diversity for the Fifth Grade Social Studies Curriculum,"…

  12. Piecing Together the 20th Century: An Interdisciplinary Unit on Principles of Collage in Modern Music, Art, and Poetry (Grades 4-8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigel, Eric; McDonald, Nan L.

    2011-01-01

    This theory-to-practice article focuses on interdisciplinary classroom activities based on principles of collage in modern music, art, and poetry. A two-lesson sequence was designed for an inner-city Grade 4 and 5 general classroom of English language learners, where the unit was taught, assessed, and documented by the authors. Included in the…

  13. Pestiviruses in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Vilcek, S; Nettleton, P F

    2006-08-25

    Pestiviruses are not strictly host-species specific and can infect not only domestic but also wild animals. The most important pestivirus, CSFV, infects domestic pigs and wild boars, which may cause a major problem for successful CSFV eradication programmes. Mainly BVDV specific antibodies have been reported in captive and free-living animals. Virus has been isolated from some of these animal species, but since BVDV can contaminate cell cultures and foetal calf serum, early reports of BVDV isolation have to be considered with caution. Genetic typing of early pestivirus isolates from wild species revealed that the majority were BVDV-1. Of the pestiviruses identified so far three species (CSFV, BVDV-1, giraffe pestivirus) and three genotypes (BDV-2, BDV-4, pronghorn) appear to circulate in wildlife animal populations. The potential for pestiviruses to spread between farm animals and free-living animals is discussed as are epidemiological and technical problems, and the future direction of research. PMID:16839713

  14. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  15. Zoo animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Kohn, B

    1994-03-01

    The history of zoo animal welfare legislation extends back to 1876, and is often tied to general animal welfare regulations. As knowledge and societal values have changed, so have the focus of zoos and the regulations governing them. Today, the issues involved in zoo animal welfare are complex and broad-based. Building on the basic welfare tenets of adequate feed, water, shelter, sanitation and veterinary care, current issues include the following: handling and training of captive animals, psychological well-being and environmental enrichment, enclosure design, species preservation, environmental and conservation issues, captive-breeding programmes. Complicating the matter further, government regulations try to assimilate all aspects of zoo animal welfare into the laws to provide humane care and handling for all species concerned. Zoo animal welfare will remain a challenging area, as increasing demands are placed on zoos and regulatory agencies to manage this diminishing resource.

  16. The representative animal

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The anthropocentric approach to the study of animal behavior uses representative nonhuman animals to understand human behavior. This approach raises problems concerning the comparison of the behavior of two different species. The datum of behavior analysis is the behavior of humans and representative animal phenotypes. The behavioral phenotype is the product of the ontogeny and phylogeny of each species, and this requires that contributions of genotype as well as behavioral history to experimental performance be considered. Behavior analysis tends to favor the ontogenetic over the phylogenetic component, yet both components are responsible for the performance of each individual animal. This paper raises questions about the role of genotype variables in the use of representative animals to understand human behavior. Examples indicating the role of genotype in human behavior are also discussed. The final section of the paper deals with considerations of genotype in the design of animal experiments. PMID:22478186

  17. Our love for animals.

    PubMed

    Scruton, Roger

    2013-12-01

    Love does not necessarily benefit its object, and cost-free love may damage both object and subject. Our love of animals mobilises several distinct human concerns and should not be considered always as a virtue or always as a benefit to the animals themselves. We need to place this love in its full psychological, cultural, and moral context in order to assess what form it ought to take if animals are to benefit from it.

  18. Lightning safety of animals.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Chandima

    2012-11-01

    This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed.

  19. Whole animal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Singh; Solorio, Luis; Broome, Ann-Marie; Salem, Nicolas; Kolthammer, Jeff; Shah, Tejas; Flask, Chris; Duerk, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Translational research plays a vital role in understanding the underlying pathophysiology of human diseases, and hence development of new diagnostic and therapeutic options for their management. After creating an animal disease model, pathophysiologic changes and effects of a therapeutic intervention on them are often evaluated on the animals using immunohistologic or imaging techniques. In contrast to the immunohistologic techniques, the imaging techniques are noninvasive and hence can be used to investigate the whole animal, oftentimes in a single exam which provides opportunities to perform longitudinal studies and dynamic imaging of the same subject, and hence minimizes the experimental variability, requirement for the number of animals, and the time to perform a given experiment. Whole animal imaging can be performed by a number of techniques including x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, fluorescence imaging, and bioluminescence imaging, among others. Individual imaging techniques provide different kinds of information regarding the structure, metabolism, and physiology of the animal. Each technique has its own strengths and weaknesses, and none serves every purpose of image acquisition from all regions of an animal. In this review, a broad overview of basic principles, available contrast mechanisms, applications, challenges, and future prospects of many imaging techniques employed for whole animal imaging is provided. Our main goal is to briefly describe the current state of art to researchers and advanced students with a strong background in the field of animal research. PMID:20836038

  20. Inhalation exposure of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, R F

    1976-01-01

    Relative advantages and disadvantages and important design criteria for various exposure methods are presented. Five types of exposures are discussed: whole-body chambers, head-only exposures, nose or mouth-only methods, lung-only exposures, and partial-lung exposures. Design considerations covered include: air cleaning and conditioning; construction materials; losses of exposure materials; evenness of exposure; sampling biases; animal observation and care; noise and vibration control, safe exhausts, chamber loading, reliability, pressure fluctuations; neck seals, masks, animal restraint methods; and animal comfort. Ethical considerations in use of animals in inhalation experiments are also discussed. PMID:1017420