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Sample records for anisotropic conductive adhesive

  1. Mechanical Properties of Anisotropic Conductive Adhesive Film Under Hygrothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Lan; Chen, Xu; Gao, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical properties of anisotropic conductive adhesive film (ACF) were investigated experimentally under various environmental conditions. The temperature sweep test was conducted to investigate the effects of temperature on dynamical mechanical properties of the ACF. The ACF exhibited transitions to the glass state, viscoelastic state, and rubber state with increasing temperature, and its glass-transition temperature ( T g) was determined to be 149°C. The creep-recovery behaviors of the ACF were investigated, and it was found that the initial strains, instantaneous strains, and creep or recovery rates increased with increasing temperature. No obvious creep phenomenon was observed at low temperatures (≤0°C). The creep strain and creep rates at any time decreased with increasing hygrothermal aging time. The uniaxial tensile behaviors of the ACF were also investigated under hygrothermal aging and thermal cycling. The results show that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the ACF decrease with increasing hygrothermal aging time; however, they increase at first and then decrease with increasing thermal cycling time. T g decreases slightly for the ACF after hygrothermal aging; however, it increases after thermal cycling.

  2. Conductivity in an anisotropic background

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Nam, Siyoung; Pang, Da-Wei; Park, Chanyong

    2011-03-15

    By using the gauge/gravity duality, we investigate the dual field theories of the anisotropic backgrounds, which are exact solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with a Liouville potential. When we turn on the bulk gauge field fluctuation A{sub x} with a nontrivial dilaton coupling, the AC conductivity of this dual field theory is proportional to the frequency with an exponent depending on parameters of the anisotropic background. In some parameter regions, we find that this conductivity can have the negative exponent like the strange metal. In addition, we also investigate another U(1) gauge field fluctuation, which is not coupled with a dilaton field. We classify all possible conductivities of this system and find that the exponent of the conductivity is always positive.

  3. Tunable anisotropic thermal conduction in graphane nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dengfeng; Xu, Yong; Chen, Xiaobin; Li, Bolin; Duan, Wenhui

    2014-04-01

    Graphane and graphene are both two-dimensional materials but of different bonding configurations, which can result in distinct thermal conduction properties. We simulate thermal conduction in graphane nanoribbons (GANRs) using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. We find anisotropic thermal conduction in GANRs, with zigzag GANRs giving higher thermal conductance than armchair ones. Compared to the graphene counterparts, GANRs show lower ballistic thermal conductance and stronger thermal conductance anisotropy. Furthermore, hydrogen vacancies of GANRs considerably suppress thermal conduction, accompanied by enhanced thermal conductance anisotropy. The tunable thermal conduction, realized by controlling the ribbon width, edge shape, and hydrogen vacancy concentration of GANRs, could be useful for thermal management and thermoelectric applications.

  4. Anisotropic heat conduction in diacetylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, D. T.; Heremans, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Uher, C.

    1986-08-01

    Measurements of the low-temperature thermal conductivity of diacetylene single crystals are reported. Monomer samples show little anisotropy and display the temperature dependence of a crystalline dielectric. In polymerized samples, heat is conducted up to 60 times better parallel to the chains than perpendicular to them. Dislocations can account for this anisotropy at the lowest temperatures. Quasi one dimensionality of the polymer crystals induces anisotropy at higher temperatures and strongly suppresses anharmonic phonon interactions.

  5. Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyejin; Wood, Joshua D; Ryder, Christopher R; Hersam, Mark C; Cahill, David G

    2015-12-22

    The anisotropic thermal conductivity of passivated black phosphorus (BP), a reactive two-dimensional material with strong in-plane anisotropy, is ascertained. The room-temperature thermal conductivity for three crystalline axes of exfoliated BP is measured by time-domain thermo-reflectance. The thermal conductivity along the zigzag direction is ≈2.5 times higher than that of the armchair direction.

  6. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  7. The Adhesive System and Anisotropic Shear Force of Guizhou Gastromyzontidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Wang, Jinrong; Ji, Chen

    2016-11-01

    The Guizhou gastromyzontidae (Beaufortia kweichowensis) can adhere to slippery and fouled surfaces in torrential streams. A unique adhesive system utilized by the fish was observed by microscope and CLSM as an attachment disc sealed by a round belt of micro bubbles. The system is effective in wet or underwater environments and can resist a normal pulling force up to 1000 times the fish’s weight. Moreover, a mechanism for passive anisotropic shear force was observed. The shear forces of the fish under different conditions were measured, showing that passive shear force plays an important role in wet environments. The adhesive system of the fish was compared with other biological adhesion principles, from which we obtained potential values for the system that refer to the unique micro sealing and enhanced adhesion in a wet environment.

  8. The Adhesive System and Anisotropic Shear Force of Guizhou Gastromyzontidae

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Wang, Jinrong; Ji, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The Guizhou gastromyzontidae (Beaufortia kweichowensis) can adhere to slippery and fouled surfaces in torrential streams. A unique adhesive system utilized by the fish was observed by microscope and CLSM as an attachment disc sealed by a round belt of micro bubbles. The system is effective in wet or underwater environments and can resist a normal pulling force up to 1000 times the fish’s weight. Moreover, a mechanism for passive anisotropic shear force was observed. The shear forces of the fish under different conditions were measured, showing that passive shear force plays an important role in wet environments. The adhesive system of the fish was compared with other biological adhesion principles, from which we obtained potential values for the system that refer to the unique micro sealing and enhanced adhesion in a wet environment. PMID:27849018

  9. Effects of anisotropic heat conduction on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional solidification influenced by anisotropic heat conduction has been considered. The interfacial energy balance was derived to account for the heat transfer in one direction (x or y) depending on the temperature gradient in both the x and y directions. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of the Stefan number, aspect ratio, initial superheat, and thermal conductivity ratios on the solidification rate. Because of the imposed boundary conditions, the interface became skewed and sometimes was not a straight line between the interface position at the upper and lower adiabatic walls (spatially nonlinear along the height). This skewness depends on the thermal conductivity ratio k(yy)/k(yx). The nonlinearity of the interface is influenced by the solidification rate, aspect ratio, and k(yy/k(yx).

  10. Anisotropic conductivity imaging with MREIT using equipotential projection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Değirmenci, Evren; Eyüboğlu, B Murat

    2007-12-21

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) combines magnetic flux or current density measurements obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surface potential measurements to reconstruct images of true conductivity with high spatial resolution. Most of the biological tissues have anisotropic conductivity; therefore, anisotropy should be taken into account in conductivity image reconstruction. Almost all of the MREIT reconstruction algorithms proposed to date assume isotropic conductivity distribution. In this study, a novel MREIT image reconstruction algorithm is proposed to image anisotropic conductivity. Relative anisotropic conductivity values are reconstructed iteratively, using only current density measurements without any potential measurement. In order to obtain true conductivity values, only either one potential or conductivity measurement is sufficient to determine a scaling factor. The proposed technique is evaluated on simulated data for isotropic and anisotropic conductivity distributions, with and without measurement noise. Simulation results show that the images of both anisotropic and isotropic conductivity distributions can be reconstructed successfully.

  11. Retrieval procedure of effective conductivity for plasmonic resonant anisotropic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermakov, O. Y.; Porubaev, F.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Samusev, A. K.; Iorsh, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we introduce the effective surface conductivity retrieval procedure in order to describe the properties of plasmonic resonant anisotropic metasurface consisting of plasmonic elliptical nanodisks.

  12. Vertical anisotropic microfibers for a gecko-inspired adhesive.

    PubMed

    Tamelier, John; Chary, Sathya; Turner, Kimberly L

    2012-06-12

    Geckos are able to adhere strongly and release easily from surfaces because the structurally anisotropic fibers on their toes naturally exhibit force anisotropy based on the direction of articulation. Here, semicircular fibers, with varying amounts of contact area on the two faces, are investigated to ascertain whether fiber shape can be used to gain anisotropy in shear and shear adhesion forces. Testing of 10-μm-diameter polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibers against a 4-mm-diameter flat glass puck show that shear and shear adhesion forces were two to five times greater when in-plane movement caused the flat face, rather than the curved face, of the fiber to come in contact with the glass puck. The directional adhesion and shear force anisotropy results are close to theoretical approximations using the Kendall peel model and clearly demonstrate how fiber shape may be used to influence the properties of the adhesive. This result has broad applicability, and by combining the results shown here with other current vertical and angled designs, synthetic adhesives can be further improved to behave more like their natural counterparts.

  13. Analysis Method for Inelastic, Adhesively Bonded Joints with Anisotropic Adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Klang, Eric C.

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional analysis method for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives with nonlinear material behavior is presented in the proposed paper. The strain and resulting stress field in a general, bonded joint overlap are determined by using a variable-step, finite-difference solution algorithm to iteratively solve a system of first-order differential equations. Applied loading is given by a system of combined extensional, bending, and shear forces that are applied to the edge of the joint overlap. Adherends are assumed to behave as linear, cylindrically bent plates using classical laminated plate theory that includes the effects of first-order transverse shear deformation. Using the deformation theory of plasticity and a modified von-Mises yield criterion, inelastic material behavior is modeled in the adhesive layer. Results for the proposed method are verified against previous results from the literature and shown to be in excellent agreement. An additional case that highlights the effects of transverse shear deformation between similar adherends is also presented.

  14. Anisotropic ionic conductivities in lyotropic supramolecular liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youju; Cong, Yuanhua; Li, Junjun; Wang, Daoliang; Zhang, Jingtuo; Xu, Lu; Li, Weili; Li, Liangbin; Pan, Guoqiang; Yang, Chuanlu

    2009-12-28

    The designed aromatic amide discotic molecule with sulfonic acid groups at its periphery exhibits a hexagonal supramolecular columnar liquid crystalline phase, which leads to the achievement of anisotropic ionic conductivity through macroscopically aligning the ionic channels.

  15. Anisotropic subvoxel-smooth conduction model for bioelectromagnetism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The bioelectric conduction model plays a key role in bioelectromagnetism analysis, such as solving electromagnetic forward and inverse problems. This paper is aimed to develop an anisotropic subvoxel-smooth conduction model (ASCM) to characterize the electrical conductivity tensor jump across the tissue interface, which is derived based on the interfacial continuity condition with asymptotic analysis method. This conduction model is furthermore combined with finite volume method to improve the numerical accuracy for solving electromagnetic forward problem. The performance of ASCM for electrical potential analysis is verified by comparison with analytic solution. The method is also applied to investigate the effect of anisotropic conduction on EEG analysis in a realistic human head model.

  16. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofryk, K.; Du, S.; Stanek, C. R.; Lashley, J. C.; Liu, X.-Y.; Schulze, R. K.; Smith, J. L.; Safarik, D. J.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Scott, B. L.; Andersson, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide has been studied for over half a century, as uranium dioxide is the fuel used in a majority of operating nuclear reactors and thermal conductivity controls the conversion of heat produced by fission events to electricity. Because uranium dioxide is a cubic compound and thermal conductivity is a second-rank tensor, it has always been assumed to be isotropic. We report thermal conductivity measurements on oriented uranium dioxide single crystals that show anisotropy from 4 K to above 300 K. Our results indicate that phonon-spin scattering is important for understanding the general thermal conductivity behaviour, and also explains the anisotropy by coupling to the applied temperature gradient and breaking cubic symmetry.

  17. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiemin; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Tan, Jun; Hou, Pengxiang; Li, Feng; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2T2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons contributing most to the conduction. The conduction is also significantly anisotropic due to the fact that the effective masses of carriers including electrons and holes are remarkably direction-dependent. Such an anisotropic electronic conduction is evidenced by the I−V curves of an individual Ti3C2T2 particulate, which demonstrates that the in-plane electrical conduction is at least one order of magnitude higher than that vertical to the basal plane. PMID:26548439

  18. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiemin; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Tan, Jun; Hou, Pengxiang; Li, Feng; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-11-01

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2T2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons contributing most to the conduction. The conduction is also significantly anisotropic due to the fact that the effective masses of carriers including electrons and holes are remarkably direction-dependent. Such an anisotropic electronic conduction is evidenced by the I-V curves of an individual Ti3C2T2 particulate, which demonstrates that the in-plane electrical conduction is at least one order of magnitude higher than that vertical to the basal plane.

  19. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiemin; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Tan, Jun; Hou, Pengxiang; Li, Feng; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-11-09

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2T2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons contributing most to the conduction. The conduction is also significantly anisotropic due to the fact that the effective masses of carriers including electrons and holes are remarkably direction-dependent. Such an anisotropic electronic conduction is evidenced by the I-V curves of an individual Ti3C2T2 particulate, which demonstrates that the in-plane electrical conduction is at least one order of magnitude higher than that vertical to the basal plane.

  20. Anisotropic thermal conduction with magnetic fields in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arth, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander; Petkova, Margarita; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role for the propagation and diffusion of charged particles, which are responsible for thermal conduction. In this poster, we present an implementation of thermal conduction including the anisotropic effects of magnetic fields for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The anisotropic thermal conduction is mainly proceeding parallel to magnetic fields and suppressed perpendicular to the fields. We derive the SPH formalism for the anisotropic heat transport and solve the corresponding equation with an implicit conjugate gradient scheme. We discuss several issues of unphysical heat transport in the cases of extreme ansiotropies or unmagnetized regions and present possible numerical workarounds. We implement our algorithm into the cosmological simulation code GADGET and study its behaviour in several test cases. In general, we reproduce the analytical solutions of our idealised test problems, and obtain good results in cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formations. Within galaxy clusters, the anisotropic conduction produces a net heat transport similar to an isotropic Spitzer conduction model with low efficiency. In contrast to isotropic conduction our new formalism allows small-scale structure in the temperature distribution to remain stable, because of their decoupling caused by magnetic field lines. Compared to observations, strong isotropic conduction leads to an oversmoothed temperature distribution within clusters, while the results obtained with anisotropic thermal conduction reproduce the observed temperature fluctuations well. A proper treatment of heat transport is crucial especially in the outskirts of clusters and also in high density regions. It's connection to the local dynamical state of the cluster also might contribute to the observed bimodal distribution of cool core and non cool core clusters. Our new scheme significantly advances the modelling of thermal conduction in numerical simulations and overall gives

  1. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, A.; Boussois, K.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D. S.; Blanchart, P.

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods reported in literature. The approach was employed to study anisotropic thermal conductivity in alumina sheet, textured kaolin ceramics and montmorillonite. Since it is rare to find in-plane thermal conductivity values for such anisotropic thin samples in literature, this technique offers a useful variant to existing techniques.

  2. Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Polymers and its Molecular Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto Simavilla, David; Venerus, David; Schieber, Jay; uCoSm Team

    2014-03-01

    Anisotropy in thermal conductivity has a significant impact on both processing and final properties of materials. Simple molecular arguments suggest that Fourier?s law must be generalized to allow for anisotropic thermal conductivity. We present two complementary experimental methods to obtain quantitative measurements of the thermal diffusivity (conductivity) tensor. We report anisotropic thermal diffusivity and stress in molten, cross-linked and solid polymers under several types of flows. Our results support the validity of a linear relationship between stress and anisotropy in thermal conductivity. When the proportionality constant, the stress-thermal coefficient, is made dimensionless by the plateau modulus of the polymer melt, a universal value of approximately 0.03 is observed for all chemistries. Such a universality is surprising, since phonon transport mechanisms are sensitive to chemical structure. For instance, the analogous stress-optic coefficient depends strongly on chemistry, and can even change sign. Connecting these measurements with current theories for thermal transport in amorphous materials, such as Minimum Thermal Conductivity (MTC) model, is crucial to understand the molecular origins of anisotropic thermal conduction in polymers.

  3. Anisotropic adhesion properties of triangular-tip-shaped micropillars.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Moon Kyu; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Bae, Won Gyu; Jung, Ho-Sup; Suh, Kahp Y

    2011-08-22

    Directional dry adhesive microstructures consisting of high-density triangular-tip-shaped micropillars are described. The wide-tip structures allow for unique directional shear adhesion properties with respect to the peeling direction, along with relatively high normal adhesion. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Polymers and its Molecular Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, Jay; Venerus, David; Gupta, Sahil

    2013-03-01

    The strong coupling of mechanical and thermal effects in polymer flows have a significant impact on both the processing and final properties of the material. Simple molecular arguments suggest that Fourier's law must be generalized to allow for anisotropic thermal conductivity in polymers subjected to deformation. In our laboratory we have developed a novel application of the optical technique known as Forced Rayleigh Scattering to obtain quantitative measurements of components of the thermal diffusivity (conductivity) tensor in polymers subjected to deformations. We report measurements of anisotropic thermal diffusivity and stress in molten, cross-linked and solid polymers subjected to several types of flows. The deformed samples have significant anisotropy in polymer chain orientation that results in significant anisotropy in thermal conductivity. Stress and thermal conductivity data support the validity of the stress-thermal rule, which is analogous to the well-known stress-optic rule. We also report measurements on solid polymers with isotropic polymer chain orientation that are under stress, which display rather unexpected behavior. These measurements are used to develop an understanding of the molecular origins of anisotropic thermal conduction in polymeric material NSF-DMR-706582

  5. Synthesis and characterization of soluble conducting polymers and conducting adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztemiz, Serhan

    With the demanding nature of the technology today, scientists are looking for new materials in order to decrease the cost, increase the efficiency of the use of the materials, and decrease time-consuming steps in order to increase the speed of production. New materials are being studied to decrease the weight of cars, planes and space vehicles; surface properties are being modified to decrease the drag coefficient; new technologies are being introduced for speeding up applications in production and assembly lines. In this research we address the needs of different technological applications from a conductivity perspective. In the first part of the thesis, the synthesis of soluble conducting polymers in order to make them more processable for potential electronic and photovoltaic applications is presented. Soluble conducting polymers of 3-hexylthiophene, 3-octylthiophene, 3-decylthiophene and 3-dodecylthiophene were synthesized electrochemically and thus, doped during synthesis. It was found that the conductivities; molecular weights and degrees of polymerization of the polymers strongly depend on the side chain's length. The substitution of alkyl side chains decreases the reactivity of the growing chain, and with an increasing side-chain length, all of these properties show a decrease. The hexyl substituent, being the shortest of the four side chains, causes the least distortion in the background, has the highest conjugation, and has the highest shift in the UV spectrum when it polymerizes. As the length of the side chain increases, the shift in the UV spectrum decreases, too. Decrease in the pi-stacking, conjugation and delocalization decreases the conductivity. This gives the material an opportunity to be used in photovoltaic applications. In the second part of the thesis, a conducting adhesive formulation that eliminates the need for heat or other expensive and rather bothersome application methods to activate the adhesive is investigated. Using the quick

  6. A Method for Measuring the Specific Electrical Conductivity of an Anisotropically Conductive Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ašmontas, S.; Kleiza, V.; Kleiza, J.

    2008-06-01

    The paper deals with the ways of finding an electrical conductivity tensor of a plane and anisotropically conductive sample. Application of the Van der Pauw method to investigate the conductivity of anisotropically conductive media makes the basis of research. Several models of distribution of the electric field potential are presented, their merits and demerits are discussed, and the necessary physical measurements are indicated. On the basis of these models, the respective calculation expressions of the specific conductivity tensor are derived and algorithms for their realization and error calculation are developed.

  7. Strong anisotropic thermal conductivity of monolayer WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinlong; Chen, Yani; Han, Zheng; Li, Wu

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) has attracted increasing attention due to its large magnetoresistance and pressure-induced superconductivity. In this work, we investigate the thermal conductivity (κ) of monolayer WTe2 by performing first-principles calculations, and find strong anisotropic κ with predicted room-temperature values of 9 and 20 W m-1 K-1 along two principal lattice directions, respectively. Such strong anisotropy suggests the importance of orientation when engineering thermal-related applications based on WTe2. The anisotropy of κ is attributed to the in-plane linear acoustic phonon branches, while the out-of-plane quadratic acoustic phonon branch is almost isotropic. The size dependence of κ shows that the size effect can persists up to 10 μm, and the anisotropy decreases with decreasing sample size due to the suppression of low-frequency anisotropic phonons by boundary scattering.

  8. Anisotropic thermal conduction in cosmological cluster formation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Parrish, Ian; Brueggen, Marcus

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the role of the magnetothermal instability (MTI) in the cosmological cluster formation simulations. Our simulations self-consistently incorporate the effects of the field amplification by the structure formation (i.e., gravitational collapse and shearing) and by anisotropic thermal conduction, as well as the effects of violent sloshing motions (e.g., due to mergers) that tend to slow down the field growth. We quantify the effects of these processes on the temperature and density profiles, the strength and topology of the magnetic fields as well as the effective thermal conduction in the intarcluster medium.

  9. Magnetotelluric inversion for anisotropic conductivities in layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pek, Josef; Santos, Fernando A. M.

    2006-10-01

    Electrical anisotropy in the Earth's crust and upper mantle has recently gained attention as a significant linking factor between electrical models and underlying structural and tectonic patterns. This interest has also motivated new methodological studies into the modelling and inversion for electrically anisotropic structures. We present an algorithm for the inversion of magnetotelluric data over layered anisotropic conductors which is a straightforward extension of the standard Occam 1-D inversion to anisotropic models. Owing to the essential limitation of magnetotellurics to resolve the complete conductivity tensor, we formulate the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy only. We treat the non-linear inverse problem as a multi-criterion minimization of the structure complexity, data misfit and anisotropy. To constrain the structure complexity, we employ the standard roughness penalty as well as non-quadratic penalties of the total variation and gradient support type that produce more focused model sections and thus conform better to the idea about sharp, non-diffuse boundaries of anisotropic structures in the Earth. Application of the anisotropy penalty is crucial for suppressing spurious anisotropy in the inverse models. We use a 2-D extension of the heuristic L-curve method to estimate the quasi-optimal penalty weights. With two non-linear iteration solvers, specifically the reweighted conjugate gradient method and the lagged diffusivity iteration, we can arrive at the minimum of the target functional, for one selected pair of regularization weights, typically after a few tens of iteration steps. To demonstrate the inverse solution, we present two simple yet not completely trivial synthetic examples, the first one based on data generated by a model with two anisotropic layers with discordant strikes, and the other showing possible misinterpretations in case a 1-D inversion with anisotropy is formally applied to data produced by simple 2-D block structures. Field

  10. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in epoxy-bonded magnetocaloric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Bruno; Sellschopp, Kai; Bierdel, Marius; Funk, Alexander; Bobeth, Manfred; Krautz, Maria; Waske, Anja

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management is one of the crucial issues in the development of magnetocaloric refrigeration technology for application. In order to ensure optimal exploitation of the materials "primary" properties, such as entropy change and temperature lift, thermal properties (and other "secondary" properties) play an important role. In magnetocaloric composites, which show an increased cycling stability in comparison to their bulk counterparts, thermal properties are strongly determined by the geometric arrangement of the corresponding components. In the first part of this paper, the inner structure of a polymer-bonded La(Fe, Co, Si)13-composite was studied by X-ray computed tomography. Based on this 3D data, a numerical study along all three spatial directions revealed anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite: Due to the preparation process, the long-axis of the magnetocaloric particles is aligned along the xy plane which is why the in-plane thermal conductivity is larger than the thermal conductivity along the z-axis. Further, the study is expanded to a second aspect devoted to the influence of particle distribution and alignment within the polymer matrix. Based on an equivalent ellipsoids model to describe the inner structure of the composite, numerical simulation of the thermal conductivity in different particle arrangements and orientation distributions were performed. This paper evaluates the possibilities of microstructural design for inducing and adjusting anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetocaloric composites.

  11. Anisotropic ion diffusivity in intervertebral disc: an electrical conductivity approach.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alicia; Yao, Hai; Brown, Mark D; Yong Gu, Wei

    2006-11-15

    Investigation of the transport behavior of ions in intervertebral disc using an electrical conductivity method. To determine the electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity of nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus in 3 major directions (axial, circumferential, and radial). Knowledge of diffusivity of small molecules is important for understanding nutrition supply in intervertebral disc and disc degeneration. However, little is known on the anisotropic behaviors of ion diffusivity and of electrical conductivity in intervertebral disc. Electrical conductivity measurement was performed on 24 axial, circumferential, and radial anulus fibrosus specimens and 24 axial nucleus pulposus specimens from bovine coccygeal discs. The diffusivity of Na and Cl were estimated by the analysis of conductivity data. The electrical conductivity (mean +/- standard deviation; n = 24) of the bovine anulus fibrosus was 4.70 +/- 1.08 mS/cm in the axial, 2.86 +/- 0.83 mS/cm in the radial, and 4.38 +/- 1.25 mS/cm in the circumferential direction. For nucleus pulposus, the electrical conductivity (mean +/- standard deviation; n = 24) was 8.95 +/- 0.89 mS/cm. The mean value for nucleus pulposus was significantly higher than that of anulus fibrosus (t test, P < 0.05). For anulus fibrosus, the conductivity in the radial direction was significantly lower than in axial or circumferential directions. Similar trends were found for both Na and Cl diffusivities. Both electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity were highly sensitive to water content. Electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity of anulus fibrosus are anisotropic.

  12. Accurately simulating anisotropic thermal conduction on a moving mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rahul; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel implementation of an extremum preserving anisotropic diffusion solver for thermal conduction on the unstructured moving Voronoi mesh of the AREPO code. The method relies on splitting the one-sided facet fluxes into normal and oblique components, with the oblique fluxes being limited such that the total flux is both locally conservative and extremum preserving. The approach makes use of harmonic averaging points and a simple, robust interpolation scheme that works well for strong heterogeneous and anisotropic diffusion problems. Moreover, the required discretization stencil is small. Efficient fully implicit and semi-implicit time integration schemes are also implemented. We perform several numerical tests that evaluate the stability and accuracy of the scheme, including applications such as point explosions with heat conduction and calculations of convective instabilities in conducting plasmas. The new implementation is suitable for studying important astrophysical phenomena, such as the conductive heat transport in galaxy clusters, the evolution of supernova remnants, or the distribution of heat from black hole-driven jets into the intracluster medium.

  13. Isotropical conductive adhesives filled with silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, G. Q.; Wu, H. P.; Tao, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, a solution-phase method was demonstrated to generate silver (Ag) nanowires with diameters in the range of 30~50nm and lengths of up to ~50μm, which was proceed by reducing silver nitrate with ethylene glycol in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Fundamental material characterizations including X-ray diffraction transmission electro microscopy (TEM) and scanning electro microscopy (SEM) were conducted on these Ag nanowires. A novel kind of isotropical conductive adhesives (ICA) was prepared by using these Ag nanowires as conductive filler. Electrical property including bulk resistivity and mechanical property including shear strength were investigated and compared with that of conventional ICA filled with micrometer-sized Ag particles or nanometer-sized Ag particles. The average diameter of these Ag particles is about 1μm and 100 nm respectively. The results shown that ICA filled Ag nanowires exhibited higher conductivity, higher shear strength and low percolation threshold value than traditional ICA. Possible conductive mechanism was discussed based on theory calculation.

  14. Reciprocal relations for effective conductivities of anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevard, John; Keller, Joseph B.

    1985-11-01

    Any pair of two-dimensional anisotropic media with local conductivity tensors that are functions of position and that are related to one another in a certain reciprocal way are considered. It is proved that their effective conductivity tensors are related to each other in the same way for both spatially periodic media and statistically stationary random media. An inequality involving the effective conductivity tensors of two three-dimensional media that are reciprocally related is also proved. These results extend the corresponding results for locally isotropic media obtained by Keller, Mendelsohn, Hansen, Schulgasser, and Kohler and Papanicolau. They also yield a relation satisfied by the effective conductivity tensor of a medium reciprocal to a translated or rotated copy of itself.

  15. Anisotropic forces from spatially constrained focal adhesions mediate contact guidance directed cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arja; Lee, Oscar; Win, Zaw; Edwards, Rachel M; Alford, Patrick W; Kim, Deok-Ho; Provenzano, Paolo P

    2017-04-12

    Directed migration by contact guidance is a poorly understood yet vital phenomenon, particularly for carcinoma cell invasion on aligned collagen fibres. We demonstrate that for single cells, aligned architectures providing contact guidance cues induce constrained focal adhesion maturation and associated F-actin alignment, consequently orchestrating anisotropic traction stresses that drive cell orientation and directional migration. Consistent with this understanding, relaxing spatial constraints to adhesion maturation either through reduction in substrate alignment density or reduction in adhesion size diminishes the contact guidance response. While such interactions allow single mesenchymal-like cells to spontaneously 'sense' and follow topographic alignment, intercellular interactions within epithelial clusters temper anisotropic cell-substratum forces, resulting in substantially lower directional response. Overall, these results point to the control of contact guidance by a balance of cell-substratum and cell-cell interactions, modulated by cell phenotype-specific cytoskeletal arrangements. Thus, our findings elucidate how phenotypically diverse cells perceive ECM alignment at the molecular level.

  16. Anisotropic conductivity of magnetic carbon nanotubes embedded in epoxy matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Tae; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2010-01-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) hybrid-materials were synthesized and their anisotropic electrical conductivities as a result of their alignment in a polymer matrix under an external magnetic field were investigated. The tethering of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the surface of MWCNT was achieved by a modified sol-gel reaction, where sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) was used in order to inhibit the formation of a 3D iron oxide gel. These hybrid-materials, specifically, magnetized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (m-MWCNTs) were readily aligned parallel to the direction of a magnetic field even when using a relatively weak magnetic field. The conductivity of the epoxy composites formed in this manner increased with increasing m-MWCNT mass fraction in the polymer matrix. Furthermore, the conductivities parallel to the direction of magnetic field were higher than those in the perpendicular direction, indicating that the alignment of the m-MWCNT contributed to the enhancement of the anisotropic electrical properties of the composites in the direction of alignment. PMID:23019381

  17. Anisotropic Tuning of Graphite Thermal Conductivity by Lithium Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Gu, Xiaokun; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Yang, Ronggui

    2016-11-17

    Understanding thermal transport in lithium intercalated layered materials is not only important for managing heat generation and dissipation in lithium ion batteries but also the understanding potentially provides a novel way to design materials with reversibly tunable thermal conductivity. In this work, the thermal conductivity of lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (LixC6) is calculated using molecular dynamics simulations as a function of the amount of lithium intercalated. We found that intercalation of lithium has an anisotropic effect on tuning the thermal conductivity: the thermal conductivity in the basal plane decreases monotonically from 1232 W/m·K of pristine graphite to 444 W/m·K of the fully lithiated LiC6, while the thermal conductivity along the c-axis decreases first from 6.5 W/m·K for graphite to 1.3 W/m·K for LiC18 and then increases to 5.0 W/m·K for LiC6 as the lithium composition increases. More importantly, we provide the very first atomic-scale insight into the effect of lithium intercalation on the spectral phonon properties of graphite. The intercalated lithium ions are found to suppress the phonon lifetime and to reduce the group velocity of phonons parallel to the basal plane but significantly to increase the phonon group velocity along the c-axis, which anisotropically tunes the thermal conductivity of lithiated graphite compounds. This work could shed some light on the search for tunable thermal conductivity materials and might have strong impacts on the thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

  18. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Anisotropic Biological Tissue In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Kai; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Lina; Jin, Bitao; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-06-01

    The accurate determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues has implications on the success of cryosurgical/hyperthermia treatments. In light of the evident anisotropy in some biological tissues, a new modified stepwise transient method was proposed to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal thermal conductivities of anisotropic biological tissues. The physical and mathematical models were established, and the analytical solution was derived. Sensitivity analysis and experimental simulation were performed to determine the feasibility and measurement accuracy of simultaneously measuring the transverse and longitudinal thermal conductivities. The experimental system was set up, and its measurement accuracy was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of a reference standard material. The thermal conductivities of the pork tenderloin and bovine muscles were measured using the traditional 1D and proposed methods, respectively, at different temperatures. Results indicate that the thermal conductivities of the bovine muscle are lower than those of the pork tenderloin muscle, whereas the bovine muscle was determined to exhibit stronger anisotropy than the pork tenderloin muscle. Moreover, the longitudinal thermal conductivity is larger than the transverse thermal conductivity for the two tissues and all thermal conductivities increase with the increase in temperature. Compared with the traditional 1D method, results obtained by the proposed method are slightly higher although the relative deviation is below 5 %.

  19. COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CLUSTER FORMATION WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, M.; Lee, D.; Parrish, I.; Oh, S. Peng E-mail: dongwook@flash.uchicago.edu E-mail: iparrish@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-10-20

    The intracluster medium (ICM) has been suggested to be buoyantly unstable in the presence of magnetic field and anisotropic thermal conduction. We perform first cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation that simultaneously include magnetic fields, radiative cooling, and anisotropic thermal conduction. In isolated and idealized cluster models, the magnetothermal instability (MTI) tends to reorient the magnetic fields radially whenever the temperature gradient points in the direction opposite to gravitational acceleration. Using cosmological simulations of cluster formation we detect radial bias in the velocity and magnetic fields. Such radial bias is consistent with either the inhomogeneous radial gas flows due to substructures or residual MTI-driven field rearrangements that are expected even in the presence of turbulence. Although disentangling the two scenarios is challenging, we do not detect excess bias in the runs that include anisotropic thermal conduction. The anisotropy effect is potentially detectable via radio polarization measurements with LOFAR and the Square Kilometer Array and future X-ray spectroscopic studies with the International X-ray Observatory. We demonstrate that radiative cooling boosts the amplification of the magnetic field by about two orders of magnitude beyond what is expected in the non-radiative cases. This effect is caused by the compression of the gas and frozen-in magnetic field as it accumulates in the cluster center. At z = 0 the field is amplified by a factor of about 10{sup 6} compared to the uniform magnetic field that evolved due to the universal expansion alone. Interestingly, the runs that include both radiative cooling and thermal conduction exhibit stronger magnetic field amplification than purely radiative runs. In these cases, buoyant restoring forces depend on the temperature gradients rather than the steeper entropy gradients. Thus, the ICM is more easily mixed and the winding up of the frozen-in magnetic

  20. Variable Anisotropic Brain Electrical Conductivities in Epileptogenic Foci

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkern, M.; Bui, D.; Salamon, N.; Vinters, H. V.; Mathern, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Source localization models assume brain electrical conductivities are isotropic at about 0.33 S/m. These assumptions have not been confirmed ex vivo in humans. This study determined bidirectional electrical conductivities from pediatric epilepsy surgery patients. Electrical conductivities perpendicular and parallel to the pial surface of neocortex and subcortical white matter (n = 15) were measured using the 4-electrode technique and compared with clinical variables. Mean (±SD) electrical conductivities were 0.10 ± 0.01 S/m, and varied by 243% from patient to patient. Perpendicular and parallel conductivities differed by 45%, and the larger values were perpendicular to the pial surface in 47% and parallel in 40% of patients. A perpendicular principal axis was associated with normal, while isotropy and parallel principal axes were linked with epileptogenic lesions by MRI. Electrical conductivities were decreased in patients with cortical dysplasia compared with non-dysplasia etiologies. The electrical conductivity values of freshly excised human brain tissues were approximately 30% of assumed values, varied by over 200% from patient to patient, and had erratic anisotropic and isotropic shapes if the MRI showed a lesion. Understanding brain electrical conductivity and ways to non-invasively measure them are probably necessary to enhance the ability to localize EEG sources from epilepsy surgery patients. PMID:20440549

  1. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the porcine cornea.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Trembly, B Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal models for the cornea of the eye support the development of thermal techniques for reshaping the cornea and other scientific purposes. Heat transfer in the cornea must be quantified accurately so that a thermal treatment does not destroy the endothelial layer, which cannot regenerate, and yet is responsible for maintaining corneal transparency. We developed a custom apparatus to measure the thermal conductivity of ex vivo porcine corneas perpendicular to the surface and applied a commercial apparatus to measure thermal conductivity parallel to the surface. We found that corneal thermal conductivity is 14% anisotropic at the normal state of corneal hydration. Small numbers of ex vivo feline and human corneas had a thermal conductivity perpendicular to the surface that was indistinguishable from the porcine corneas. Aqueous humor from ex vivo porcine, feline, and human eyes had a thermal conductivity nearly equal to that of water. Including the anisotropy of corneal thermal conductivity will improve the predictive power of thermal models of the eye.

  2. Thermal conduction in single-layer black phosphorus: highly anisotropic?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2015-02-06

    The single-layer black phosphorus is characteristic for its puckered structure, which has led to distinct anisotropy in its optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. We use the non-equilibrium Green's function approach and the first-principles method to investigate the thermal conductance for single-layer black phosphorus in the ballistic transport regime, in which the phonon-phonon scattering is neglected. We find that the anisotropy in the thermal conduction is very weak for the single-layer black phosphorus--the difference between two in-plane directions is less than 4%. Our phonon calculations disclose that the out-of-plane acoustic phonon branch has lower group velocities in the direction perpendicular to the pucker, as the black phosphorus is softer in this direction, leading to a weakening effect for the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction. However, the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch behaves abnormally; i.e., the group velocity of this phonon branch is higher in the perpendicular direction, although the single-layer black phosphorus is softer in this direction. The abnormal behavior of the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch is closely related to the highly anisotropic Poisson's ratio in the single-layer black phosphorus. As a result of the counteraction between the out-of-plane phonon mode and the in-plane phonon modes, the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction is weaker than the parallel direction, but the anisotropy is pretty small.

  3. Pulse accumulation, radial heat conduction, and anisotropic thermal conductivity in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aaron J; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-11-01

    The relationship between pulse accumulation and radial heat conduction in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance (TTR) is explored. The results illustrate how pulse accumulation allows TTR to probe two thermal length scales simultaneously. In addition, the conditions under which radial transport effects are important are described. An analytical solution for anisotropic heat flow in layered structures is given, and a method for measuring both cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of thermally anisotropic thin films is described. As verification, the technique is used to extract the cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Results are found to be in good agreement with literature values.

  4. Stable determination of an inclusion for a class of anisotropic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cristo, Michele; Ren, Yong

    2017-09-01

    We deal with the inverse problem of determining an inclusion within an electrical conductor from electrostatic boundary measurements. We consider an anisotropic conductivity and provide logarithmic type stability.

  5. Stress evolution in a conductive adhesive during curing and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuhai

    2000-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using conductive adhesives, which are composites of polymers and conductive fillers, as replacements for solder in different types of microelectronic assemblies. However, conductive adhesives still suffer from several deficiencies, such as unstable electrical conductivity and inadequate adhesion. The reliability of the conductive adhesive joints is always one of the major considerations during their design and operation, and the curing and thermal stresses generated in polymers and composites during curing, cooling and thermal cycling play a very important role in determining reliability. Because of the mismatch in the mechanical properties between the conductive adhesive and the substrate, appreciable curing and thermal stress is generated during manufacturing, which may be detrimental to the reliability of conductive adhesive joints. In this dissertation, an interactive linear viscoelastic model which considers interaction between the initial gel network and the other networks that form during curing is proposed to simulate stress and volume shrinkage during the thermoset curing process, and an effective method for measuring volume shrinkage during the thermoset cure is developed. A systematic experimental study of the material properties of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix during the curing and cooling processes has been conducted. Based on these experimental data, stresses generated during several spatially homogeneous curing and cooling processes of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix are also calculated. It is found that the conductive adhesive possesses mechanical properties which are substantially different from those of the constituents, and that the conductive adhesive has a relaxation process which is similar to its matrix and generates appreciable curing and thermal stresses during curing and cooling. Finally, a processing procedure designed to provide desired residual stresses is discussed.

  6. Low-Temperature Curable Photo-Active Anisotropic Conductive Films (PA-ACFs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Il; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2014-09-01

    Photo-active anisotropic conductive films (PA-ACFs) with curing temperatures below 120°C were introduced using photo-active curing agents. The PA-ACFs showed no curing before UV activation, and the crosslinking systems of the PA-ACFs were not activated under fluorescent light exposure. However, after UV activation, the PA-ACFs were completely cured at 120°C within 10 s. Flex-on-board (FOB) assembly using PA-ACFs had adhesion strength and joint resistances similar to those of the FOB assemblies using conventional epoxy-based ACFs. This study demonstrates that PA-ACFs provide reliable interconnection and minimal thermal deformation among all the commercially available ACFs, especially for low T g substrate applications.

  7. Rectangle-capped and tilted micropillar array for enhanced anisotropic anti-shearing in biomimetic adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Hu, Hong; Tian, Yu; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Dry adhesion observed in the feet of various small creatures has attracted considerable attention owing to the unique advantages such as self-cleaning, adaptability to rough surfaces along with repeatable and reversible adhesiveness. Among these advantages, for practical applications, proper detachability is critical for dry adhesives with artificial microstructures. In this study, we present a microstructured array consisting of both asymmetric rectangle-capped tip and tilted shafts, which produce an orthogonal anisotropy of the shearing strength along the long and short dimensions of the tip, with a maximum anti-shearing in the two directions along the longer dimension. Meanwhile, the tilt feature can enhance anisotropic shearing adhesion by increasing shearing strength in the forward shearing direction and decreasing strength in the reverse shearing direction along the short dimension of the tip, leading to a minimum anti-shearing in only one of the two directions along the shorter dimension of the rectangular tip. Such a microstructured adhesive with only one weak shearing direction, leading to well-controlled attachment and detachment of the adhesive, is created in our experiment by conventional double-sided exposure of a photoresist followed by a moulding process. PMID:25808338

  8. Unusually High and Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonshin; Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C; Cui, Shuang; Chen, Renkun

    2017-02-02

    Amorphous Si (a-Si) nanostructures are ubiquitous in numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices. Amorphous materials are considered to possess the lower limit to the thermal conductivity (κ), which is ∼1 W·m(-1) K(-1) for a-Si. However, recent work suggested that κ of micrometer-thick a-Si films can be greater than 3 W·m(-1) K(-1), which is contributed to by propagating vibrational modes, referred to as "propagons". However, precise determination of κ in a-Si has been elusive. Here, we used structures of a-Si nanotubes and suspended a-Si films that enabled precise in-plane thermal conductivity (κ∥) measurement within a wide thickness range of 5 nm to 1.7 μm. We showed unexpectedly high κ∥ in a-Si nanostructures, reaching ∼3.0 and 5.3 W·m(-1) K(-1) at ∼100 nm and 1.7 μm, respectively. Furthermore, the measured κ∥ is significantly higher than the cross-plane κ on the same films. This unusually high and anisotropic thermal conductivity in the amorphous Si nanostructure manifests the surprisingly broad propagon mean free path distribution, which is found to range from 10 nm to 10 μm, in the disordered and atomically isotropic structure. This result provides an unambiguous answer to the century-old problem regarding mean free path distribution of propagons and also sheds light on the design and performance of numerous a-Si based electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5) that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information. PMID:26057524

  10. Anisotropic forces from spatially constrained focal adhesions mediate contact guidance directed cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arja; Lee, Oscar; Win, Zaw; Edwards, Rachel M.; Alford, Patrick W.; Kim, Deok-Ho; Provenzano, Paolo P.

    2017-01-01

    Directed migration by contact guidance is a poorly understood yet vital phenomenon, particularly for carcinoma cell invasion on aligned collagen fibres. We demonstrate that for single cells, aligned architectures providing contact guidance cues induce constrained focal adhesion maturation and associated F-actin alignment, consequently orchestrating anisotropic traction stresses that drive cell orientation and directional migration. Consistent with this understanding, relaxing spatial constraints to adhesion maturation either through reduction in substrate alignment density or reduction in adhesion size diminishes the contact guidance response. While such interactions allow single mesenchymal-like cells to spontaneously ‘sense' and follow topographic alignment, intercellular interactions within epithelial clusters temper anisotropic cell–substratum forces, resulting in substantially lower directional response. Overall, these results point to the control of contact guidance by a balance of cell–substratum and cell–cell interactions, modulated by cell phenotype-specific cytoskeletal arrangements. Thus, our findings elucidate how phenotypically diverse cells perceive ECM alignment at the molecular level. PMID:28401884

  11. Highly Anisotropic Adhesive Film Made from Upside-Down, Flat, and Uniform Vertically Aligned CNTs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sanghyun; Lundstrom, Troy; Ghosh, Ranajay; Abdi, Hamed; Hao, Ji; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Su, Paul; Suhr, Jonghwan; Vaziri, Ashkan; Jalili, Nader; Jung, Yung Joon

    2016-12-14

    We have created a multifunctional dry adhesive film with transferred vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). This unique VA-CNT film was fabricated by a multistep transfer process, converting the flat and uniform bottom of VA-CNTs grown on atomically flat silicon wafer substrates into the top surface of an adhesive layer. Unlike as-grown VA-CNTs, which have a nonuniform surface, randomly entangled CNT arrays, and a weak interface between the CNTs and substrates, this transferred VA-CNT film shows an extremely high coefficient of static friction (COF) of up to 60 and a shear adhesion force 30 times higher (12 N/cm(2)) than that of the as-grown VA-CNTs under a very small preloading of 0.2 N/cm(2). Moreover, a near-zero normal adhesion force was observed with 20 mN/cm(2) preloading and a maximum 100-μm displacement in a piezo scanner, demonstrating ideal properties for an artificial gecko foot. Using this unique structural feature and anisotropic adhesion properties, we also demonstrate effective removal and assembly of nanoparticles into organized micrometer-scale circular and line patterns by a single brushing of this flat and uniform VA-CNT film.

  12. Nano-anisotropic surface coating based on drug immobilized pendant polymer to suppress macrophage adhesion response.

    PubMed

    Kaladhar, K; Renz, H; Sharma, C P

    2015-04-01

    Exploring drug molecules for material design, to harness concepts of nano-anisotropy and ligand-receptor interactions, are rather elusive. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the bottom-up design of a single-step and bio-interactive polymeric surface coating, based on drug based pendant polymer. This can be applied on to polystyrene (PS) substrates, to suppress macrophage adhesion and spreading. The drug molecule is used in this coating for two purposes. The first one is drug as a "pendant" group, to produce nano-anisotropic properties that can enable adhesion of the coatings to the substrate. The second purpose is to use the drug as a "ligand", to produce ligand-receptor interaction, between the bound ligand and receptors of albumin, to develop a self-albumin coat over the surface, by the preferential binding of albumin in biological environment, to reduce macrophage adhesion. Our in silico studies show that, diclofenac (DIC) is an ideal drug based "ligand" for albumin. This can also act as a "pendant" group with planar aryl groups. The combination of these two factors can help to harness, both nano-anisotropic properties and biological functions to the polymeric coating. Further, the drug, diclofenac (DIC) is immobilized to the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), to develop the pendant polymer (PVA-DIC). The interaction of bound DIC with the albumin is a ligand-receptor based interaction, as per the studies by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and SDS-PAGE. The non-polar π-π* interactions are regulating; the interactions between PVA bound DIC-DIC interactions, leading to "nano-anisotropic condensation" to form distinct "nano-anisotropic segments" inside the polymeric coating. This is evident from, the thermo-responsiveness and uniform size of nanoparticles, as well as regular roughness in the surface coating, with similar properties as that of nanoparticles. In addition, the hydrophobic DIC-polystyrene (PS) interactions, between the PVA

  13. Effects of rugged nanoprotrusions on the surface hydrophobicity and water adhesion of anisotropic micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuefeng; Yao, Xi; Jiang, Lei

    2007-04-24

    A facile laser-etching method was used for the one-step creation of various controllable dimensions of anisotropic micropatterns consisting of an alternating arrangement of microgrooves and microstripes with rugged nanoprotrusions, which after modified with fluoroalkylsilane reagent, showed perfect isotropic superhydrophobicity without apparent CA hystereses, water adhesion, and drag resistance, other than the conventional view of anisotropic surface microstructures with anisotropic surface dewetting. The detailed experiments and analyses have indicated that the introduction of the rugged nanoprotrusions on the surface of microstripes provided ideal 3D roughness, which could not only enhance the apparent contact angles close to 180 degrees by the "point" contact fashion to maximally reduce the liquid-solid contact area but, most importantly, make droplets easily roll off the surface without apparent CA hysteresis by regulating the triple-phase contact line (TCL) to become extremely discrete. These findings would be helpful in understanding the role of complex micro- and nanostructures on natural superhydrophobic biosurfaces and guiding the design of perfect artificial superhydrophobic materials for technological innovations such as the raindrop easy-cleaning, aquatic super-floating, and drag-reducing coatings.

  14. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries. PMID:27459901

  15. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K; Park, Hyun S; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-27

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  16. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  17. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-12-01

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation.

  18. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-12-23

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation.

  19. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation. PMID:28008942

  20. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Y.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conducting polymers have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, conducting polymers have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of conducting polymers with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-L-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized conducting polymer substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, an amine functionality present on conducting polymers can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. PMID:25294089

  1. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  2. Identification of current density distribution in electrically conducting subject with anisotropic conductivity distribution.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Hyun Chan; Kwon, Ohin; Seo, Jin Keun; Woo, Eung Je

    2005-07-07

    Current density imaging (CDI) is able to visualize a three-dimensional current density distribution J inside an electrically conducting subject caused by an externally applied current. CDI may use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to measure the induced magnetic flux density B and compute J via the Ampere law [Formula: see text]. However, measuring all three components of B = (B(x), B(y), B(z)) has a technical difficulty due to the requirement of orthogonal rotations of the subject inside the MRI scanner. In this work, we propose a new method of reconstructing a current density image using only B(z) data so that we can avoid the subject rotation procedure. The method utilizes an auxiliary injection current to compensate the missing information of B(x) and B(y). The major advantage of the method is its applicability to a subject with an anisotropic conductivity distribution. Numerical experiments show the feasibility of the new technique.

  3. Anisotropic in-Plane Thermal Conductivity Observed in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-16

    consists of puckered honeycomb atomic sheets bonded by van der Waals force and therefore can be mechanically exfo- liated into atomically thin layers ...ARTICLE Received 25 Mar 2015 | Accepted 7 Sep 2015 | Published 16 Oct 2015 Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity observed in few- layer black...report the anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended few- layer black phosphorus measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The armchair and

  4. Anisotropic properties of the fluctuational conductivity in YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, S.; Boffa, V.; Fastampa, R.; Giura, M.; Marcon, R.; Silva, E.

    1996-03-01

    We report on resisitive transitions in YBCO films as a function of strength and orientation of the applied magnetic field. Angular behaviour is found to be markedly different in the upper and lower part of the transition. At high dissipation level, and angular scaling behaviour is observed, following the anisotropic Lawerence-Doniach expression for the upper critical field. The scaling breaks down at the midpoint of the transition. No scaling is observed at lower temperatures, even if different angular scaling functions are used. The results are very well interpreted in terms of superconducting fluctuations above ρ/ρn=0.5 and pinning phenomena below.

  5. Reliability of Conductive Adhesives as a Pb-free Alternative in Flip-Chip Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Woong; Lee, Young-Chul; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2008-01-01

    The temperature-humidity reliability of anisotropic conductive film (ACF) and non-conductive film (NCF) interconnects is investigated by measuring the interconnect resistance during temperature-humidity testing (THT) at 85°C and 85% relative humidity. The four-point probe method was used to measure the interconnect resistance of the adhesive joints constructed with Au bumps on Si chips and Cu pads on flexible printed circuits (FPCs). The interconnect resistance of the ACF joints was markedly higher than that of the NCF joints, mainly due to the constriction of the current flow and the intrinsic resistance of the conductive particles in the ACF joints. The interconnect resistances of both interconnects decreased with increasing bonding force, and subsequently converged to about 10 mΩ and 1 mΩ at a bonding force of 70 N and 80 N, for the ACF and NCF joints, respectively. During the THT, two different conduction behaviors were observed: increased interconnect resistance and the termination of Ohmic behavior. The former was due to the decreased contact area caused by z-directional swelling of the adhesives, whereas the latter was caused by either contact opening in the adhesive joints or interface cracking.

  6. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: Inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Y; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-06-01

    Electrically conducting polymers (CPs) have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, CPs have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of CPs with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-l-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized CP substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, amine functionality present on CPs can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Conductivities and curing properties of electron-beam-irradiated anisotropic conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Tae Gyu; Lee, Inhyuk; Kim, Jae yong

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-curable acrylated epoxy oligomer was irradiated by using an electron beam (E-beam) with dosages of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 200, 400, and 550 kGy to investigate the electrical and the physical properties of anisotropic conductive films (ACFs) and to evaluate the potential application of radiation technology to flip-chip package processing. An ACF is an insulating epoxy matrix containing conducting particles that keep the electrical conductivity along the out-of-plane direction and the insulation property along the in-plane direction. The contact resistance between ACF joints cured by using an E-beam irradiation of 80 kGy was measured under a constant bonding pressure of 2 kgf/cm2 to demonstrate the effects of pad pitch size and the number of added conductive particles in the epoxy resin. Three types of PCBs, 1000-, 500-, and 100-µm pad pitches, were employed while the E-beam curable epoxy resin was mixed with conductive particles in a weight ratio of 10:1. The measured average contact resistance was 0.24 Ω with a minimum of 0.06 Ω for the samples prepared with a 100-µm pad pitch size, which is compatible with or lower than the values obtained from thermally-cured commercial ACFs. Our results demonstrate that an E-beam is an effective radiation method for curing epoxy resins at low temperatures in a short time and can be employed as a new technique for bonding circuits in high-density electric devices.

  8. Conductive Polymer Porous Film with Tunable Wettability and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuqi; Zhang, Yuqi; Heng, Liping; Meng, Xiangfu; Yang, Qiaowen; Jiang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A conductive polymer porous film with tunable wettability and adhesion was fabricated by the chloroform solution of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyricacid-methyl-ester (PCBM) via the freeze drying method. The porous film could be obtained from the solution of 0.8 wt%, whose pore diameters ranged from 50 nm to 500 nm. The hydrophobic porous surface with a water contact angle (CA) of 144.7° could be transferred into a hydrophilic surface with CA of 25° by applying a voltage. The water adhesive force on the porous film increased with the increase of the external voltage. The electro-controllable wettability and adhesion of the porous film have potential application in manipulating liquid collection and transportation. PMID:28788033

  9. Anisotropic lattice thermal conductivity in chiral tellurium from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Hua; Kioussis, Nicholas; Stewart, Derek A.

    2015-12-21

    Using ab initio based calculations, we have calculated the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of chiral tellurium. We show that the interplay between the strong covalent intrachain and weak van der Waals interchain interactions gives rise to the phonon band gap between the lower and higher optical phonon branches. The underlying mechanism of the large anisotropy of the thermal conductivity is the anisotropy of the phonon group velocities and of the anharmonic interatomic force constants (IFCs), where large interchain anharmonic IFCs are associated with the lone electron pairs. We predict that tellurium has a large three-phonon scattering phase space that results in low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity anisotropy decreases under applied hydrostatic pressure.

  10. Strain-Engineering the Anisotropic Electrical Conductance of Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li

    2014-05-01

    Newly fabricated monolayer phosphorene and its few-layer structures are expected to be promising for electronic and optical applications because of their finite direct band gaps and sizable but anisotropic electronic mobility. By first-principles simulations, we show that this unique anisotropic conductance can be controlled by using simple strain conditions. With the appropriate biaxial or uniaxial strain, we can rotate the preferred conducting direction by 90 degrees. This will be of useful for exploring quantum Hall effects, and exotic electronic and mechanical applications based on phosphorene.

  11. The Effect of Anisotropic Conduction on the Thermal Instability in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ena; Stone, James M.

    2012-03-01

    Thermal instability (TI) can strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Milky Way and other disk galaxies. Thermal conduction plays an important role in the TI by stabilizing small scales and limiting the size of the smallest condensates. In the magnetized ISM, however, heat is conducted anisotropically (primarily along magnetic field lines). We investigate the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on the nonlinear regime of the TI by performing two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We present models with magnetic fields of different initial geometries and strengths, and compare them to hydrodynamic models with isotropic conduction. We find that anisotropic conduction does not significantly alter the overall density and temperature statistics in the saturated state of the TI. However, it can strongly affect the shapes and sizes of cold clouds formed by the TI. For example, for uniform initial fields long filaments of cold gas are produced that are reminiscent of some observed H I clouds. For initially tangled fields, such filaments are not produced. We also show that anisotropic conduction suppresses turbulence generated by evaporative flows from the surfaces of cold blobs, which may have implications for mechanisms for driving turbulence in the ISM.

  12. Anisotropic Ionic Conductivity of Lithium-Doped Sulfonated PBI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spry, R. J.; Arnold, F. E.; Dean, D. R.; Alexander, M. D., Jr.; Bai, S. J.; Dang, T. D.; Price, G. E.; Solomon, J. S.

    1997-03-01

    We report the conductivity study results of lithium-doped sulfonated PBI, a conjugated rigid rod polymer, poly[(1,7-dihydrobenzo[1,2-d:4,5-d']dimidazole-2,6-diyl)-2-(2-sulfo)-p- phenylene], derivatized with pendants of propane sulfonate Li^+ ionomer. The DC four-probe conductivity parallel to the surface of cast films was as large as 8.3× 10-3 S/cm. Similar measurements in an eight-probe configuration showed no difference between bulk and surface conductivity. The ionic nature of the conductivity was indicated by constant voltage depletion experiments and by secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of the residues near the electrodes. Both the AC and DC two-probe conductivities measured transverse to the sample surface were ~ 10-8 S/cm. Electron microscopy indicated that the films has a layered structure parallel to the surfaces. This structural anisotropy was confirmed by refractive index values obtained from wave-guide experiments. The polymer morphology was also investigated by X-ray scattering.

  13. 3D Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Exfoliated Rhenium Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyejin; Ryder, Christopher R; Wood, Joshua D; Hersam, Mark C; Cahill, David G

    2017-07-19

    ReS2 represents a different class of 2D materials, which is characterized by low symmetry having 1D metallic chains within the planes and extremely weak interlayer bonding. Here, the thermal conductivity of single-crystalline ReS2 in a distorted 1T phase is determined at room temperature for the in-plane directions parallel and perpendicular to the Re-chains, and the through-plane direction using time-domain thermoreflectance. ReS2 is prepared in the form of flakes having thicknesses of 60-450 nm by micromechanical exfoliation, and their crystalline orientations are identified by polarized Raman spectroscopy. The in-plane thermal conductivity is higher along the Re-chains, (70 ± 18) W m(-1) K(-1) , as compared to transverse to the chains, (50 ± 13) W m(-1) K(-1) . As expected from the weak interlayer bonding, the through-plane thermal conductivity is the lowest observed to date for 2D materials, (0.55 ± 0.07) W m(-1) K(-1) , resulting in a remarkably high anisotropy of (130 ± 40) and (90 ± 30) for the two in-plane directions. The thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of ReS2 are discussed relative to the other 2D materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Magneto-optical conductivity of anisotropic two-dimensional Dirac-Weyl materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Leyva, M.; Wang, Chumin

    2017-09-01

    In the presence of an external magnetic field, the optical response of two-dimensional materials, whose charge carriers behave as massless Dirac fermions with arbitrary anisotropic Fermi velocity, is investigated. Using Kubo formalism, we obtain the magneto-optical conductivity tensor for these materials, which allows to address the magneto-optical response of anisotropic Dirac fermions from the well known magneto-optical conductivity of isotropic Dirac fermions. As an application, we analyse the combined effects of strain-induced anisotropy and magnetic field on the transmittance, as well as on the Faraday rotation, of linearly polarized light after passing strained graphene. The reported analytical expressions can be a useful tool to predict the absorption and the Faraday angle of strained graphene under magnetic field. Finally, our study is extended to anisotropic two-dimensional materials with Dirac fermions of arbitrary pseudospin.

  15. Theoretical determination of anisotropic thermal conductivity for initially defect-free and defective TATB single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2014-11-01

    The anisotropic thermal conductivity was determined for initially defect-free and defective crystals of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB), a material that exhibits a graphitic-like packing structure with stacked single-molecule-thick layers, using the reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method and an established TATB molecular dynamics force field. Thermal conduction in TATB is predicted to be substantially higher and more anisotropic than in other related organic molecular explosives, with conduction along directions nominally in the plane of the molecular layers at least 68% greater than conduction along the direction exactly perpendicular to the layers. Finite-size effects along the conduction directions were assessed. The conductivity along directions nominally in the plane of the molecular layers was found to be insensitive to the supercell length along the conduction direction—a result commensurate with the estimated phonon mean free path, ˜6 Å. A small decrease in the conductivity normal to the layers was found for longer supercells and is likely due to increased phonon scattering as a result of dynamic structural transitions in the crystal. The thermal conductivity of TATB crystals containing vacancy defects was also determined and the variation of conductivity with crystal density was found to be both linear and anisotropic, with the introduction of vacancy defects leading to a greater percentage reduction in conduction for the direction perpendicular to the molecular layers.

  16. Theoretical determination of anisotropic thermal conductivity for initially defect-free and defective TATB single crystals.

    PubMed

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Sewell, Thomas D

    2014-11-14

    The anisotropic thermal conductivity was determined for initially defect-free and defective crystals of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB), a material that exhibits a graphitic-like packing structure with stacked single-molecule-thick layers, using the reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method and an established TATB molecular dynamics force field. Thermal conduction in TATB is predicted to be substantially higher and more anisotropic than in other related organic molecular explosives, with conduction along directions nominally in the plane of the molecular layers at least 68% greater than conduction along the direction exactly perpendicular to the layers. Finite-size effects along the conduction directions were assessed. The conductivity along directions nominally in the plane of the molecular layers was found to be insensitive to the supercell length along the conduction direction-a result commensurate with the estimated phonon mean free path, ∼6 Å. A small decrease in the conductivity normal to the layers was found for longer supercells and is likely due to increased phonon scattering as a result of dynamic structural transitions in the crystal. The thermal conductivity of TATB crystals containing vacancy defects was also determined and the variation of conductivity with crystal density was found to be both linear and anisotropic, with the introduction of vacancy defects leading to a greater percentage reduction in conduction for the direction perpendicular to the molecular layers.

  17. Electromagnetic characterization of the CFRPs anisotropic conductivity: modeling and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menana, H.; Féliachi, M.

    2011-02-01

    This work deals with the characterization of the conductivity tensor of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) thin plate. We propose a contactless method based on the eddy current non destructive testing technique. The used eddy current sensor consists of a ferrite torus on which a winding is wound. The torus is of a rectangular section and contains a thin air-gap in which the thin CFRP plate is inserted. We developed analytical relations giving the longitudinal and transversal conductivities of the CFRP plate as functions of the impedances variations of the eddy current sensor, corresponding to the orientations of the carbon fibers parallel and transverse to the direction of the torus width which is much greater than its thickness. The analytical relations are developed by inverting interpolation functions of curves giving the variations of the sensor impedances as functions of the longitudinal and transversal conductivities of the CFRP plate. These curves are obtained by a numerical model based on a simplified integro-differential formulation in terms of the electric vector potential in the CFRP plate, coupled to the magnetic circuit equations in the ferrite torus. The modeling results are supported by measurements.

  18. Anisotropic charge transport in ion-conductive photoresponsive polyethylene oxide-based mesomorphic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binet, Corinne; Allart, Alexandre; Judeinstein, Patrick; Roussel, Frédérick

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of charge motion in conductive and photosensitive mesogenic block copolymers containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) segments is investigated over a wide frequency and temperature range with the broadband dielectric spectroscopy technique. It is found that the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, the UV intensity, and the anchoring conditions of mesogenic unit in the cells produce changes in conductivity properties and in the molecular arrangement. The anisotropic nature of the conductivity is established.

  19. Anisotropic charge transport in ion-conductive photoresponsive polyethylene oxide-based mesomorphic materials.

    PubMed

    Binet, Corinne; Allart, Alexandre; Judeinstein, Patrick; Roussel, Frédérick

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of charge motion in conductive and photosensitive mesogenic block copolymers containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) segments is investigated over a wide frequency and temperature range with the broadband dielectric spectroscopy technique. It is found that the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, the UV intensity, and the anchoring conditions of mesogenic unit in the cells produce changes in conductivity properties and in the molecular arrangement. The anisotropic nature of the conductivity is established.

  20. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance of few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li

    2014-05-14

    Newly fabricated few-layer black phosphorus and its monolayer structure, phosphorene, are expected to be promising for electronic and optical applications because of their finite direct band gaps and sizable but anisotropic electronic mobility. By first-principles simulations, we show that this unique anisotropic free-carrier mobility can be controlled by using simple strain conditions. With the appropriate biaxial or uniaxial strain (4-6%), we can rotate the preferred conducting direction by 90°. This will be useful for exploring unusual quantum Hall effects and exotic electronic and mechanical applications based on phosphorene.

  1. Conductivity tensor for anisotropic plasma in gyrokinetic theory

    DOE PAGES

    Porazik, Peter; Johnson, Jay R.

    2017-05-18

    Comprehensive non-invasive spectroscopic techniques and electrical measurements of the carbon arc revealed two distinguishable plasma synthesis regions in the radial direction normal to the arc axis. These regions, which are defined as the arc core and the arc periphery, are shown to have very different compositions of carbon species with different densities and temperatures. The colder arc periphery is dominated by carbon diatomic molecules (C-2), which are in the minority in the composition of the hot arc core. These differences are due to a highly non-uniform distribution of the arc current, which is mainly conducted through the arc core populatedmore » with carbon atoms and ions. Therefore, the ablation of the graphite anode is governed by the arc core, while the formation of carbon molecules occurs in the colder arc periphery. This result is consistent with previous predictions that the plasma environment in the arc periphery is suitable for synthesis of carbon nanotubes.« less

  2. Extracellular measurement of anisotropic bidomain myocardial conductivities. I. Theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Le Guyader, P; Trelles, F; Savard, P

    2001-10-01

    The passive electrical properties of cardiac tissue, such as the intracellular and interstitial conductivities along the longitudinal and transverse axes, have not been often measured because intracellular electrodes are usually needed for these measurements. In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of two myocardial models developed to estimate these properties by analyzing potentials recorded with a pair of extracellular electrodes while injecting alternating current between another pair of electrodes. First, the cardiac tissue is represented by a standard bidomain model which includes a membrane capacitance; second, this model is modified by adding an intracellular capacitance representing the intercalated disks. Numerical solutions are computed with a fast Fourier transform algorithm without constraining the anisotropy ratios of the interstitial and intracellular domains. We systematically investigate the effects of changes in the bidomain parameters on the voltage-to-current ratio curves. We also demonstrate how the bidomain parameters can be theoretically estimated by fitting, with a modified Shor's r algorithm, the simulated potentials along the longitudinal and transverse axes for different frequencies between 10 and 10,000 Hz. An important finding is that the interelectrode distance must be similar to the myocardial space constant so as to obtain frequency dependent measurements.

  3. Anisotropic conduction block and reentry in neonatal rat ventricular myocyte monolayers

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Carlos; Chen, Fuhua; Xie, Yuanfang; Pai, Rakesh K.; Slavin, Leonid; Parker, John; Lamp, Scott T.; Qu, Zhilin; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropy can lead to unidirectional conduction block that initiates reentry. We analyzed the mechanisms in patterned anisotropic neonatal rat ventricular myocyte monolayers. Voltage and intracellular Ca (Cai) were optically mapped under the following conditions: extrastimulus (S1S2) testing and/or tetrodotoxin (TTX) to suppress Na current availability; heptanol to reduce gap junction conductance; and incremental rapid pacing. In anisotropic monolayers paced at 2 Hz, conduction velocity (CV) was faster longitudinally than transversely, with an anisotropy ratio [AR = CVL/CVT, where CVL and CVT are CV in the longitudinal and transverse directions, respectively], averaging 2.1 ± 0.8. Interventions decreasing Na current availability, such as S1S2 pacing and TTX, slowed CVL and CVT proportionately, without changing the AR. Conduction block preferentially occurred longitudinal to fiber direction, commonly initiating reentry. Interventions that decreased gap junction conductance, such as heptanol, decreased CVT more than CVL, increasing the AR and causing preferential transverse conduction block and reentry. Rapid pacing resembled the latter, increasing the AR and promoting transverse conduction block and reentry, which was prevented by the Cai chelator 1,2-bis oaminophenoxy ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). In contrast to isotropic and uniformly anisotropic monolayers, in which reentrant rotors drifted and self-terminated, bidirectional anisotropy (i.e., an abrupt change in fiber direction exceeding 45°) caused reentry to anchor near the zone of fiber direction change in 77% of monolayers. In anisotropic monolayers, unidirectional conduction block initiating reentry can occur longitudinal or transverse to fiber direction, depending on whether the experimental intervention reduces Na current availability or decreases gap junction conductance, agreeing with theoretical predictions. PMID:21037233

  4. Anisotropic conductivity tensor imaging in MREIT using directional diffusion rate of water molecules.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-06-21

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an emerging method to visualize electrical conductivity and/or current density images at low frequencies (below 1 KHz). Injecting currents into an imaging object, one component of the induced magnetic flux density is acquired using an MRI scanner for isotropic conductivity image reconstructions. Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) measures the intrinsic three-dimensional diffusion property of water molecules within a tissue. It characterizes the anisotropic water transport by the effective diffusion tensor. Combining the DT-MRI and MREIT techniques, we propose a novel direct method for absolute conductivity tensor image reconstructions based on a linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. We first recover the projected current density, which is the best approximation of the internal current density one can obtain from the measured single component of the induced magnetic flux density. This enables us to estimate a scale factor between the diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor. Combining these values at all pixels with the acquired diffusion tensor map, we can quantitatively recover the anisotropic conductivity tensor map. From numerical simulations and experimental verifications using a biological tissue phantom, we found that the new method overcomes the limitations of each method and successfully reconstructs both the direction and magnitude of the conductivity tensor for both the anisotropic and isotropic regions.

  5. Anisotropic heat conduction in silicon nanowire network revealed by Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaiev, Mykola; Didukh, Oles; Nychyporuk, Tetyana; Timoshenko, Victor; Lysenko, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic nanomaterials possess interesting thermal transport properties because they allow orientation of heat fluxes along preferential directions due to a high ratio (up to three orders of magnitude) between their in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities. Among different techniques allowing thermal conductivity evaluation, micro-Raman scattering is known to be one of the most efficient contactless measurement approaches. In this letter, an experimental approach based on Raman scattering measurements with variable laser spot sizes is reported. Correlation between experimental and calculated thermal resistances of one-dimensional nanocrystalline solids allows a simultaneous estimation of their in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities. In particular, our measurement approach is illustrated to be applied for anisotropic thermal conductivity evaluation of silicon nanowire arrays.

  6. Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in a Polymer Liquid Subjected to Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venerus, David C.; Schieber, Jay D.; Balasubramanian, Venkat; Bush, Kendall; Smoukov, Stoyan

    2004-08-01

    Flow-induced anisotropic thermal conduction in a polymer liquid is studied using force Rayleigh scattering. Time-dependent measurements of the complete thermal diffusivity tensor, which includes one off-diagonal and three diagonal components, are reported on an entangled polymer melt subjected to a uniform shear deformation. These data, in conjunction with mechanical measurements of the stress, provide the first direct evidence that the thermal conductivity tensor and the stress tensor are linearly related in a deformed polymer liquid.

  7. Anisotropic Conductivity Tensor Imaging of In Vivo Canine Brain Using DT-MREIT.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Katoch, Nitish; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-01-01

    We present in vivo images of anisotropic electrical conductivity tensor distributions inside canine brains using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT). The conductivity tensor is represented as a product of an ion mobility tensor and a scale factor of ion concentrations. Incorporating directional mobility information from water diffusion tensors, we developed a stable process to reconstruct anisotropic conductivity tensor images from measured magnetic flux density data using an MRI scanner. Devising a new image reconstruction algorithm, we reconstructed anisotropic conductivity tensor images of two canine brains with a pixel size of 1.25 mm. Though the reconstructed conductivity values matched well in general with those measured by using invasive probing methods, there were some discrepancies as well. The degree of white matter anisotropy was 2 to 4.5, which is smaller than previous findings of 5 to 10. The reconstructed conductivity value of the cerebrospinal fluid was about 1.3 S/m, which is smaller than previous measurements of about 1.8 S/m. Future studies of in vivo imaging experiments with disease models should follow this initial trial to validate clinical significance of DT-MREIT as a new diagnostic imaging modality. Applications in modeling and simulation studies of bioelectromagnetic phenomena including source imaging and electrical stimulation are also promising.

  8. Five-layer realistic head model based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of different tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dandan; Zhang, Jianwei; Wu, Weijuan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiangping

    2009-10-01

    This paper is focused on the sophisticated realistic head modeling based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of the head tissues. The finite element method (FEM) was used to model the five-layer head volume conductor models with hexahedral elements from segmentation and mapping of DT-MRI data. Then the inhomogeneous conductivities of the scalp, CSF and gray matter tissue were distributed according a normal distribution based on the mean value of respective tissues. The electric conductivity of the brain tissues dictates different inhomogeneous and anisotropic at some different microscopic levels. Including the inhomogeneous and anisotropy of the tissue would improve the accuracy of the MREIT, EEG and MEG problems in the simulation research.

  9. The Dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Stable and Unstable Contact Discontinuities with Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Parrish, Ian; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-11-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines on an accelerated contact discontinuity in a weakly collisional plasma. Anisotropic conduction can result in doubly-diffusive instabilities, including the magnetothermal instability (MTI) and the heat flux driven buoyancy instability (HBI). We run fully non-linear numerical simulations of a contact discontinuity with anisotropic conduction. The non-linear evolution can be described as a superposition of three physical effects: temperature diffusion due to vertical conduction, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and the HBI. In simulations with RTI-stable contact discontinuities, the temperature discontinuity spreads due to vertical heat conduction. The HBI slows this temperature diffusion by reorienting initially vertical magnetic field lines to a more horizontal geometry, eventually stopping vertical temperature diffusion. In simulations with RTI-unstable contact discontinuities, the dynamics are initially governed by temperature diffusion, but the RTI becomes increasingly important at late times. These results could be important in various astrophysical contexts including supernova remnants, solar prominences and cold fronts in galaxy clusters. DL is supported by the Hertz Foundation and NSF Grant DGE 1106400; IP & EQ are supported in part by NASA Grant ATP09-0125, NSF-DOE Grant PHY-0812811, and by the David and Lucille Packard Foundation.

  10. Influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue conductivity on electric field distribution in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to quantify the influence of heterogeneous isotropic and heterogeneous anisotropic tissue on the spatial distribution of the electric field during deep brain stimulation (DBS). Three finite element tissue models were created of one patient treated with DBS. Tissue conductivity was modelled as (I) homogeneous isotropic, (II) heterogeneous isotropic based on MRI, and (III) heterogeneous anisotropic based on diffusion tensor MRI. Modelled DBS electrodes were positioned in the subthalamic area, the pallidum, and the internal capsule in each tissue model. Electric fields generated during DBS were simulated for each model and target-combination and visualized with isolevels at 0.20 (inner), and 0.05 V mm(-1) (outer). Statistical and vector analysis was used for evaluation of the distribution of the electric field. Heterogeneous isotropic tissue altered the spatial distribution of the electric field by up to 4% at inner, and up to 10% at outer isolevel. Heterogeneous anisotropic tissue influenced the distribution of the electric field by up to 18 and 15% at each isolevel, respectively. The influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue on the electric field may be clinically relevant in anatomic regions that are functionally subdivided and surrounded by multiple fibres of passage.

  11. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity by Means of Inverse Solution for One-Dimensional Heat Conduction (Anisotropic Thermal Properties of CFRP for FCEV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Masataka; Monde, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    For safe and fast fueling of hydrogen in a fuel cell electric vehicle at hydrogen fueling stations, an understanding of the heat transferred from the gas into the tank wall (carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) material) during hydrogen fueling is necessary. Its thermal properties are needed in estimating heat loss accurately during hydrogen fueling. The CFRP has anisotropic thermal properties, because it consists of an adhesive agent and layers of the CFRP which is wound with a carbon fiber. In this paper, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the tank wall material were measured by an inverse solution for one-dimensional unsteady heat conduction. As a result, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were 2.09 × 10^{-6}{ m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 3.06{ W}{\\cdot }{m}{\\cdot }^{-1}{K}^{-1} for the axial direction, while they were 6.03 × 10^{-7} {m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 0.93 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} for the radial direction. The thermal conductivity for the axial direction was about three times higher than that for the radial direction. The thermal diffusivity shows the same trend in both directions because the thermal capacity, ρ c, is independent of direction, where ρ is the density and c is the heat capacity.

  12. Temperature and Thickness Dependences of the Anisotropic In-Plane Thermal Conductivity of Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brandon; Vermeersch, Bjorn; Carrete, Jesús; Ou, Eric; Kim, Jaehyun; Mingo, Natalio; Akinwande, Deji; Shi, Li

    2017-02-01

    The anisotropic basal-plane thermal conductivities of thin black phosphorus obtained from a new four-probe measurement exhibit much higher peak values at low temperatures than previous reports. First principles calculations reveal the important role of crystal defects and weak thickness dependence that is opposite to the case of graphene and graphite due to the absence of reflection symmetry in puckered phosphorene. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of Ge quantum-dot and symmetrically strained Si/Ge superlattices.

    PubMed

    Liu, W L; Borca-Tasciuc, T; Chen, G; Liu, J L; Wang, K L

    2001-03-01

    We report the first experimental results on the temperature dependent in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of a symmetrically strained Si/Ge superlattice and a Ge quantum-dot superlattice measured by the two-wire 3 omega method. The measured thermal conductivity values are highly anisotropic and are significantly reduced compared to the bulk thermal conductivity of the structures. The results can be explained by using heat transport models based on the Boltzmann transport equation with partially diffusive scattering of the phonons at the superlattice interfaces.

  14. A Controllably Anisotropic Conductivity or Diffusion Phantom Constructed from Isotropic Layers

    PubMed Central

    Sadleir, Rosalind J.; Neralwala, Farida; Te, Tang; Tucker, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Phantoms with controllable and well-defined anisotropy are needed to test methods for imaging electrical anisotropy. We developed and tested a phantom that had properties similar to a homogeneous anisotropic conductive medium. The phantom was constructed with alternate slices of isotropic gel having different conductivities. The degree of anisotropy in the phantom could be varied easily by changing the relative conductivity of the two gels. We tested the stability of several phantoms and found their properties were maintained for approximately 8 h following construction. The phantom has application to electrical impedance tomography, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography, EEG and ECG source imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. PMID:19760146

  15. Strong anisotropic optical conductivity in two-dimensional puckered structures: The role of the Rashba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi-Pouya, S.; Vazifehshenas, T.; Salavati-fard, T.; Farmanbar, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the optical conductivity of an anisotropic two-dimensional system with Rashba spin-flip excitation within the Kubo formalism. We show that the anisotropic Rashba effect caused by an external field significantly changes the magnitude of the spin splitting. Furthermore, we obtain an analytical expression for the longitudinal optical conductivity associated with interband transitions as a function of the frequency for arbitrary polarization angle. We find that the diagonal components of the optical conductivity tensor are direction dependent and the optical absorption spectrum exhibits a strongly anisotropic absorption window. The height and width of this absorption window are very sensitive to the anisotropy of the system. While the height of absorption peak increases with increasing effective mass anisotropy ratio, the peak intensity is larger when the light polarization is along the armchair direction. Moreover, the absorption peak width becomes broader as the density-of-states mass or Rashba interaction is enhanced. These features in the optical absorption spectrum can be used to determine parameters relevant for spintronics.

  16. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity observed in few-layer black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhe; Maassen, Jesse; Deng, Yexin; Du, Yuchen; Garrelts, Richard P.; Lundstrom, Mark S; Ye, Peide D.; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus has been revisited recently as a new two-dimensional material showing potential applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Here we report the anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer black phosphorus measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The armchair and zigzag thermal conductivities are ∼20 and ∼40 W m−1 K−1 for black phosphorus films thicker than 15 nm, respectively, and decrease to ∼10 and ∼20 W m−1 K−1 as the film thickness is reduced, exhibiting significant anisotropy. The thermal conductivity anisotropic ratio is found to be ∼2 for thick black phosphorus films and drops to ∼1.5 for the thinnest 9.5-nm-thick film. Theoretical modelling reveals that the observed anisotropy is primarily related to the anisotropic phonon dispersion, whereas the intrinsic phonon scattering rates are found to be similar along the armchair and zigzag directions. Surface scattering in the black phosphorus films is shown to strongly suppress the contribution of long mean-free-path acoustic phonons. PMID:26472191

  17. A small-plane heat source method for measuring the thermal conductivities of anisotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Liang; Yue, Kai; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-07-01

    A new small-plane heat source method was proposed in this study to simultaneously measure the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of anisotropic insulating materials. In this method the size of the heat source element is smaller than the sample size and the boundary condition is thermal insulation due to no heat flux at the edge of the sample during the experiment. A three-dimensional model in a rectangular coordinate system was established to exactly describe the heat transfer process of the measurement system. Using the Laplace transform, variable separation, and Laplace inverse transform methods, the analytical solution of the temperature rise of the sample was derived. The temperature rises calculated by the analytical solution agree well with the results of numerical calculation. The result of the sensitivity analysis shows that the sensitivity coefficients of the estimated thermal conductivities are high and uncorrelated to each other. At room temperature and in a high-temperature environment, experimental measurements of anisotropic silica aerogel were carried out using the traditional one-dimensional plane heat source method and the proposed method, respectively. The results demonstrate that the measurement method developed in this study is effective and feasible for simultaneously obtaining the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the anisotropic materials.

  18. Carbon-nanotube/silver networks in nitrile butadiene rubber for highly conductive flexible adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rujun; Kwon, Seoyoung; Zheng, Qing; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2012-07-03

    An adhesive with high conductivity, flexibility, cyclability, oxidation resistance, and good adhesion is developed using microscale silver flakes, multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with nanoscale silver particles, and nitrile butadiene rubber. Light-emitting-diode chips are attached to the conductive, flexible adhesive pattern on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate as a visual demonstration. The brightness is invariant during bending tests.

  19. Thermal conductivity investigation of adhesive-free bond laser components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Vedula, MahaLakshmi; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2017-02-01

    An interferometric method has been developed and employed at Onyx Optics, Inc. to accurately measure the thermal conductivity of laser-active crystals as function of dopant concentration or inactive materials such as single crystals, optical ceramics and glasses relative to a standard of assumed to be known thermal conductivity [1]. This technique can also provide information on heat transfer resistance at the interface between two materials in close thermal contact. While the technique appears generally applicable to composites between optically homogeneous materials, we report on thermal conductivities and heat transfer coefficients of selected adhesive-free bond (AFB®) laser composites. Single crystal bars and AFB bonded crystal doublets with the combinations of various rare-earth (Nd3+, Yb3+, Er3+, and Tm3+ trivalent ion doped YAG, and un-doped YAG have been fabricated with the AFB technique. By loading the test sample in a vacuum cryostat, with a precisely controlled heat load at one end of the doublets, the temperature distribution inside the single crystal or the composite samples can been precisely mapped by measuring the optical path difference interferometrically, given the material's thermal-optical properties. No measurable heat transfer resistance can be identified for the AFB interfaces between low-concentration doped YAG and un-doped YAG. For the heavily doped RE3+:YAG, for example, 10% Yb:YAG, the thermal conductivity measured in our experiment is 8.3 W/m•K, using the thermal conductivity of undoped YAG reported in [1] as basis. The thermal transfer resistance of the AFB interface with un-doped YAG, if there is any at the AFB interface, could be less than 1.29×10-6 m2•K/W.

  20. Nanostructured conducting polymers for stiffness controlled cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Eric; Hama, Adel; Ismailova, Esma; Assaud, Loic; Malliaras, George; Hanbücken, Margrit; Owens, Roisin M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a facile and reproducible method, based on ultra thin porous alumina membranes, to produce cm2 ordered arrays of nano-pores and nano-pillars on any kind of substrates. In particular our method enables the fabrication of conducting polymers nano-structures, such as poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (PEDOT:PSS). Here, we demonstrate the potential interest of those templates with controlled cell adhesion studies. The triggering of the eventual fate of the cell (proliferation, death, differentiation or migration) is mediated through chemical cues from the adsorbed proteins and physical cues such as surface energy, stiffness and topography. Interestingly, as well as through material properties, stiffness modifications can be induced by nano-topography, the ability of nano-pillars to bend defining an effective stiffness. By controlling the diameter, length, depth and material of the nano-structures, one can possibly tune the effective stiffness of a (nano) structured substrate. First results indicate a possible change in the fate of living cells on such nano-patterned devices, whether they are made of conducting polymer (soft material) or silicon (hard material).

  1. Effects of anisotropic conduction and heat pipe interaction on minimum mass space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Lund, Kurt O.

    1991-01-01

    Equations are formulated for the two dimensional, anisotropic conduction of heat in space radiator fins. The transverse temperature field was obtained by the integral method, and the axial field by numerical integration. A shape factor, defined for the axial boundary condition, simplifies the analysis and renders the results applicable to general heat pipe/conduction fin interface designs. The thermal results are summarized in terms of the fin efficiency, a radiation/axial conductance number, and a transverse conductance surface Biot number. These relations, together with those for mass distribution between fins and heat pipes, were used in predicting the minimum radiator mass for fixed thermal properties and fin efficiency. This mass is found to decrease monotonically with increasing fin conductivity. Sensitivities of the minimum mass designs to the problem parameters are determined.

  2. Increasing Black Hole Feedback-induced Quenching with Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rahul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Pfrommer, Christoph; Weinberger, Rainer; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars; Puchwein, Ewald; Pakmor, Rüdiger

    2017-03-01

    Feedback from central supermassive black holes is often invoked to explain the low star formation rates (SFRs) in the massive galaxies at the centers of galaxy clusters. However, the detailed physics of the coupling of the injected feedback energy with the intracluster medium (ICM) is still unclear. Using high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation, we investigate the role of anisotropic thermal conduction in shaping the thermodynamic structure of clusters, and in particular, in modifying the impact of black hole feedback. Stratified anisotropically conducting plasmas are formally always unstable, and thus more prone to mixing, an expectation borne out by our results. The increased mixing efficiently isotropizes the injected feedback energy, which in turn significantly improves the coupling between the feedback energy and the ICM. This facilitates an earlier disruption of the cool-core, reduces the SFR by more than an order of magnitude, and results in earlier quenching despite an overall lower amount of feedback energy injected into the cluster core. With conduction, the metallicity gradients and dispersions are lowered, aligning them better with observational constraints. These results highlight the important role of thermal conduction in establishing and maintaining the quiescence of massive galaxies.

  3. Measuring In-Plane Thermal Conductivity of Anisotropic Thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Misha; Yee, Shannon

    2014-03-01

    Polymer thermoelectrics (TEs) are a promising alternative to traditional TEs due to low cost and scalability. Higher efficiency polymer TEs can be realized by control of in-plane electrical and thermal properties. This specifically requires a non-contact technique that can probe the thermal conductivity of highly anisotropic films. Current conductivity measurements of thin-films rely on periodic heating of a semi-infinite solid. The periodic heating causes surface temperature fluctuations, which depend on the thermal and physical properties of the material. Presented here is our progress in developing a frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR) technique to measure in-plane thermal conductivity of highly anisotropic films. Traditional FDTR uses a circular laser spot for heating and is insensitive to the effects of lateral heat flow. By modifying the heating laser spot from a circle to an annulus, the temperature fluctuations inside the annulus perimeter are significantly influenced by lateral heat flow. The probe laser can scan within the annulus, making this technique sensitive to both the in-plane and through-plane properties. Additionally, this technique can be used at high heating frequencies to measure phonon MFP contributions to the thermal conductivity in both directions.

  4. Nanofiber Anisotropic Conductive Films (ACF) for Ultra-Fine-Pitch Chip-on-Glass (COG) Interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Suk, Kyung-Lim; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Nanofiber anisotropic conductive films (ACF) were invented, by adapting nanofiber technology to ACF materials, to overcome the limitations of ultra-fine-pitch interconnection packaging, i.e. shorts and open circuits as a result of the narrow space between bumps and electrodes. For nanofiber ACF, poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) polymers were used as nanofiber polymer materials. For PVDF and PBS nanofiber ACF, conductive particles of diameter 3.5 μm were incorporated into nanofibers by electrospinning. In ultra-fine-pitch chip-on-glass assembly, insulation was significantly improved by using nanofiber ACF, because nanofibers inside the ACF suppressed the mobility of conductive particles, preventing them from flowing out during the bonding process. Capture of conductive particles was increased from 31% (conventional ACF) to 65%, and stable electrical properties and reliability were achieved by use of nanofiber ACF.

  5. INTERPLAY AMONG COOLING, AGN FEEDBACK, AND ANISOTROPIC CONDUCTION IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Yang, H.-Y.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-02-20

    Feedback from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is one of the most promising heating mechanisms to circumvent the cooling-flow problem in galaxy clusters. However, the role of thermal conduction remains unclear. Previous studies have shown that anisotropic thermal conduction in cluster cool cores (CCs) could drive the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities (HBIs) that reorient the field lines in the azimuthal directions and isolate the cores from conductive heating from the outskirts. However, how the AGN interacts with the HBI is still unknown. To understand these interwined processes, we perform the first 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of isolated CC clusters that include anisotropic conduction, radiative cooling, and AGN feedback. We find the following: (1) For realistic magnetic field strengths in clusters, magnetic tension can suppress a significant portion of HBI-unstable modes, and thus the HBI is either completely inhibited or significantly impaired, depending on the unknown magnetic field coherence length. (2) Turbulence driven by AGN jets can effectively randomize magnetic field lines and sustain conductivity at ∼1/3 of the Spitzer value; however, the AGN-driven turbulence is not volume filling. (3) Conductive heating within the cores could contribute to ∼10% of the radiative losses in Perseus-like clusters and up to ∼50% for clusters twice the mass of Perseus. (4) Thermal conduction has various impacts on the AGN activity and intracluster medium properties for the hottest clusters, which may be searched by future observations to constrain the level of conductivity in clusters. The distribution of cold gas and the implications are also discussed.

  6. Effect of anisotropic thermal conductivity on the morphological stability of a binary alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A linear morphological stability analysis is presented for a planar interface during unidirectional solidification of a binary alloy, in the case of a crystal having an anisotropic thermal conductivity. A dispersion relation shows that the onset of instability depends on the orientation of the growth direction with respect to principal crystallographic axes and on the orientation of the wavevector of the perturbation. The onset of instability can be either oscillatory (traveling waves) or nonoscillatory in time. For growth along a principal axis of the crystal there is an exchange of stabilities, and the onset of instability is nonoscillatory.

  7. Life cycle assessment of Japanese high-temperature conductive adhesives.

    PubMed

    Andrae, Anders S G; Itsubo, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Inaba, Atsushi

    2008-04-15

    The electrically conductive adhesives (ECA) are on the verge of a breakthrough as reliable interconnection materials for electronic components. As the ban of lead (Pb) in the electronics industry becomes a reality, the ECA's could be attractive overall alternatives to high melting point (HMP) Pb-based solder pastes. Environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to estimate trade-offs between the energy use and the potential toxicity of two future types of ECA's and one HMP Pb-based. The probability is around 90% that the overall CO2 emissions from an ECA based on a tin-bismuth alloy are lower than for a silver-epoxy based ECA, whereas the probability is about 80% that the cumulative energy demand would be lower. It is more uncertain whether the tin-bismuth ECA would contribute to less CO2, or consume less energy, than a HMP Pb-based solder paste. Moreover, for the impact categories contributing to the life-cycle impact assessment method based on end point modeling (LIME) damage category of human health, the tin-bismuth ECA shows a 25 times lower score, and a silver-epoxy based ECA shows an 11 times lower score than the HMP Pb-based solder paste. In order to save resources and decrease CO2 emissions it is recommended to increase the collection and recycling of printed board assemblies using silver-epoxy based ECA.

  8. Optic phonons and anisotropic thermal conductivity in hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5

    DOE PAGES

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Singh, David

    2016-11-16

    The lattice thermal conductivity ($κ$) of hexagonal Ge2Sb2Tesub>5 (h-GST) is studied via direct first-principles calculations. We find significant intrinsic anisotropy of ( $κ$a/$κ$c~2) of $κ$ in bulk h-GST along different transport directions. The dominant contribution to$κ$ is from optic phonons, ~75%. This is extremely unusual as the acoustic phonon modes carry most of the heat in typical semiconductors and insulators with small unit cells. Very recently, Lee et. al. observed anisotropic in GST thin films and attributed this to thermal resistance of amorphous regions near grain boundaries. However, our results suggest an additional strong intrinsic anisotropy for the pure hexagonalmore » phase. This derives from bonding anisotropy along different crystal directions, specifically from weak interlayer coupling, which gives anisotropic phonon dispersions. The phonon spectrum of h-GST has very dispersive optic branches with higher group velocities along the a-axis as compared to flat optic bands along the c-axis. The importance of optic mode contributions for the thermal conductivity in low-$κ$ h-GST is unusual, and development of fundamental physical understanding of these contributions may be critical to better understanding of thermal conduction in other complex layered materials.« less

  9. Heat transfer due to electroconvulsive therapy: Influence of anisotropic thermal and electrical skull conductivity.

    PubMed

    Menezes de Oliveira, Marilia; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and head models to investigate temperature profiles arising when anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivities are considered in the skull layer. The aim was to numerically investigate the threshold for which this therapy operates safely to the brain, from the thermal point of view. A six-layer spherical head model consisting of scalp, fat, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid, grey matter and white matter was developed. Later on, a realistic human head model was also implemented. These models were built up using the packages from COMSOL Inc. and Simpleware Ltd. In these models, three of the most common electrode montages used in ECT were applied. Anisotropic conductivities were derived using volume constraint and included in both spherical and realistic head models. The bio-heat transferring problem governed by Laplace equation was solved numerically. The results show that both the tensor eigenvalues of electrical conductivity and the electrode montage affect the maximum temperature, but thermal anisotropy does not have a significant influence. Temperature increases occur mainly in the scalp and fat, and no harm is caused to the brain by the current applied during ECT. The work assures the thermal safety of ECT and also provides a numerical method to investigate other non-invasive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In Situ Generation of Photosensitive Silver Halide for Improving the Conductivity of Electrically Conductive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaowei; Li, Qiulong; Long, Xiaoyang; Li, Taotao; Zhao, Jingxin; Zhang, Kai; E, Songfeng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhuo; Yao, Yagang

    2017-08-30

    Electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) can be regarded as one of the most promising materials to replace tin/lead solder. However, relatively low conductivity seriously restricts their applications. In the present study, we develop an effective method to decrease the bulk electrical resistivity of ECAs. KI or KBr is added to replace the lubricant and silver oxide layers on silver flakes and to form photosensitive silver halide. After exposure to sunlight, silver halide can photodecompose into silver nanoparticles that will sinter and form metallic bonding between/among flakes during the curing process of ECAs, which would remarkably reduce the resistivity. The modified micro silver flakes play a crucial role in decreasing the electrical resistivity of the corresponding ECAs, exhibiting the lowest resistivity of 7.6 × 10(-5) Ω·cm for 70 wt % loaded ECAs. The obtained ECAs can have wide applications in the electronics industry, where high conductance is required.

  11. Three-dimensional forward modeling and inversion of marine CSEM data in anisotropic conductivity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) forward and inverse modeling code for marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) surveys in anisotropic media. The forward solution is based on a primary/secondary field approach, in which secondary fields are solved using a staggered finite-volume (FV) method and primary fields are solved for 1D isotropic background models analytically. It is shown that it is rather straightforward to extend the isotopic 3D FV algorithm to a triaxial anisotropic one, while additional coefficients are required to account for full tensor conductivity. To solve the linear system resulting from FV discretization of Maxwell' s equations, both iterative Krylov solvers (e.g. BiCGSTAB) and direct solvers (e.g. MUMPS) have been implemented, makes the code flexible for different computing platforms and different problems. For iterative soloutions, the linear system in terms of electromagnetic potentials (A-Phi) is used to precondition the original linear system, transforming the discretized Curl-Curl equations to discretized Laplace-like equations, thus much more favorable numerical properties can be obtained. Numerical experiments suggest that this A-Phi preconditioner can dramatically improve the convergence rate of an iterative solver and high accuracy can be achieved without divergence correction even for low frequencies. To efficiently calculate the sensitivities, i.e. the derivatives of CSEM data with respect to tensor conductivity, the adjoint method is employed. For inverse modeling, triaxial anisotropy is taken into account. Since the number of model parameters to be resolved of triaxial anisotropic medias is twice or thrice that of isotropic medias, the data-space version of the Gauss-Newton (GN) minimization method is preferred due to its lower computational cost compared with the traditional model-space GN method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the code with synthetic examples.

  12. Electrical conductivity of a two-dimensional model for a structurally anisotropic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Balagurov, B. Ya.

    2010-02-15

    The electrical conductivity of a two-dimensional structurally anisotropic model for a composite is considered. The model represents an isotropic matrix with a system of nonconducting inclusions in the form of infinitely thin straight line segments (scratches). The scratches make an angle {theta} or -{theta} with a preferred axis (for definiteness, axis y) at the same probability, and their centers are chaotically distributed. An approximate effective medium method is used to obtain a general expression for the effective conductivity tensor of this model that is valid over a wide concentration range. In this approximation, both components of tensor are shown to vanish at the same percolation threshold, which is expressed explicitly. The conductivity of the model in a critical region is considered in terms of the similarity hypothesis.

  13. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices.

  14. Field determination of the three dimensional hydraulic conductivity tensor of anisotropic media: 1. Theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul A.; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    1985-01-01

    A field method is proposed for determining the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity tensor and specific storage of an anisotropic porous or fractured medium. The method, known as cross-hole testing (to distinguish it from conventional single-hole packer tests), consists of injecting fluid into (or withdrawing fluid from) packed-off intervals in a number of boreholes and monitoring the transient head response in similar intervals in neighboring boreholes. The directions of the principal hydraulic conductivities need not be known prior to the test, and the boreholes may have arbitrary orientations (e.g., they can all be vertical). An important aspect of the proposed method is that it provides direct field information on whether it is proper to regard the medium as being uniform and anisotropic on the scale of the test. The first paper presents theoretical expressions describing transient and steady state head response in monitoring intervals of arbitrary lengths and orientations, to constant-rate injection into (or withdrawal from) intervals having similar or different lengths and orientations. The conditions under which these intervals can be treated mathematically as points are investigated by an asymptotic analysis. The effect of planar no-flow and constant-head boundaries on the response is analyzed by the theory of images. The second paper describes the field methodology and shows how the proposed approach works in the case of fractured granitic rocks.

  15. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices. PMID:24642903

  16. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for anisotropic inhomogeneous head tissue conductivity in human head modelling.

    PubMed

    Bashar, M R; Li, Y; Wen, P

    2010-06-01

    The accuracy of an electroencephalography (EEG) forward problem partially depends on the head tissue conductivities. These conductivities are anisotropic and inhomogeneous in nature. This paper investigates the effects of conductivity uncertainty and analyses its sensitivity on an EEG forward problem for a spherical and a realistic head models. We estimate the uncertain conductivities using an efficient constraint based on an optimization method and perturb it by means of the volume and directional constraints. Assigning the uncertain conductivities, we construct spherical and realistic head models by means of a stochastic finite element method for fixed dipolar sources. We also compute EEG based on the constructed head models. We use a probabilistic sensitivity analysis method to determine the sensitivity indexes. These indexes characterize the conductivities with the most or the least effects on the computed outputs. These results demonstrate that conductivity uncertainty has significant effects on EEG. These results also show that the uncertain conductivities of the scalp, the radial direction of the skull and transversal direction in the white matter are more sensible.

  17. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  18. Cold Fronts and Gas Sloshing in Galaxy Clusters with Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Lee, D.

    2013-01-01

    Cold fronts in cluster cool cores should be erased on short timescales by thermal conduction, unless protected by magnetic fields that are "draped" parallel to the front surfaces, suppressing conduction perpendicular to the sloshing fronts. We present a series of MHD simulations of cold front formation in the core of a galaxy cluster with anisotropic thermal conduction, exploring a parameter space of conduction strengths parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. Including conduction has a strong effect on the temperature distribution of the core and the appearance of the cold fronts. Though magnetic field lines are draping parallel to the front surfaces, preventing conduction directly across them, the temperature jumps across the fronts are nevertheless reduced. The geometry of the field is such that the cold gas below the front surfaces can be connected to hotter regions outside via field lines along directions perpendicular to the plane of the sloshing motions and along sections of the front that are not perfectly draped. This results in the heating of this gas below the front on a timescale of a Gyr, but the sharpness of the density and temperature jumps may nevertheless be preserved. By modifying the gas density distribution below the front, conduction may indirectly aid in suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. If conduction along the field lines is unsuppressed, we find that the characteristic sharp jumps seen in Chandra observations of cold front clusters do not form. Therefore, the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters is in contradiction with our simulations with full Spitzer conduction. This suggests that the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters could be used to place upper limits on conduction in the bulk of the intracluster medium. Finally, the combination of sloshing and anisotropic thermal conduction can result in a larger flux of heat to the core than either process in isolation. While still not sufficient to prevent a cooling

  19. COLD FRONTS AND GAS SLOSHING IN GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2013-01-10

    Cold fronts in cluster cool cores should be erased on short timescales by thermal conduction, unless protected by magnetic fields that are 'draped' parallel to the front surfaces, suppressing conduction perpendicular to the sloshing fronts. We present a series of MHD simulations of cold front formation in the core of a galaxy cluster with anisotropic thermal conduction, exploring a parameter space of conduction strengths parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. Including conduction has a strong effect on the temperature distribution of the core and the appearance of the cold fronts. Though magnetic field lines are draping parallel to the front surfaces, preventing conduction directly across them, the temperature jumps across the fronts are nevertheless reduced. The geometry of the field is such that the cold gas below the front surfaces can be connected to hotter regions outside via field lines along directions perpendicular to the plane of the sloshing motions and along sections of the front that are not perfectly draped. This results in the heating of this gas below the front on a timescale of a Gyr, but the sharpness of the density and temperature jumps may nevertheless be preserved. By modifying the gas density distribution below the front, conduction may indirectly aid in suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. If conduction along the field lines is unsuppressed, we find that the characteristic sharp jumps seen in Chandra observations of cold front clusters do not form. Therefore, the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters is in contradiction with our simulations with full Spitzer conduction. This suggests that the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters could be used to place upper limits on conduction in the bulk of the intracluster medium. Finally, the combination of sloshing and anisotropic thermal conduction can result in a larger flux of heat to the core than either process in isolation. While still not sufficient to prevent a cooling

  20. Current-dependent anisotropic conductivity of locally assembled silver nanoparticles in hybrid polymer films.

    PubMed

    Goel, Pooja; Vinokur, Rostislav; Weichold, Oliver

    2010-12-15

    The electrical behaviour of hybrid poly(ethylene terephthalate) films containing localised, percolating networks of silver nanoparticles separated by pure polymer is studied. The films resemble an array of parallel wires in the submicron range and, thus, exhibit anisotropic conductivity. In the high-conductivity direction at low amplitudes, the films show Ohmic behaviour, while at moderate voltage, non-linearity and a decreasing resistance is observed. The samples were found to heat up during the measurements and the deviation from Ohm's law coincides with the Tg of the polymer. Microstructural analysis of the samples revealed an irreversible agglomeration of the particles at moderate voltages leading to the formation of filaments with higher metallic character than the random particle network.

  1. Anisotropic hopping conduction in spin-coated PEDOT:PSS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardes, A. M.; Kemerink, M.; Janssen, R. A. J.

    2007-08-01

    The charge transport in spin-coated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been investigated as a function of temperature and electric field. Both the magnitude and the transport mechanism are found to be strongly anisotropic. This striking behavior is quantitatively explained in terms of a morphological model in which flattened, quasimetallic PEDOT-rich grains are organized in horizontal layers that are separated by continuous insulating PSS lamellas. In this model, the in-plane conductivity is described by three-dimensional variable range hopping between ˜25nm sized PEDOT-rich particles separated by subnanometer PSS barriers, while the out-of-plane conductivity is described by nearest-neighbor hopping between more widely spaced molecular sites. These length scales are supported by previously reported scanning probe measurements.

  2. ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION AND THE COOLING FLOW PROBLEM IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, Ian J.; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot

    2009-09-20

    We examine the long-standing cooling flow problem in galaxy clusters with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of isolated clusters including radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The central regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) can have cooling timescales of {approx}200 Myr or shorter-in order to prevent a cooling catastrophe the ICM must be heated by some mechanism such as active galactic nucleus feedback or thermal conduction from the thermal reservoir at large radii. The cores of galaxy clusters are linearly unstable to the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), which significantly changes the thermodynamics of the cluster core. The HBI is a convective, buoyancy-driven instability that rearranges the magnetic field to be preferentially perpendicular to the temperature gradient. For a wide range of parameters, our simulations demonstrate that in the presence of the HBI, the effective radial thermal conductivity is reduced to {approx}<10% of the full Spitzer conductivity. With this suppression of conductive heating, the cooling catastrophe occurs on a timescale comparable to the central cooling time of the cluster. Thermal conduction alone is thus unlikely to stabilize clusters with low central entropies and short central cooling timescales. High central entropy clusters have sufficiently long cooling times that conduction can help stave off the cooling catastrophe for cosmologically interesting timescales.

  3. Anisotropic and inhomogeneous thermal conduction in suspended thin-film polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Aditya; Cho, Jungwan; Hobart, Karl D.; Feygelson, Tatyana I.; Pate, Bradford B.; Asheghi, Mehdi; Cahill, David G.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2016-05-01

    While there is a great wealth of data for thermal transport in synthetic diamond, there remains much to be learned about the impacts of grain structure and associated defects and impurities within a few microns of the nucleation region in films grown using chemical vapor deposition. Measurements of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic thermal conductivity in films thinner than 10 μm have previously been complicated by the presence of the substrate thermal boundary resistance. Here, we study thermal conduction in suspended films of polycrystalline diamond, with thicknesses ranging between 0.5 and 5.6 μm, using time-domain thermoreflectance. Measurements on both sides of the films facilitate extraction of the thickness-dependent in-plane ( κ r ) and through-plane ( κ z ) thermal conductivities in the vicinity of the coalescence and high-quality regions. The columnar grain structure makes the conductivity highly anisotropic, with κ z being nearly three to five times as large as κ r , a contrast higher than that reported previously for thicker films. In the vicinity of the high-quality region, κ r and κ z range from 77 ± 10 W/m-K and 210 ± 50 W/m-K for the 1 μm thick film to 130 ± 20 W/m-K and 710 ± 120 W/m-K for the 5.6 μm thick film, respectively. The data are interpreted using a model relating the anisotropy to the scattering on the boundaries of columnar grains and the evolution of the grain size considering their nucleation density and spatial rate of growth. This study aids in the reduction in the near-interfacial resistance of diamond films and efforts to fabricate diamond composites with silicon and GaN for power electronics.

  4. Anisotropic Electroless Deposition on DNA Origami Templates To Form Small Diameter Conductive Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Bibek; Westover, Tyler; Stoddard, Michael; Brinkerhoff, Kamron; Jensen, John; Davis, Robert C; Woolley, Adam T; Harb, John N

    2017-01-24

    An improved method for the metallization of DNA origami is examined in this work. DNA origami, a simple and robust method for creating a wide variety of nanostructured shapes and patterns, provides an enabling template for bottom-up fabrication of next-generation nanodevices. Selective metallization of these DNA templates is needed to make nanoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate a metallization process that uses gold nanorod seeds followed by anisotropic plating to provide improved morphology and greater control of the final metallized width of the structure. In our approach, gold nanorods are attached to an origami template to create a seed layer. Electroless gold deposition is then used to fill the gaps between seeds in order to create continuous, conductive nanowires. Importantly, growth during electroless deposition occurs preferentially in the length direction at a rate that is approximately 4 times the growth rate in the width direction, which enables fabrication of narrow, continuous wires. The electrical properties of 49 nanowires with widths ranging from 13 to 29 nm were characterized, and resistivity values as low as 8.9 × 10(-7) Ω·m were measured. The anisotropic metallization process presented here represents important progress toward the creation of nanoelectronic devices by molecularly directed placement of functional components onto self-assembled biological templates.

  5. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance in ReS{sub 2} monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Sheng Eshun, Kwesi; Shi, Chen; Zeng, Min; Li, Qiliang; Zhu, Hao

    2016-05-09

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS{sub 2}) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1 T (Re in octahedral coordination) phase. The reduced symmetry in ReS{sub 2} leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. In this work, we performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of strain effect on the anisotropic mechanical and electronic properties of ReS{sub 2} monolayers. We found that the anisotropic ratio in electron mobility along two principle axes is 2.36 while the ratio in hole mobility reaches 7.76. The study of strain applied along different directions shows that the elastic modulus is largest for out-of-plane direction, and the strain along a-direction induces indirect bandgap while strain along b- or c-direction does not. In addition, the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by the c-direction tensile strain. This study indicates that the ReS{sub 2} monolayer has promising applications in nanoscale strain sensor and conductance-switch FETs.

  6. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance in ReS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng; Zhu, Hao; Eshun, Kwesi; Shi, Chen; Zeng, Min; Li, Qiliang

    2016-05-01

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1 T (Re in octahedral coordination) phase. The reduced symmetry in ReS2 leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. In this work, we performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of strain effect on the anisotropic mechanical and electronic properties of ReS2 monolayers. We found that the anisotropic ratio in electron mobility along two principle axes is 2.36 while the ratio in hole mobility reaches 7.76. The study of strain applied along different directions shows that the elastic modulus is largest for out-of-plane direction, and the strain along a-direction induces indirect bandgap while strain along b- or c-direction does not. In addition, the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by the c-direction tensile strain. This study indicates that the ReS2 monolayer has promising applications in nanoscale strain sensor and conductance-switch FETs.

  7. High performance heat curing copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui-Wang; Jiu, Jin-Ting; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, high performance electrically conductive adhesives were fabricated from a vinyl ester resin, a thermal initiator, silver coated copper powders, and pure silver powders, without using any other coupling agent, dispersing agent, and reducing agent. The heat cured copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives presented low bulk resistivity (e.g., 4.53 × 10-5 Ω·cm) due to the silver powders that had given high electrical conductivity to the adhesives, and high shear strength (e.g., 16.22 MPa) provided by the crosslinked structures of vinyl ester resin. These high performance copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives have lower cost than those filled by pure silver powders, which can be well used in the electronic packaging and can enlarge the application prospects of electrically conductive adhesives. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Geometric tuning of thermal conductivity in three-dimensional anisotropic phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiyong; Wehmeyer, Geoff; Dames, Chris; Chen, Yunfei

    2016-10-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the thermal transport properties of a three-dimensional (3D) anisotropic phononic crystal consisting of silicon nanowires and films. The calculation shows that the in-plane thermal conductivity is negatively correlated with the out-of-plane thermal conductivity upon making geometric changes, whether varying the nanowire diameter or the film thickness. This enables the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity to be tailored over a wide range, in some cases by more than a factor of 20. Similar trends in thermal conductivity are also observed from an independent phonon ray tracing simulation considering only diffuse boundary scattering effects, though the range of anisotropy ratios is smaller than that obtained in MD simulation. By analyzing the phonon dispersion relation with varied geometric parameters, it is found that increasing the nanowire diameter increases the out-of-plane acoustic phonon group velocities, but reduces the in-plane longitudinal and fast transverse acoustic phonon group velocities. The calculated phonon irradiation further verified the negative correlation between the in-plane and the out-of-plane thermal conductivity. The proposed 3D phononic crystal may find potential application in thermoelectrics, energy storage, catalysis and sensing applications owing to its widely tailorable thermal conductivity.

  9. Anisotropic intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of borophane from first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Haifeng; Gao, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-25

    Borophene (boron sheet) as a new type of two-dimensional (2D) material was grown successfully recently. Unfortunately, the structural stability of freestanding borophene is still an open issue. Theoretical research has found that full hydrogenation can remove such instability, and the product is called borophane. In this paper, using first-principles calculations we investigate the lattice dynamics and thermal transport properties of borophane. The intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity and the relaxation time of borophane are investigated by solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. We find that the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of borophane is anisotropic, as the higher value (along the zigzag direction) is about two times of the lower one (along the armchair direction). The contributions of phonon branches to the lattice thermal conductivities along different directions are evaluated. It is found that both the anisotropy of thermal conductivity and the different phonon branches which dominate the thermal transport along different directions are decided by the group velocity and the relaxation time of phonons with very low frequency. In addition, the size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated using cumulative thermal conductivity. The underlying physical mechanisms of these unique properties are also discussed in this paper.

  10. Field determination of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity tensor of anisotropic media 2. Methodology and application to fractured rocks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, P.A.; Neuman, S.P.; Stiles, G.K.; Simpson, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical solutions developed in the first paper can be used to interpret the results of cross-hole tests conducted in anisotropic porous or fractured media. Test results from a granitic rock near Oracle in southern Arizona are presented to illustrate how the method works for fractured rocks. At the site, the Oracle granite is shown to respond as a near-uniform, anisotropic medium, the hydraulic conductivity of which is strongly controlled by the orientations of major fracture sets. The cross-hole test results are shown to be consistent with the results of more than 100 single- hole packer tests conducted at the site. -from Authors

  11. Automated optical inspection of liquid crystal display anisotropic conductive film bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangming; Du, Xiaohui; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Juanxiu; Liu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Anisotropic conductive film (ACF) bonding is widely used in the liquid crystal display (LCD) industry. It implements circuit connection between screens and flexible printed circuits or integrated circuits. Conductive microspheres in ACF are key factors that influence LCD quality, because the conductive microspheres' quantity and shape deformation rate affect the interconnection resistance. Although this issue has been studied extensively by prior work, quick and accurate methods to inspect the quality of ACF bonding are still missing in the actual production process. We propose a method to inspect ACF bonding effectively by using automated optical inspection. The method has three steps. The first step is that it acquires images of the detection zones using a differential interference contrast (DIC) imaging system. The second step is that it identifies the conductive microspheres and their shape deformation rate using quantitative analysis of the characteristics of the DIC images. The final step is that it inspects ACF bonding using a back propagation trained neural network. The result shows that the miss rate is lower than 0.1%, and the false inspection rate is lower than 0.05%.

  12. Optic phonons and anisotropic thermal conductivity in hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lindsay, Lucas; Singh, David J.

    2016-11-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5 (h-GST) is studied via direct first-principles calculations. We find significant intrinsic anisotropy (κa/κc~2) of κ in bulk h-GST, with the dominant contribution to κ from optic phonons, ~75%. This is extremely unusual as the acoustic phonon modes are the majority heat carriers in typical semiconductors and insulators. The anisotropy derives from varying bonding along different crystal directions, specifically from weak interlayer bonding along the c-axis, which gives anisotropic phonon dispersions. The phonon spectrum of h-GST has very dispersive optic branches with higher group velocities along the a-axis as compared to flat optic bands along the c-axis. The large optic mode contributions to the thermal conductivity in low-κ h-GST is unusual, and development of fundamental physical understanding of these contributions may be critical to better understanding of thermal conduction in other complex layered materials.

  13. Optic phonons and anisotropic thermal conductivity in hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lindsay, Lucas; Singh, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5 (h-GST) is studied via direct first-principles calculations. We find significant intrinsic anisotropy (κa/κc~2) of κ in bulk h-GST, with the dominant contribution to κ from optic phonons, ~75%. This is extremely unusual as the acoustic phonon modes are the majority heat carriers in typical semiconductors and insulators. The anisotropy derives from varying bonding along different crystal directions, specifically from weak interlayer bonding along the c-axis, which gives anisotropic phonon dispersions. The phonon spectrum of h-GST has very dispersive optic branches with higher group velocities along the a-axis as compared to flat optic bands along the c-axis. The large optic mode contributions to the thermal conductivity in low-κ h-GST is unusual, and development of fundamental physical understanding of these contributions may be critical to better understanding of thermal conduction in other complex layered materials. PMID:27848985

  14. Large anisotropic thermal conductivity and excellent thermoelectric properties observed in carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ting; Chen, Shi-Zhang; Cao, Xuan-Hao; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Xie, Fang; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2017-07-01

    Using first-principles calculations in combination with the Boltzmann transport equation and empirical potential models, we investigate the thermal transport and thermoelectric properties of carbon foam. The results show that large anisotropic thermal conductivity can be observed in carbon foam. The Z direction of carbon foam has the highest thermal conductivity of 22.97 W/m K at room temperature, which is about 25 times greater than that of the Y direction. This is due to the lower phonon group velocity and stronger anharmonic interaction in the Y direction than those in the Z direction. Moreover, we find that the carbon form has excellent thermoelectric properties in the Y direction, the ZT can reach 0.5 at room temperature, and the ZT can be further improved to 0.84 at 800 K, which is two orders of magnitude higher than that in the Z direction. This results from the large power factor and ultralow thermal conductivity in the Y direction.

  15. Prediction of Two-Dimensional Phase of Boron with Anisotropic Electric Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhi-Hao; Jimenez-Izal, Elisa; Alexandrova, Anastassia N

    2017-03-03

    Two-dimensional (2D) phases of boron are rare and unique. Here we report a new 2D all-boron phase (named the π phase) that can be grown on a W(110) surface. The π phase, composed of four-membered rings and six-membered rings filled with an additional B atom, is predicted to be the most stable on this support. It is characterized by an outstanding stability upon exfoliation off of the W surface, and unusual electronic properties. The chemical bonding analysis reveals the metallic nature of this material, which can be attributed to the multicentered π-bonds. Importantly, the calculated conductivity tensor is anisotropic, showing larger conductivity in the direction of the sheet that is in-line with the conjugated π-bonds, and diminished in the direction where the π-subsystems are connected by single σ-bonds. The π-phase can be viewed as an ultrastable web of aligned conducting boron wires, possibly of interest to applications in electronic devices.

  16. Sintering Behavior and Effect of Silver Nanowires on the Electrical Conductivity of Electrically Conductive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Xiong, N N; Wang, Y H; Zhao, Y Z; Li, J Z

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of silver nanowires with a 160 nm average diameter ranging from 30 to 90 µm length and a 450 nm average diameter up to 100 µm length were successfully synthesized by a polyol process with FeCl3 and Na₂S as reaction inhibitor, respectively. The experimental results indicate that the morphologies and sintering behaviors of both of silver nanowires are impacted by glutaric acid and sintering temperature. The isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs) filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires as hybrid fillers were fabricated and the electrical properties were investigated based on the fraction of the silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers and the curing temperature, etc. The in situ monitoring the variation in electrical resistance of the ICAs explores that silver nanowires have influence on the curing behavior of the ICAs. Silver nanowires synthesized with Na2S as reaction inhibitor and treated with glutaric acid can significantly improve the electrical conductivity of the ICAs in the case of the low loading of silver fillers in the appropriate proportion range of the weight ratio of micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires, primarily as a result of connecting effect. When the loading of silver fillers in the ICAs is high, the electrical conductivity is also enhanced slightly in the case of the proper fraction of silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers. The effect of the curing temperature on the electrical conductivity relates to the fraction of silver nanowires and the total loading of silver fillers. The electrical conductivity of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires synthesized with FeCl₃ as reaction inhibitor is greatly damaged, indicating that the size of silver nanowires also is one of main factor to impact the electrical conductivity of the ICAs doped with silver nanowires. The electrical property of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver

  17. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide by the time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun Choi, Gyung-Min; Cahill, David G.

    2014-12-21

    We use pump-probe metrology based on the magneto-optic Kerr effect to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of (001)-oriented MoS{sub 2} crystals. A ≈20 nm thick CoPt multilayer with perpendicular magnetization serves as the heater and thermometer in the experiment. The low thermal conductivity and small thickness of the CoPt transducer improve the sensitivity of the measurement to lateral heat flow in the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The thermal conductivity of MoS{sub 2} is highly anisotropic with basal-plane thermal conductivity varying between 85–110 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1} as a function of laser spot size. The basal-plane thermal conductivity is a factor of ≈50 larger than the c-axis thermal conductivity, 2.0±0.3 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}.

  18. Three discontinuous Galerkin schemes for the anisotropic heat conduction equation on non-aligned grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, M.; Wiesenberger, M.; Stegmeir, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present and discuss three discontinuous Galerkin (dG) discretizations for the anisotropic heat conduction equation on non-aligned cylindrical grids. Our non-aligned scheme relies on a self-adjoint local dG (LDG) discretization of the elliptic operator. It conserves the energy exactly and converges with arbitrary order. The pollution by numerical perpendicular heat fluxes decreases with superconvergence rates. We compare this scheme with aligned schemes that are based on the flux-coordinate independent approach for the discretization of parallel derivatives. Here, the dG method provides the necessary interpolation. The first aligned discretization can be used in an explicit time-integrator. However, the scheme violates conservation of energy and shows up stagnating convergence rates for very high resolutions. We overcome this partly by using the adjoint of the parallel derivative operator to construct a second self-adjoint aligned scheme. This scheme preserves energy, but reveals unphysical oscillations in the numerical tests, which result in a decreased order of convergence. Both aligned schemes exhibit low numerical heat fluxes into the perpendicular direction and are superior for flute-modes with finite parallel gradients. We build our argumentation on various numerical experiments on all three schemes for a general axisymmetric magnetic field, which is closed by a comparison to the aligned finite difference (FD) schemes of Stegmeir et al. (2014) and Stegmeir et al. (submitted for publication).

  19. MHD Simulations of Coronal Supra-arcade Downflows Including Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbriggen, E.; Costa, A.; Esquivel, A.; Schneiter, M.; Cécere, M.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal supra-arcade downflows (SADs) are observed as dark trails descending toward hot turbulent-fan-shaped regions. Due to the large temperature values and gradients in these fan regions, the thermal conduction (TC) should be very efficient. While several models have been proposed to explain the triggering and the evolution of SADs, none of these scenarios address a systematic consideration of TC. Thus, we accomplish this task numerically simulating the evolution of SADs within this framework. That is, SADs are conceived as voided (subdense) cavities formed by nonlinear waves triggered by downflowing bursty localized reconnection events in a perturbed hot fan. We generate a properly turbulent fan, obtained by a stirring force that permits control of the energy and vorticity input in the medium where SADs develop. We include anisotropic TC and consider plasma properties consistent with observations. Our aim is to study whether it is possible to prevent SADs from vanishing by thermal diffusion. We find that this will be the case, depending on the turbulence parameters, in particular if the magnetic field lines are able to envelope the voided cavities, thermally isolating them from the hot environment. Velocity shear perturbations that are able to generate instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type help to produce magnetic islands, extending the lifetime of SADs.

  20. Investigation of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of GaAs/AlAs Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran

    The thermal conductivities of superlattices are essential to improve the properties of thermoelectrics and optoelectronics; however, limited results in relation to both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities have been reported. A convenient, effective, and accurate experimental method is required to improve the current research on the thermal properties of superlattices. We conducted an experimental research study on two GaAs/AlAs superlattice samples with a total superlattice layer thickness of 2 microm using a combination of the 2-omega and 3-omega techniques. The samples have period thicknesses of 4 nm and 10 nm, respectively. To explore the thermal conductivities of the substrate and insulation layer of the superlattice samples indirectly, a controlled sample with the same structure, but without a superlattice layer, is used. We obtained the thermal conductivities of the GaAs substrate and insulation layer (SiO2 thin film) using the 3-omega technique and FEM simulation model. We also explored the deviation of the experimental results of the 2-omega technique from the Fourier's Law through the controlled sample. These parameters obtained from the controlled sample are used in the data analysis in the following superlattice research. In the superlattice study, we combine the 3-omega and 2-omega techniques to characterize the anisotropic thermal conductivity of GaAs/AlAs superlattice from the same wafer. The in-plane thermal conductivity, cross-plane thermal conductivity, and anisotropy are obtained from the same wafer by comparing the experimental results with the FEM simulated results. This combination works fine in general and demonstrates a significant reduction in thermal conductivity compared to that of equivalent bulk materials. Superlattices with different period thicknesses but the same total superlattice thickness present a significant difference in both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the superlattices. However, we

  1. Dipole estimation errors due to differences in modeling anisotropic conductivities in realistic head models for EEG source analysis.

    PubMed

    Hallez, Hans; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Hese, Peter; Delputte, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2008-04-07

    To improve the EEG source localization in the brain, the conductivities used in the head model play a very important role. In this study, we focus on the modeling of the anisotropic conductivity of the white matter. The anisotropic conductivity profile can be derived from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images (DW-MRI). However, deriving these anisotropic conductivities from diffusion weighted MR images of the white matter is not straightforward. In the literature, two methods can be found for calculating the conductivity from the diffusion weighted images. One method uses a fixed value for the ratio of the conductivity in different directions, while the other method uses a conductivity profile obtained from a linear scaling of the diffusion ellipsoid. We propose a model which can be used to derive the conductivity profile from the diffusion tensor images. This model is based on the variable anisotropic ratio throughout the white matter and is a combination of the linear relationship as stated in the literature, with a constraint on the magnitude of the conductivity tensor (also known as the volume constraint). This approach is stated in the paper as approach A. In our study we want to investigate dipole estimation differences due to using a more simplified model for white matter anisotropy (approach B), while the electrode potentials are derived using a head model with a more realistic approach for the white matter anisotropy (approach A). We used a realistic head model, in which the forward problem was solved using a finite difference method that can incorporate anisotropic conductivities. As error measures we considered the dipole location error and the dipole orientation error. The results show that the dipole location errors are all below 10 mm and have an average of 4 mm in gray matter regions. The dipole orientation errors ranged up to 66.4 degrees, and had a mean of, on average, 11.6 degrees in gray matter regions. In a qualitative manner, the results

  2. Sheet resistance characterization of locally anisotropic transparent conductive films made of aligned metal-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hosung; Kim, Duckjong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-09-21

    One-dimensional conductive fillers such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be aggregated and aligned during transparent conductive film (TCF) formation by the vacuum filtration method. The potential error of analysing the average sheet resistance of these anisotropic films, using the four-point probe in-line method and the conversion formula developed assuming uniform isotropic material properties, was systematically investigated by finite element analysis and experiments. The finite element analysis of anisotropic stripe-patterned TCFs with alternating low (ρ1) and high (ρ2) resistivities revealed that the estimated average sheet resistance approached ρ1/t when the probes were parallel to the aligned nanotubes. The thickness of the film is t. It was more close to ρ2/t when the probes were perpendicular to the aligned tubes. Indeed, TCFs fabricated by the vacuum filtration method using metal-enriched SWNTs exhibited highly anisotropic local regions where tubes were aggregated and aligned. The local sheet resistances of randomly oriented, aligned, and perpendicular tube regions of the TCF at a transmittance of 89.9% were 5000, 2.4, and 12 300 Ω □(-1), respectively. Resistivities of the aggregated and aligned tube region (ρ1 = 1.2 × 10(-5) Ω cm) and the region between tubes (ρ2 = 6.2 × 10(-2) Ω cm) could be approximated with the aid of finite element analysis. This work demonstrates the potential error of characterizing the average sheet resistance of anisotropic TCFs using the four-point probe in-line method since surprisingly high or low values could be obtained depending on the measurement angle. On the other hand, a better control of aggregation and alignment of nanotubes would realize TCFs with a very small anisotropic resistivity and a high transparency.

  3. Metalized nanotube tips improve through thickness thermal conductivity in adhesive joints.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Sihn, Sangwook; Roy, Ajit K; Dai, Liming; Qu, Liangti

    2009-03-01

    The through-thickness thermal conductivity in conventional adhesive joints (of approximately 0.3 W/m-K) fails to meet the thermal load transfer requirement in numerous applications to enable lean manufacturing and improve system reliability to thermal load. Carbon nanotubes are known to possess extremely high thermal conductivity along the longitudinal axis. According to molecular dynamics simulations, the value can be as high as 3500 W/m-K at room temperature for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Meanwhile, the transverse thermal conductivity perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the MWCNTs is known to be relatively low, approximately 10-15 W/m-K. Existing studies of mixing the MWCNTs in polymers for adhesive joints only achieved minimal enhancement in the thermal conductivity and failed to satisfy the thermal property requirement for the adhesive joints. In order to properly utilize the superior axial thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs, vertically aligned MWCNTs have been used in this study and incorporated in the adhesive joint configuration. Analytical parametric study was conducted to identify critical parameters that affect the overall thermal conductivity of the joint and to provide guidelines for the process development. The process development involved growing the vertically aligned MWCNTs on silicon wafers. The aligned nanotube array was partially infused with epoxy adhesive. Selective reactive ion etching of the epoxy revealed the nanotube tips. In order to reduce the impedance mismatch and phonon scattering at the interface between the nanotube tips and the adherends, gold was thermally evaporated on the nanotube tips. The measured thermal conductivity of the adhesive joint device incorporating the MWCNTs was 262 W/m-K, which is significantly larger compared to that of less than 1 W/m-K without the MWCNTs.

  4. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF PARTICLE JOINT FOR POTENTIAL LEAD FREE ANISOTROPIC CONDUCTIVE ADHESIVE APPLICATIONS. (R831489)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF PARTICLE JOINT FOR POTENTIAL LEAD FREE ANISOTROPIC CONDUCTIVE ADHESIVE APPLICATIONS. (R831489)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Strong tendency of homeotropic alignment and anisotropic lithium ion conductivity of sulfonate functionalized zwitterionic imidazolium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rondla, Rohini; Lin, Joseph C Y; Yang, C T; Lin, Ivan J B

    2013-09-17

    Here, we report the first attempt to investigate the liquid crystal (LC) behavior of SO3(-) functionalized imidazolium zwitterionic (SO3(-)ImZI) salts, which display homeotropic alignment on a glass slide without the aid of any aligning approach. Doping lithium salt to ImZI salts lowers the melting temperatures and raises the clearing temperatures substantially to form room temperature ImZILCs. Excellent anisotropic lithium ion conductivity is achieved; which is strengthened by their tendency for homeotropic alignment.

  7. Enhancement of Thermal Conductance at Metal-Dielectric Interfaces Using Subnanometer Metal Adhesion Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Minyoung; Freedman, Justin P.; Liang, Hongliang Joe; Chow, Cheng-Ming; Sokalski, Vincent M.; Bain, James A.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the use of subnanometer adhesion layers significantly enhances the thermal interface conductance at metal-dielectric interfaces. A metal-dielectric interface between Au and sapphire (Al2O3) is considered using Cu (low optical loss) and Cr (high optical loss) as adhesion layers. To enable high throughput measurements, each adhesion layer is deposited as a wedge such that a continuous range of thicknesses could be sampled. Our measurements of thermal interface conductance at the metal-Al2O3 interface made using frequency-domain thermoreflectance show that a 1-nm-thick adhesion layer of Cu or Cr is sufficient to enhance the thermal interface conductance by more than a factor of 2 or 4, respectively, relative to the pure Au/Al2O3 interface. The enhancement agrees with the diffuse-mismatch-model-based predictions of accumulated thermal conductance versus adhesion-layer thickness assuming that it contributes phonons with wavelengths less than its thickness, while those with longer wavelengths transmit directly from the Au.

  8. Development of electrically conductive-superoleophobic micropillars for reducing surface adhesion of oil at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zihe; Wang, Tianchang; Zhou, Yikang; Zhao, Boxin

    2016-12-01

    Electrically conductive and superoleophobic micropillars have been developed through the construction of biomimetic micropillars using Ag-filled epoxy composites and the incorporation of FDTS on the micropillar surface. These micropillars are found to be superoleophobic with an oil contact angle of 140°, demonstrating excellent self-cleaning properties. The conductivity of micropillars allows for the Joule-heating effect to actively reduce the adhesion and even unfreeze the frozen oil droplets by passing electrical current. Electrical resistance of the composite micropillars was modulated by two orders of magnitudes by varying the contents of Ag flakes from 45 wt% to 65 wt%. The effectiveness of conductive micropillars for surface un-freezing was investigated by applying DC current to decrease the adhesion strength of frozen oil droplets on surfaces. The results showed a pronounced reduction of frozen oil adhesion force by 60% when the resistance increased from 7.5 Ω to 877 Ω after applying DC current for 2 min. By continuously applying DC current for 3 min, the frozen oil adhesion decreased to 0.05 N, reaching zero when the surface was heated up to -10 °C after applying DC current for 5 min. In contrast, when the droplet was heated up to -5 °C by hot air, there is still a substantial force of adhesion. The research findings demonstrate the use of constructing conductive-superoleophobic composite micropillars at surface for eliminating the frozen oil from surfaces at low temperatures.

  9. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  10. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  11. Resolution of anisotropic and shielded highly conductive layers using 2-D electromagnetic modelling in the Rhine Graben and Black Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezkan, Bülent; Červ, Václav; Pek, Josef

    1992-12-01

    Anisotropy in magnetotelluric (MT) data has been found very often and has been explained as the result of local structures of different conductivities. In this paper, an observed anisotropy in MT data is not interpreted qualitatively in terms of local structures but is modelled quantitatively by a quasi-anisotropic layer. Besides the MT transfer functions, measurements of the vertical magnetic component are required. The second goal of this paper is to describe a method which permits the resolution of mid-crustal conductive layers in the presence of an additional high-conductivity layer at the surface. This method is possible in a two-dimensional (2-D) situation that limits the spatial extension of the surface structure. Again, vertical magnetic field recordings are necessary, but the phase of the E-polarization with respect to the 2-D structure is the most sensitive parameter. Using two field sites in Southern Germany, it has been possible to give a quantitative explanation of anisotropy and an improved depth resolution, and to derive an integrated conductivity of the highly conductive mid-crustal layers using MT and geomagnetic depth sounding data. The anisotropic highly conductive layer is located 12 km beneath the poorly conductive Black Forest crystalline rocks, whereas it is at a depth of 6 km beneath the highly conductive Rhine Graben sediments.

  12. Rolling silver nanowire electrodes: simultaneously addressing adhesion, roughness, and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Tate C; Al-Rafia, S M Ibrahim; Buriak, Jillian M

    2013-12-11

    Silver nanowire mesh electrodes represent a possible mass-manufacturable route toward transparent and flexible electrodes for plastic-based electronics such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and others. Here we describe a route that is based upon spray-coated silver nanowire meshes on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets that are treated with a straightforward combination of heat and pressure to generate electrodes that have low sheet resistance, good optical transmission, that are topologically flat, and adhere well to the PET substrate. The silver nanowire meshes were prepared by spray-coating a solution of silver nanowires onto PET, in air at slightly elevated temperatures. The as-prepared silver nanowire electrodes are highly resistive due to the poor contact between the individual silver nanowires. Light pressure applied with a stainless steel rod, rolled over the as-sprayed silver nanowire meshes on PET with a speed of 10 cm s(-1) and a pressure of 50 psi, results in silver nanowire mesh arrays with sheet resistances of less than 20 Ω/□. Bending of these rolled nanowire meshes on PET with different radii of curvature, from 50 to 0.625 mm, showed no degradation of the conductivity of the electrodes, as shown by the constant sheet resistance before and after bending. Repeated bending (100 times) around a rod with a radius of curvature of 1 mm also showed no increase in the sheet resistance, demonstrating good adherence and no signs of delamination of the nanowire mesh array. The diffuse and direct transmittance of the silver nanowires (both rolled and as-sprayed) was measured for wavelengths from 350 to 1200 nm, and the diffuse transmission was similar to that of the PET substrate; the direct transmission decreases by about 7-8%. The silver nanowires were then incorporated into OPV devices with the following architecture: transparent electrode/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PC61BM/LiF/Al. While slightly lower in efficiency than the

  13. Thermal and tensile strength testing of thermally-conductive adhesives and carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, M.; Fu, M.; Irving, M.; Neher, C.; Shi, M.; Tolfa, K.; Tripathi, M.; Vinson, Y.; Wang, R.; Zheng, G.

    2017-01-01

    Future collider detectors, including silicon tracking detectors planned for the High Luminosity LHC, will require components and mechanical structures providing unprecedented strength-to-mass ratios, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. This paper studies carbon foam used in conjunction with thermally conductive epoxy and thermally conductive tape for such applications. Thermal performance and tensile strength measurements of aluminum-carbon foam-adhesive stacks are reported, along with initial radiation damage test results.

  14. Highly Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Layer-by-Layer Assembled Nanofibrillated Cellulose/Graphene Nanosheets Hybrid Films for Thermal Management.

    PubMed

    Song, Na; Jiao, Dejin; Cui, Siqi; Hou, Xingshuang; Ding, Peng; Shi, Liyi

    2017-01-25

    An anisotropic thermally conductive film with tailorable microstructures and macroproperties is fabricated using a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of graphene oxide (GO) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on a flexible NFC substrate driven by hydrogen bonding interactions, followed by chemical reduction process. The resulting NFC/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) hybrid film reveals an orderly hierarchical structure in which the RGO nanosheets exhibit a high degree of orientation along the in-plane direction. The assembly cycles dramatically increase the in-plane thermal conductivity (λX) of the hybrid film to 12.6 W·m(-1)·K(-1), while the cross-plane thermal conductivity (λZ) shows a lower value of 0.042 W·m(-1)·K(-1) in the hybrid film with 40 assembly cycles. The thermal conductivity anisotropy reaches up to λX/λZ = 279, which is substantially larger than that of similar polymeric nanocomposites, indicating that the LbL assembly on a flexible NFC substrate is an efficient technique for the preparation of polymeric nanocomposites with improved heat conducting property. Moreover, the layered hybrid film composed of 1D NFC and 2D RGO exhibits synergetic mechnical properties with outstanding flexibility and a high tensile strength (107 MPa). The combination of anisotropic thermal conductivity and superior mechanical performance may facilitate the applications in thermal management.

  15. Evaluation of the Anisotropic Radiative Conductivity of a Low-Density Carbon Fiber Material from Realistic Microscale Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouri, Nima; Panerai, Francesco; Tagavi, Kaveh A.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Martin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The radiative heat transfer inside a low-density carbon fiber insulator is analyzed using a three-dimensional direct simulation model. A robust procedure is presented for the numerical calculation of the geometric configuration factor to compute the radiative energy exchange processes among the small discretized surface areas of the fibrous material. The methodology is applied to a polygonal mesh of a fibrous insulator obtained from three-dimensional microscale imaging of the real material. The anisotropic values of the radiative conductivity are calculated for that geometry. The results yield both directional and thermal dependence of the radiative conductivity.

  16. Numerical computation of lightning transfer functions for layered, anisotropically conducting shielding structures by the method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happ, Fabian; Brüns, Heinz-D.; Mavraj, Gazmend; Gronwald, Frank

    2016-09-01

    A formalism for the computation of lightning transfer functions by the method of moments, which involves shielding structures that may consist of layered, anisotropically conducting composite materials, is presented in this contribution. The composite materials, being of a type that is widely used in space- and aircraft design, are electrically characterized by an equivalent conductivity. As basis for the quantitative analysis the method of moments is used where shielding surfaces can be treated by a thin layer technique which utilizes analytical solutions inside the layer. Also the effect of an extended lightning channel can be taken into account. The method is applied to geometries that resemble an actual airplane fuselage.

  17. Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions: Phase Tensor and Tipper Vector above a Simple Anisotropic Three-Dimensional Conductivity Anomaly and Implications for 3D Isotropic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwer, Alexander; Junge, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    The influence of anisotropic conductivity structures on magnetotelluric transfer functions is not easy to analyse in its entire complexity. In this study, we investigate the spatial and frequency-dependent behaviour of phase tensors and tipper vectors above a 3D anisotropic conductivity anomaly. The anomaly consists of a simple cubic block embedded in a homogeneous half space. Using a 3D FD code, we compare an isotropic, 2 anisotropic models with an anisotropy factor of 10 and one anisotropic model with the anisotropy factor of 100. The results show characteristic differences between the isotropic and anisotropic cases. For the anisotropic anomalies, the tipper vectors are parallel over the entire area despite the 3D geometry of the anomalous body. The size of the tipper vectors depends on the position of the site relative to the anomaly's boundaries and the direction of the anisotropic strike. Above the anomalous anisotropic body, the main diagonal elements of the phase tensor show the well-known split. Outside the anomaly, the phase tensor principal axis rotates according to the site position in contrast to the constant tipper direction. The 3D inversion of the forward data using an isotropic 3D code (ModEM) yields a very good fit for all cases. Whereas the inversion result matches the isotropic model, wave-like structures with high conductivity contrast occur for the anisotropic models. These structures extend far beyond the extension of the original anomalous body. Thus, the study reveals important indications of the existence of anisotropic conductivity structures for observed magnetotelluric transfer functions.

  18. Transient adhesion and conductance phenomena in initial nanoscale mechanical contacts between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2013-11-29

    We report on transient adhesion and conductance phenomena associated with tip wetting in mechanical contacts produced by the indentation of a clean W(111) tip into a Au(111) surface. A combination of atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy was used to carry out indentation and to image residual impressions in ultra-high vacuum. The ∼7 nm radii tips used in these experiments were prepared and characterized by field ion microscopy in the same instrument. The very first indentations of the tungsten tips show larger conductance and pull-off adhesive forces than subsequent indentations. After ∼30 indentations to a depth of ∼1.7 nm, the maximum conductance and adhesion forces reach steady state values approximately 12 ×  and 6 ×  smaller than their initial value. Indentation of W(111) tips into Cu(100) was also performed to investigate the universality of tip wetting phenomena with a different substrate. We propose a model from contact mechanics considerations which quantitatively reproduces the observed decay rate of the conductance and adhesion drops with a 1/e decay constant of 9-14 indentation cycles. The results show that the surface composition of an indenting tip plays an important role in defining the mechanical and electrical properties of indentation contacts.

  19. Graphics processing unit (GPU)-based computation of heat conduction in thermally anisotropic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, C. A.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2013-01-01

    Numerical modeling of anisotropic media is a computationally intensive task since it brings additional complexity to the field problem in such a way that the physical properties are different in different directions. Largely used in the aerospace industry because of their lightweight nature, composite materials are a very good example of thermally anisotropic media. With advancements in video gaming technology, parallel processors are much cheaper today and accessibility to higher-end graphical processing devices has increased dramatically over the past couple of years. Since these massively parallel GPUs are very good in handling floating point arithmetic, they provide a new platform for engineers and scientists to accelerate their numerical models using commodity hardware. In this paper we implement a parallel finite difference model of thermal diffusion through anisotropic media using the NVIDIA CUDA (Compute Unified device Architecture). We use the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti as our primary computing device which consists of 384 CUDA cores clocked at 1645 MHz with a standard desktop pc as the host platform. We compare the results from standard CPU implementation for its accuracy and speed and draw implications for simulation using the GPU paradigm.

  20. Towards p × n transverse thermoelectrics: extreme anisotropic conduction in bulk doped semiconductor thin films via proton implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yang; Koblmüller, G.; Riedl, H.; Grayson, M.

    2016-03-01

    Transverse thermoelectrics promise entirely new strategies for integrated cooling elements for optoelectronics. The recently introduced p × n-type transverse thermoelectric paradigm indicates that the most important step to engineering artificial transverse thermoelectrics is to create alternate p- and n-doped layers with orthogonally oriented anisotropic conductivity. This paper studies an approach to creating extreme anisotropic conductivity in bulk-doped semiconductor thin films via ion implantation. This approach defines an array of parallel conduction channels with photolithographic patterning of an SiO2 mask layer, followed by proton implantation. With a 10 μm channel width and 20 μm pitch, both n-type and p-type Al0.42 Ga0.58As thin films demonstrate a conductivity anisotropy ratio σ /σ⊥ > 104 at room temperature, while the longitudinal resistivity along the channel direction after implantation only increased by a factor of 3.3 ˜ 3.6. This approach can be readily adapted to other semiconductor materials for artificial p × n-type transverse thermoelectrics as other applications.

  1. Commensurability Oscillations in the Radio-Frequency Conductivity of Unidirectional Lateral Superlattices: Measurement of Anisotropic Conductivity by Coplanar Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira; Kajioka, Toshiyuki; Iye, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    We have measured the rf magnetoconductivity of unidirectional lateral superlattices (ULSLs) by detecting the attenuation of microwave through a coplanar waveguide placed on the surface. ULSL samples with the principal axis of the modulation perpendicular (S\\bot) and parallel (S\\|) to the microwave electric field are examined. For low microwave power, we observe expected anisotropic behavior of the commensurability oscillations (CO), with CO in samples S\\bot and S\\| dominated by the diffusion and the collisional contributions, respectively. Amplitude modulation of the Shubnikov--de Haas oscillations is observed to be more prominent in sample S\\|. The difference between the two samples is washed out with the increase of the microwave power, letting the diffusion contribution govern the CO in both samples. The dominance of the diffusion contribution even in sample S\\| in the CO measured with high microwave power is interpreted in terms of large-angle electron--phonon scattering.

  2. Double-Wall Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoplatelets for Hybrid Conductive Adhesives with Enhanced Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Messina, Elena; Leone, Nancy; Foti, Antonino; Di Marco, Gaetano; Riccucci, Cristina; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Di Maggio, Francesco; Cassata, Antonio; Gargano, Leonardo; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Fazio, Barbara; Maragò, Onofrio Maria; Robba, Benedetto; Vasi, Cirino; Ingo, Gabriel Maria; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe

    2016-09-07

    Improving the electrical and thermal properties of conductive adhesives is essential for the fabrication of compact microelectronic and optoelectronic power devices. Here we report on the addition of a commercially available conductive resin with double-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets that yields simultaneously improved thermal and electrical conductivity. Using isopropanol as a common solvent for the debundling of nanotubes, exfoliation of graphene, and dispersion of the carbon nanostructures in the epoxy resin, we obtain a nanostructured conducting adhesive with thermal conductivity of ∼12 W/mK and resistivity down to 30 μΩ cm at very small loadings (1% w/w for nanotubes and 0.01% w/w for graphene). The low filler content allows one to keep almost unchanged the glass-transition temperature, the viscosity, and the curing parameters. Die shear measurements show that the nanostructured resins fulfill the MIL-STD-883 requirements when bonding gold-metalized SMD components, even after repeated thermal cycling. The same procedure has been validated on a high-conductivity resin characterized by a higher viscosity, on which we have doubled the thermal conductivity and quadrupled the electrical conductivity. Graphene yields better performances with respect to nanotubes in terms of conductivity and filler quantity needed to improve the resin. We have finally applied the nanostructured resins to bond GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors in power-amplifier circuits. We observe a decrease of the GaN peak and average temperatures of, respectively, ∼30 °C and ∼10 °C, with respect to the pristine resin. The obtained results are important for the fabrication of advanced packaging materials in power electronic and microwave applications and fit the technological roadmap for CNTs, graphene, and hybrid systems.

  3. Computational Study on Subdural Cortical Stimulation - The Influence of the Head Geometry, Anisotropic Conductivity, and Electrode Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghyeon; Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Jun, Sung Chan

    2014-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is a method used to inject electrical current through electrodes beneath the dura mater, and is known to be useful in treating brain disorders. However, precisely how SuCS must be applied to yield the most effective results has rarely been investigated. For this purpose, we developed a three-dimensional computational model that represents an anatomically realistic brain model including an upper chest. With this computational model, we investigated the influence of stimulation amplitudes, electrode configurations (single or paddle-array), and white matter conductivities (isotropy or anisotropy). Further, the effects of stimulation were compared with two other computational models, including an anatomically realistic brain-only model and the simplified extruded slab model representing the precentral gyrus area. The results of voltage stimulation suggested that there was a synergistic effect with the paddle-array due to the use of multiple electrodes; however, a single electrode was more efficient with current stimulation. The conventional model (simplified extruded slab) far overestimated the effects of stimulation with both voltage and current by comparison to our proposed realistic upper body model. However, the realistic upper body and full brain-only models demonstrated similar stimulation effects. In our investigation of the influence of anisotropic conductivity, model with a fixed ratio (1∶10) anisotropic conductivity yielded deeper penetration depths and larger extents of stimulation than others. However, isotropic and anisotropic models with fixed ratios (1∶2, 1∶5) yielded similar stimulation effects. Lastly, whether the reference electrode was located on the right or left chest had no substantial effects on stimulation. PMID:25229673

  4. Qualitative link between work of adhesion and thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Monachon, Christian Weber, Ludger; Schusteritsch, Georg; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-03-28

    We report Time-Domain ThermoReflectance experiments measuring the Thermal Boundary Conductance (TBC) of interfaces between diamond and metal surfaces, based on samples consisting of [111]-oriented diamond substrates with hydrogen or with sp{sup 2} carbon surface terminations created using plasma treatments. In a concurrent theoretical study, we calculate the work of adhesion between Ni, Cu, and diamond interfaces with (111) surface orientation, with or without hydrogen termination of the diamond surface, using first-principles electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We find a positive correlation between the calculated work of adhesion and the measured conductance of these interfaces, suggesting that DFT could be used as a screening tool to identify metal/dielectric systems with high TBC. We also explain the negative effect of hydrogen on the thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces.

  5. Use of the correct heat conduction-convection equation as basis for heat-pulse sap flow methods in anisotropic wood.

    PubMed

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-05-01

    Heat-pulse methods to determine sap flux density in trees are founded on the theory of heat conduction and heat convection in an isotropic medium. However, sapwood is clearly anisotropic, implying a difference in thermal conductivity along and across the grain, and hence necessitates the theory for an anisotropic medium. This difference in thermal conductivities, which can be up to 50%, is, however, not taken into account in the key equation leading to the currently available heat-pulse methods. Despite this major flaw, the methods remain theoretically correct as they are based on derivations of the key equation, ruling out any anisotropic aspects. The importance of specifying the thermal characteristics of the sapwood according to axial, tangential or radial direction is revealed as well as referring to and using the proper anisotropic theory in order to avoid confusion and misinterpretation of thermal properties when dealing with sap flux density measurements or erroneous results when modelling heat transport in sapwood.

  6. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Controllable Electrical Conductivity and Water Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lijun; Guan, Jipeng; Li, Zhixiang; Zhao, Jingxin; Ye, Cuicui; You, Jichun; Li, Yongjin

    2017-02-14

    A facile and versatile strategy for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable electrical conductivity and water adhesion is reported. "Vine-on-fence"-structured and cerebral cortex-like superhydrophobic surfaces are constructed by filtering a suspension of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), using polyoxymethylene nonwovens as the filter paper. The nonwovens with micro- and nanoporous two-tier structures act as the skeleton, introducing a microscale structure. The MWCNTs act as nanoscale structures, creating hierarchical surface roughness. The surface topography and the electrical conductivity of the superhydrophobic surfaces are controlled by varying the MWCNT loading. The vine-on-fence-structured surfaces exhibit "sticky" superhydrophobicity with high water adhesion. The cerebral cortex-like surfaces exhibit self-cleaning properties with low water adhesion. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces are chemically resistant to acidic and alkaline environments of pH 2-12. They therefore have potential in applications such as droplet-based microreactors and thin-film microextraction. These findings aid our understanding of the role that surface topography plays in the design and fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces with different water-adhesion properties.

  7. Anisotropic dc conductivity in stretch-oriented iodine-doped poly[3-(4-octylphenyl)-2,2script]-bithiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyreklev, P.; Inganäs, O.

    1994-12-01

    A square four-point probe is constructed to measure anisotropic conductivity of small samples. The method is applied to measurements of the anisotropic conductivity of a conjugated polymer. The polymer poly[3-(4-octylphenyl)-2,2'-bithiophene] is stretch oriented to various elongations and doped with I2 vapor. The conductivity anisotropy is dependent on the degree of orientation and the absolute conductivity. An anisotropy value of 2.4 is obtained for an elongation of four times. For a given elongation the conductivity anisotropy decreases during the spontaneous undoping. The experimental results are discussed in terms of varying charge hopping distances.

  8. Enhanced cell viability and cell adhesion using low conductivity medium for negative dielectrophoretic cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Puttaswamy, Srinivasu Valagerahally; Sivashankar, Shilpa; Chen, Rong-Jhe; Chin, Chung-Kuang; Chang, Hwan-You; Liu, Cheng Hsien

    2010-10-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic (n-DEP) cell manipulation is an efficient way to pattern human liver cells on micro-electrode arrays. Maintaining cell viability is an important objective for this approach. This study investigates the effect of low conductivity medium and the optimally designed microchip on cell viability and cell adhesion. To explore the influence of conductivity on cell viability and cell adhesion, we have used earlier reported dielectrophoresis (DEP) buffer with a conductivity of 10.2 mS/m and three formulated media with conductivity of 9.02 (M1), 8.14 (M2), 9.55 (M3) mS/m. The earlier reported isotonic sucrose/dextrose buffer (DEP buffer) used for DEP manipulation has the drawback of poor cell adhesion and cell viability. A microchip prototype with well-defined positioning of titanium electrode arrays was designed and fabricated on a glass substrate. The gap between the radial electrodes was accurately determined to achieve good cell patterning performance. Parameters such as dimension of positioning electrode, amplitude, and frequency of voltage signal were investigated to optimize the performance of the microchip.

  9. Anisotropic electrical conductivity of surface-roughened semipolar (11\\bar{2}2) GaN films by photochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soohwan; Lee, Sohyun; Baik, Kwang Hyeon

    2017-05-01

    We studied the anisotropy of electrical conductivity in surface-roughened semipolar (11\\bar{2}2) GaN (s-GaN) films. Highly crystalline s-GaN films were obtained using asymmetric lateral epitaxy on oxide-patterned m-plane sapphire substrates. The in-plane structural anisotropy of the s-GaN films was confirmed by anisotropic peak broadening in X-ray rocking curves (XRC) with the in-beam orientations. The XRC full-width at half maximum (FWHM) values were measured to be 454 and 615 arcsec along the [11\\bar{2}3] GaN and [1\\bar{1}00] GaN directions, respectively. The s-GaN surface was roughened using photo-chemical etching, and the electrical anisotropy was then investigated as a function of azimuth angles with the transmission line method. The Ohmic contact properties on the roughened s-GaN surface did not depend on the azimuth angle or annealing temperatures between 750 and 950 °C. The sheet resistances parallel to the [1\\bar{1}00] GaN direction on roughened s-GaN were found to be approximately half of the resistance parallel to the [11\\bar{2}3] GaN direction, showing that anisotropic electrical conductivity is maintained for surface-roughened s-GaN due to charged carrier scattering induced by basal-plane stacking faults.

  10. Controlling the adhesion of conducting polymer films with patterned self-assembled monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, L.F.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1996-02-01

    A photosensitive self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is selectively irradiated to fabricate a pattern on an Au electrode, and a thin film of aniline or 3-methylthiophene is deposited on it by electopolymerization. Adhesion of the polymer films can be controlled by the monolayer terminal group. Applying tape to the sample and peeling it away selectively removes the conducting polymer film to the tape in a near-micron resolution pattern. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Electrical field effects on endothelial cell adhesion and growth on conducting biomaterials surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gwen Elaine

    A major problem for vascular graft implants is poor long-term patency for small-diameter (<6 mm) prostheses. Small-diameter woven Dacron RTM or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) grafts often occlude in a short time due to thrombus or polytetrafluoroethylene intimal hyperplasia. It has generally been considered that an endothelial cell lining of such grafts might reduce thrombogenicity and thereby produce a more biomimetic prosthesis. Electrical stimulation has been studied for effects on in vitro cell growth, motility, and adhesion characteristics, as well as for in vivo wound healing. A comprehensive literature review was conducted which suggested the need for further research concerning the effects of electrical fields on endothelial cell adhesion and growth properties. The focus of these studies was therefore to determine the effect of electrical fields on the proliferation and adhesion characteristics of endothelial cells cultured on various substrates using low-voltage direct current. Voltages of 0, 0.5, and 1 volt were used for in vitro endothelial cell cultures plated at 50,000 and 100,000 cells/mL. Growth experiments were performed on glass, MylarRTM, Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-glass, on ITO-, carbon-, and gold-palladium-coated MylarRTM, and on polypyrrole-coated DacronRTM. Proliferation of endothelial cells was determined at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Adhesion characteristics were measured using a novel flow adhesion system. Characterization was via cell staining in conjunction with optical microscopy and a 6-keto-prostaglandin-F 1alpha assay to measure cell viability. Results of these cell growth studies in electric fields indicate that low voltage stimulation moderately increased endothelial cell growth on most substrates. The release of 6-keto-prostaglandin-F1alpha decreased over time at most cell concentrations and voltage levels. Cell adhesion experiments provided contrary results to the growth studies and suggested Rested that low-voltage electric

  12. Effects of Silver Microparticles and Nanoparticles on Thermal and Electrical Characteristics of Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkarnain, M.; Fadzil, M. A.; Mariatti, M.; Azid, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of different volume fractions of silver (Ag) particles of different size (microsize, 2 μm to 3.5 μm diameter; nanosize, 80 nm diameter) on the thermal and electrical characteristics of epoxy-Ag electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) have been evaluated, as well as hybrid ECAs with both particle sizes at different ratios. Improved thermal and electrical conductivity resulted from the interaction between the particles, as evaluated by analysis of sample morphology. The interaction was altered to improve the conductivity. For both particle sizes, the electrical resistivity showed a transition from insulation to conduction at 6 vol.% Ag. In the hybrid system, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing microparticle filler ratio. The electrical conductivity of the hybrid composite increased at 50:50 weight ratio.

  13. Direct Insulation-to-Conduction Transformation of Adhesive Catecholamine for Simultaneous Increases of Electrical Conductivity and Mechanical Strength of CNT Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Chou, Jeffrey B; Lee, Kyueui; Lee, Dongju; Hong, Soon Hyung; Zhao, Rong; Lee, Haeshin; Kim, Sang-gook

    2015-06-03

    Increase in conductivity and mechanical properties of a carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber inspired by mussel-adhesion chemistry is described. Infiltration of polydopamine into an as-drawn CNT fiber followed by pyrolysis results in a direct insulation-to-conduction transformation of poly(dopamine) into pyrolyzed-poly(dopamine) (py-PDA), retaining the intrinsic adhesive function of catecholamine. The py-PDA enhances both the electrical conductivity and the mechanical strength of the CNT fibers.

  14. Processing of generic circuits by conductive adhesives: Geometrical and rheological considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianguo

    2007-12-01

    Epoxy/Ni adhesives can be used as integrated circuit (IC) packaging materials due to their lower cost than epoxy/Ag adhesives with acceptable electrical conductivity. In this study, epoxy/Ni adhesives were prepared and filled into multi-layer hole structures of novel design, a prototype of potential electronic components in circuit boards, to study effects of the hole structure geometry on a component's electrical resistance. Rheological behaviors at different conditions for capillary flows of highly filled epoxy/Ni suspensions, including stable and unstable (filtering and matting behaviors), chemorheological behaviors during processing and cure, and yield behaviors of moderately filled epoxy/Ni suspensions, were investigated to potentially relate to electrical conduction behaviors and processing of prototypes in generic circuits. An empirical relationship between the contact resistance, hole diameter, and plate thickness was proposed, together with Ohm's law, to describe effects of the geometry on electrical resistance in generic circuits. Stable and unstable capillary flows were investigated for highly filled epoxy/Ni systems with 75 wt% of different Ni particles. It was determined that, lower resin viscosity and shear rates enhance the flow instabilities and filtering of the polymer binder, and the pressure oscillation frequency and the average force increase with increasing shear rate. Incorporation of Ni nanopowders promotes a stable flow at similar filler concentrations, whereas occurrence of particle agglomerates somewhat nullifies this advantage, and leads to flow instabilities. Similar phenomena occur for adhesives during cure, and the rheological behavior changes as cure proceeds. As an integrated circuit (IC) packaging material, chemorheological behaviors of electrically conductive epoxy/Ni adhesives were investigated. Strong nonlinearity and non-Newtonian flow behaviors were observed during cure. A comprehensive model, as well as its modified form, was

  15. High adhesion transparent conducting films using graphene oxide hybrid carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Jia, Song-Lin; Xu, Chun-Xia; Li, Lin-Ge; Shi, Pei-Pei; Li, Guangfen

    2017-01-01

    Flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted more and more attention for their wide range of potential applications. While, there are still some problems to be solved on several aspects. In this study, a graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (GO/CNT) hybrid TCF was fabricated through the simple spray coating method. GO sheets were introduced to form new electron transporting channels. It was found that the best optoelectronic property films were fabricated when the ratio of GO/CNT is 1.5:1.0, which the sheet resistance of the film was found to be 146 Ω/sq at the transmittance of 86.0%. Due to the two-dimensional structure and the oxidation groups of GO sheets, flatness and wettability of the electrode surface was improved obviously. Adhesion factor of the TCFs was calculated by the change of transparent and sheet resistance after trial test, the addition of GO sheets enhanced the adhesion dramatically and the mechanism was analyzed. Improvements of conductivity, flatness, wettability and adhesion above are all advantageous for the solution-based processing of organic electronics for spraying and printing.

  16. Use of conductive adhesive for MEMS interconnection in military fuze applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gakkestad, Jakob; Dalsjo, Per; Kristiansen, Helge; Johannessen, Rolf; Taklo, Maaike M. Visser

    2010-02-01

    A novel conductive adhesive has been used to interconnect MEMS test structures with different pad sizes directly to a PCB in a medium caliber ammunition fuze. The fuze environment is very demanding with a setback acceleration exceeding 60 000 g and a centripetal acceleration increasing radially with 9000 g/mm. The adhesive shows excellent mechanical and thermal properties. The mounted MEMS test structures have been subjected to rapid temperature cycling according to MIL-STD 883G method 1010.8 test condition B and performed well. The test structures with the largest pad sizes passed 100 temperature cycles and firing test where the test structures have been exposed to an acceleration of more than 60 000 g.

  17. Realistic Electric Field Mapping of Anisotropic Muscle During Electrical Stimulation Using a Combination of Water Diffusion Tensor and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bup Kyung; Oh, Tong In; Sajib, Saurav Zk; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-04-01

    To realistically map the electric fields of biological tissues using a diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT) method to estimate tissue response during electrical stimulation. Imaging experiments were performed using chunks of bovine muscle. Two silver wire electrodes were positioned inside the muscle tissue for electrical stimulation. Electric pulses were applied with a 100-V amplitude and 100-μs width using a voltage stimulator. During electrical stimulation, we collected DT-MREIT data from a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We adopted the projected current density method to calculate the electric field. Based on the relation between the water diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor, we computed the position-dependent scale factor using the measured magnetic flux density data. Then, a final conductivity tensor map was reconstructed using the multiplication of the water diffusion tensor and the scale factor. The current density images from DT-MREIT data represent the internal current flows that exist not only in the electrodes but also in surrounding regions. The reconstructed electric filed map from our anisotropic conductivity tensor with the projected current density shows coverage that is more than 2 times as wide, and higher signals in both the electrodes and surrounding tissues, than the previous isotropic method owing to the consideration of tissue anisotropy. An electric field map obtained by an anisotropic reconstruction method showed different patterns from the results of the previous isotropic reconstruction method. Since accurate electric field mapping is important to correctly estimate the coverage of the electrical treatment, future studies should include more rigorous validations of the new method through in vivo and in situ experiments.

  18. Realistic Electric Field Mapping of Anisotropic Muscle During Electrical Stimulation Using a Combination of Water Diffusion Tensor and Electrical Conductivity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To realistically map the electric fields of biological tissues using a diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT) method to estimate tissue response during electrical stimulation. Methods Imaging experiments were performed using chunks of bovine muscle. Two silver wire electrodes were positioned inside the muscle tissue for electrical stimulation. Electric pulses were applied with a 100-V amplitude and 100-μs width using a voltage stimulator. During electrical stimulation, we collected DT-MREIT data from a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We adopted the projected current density method to calculate the electric field. Based on the relation between the water diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor, we computed the position-dependent scale factor using the measured magnetic flux density data. Then, a final conductivity tensor map was reconstructed using the multiplication of the water diffusion tensor and the scale factor. Results The current density images from DT-MREIT data represent the internal current flows that exist not only in the electrodes but also in surrounding regions. The reconstructed electric filed map from our anisotropic conductivity tensor with the projected current density shows coverage that is more than 2 times as wide, and higher signals in both the electrodes and surrounding tissues, than the previous isotropic method owing to the consideration of tissue anisotropy. Conclusions An electric field map obtained by an anisotropic reconstruction method showed different patterns from the results of the previous isotropic reconstruction method. Since accurate electric field mapping is important to correctly estimate the coverage of the electrical treatment, future studies should include more rigorous validations of the new method through in vivo and in situ experiments. PMID:28446015

  19. A Study on the Nanofiber-Sheet Anisotropic Conductive Films (NS-ACFs) for Ultra-Fine-Pitch Interconnection Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Nanofiber-sheet anisotropic conductive films (NS-ACFs) were invented to overcome the limitations of high joint resistance and short-circuit issues of ultra-fine-pitch interconnections. The NS-ACFs have great advantages in terms of suppressing conductive particle movement during the flip-chip bonding process. In a 20-μm ultra-fine-pitch with 7-μm bump spacing ultra-fine-pitch chip-on-glass assembly, suppression effects of conductive particle movement were significantly improved by using the NS-ACFs because an unmelted NS inside the ACFs suppressed the mobility of conductive particles so that they would not flow out during the bonding process. The NS-ACFs could significantly increase the capture rate of conductive particles from 31% up to 81% compared to conventional ACFs. Moreover, excellent electrical contact properties were obtained without melting the nanofiber material which was essential for the conventional nanofiber ACFs. The NS-ACFs are promising interconnection materials for ultra-fine-pitch packaging applications.

  20. Adhesive Stretchable Printed Conductive Thin Film Patterns on PDMS Surface with an Atmospheric Plasma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yi; Liao, Ying-Chih

    2016-05-11

    In this study, a plasma surface modification with printing process was developed to fabricate printed flexible conductor patterns or devices directly on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface. An atmospheric plasma treatment was first used to oxidize the PDMS surface and create a hydrophilic silica surface layer, which was confirmed with photoelectron spectra. The plasma operating parameters, such as gas types and plasma powers, were optimized to obtain surface silica layers with the longest lifetime. Conductive paste with epoxy resin was screen-printed on the plasma-treated PDMS surface to fabricate flexible conductive tracks. As a result of the strong binding forces between epoxy resin and the silica surface layer, the printed patterns showed great adhesion on PDMS and were undamaged after several stringent adhesion tests. The printed conductive tracks showed strong mechanical stability and exhibited great electric conductivity under bending, twisting, and stretching conditions. Finally, a printed pressure sensor with good sensitivity and a fast response time was fabricated to demonstrate the capability of this method for the realization of printed electronic devices.

  1. The thermal instability in a sheared magnetic field - Filament condensation with anisotropic heat conduction. [solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The condensation-mode growth rate of the thermal instability in an empirically motivated sheared field is shown to depend upon the existence of perpendicular thermal conduction. This typically very small effect (perpendicular conductivity/parallel conductivity less than about 10 to the -10th for the solar corona) increases the spatial-derivative order of the compressible temperature-perturbation equation, and thereby eliminates the singularities which appear when perpendicular conductivity = 0. The resulting growth rate is less than 1.5 times the controlling constant-density radiation rate, and has a clear maximum at a cross-field length of order 100 times and a width of about 0.1 the magnetic shear scale for solar conditions. The profiles of the observable temperature and density perturbations are independent of the thermal conductivity, and thus agree with those found previously. An analytic solution to the short-wavelength incompressible case is also given.

  2. Towards Practical Application of Paper based Printed Circuits: Capillarity Effectively Enhances Conductivity of the Thermoplastic Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Lin, Wei; Yang, Cheng; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Jingping; Cui, Xiaoya; Kang, Feiyu; Wong, Ching Ping

    2014-01-01

    Direct printing nanoparticle-based conductive inks onto paper substrates has encountered difficulties e.g. the nanoparticles are prone to penetrate into the pores of the paper and become partially segmented, and the necessary low-temperature-sintering process is harmful to the dimension-stability of paper. Here we prototyped the paper-based circuit substrate in combination with printed thermoplastic electrically conductive adhesives (ECA), which takes the advantage of the capillarity of paper and thus both the conductivity and mechanical robustness of the printed circuitsweredrastically improved without sintering process. For instance, the electrical resistivity of the ECA specimen on a pulp paper (6 × 10−5Ω·cm, with 50 wt% loading of Ag) was only 14% of that on PET film than that on PET film. This improvement has been found directly related to the sizing degree of paper, in agreement with the effective medium approximation simulation results in this work. The thermoplastic nature also enables excellent mechanical strength of the printed ECA to resist repeated folding. Considering the generality of the process and the wide acceptance of ECA technique in the modern electronic packages, this method may find vast applications in e.g. circuit boards, capacitive touch pads, and radio frequency identification antennas, which have been prototyped in the manuscript. PMID:25182052

  3. Towards Practical Application of Paper based Printed Circuits: Capillarity Effectively Enhances Conductivity of the Thermoplastic Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Lin, Wei; Yang, Cheng; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Jingping; Cui, Xiaoya; Kang, Feiyu; Wong, Ching Ping

    2014-09-01

    Direct printing nanoparticle-based conductive inks onto paper substrates has encountered difficulties e.g. the nanoparticles are prone to penetrate into the pores of the paper and become partially segmented, and the necessary low-temperature-sintering process is harmful to the dimension-stability of paper. Here we prototyped the paper-based circuit substrate in combination with printed thermoplastic electrically conductive adhesives (ECA), which takes the advantage of the capillarity of paper and thus both the conductivity and mechanical robustness of the printed circuitsweredrastically improved without sintering process. For instance, the electrical resistivity of the ECA specimen on a pulp paper (6 × 10-5Ω.cm, with 50 wt% loading of Ag) was only 14% of that on PET film than that on PET film. This improvement has been found directly related to the sizing degree of paper, in agreement with the effective medium approximation simulation results in this work. The thermoplastic nature also enables excellent mechanical strength of the printed ECA to resist repeated folding. Considering the generality of the process and the wide acceptance of ECA technique in the modern electronic packages, this method may find vast applications in e.g. circuit boards, capacitive touch pads, and radio frequency identification antennas, which have been prototyped in the manuscript.

  4. Research of the electrical anisotropic characteristics of water-conducting fractured zones in coal seams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ben-Yu; Yue, Jian-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Water flooding disasters are one of the five natural coal-mining disasters that threaten the lives of coal miners. The main causes of this flooding are water-conducting fractured zones within coal seams. However, when resistivity methods are used to detect water-conducting fractured zones in coal seams, incorrect conclusions can be drawn because of electrical anisotropy within the water-conducting fractured zones. We present, in this paper, a new geo-electrical model based on the geology of water-conducting fractured zones in coal seams. Factors that influence electrical anisotropy were analyzed, including formation water resistivity, porosity, fracture density, and fracture surface roughness, pressure, and dip angle. Numerical simulation was used to evaluate the proposed electrical method. The results demonstrate a closed relationship between the shape of apparent resistivity and the strike and dip of a fracture. Hence, the findings of this paper provide a practical resistivity method for coal-mining production.

  5. Tunneling conductivity in anisotropic nanofiber composites: a percolation-based model.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Avik P; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2015-04-15

    The critical path approximation ('CPA') is integrated with a lattice-based approach to percolation to provide a model for conductivity in nanofiber-based composites. Our treatment incorporates a recent estimate for the anisotropy in tunneling-based conductance as a function of the relative angle between the axes of elongated nanoparticles. The conductivity is examined as a function of the volume fraction, degree of clustering, and of the mean value and standard deviation of the orientational order parameter. Results from our calculations suggest that the conductivity can depend strongly upon the standard deviation in the orientational order parameter even when all the other variables (including the mean value of the order parameter 〈S〉) are held invariant.

  6. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of black phosphorus nanoribbons at temperatures higher than 100 K

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Sangwook; Yang, Fan; Suh, Joonki; ...

    2015-10-16

    Black phosphorus attracts enormous attention as a promising layered material for electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. Here we report large anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons along the zigzag and armchair lattice directions at variable temperatures. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out under the condition of steady-state longitudinal heat flow using suspended-pad micro-devices. We discovered increasing thermal conductivity anisotropy, up to a factor of two, with temperatures above 100 K. A size effect in thermal conductivity was also observed in which thinner nanoribbons show lower thermal conductivity. Analysed with the relaxation time approximation model using phononmore » dispersions obtained based on density function perturbation theory, the high anisotropy is attributed mainly to direction-dependent phonon dispersion and partially to phonon–phonon scattering. Lastly, our results revealing the intrinsic, orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of black phosphorus are useful for designing devices, as well as understanding fundamental physical properties of layered materials.« less

  7. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of black phosphorus nanoribbons at temperatures higher than 100 K

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangwook; Yang, Fan; Suh, Joonki; Yang, Sijie; Lee, Yeonbae; Li, Guo; Sung Choe, Hwan; Suslu, Aslihan; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Park, Joonsuk; Liu, Kai; Li, Jingbo; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2015-10-16

    Black phosphorus attracts enormous attention as a promising layered material for electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. Here we report large anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons along the zigzag and armchair lattice directions at variable temperatures. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out under the condition of steady-state longitudinal heat flow using suspended-pad micro-devices. We discovered increasing thermal conductivity anisotropy, up to a factor of two, with temperatures above 100 K. A size effect in thermal conductivity was also observed in which thinner nanoribbons show lower thermal conductivity. Analysed with the relaxation time approximation model using phonon dispersions obtained based on density function perturbation theory, the high anisotropy is attributed mainly to direction-dependent phonon dispersion and partially to phonon–phonon scattering. Lastly, our results revealing the intrinsic, orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of black phosphorus are useful for designing devices, as well as understanding fundamental physical properties of layered materials.

  8. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of black phosphorus nanoribbons at temperatures higher than 100 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwook; Yang, Fan; Suh, Joonki; Yang, Sijie; Lee, Yeonbae; Li, Guo; Sung Choe, Hwan; Suslu, Aslihan; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Park, Joonsuk; Liu, Kai; Li, Jingbo; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2015-10-01

    Black phosphorus attracts enormous attention as a promising layered material for electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. Here we report large anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons along the zigzag and armchair lattice directions at variable temperatures. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out under the condition of steady-state longitudinal heat flow using suspended-pad micro-devices. We discovered increasing thermal conductivity anisotropy, up to a factor of two, with temperatures above 100 K. A size effect in thermal conductivity was also observed in which thinner nanoribbons show lower thermal conductivity. Analysed with the relaxation time approximation model using phonon dispersions obtained based on density function perturbation theory, the high anisotropy is attributed mainly to direction-dependent phonon dispersion and partially to phonon-phonon scattering. Our results revealing the intrinsic, orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of black phosphorus are useful for designing devices, as well as understanding fundamental physical properties of layered materials.

  9. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  10. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr; Woo, Eung Je E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Kwon, Oh In

    2016-06-15

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  11. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T.

    2015-08-28

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering.

  12. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Nano-conductive Filament in Co/HfO2/Pt Resistive Switching Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leilei; Liu, Yang; Teng, Jiao; Long, Shibing; Guo, Qixun; Zhang, Meiyun; Wu, Yu; Yu, Guanghua; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) has been extensively studied as a next-generation non-volatile memory. The conductive filament (CF) shows rich physical effects such as conductance quantization and magnetic effect. But so far, the study of filaments is not very sufficient. In this work, Co/HfO2/Pt CBRAM device with magnetic CF was designed and fabricated. By electrical manipulation with a partial-RESET method, we controlled the size of ferromagnetic metal filament. The resistance-temperature characteristics of the ON-state after various partial-RESET behaviors have been studied. Using two kinds of magnetic measurement methods, we measured the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of the CF at different temperatures to reflect the magnetic structure characteristics. By rotating the direction of the magnetic field and by sweeping the magnitude, we obtained the spatial direction as well as the easy-axis of the CF. The results indicate that the easy-axis of the CF is along the direction perpendicular to the top electrode plane. The maximum magnetoresistance was found to appear when the angle between the direction of magnetic field and that of the electric current in the CF is about 30°, and this angle varies slightly with temperature, indicating that the current is tilted.

  13. Anisotropic conductivity and charge ordering in (TMTTF)2X salts probed by ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulon, Claude; Lalet, Grégory; Pouget, Jean Paul; Foury-Leylekian, Pascale; Moradpour, Alec; Fabre, Jean Marc

    2007-08-01

    Single crystal ESR data on (TMTTF)2X salts are presented. Taking advantage of the large dimensions of the crystals, skin effect is studied through the asymmetry of the ESR resonance lines. When the microwave magnetic field is perpendicular to the stacking axis, a very rich temperature dependence of this asymmetry is found although the three components of the conductivity tensor often exhibit a semiconducting behavior. In particular, we show that anomalies are present when the TMTTF chains experience a Mott localization or a charge ordering. The whole set of data is discussed theoretically in relation with the anisotropy of the electrical conductivity. We show that the crystal orientation and crystal shape are crucial parameters in explaining the experimental results. More precisely, we found that at the charge ordering transition, the largest conductivity anomaly occurs along the transverse b direction, and we provide evidence, through ESR measurements of the conductivity in this direction, of a charge ordering transition at about 50K in (TMTTF)2Br . With the same method, we also show that irradiation kills the charge ordering transition, while deuteration enhances its critical temperature.

  14. Highly anisotropic conductivity of tablets pressed from polyaniline-montmorillonite nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarský, Jonáš

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Montmorillonite (MMT) can be intercalated with polyaniline (PANI) chains. • Tablets pressed from PANI/MMT exhibit high anisotropy in electrical conductivity. • Pressure 28MPa is sufficient to reach the anisotropy. • Tablets pressed from pure PANI also exhibit anisotropy in electrical conductivity. - Abstract: Polyaniline-montmorillonite nanocomposite was prepared from anilinium sulfate (precursor) and ammonium peroxodisulfate (oxidizing agent) using simple one-step method. The resulting nanocomposite obtained in powder form has been pressed into tablets using various compression pressures (28–400 MPa). Electrical conductivities of tablets in two perpendicular directions, i.e. direction parallel with the main surface of tablet (σ=) and in orthogonal direction (σ⊥), and corresponding anisotropy factors (i.e., the ratio σ=/σ⊥) have been studied in dependence on compression pressure used during the preparation. Polyaniline-montmorillonite nanocomposite was characterized using X-ray diffraction analysis, raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and molecular modeling which led to the understanding of the internal structure. Measurement of hardness performed on pressed tablets has been also involved. Taking into account the highest value of anisotropy factor reached (σ=/σ⊥ = 490), present study shows a chance to design conductors with nearly two-dimensional conductivity.

  15. Single-layer nanosheets with exceptionally high and anisotropic hydroxyl ion conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengzhan; Ma, Renzhi; Bai, Xueyin; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    When the dimensionality of layered materials is reduced to the physical limit, an ultimate two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy and/or confinement effect may bring about extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), bearing abundant hydroxyl groups covalently bonded within 2D host layers, have been proposed as inorganic anion conductors. However, typical hydroxyl ion conductivities for bulk or lamellar LDHs, generally up to 10−3 S cm−1, are considered not high enough for practical applications. We show that single-layer LDH nanosheets exhibited exceptionally high in-plane conductivities approaching 10−1 S cm−1, which were the highest among anion conductors and comparable to proton conductivities in commercial proton exchange membranes (for example, Nafion). The in-plane conductivities were four to five orders of magnitude higher than the cross-plane or cross-membrane values of restacked LDH nanosheets. This 2D superionic transport characteristic might have great promises in a variety of applications including alkaline fuel cells and water electrolysis. PMID:28439551

  16. Anisotropic Lithium Ion Conductivity in Single-Ion Diblock Copolymer Electrolyte Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Aissou, Karim; Mumtaz, Muhammad; Usluer, Özlem; Pécastaings, Gilles; Portale, Giuseppe; Fleury, Guillaume; Cloutet, Eric; Hadziioannou, Georges

    2016-02-01

    Well-defined single-ion diblock copolymers consisting of a Li-ion conductive poly(styrenesulfonyllithium(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) (PSLiTFSI) block associated with a glassy polystyrene (PS) block have been synthesized via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. Conductivity anisotropy ratio up to 1000 has been achieved from PS-b-PSLiTFSI thin films by comparing Li-ion conductivities of out-of-plane (aligned) and in-plane (antialigned) cylinder morphologies at 40 °C. Blending of PS-b-PSLiTFSI thin films with poly(ethylene oxide) homopolymer (hPEO) enables a substantial improvement of Li-ion transport within aligned cylindrical domains, since hPEO, preferentially located in PSLiTFSI domains, is an excellent lithium-solvating material. Results are also compared with unblended and blended PSLiTFSI homopolymer (hPSLiTFSI) homologues, which reveals that ionic conductivity is improved when thin films are nanostructured. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) measurements of anisotropic thermal conductivity using a variable spot size approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Puqing; Qian, Xin; Yang, Ronggui

    2017-07-01

    It is challenging to characterize thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. In this work, we extend the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) method with a variable spot size approach to simultaneously measure the in-plane (Kr) and the through-plane (Kz) thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. We first determine Kz from the measurement using a larger spot size, when the heat flow is mainly one-dimensional along the through-plane direction, and the measured signals are only sensitive to Kz. We then extract the in-plane thermal conductivity Kr from a second measurement using the same modulation frequency but with a smaller spot size, when the heat flow becomes three-dimensional, and the signal is sensitive to both Kr and Kz. By choosing the same modulation frequency for the two sets of measurements, we can avoid potential artifacts introduced by the frequency-dependent Kz, which we have found to be non-negligible, especially for some two-dimensional layered materials like MoS2. After careful evaluation of the sensitivity of a series of hypothetical samples, we provided guidelines on choosing the most appropriate laser spot size and modulation frequency that yield the smallest uncertainty, and established a criterion for the range of thermal conductivity that can be measured reliably using our proposed variable spot size TDTR approach. We have demonstrated this variable spot size TDTR approach on samples with a wide range of in-plane thermal conductivity, including fused silica, rutile titania (TiO2 [001]), zinc oxide (ZnO [0001]), molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite.

  18. Time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) measurements of anisotropic thermal conductivity using a variable spot size approach.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Puqing; Qian, Xin; Yang, Ronggui

    2017-07-01

    It is challenging to characterize thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. In this work, we extend the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) method with a variable spot size approach to simultaneously measure the in-plane (Kr) and the through-plane (Kz) thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. We first determine Kz from the measurement using a larger spot size, when the heat flow is mainly one-dimensional along the through-plane direction, and the measured signals are only sensitive to Kz. We then extract the in-plane thermal conductivity Kr from a second measurement using the same modulation frequency but with a smaller spot size, when the heat flow becomes three-dimensional, and the signal is sensitive to both Kr and Kz. By choosing the same modulation frequency for the two sets of measurements, we can avoid potential artifacts introduced by the frequency-dependent Kz, which we have found to be non-negligible, especially for some two-dimensional layered materials like MoS2. After careful evaluation of the sensitivity of a series of hypothetical samples, we provided guidelines on choosing the most appropriate laser spot size and modulation frequency that yield the smallest uncertainty, and established a criterion for the range of thermal conductivity that can be measured reliably using our proposed variable spot size TDTR approach. We have demonstrated this variable spot size TDTR approach on samples with a wide range of in-plane thermal conductivity, including fused silica, rutile titania (TiO2 [001]), zinc oxide (ZnO [0001]), molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite.

  19. Contact Resistance and Metallurgical Connections Between Silver Coated Polymer Particles in Isotropic Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Kristiansen, Helge; Nagao, Shijo; Helland, Susanne; Njagi, John; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in silver thin film coated polymer spheres as conductive fillers in isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs). Such ICAs yield resistivities similar to conventional silver flake based ICAs while requiring only a fraction of the silver content. In this work, effects of the nanostructure of silver thin films on inter-particle contact resistance were investigated. The electrical resistivity of ICAs with similar particle content was shown to decrease with increasing coating thickness. Scanning electron micrographs of ion milled cross-sections revealed that the silver coatings formed continuous metallurgical connections at the contacts between the filler particles after adhesive curing at 150°C. The electrical resistivity decreased for all samples after environmental treatment for 3 weeks at 85°C/85% relative humidity. It was concluded that after the metallurgical connections formed, the bulk resistance of these ICAs were no longer dominated by the contact resistance, but by the geometry and nanostructure of the silver coatings. A figure of merit (FoM) was defined based on the ratio between bulk silver resistivity and the ICA resistivity, and this showed that although the resistivity was lowest in the ICAs containing the most silver, the volume of silver was more effectively used in the ICAs with intermediate silver contents. This was attributed to a size effect due to smaller grains in the thickest coating.

  20. Extraordinarily high conductivity of flexible adhesive films by hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed Ajmal, C.; Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-06-01

    Highly conductive flexible adhesive (CFA) film was developed using micro-sized silver flakes (primary fillers), hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires (secondary fillers) and nitrile butadiene rubber. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were synthesized by decorating silver nanowires with silver nanoparticle clusters using bifunctional cysteamine as a linker. The dispersion in ethanol was excellent for several months. Silver nanowires constructed electrical networks between the micro-scale silver flakes. The low-temperature surface sintering of silver nanoparticles enabled effective joining of silver nanowires to silver flakes. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires provided a greater maximum conductivity (54 390 S cm-1) than pure silver nanowires, pure multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles in nitrile butadiene rubber matrix. The resistance change was smallest upon bending when the hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were employed. The adhesion of the film on polyethylene terephthalate substrate was excellent. Light emitting diodes were successfully wired to the CFA circuit patterned by the screen printing method for application demonstration.

  1. Extraordinarily high conductivity of flexible adhesive films by hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, C Muhammed; Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-06-03

    Highly conductive flexible adhesive (CFA) film was developed using micro-sized silver flakes (primary fillers), hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires (secondary fillers) and nitrile butadiene rubber. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were synthesized by decorating silver nanowires with silver nanoparticle clusters using bifunctional cysteamine as a linker. The dispersion in ethanol was excellent for several months. Silver nanowires constructed electrical networks between the micro-scale silver flakes. The low-temperature surface sintering of silver nanoparticles enabled effective joining of silver nanowires to silver flakes. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires provided a greater maximum conductivity (54 390 S cm(-1)) than pure silver nanowires, pure multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles in nitrile butadiene rubber matrix. The resistance change was smallest upon bending when the hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were employed. The adhesion of the film on polyethylene terephthalate substrate was excellent. Light emitting diodes were successfully wired to the CFA circuit patterned by the screen printing method for application demonstration.

  2. High performance low cost interconnections for flip chip attachment with electrically conductive adhesive. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This final report is a compilation of final reports from each of the groups participating in the program. The main three groups involved in this effort are the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of IBM Corporation in Yorktown Heights, New York, Assembly Process Design of IBM Corporation in Endicott, New York, and SMT Laboratory of Universal Instruments Corporation in Binghamton, New York. The group at the research center focused on the conductive adhesive materials development and characterization. The group in process development focused on processing of the Polymer-Metal-Solvent Paste (PMSP) to form conductive adhesive bumps, formation of the Polymer-Metal Composite (PMC) on semiconductor devices and study of the bonding process to circuitized organic carriers, and the long term durability and reliability of joints formed using the process. The group at Universal Instruments focused on development of an equipment set and bonding parameters for the equipment to produce bond assembly tooling. Reports of each of these individual groups are presented here reviewing their technical efforts and achievements.

  3. One-Step Preparation of Silver Hexagonal Microsheets as Electrically Conductive Adhesive Fillers for Printed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hu-Ming; Guo, Ying; Huang, Sheng-Yun; Zhang, Kai; Yuen, Matthew M F; Fu, Xian-Zhu; Yu, Shuhui; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-06-24

    A facile one-step solution-phase chemical reduction method has been developed to synthesize Ag microsheets at room temperature. The morphology of Ag sheets is a regular hexagon more than 1 μm in size and about 200 nm in thickness. The hexagonal Ag microsheets possess a smoother and straighter surface compared with that of the commercial Ag micrometer-sized flakes prepared by ball milling for electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs). The function of the reagents and the formation mechanism of Ag hexagonal microsheets are also investigated. For the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate facet-selective capping, the Ag atoms freshly reduced by N2H4 would orientationally grow alone on the {111} facet of Ag seeds, with the synergistically selective etching of irregular and small Ag particles by H2O2, to form Ag hexagonal microsheets. The hexagonal Ag microsheet-filled epoxy adhesives, as electrically conductive materials, can be easily printed on various substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), epoxy, glass, and flexible papers. The hexagonal Ag microsheet filled ECAs demonstrate lower bulk resistivity (approximately 8 × 10(-5) Ω cm) than that of the traditional Ag micrometer-sized-flake-filled ECAs with the same Ag content of 80 wt % (approximately 1.2 × 10(-4) Ω cm).

  4. Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Cross-Linked Polybutadienes in Uniaxial Elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venerus, David C.; Kolev, Dimitre

    2008-07-01

    Cross-linked elastomers have numerous applications including automobiles, sporting goods, and biomedical devices. During both their processing and application, these materials experience large mechanical stresses and thermal gradients. In this study, we investigate the mechanical and thermal transport behavior of cross-linked polybutadienes. These materials have been prepared by cross linking well-entangled polybutadienes using an organic peroxide cross-linking agent at low concentration. Samples obtained after nearly complete conversion of the cross-linking agent, which can be characterized as lightly cross-linked (i.e., more than 10 entanglements per cross-link), were subjected to a series of large strain, uniaxial deformations. Measurements of the tensile stress and two components of the thermal conductivity tensor will be reported as a function of elongation. These data are also used to examine the stress-thermal rule in which the stress and thermal conductivity tensors are linearly related.

  5. Quantifying Molecular-Level Cell Adhesion on Electroactive Conducting Polymers using Electrochemical-Single Cell Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongrui; Molino, Paul J.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Higgins, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Single Cell Force Spectroscopy was combined with Electrochemical-AFM to quantify the adhesion between live single cells and conducting polymers whilst simultaneously applying a voltage to electrically switch the polymer from oxidized to reduced states. The cell-conducting polymer adhesion represents the non-specific interaction between cell surface glycocalyx molecules and polymer groups such as sulfonate and dodecylbenzene groups, which rearrange their orientation during electrical switching. Single cell adhesion significantly increases as the polymer is switched from an oxidized to fully reduced state, indicating stronger cell binding to sulfonate groups as opposed to hydrophobic groups. This increase in single cell adhesion is concomitant with an increase in surface hydrophilicity and uptake of cell media, driven by cation movement, into the polymer film during electrochemical reduction. Binding forces between the glycocalyx and polymer surface are indicative of molecular-level interactions and during electrical stimulation there is a decrease in both the binding force and stiffness of the adhesive bonds. The study provides insight into the effects of electrochemical switching on cell adhesion at the cell-conducting polymer interface and is more broadly applicable to elucidating the binding of cell adhesion molecules in the presence of electrical fields and directly at electrode interfaces. PMID:26335299

  6. The value and cost of complexity in predictive modelling: role of tissue anisotropic conductivity and fibre tracts in neuromodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Shahid, Syed; Bikson, Marom; Salman, Humaira; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2014-06-01

    Objectives. Computational methods are increasingly used to optimize transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) dose strategies and yet complexities of existing approaches limit their clinical access. Since predictive modelling indicates the relevance of subject/pathology based data and hence the need for subject specific modelling, the incremental clinical value of increasingly complex modelling methods must be balanced against the computational and clinical time and costs. For example, the incorporation of multiple tissue layers and measured diffusion tensor (DTI) based conductivity estimates increase model precision but at the cost of clinical and computational resources. Costs related to such complexities aggregate when considering individual optimization and the myriad of potential montages. Here, rather than considering if additional details change current-flow prediction, we consider when added complexities influence clinical decisions. Approach. Towards developing quantitative and qualitative metrics of value/cost associated with computational model complexity, we considered field distributions generated by two 4 × 1 high-definition montages (m1 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C3 and m2 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C1) and a single conventional (m3 = C3-Fp2) tDCS electrode montage. We evaluated statistical methods, including residual error (RE) and relative difference measure (RDM), to consider the clinical impact and utility of increased complexities, namely the influence of skull, muscle and brain anisotropic conductivities in a volume conductor model. Main results. Anisotropy modulated current-flow in a montage and region dependent manner. However, significant statistical changes, produced within montage by anisotropy, did not change qualitative peak and topographic comparisons across montages. Thus for the examples analysed, clinical decision on which dose to select would not be altered by the omission of anisotropic brain conductivity

  7. Theoretical determination of anisotropic thermal conductivity for crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB).

    PubMed

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Sewell, Thomas D

    2013-08-21

    Bond stretching and three-center angle bending potentials have been developed to extend an existing rigid-bond 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene molecular dynamics force field [D. Bedrov, O. Borodin, G. D. Smith, T. D. Sewell, D. M. Dattelbaum, and L. L. Stevens, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 224703 (2009)] for simulations requiring fully flexible molecules. The potentials were fit to experimental vibrational spectra and electronic structure predictions of vibrational normal modes using a combination of zero kelvin eigenmode analysis for the isolated molecule and power spectra for the isolated molecule and crystal. A reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method [F. Müller-Plathe, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 6082 (1997)] was used to obtain the room temperature, atmospheric pressure thermal conductivity along three directions in a well-defined, non-orthogonal basis. The thermal conductivity was found to be significantly anisotropic with values 1.13 ± 0.07, 1.07 ± 0.07, and 0.65 ± 0.03 W m(-1) K(-1) for directions nominally parallel to the a, b, and c lattice vectors, respectively.

  8. Theoretical determination of anisotropic thermal conductivity for crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2013-08-01

    Bond stretching and three-center angle bending potentials have been developed to extend an existing rigid-bond 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene molecular dynamics force field [D. Bedrov, O. Borodin, G. D. Smith, T. D. Sewell, D. M. Dattelbaum, and L. L. Stevens, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 224703 (2009), 10.1063/1.3264972] for simulations requiring fully flexible molecules. The potentials were fit to experimental vibrational spectra and electronic structure predictions of vibrational normal modes using a combination of zero kelvin eigenmode analysis for the isolated molecule and power spectra for the isolated molecule and crystal. A reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method [F. Müller-Plathe, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 6082 (1997), 10.1063/1.473271] was used to obtain the room temperature, atmospheric pressure thermal conductivity along three directions in a well-defined, non-orthogonal basis. The thermal conductivity was found to be significantly anisotropic with values 1.13 ± 0.07, 1.07 ± 0.07, and 0.65 ± 0.03 W m-1 K-1 for directions nominally parallel to the a, b, and c lattice vectors, respectively.

  9. Theoretical determination of anisotropic thermal conductivity for crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew; Sewell, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Bond stretching and three-center angle bending potentials have been developed to extend an existing rigid-bond TATB molecular dynamics (MD) force field (FF) for simulations requiring fully flexible molecules. The FF potentials were fit to experimental vibrational spectra and electronic structure predictions of vibrational normal modes and frequencies using a combination of zero Kelvin eigenmode analysis for the isolated molecule and finite-temperature power spectra for the isolated molecule and bulk crystal. Crystal structures computed using the revised FF are in good agreement with results from other computational models and experimental data. A non-equilibrium MD method was used to obtain the room temperature, atmospheric pressure thermal conductivity along three directions in a well-defined, non-orthogonal basis. The thermal conductivity was found to be significantly anisotropic with values of 1.13 +/- 0.07, 1.07 +/- 0.07 and 0.65 +/- 0.03 W m-1 K-1 for directions nominally parallel to the a, b, and c crystal directions, respectively. The U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research supported this research.

  10. Remote cooling by a novel thermal lens with anisotropic positive thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A novel thermal lens that can achieve a remote cooling effect is designed by transformation thermodynamics. The effective distance between the separate hot source and cold source is shortened by our shelled thermal lens without any negative thermal conductivity. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our thermal lens. Based on the effective medium theory, we also propose a practical way to realize our lens using two-layered isotropic thermal media that are both found in nature. The proposed thermal lens will have potential applications in remote temperature control and in creating other thermal illusions. PMID:28098221

  11. Remote cooling by a novel thermal lens with anisotropic positive thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A novel thermal lens that can achieve a remote cooling effect is designed by transformation thermodynamics. The effective distance between the separate hot source and cold source is shortened by our shelled thermal lens without any negative thermal conductivity. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our thermal lens. Based on the effective medium theory, we also propose a practical way to realize our lens using two-layered isotropic thermal media that are both found in nature. The proposed thermal lens will have potential applications in remote temperature control and in creating other thermal illusions.

  12. Characterization of a random anisotropic conductivity field with Karhunen-Loeve methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Matthew R.; Sabbagh, Harold S.; Pilchak, Adam L.; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    2014-02-18

    While parametric uncertainty quantification for NDE models has been addressed in recent years, the problem of stochastic field parameters such as spatially distributed electrical conductivity has only been investigated minimally in the last year. In that work, the authors treated the field as a one-dimensional random process and Karhunen-Loeve methods were used to discretize this process to make it amenable to UQ methods such as ANOVA expansions. In the present work, we will treat the field as a two dimensional random process, and the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the integral operator will be determined via Galerkin methods. The Karhunen-Loeve methods is extended to two dimensions and implemented to represent this process. Several different choices for basis functions will be discussed, as well as convergence criteria for each. The methods are applied to correlation functions collected over electron backscatter data from highly micro textured Ti-7Al.

  13. Tuning the Interfacial Thermal Conductance between Polystyrene and Sapphire by Controlling the Interfacial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Sun, Fangyuan; Tian, Xia; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yongmei; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Fosong

    2015-10-28

    In polymer-based electric microdevices, thermal transport across polymer/ceramic interface is essential for heat dissipation, which limits the improvement of the device performance and lifetime. In this work, four sets of polystyrene (PS) thin films/sapphire samples were prepared with different interface adhesion values, which was achieved by changing the rotation speeds in the spin-coating process. The interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) between the PS films and the sapphire were measured by time domain thermoreflectance method, and the interfacial adhesion between the PS films and the sapphire, as measured by a scratch tester, was found to increase with the rotation speed from 2000 to 8000 rpm. The ITC shows a similar dependence on the rotation speed, increasing up to a 3-fold from 7.0 ± 1.4 to 21.0 ± 4.2 MW/(m(2) K). This study demonstrates the role of spin-coating rotation speed in thermal transport across the polymer/ceramic interfaces, evoking a much simpler mechanical method for tuning this type of ITC. The findings of enhancement of the ITC of polymer/ceramic interface can shed some light on the thermal management and reliability of macro- and microelectronics, where polymeric and hybrid organic-inorganic nano films are employed.

  14. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube/nanofiber Arrays as Conductive and Dry Adhesive Interface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Tao; Zhao, Yang; Delzeit, Lance; Majumdar, Arun; Kashani, Ali

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of making conductive and dry adhesive interfaces between multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and nanofiber (MWNF) arrays grown by chemical vapor deposition with transition-metal as catalyst on highly Boron doped silicon substrates. The maximum observed adhesion force between MWNT and MWNF surfaces is 3.5 mN for an apparent contact area of 2 mm by 4 mm. The minimum contact resistance measured at the same time is approx.20 Omega. Contact resistances of MWNT-MWNT and MWNT-gold interfaces were also measured as pressure forces around several mN were applied at the interface. The resulting minimum contact resistances are on the same order but with considerable variation from sample to sample. For MWNT-MWNT contacts, a minimum contact resistance of approx.1 Omega is observed for a contact area of 2 mm by 1 mm. The relatively high contact resistances, considering the area density of the nanotubes, might be explained by the high cross-tube resistances at the contact interfaces.

  15. Hexagonal superlattice of chiral conducting polymers self-assembled by mimicking beta-sheet proteins with anisotropic electrical transport.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong; Wang, Rui; Qiu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhixiang

    2010-09-01

    An ordered superlattice self-assembled from monodispersed nanostructures can exhibit collective effects of its individual building blocks, a desirable property that gives rise to potential applications. However, no general method for the direct fabrication of superstructures yet exists, especially for superlattices that start from rational-designed functional molecules. Noncovalent interactions are widely used for the self-assembly of biomolecules in nature, such as various superstructures of proteins. Instead of using hydrogen bonds as driving force for the self-assembly of beta-sheet structures of peptides, pi-pi stacking interactions were used in this study to self-assemble conducting polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures and superstructures. Monodispersed crystalline PANI nanorices were prepared by using homochiral PANI as building blocks; these nanorices can further self-assemble into hexagonal microplates aligned shoulder to shoulder. PANI molecules were organized into nanorices via single-handed helical pi-pi stacking, in which the molecular plane was normal to the long axis of the nanorices. Electrical transport measurements showed the anisotropic characteristics of self-assembled nanorices and their superstructures, which were due to the directional transport barrier in the nanorices and the structural defects at the interfaces between neighboring nanorices. As chiral PANI and peptides have similar self-assembly behaviors, the method used in this study is greatly expected to be applicable to other chemical and biochemical building blocks.

  16. Effect of buffer and interlayer on the adhesion and magnetic properties of anisotropic Nd-Fe-B single and multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoras, M.; Urse, M.; Lupu, N.; Borza, F.; Chiriac, H.

    2015-10-01

    Nd-Fe-B films with good perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were obtained by using a Mo film with the thickness of about 40 nm as buffer layer. Large out-of-plane coercivity (Hc⊥ = 1182 kA/m) and remanent ratio (remanent magnetization/saturation magnetization)⊥ = 0.99 are obtained by the stratification of the Nd-Fe-B magnetic film in three NdFeB(180 nm)/Mo(5 nm) bilayer sequences using Mo as interlayer. Using a Ni film, with a thickness of about 8 nm, alongside with a Mo film of 40 nm as buffer layer improves the adhesion to substrate and keeps the anisotropic hard magnetic performances of the Nd-Fe-B films unchanged. By increasing the total thickness of the Nd-Fe-B magnetic layer from 540 nm to 1620 nm the coercivity measured at high fields increases from about 1350 kA/m for Nd-Fe-B film with 3 NdFeB(180 nm)/Mo(5 nm) sequences to about 1640 kA/m for Nd-Fe-B film with 9 NdFeB(180 nm)/Mo(5 nm) sequences which can be ascribed to a stronger pinning effect as a result of the increased number of NdFeB/Mo interfaces.

  17. Regional electric field induced by electroconvulsive therapy in a realistic finite element head model: Influence of white matter anisotropic conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Hee; Deng, Zhi-De; Kim, Tae-Seong; Laine, Andrew F.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first computational study investigating the electric field (E-field) strength generated by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) electrode configurations in specific brain regions of interest (ROIs) that have putative roles in the therapeutic action and/or adverse side effects of ECT. This study also characterizes the impact of the white matter (WM) conductivity anisotropy on the E-field distribution. A finite element head model incorporating tissue heterogeneity and WM anisotropic conductivity was constructed based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI data. We computed the spatial E-field distributions generated by three standard ECT electrode placements including bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), and right unilateral (RUL) and an investigational electrode configuration for focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST). The key results are that (1) the median E-field strength over the whole brain is 3.9, 1.5, 2.3, and 2.6 V/cm for the BL, BF, RUL, and FEAST electrode configurations, respectively, which coupled with the broad spread of the BL E-field suggests a biophysical basis for observations of superior efficacy of BL ECT compared to BF and RUL ECT; (2) in the hippocampi, BL ECT produces a median E-field of 4.8 V/cm that is 1.5–2.8 times stronger than that for the other electrode configurations, consistent with the more pronounced amnestic effects of BL ECT; and (3) neglecting the WM conductivity anisotropy results in E-field strength error up to 18% overall and up to 39% in specific ROIs, motivating the inclusion of the WM conductivity anisotropy in accurate head models. This computational study demonstrates how the realistic finite element head model incorporating tissue conductivity anisotropy provides quantitative insight into the biophysics of ECT, which may shed light on the differential clinical outcomes seen with various forms of ECT, and may guide the development of novel stimulation

  18. Flexible Touch Sensors Made of Two Layers of Printed Conductive Flexible Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sungwon; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Jiyeon; Ma, Rujun; Baik, Seunghyun; Moon, Hyungpil

    2016-01-01

    Touch sensors are crucial in controlling robotic manipulation when a robot interacts with environmental objects. In this study, multilayer flexible touch sensors in the form of an array were developed. The sensors use ink-type conductive flexible adhesives as electrodes which were printed on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films in a parallel equidistance stripe pattern. Between the two printed layers, a double-sided adhesive film was used to combine each layer and was perforated at the junctions of the top and bottom electrodes with different-sized circles. These holes represent switching mechanisms between the top and bottom electrodes, and their sizes make the sensor respond to different levels of external pressure. We showed the durability of the fabricated sensor with 1 mm diameter holes by repeated experiments of exerting normal pressure ranging from 0 to 159.15 kPa for 1000 cycles. In case of 1 mm diameter holes, the state of each sensor node was reliably determined by the threshold pressures of 127.3 kPa for increasing pressure and 111.4 kPa for decreasing pressure. On the other hand, decreasing the hole size from 3 to 0.5 mm caused an increase in the threshold pressure from 1.41 to 214 kPa. The relation between the hole size and the threshold pressure was analyzed by a mechanical model. The sensor performance was also verified on curved surfaces up to 60 mm radius of curvatures. Additionally, we fabricated a sensor with three levels of sensitivity with a conventional method which was a thermal evaporation to show the extendibility of the idea. PMID:27649205

  19. Flexible Touch Sensors Made of Two Layers of Printed Conductive Flexible Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sungwon; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Jiyeon; Ma, Rujun; Baik, Seunghyun; Moon, Hyungpil

    2016-09-16

    Touch sensors are crucial in controlling robotic manipulation when a robot interacts with environmental objects. In this study, multilayer flexible touch sensors in the form of an array were developed. The sensors use ink-type conductive flexible adhesives as electrodes which were printed on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films in a parallel equidistance stripe pattern. Between the two printed layers, a double-sided adhesive film was used to combine each layer and was perforated at the junctions of the top and bottom electrodes with different-sized circles. These holes represent switching mechanisms between the top and bottom electrodes, and their sizes make the sensor respond to different levels of external pressure. We showed the durability of the fabricated sensor with 1 mm diameter holes by repeated experiments of exerting normal pressure ranging from 0 to 159.15 kPa for 1000 cycles. In case of 1 mm diameter holes, the state of each sensor node was reliably determined by the threshold pressures of 127.3 kPa for increasing pressure and 111.4 kPa for decreasing pressure. On the other hand, decreasing the hole size from 3 to 0.5 mm caused an increase in the threshold pressure from 1.41 to 214 kPa. The relation between the hole size and the threshold pressure was analyzed by a mechanical model. The sensor performance was also verified on curved surfaces up to 60 mm radius of curvatures. Additionally, we fabricated a sensor with three levels of sensitivity with a conventional method which was a thermal evaporation to show the extendibility of the idea.

  20. Liquid crystal self-assembly of halloysite nanotubes in ionic liquids: a novel soft nanocomposite ionogel electrolyte with high anisotropic ionic conductivity and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ningning; Liu, Yulin; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Song, Hongzan

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel class of liquid crystalline (LC) nanohybrid ionogels fabricated via self-assembly of natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in ionic liquids (ILs). The obtained ionogels are very stable and nonvolatile and show LC phases over a wide temperature range. Remarkably, the nanocomposite ionogels exhibit high anisotropic ionic conductivity after shear, and their room temperature ionic conductivity can reach 3.8 × 10-3 S cm-1 for aligned nanotubes perpendicular to the electrode even when the HNTs content increases to 40 wt%, which is 380 times higher than that obtained for aligned nanotubes parallel to the electrode, which is 1.0 × 10-5 S cm-1. Crucially, the obtained LC nanocomposite ionogels have very high thermal stability, which can sustain 400 °C thermal treatment. The findings will promote the development of novel nanocomposite ionogel electrolytes with faster ion transport and larger anisotropic conductivity.We report a novel class of liquid crystalline (LC) nanohybrid ionogels fabricated via self-assembly of natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in ionic liquids (ILs). The obtained ionogels are very stable and nonvolatile and show LC phases over a wide temperature range. Remarkably, the nanocomposite ionogels exhibit high anisotropic ionic conductivity after shear, and their room temperature ionic conductivity can reach 3.8 × 10-3 S cm-1 for aligned nanotubes perpendicular to the electrode even when the HNTs content increases to 40 wt%, which is 380 times higher than that obtained for aligned nanotubes parallel to the electrode, which is 1.0 × 10-5 S cm-1. Crucially, the obtained LC nanocomposite ionogels have very high thermal stability, which can sustain 400 °C thermal treatment. The findings will promote the development of novel nanocomposite ionogel electrolytes with faster ion transport and larger anisotropic conductivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06888f

  1. Investigation of a Biocompatible Polyurethane-Based Isotropically Conductive Adhesive for UHF RFID Tag Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Yuen, Matthew M. F.; Gao, Bo; Ma, Yuhui; Wong, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    As a candidate dispersant for silver-based isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs), polyurethane (PU) is an environmentally benign material that can withstand a high deformation rate and that exhibits excellent reliability. In this work we investigated methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO) blocked isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and MEKO blocked hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as dispersant materials, and we characterize the electrical conductivity, mechanical properties, and reliability of these PU-based ICAs with silver-flake filler content ranging from 30 wt.% to 75 wt.%. Results of temperature-humidity testing (THT) at 85°C and 85% relative humidity (RH) and thermal cycling testing (TCT) at -40°C to 125°C show that these ICAs have excellent reliability. Our experimental results suggest that the MEKO blocked PU dispersants are suitable for preparing ultralow-cost, flexible, high-performance ICAs for printing antennas for ultrahigh-frequency radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags. These tags can potentially be used for identifying washable items and food packaging.

  2. A transparent conductive adhesive laminate electrode for high-efficiency organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Daniel; Greenwood, Peter; Troughton, Joel; Wijdekop, Maarten; Carnie, Mathew; Davies, Matthew; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Snaith, Henry J; Watson, Trystan; Worsley, David

    2014-11-26

    A self-adhesive laminate solar-cell electrode is presented based on a metal grid embedded in a polymer film (x-y conduction) and set in contact with the active layer using a pressure-sensitive adhesive containing a very low quantity (1.8%) of organic conductor, which self-organizes to provide z conduction to the grid. This ITO-free material performs in an identical fashion to evaporated gold in high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. © 2014 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Can anisotropic conductivity in the lower ionosphere and in the Earth's crust be studied by Schumann resonance transients?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludván, Brigitta; Bór, József; Steinbach, Péter; Novák, Attila; Sátori, Gabriella

    2015-04-01

    to anisotropic conductivity in the Earth's crust below the observatory. On the other hand, the diurnal variation of source azimuth deviations is rather due to different conductivities in the upper waveguide boundary (i.e. in the lower ionosphere) above the detection site during day and night.

  4. Influence of anisotropic electrical conductivity in white matter tissue on the EEG/MEG forward and inverse solution. A high-resolution whole head simulation study.

    PubMed

    Güllmar, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2010-05-15

    To investigate the influence of anisotropic electrical conductivity in white matter on the forward and inverse solution in electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) numerical simulation studies were performed. A high-resolution (1 mm3 isotropic) finite element model of a human head was implemented to study the sensitivity of EEG and MEG source localization. In vivo information on the anisotropy was obtained from magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging and included into the model, whereas both a direct transformation and a direct transformation with volume normalization were used to obtain conductivity tensors. Additionally, fixed artificial anisotropy ratios were also used, while considering only the orientation information from DTI, to generate conductivity tensors. Analysis was performed using over 25,000 single dipolar sources covering the full neocortex. Major findings of the study include that EEG is more sensitive to anisotropic conductivities in white matter compared to MEG. Especially with the inverse analysis, we found that sources placed deep in sulci are located more laterally if anisotropic conductivity of white matter tissue is neglected. Overall, the single-source localization errors resulting from a neglect of anisotropy were found to be smaller compared to errors associated with other modeling errors, like misclassified tissue or the use of nonrealistic head models. In contrast to the small localization error we observed significant changes in magnitude and orientation. The latter is important since dipole orientation might be more important than absolute dipole localization in assigning, e.g., epileptic activity to the wall of the affected brain sulcal area. If high-resolution finite element models are used to perform source localization in EEG and MEG experiments and the quality of the measured data permits localization accuracy of 1 mm and below, the influence of anisotropic compartments has to be taken into account

  5. Optical conductivity of a 2DEG with anisotropic Rashba interaction at the interface of LaAlO3/SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawrie, Alestin; Kanti Ghosh, Tarun

    2016-10-01

    We study optical conductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas with anisotropic k-cubic Rashba spin-orbit interaction formed at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. The anisotropic spin splitting energy gives rise to different features of the optical conductivity in comparison to the isotropic k-cubic Rashba spin-orbit interaction. For large carrier density and strong spin-orbit couplings, the density dependence of Drude weight deviates from the linear behavior. The charge and optical conductivities remain isotropic despite anisotropic nature of the Fermi contours. An infinitesimally small photon energy would suffice to initiate inter-band optical transitions due to degeneracy along certain directions in momentum space. The optical conductivity shows a single peak at a given photon energy depending on the system parameters and then falls off to zero at higher photon energy. These features are lacking for systems with isotropic k-cubic Rashba spin-orbit coupling. These striking features can be used to extract the information about nature of the spin-orbit interaction experimentally and illuminate some light on the orbital origin of the two-dimensional electron gas.

  6. Optical conductivity of a 2DEG with anisotropic Rashba interaction at the interface of LaAlO3/SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Mawrie, Alestin; Kanti Ghosh, Tarun

    2016-10-26

    We study optical conductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas with anisotropic k-cubic Rashba spin-orbit interaction formed at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. The anisotropic spin splitting energy gives rise to different features of the optical conductivity in comparison to the isotropic k-cubic Rashba spin-orbit interaction. For large carrier density and strong spin-orbit couplings, the density dependence of Drude weight deviates from the linear behavior. The charge and optical conductivities remain isotropic despite anisotropic nature of the Fermi contours. An infinitesimally small photon energy would suffice to initiate inter-band optical transitions due to degeneracy along certain directions in momentum space. The optical conductivity shows a single peak at a given photon energy depending on the system parameters and then falls off to zero at higher photon energy. These features are lacking for systems with isotropic k-cubic Rashba spin-orbit coupling. These striking features can be used to extract the information about nature of the spin-orbit interaction experimentally and illuminate some light on the orbital origin of the two-dimensional electron gas.

  7. Surfactant-Free Synthesis of Copper Particles for Electrically Conductive Adhesive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Li-Ngee; Nishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    In this study, a simple one-step microwave-assisted method was developed to synthesize Cu and Cu-Ag particles for application in electrically conductive adhesive (ECA). The particle size of the obtained Cu particles was about 1 μm to 3 μm, whereas Cu-Ag particles were in the range of 0.1 μm to 1.0 μm. ECA samples were cured at 175°C for 1 h. Results revealed that the as-cured ECAs showed significant differences in electrical resistivity. The resistivity of Cu-filled ECA was on the order of 10-5 Ω cm, which was lower than the Cu-Ag-filled ECAs with resistivity on the order of 10-3 Ω cm. The thermal stability of the ECAs was studied under high-temperature exposure at 125°C for 1000 h. Results showed that Cu-filled ECA was thermally stable for 1000 h of aging, whereas Cu-Ag-filled ECAs were thermally stable for aging time above 100 h.

  8. Study of the effect of adhesion and anharmonicity of atomic vibrations on the thermal conductance of "metal-dielectric" interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepnev, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    The method for calculating the thermal conductance of "metal-dielectric" interfaces, which takes into account the adhesive interaction and anharmonicity of atomic vibrations at the interface within the acoustic mismatch model and allows achieving better agreement of calculated and experimental data.

  9. Thermal conductivity of layered borides: The effect of building defects on the thermal conductivity of TmAlB{sub 4} and the anisotropic thermal conductivity of AlB{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. J. E-mail: xwang58@illinois.edu; Mori, T. E-mail: xwang58@illinois.edu; Kuzmych-Ianchuk, I.; Michiue, Y.; Yubuta, K.; Shishido, T.; Grin, Y.; Okada, S.; Cahill, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    Rare earth metal borides have attracted great interest due to their unusual properties, such as superconductivity and f-electron magnetism. A recent discovery attributes the tunability of magnetism in rare earth aluminoborides to the effect of so-called “building defects.” In this paper, we report data for the effect of building defects on the thermal conductivities of α-TmAlB{sub 4} single crystals. Building defects reduce the thermal conductivity of α-TmAlB{sub 4} by ≈30%. At room temperature, the thermal conductivity of AlB{sub 2} is nearly a factor of 5 higher than that of α-TmAlB{sub 4}. AlB{sub 2} single crystals are thermally anisotropic with the c-axis thermal conductivity nearly twice the thermal conductivity of the a-b plane. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity near and above room temperature reveals that both electrons and phonons contribute substantially to thermal transport in AlB{sub 2} with electrons being the dominant heat carriers.

  10. Heparin dopant increases the electrical stability, cell adhesion, and growth of conducting polypyrrole/poly(L,L-lactide) composites.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shiyun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Shi, Guixin; Zhang, Ze

    2008-11-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a promising conductive polymer for tissue engineering and bioelectrical applications. However, its electrical conductivity deteriorates easily in aqueous conditions. Cell adhesion to PPy is also relatively poor. The goal of this study was to simultaneously improve the electrical stability of and cell adhesion to PPy by using heparin (HE) as dopant, for HE is both a polyanion and an important glycosaminoglycan in cell membranes and extracellular matrix. PPy particles doped with HE were synthesized through emulsion polymerization using Fenton's reagent as an oxidant. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the PPy particles. Conductive biodegradable membranes of 10(2) to 10(3) Omega/square were prepared from 5% (w) PPy with various amounts of HE and 95% (w) poly(L,L-lactide) (PPy/PLLA). Azure A staining was employed to quantify the HE exposed on the surface of the PPy particles and PPy/PLLA membranes. The distribution of HE on membranes was demonstrated by DAPI staining. Results showed that HE was incorporated into the PPy particles as counterions and presented on particle surface. A unique "filament"-like morphology of the PPy preparation was observed at high-HE content. The electrical stability of the PPy/PLLA membranes was tested in saline at 37 degrees C for 500 h. Human skin fibroblasts were used to test the cell adhesion capacity. The conductive membranes containing HE-doped PPy particles recorded significantly increased electrical stability, cell adhesion, and growth. The electrically more stable and cell adhesive conductive biodegradable membrane may act as a platform for various biomedical applications.

  11. Ionic Intercalation in Two-Dimensional van der Waals Materials: In Situ Characterization and Electrochemical Control of the Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joon Sang; Ke, Ming; Hu, Yongjie

    2017-03-08

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have shown novel fundamental properties and promise for wide applications. Here, we report for the first time an experimental demonstration of the in situ characterization and highly reversible control of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of black phosphorus. We develop a novel platform based on lithium ion batteries that integrates ultrafast optical spectroscopy and electrochemical control to investigate the interactions between lithium ions and the lattices of the black phosphorus electrode. We discover a strong dependence of the thermal conductivity on battery charge states (lithium concentrations) during the discharge/charge process. The thermal conductivity of black phosphorus is reversibly tunable over a wide range of 2.45-3.86, 62.67-85.80, and 21.66-27.58 W·m(-1)·K(-1) in the cross-plan, zigzag, and armchair directions, respectively. The modulation in thermal conductivity is attributed to phonon scattering introduced by the ionic intercalation in between the interspacing layers and shows anisotropic phonon scattering mechanism based on semiclassical model. At the fully discharged state (x ∼ 3 in LixP), a dramatic reduction of thermal conductivity by up to 6 times from that of the pristine crystal has been observed. This study provides a unique approach to explore the fundamental energy transport involving lattices and ions in the layered structures and may open up new opportunities in controlling energy transport based on novel operation mechanisms and the rational design of nanostructures.

  12. Anisotropic temperature-dependent thermal conductivity by an Al2O3 interlayer in Al2O3/ZnO superlattice films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won-Yong; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Young; Park, Tae-Hyun; Park, No-Won; Kim, Gil-Sung; Park, Jin-Seong; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2017-03-01

    The thermal conductivity of superlattice films is generally anisotropic and should be studied separately in the in-plane and cross-plane directions of the films. However, previous works have mostly focused on the cross-plane thermal conductivity because the electrons and phonons in the cross-plane direction of superlattice films may result in much stronger interface scattering than that in the in-plane direction. Nevertheless, it is highly desirable to perform systematic studies on the effect of interface formation in semiconducting superlattice films on both in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities. In this study, we determine both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of Al2O3 (AO)/ZnO superlattice films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on SiO2/Si substrates in the temperature range of 50-300 K by the four-point-probe 3-ω method. Our experimental results indicate that the formation of an atomic AO layer (0.82 nm) significantly contributes to the decrease of the cross-plane thermal conductivity of the AO/ZnO superlattice films compared with that of AO/ZnO thin films. The cross-plane thermal conductivity (0.26-0.63 W m-1 K-1 of the AO/ZnO superlattice films (with an AO layer of ˜0.82 nm thickness) is approximately ˜150%-370% less than the in-plane thermal conductivity (0.96-1.19 W m-1 K-1) of the corresponding film, implying significant anisotropy. This indicates that the suppression of the cross-plane thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the superlattice, rather than the nanograin columnar structure in the films. In addition, we theoretically analyzed strong anisotropic behavior of the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the AO/ZnO superlattice films in terms of temperature dependence.

  13. Anisotropic temperature-dependent thermal conductivity by an Al2O3 interlayer in Al2O3/ZnO superlattice films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Yong; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Young; Park, Tae-Hyun; Park, No-Won; Kim, Gil-Sung; Park, Jin-Seong; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2017-03-10

    The thermal conductivity of superlattice films is generally anisotropic and should be studied separately in the in-plane and cross-plane directions of the films. However, previous works have mostly focused on the cross-plane thermal conductivity because the electrons and phonons in the cross-plane direction of superlattice films may result in much stronger interface scattering than that in the in-plane direction. Nevertheless, it is highly desirable to perform systematic studies on the effect of interface formation in semiconducting superlattice films on both in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities. In this study, we determine both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of Al2O3 (AO)/ZnO superlattice films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on SiO2/Si substrates in the temperature range of 50-300 K by the four-point-probe 3-ω method. Our experimental results indicate that the formation of an atomic AO layer (0.82 nm) significantly contributes to the decrease of the cross-plane thermal conductivity of the AO/ZnO superlattice films compared with that of AO/ZnO thin films. The cross-plane thermal conductivity (0.26-0.63 W m(-1) K(-1) of the AO/ZnO superlattice films (with an AO layer of ∼0.82 nm thickness) is approximately ∼150%-370% less than the in-plane thermal conductivity (0.96-1.19 W m(-1) K(-1)) of the corresponding film, implying significant anisotropy. This indicates that the suppression of the cross-plane thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the superlattice, rather than the nanograin columnar structure in the films. In addition, we theoretically analyzed strong anisotropic behavior of the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the AO/ZnO superlattice films in terms of temperature dependence.

  14. Optic phonons and anisotropic thermal conductivity in hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Singh, David

    2016-11-16

    The lattice thermal conductivity ($κ$) of hexagonal Ge2Sb2Tesub>5 (h-GST) is studied via direct first-principles calculations. We find significant intrinsic anisotropy of ( $κ$a/$κ$c~2) of $κ$ in bulk h-GST along different transport directions. The dominant contribution to$κ$ is from optic phonons, ~75%. This is extremely unusual as the acoustic phonon modes carry most of the heat in typical semiconductors and insulators with small unit cells. Very recently, Lee et. al. observed anisotropic in GST thin films and attributed this to thermal resistance of amorphous regions near grain boundaries. However, our results suggest an additional strong intrinsic anisotropy for the pure hexagonal phase. This derives from bonding anisotropy along different crystal directions, specifically from weak interlayer coupling, which gives anisotropic phonon dispersions. The phonon spectrum of h-GST has very dispersive optic branches with higher group velocities along the a-axis as compared to flat optic bands along the c-axis. The importance of optic mode contributions for the thermal conductivity in low-$κ$ h-GST is unusual, and development of fundamental physical understanding of these contributions may be critical to better understanding of thermal conduction in other complex layered materials.

  15. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine-Functionalized Graphene as a Conductive Adhesion Promoter and Protective Layer for Silver Nanowire Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jinlei; Liu, Haihui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xingxiang

    2016-05-31

    For the scalable fabrication of transparent electrodes and optoelectronic devices, excellent adhesion between the conductive films and the substrates is essential. In this work, a novel mussel-inspired polydopamine-functionalized graphene/silver nanowire hybrid nanomaterial for transparent electrodes was fabricated in a facile manner. Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized and reduced by polydopamine while remaining stable in water without precipitation. It is shown that the polydopamine-functionalized GO (PFGO) film adhered to the substrate much more easily and more uniformly than the GO film. The PFGO film had a sheet resistance of ∼3.46 × 10(8) Ω/sq and a transparency of 78.2%, with excellent thermal and chemical stability; these characteristics are appropriate for antistatic coatings. Further reduced PFGO (RPFGO) as a conductive adhesion promoter and protective layer for the Ag nanowire (AgNW) significantly enhanced the adhesion force between AgNW networks and the substrate. The RPFGO-AgNW electrode was found to have a sheet resistance of 63 Ω/sq and a transparency of 70.5%. Moreover, the long-term stability of the RPFGO-AgNW electrode was greatly enhanced via the effective protection of the AgNW by RPFGO. These solution-processed antistatic coatings and electrodes have tremendous potential in the applications of optoelectronic devices as a result of their low production cost and facile processing.

  16. High-resolution patterning of silver conductive lines by adhesion contrast planography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Koutake, Masayoshi; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2015-09-01

    We developed printed electronics compatible planographic printing methods that enable single-micrometer-order patterning with high rectangularity and thickness uniformity. Instead of conventional planographic printing methods where selective wetting is used for pattern generation, an adhesive latent image produced on a silicone surface is exploited for patterning in the proposed printing methodologies. We further investigated the fundamental mechanisms of the proposed methods by focusing on adhesion contrasts between the blanket, printing area, and non-printing area of a printing plate (PP) and determined that printing is feasible when a simple magnitude relation of adhesions is satisfied for thin layers of size ranging from approximately 50 nm to 100 nm. Latent image formation can be carried out via a simple ultraviolet exposure of the silicone surface, thereby enabling the rapid prototyping of printed device fabrications. The easily preparable, single material-based flat PPs developed in this study have the advantages of flexibility in pattern designs, washing process, fabrication cost, and pattern-rewriting capability compared with the conventional printing methods in which raised surfaces such as stamps or clichés are required for patterning.

  17. Hydrothermal Fabrication of Silver Nanowires-Silver Nanoparticles-Graphene Nanosheets Composites in Enhancing Electrical Conductive Performance of Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongru; Zeng, Jinfeng; Harrington, Steven; Ma, Lei; Ma, Mingze; Guo, Xuhong; Ma, Yanqing

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanowires-silver nanoparticles-graphene nanosheets (AgNWs-AgNPs-GN) hybrid nanomaterials were fabricated through a hydrothermal method by using glucose as a green reducing agent. The charge carriers of AgNWs-AgNPs-GN passed through defect regions in the GNs rapidly with the aid of the AgNW and AgNP building blocks, leading to high electrical conductivity of electrically conductive adhesives (ECA) filled with AgNWs-AgNPs-GN. The morphologies of synthesized AgNWs-AgNPs-GN hybrid nanomaterials were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the structure of AgNWs-AgNPs-GN. The resistance of cured ECAs was investigated by the four-probe method. The results indicated AgNWs-AgNPs-GN hybrid nanomaterials exhibited excellent electrical properties for decreasing the resistivity of electrically conductive adhesives (ECA). The resistivity of ECA was 3.01 × 10−4 Ω·cm when the content of the AgNWs-AgNPs-GN hybrid nanomaterial was 0.8 wt %. PMID:28335247

  18. Morphology and conductivity of Au films on polydimethylsiloxane using (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) as an adhesion promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmani, Bekim; Deyhle, Hans; Weiss, Florian M.; Töpper, Tino; Karapetkova, Maria; Leung, Vanessa; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are often referred to as artificial muscles due to their high specific continuous power, which is comparable to that of human skeletal muscles, and because of their millisecond response time. We intend to use nanometer-thin DEA as medical implant actuators and sensors to be operated at voltages as low as a few tens of volts. The conductivity of the electrode and the impact of its stiffness on the stacked structure are key to the design and operation of future devices. The stiffness of sputtered Au electrodes on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was characterized using AFM nanoindentation techniques. 2500 nanoindentations were performed on 10 x 10 μm2 regions at loads of 100 to 400 nN using a spherical tip with a radius of (522 +/- 2) nm. Stiffness maps based on the Hertz model were calculated using the Nanosurf Flex-ANA system. The low adhesion of Au to PDMS has been reported in the literature and leads to the formation of Au-nanoclusters. The size of the nanoclusters was (25 +/- 10) nm and can be explained by the low surface energy of PDMS leading to a Volmer-Weber growth mode. Therefore, we propose (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) as a molecular adhesive to promote the adhesion between the PDMS and Au electrode. A beneficial side effect of these self-assembling monolayers is the significant improvement of the electrode's conductivity as determined by four-point probe measurements. Therefore, the application of a soft adhesive layer for building a dielectric elastomer actuator appears promising.

  19. Room-Temperature Curing and Grain Growth at High Humidity in Conductive Adhesives with Ultra-Low Silver Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Redford, Keith; Njagi, John; Kristiansen, Helge; Helland, Susanne; Kalland, Erik; Goia, Dan V.; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2017-02-01

    Isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs) are alternatives to metallic solders as interconnects in solar modules and electronic devices, but normally require silver contents >25 vol.% and elevated curing temperatures to achieve reasonable conductivity. In this work, ICAs are prepared with a silver content of 1.0 vol.% by using polymer spheres coated with nanograined silver thin films as filler particles. In contrast to conventional ICAs, there are no organic lubricants on the silver surfaces to obstruct the formation of metallic contacts, and conductivity is achieved even when the adhesive is cured at room temperature. When exposed to long-term storage at 85°C and 85% relative humidity, the silver films undergo significant grain growth, evidenced by field-emission scanning electron microscopy observation of ion-milled cross-sections and x-ray diffraction. This has a positive effect on the electrical conductivity of the ICA through the widening of metallic contacts and decreased scattering of electrons at grain boundaries, and is explained by an electrochemical Ostwald ripening process. The effects of decoupling heat and humidity is investigated by storage at either 85°C or immersion in water. It is shown that the level of grain growth during the various post-curing treatments is dependent on the initial curing temperature.

  20. Room-Temperature Curing and Grain Growth at High Humidity in Conductive Adhesives with Ultra-Low Silver Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Redford, Keith; Njagi, John; Kristiansen, Helge; Helland, Susanne; Kalland, Erik; Goia, Dan V.; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2017-07-01

    Isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs) are alternatives to metallic solders as interconnects in solar modules and electronic devices, but normally require silver contents >25 vol.% and elevated curing temperatures to achieve reasonable conductivity. In this work, ICAs are prepared with a silver content of 1.0 vol.% by using polymer spheres coated with nanograined silver thin films as filler particles. In contrast to conventional ICAs, there are no organic lubricants on the silver surfaces to obstruct the formation of metallic contacts, and conductivity is achieved even when the adhesive is cured at room temperature. When exposed to long-term storage at 85°C and 85% relative humidity, the silver films undergo significant grain growth, evidenced by field-emission scanning electron microscopy observation of ion-milled cross-sections and x-ray diffraction. This has a positive effect on the electrical conductivity of the ICA through the widening of metallic contacts and decreased scattering of electrons at grain boundaries, and is explained by an electrochemical Ostwald ripening process. The effects of decoupling heat and humidity is investigated by storage at either 85°C or immersion in water. It is shown that the level of grain growth during the various post-curing treatments is dependent on the initial curing temperature.

  1. Probing Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides MX2 (M = Mo, W and X = S, Se) using Time-Domain Thermoreflectance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Puqing; Qian, Xin; Gu, Xiaokun; Yang, Ronggui

    2017-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are a group of layered 2D semiconductors that have shown many intriguing electrical and optical properties. However, the thermal transport properties in TMDs are not well understood due to the challenges in characterizing anisotropic thermal conductivity. Here, a variable-spot-size time-domain thermoreflectance approach is developed to simultaneously measure both the in-plane and the through-plane thermal conductivity of four kinds of layered TMDs (MoS2 , WS2 , MoSe2 , and WSe2 ) over a wide temperature range, 80-300 K. Interestingly, it is found that both the through-plane thermal conductivity and the Al/TMD interface conductance depend on the modulation frequency of the pump beam for all these four compounds. The frequency-dependent thermal properties are attributed to the nonequilibrium thermal resistance between the different groups of phonons in the substrate. A two-channel thermal model is used to analyze the nonequilibrium phonon transport and to derive the intrinsic thermal conductivity at the thermal equilibrium limit. The measurements of the thermal conductivities of bulk TMDs serve as an important benchmark for understanding the thermal conductivity of single- and few-layer TMDs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The effect of surface conductivity and adhesivity on the electrostatic manipulation condition for dielectric microparticles using a single probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Ryo; Hemthavy, Pasomphone; Takahashi, Kunio; Saito, Shigeki

    2016-05-01

    By clarifying the effect of surface conductivity and adhesivity on the electrostatic manipulation condition, a dielectric particle made of any material can be manipulated with surface conductivity. The manipulation system consists of three elements: a conductive probe as a manipulator, a conductive plate as a substrate, and a dielectric particle as the target object for manipulation. The particle can be successfully picked up/placed if a rectangular pulse voltage is applied between the probe and the plate. Four kinds of particle materials are used in the experiment: silica, soda-lime glass, polymethyl methacrylate coated by conductive polymer, and polystyrene coated by surfactant. The radius of each particle is 15 μm. A first-order resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit model is adopted to describe the effect of surface conductivity and adhesivity on the manipulation condition. The manipulation system is modeled as a series circuit consisting of a resistor and a capacitor by considering the surface conductivity. A detachment voltage is defined as the capacitance voltage to detach the particle adhered to the plate or probe. Parameters of the RC model, surface resistance, surface capacitance and detachment voltage are identified by a simulation and measurements. To verify the RC model, the particle’s behavior is observed by a high-speed camera, and the electrical current is measured by an electrometer. A manipulation experiment is demonstrated to show the effectiveness of the model. The particle reaction is observed for each duration and magnitude of the pulse voltage for the manipulation. The optimum pulse voltage for successful manipulation is determined by the parameters of the RC model as the standard. This knowledge is expected to expand the possibility of micro-fabrication technology.

  3. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  4. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of β-Ga2O3 at elevated temperatures: Effect of Sn and Fe dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slomski, M.; Blumenschein, N.; Paskov, P. P.; Muth, J. F.; Paskova, T.

    2017-06-01

    The thermal conductivity of undoped, Sn-doped, and Fe-doped β-Ga2O3 bulk crystals was measured by the 3ω technique in the temperature range of 295-410 K. A unique approach for extracting the thermal conductivity along the lateral and transverse heat flow directions was used in order to determine the thermal conductivity along different crystallographic directions. The data analysis at room temperature confirmed the expected anisotropy of the thermal conductivity of β-Ga2O3, revealing the highest value of ˜29 W/m K in the [010] direction. The thermal conductivity of the Sn-doped and Fe-doped β-Ga2O3 samples was found to be lower than that of the undoped samples due to the enhanced phonon-impurity scattering contribution, which reduces the thermal conductivity. This tendency was maintained for the thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. The thermal conductivity in all samples decreased with increasing temperature, but the slope of the temperature dependence was found to depend on both the doping and the crystallographic orientation.

  5. Laser-direct process of Cu nano-ink to coat highly conductive and adhesive metallization patterns on plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hyungsuk; Lee, Byoungyoon; Jeong, Sooncheol; Lee, Myeongkyu

    2016-05-01

    We here present a simple, low-cost laser-direct process to fabricate conductive Cu patterns on plastic substrate. A Cu nano-ink was synthesized using Cu formate as a precursor. The Cu ink spin-coated on a polyimide substrate was selectively sintered using a pulsed ultraviolet laser beam. The unexposed regions of the coated ink could be removed by rinsing the whole film in the dispersion agent of the synthesized ink, which revealed a conductive Cu pattern. This allowed sintering and patterning to be simultaneously accomplished, with a minimum line width of ~20 μm available. The fabricated pattern remained strongly adhesive to the substrate and exhibited only a slight increase in resistance even after 1000 bending cycles to a radius of curvature of 4.8 mm.

  6. Silver nanowire based flexible electrodes with improved properties: High conductivity, transparency, adhesion and low haze

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran Kumar, A.B.V.; Wan Bae, Chang; Piao, Longhai Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract illustrates the schematic representation of the main drawbacks and rectifications for AgNWs based transparent electrodes. - Highlights: • Films exhibited low sheet resistance and optical properties with R{sub s} ≤ 30 Ω/□ and T ≥ 90%. • We decreased haze to 2% by controlling AgNWs length, diameter, and concentration. • We achieved good adhesion for AgNWs on PET film. • There is no significant change in resistance in the bending angle from 0° to 180°, and on twisting. - Abstract: Recent work has been focusing on solution processable transparent electrodes for various applications including solar cells and displays. As well as, the research aims majorly at silver nanowires (AgNWs) to replace ITO. We enhance the transparent electrode performance as a function of optical and mechanical properties with low sheet resistance, by controlling the AgNWs accept ratios, ink composition, and processing conditions. The nanowire network of transparent films agrees with the 2D percolation law. The film transmittance values at 550 nm are coping with a reference ITO film. Sheet resistance and haze values are suitable for flexible electronic applications. We fabricate transparent flexible film using a low-cost processing technique.

  7. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of black phosphorus nanoribbons at temperatures higher than 100 K.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwook; Yang, Fan; Suh, Joonki; Yang, Sijie; Lee, Yeonbae; Li, Guo; Sung Choe, Hwan; Suslu, Aslihan; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Park, Joonsuk; Liu, Kai; Li, Jingbo; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Urban, Jeffrey J; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2015-10-16

    Black phosphorus attracts enormous attention as a promising layered material for electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. Here we report large anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons along the zigzag and armchair lattice directions at variable temperatures. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out under the condition of steady-state longitudinal heat flow using suspended-pad micro-devices. We discovered increasing thermal conductivity anisotropy, up to a factor of two, with temperatures above 100 K. A size effect in thermal conductivity was also observed in which thinner nanoribbons show lower thermal conductivity. Analysed with the relaxation time approximation model using phonon dispersions obtained based on density function perturbation theory, the high anisotropy is attributed mainly to direction-dependent phonon dispersion and partially to phonon-phonon scattering. Our results revealing the intrinsic, orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of black phosphorus are useful for designing devices, as well as understanding fundamental physical properties of layered materials.

  8. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of black phosphorus nanoribbons at temperatures higher than 100 K

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangwook; Yang, Fan; Suh, Joonki; Yang, Sijie; Lee, Yeonbae; Li, Guo; Sung Choe, Hwan; Suslu, Aslihan; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Park, Joonsuk; Liu, Kai; Li, Jingbo; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus attracts enormous attention as a promising layered material for electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. Here we report large anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons along the zigzag and armchair lattice directions at variable temperatures. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out under the condition of steady-state longitudinal heat flow using suspended-pad micro-devices. We discovered increasing thermal conductivity anisotropy, up to a factor of two, with temperatures above 100 K. A size effect in thermal conductivity was also observed in which thinner nanoribbons show lower thermal conductivity. Analysed with the relaxation time approximation model using phonon dispersions obtained based on density function perturbation theory, the high anisotropy is attributed mainly to direction-dependent phonon dispersion and partially to phonon–phonon scattering. Our results revealing the intrinsic, orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of black phosphorus are useful for designing devices, as well as understanding fundamental physical properties of layered materials. PMID:26472285

  9. Particle Arrangement Design for Predicting the Percolation Threshold of Silver/Epoxy Composite for Electrically Conductive Adhesive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkarnain, M.; Husaini, Muhammad; Mariatti, M.; Azid, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The early use of electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) provided an alternative to solder because of their several advantages, such as good electrical conductivity, low cost, extendability to fine pitch of interconnecting material and environmental friendliness. According to previous works, an optimal particle volume fraction became a major objective of many researchers in order to obtain highly conductive ECAs, realizing that the need for transitions from an insulator to a conductor is controlled by the geometric arrangement of particles. In the current study, particle arrangement models of ECAs are developed by establishing the effects of van der Waals' attraction energy and particle motion, which act as a kind of particle interaction to generate a conducting structure. The methodology is divided into three major parts: the formulation of a particle arrangement technique, and numerical and experimental studies. The formulation of particle arrangement is developed in an epoxy colloidal system. During verification, the particle arrangement model is validated by the theoretical fractal dimension and guided by a morphological study of the experimental assessments. The model was simulated through representative volume elements with the volume fraction factor, which was set in the range of 2-8 vol.%, while electrical conductivity was an observed parameter. The numerical results showed good agreement with the experiments in which the percolation threshold occurred between 4 and 6% of the volume of filler loading.

  10. Enhanced adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells on conductive PANI-PCL fiber scaffold by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yumei; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Chuying; Qiu, Fangping; Sun, Bolun; Ji, He; Qiu, Ju; Wang, Ce

    2017-03-01

    Recently, electrically conductive biomaterial scaffolds have shown great potential in tissue regeneration. Herein, we reported an electrically conductive polyaniline (PANI) coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) electrospun micron-fiber scaffold for the enhanced attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under electrical stimulation conditions. After the O2 plasma treatment toward PCL electrospun fiber, PANI could be polymerized onto their surfaces successfully. The obtained PANI-PCL fibers were characterized by SEM observations, FT-IR spectra, XPS analysis, and water contact angle measurement. The mechanical tests indicated that the fibers could satisfy the practical vascular scaffold requirements. The conductivity of the PANI-PCL fibers was 6.71×10(-3)S/cm which could provide a conductive in-vitro platform to study the effect of electrical stimulation on HUVECs proliferation. When PANI-coated PCL fibers were compared with PCL fibers, HUVECs exhibited highly enhanced adhesion and viability, especially under electrical stimulation (ES) of 200, 300, and 400mV/cm. Proliferation of HUVECs on PANI-PCL fibers was strongly dependent on electrical stimulation intensity. The results showed new insights into conductive scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Relation of thermal conductivity with process induced anisotropic void system in EB-PVD PYSZ thermal barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria, A. F.; Saruhan, B.; Ilavsky, J.; German Aerospace Center

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by Electron-beam physical deposition (EB-PVD) protect the turbine blades situated at the high pressure sector of the aircraft and stationary turbines. It is an important task to uphold low thermal conductivity in TBCs during long-term service at elevated temperatures. One of the most promising methods to fulfil this task is to optimize the properties of PYSZ-based ,TBC by tailoring its microstructure. Thermal conductivity of the EB-PVD produced PYSZ TBCs is influenced mainly by the size, shape, orientation and volume of the various types of porosity present in the coatings. These pores can be classified as open (inter-columnar and between feather arms gaps) and closed (intra-columnar pores). Since such pores are located within the three-dimensionally deposited columns and enclose large differences in their sizes, shapes, distribution and anisotropy, the accessibility for their characterization is very complex and requires the use of sophisticated methods. In this work, three different EB-PVD TBC microstructures were manufactured by varying the process parameters, yielding various characteristics of their pores. The corresponding thermal conductivities in as-coated state and after ageing at 1100C/1h and 100h were measured via Laser Flash Analysis Method (LFA). The pore characteristics and their individual effect on the thermal conductivity are analysed by USAXS which is supported by subsequent modelling and LFA methods, respectively. Evident differences in the thermal conductivity values of each microstructure were found in as-coated and aged conditions. In summary, broader columns introduce higher values in thermal conductivity. In general, thermal conductivity increases after ageing for all three investigated microstructures, although those with initial smaller pore surface area show smaller changes.

  12. Relation of Thermal Conductivity with Process Induced Anisotropic Void Systems in EB-PVD PYSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria, A. Flores; Saruhan-Brings, B.; Ilavsky, J.

    2008-03-03

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by Electron-beam physical deposition (EB-PVD) protect the turbine blades situated at the high pressure sector of the aircraft and stationary turbines. It is an important task to uphold low thermal conductivity in TBCs during long-term service at elevated temperatures. One of the most promising methods to fulfil this task is to optimize the properties of PYSZ-based TBC by tailoring its microstructure. Thermal conductivity of the EB-PVD produced PYSZ TBCs is influenced mainly by the size, shape, orientation and volume of the various types of porosity present in the coatings. These pores can be classified as open (inter-columnar and between feather arms gaps) and closed (intra-columnar pores). Since such pores are located within the three-dimensionally deposited columns and enclose large differences in their sizes, shapes, distribution and anisotropy, the accessibility for their characterization is very complex and requires the use of sophisticated methods. In this work, three different EB-PVD TBC microstructures were manufactured by varying the process parameters, yielding various characteristics of their pores. The corresponding thermal conductivities in as-coated state and after ageing at 11000C/1h and 100h were measured via Laser Flash Analysis Method (LFA). The pore characteristics and their individual effect on the thermal conductivity are analysed by USAXS which is supported by subsequent modelling and LFA methods, respectively. Evident differences in the thermal conductivity values of each microstructure were found in as-coated and aged conditions. In summary, broader columns introduce higher values in thermal conductivity. In general, thermal conductivity increases after ageing for all three investigated microstructures, although those with initial smaller pore surface area show smaller changes.

  13. An Engineered Anisotropic Nanofilm with Unidirectional Wetting Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    ARTICLES PUBLISHED ONLINE: 10 OCTOBER 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT2864 An engineered anisotropic nanofilm with unidirectional wetting properties Niranjan...body3. Engineering synthetic materials with such anisotropic adhesive properties has led to advances in digitalmicrofluidic devices5,6 andmedicine7,8...The anisotropic wetting properties of existing engineered surfaces are derived either from spatial gradients (for example, temperature, surface

  14. Anisotropic lattice thermal conductivity in three-fold degeneracy topological semimetal MoP: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Guo, San-Dong

    2017-08-30

    Recently, three-component new fermions in topological semimetal MoP are experimentally observed (2017 Nature 546 627), which may have potential applications like topological qubits, low-power electronics and spintronics. These are closely related to thermal transport properties of MoP. In this work, the phonon transport of MoP is investigated by solving the linearized phonon Boltzmann equation within the single-mode relaxation time approximation (RTA). The calculated room-temperature lattice thermal conductivity is 18.41 [Formula: see text] and 34.71 [Formula: see text] along the in- and cross-plane directions, exhibiting very strong anisotropy. The isotope and size effects on the lattice thermal conductivity are also considered. It is found that isotope scattering produces little effect, and phonon has little contribution to the lattice thermal conductivity, when phonon mean free path (MFP) is larger than 0.15 [Formula: see text] at 300 K. It is noted that average room-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of MoP is lower than that of representative Weyl semimetal TaAs, which is due to smaller group velocities and larger Grüneisen parameters. Our works provide valuable informations for the thermal management of MoP-based nano-electronics devices, and motivate further experimental works to study thermal transport of MoP.

  15. Thermal conductivity calculation in anisotropic crystals by molecular dynamics: Application to α-Fe2O3.

    PubMed

    Severin, Jonathan; Jund, Philippe

    2017-02-07

    In this work, we aim to study the thermal properties of materials using classical molecular dynamics simulations and specialized numerical methods. We focus primarily on the thermal conductivity κ using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) to study the response of a crystalline solid, namely hematite (α-Fe2O3), to an imposed heat flux as is the case in real life applications. We present a methodology for the calculation of κ as well as an adapted potential for hematite. Taking into account the size of the simulation box, we show that not only the longitudinal size (in the direction of the heat flux) but also the transverse size plays a role in the determination of κ and should be converged properly in order to have reliable results. Moreover we propose a comparison of thermal conductivity calculations in two different crystallographic directions to highlight the spatial anisotropy and we investigate the non-linear temperature behavior typically observed in NEMD methods.

  16. Thermal conductivity calculation in anisotropic crystals by molecular dynamics: Application to α-Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, Jonathan; Jund, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we aim to study the thermal properties of materials using classical molecular dynamics simulations and specialized numerical methods. We focus primarily on the thermal conductivity κ using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) to study the response of a crystalline solid, namely hematite (α -Fe2O3 ), to an imposed heat flux as is the case in real life applications. We present a methodology for the calculation of κ as well as an adapted potential for hematite. Taking into account the size of the simulation box, we show that not only the longitudinal size (in the direction of the heat flux) but also the transverse size plays a role in the determination of κ and should be converged properly in order to have reliable results. Moreover we propose a comparison of thermal conductivity calculations in two different crystallographic directions to highlight the spatial anisotropy and we investigate the non-linear temperature behavior typically observed in NEMD methods.

  17. Adhesion to Carbon Nanotube Conductive Scaffolds Forces Action-Potential Appearance in Immature Rat Spinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies. PMID:23951361

  18. Adhesion to carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds forces action-potential appearance in immature rat spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Sucapane, Antonietta; Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies.

  19. Adhesion, Modulus and Thermal Conductivity of Porous Epoxy Film on Silicon Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2016-11-01

    An 8 μm epoxy film deposited on a 350 μm Si (100) Si wafer with a 0.4 μm Au transducer film deposited on top of the polymer film was used to evaluate the thermal conductivity, the modulus of the porous film, and the initiation of spalling upon laser beam irradiation on the back side of the Si wafer. The polymer films were characterized for pore microstructure using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The polymer films were characterized using transient thermo reflectance (TTR) with laser beams illuminating the Au layer. The TTR signal from the polymer film showed only the thermal component and was characteristic of variations associated with thermal conduction into the film. To induce spalling, the back side was illuminated with a Nd-YAG laser beam with a 532 nm wavelength, pulse energy density 1.8 J/cm2, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz for 10 s in conjunction with TTR measurements on the front side. The TTR signal from the polymer film subjected to laser beam incidence from the backside of the Si wafer showed both the thermal and the acoustic components. The acoustic component was used to detect the initial stages of spalling or delamination. The acoustic oscillations were modeled using a modified wave equation to determine the velocity of sound and the modulus of the film. The results were also used to determine the effect of porosity on the modulus of the polymer film. The TTR signal was found to be very sensitive to detection of delamination without complete separation of the film.

  20. Fatigue study and improve reliability of cantilever type micro piezoelectric energy harvesters reinforced with flexible adhesive conductive tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. K.; Hsieh, Y. C.; Chen, C. T.; Chen, J. J.; Wu, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    Cantilever type piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH) is widely adopted in the design of vibration energy harvesters because of simple, effective and easy to fabricate. When the PEH is working under excitation of continuous vibration sources, like mounting on motors, reliability and durability is a major concern. The failure mode and fatigue issues will be important design considerations in field applications. Since the largest strain of a cantilever structure is located in the clamping position of fixed end, the location is therefore the weakest point of the structure and the hot zone of mechanical cracks. The failure mode due to fatigue under long time excitation of vibration sources is typically continuously developing small cracks on the piezoelectric PZT films till tearing the surface electrodes and caused open circuit to the output circuitry. Therefore, extending the lifetime with minimize the surface electrodes cracking becomes a key point for field applications. Previously, we focused on the output performance of PEH. At PowerMEMS 2014 [1], we presented a high performance PEH based on PZT thin films fabricated with a homemade PZT deposition equipment on stainless steel substrates. We confirmed that the stainless steel based PEH can generate better output power than silicon based devices under the same vibration excitation levels, and also the stainless based PEH can have longer lifetime when excited at higher vibration levels due to better mechanical strength. In this study, we tried to further reinforce the PEH with a conductive adhesive tape sticking on the surface electrode near the clamping position. We investigated the change of failure mode and mechanical behaviors, including the frequency bandwidth and non-linearity of the piezoelectric energy harvester. The PEH devices was mounted on a shaker for long time testing with vibration frequency set around 120Hz at 0.5g, 0.6g, and 0.7g acceleration vibration levels. The electrodes of the PEH device were

  1. Entropy-Driven Pt3Co Nanocube Assembles and Thermally Mediated Electrical Conductivity with Anisotropic Variation of the Rhombohedral Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Jinlong; Li, Ruipeng; Fang, Jiye; Wang, Zhongwu

    2017-01-11

    Understanding the shape-dependent superlattices and resultant anisotropies of both structure and property allows for rational design of materials processing and engineering to fabricate transformative materials with useful properties for applications. This work shows the structural evolution from square lattice of two-dimensional (2D) thin film to rhombic lattice of large three-dimensional (3D) assembles of Pt3Co nanocubes (NCs). Synchrotron-based X-ray supercrystallography determines the superlattice of large 3D supercrystal into an obtuse rhombohedral (Rh) symmetry, which holds a long-range coherence of both NC translation and atomic crystallographic orientation. The Rh superlattice has a trigonal cell angle of 104°, and the constitute NCs orient their atomic Pt3Co(111) planes to the superlattice Rh[111] direction. The temperature-dependent in situ small and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) measurements reveal a thermally induced superlattice contraction of supercrystal, which maintains translational ordering but slightly develops orientational disordering. The observed increases of both the packing density and the rotation magnitude of NCs indicate a rational compromise between configurational and rotational entropies of NCs. The resultant minimization of the total free energy is responsible for the formation and stability of the obtuse Rh superlattice. The temperature-dependent in situ measurements of SAXS and electrical resistance reveal that, in conjunction with the thermally induced sharp contraction of superlattice at 160 °C, the supercrystal becomes measurable of electrical resistance, which was followed by a temperature-dependent linear increase. Upon rapid annealing from 250 °C, the supercrystal remains almost constant in both structure and electrical resistance. The heating-enabled electrical conductivity of the supercrystal at high temperature implies the formation of a NC-interconnected architecture. The experiments and overall analysis

  2. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications.Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to

  3. Calculation of effective conductivity of 2D and 3D composite materials with anisotropic constituents and different inclusion shapes in Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Muñoz, José Luis; Bravo-Castillero, Julián

    2008-08-01

    The study of the effective properties of composite materials with anisotropic constituents and different inclusion shapes has motivated the development of the Mathematica 6.0 package "CompositeMaterials". This package can be used to calculate the effective anisotropic conductivity tensor of two-phase composites. Any fiber cross section, even percolating ones, can be studied in the 2D composites. "Rectangular Prism" and "Ellipsoidal" inclusion shapes with arbitrary orientations can be investigated in the 3D composites. This package combines the Asymptotic Homogenization Method and the Finite Element Method in order to obtain the effective conductivity tensor. The commands and options of the package are illustrated with two sample applications for two- and three-dimensional composites. Program summaryProgram title:CompositeMaterials Catalogue identifier:AEAU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAU_v1_0.html Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:132 183 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:1 334 908 Distribution format:tar.gz Programming language:Mathematica 6.0 Computer:Any that can run Mathematica 6.0 and where the open-source free C-programs Triangle ( http://www.cs.cmu.edu/ quake/triangle.html) and TetGen ( http://tetgen.berlios.de/) can be compiled and executed. Tested in Intel Pentium computers. Operating system:Any that can run Mathematica 6.0 and where the open-source free C-programs Triangle ( http://www.cs.cmu.edu/ quake/triangle.html) and TetGen ( http://tetgen.berlios.de/) can be compiled and executed. Tested in Windows XP. RAM:Small two-dimensional calculations require less than 100 MB. Large three-dimensional calculations require 500 MB or more. Classification:7.9 External routines:One Mathematica Add-on and

  4. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  5. Long-Term Stable Adhesion for Conducting Polymers in Biomedical Applications: IrOx and Nanostructured Platinum Solve the Chronic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Boehler, Christian; Oberueber, Felix; Schlabach, Sabine; Stieglitz, Thomas; Asplund, Maria

    2017-01-11

    Conducting polymers (CPs) have frequently been described as outstanding coating materials for neural microelectrodes, providing significantly reduced impedance or higher charge injection compared to pure metals. Usability has until now, however, been limited by poor adhesion of polymers like poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to metallic substrates, ultimately precluding long-term applications. The aim of this study was to overcome this weakness of CPs by introducing two novel adhesion improvement strategies that can easily be integrated with standard microelectrode fabrication processes. Iridium Oxide (IrOx) demonstrated exceptional stability for PEDOT coatings, resulting in polymer survival over 10 000 redox cycles and 110 days under accelerated aging conditions at 60 °C. Nanostructured Pt was furthermore introduced as a purely mechanical adhesion promoter providing 10-fold adhesion improvement compared to smooth Pt substrates by simply altering the morphology of Pt. This layer can be realized in a very simple process that is compatible with any electrode design, turning nanostructured Pt into a universal adhesion layer for CP coatings. By the introduction of these adhesion-promoting strategies, the weakness of CP-based neural probes can ultimately be eliminated and true long-term stable use of PEDOT on neural probes will be possible in future electrode generations.

  6. Applying distributions of hydraulic conductivity for anisotropic systems and applications to Tc Transport at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Allen G Hunt

    2008-06-09

    43Tc99 is spreading mostly laterally through the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site sediments. At higher tensions in the unsaturated zone, the hydraulic conductivity may be strongly anisotropic as a consequence of finer soils to retain more water than coarser ones, and for these soils to have been deposited primarily in horizontal structures. We have tried to develop a consistent modeling procedure that could predict the behavior of Tc plumes. Our procedure consists of: (1) Adapting existing numerical recipes based on critical path analysis to calculate the hydraulic conductivity, K, as a function of tension, h, (2) Statistically correlating the predicted K at various values of the tension with fine content, (3) Seeking a tension value, for which the anisotropy and the horizontal K values are both sufficiently large to accommodate multi-kilometer spreading, (4) Predicting the distribution of K values for vertical flow as a function of system support volume, (5) Comparing the largest likely K value in the vertical direction with the expected K in the horizontal direction, (6) Finding the length scale at which the two K values are roughly equal, (7) Comparing that length scale with the horizontal spreading of the plume. We find that our predictions of the value of the tension at which the principle spreading is likely occurring compares very well with experiment. However, we seem to underestimate the physical length scale at which the predominantly horizontal spreading begins to take on significant vertical characteristics. Our data and predictions would seem to indicate that this should happen after horizontal transport of somewhat over a km, but the chiefly horizontal transport appears to continue out to scales of 10km or so.

  7. An adhesive conducting electrode material based on commercial mesoporous titanium dioxide as a support for Horseradish peroxidase for bioelectrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Rahemi, Vanoushe; Trashin, Stanislav; Meynen, Vera; De Wael, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    An adhesive conducting electrode material containing of graphite, biocompatible ion exchange polymer nafion(®) and commercial mesoporous TiO2 impregnated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is prepared and characterized by amperometric, UV-vis and N2 sorption methods. The factors influencing the performance of the resulting biosensor are studied in detail. The optimal electrode material consists of 45% graphite, 50% impregnated HRP-TiO2 and 5% nafion(®). The optimum conditions for H2O2 reduction are an applied potential of -0.3 V and 0.1 mM hydroquinone. Sensitivity and limit of detection in the optimum conditions are 1 A M(-1) cm(-2) and 1 µM correspondingly. The N2 sorption results show that the pore volume of TiO2 decreases sharply upon adsorption of HRP. The preparation process of the proposed enzyme electrode is straightforward and potentially can be used for preparation of carbon paste electrodes for bioelectrochemical detections.

  8. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-21

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A 'stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications.

  9. Bioinspired, Highly Stretchable, and Conductive Dry Adhesives Based on 1D-2D Hybrid Carbon Nanocomposites for All-in-One ECG Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Junyong; Sohn, Jongmoo; Cho, Donghwi; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2016-04-26

    Here we propose a concept of conductive dry adhesives (CDA) combining a gecko-inspired hierarchical structure and an elastomeric carbon nanocomposite. To complement the poor electrical percolation of 1D carbon nanotube (CNT) networks in an elastomeric matrix at a low filler content (∼1 wt %), a higher dimensional carbon material (i.e., carbon black, nanographite, and graphene nanopowder) is added into the mixture as an aid filler. The co-doped graphene and CNT in the composite show the lowest volume resistance (∼100 ohm·cm) at an optimized filler ratio (1:9, total filler content: 1 wt %) through a synergetic effect in electrical percolation. With an optimized conductive elastomer, gecko-inspired high-aspect-ratio (>3) microstructures over a large area (∼4 in.(2)) are successfully replicated from intaglio-patterned molds without collapse. The resultant CDA pad shows a high normal adhesion force (∼1.3 N/cm(2)) even on rough human skin and an excellent cycling property for repeatable use over 30 times without degradation of adhesion force, which cannot be achieved by commercial wet adhesives. The body-attachable CDA can be used as a metal-free, all-in-one component for measuring biosignals under daily activity conditions (i.e., underwater, movements) because of its superior conformality and water-repellent characteristic.

  10. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  11. Printed highly conductive Cu films with strong adhesion enabled by low-energy photonic sintering on low-Tg flexible plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinzhou; Shao, Shuangshuang; Chen, Zheng; Cui, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Copper (Cu) films and circuits were fabricated by screen-printing Cu nanoink on low-Tg (glass transition temperature) flexible plastic substrates (PEN and PET) instead of widely used high-Tg polyimide (PI) substrate. Photonic sintering of printed Cu films was carried out using intensive pulsed light (IPL). Low resistivities of 28 μΩ · cm on PEN and 44 μΩ · cm on PET were obtained without damaging the substrates. The sintered Cu films exhibited strong adhesion to PEN and PET substrates, with measured adhesion strength of 5B by the ASTM D3359 international standard, whereas the top part of the copper film on the PI substrate was stripped off during the adhesion test. The sintered Cu films also showed excellent stability in harsh conditions and mechanical flexibility in rolling tests. The underlying mechanisms of the high conductivity and strong adhesion on PEN and PET substrates with low-energy IPL sintering were investigated. Simple circuits and radio frequency identification antennas were made by screen-printing Cu nanoink and IPL sintering, demonstrating the technique’s feasibility for practical applications.

  12. Printed highly conductive Cu films with strong adhesion enabled by low-energy photonic sintering on low-Tg flexible plastic substrate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinzhou; Shao, Shuangshuang; Chen, Zheng; Cui, Zheng

    2017-01-20

    Copper (Cu) films and circuits were fabricated by screen-printing Cu nanoink on low-Tg (glass transition temperature) flexible plastic substrates (PEN and PET) instead of widely used high-Tg polyimide (PI) substrate. Photonic sintering of printed Cu films was carried out using intensive pulsed light (IPL). Low resistivities of 28 μΩ · cm on PEN and 44 μΩ · cm on PET were obtained without damaging the substrates. The sintered Cu films exhibited strong adhesion to PEN and PET substrates, with measured adhesion strength of 5B by the ASTM D3359 international standard, whereas the top part of the copper film on the PI substrate was stripped off during the adhesion test. The sintered Cu films also showed excellent stability in harsh conditions and mechanical flexibility in rolling tests. The underlying mechanisms of the high conductivity and strong adhesion on PEN and PET substrates with low-energy IPL sintering were investigated. Simple circuits and radio frequency identification antennas were made by screen-printing Cu nanoink and IPL sintering, demonstrating the technique's feasibility for practical applications.

  13. Asymptotic analysis of solution to the nonlinear problem of non-stationary heat conductivity of layered anisotropic non-uniform shells at low Biot numbers on the front surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovskii, A. P.

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear problem of non-stationary heat conductivity of the layered anisotropic heat-sensitive shells was formulated taking into account the linear dependence of thermal-physical characteristics of the materials of phase compositions on the temperature. The initial-boundary-value problem is formulated in the dimensionless form, and four small parameters are identified: thermal-physical, characterizing the degree of heat sensitivity of the layer material; geometric, characterizing the relative thickness of the thin-walled structure, and two small Biot numbers on the front surfaces of shells. A sequential recursion of dimensionless equations is carried out, at first, using the thermalphysical small parameter, then, small Biot numbers and, finally, geometrical small parameter. The first type of recursion allowed us to linearize the problem of heat conductivity, and on the basis of two latter types of recursion, the outer asymptotic expansion of solution to the problem of non-stationary heat conductivity of the layered anisotropic non-uniform shells and plates under boundary conditions of the II and III kind and small Biot numbers on the facial surfaces was built, taking into account heat sensitivity of the layer materials. The resulting two-dimensional boundary problems were analyzed, and asymptotic properties of solutions to the heat conductivity problem were studied. The physical explanation was given to some aspects of asymptotic temperature decomposition.

  14. Wood : adhesives

    Treesearch

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  15. Enhancement of neurite adhesion, alignment and elongation on conductive polypyrrole-poly(lactide acid) fibers with cell-derived extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingxing; Yang, Anneng; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Jin, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) can promote peripheral nerve repair. In this study, a conductive fiber-film (CFF) with core-sheath structure and conductivity of ∼10Scm(-1) was prepared by electrospinning of aligned poly(l-lactide acid) (PLLA) fibers and electrochemical deposition of polypyrole (PPy) nanoparticles. Then the multiple components of ECM, including laminin, fibronectin and collagen, were coated on the surface of CFF by culturing and lysing L929 cells to fabricate the bioactive scaffold of ECM-linked CFF (ECM-CFF). The electrical stimulation (ES) of 100mV/cm for 14days and 2h per day did not significantly decrease the conductivity of ECM-CFF. The results of PC12 cells test indicated that, cells adhesion rate, neurite-bearing cell rate and neurite alignment rate on ECM-CFF were ∼95%, ∼77%, ∼70%, respectively, significantly larger than the corresponding values on bare CFF (17%, 29% and 14%, respectively). The neurites length on ECM-CFF (∼79mm) was also larger than that on bare CFF (∼25mm). ES of 100mV/cm onto PC12 cells through ECM-CFF could significantly promote neurite extension in first 3days of the neurite growth. These results indicated that, the combination of ECM-CFF with ES could improve the nerve regeneration by encouraging neural-cell adhesion, neurite growth and extension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Electro-Conductive Polymeric Nanowire Templates Facilitates In Vitro C17.2 Neural Stem Cell Line Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Samuel; Wadman, Lucas; Popat, Ketul C.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells still remain one of the most exciting and lucrative options for treatment of variety of nervous system disorders and diseases. Although there are neural stem cells present in adults, the ability of both the peripheral and central nervous system for self-repair is limited at best. As such, there is a great need for a tissue engineering approach to solve nervous system disorders and diseases. In this study, we have developed electrically conductive surfaces with controlled arrays of high aspect ratio nanowires for the growth and maintenance of neural stem cells. The nanowire surfaces were fabricated from polycaprolactone using a novelnanotemplating technique, and were coated with an electrically conductive polymer, polypyrrole. The polypyrrole coated nanowire surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Additionally, the surface resistance of polypyrrole coated nanowire surfaces was measured. C17.2 neural stem cells were used to evaluate the efficacy of the polypyrrole coated nanowire surfaces to promote cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The results presented here indicate significantly higher cellular adhesion and proliferation on polypyrrole coated nanowire surfaces as compared to control surfaces. The differentiation potential of polypyrrole nanowire surfaces was also evaluated by immunostaining key neuronal markers that are expressed when NSCs differentiate into their respective neural lineages. PMID:21530693

  17. Design and fabrication of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kejia; Tian, Yu; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Puthoff, Jonathan; Autumn, Kellar; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-04-03

    Recently, there has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties; the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this study, we present an easy, scalable method, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques, to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provides anisotropic adhesion properties. We measured the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function. Consistent with the peel zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. The tribological properties of the synthetic arrays were highly anisotropic, reminiscent of the frictional adhesion behavior of gecko setal arrays. When a 60° tilt sample was actuated in the gripping direction, a static adhesion strength of ~1.4 N/cm(2) and a static friction strength of ~5.4 N/cm(2) were obtained. In contrast, when the dry adhesive was actuated in the releasing direction, we measured an initial repulsive normal force and negligible friction.

  18. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  19. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome The Digestive System & How it Works Abdominal Adhesions What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that ... or stool through the intestines. What causes abdominal adhesions? Abdominal surgery is the most frequent cause of ...

  20. Anisotropic electrical and thermal conductivity in Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ [AE = Ca, Sr1-xBax (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0)] single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Song-Tao; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Xiong, Ye; Lv, Yang-Yang; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ (AE represents alkaline earth), constructed by stacking of rock-salt Bi2AE2O4 and triangle CoO2 layers alternatively along c-axis, is one of promising thermoelectric oxides. The most impressive feature of Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ, as reported previously, is their electrical conductivity mainly lying along CoO2 plane, adjusting Bi2AE2O4 layer simultaneously manipulates both thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. It in turn optimizes thermoelectric performance of these materials. In this work, we characterize the anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivity along both ab-plane and c-direction of Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba, Sr1-xBax) single crystals. The results substantiate that isovalence replacement in Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ remarkably modifies their electrical property along ab-plane; while their thermal conductivity along ab-plane only has a slightly difference. At the same time, both the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity along c-axis of these materials also have dramatic changes. Certainly, the electrical resistance along c-axis is too high to be used as thermoelectric applications. These results suggest that adjusting nano-block Bi2AE2O4 layer in Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ cannot modify the thermal conductivity along high electrical conductivity plane (ab-plane here). The evolution of electrical property is discussed by Anderson localization and electron-electron interaction U. And the modification of thermal conductivity along c-axis is attributed to the microstructure difference. This work sheds more light on the manipulation of the thermal and electrical conductivity in the layered thermoelectric materials.

  1. Wood adhesion and adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    An appreciation of rheology, material science, organic chemistry, polymer science, and mechanics leads to better understanding of the factors controlling the performance of the bonded assemblies. Given the complexity of wood as a substrate, it is hard to understand why some wood adhesives work better than other wood adhesives, especially when under the more severe...

  2. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  3. Conducting-polymer nanotubes improve electrical properties, mechanical adhesion, neural attachment, and neurite outgrowth of neural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Abidian, Mohammad Reza; Corey, Joseph M; Kipke, Daryl R; Martin, David C

    2010-02-05

    An in vitro comparison of conducting-polymer nanotubes of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly(pyrrole) (PPy) and to their film counterparts is reported. Impedance, charge-capacity density (CCD), tendency towards delamination, and neurite outgrowth are compared. For the same deposition charge density, PPy films and nanotubes grow relatively faster vertically, while PEDOT films and nanotubes grow more laterally. For the same deposition charge density (1.44 C cm(-2)), PPy nanotubes and PEDOT nanotubes have lower impedance (19.5 +/- 2.1 kOmega for PPy nanotubes and 2.5 +/- 1.4 kOmega for PEDOT nanotubes at 1 kHz) and higher CCD (184 +/- 5.3 mC cm(-2) for PPy nanotubes and 392 +/- 6.2 mC cm(-2) for PEDOT nanotubes) compared to their film counterparts. However, PEDOT nanotubes decrease the impedance of neural-electrode sites by about two orders of magnitude (bare iridium 468.8 +/- 13.3 kOmega at 1 kHz) and increase capacity of charge density by about three orders of magnitude (bare iridium 0.1 +/- 0.5 mC cm(-2)). During cyclic voltammetry measurements, both PPy and PEDOT nanotubes remain adherent on the surface of the silicon dioxide while PPy and PEDOT films delaminate. In experiments of primary neurons with conducting-polymer nanotubes, cultured dorsal root ganglion explants remain more intact and exhibit longer neurites (1400 +/- 95 microm for PPy nanotubes and 2100 +/- 150 microm for PEDOT nanotubes) than their film counterparts. These findings suggest that conducting-polymer nanotubes may improve the long-term function of neural microelectrodes.

  4. Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes Improve Electrical Properties, Mechanical Adhesion, Neural Attachment, and Neurite Outgrowth of Neural Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Abidian, Mohammad Reza; Corey, Joseph M.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Martin, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An in vitro comparison of conducting-polymer nanotubes of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly(pyrrole) (PPy) and to their film counterparts is reported. Impedance, charge-capacity density (CCD), tendency towards delamination, and neurite outgrowth are compared. For the same deposition charge density, PPy films and nanotubes grow relatively faster vertically, while PEDOT films and nanotubes grow more laterally. For the same deposition charge density (1.44 C cm–2), PPy nanotubes and PEDOT nanotubes have lower impedance (19.5 ± 2.1 kΩ for PPy nanotubes and 2.5 ± 1.4 kΩ for PEDOT nanotubes at 1 kHz) and higher CCD (184 ± 5.3 mC cm–2 for PPy nanotubes and 392 ± 6.2 mC cm–2 for PEDOT nanotubes) compared to their film counterparts. However, PEDOT nanotubes decrease the impedance of neural-electrode sites by about two orders of magnitude (bare iridium 468.8 ± 13.3 kΩ at 1 kHz) and increase capacity of charge density by about three orders of magnitude (bare iridium 0.1 ± 0.5 mC cm–2). During cyclic voltammetry measurements, both PPy and PEDOT nanotubes remain adherent on the surface of the silicon dioxide while PPy and PEDOT films delaminate. In experiments of primary neurons with conducting-polymer nanotubes, cultured dorsal root ganglion explants remain more intact and exhibit longer neurites (1400 ± 95 μm for PPy nanotubes and 2100 ± 150 μm for PEDOT nanotubes) than their film counterparts. These findings suggest that conducting-polymer nanotubes may improve the long-term function of neural microelectrodes. PMID:20077424

  5. Characterization of anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Hyeong; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    In an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial, the off-diagonal components of its effective mass density tensor should be considered in order to describe the anisotropic behavior produced by arbitrarily shaped inclusions. However, few studies have been carried out to characterize anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a method that uses the non-diagonal effective mass density tensor to determine the behavior of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. Our method accurately evaluates the effective properties of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials by separately dealing with slabs made of single and multiple unit cells along the thickness direction. To determine the effective properties, the reflection and transmission coefficients of an acoustic metamaterial slab are calculated, and then the wave vectors inside of the slab are determined using these coefficients. The effective material properties are finally determined by utilizing the spatial dispersion relation of the anisotropic acoustic metamaterial. Since the dispersion relation of an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial is explicitly used, its effective properties can be easily determined by only using a limited number of normal and oblique plane wave incidences into a metamaterial slab, unlike existing approaches requiring a large number of wave incidences. The validity of the proposed method is verified by conducting wave simulations for anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs with Z-shaped elastic inclusions of tilted principal material axes.

  6. Phase behavior of 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium fluorohydrogenate salts (C12MIm(FH)(n)F, n = 1.0-2.3) and their anisotropic ionic conductivity as ionic liquid crystal electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Hagiwara, Rika

    2012-08-23

    The effects of the HF composition, n, in 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium fluorohydrogenate salts (C(12)MIm(FH)(n)F, n = 1.0-2.3) on their physicochemical and structural properties have been investigated using infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, polarized optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and anisotropic ionic conductivity measurements. The phase diagram of C(12)MIm(FH)(n)F (n vs transition temperature) suggests that C(12)MIm(FH)(n)F is a mixed crystal system that has a boundary around n = 1.9. For all compositions, a liquid crystalline mesophase with a smectic A interdigitated bilayer structure is observed. The temperature range of the mesophase decreases with increasing n value (from 61.8 °C for C(12)MIm(FH)(1.0)F to 37.0 °C for C(12)MIm(FH)(2.3)F). The layer spacing of the smectic structure decreases with increasing n value or increasing temperature. Two structural types with different layer spacings are observed in the crystalline phase (type I, 1.0 ≤ n ≤ 1.9, and type II, 1.9 ≤ n ≤ 2.3). Ionic conductivities parallel and perpendicular to the smectic layers (σ(||) and σ([perpendicular])) increase with increasing n value, whereas the anisotropy of the ionic conductivities (σ(||)/σ([perpendicular])) is independent of the n value, since the thickness of the insulating sheet formed by the dodecyl group remains nearly unchanged.

  7. Modified carbon fibers to improve composite properties. [sizing fibers for reduced electrical conductivity and adhesion during combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepler, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thin coatings, 5 to 10 wt. percent, were applied to PAN-based carbon fibers. These coatings were intended to make the carbon fibers less electrically conductive or to cause fibers to stick together when a carbon fiber/epoxy composite burned. The effectiveness of the coatings in these regards was evaluated in burn tests with a test rig designed to simulate burning, impact and wind conditions which might release carbon fibers. The effect of the coatings on fiber and composite properties and handling was also investigated. Attempts at sizing carbon fibers with silicon dioxide, silicon carbide and boron nitride meet with varying degrees of success; however, none of these materials provided an electrically nonconductive coating. Coatings intended to stick carbon fibers together after a composite burned were sodium silicate, silica gel, ethyl silicate, boric acid and ammonium borate. Of these, only the sodium silicate and silica gel provided any sticking together of fibers. The amount of sticking was insufficient to achieve the desired objectives.

  8. Theoretical aspects for estimating anisotropic saturated hydraulic conductivity from in-well or direct-push probe injection tests in uniform media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Layton, Leif; Nemer, Bassel; Hatfield, Kirk; Mohseni, Ana

    2017-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivity and its anisotropy are fundamental aquifer properties for groundwater flow and transport modeling. Current in-well or direct-push field measurement techniques allow for relatively quick determination of general conductivity profiles with depth. However, capabilities for identifying local scale conductivities in the horizontal and vertical directions are very limited. Here, we develop the theoretical basis for estimating horizontal and vertical conductivities from different types of steady-state single-well/probe injection tests under saturated conditions and in the absence of a well skin. We explore existing solutions and a recent semi-analytical solution approach to the flow problem under the assumption that the aquifer is locally homogeneous. The methods are based on the collection of an additional piece of information in the form of a second injection (or recirculation) test at a same location, or in the form of an additional head or flow observation along the well/probe. Results are represented in dimensionless charts for partial validation against approximate solutions and for practical application to test interpretation. The charts further allow for optimization of a test configuration to maximize sensitivity to anisotropy ratio. The two methods most sensitive to anisotropy are found to be (1) subsequent injection from a lateral screen and from the bottom of an otherwise cased borehole, and (2) single injection from a lateral screen with an additional head observation along the casing. Results may also be relevant for attributing consistent divergences in conductivity measurements from different testing methods applied at a same site or location to the potential effects of anisotropy. Some practical aspects are discussed and references are made to existing methods, which appear easily compatible with the proposed procedures.

  9. One-Step Process for High-Performance, Adhesive, Flexible Transparent Conductive Films Based on p-Type Reduced Graphene Oxides and Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Ting; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2015-08-26

    This work demonstrates a one-step process to synthesize uniformly dispersed hybrid nanomaterial containing silver nanowires (AgNWs) and p-type reduced graphene (p-rGO). The hybrid nanomaterial was coated onto a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate for preparing high-performance flexible transparent conductive films (TCFs). The p-rGO plays the role of bridging discrete AgNWs, providing more electron holes and lowering the resistance of the contacted AgNWs; therefore, enhancing the electrical conductivity without sacrificing too much transparence of the TCFs. Additionally, the p-rGO also improves the adhesion between AgNWs and substrate by covering the AgNWs on the substrate tightly. The study shows that coating of the hybrid nanomaterials on the PET substrate demonstrates exceptional optoelectronic properties with a transmittance of 94.68% (at a wavelength of 550 nm) and a sheet resistance of 25.0 ± 0.8 Ω/sq. No significant variation in electric resistance can be detected even when the film was subjected to a bend loading with a radius of curvature of 5.0 mm or the film was loaded with a reciprocal tension or compression for 1000 cycles. Furthermore, both chemical corrosion resistance and haze effect were improved when p-rGO was introduced. The study shows that the fabricated flexible TCFs have the potential to replace indium tin oxide film in the optoelectronic industry.

  10. Determination of all relevant conduction electron scattering times in an exceptionally anisotropic arene conductor, the 12:7 pyrene hexafluoroantimonate radical cation salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, A.; Wokrina, T.; Pongs, B.; Dormann, E.

    2003-10-01

    For (pyrene)12(SbF6)7 a 104:1 anisotropy of the microwave conductivity is observed. We show that the timescale for the end of the one-dimensional motion of the conduction electron spins derived by analysis of the frequency and temperature dependence of the proton spin-lattice relaxation and of the electron spin resonance linewidth and relaxation times is governed to a comparable degree by perpendicular-to-stack hopping and by interaction with intrastack paramagnetic localized defects in these crystals. The electron spin self-diffusion coefficient derived for the magnetic field gradient parallel to the pyrene stacking direction is therefore influenced by perpendicular-to-stack motion as well.

  11. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  12. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  13. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (μ‧) of 8-16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30 000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10 000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10 000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of μ‧, along with a large shear force of ˜78 kPa, approaching the 88-226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry.

  14. Anisotropic Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarfoth, Ryan Gordon

    Anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces are a group of planar materials that can be modeled by the tensor impedance boundary condition. This boundary condition relates the electric and magnetic field components on a surface using a 2x2 tensor. The advantage of using the tensor impedance boundary condition, and by extension anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces, is that the method allows large and complex structures to be modeled quickly and accurately using a planar boundary condition. This thesis presents the theory of anisotropic impedance surfaces and multiple applications. Anisotropic impedance surfaces are a generalization of scalar impedance surfaces. Unlike the scalar version, anisotropic impedance surfaces have material properties that are dependent on the polarization and wave vector of electromagnetic radiation that interacts with the surface. This allows anisotropic impedance surfaces to be used for applications that scalar surfaces cannot achieve. Three of these applications are presented in this thesis. The first is an anisotropic surface wave waveguide which allows propagation in one direction, but passes radiation in the orthogonal direction without reflection. The second application is a surface wave beam shifter which splits a surface wave beam in two directions and reduces the scattering from an object placed on the surface. The third application is a patterned surface which can alter the scattered radiation pattern of a rectangular shape. For each application, anisotropic impedance surfaces are constructed using periodic unit cells. These unit cells are designed to give the desired surface impedance characteristics by modifying a patterned metallic patch on a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple unit cell geometries are analyzed in order to find the setup with the best performance in terms of impedance characteristics and frequency bandwidth.

  15. Anisotropic Nanoparticles and Anisotropic Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Nathan D; Vartanian, Ariane M; Abadeer, Nardine S; Grzincic, Elissa M; Jacob, Lisa M; Lin, Wayne; Li, Ji; Dennison, Jordan M; Hinman, Joshua G; Murphy, Catherine J

    2016-02-18

    Anisotropic nanoparticles are powerful building blocks for materials engineering. Unusual properties emerge with added anisotropy-often to an extraordinary degree-enabling countless new applications. For bottom-up assembly, anisotropy is crucial for programmability; isotropic particles lack directional interactions and can self-assemble only by basic packing rules. Anisotropic particles have long fascinated scientists, and their properties and assembly behavior have been the subjects of many theoretical studies over the years. However, only recently has experiment caught up with theory. We have begun to witness tremendous diversity in the synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled anisotropy. In this Perspective, we highlight the synthetic achievements that have galvanized the field, presenting a comprehensive discussion of the mechanisms and products of both seed-mediated and alternative growth methods. We also address recent breakthroughs and challenges in regiospecific functionalization, which is the next frontier in exploiting nanoparticle anisotropy.

  16. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  17. Anisotropic ray trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  18. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  19. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by 3 d transition-metal wires. We show that a gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symmetry filtering properties of the molecules. We further discuss how this molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance (MAMR) can be tuned by the proper choice of materials and their electronic properties.

  20. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  1. Waveguide structures in anisotropic nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the design and manufacturing parameters of waveguiding structures of anisotropic nonlinear crystals that are employed for harmonic conversions, using Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®). This technology enables a full range of predetermined refractive index differences that are essential for the design of single mode or low-mode propagation with high efficiency in anisotropic nonlinear crystals which in turn results in compact frequency conversion systems. Examples of nonlinear optical waveguides include periodically bonded walk-off corrected nonlinear optical waveguides and periodically poled waveguide components, such as lithium triborate (LBO), beta barium borate (β-BBO), lithium niobate (LN), potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), zinc germanium phosphide (ZGP) and silver selenogallate (AGSE). Simulation of planar LN waveguide shows that when the electric field vector E lies in the k-c plane, the power flow is directed precisely along the propagation direction, demonstrating waveguiding effect in the planar waveguide. Employment of anisotropic nonlinear optical waveguides, for example in combination with AFB® crystalline fiber waveguides (CFW), provides access to the design of a number of novel high power and high efficiency light sources spanning the range of wavelengths from deep ultraviolet (as short as 200 nm) to mid-infrared (as long as about 18 μm). To our knowledge, the technique is the only generally applicable one because most often there are no compatible cladding crystals available to nonlinear optical cores, especially not with an engineer-able refractive index difference and large mode area.

  2. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  3. Propulsion by directional adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John; Prakash, Manu

    2008-03-01

    The rough, hairy integument of water-walking arthropods is well known to be responsible for their water-repellency; we here consider its additional propulsive role. We demonstrate that the tilted flexible leg hairs of water-walking arthropods render the leg cuticle directionally anisotropic: contact lines advance most readily towards the leg tips. The dynamical role of the resulting unidirectional adhesion is explored, and yields new insight into the manner in which water-walking arthropods generate thrust, glide and leap from the free surface. We thus provide new rationale for the fundamental topological difference in the roughness on plants and insects, and suggest novel directions for biomimetic design of smart, hydrophobic surfaces.

  4. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  5. Variational bounds on the effective moduli of anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme W.; Kohn, Robert V.

    THE VRITIONAL inequalities of Hashin and Shtrikman are transformed to a simple and concise form. They are used to bound the effective conductivity tensor σ∗ of an anisotropic composite made from an arbitrary number of possibly anisotropic phases, and to bound the effective elasticity tensor C∗ of an anisotropic mixture of two well-ordered isotropic materials. The bounds depend on the conductivities and elastic moduli of the components and their respective volume fractions. When the components are isotropic the conductivity bounds, which constrain the eigenvalues of σ∗, include those previously obtained by Hashin and Shtrikman, Murat and Tartar, and Lurie and Cherkaev. Our approach can also be used in the context of linear elasticity to derive bounds on C∗ for composites comprised of an arbitrary number of anisotropic phases. For two-component composites our bounds are tighter than those obtained by Kantor and Bergman and by Francfort and Murat, and are attained by sequentially layered laminate materials.

  6. Challenges in nanoelectrochemical and nanomechanical studies of individual anisotropic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Knittel, P; Bibikova, O; Kranz, C

    2016-11-01

    The characterization of nanoparticles and the correlation of physical properties such as size and shape to their (electro)chemical properties is an emerging field, which may facilitate future optimization and tuning of devices involving nanoparticles. This requires the investigation of individual particles rather than obtaining averaged information on large ensembles. Here, we present atomic force - scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) measurements of soft conductive PDMS substrates modified with gold nanostars (i.e., multibranched Au nanoparticles) in peak force tapping mode, which next to the electrochemical characterization provides information on the adhesion, deformation properties, and Young's modulus of the sample. AFM-SECM probes with integrated nanodisc electrodes (radii < 50 nm) have been used for these measurements. Most studies attempting to map individual nanoparticles have to date been performed at spherical nanoparticles, rather than highly active asymmetric gold nanoparticles. Consequently, this study discusses challenges during the nanocharacterization of individual anisotropic gold nanostars.

  7. Elastomer-toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the Tg, thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicone elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin (1) as physical polyblends, and (2) by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after aging at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  8. Point of Impact Prediction in Anisotropic Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates from the Acoustic Emission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, T.; Das, S.; Jata, K. V.

    2008-02-01

    A newly developed optimization based method is followed to locate the point of impact in anisotropic composite plates for which conventional triangulation technique fails. The new technique works for both anisotropic and isotropic plates. Experiments are carried out by dropping a steel ball on a graphite-epoxy composite plate and picking up acoustic signals by passive transducers adhesively bonded to the plate at different locations. Predicted points of impact are compared with the true impact point.

  9. Mechanics of robust and releasable adhesion in biology: Bottom up designed hierarchical structures of gecko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haimin; Gao, Huajian

    2006-06-01

    Gecko and many insects have evolved specialized adhesive tissues with bottom-up designed (from nanoscale and up) hierarchical structures that allow them to maneuver on vertical walls and ceilings. The adhesion mechanisms of gecko must be robust enough to function on unknown rough surfaces and also easily releasable upon animal movement. How does nature design such macroscopic sized robust and releasable adhesion devices? How can an adhesion system designed for robust attachment simultaneously allow easy detachment? These questions have motivated the present investigation on mechanics of robust and releasable adhesion in biology. On the question of robust adhesion, we introduce a fractal gecko hairs model, which assumes self-similar fibrillar structures at multiple hierarchical levels mimicking gecko's spatula ultrastructure, to show that structural hierarchy plays a key role in robust adhesion: it allows the work of adhesion to be exponentially enhanced with each added level of hierarchy. We demonstrate that, barring fiber fracture, the fractal gecko hairs can be designed from nanoscale and up to achieve flaw tolerant adhesion at any length scales. However, consideration of crack-like flaws in the hairs themselves results in an upper size limit for flaw tolerant design. On the question of releasable adhesion, we hypothesize that the asymmetrically aligned seta hairs of gecko form a strongly anisotropic material with adhesion strength strongly varying with the direction of pulling. We use analytical solutions to show that a strongly anisotropic elastic solid indeed exhibits a strongly anisotropic adhesion strength when sticking on a rough surface. Furthermore, we perform finite element calculations to show that the adhesion strength of a strongly anisotropic attachment pad exhibits essentially two levels of adhesion strength depending on the direction of pulling, resulting in an orientation-controlled switch between attachment and detachment. These findings not only

  10. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  11. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  12. Anisotropic Total Variation Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grasmair, Markus; Lenzen, Frank

    2010-12-15

    Total variation regularization and anisotropic filtering have been established as standard methods for image denoising because of their ability to detect and keep prominent edges in the data. Both methods, however, introduce artifacts: In the case of anisotropic filtering, the preservation of edges comes at the cost of the creation of additional structures out of noise; total variation regularization, on the other hand, suffers from the stair-casing effect, which leads to gradual contrast changes in homogeneous objects, especially near curved edges and corners. In order to circumvent these drawbacks, we propose to combine the two regularization techniques. To that end we replace the isotropic TV semi-norm by an anisotropic term that mirrors the directional structure of either the noisy original data or the smoothed image. We provide a detailed existence theory for our regularization method by using the concept of relaxation. The numerical examples concluding the paper show that the proposed introduction of an anisotropy to TV regularization indeed leads to improved denoising: the stair-casing effect is reduced while at the same time the creation of artifacts is suppressed.

  13. Modeling anisotropic magnetoresistance in layered antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, D. L. R.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Velev, J.; Chshiev, M.; Castro, J. d.'Albuquerque e.; Lacroix, C.

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the electronic transport and the anisotropic magnetoresistance in systems consisting of pairs of antiferromagnetically aligned layers separated by a non-magnetic layer, across which an antiferromagnetic coupling between the double layers is established. Calculations have been performed within the framework of the tight-binding model, taking into account the exchange coupling within the ferromagnetic layers and the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Conductivities have been evaluated in the ballistic regime, based on Kubo formula. We have systematically studied the dependence of the conductivity and of the anisotropic magnetoresistance on several material and structural parameters, such as the orientation of the magnetic moments relative to the crystalline axis, band filling, out-of-plane hopping and spin-orbit parameter.

  14. Membrane-mediated aggregation of anisotropically curved nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Olinger, Alexander D; Spangler, Eric J; Kumar, P B Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Using systematic numerical simulations, we study the self-assembly of elongated curved nanoparticles on lipid vesicles. Our simulations are based on molecular dynamics of a coarse-grained implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid membranes with a Langevin thermostat. Here we consider only the case wherein the nanoparticle-nanoparticle interaction is repulsive, only the concave surface of the nanoparticle interacts attractively with the lipid head groups and only the outer surface of the vesicle is exposed to the nanoparticles. Upon their adhesion on the vesicle, the curved nanoparticles generate local curvature on the membrane. The resulting nanoparticle-generated membrane curvature leads in turn to nanoparticle self-assembly into two main types of aggregates corresponding to chain aggregates at low adhesion strengths and aster aggregates at high adhesion strength. The chain-like aggregates are due to the fact that at low values of adhesion strength, the nanoparticles prefer to lie parallel to each other. As the adhesion strength is increased, a splay angle between the nanoparticles is induced with a magnitude that increases with increasing adhesion strength. The origin of the splay angles between the nanoparticles is shown to be saddle-like membrane deformations induced by a tilt of the lipids around the nanoparticles. This phenomenon of membrane mediated self-assembly of anisotropically curved nanoparticles is explored for systems with varying nanoparticle number densities, adhesion strength, and nanoparticle intrinsic curvature.

  15. Anisotropic Weyl symmetry and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Taeyoon; Oh, Phillial; Sohn, Jongsu E-mail: ploh@skku.edu

    2010-11-01

    We construct an anisotropic Weyl invariant theory in the ADM formalism and discuss its cosmological consequences. It extends the original anisotropic Weyl invariance of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity using an extra scalar field. The action is invariant under the anisotropic transformations of the space and time metric components with an arbitrary value of the critical exponent z. One of the interesting features is that the cosmological constant term maintains the anisotropic symmetry for z = −3. We also include the cosmological fluid and show that it can preserve the anisotropic Weyl invariance if the equation of state satisfies P = zρ/3. Then, we study cosmology of the Einstein-Hilbert-anisotropic Weyl (EHaW) action including the cosmological fluid, both with or without anisotropic Weyl invariance. The correlation of the critical exponent z and the equation of state parameter ω-bar provides a new perspective of the cosmology. It is also shown that the EHaW action admits a late time accelerating universe for an arbitrary value of z when the anisotropic conformal invariance is broken, and the anisotropic conformal scalar field is interpreted as a possible source of dark energy.

  16. On the relativistic anisotropic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojai, F.; Kohandel, M.; Stepanian, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behavior of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed.

  17. Anisotropic multiple bounce models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalhau, Anna Paula; Peter, Patrick; Vitenti, Sandro D. P.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the Galileon ghost condensate implementation of a bouncing cosmological model in the presence of a non-negligible anisotropic stress. We exhibit its structure, which we find to be far richer than previously thought. In particular, even restricting attention to a single set of underlying microscopic parameters, we obtain, numerically, many qualitatively different regimes: depending on the initial conditions on the scalar field leading the dynamics of the Universe, the contraction phase can evolve directly towards a singularity, avoid it by bouncing once, or even bounce many times before settling into an ever-expanding phase. We clarify the behavior of the anisotropies in these various situations.

  18. High anisotropic pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Dickakian, G. B.

    1985-11-05

    An improved process for preparing an optically anisotropic pitch which comprises heating a pitch feed material at a temperature within the range of about 350/sup 0/ C. to 450/sup 0/ C. while passing an inert gas therethrough at a rate of at least 2.5 SCFH/lb of pitch feed material and agitating said pitch feed material at a stirrer rate of from about 500 to 600 rpm to obtain an essentially 100% mesophase pitch product suitable for carbon production.

  19. Anisotropic spinfoam cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennert, Julian; Sloan, David

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of a homogeneous, anisotropic universe are investigated within the context of spinfoam cosmology. Transition amplitudes are calculated for a graph consisting of a single node and three links—the ‘Daisy graph’—probing the behaviour a classical Bianchi I spacetime. It is shown further how the use of such single node graphs gives rise to a simplification of states such that all orders in the spin expansion can be calculated, indicating that it is the vertex expansion that contains information about quantum dynamics.

  20. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with ``flat'' (including toroidal) and ``open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are ``flat'' or ``open''. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with ``flat'' or ``open'' topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  1. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-12

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with “flat” (including toroidal) and “open” (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are “flat” or “open”. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with “flat” or “open” topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  2. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    DOE PAGES

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-12

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here in this paper, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with "flat'' (including toroidal) and "open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarilymore » large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are "flat" or "open". Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with "flat'' or "open" topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.« less

  3. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-12

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here in this paper, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with "flat'' (including toroidal) and "open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are "flat" or "open". Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with "flat'' or "open" topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  4. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  5. Anisotropic power-law inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Watanabe, Masa-aki E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-12-01

    We study an inflationary scenario in supergravity model with a gauge kinetic function. We find exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solutions when both the potential function for an inflaton and the gauge kinetic function are exponential type. The dynamical system analysis tells us that the anisotropic power-law inflation is an attractor for a large parameter region.

  6. Novel anisotropic engineered cardiac tissues: studies of electrical propagation.

    PubMed

    Bursac, Nenad; Loo, Yihua; Leong, Kam; Tung, Leslie

    2007-10-05

    The goal of this study was to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with uniformly anisotropic architecture, and to evaluate their electrical function using multi-site optical mapping of cell membrane potentials. Anisotropic polymer scaffolds made by leaching of aligned sucrose templates were seeded with neonatal rat cardiac cells and cultured in rotating bioreactors for 6-14 days. Cells aligned and interconnected inside the scaffolds and when stimulated by a point electrode, supported macroscopically continuous, anisotropic impulse propagation. By culture day 14, the ratio of conduction velocities along vs. across cardiac fibers reached a value of 2, similar to that in native neonatal ventricles, while action potential duration and maximum capture rate, respectively, decreased to 120ms and increased to approximately 5Hz. The shorter culture time and larger scaffold thickness were associated with increased incidence of sustained reentrant arrhythmias. In summary, this study is the first successful attempt to engineer a cm(2)-size, functional anisotropic cardiac tissue patch.

  7. Design guidelines for hybrid microcircuits; organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were studied to acquire an adequate information base to generate a guideline document for the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specific areas covered include: (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives; (2) effects of long term aging at 150C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives; (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics; (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive; (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters; (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives; and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  8. Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    The complex structures that allow geckos to repeatably adhere to surfaces consist of multilevel branching fibers with specialized tips. We present a novel technique for fabricating similar multilevel structures from polymer materials and demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of two- and three-level structures, wherein each level terminates in flat mushroom-type tips. Adhesion experiments are conducted on two-level fiber arrays on a 12-mm-diameter glass hemisphere, which exhibit both increased adhesion and interface toughness over one-level fiber samples and unstructured control samples. These adhesion enhancements are the result of increased surface conformation as well as increased extension during detachment.

  9. Anisotropic Kepler and anisotropic two fixed centres problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Szumiński, Wojciech

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we show that the anisotropic Kepler problem is dynamically equivalent to a system of two point masses which move in perpendicular lines (or planes) and interact according to Newton's law of universal gravitation. Moreover, we prove that generalised version of anisotropic Kepler problem as well as anisotropic two centres problem are non-integrable. This was achieved thanks to investigation of differential Galois groups of variational equations along certain particular solutions. Properties of these groups yield very strong necessary integrability conditions.

  10. Thermodynamics of anisotropic branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, Daniel; Fernández, Daniel; Patiño, Leonardo; Trancanelli, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We study the thermodynamics of flavor D7-branes embedded in an anisotropic black brane solution of type IIB supergravity. The flavor branes undergo a phase transition between a `Minkowski embedding', in which they lie outside of the horizon, and a `black hole embedding', in which they fall into the horizon. This transition depends on the black hole temperature, its degree of anisotropy, and the mass of the flavor degrees of freedom. It happens either at a critical temperature or at a critical anisotropy. A general lesson we learn from this analysis is that the anisotropy, in this particular realization, induces similar effects as the temperature. In particular, increasing the anisotropy bends the branes more and more into the horizon. Moreover, we observe that the transition becomes smoother for higher anisotropies.

  11. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Stclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A process was developed for preparing aromatic polyamide acids for use as adhesives by reacting an aromatic dianhydride to an approximately equimolar amount of an aromatic diamine in a water or lower alkanol miscible ether solvent. The polyamide acids are converted to polyimides by heating to the temperature range of 200 - 300 C. The polyimides are thermally stable and insoluble in ethers and other organic solvents.

  12. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in the fabrication and adhesion testing of biomimetic dry adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2010-10-01

    In the past two years, there have been a large number of publications on the topic of biomimetic dry adhesives from modeling, fabrication and testing perspectives. We review and compare the most recent advances in fabrication and testing of these materials. While there is increased convergence and consensus as to what makes a good dry adhesive, the fabrication of these materials is still challenging, particularly for anisotropic or hierarchal designs. Although qualitative comparisons between different adhesive designs can be made, quantifying the exact performance and rating each design is significantly hampered by the lack of standardized testing methods. Manufacturing dry adhesives, which can reliably adhere to rough surfaces, show directional and self-cleaning behavior and are relatively simple to manufacture, is still very challenging—great strides by multiple research groups have however made these goals appear achievable within the next few years.

  14. Optical trapping of anisotropic nanocylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareil, Paul B.; Sheng, Yunlong

    2013-09-01

    The T-matrix method with the Vector Spherical Wave Function (VSWF) expansions represents some difficulties for computing optical scattering of anisotropic particles. As the divergence of the electric field is nonzero in the anisotropic medium and the VSWFs do not satisfy the anisotropic wave equations one questioned whether the VSWFs are still a suitable basis in the anisotropic medium. We made a systematic and careful review on the vector basis functions and the VSWFs. We found that a field vector in Euclidean space can be decomposed to triplet vectors {L, M, N}, which as non-coplanar. Especially, the vector L is designed to represent non-zero divergence component of the vector solution, so that the VSWF basis is sufficiently general to represent the solutions of the anisotropic wave equation. The mathematical proof can be that when the anisotropic wave equations is solved in the Fourier space, the solution is expanded in the basis of the plan waves with angular spectrum amplitude distributions. The plane waves constitute an orthogonal and complete set for the anisotropic solutions. Furthermore, the plane waves are expanded into the VSWF basis. These two-step expansions are equivalent to the one-step direct expansion of the anisotropic solution to the VSWF basis. We used direct VSWF expansion, along with the point-matching method in the T-matrix, and applied the boundary condition to the normal components displacement field in order to compute the stress and the related forces and torques and to show the mechanism of the optical trap of the anisotropic nano-cylinders.

  15. Anisotropic and Hierarchical Porosity in Multifunctional Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtner, Aaron Zev

    The performance of multifunctional porous ceramics is often hindered by the seemingly contradictory effects of porosity on both mechanical and non-structural properties and yet a sufficient body of knowledge linking microstructure to these properties does not exist. Using a combination of tailored anisotropic and hierarchical materials, these disparate effects may be reconciled. In this project, a systematic investigation of the processing, characterization and properties of anisotropic and isotropic hierarchically porous ceramics was conducted. The system chosen was a composite ceramic intended as the cathode for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Comprehensive processing investigations led to the development of approaches to make hierarchical, anisotropic porous microstructures using directional freeze-casting of well dispersed slurries. The effect of all the important processing parameters was investigated. This resulted in an ability to tailor and control the important microstructural features including the scale of the microstructure, the macropore size and total porosity. Comparable isotropic porous ceramics were also processed using fugitive pore formers. A suite of characterization techniques including x-ray tomography and 3-D sectional scanning electron micrographs (FIB-SEM) was used to characterize and quantify the green and partially sintered microstructures. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure was quantified and discrete element simulations (DEM) were used to explain the experimental observations. Finally, the comprehensive mechanical properties, at room temperature, were investigated, experimentally and using DEM, for the different microstructures.

  16. Prediction of the point of impact in an anisotropic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koabaz, M.; Hajzargarbashi, T.; Kundu, T.; Deschamps, M.

    2011-01-01

    Locating the point of impact of a foreign object in a plate is important for continuous health monitoring of structures. A new method based on an optimization scheme has been recently proposed to locate the point of impact in anisotropic plates by analyzing the times of arrival of the ultrasonic signals at the passive sensors attached to the plate. Following this optimization based technique, in this paper the impact point on an anisotropic plate is predicted from the acoustic emission data. Experiments are carried out with a carbon-epoxy plate where the impact point is modeled by an acoustic source. A Parallel Pre-stressed Actuator (PPA) is used as the acoustic source and the acoustic signals at different locations are received by adhesively bonded acoustic sensors. The source point is then predicted and compared with its actual location. Related theory is also presented in the paper.

  17. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  18. Cracking on anisotropic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, A. M.; Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of cracking of a local anisotropic neutron star (NS) due to small density fluctuations. It is assumed that the neutron star core consists of leptons, nucleons and hyperons. The relativistic mean field model is used to describe the core of equation of state (EOS). For the crust, we use the EOS introduced by Miyatsu et al. [1]. Furthermore, two models are used to describe pressure anisotropic in neutron star matter. One is proposed by Doneva-Yazadjiev (DY) [2] and the other is proposed by Herrera-Barreto (HB) [3]. The anisotropic parameter of DY and HB models are adjusted in order the predicted maximum mass compatible to the mass of PSR J1614-2230 [4] and PSR J0348+0432 [5]. We have found that cracking can potentially present in the region close to the neutron star surface. The instability due cracking is quite sensitive to the NS mass and anisotropic parameter used.

  19. Theoretical studies of anisotropic energy transport in TATB crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew; Sewell, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Anisotropic thermal transport properties were determined theoretically for single crystals of the insensitive explosive 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) using molecular dynamics. TATB exhibits a graphitic-like layered packing structure with a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network within, but not between, the molecule-thick layers that comprise the crystal. Anisotropic thermal conductivity coefficients were determined for initially defect-free and defective TATB crystals at various temperatures and pressures, and direction-dependent relaxation of idealized hot spots was studied. The room temperature, atmospheric pressure thermal conductivity for TATB is predicted to be generally greater and more anisotropic than the thermal conductivities of other molecular explosives; conduction within the layers is at least 68% greater than conduction between them. The phonon mean free path length is predicted to be less than 1 nm. Decreases in thermal conductivity induced by molecular vacancy defects are also anisotropic and exhibit a linear dependence on defect density. Results from the hot-spot relaxation simulations were compared with and fit to an analytical solution for the one-dimensional continuum heat equation by treating the thermal diffusivity as a parameter. Validity of the continuum heat equation predictions for TATB is assessed for length scales below 20 nm.

  20. Actuation performances of anisotropic gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardinocchi, P.; Teresi, L.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the actuation performances of anisotropic gels driven by mechanical and chemical stimuli, in terms of both deformation processes and stroke-curves, and distinguished between the fast response of gels before diffusion starts and the asymptotic response attained at the steady state. We also showed as the range of forces that an anisotropic hydrogel can exert when constrained is especially wide; indeed, changing fiber orientation allows us to induce shear as well as transversely isotropic extensions.

  1. Anisotropic assembly and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.; Uminsky, David T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of anisotropy in two classes of individual-based models for self-organization, collective behavior and self-assembly. We accomplish this via first-order dynamical systems of pairwise interacting particles that incorporate anisotropic interactions. At a continuum level, these models represent the natural anisotropic variants of the well-known aggregation equation. We leverage this framework to analyze the impact of anisotropic effects upon the self-assembly of co-dimension one equilibrium structures, such as micelles and vesicles. Our analytical results reveal the regularizing effect of anisotropy, and isolate the contexts in which anisotropic effects are necessary to achieve dynamical stability of co-dimension one structures. Our results therefore place theoretical limits on when anisotropic effects can be safely neglected. We also explore whether anisotropic effects suffice to induce pattern formation in such particle systems. We conclude with brief numerical studies that highlight various aspects of the models we introduce, elucidate their phase structure and partially validate the analysis we provide.

  2. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  3. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  4. Textured silicon nitride: processing and anisotropic properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinwen; Sakka, Yoshio

    2008-01-01

    Textured silicon nitride (Si3N4) has been intensively studied over the past 15 years because of its use for achieving its superthermal and mechanical properties. In this review we present the fundamental aspects of the processing and anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4, with emphasis on the anisotropic and abnormal grain growth of β-Si3N4, texture structure and texture analysis, processing methods and anisotropic properties. On the basis of the texturing mechanisms, the processing methods described in this article have been classified into two types: hot-working (HW) and templated grain growth (TGG). The HW method includes the hot-pressing, hot-forging and sinter-forging techniques, and the TGG method includes the cold-pressing, extrusion, tape-casting and strong magnetic field alignment techniques for β-Si3N4 seed crystals. Each processing technique is thoroughly discussed in terms of theoretical models and experimental data, including the texturing mechanisms and the factors affecting texture development. Also, methods of synthesizing the rodlike β-Si3N4 single crystals are presented. Various anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4 and their origins are thoroughly described and discussed, such as hardness, elastic modulus, bending strength, fracture toughness, fracture energy, creep behavior, tribological and wear behavior, erosion behavior, contact damage behavior and thermal conductivity. Models are analyzed to determine the thermal anisotropy by considering the intrinsic thermal anisotropy, degree of orientation and various microstructure factors. Textured porous Si3N4 with a unique microstructure composed of oriented elongated β-Si3N4 and anisotropic pores is also described for the first time, with emphasis on its unique mechanical and thermal-mechanical properties. Moreover, as an important related material, textured α-Sialon is also reviewed, because the presence of elongated α-Sialon grains allows the production of textured α-Sialon using the

  5. Textured silicon nitride: processing and anisotropic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinwen; Sakka, Yoshio

    2008-07-01

    Textured silicon nitride (Si3N4) has been intensively studied over the past 15 years because of its use for achieving its superthermal and mechanical properties. In this review we present the fundamental aspects of the processing and anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4, with emphasis on the anisotropic and abnormal grain growth of β-Si3N4, texture structure and texture analysis, processing methods and anisotropic properties. On the basis of the texturing mechanisms, the processing methods described in this article have been classified into two types: hot-working (HW) and templated grain growth (TGG). The HW method includes the hot-pressing, hot-forging and sinter-forging techniques, and the TGG method includes the cold-pressing, extrusion, tape-casting and strong magnetic field alignment techniques for β-Si3N4 seed crystals. Each processing technique is thoroughly discussed in terms of theoretical models and experimental data, including the texturing mechanisms and the factors affecting texture development. Also, methods of synthesizing the rodlike β-Si3N4 single crystals are presented. Various anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4 and their origins are thoroughly described and discussed, such as hardness, elastic modulus, bending strength, fracture toughness, fracture energy, creep behavior, tribological and wear behavior, erosion behavior, contact damage behavior and thermal conductivity. Models are analyzed to determine the thermal anisotropy by considering the intrinsic thermal anisotropy, degree of orientation and various microstructure factors. Textured porous Si3N4 with a unique microstructure composed of oriented elongated β-Si3N4 and anisotropic pores is also described for the first time, with emphasis on its unique mechanical and thermal-mechanical properties. Moreover, as an important related material, textured α-Sialon is also reviewed, because the presence of elongated α-Sialon grains allows the production of textured α-Sialon using the

  6. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  7. Anisotropic electrical and thermal conductivity in Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} [AE = Ca, Sr{sub 1−x}Ba{sub x} (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0)] single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Song-Tao; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Xiong, Ye; Yao, Shu-Hua E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn; Chen, Y. B. E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-09-28

    Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} (AE represents alkaline earth), constructed by stacking of rock-salt Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}O{sub 4} and triangle CoO{sub 2} layers alternatively along c-axis, is one of promising thermoelectric oxides. The most impressive feature of Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}, as reported previously, is their electrical conductivity mainly lying along CoO{sub 2} plane, adjusting Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer simultaneously manipulates both thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. It in turn optimizes thermoelectric performance of these materials. In this work, we characterize the anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivity along both ab-plane and c-direction of Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba, Sr{sub 1−x}Ba{sub x}) single crystals. The results substantiate that isovalence replacement in Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} remarkably modifies their electrical property along ab-plane; while their thermal conductivity along ab-plane only has a slightly difference. At the same time, both the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity along c-axis of these materials also have dramatic changes. Certainly, the electrical resistance along c-axis is too high to be used as thermoelectric applications. These results suggest that adjusting nano-block Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer in Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} cannot modify the thermal conductivity along high electrical conductivity plane (ab-plane here). The evolution of electrical property is discussed by Anderson localization and electron-electron interaction U. And the modification of thermal conductivity along c-axis is attributed to the microstructure difference. This work sheds more light on the manipulation of the thermal and electrical conductivity in the layered thermoelectric materials.

  8. Light propagation through anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Italo; Agrawal, Brij; Restaino, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    A wealth of experimental data has shown that atmospheric turbulence can be anisotropic; in this case, a Kolmogorov spectrum does not describe well the atmospheric turbulence statistics. In this paper, we show a quantitative analysis of anisotropic turbulence by using a non-Kolmogorov power spectrum with an anisotropic coefficient. The spectrum we use does not include the inner and outer scales, it is valid only inside the inertial subrange, and it has a power-law slope that can be different from a Kolmogorov one. Using this power spectrum, in the weak turbulence condition, we analyze the impact of the power-law variations α on the long-term beam spread and scintillation index for several anisotropic coefficient values ς. We consider only horizontal propagation across the turbulence cells, assuming circular symmetry is maintained on the orthogonal plane to the propagation direction. We conclude that the anisotropic coefficient influences both the long-term beam spread and the scintillation index by the factor ς(2-α).

  9. Quark–gluon plasma phenomenology from anisotropic lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Skullerud, Jon-Ivar; Kelly, Aoife; Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; Amato, Alessandro; Evans, P. Wynne M.; Hands, Simon; Burnier, Yannis; Giudice, Pietro; Harris, Tim; Ryan, Sinéad M.; Kim, Seyong; Lombardo, Maria Paola; Oktay, Mehmet B.; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2016-01-22

    The FASTSUM collaboration has been carrying out simulations of N{sub f} = 2 + 1 QCD at nonzero temperature in the fixed-scale approach using anisotropic lattices. Here we present the status of these studies, including recent results for electrical conductivity and charge diffusion, and heavy quarkonium (charm and beauty) physics.

  10. Deformation, fatigue and fracture behavior of two cast anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Huron, Eric S.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1987-01-01

    Tensile and low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted on two cast anisotropic superalloys. The effects of temperature, strain rate and stress range were investigated. Deformation behavior was extensively characterized and modeled. LCF and fracture behavior were studied and correlated with deformation behavior.

  11. Deformation, fatigue and fracture behavior of two cast anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Huron, Eric S.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1987-01-01

    Tensile and low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted on two cast anisotropic superalloys. The effects of temperature, strain rate and stress range were investigated. Deformation behavior was extensively characterized and modeled. LCF and fracture behavior were studied and correlated with deformation behavior.

  12. Anisotropic magnetotransport in Dirac-Weyl magnetic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ominato, Yuya; Kobayashi, Koji; Nomura, Kentaro

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically study the anisotropic magnetotransport in Dirac-Weyl magnetic junctions where a doped ferromagnetic Weyl semimetal is sandwiched between doped Dirac semimetals. We calculate the conductance using the Landauer formula and find that the system exhibits extraordinarily large anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The AMR depends on the ratio of the Fermi energy to the strength of the exchange interaction. The origin of the AMR is the shift of the Fermi surface in the Weyl semimetal, and the mechanism is completely different from the conventional AMR originating from the spin dependent scattering and the spin-orbit interaction.

  13. Anisotropic lattice models of electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, Vladimir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2002-11-01

    Systems of charged particles on anisotropic three-dimensional lattices are investigated theoretically using Debye-Huckel theory. It is found that the thermodynamics of these systems strongly depends on the degree of anisotropy. For weakly anisotropic simple cubic lattices, the results indicate the existence of order-disorder phase transitions and a tricritical point, while the possibility of low-density gas-liquid coexistence is suppressed. For strongly anisotropic lattices this picture changes dramatically: The low-density gas-liquid phase separation reappears and the phase diagram exhibits critical, tricritical, and triple points. For body-centered lattices, the low-density gas-liquid phase coexistence is suppressed for all degrees of anisotropy. These results show that the effect of anisotropy in lattice models of electrolytes amounts to reduction of spatial dimensionality.

  14. Fluctuation relations for anisotropic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio-Sanchez, R.; Harris, R. J.; Touchette, H.

    2014-02-01

    Currents of particles or energy in driven non-equilibrium steady states are known to satisfy certain symmetries, referred to as fluctuation relations, determining the ratio of the probabilities of positive fluctuations to negative ones. A generalization of these fluctuation relations has been proposed recently for extended non-equilibrium systems of dimension greater than one, assuming, crucially, that they are isotropic (Hurtado P. I., Pérez-Espigares C., del Pozo J. J. and Garrido P. L., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 7704). Here we relax this assumption and derive a fluctuation relation for d-dimensional systems having anisotropic bulk driving rates. We test the validity of this anisotropic fluctuation relation by calculating the particle current fluctuations in the 2d anisotropic zero-range process, using both exact and fluctuating hydrodynamic approaches.

  15. Anisotropic diffusion in mesh-free numerical magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-04-01

    We extend recently developed mesh-free Lagrangian methods for numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to arbitrary anisotropic diffusion equations, including: passive scalar diffusion, Spitzer-Braginskii conduction and viscosity, cosmic ray diffusion/streaming, anisotropic radiation transport, non-ideal MHD (Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, the Hall effect) and turbulent 'eddy diffusion'. We study these as implemented in the code GIZMO for both new meshless finite-volume Godunov schemes (MFM/MFV). We show that the MFM/MFV methods are accurate and stable even with noisy fields and irregular particle arrangements, and recover the correct behaviour even in arbitrarily anisotropic cases. They are competitive with state-of-the-art AMR/moving-mesh methods, and can correctly treat anisotropic diffusion-driven instabilities (e.g. the MTI and HBI, Hall MRI). We also develop a new scheme for stabilizing anisotropic tensor-valued fluxes with high-order gradient estimators and non-linear flux limiters, which is trivially generalized to AMR/moving-mesh codes. We also present applications of some of these improvements for SPH, in the form of a new integral-Godunov SPH formulation that adopts a moving-least squares gradient estimator and introduces a flux-limited Riemann problem between particles.

  16. Anisotropically structured magnetic aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiligtag, Florian J.; Airaghi Leccardi, Marta J. I.; Erdem, Derya; Süess, Martin J.; Niederberger, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture.Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Digital photographs of dispersions and gels with different water-to-ethanol ratios; magnetic measurements of an anatase aerogel containing 0.25 mol% Fe3O4 nanoparticles; XRD patterns of the iron oxide and

  17. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  18. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-08-25

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  19. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  20. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Fathi, Zakaryae; Wei, Jianghua

    1998-01-01

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

  1. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Fathi, Zakaryae; Wei, Jianghua

    1998-01-01

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

  2. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  3. Finite-difference schemes for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2014-09-01

    In fusion plasmas diffusion tensors are extremely anisotropic due to the high temperature and large magnetic field strength. This causes diffusion, heat conduction, and viscous momentum loss, to effectively be aligned with the magnetic field lines. This alignment leads to different values for the respective diffusive coefficients in the magnetic field direction and in the perpendicular direction, to the extent that heat diffusion coefficients can be up to 10{sup 12} times larger in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular direction. This anisotropy puts stringent requirements on the numerical methods used to approximate the MHD-equations since any misalignment of the grid may cause the perpendicular diffusion to be polluted by the numerical error in approximating the parallel diffusion. Currently the common approach is to apply magnetic field-aligned coordinates, an approach that automatically takes care of the directionality of the diffusive coefficients. This approach runs into problems at x-points and at points where there is magnetic re-connection, since this causes local non-alignment. It is therefore useful to consider numerical schemes that are tolerant to the misalignment of the grid with the magnetic field lines, both to improve existing methods and to help open the possibility of applying regular non-aligned grids. To investigate this, in this paper several discretization schemes are developed and applied to the anisotropic heat diffusion equation on a non-aligned grid.

  4. Thermoelectric Figure of Merit in Anisotropic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bies, W.; Radtke, R. J.; Ehrenreich, H.

    1998-03-01

    General expressions for the electrical conductivity, thermopower, and electronic thermal conductivity are derived for anisotropic materials including their full tensorial character and properly treating the effects of the sample boundaries. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT constructed from these quantities is proved to be maximal only when the electric field (in thermoelectric coolers) or thermal gradient (in power generators) is applied along the direction of highest conductivity. Fields applied along directions for which the conductivity tensor is non-diagonal induce transverse electric fields and thermal gradients which may be larger in magnitude than the applied fields. These fields reduce ZT below that expected from anisotropy alone. Numerical results are presented for bulk n-type Bi_2Te3 and quantum well and quantum wire geometries using semiclassical transport theory in the effective mass and relaxation time approximations. The effects of multi-valley conduction and confinement-induced splitting of the valley degeneracy are included. Surprisingly, this model predicts generally that the thermopower and hence ZT are independent of the direction of the applied fields in the limit of vanishing lattice thermal conductivity.

  5. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-11-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143 N cm-2 (4 mm × 4 mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from -196 to 1,000 °C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperature-enhanced electrical and thermal transports, enabling the CNT dry adhesive for efficient electrical and thermal management when being used as a conductive double-sided sticky tape. With its intrinsic thermal stability, our CNT adhesive sustains many temperature transition cycles over a wide operation temperature range. We discover that a `nano-interlock' adhesion mechanism is responsible for the adhesion behaviour, which could be applied to the development of various dry CNT adhesives with novel features.

  6. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143 N cm−2 (4 mm × 4 mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from −196 to 1,000 °C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperature-enhanced electrical and thermal transports, enabling the CNT dry adhesive for efficient electrical and thermal management when being used as a conductive double-sided sticky tape. With its intrinsic thermal stability, our CNT adhesive sustains many temperature transition cycles over a wide operation temperature range. We discover that a ‘nano-interlock' adhesion mechanism is responsible for the adhesion behaviour, which could be applied to the development of various dry CNT adhesives with novel features. PMID:27849052

  7. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  8. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  9. Denture adhesives: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis; Papadiochos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Denture adhesives have been the objective of scientific research for over half a century. Although they are used by denture wearers worldwide, investigations of their effectiveness and biocompatibility have led to controversial conclusions. The purpose of this study was to review the literature data with regard to the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives as well as the attitudes of both patients and dental professionals toward these materials. An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literature in the Medline database was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives. There was no limitation in publication year, so the search included all the available scientific evidence included in that particular database until March 2014. Specific inclusion criteria were used for the selection of the appropriate articles. A manual search of the citations of the obtained articles followed to extend the electronic search. A full text review was carried out for only 32 articles. Of the 32 articles, 21 examined the efficacy of denture adhesives in terms of retention and stability and masticatory performance, 6 evaluated the issue of the biocompatibility of denture adhesives, and 5 presented the attitudes of either professionals or patients toward these materials. The majority of clinical studies supported the fact that denture adhesives enhance the retention, stability, and masticatory performance of a removable prosthesis. In terms of biocompatibility, long-term in vivo studies to investigate potential harmful effects were lacking. Patients are satisfied with denture adhesives that meet their needs. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Collective cell streams in epithelial monolayers depend on cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, András; Varga, Katalin; Méhes, Előd; Szabó, András

    2013-07-01

    We report spontaneously emerging, randomly oriented, collective streaming behavior within a monolayer culture of a human keratinocyte cell line, and explore the effect of modulating cell adhesions by perturbing the function of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules. We demonstrate that decreasing cell adhesion induces narrower and more anisotropic cell streams, reminiscent of decreasing the Taylor scale of turbulent liquids. To explain our empirical findings, we propose a cell-based model that represents the dual nature of cell-cell adhesions. Spring-like connections provide mechanical stability, while a cellular Potts model formalism represents surface-tension driven attachment. By changing the relevance and persistence of mechanical links between cells, we are able to explain the experimentally observed changes in emergent flow patterns.

  11. Adhesives and the ATS satellite. [construction of honeycomb panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Adhesives in the ATS satellite allow the designers to save weight, simplify design and fabrication and provide thermal and electrical conductivity or resistivity as required. The selections of adhesives are restricted to those few which can pass rigorous outgassing tests in order to avoid contaminating lenses and thermal control surfaces in space. An epoxy adhesive is used to construct the honeycomb panels which constitute most of the satellite's structure. General purpose epoxy adhesives hold doublers and standoffs in place and bond the truss to its fittings. Specialized adhesives include a high temperature resistant polyamide, a flexible polyurethane and filled epoxies which conduct heat or electricity.

  12. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  13. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  14. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  15. An accelerated buoyancy adhesion assay combined with 3-D morphometric analysis for assessing osteoblast adhesion on microgrooved substrata.

    PubMed

    Sobral, J M; Malheiro, V N; Clyne, T W; Harris, J; Rezk, R; O'Neill, W; Markaki, A E

    2016-07-01

    An accelerated negative buoyancy method has been developed to assess cell adhesion strength. This method has been used in conjunction with 3-D morphometric analysis to understand the effects of surface topology on cell response. Aligned micro-grooved surface topographies (with a range of groove depths) were produced on stainless steel 316L substrates by laser ablation. An investigation was carried out on the effect of the micro-grooved surface topography on cell adhesion strength, cell and nucleus volumes, cell phenotypic expression and attachment patterns. Increased hydrophobicity and anisotropic wettability was observed on surfaces with deeper grooves. A reduction was noted in cell volume, projected areas and adhesion sites for deeper grooves, linked to lower cell proliferation and differentiation rates and also to reduced adhesion strength. The results suggest that the centrifugation assay combined with three-dimensional cell morphometric analysis has considerable potential for obtaining improved understanding of the cell/substrate interface.

  16. Entanglement in the Anisotropic Kondo Necklace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    We study the entanglement in the one-dimensional Kondo necklace model with exact diagonalization, calculating the concurrence as a function of the Kondo coupling J and an anisotropy η in the interaction between conduction spins, and we review some results previously obtained in the limiting cases η = 0 and 1. We observe that as J increases, localized and conduction spins get more entangled, while neighboring conduction spins diminish their concurrence; localized spins require a minimum concurrence between conduction spins to be entangled. The anisotropy η diminishes the entanglement for neighboring spins when it increases, driving the system to the Ising limit η = 1 where conduction spins are not entangled. We observe that the concurrence does not give information about the quantum phase transition in the anisotropic Kondo necklace model (between a Kondo singlet and an antiferromagnetic state), but calculating the von Neumann block entropy with the density matrix renormalization group in a chain of 100 sites for the Ising limit indicates that this quantity is useful for locating the quantum critical point.

  17. Particle adhesion in powder coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Wankum, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Williams, S.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Electrostatic powder coating is a widely used industrial painting process. It has three major advantages: (1) it provides high quality durable finish, (2) the process is environmentally friendly and does not require the use of organic solvents, and (3) it is economically competitive. The adhesion of electrostatically deposited polymer paint particles on the grounded conducting substrate depends upon many parameters: (a) particle size and shape distributions, (b) electrostatic charge distributions, (c) electrical resistivity, (d) dielectric strength of the particles, (e) thickness of the powder film, (f) presence and severity of the back corona, and (g) the conductivity and surface properties of the substrate. The authors present a model on the forces of deposition and adhesion of corona charged particles on conducting substrates.

  18. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  19. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    DOE PAGES

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; ...

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticitymore » theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.« less

  20. Yield surfaces for anisotropic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. D.; Thacker, B. H.

    2000-04-01

    Aerospace systems are incorporating composite materials into their structures. The composite materials are often anisotropic in mechanical response due to their geometric layout. For many years, the failure surfaces of anisotropic materials were thought to be characterizable by a quadratic function in the stress, referred to as a Tsai-Wu yield surface, or, in a more restrictive form, a Tsai-Hill yield surface. Such a representation does not work for materials that are strong in two directions and weak in one direction, which is the case of most interest since it represents fiber/epoxy composite plates. This paper demonstrates the impossibility of modeling the failure surface with either the Tsai-Wu or Tsai-Hill failure surfaces. A yield surface is presented based on the lemniscate, which is quartic in the stress. This new yield surface addresses the case of strong in two directions and weak in one.

  1. Anisotropic Ripple Deformation in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-05-07

    Two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  2. Hybrid Surface Patterns Mimicking the Design of the Adhesive Toe Pad of Tree Frog.

    PubMed

    Xue, Longjian; Sanz, Belén; Luo, Aoyi; Turner, Kevin T; Wang, Xin; Tan, Di; Zhang, Rui; Du, Hang; Steinhart, Martin; Mijangos, Carmen; Guttmann, Markus; Kappl, Michael; Del Campo, Aránzazu

    2017-09-08

    Biological materials achieve directional reinforcement with oriented assemblies of anisotropic building blocks. One such example is the nanocomposite structure of keratinized epithelium on the toe pad of tree frogs, in which hexagonal arrays of (soft) epithelial cells are crossed by densely packed and oriented (hard) keratin nanofibrils. Here, a method is established to fabricate arrays of tree-frog-inspired composite micropatterns composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars embedded with polystyrene (PS) nanopillars. Adhesive and frictional studies of these synthetic materials reveal a benefit of the hierarchical and anisotropic design for both adhesion and friction, in particular, at high matrix-fiber interfacial strengths. The presence of PS nanopillars alters the stress distribution at the contact interface of micropillars and therefore enhances the adhesion and friction of the composite micropattern. The results suggest a design principle for bioinspired structural adhesives, especially for wet environments.

  3. Thermohaline instability in anisotropic porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tyvand, P.A.

    1980-04-01

    The onset of thermohaline convection in a horizontal porous layer is investigated theoretically. The layer is homogeneous, anisotropic, and of infinite horizontal extent. Horizontal isotropy with respect to permeability, thermal diffusivity, and solute diffusivity is assumed. For porous media with thermally insulating solid matrices the stability diagram has the same shape as in the case of isotropy. The critical wave number is constant and equal to that of the one-component case. For thermally conducting matrices, new features may occur. The locus of the direct mode in the stability diagram may not be a straight line, and the corresponding wave number may be nonconstant. The initiation of salt fingers is studied by linear theory. It seems that the width of salt fingers is influenced by anisotropy in the diffusivities. Anisotrophy may or may not favor salt fingers, depending on a dimensionless diffusion parameter being greater than or less than one. 12 references.

  4. Cracking in charged anisotropic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sadiq, Sobia

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of static charged anisotropic cylindrically symmetric compact object through cracking. The Einstein-Maxwell field equations and conservation equation are formulated. We then apply local density perturbation and study the behavior of force distribution function. Finally, the cracking is explored for two models satisfying specific form of Chaplygin equation of state. It is found that these models exhibit cracking and the instability increases as the value of charge parameter is increased.

  5. Chapter 9:Wood Adhesion and Adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2013-01-01

    The recorded history of bonding wood dates back at least 3000 years to the Egyptians (Skeist and Miron 1990, River 1994a), and adhesive bonding goes back to early mankind (Keimel 2003). Although wood and paper bonding are the largest applications for adhesives, some of the fundamental aspects leading to good bonds are not fully understood. Better understanding of these...

  6. Reversible Control of Anisotropic Electrical Conductivity using Colloidal Microfluidic Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-17

    a 12 bit CCD camera ( ORCA -ER, Hamamatsu, Japan) operated with 2X binning. A sequence file of equilibrium particle configurations was generated at...To begin, microscope glass slides were immersed in a 3:1 mixture of H2SO4 to 35% H2O2 for 1 hour to remove organic contaminants . Slides were then

  7. Viscoacoustic anisotropic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Li, Zhenchun; Huang, Jianping; Li, Jinli

    2017-01-01

    A viscoacoustic vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) quasi-differential wave equation, which takes account for both the viscosity and anisotropy of media, is proposed for wavefield simulation in this study. The finite difference method is used to solve the equations, for which the attenuation terms are solved in the wavenumber domain, and all remaining terms in the time-space domain. To stabilize the adjoint wavefield, robust regularization operators are applied to the wave equation to eliminate the high-frequency component of the numerical noise produced during the backward propagation of the viscoacoustic wavefield. Based on these strategies, we derive the corresponding gradient formula and implement a viscoacoustic VTI full waveform inversion (FWI). Numerical tests verify that our proposed viscoacoustic VTI FWI can produce accurate and stable inversion results for viscoacoustic VTI data sets. In addition, we test our method's sensitivity to velocity, Q, and anisotropic parameters. Our results show that the sensitivity to velocity is much higher than that to Q and anisotropic parameters. As such, our proposed method can produce acceptable inversion results as long as the Q and anisotropic parameters are within predefined thresholds.

  8. Yield Surfaces for Anisotropic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. D.; Thacker, B. H.

    1999-06-01

    Modern aerospace systems are incorporating composite materials into their structures. Often, the composite materials are anisotropic in their mechanical response due to the geometric layout of fibers. For many years, the failure surfaces of anisotropic materials were thought to be characterizable by a quadratic function in the stress, often referred to as a Tsai-Wu yield surface, or, in a more restrictive form, a Tsai-Hill yield surface. Such a representation does not work for materials that are strong in two directions and weak in one direction, which, unfortunately, is the case of most interest since it represents most composite plates. This paper demonstrates the impossibility of modeling the failure surface with both the Tsai-Wu and Tsai-Hill failure surfaces. We then present a yield surface based on the lemniscate, which is quartic in the stress. This new yield surface addresses the case of strong in two directions and weak in one. Calculations with a fragment impacting a composite plate modeled with the new yield surface are presented. Modifications of the yield surface are presented to allow, in a limited way, materials that are both anisotropic and have differing strengths in tension and compression.

  9. Anisotropic characterization of magnetorheological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmen, E.; Modler, N.; Gude, M.

    2017-06-01

    For the development of energy efficient lightweight parts novel function integrating materials are needed. Concerning this field of application magnetorheological (MR) fluids, MR elastomers and MR composites are promising materials allowing the adjustment of mechanical properties by an external magnetic field. A key issue for operating such structures in praxis is the magneto-mechanical description. Most rheological properties are gathered at laboratory conditions for high magnetic flux densities and a single field direction, which does not correspond to real praxis conditions. Although anisotropic formation of superstructures can be observed in MR suspensions (Fig. 1) or experimenters intentionally polymerize MR elastomers with anisotropic superstructures these MR materials are usually described in an external magnetic field as uniform, isotropic materials. This is due to missing possibilities for experimentally measuring field angle dependent properties and ways of distinguishing between material properties and frictional effects. Just a few scientific works experimentally investigated the influence of different field angles (Ambacher et al., 1992; Grants et al., 1990; Kuzhir et al., 2003) [1-3] or the influence of surface roughness on the shear behaviour of magnetic fluids (Tang and Conrad, 1996) [4]. The aim of this work is the introduction of a novel field angle cell allowing the determination of anisotropic mechanical properties for various MR materials depending on the applied magnetic field angle.

  10. Anisotropic spin dephasing of impurity-bound electron spins in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jieun; Sih, Vanessa; Venugopal, Aneesh

    2015-01-05

    We investigate the electron spin dynamics of n-type c-axis oriented bulk zinc oxide (ZnO) by using time-resolved Kerr rotation and resonant spin amplification measurements. Calculating resonant spin amplification using an anisotropic spin dephasing model reveals that there are two species involved in the spin dynamics, which we attribute to conduction and impurity-bound electron spins, respectively. We find that the impurity-bound electron spin dephasing mechanism is strongly anisotropic due to anisotropic exchange interactions. The identification of the two spin species and their dephasing mechanisms is further supported by the temperature, power, and wavelength dependence of the spin coherence measurements.

  11. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  12. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  13. Heat Flow Pattern and Thermal Resistance Modeling of Anisotropic Heat Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falakzaadeh, F.; Mehryar, R.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure safe operating temperatures of the ever smaller heat generating electronic devices, drastic measures should be taken. Heat spreaders are used to increase surface area, by spreading the heat without necessarily transferring it to the ambient in the first place. The heat flow pattern is investigated in heat spreaders and the fundamental differences regarding how heat conducts in different materials is addressed. Isotropic materials are compared with anisotropic ones having a specifically higher in-plane thermal conductivity than through plane direction. Thermal resistance models are proposed for anisotropic and isotropic heat spreaders in compliance with the order of magnitude of dimensions used in electronics packaging. After establishing thermal resistance models for both the isotropic and anisotropic cases, numerical results are used to find a correlation for predicting thermal resistance in anisotropic heat spreaders with high anisotropy ratios.

  14. Inverse boundary value problem for anisotropic heat operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungsun; Nakamura, Gen

    2011-04-01

    As a mathematical model of thermography, a reconstruction scheme called the dynamical probe method is given for identifying unknown separated inclusions inside a known anisotropic heat conductor. The heat conductivities of inclusions can be also anisotropic. The measured data is the so called Neumann to Dirichlet map which is a mathematical idealization of many measurements consisting of injecting heat flux and measuring the corresponding heat distribution on the part of the boundary of the known heat conductor by infrared camera for any fixed time interval. This idealization becomes relevant if we have for instance the cooling boundary condition on the other part of the boundary. This is due to the exponential decay of temperature in time which enables to conduct many measurements in a short time.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nanowire-based anisotropic conductors.

    PubMed

    Sykes, E Charles H; Andreu, Aja; Deadwyler, Dan A; Daneshvar, Kasra; El-Kouedi, Mahnaz

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the potential of commercially available porous templates to be used for the fabrication of functional anisotropic conductors. A galvanostatic deposition technique was used to fabricate arrays consisting of 200 nm diameter nanowires inside the pores of polycarbonate membranes. A tape lift-off procedure allowed the complete removal of any residual metal from both sides of the polymer membrane to form an anisotropic conductive film. The 10 microm thick film has roughly 3 x 10(8) nanowires per cm2, and it showed near zero electrical resistance perpendicular to the surface while appearing completely open to circuits between any points on the surface. The preparation of the film, characterization using SEM, AFM, and resistance measurements are presented. The 1D conductivity of these membranes may have many potential applications for microelectronic interconnects for packaging technologies.

  16. Textile-templated electrospun anisotropic scaffolds for regenerative cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Şenel Ayaz, H Gözde; Perets, Anat; Ayaz, Hasan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Govindaraj, Muthu; Brookstein, David; Lelkes, Peter I

    2014-10-01

    For patients with end-stage heart disease, the access to heart transplantation is limited due to the shortage of donor organs and to the potential for rejection of the donated organ. Therefore, current studies focus on bioengineering approaches for creating biomimetic cardiac patches that will assist in restoring cardiac function, by repairing and/or regenerating the intrinsically anisotropic myocardium. In this paper we present a simplified, straightforward approach for creating bioactive anisotropic cardiac patches, based on a combination of bioengineering and textile-manufacturing techniques in concert with nano-biotechnology based tissue-engineering stratagems. Using knitted conventional textiles, made of cotton or polyester yarns as template targets, we successfully electrospun anisotropic three-dimensional scaffolds from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), and thermoplastic polycarbonate-urethane (PCU, Bionate(®)). The surface topography and mechanical properties of textile-templated anisotropic scaffolds significantly differed from those of scaffolds electrospun from the same materials onto conventional 2-D flat-target electrospun scaffolds. Anisotropic textile-templated scaffolds electrospun from both PLGA and PCU, supported the adhesion and proliferation of H9C2 cardiac myoblasts cell line, and guided the cardiac tissue-like anisotropic organization of these cells in vitro. All cell-seeded PCU scaffolds exhibited mechanical properties comparable to those of a human heart, but only the cells on the polyester-templated scaffolds exhibited prolonged spontaneous synchronous contractility on the entire engineered construct for 10 days in vitro at a near physiologic frequency of ∼120 bpm. Taken together, the methods described here take advantage of straightforward established textile manufacturing strategies as an efficient and cost-effective approach to engineering 3D anisotropic, elastomeric PCU scaffolds that can serve as a cardiac patch.

  17. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  18. Gecko-inspired bidirectional double-sided adhesives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Gu, Ping; Wu, Xiaoping

    2014-05-14

    A new concept of gecko-inspired double-sided adhesives (DSAs) is presented. The DSAs, constructed by dual-angled (i.e. angled base and angled tip) micro-pillars on both sides of the backplane substrate, are fabricated by combinations of angled etching, mould replication, tip modification, and curing bonding. Two types of DSA, symmetric and antisymmetric (i.e. pillars are patterned symmetrically or antisymmetrically relative to the backplane), are fabricated and studied in comparison with the single-sided adhesive (SSA) counterparts through both non-conformal and conformal tests. Results indicate that the DSAs show controllable and bidirectional adhesion. Combination of the two pillar-layers can either amplify (for the antisymmetric DSA, providing a remarkable and durable adhesion capacity of 25.8 ± 2.8 N cm⁻² and a high anisotropy ratio of ∼8) or counteract (for the symmetric DSA, generating almost isotropic adhesion) the adhesion capacity and anisotropic level of one SSA (capacity of 16.2 ± 1.7 N cm⁻² and anisotropy ratio of ∼6). We demonstrate that these two DSAs can be utilized as a facile fastener for two individual objects and a small-scale delivery setup, respectively, complementing the functionality of the commonly studied SSA. As such, the double-sided patterning is believed to be a new branch in the further development of biomimetic dry adhesives.

  19. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug

    2012-05-24

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  20. Understanding adhesive dentistry.

    PubMed

    Burrow, Michael

    2010-03-01

    This review paper firstly provides an outline of the development of resin-based adhesives. A simple classification method is described based on whether an acid etching agent requiring a washing and drying step is used. These systems are called etch and rinse systems. The other adhesives that do not have the washing and drying steps are referred to as self-etching adhesives. The advantages and disadvantages of these groups of adhesives are discussed. Methods of adhering to the tooth surface are provided, especially where the resin-based adhesive reliability is difficult to control.

  1. Constitutive Equation for Anisotropic Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, O.

    2006-12-01

    In many rocks, due to the existence of well-defined fabric elements such as bedding, layering, foliation or lamination planes, or due to the existence of linear structures, anisotropy can be important. The symmetries most frequently encountered are: transverse isotropy and orthotropy. By adopting both theoretical and experimental approaches, many authors have investigated the effect of the presence within the rock of pronounced anisotropic feature on the mechanical behavior in the elastic regime and on strength properties. Fewer attempts however have been made to capture the anisotropy of rocks in the plastic range. In this paper an elastic/viscoplastic non-associated constitutive equation for an initially transversely isotropic material is presented. The model captures the observed dependency of the elastic moduli on the stress state. The limit of the elastic domain is given by an yield function whose expression is a priori unknown and is determined from data. The basic assumption adopted is that the type of anisotropy of the rock does not change during the deformation process. The anisotropy is thus described by a fourth order tensor invariant with respect to any transformation belonging to the symmetry group of the material. This tensor is assumed to be constant: it does not depend on time nor on deformation; A is involved in the expression of the flow rule, of the yield function, and of the failure criterion in the form of a transformed stress tensor. The components of the anisotropic tensor A are determined from the compressive strengths in conjunction with an anisotropic short- term failure The irreversibility is supposed to be due to transient creep, the irreversible stress work per unit volume being considered as hardening parameter. The adequacy of the model is demonstrated by applying it to a stratified sedimentary rock, Tournemire shale.

  2. Resistivity inversion in 2-D anisotropic media: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, Timothy; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Greenhalgh, Mark; Marescot, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Many rocks and layered/fractured sequences have a clearly expressed electrical anisotropy although it is rare in practice to incorporate anisotropy into resistivity inversion. In this contribution, we present a series of 2.5-D synthetic inversion experiments for various electrode configurations and 2-D anisotropic models. We examine and compare the image reconstructions obtained using the correct anisotropic inversion code with those obtained using the false but widely used isotropic assumption. Superior reconstruction in terms of reduced data misfit, true anomaly shape and position, and anisotropic background parameters were obtained when the correct anisotropic assumption was employed for medium to high coefficients of anisotropy. However, for low coefficient values the isotropic assumption produced better-quality results. When an erroneous isotropic inversion is performed on medium to high level anisotropic data, the images are dominated by patterns of banded artefacts and high data misfits. Various pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole data sets were investigated and evaluated for the accuracy of the inversion result. The eigenvalue spectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix and the formal resolution matrix were also computed to determine the information content and goodness of the results. We also present a data selection strategy based on high sensitivity measurements which drastically reduces the number of data to be inverted but still produces comparable results to that of the comprehensive data set. Inversion was carried out using transversely isotropic model parameters described in two different co-ordinate frames for the conductivity tensor, namely Cartesian versus natural or eigenframe. The Cartesian frame provided a more stable inversion product. This can be simply explained from inspection of the eigenspectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix for the two model descriptions.

  3. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  4. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  5. Anisotropic inflation from vector impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Kimura, Masashi; Soda, Jiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: mkimura@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2008-08-15

    We study an inflationary scenario with a vector impurity. We show that the universe undergoes anisotropic inflationary expansion due to a preferred direction determined by the vector. Using the slow roll approximation, we find a formula for determining the anisotropy of the inflationary universe. We discuss possible observable predictions of this scenario. In particular, it is stressed that primordial gravitational waves can be induced from curvature perturbations. Hence, even in low scale inflation, a sizable amount of primordial gravitational waves may be produced during inflation.

  6. Anisotropic Geometrodynamics in Cosmological Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siparov, Sergey

    2010-10-01

    Anisotropic geometrodynamics (AGD) is the GRT modification that takes into account the dependence of metric on the velocities of the sources which follows from the equivalence principle and from the inseparability of the field equations and geodesics equations. The AGD provides the explanation for the flat character of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies, for Tully-Fisher law, for some specific features of globular clusters behavior and for the essential excess of the observable gravitational lens effect over the predicted one. Neither dark matter nor arbitrary change of dynamics equations as in known approaches appears to be needed. Important cosmological consequences are discussed.

  7. Light Propagation through Anisotropic Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Kolmogorov stratospheric turbulence on star image motion,” Proc. SPIE 3126, 113–123 (1997). 5. B. E . Stribling, B. M . Welsh, and M . C. Roggemann...746407 (2009). 10. M . Chang, C. O. Font, F. Santiago, Y. Luna, E . Roura, and S. Restaino, “Marine environment optical propagation measure- ments,” Proc...Anisotropic factor as a function of alpha for several zeta values. Toselli et al. Vol. 28, No. 3 / March 2011 / J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 487 14. M . S

  8. Granular Segregation with Anisotropic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Tim

    2005-11-01

    The results from experimental investigations of horizontally vibrated mixtures of anisotropic poppy seeds and long chains of linked spheres will be presented. A critical packing fraction was observed to be required to initiate a transition to segregation. The average size of the resulting patterns was measured and the concentration ratio of the mixtures was varied by changing the number of chains present in the mixtures. A change in the order of the transition, from second to first order with associated hysteresis, was observed as the chain number was reduced. This gave rise to three distinct regions of behaviour: segregated, mixed and a bi-stable state.

  9. Signature of anisotropic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2010-09-15

    Our universe may have formed via bubble nucleation in an eternally inflating background. Furthermore, the background may have a compact dimension--the modulus of which tunnels out of a metastable minimum during bubble nucleation--which subsequently grows to become one of our three large spatial dimensions. When in this scenario our bubble universe collides with other ones like it, the collision geometry is constrained by the reduced symmetry of the tunneling instanton. While the regions affected by such bubble collisions still appear (to leading order) as disks in an observer's sky, the centers of these disks all lie on a single great circle, providing a distinct signature of anisotropic bubble nucleation.

  10. Dielectric Models in Adhesion and Extrapolations of Molecular Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    temperatures on polyethyleneterpthalate (PET), as measured by Silvain and others (Reference 34), fits reasonably well with its resistivity and inverse ...Interestingly, the inverse thermal conductivity at low temperatures shows the best agreement with the adhesion data, with Mg > Al > Ag > Cu, which suggests...between resistivity, inverse thermal conductivity, dielectric constant, and adhesion is interesting because it indicates that the loss mechanisms, which

  11. Anisotropic water reorientation around ions.

    PubMed

    Tielrooij, K J; van der Post, S T; Hunger, J; Bonn, M; Bakker, H J

    2011-11-03

    We study the reorientation dynamics of water molecules around ions using terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The results are discussed in relation to the ion-specific Hofmeister series and the concomitant "structure-making" and "structure-breaking" effects of ions on water. We show that when a dissolved salt consists of a strongly hydrated ion with a weakly hydrated counterion the reorientation of water molecules around the strongly hydrated ion is anisotropic, in the sense that differently charged ions affect reorientation along different molecular axes: cations mainly slow the reorientation dynamics of the water dipole vectors, and anions mainly slow down the reorientation dynamics of the hydroxyl group that points toward the anion. In both cases, motion along only one molecular axis is impeded, so that the hydration shell is best described as semirigid. In this semirigid hydration picture, water molecules in the first hydration shell show anisotropic reorientation, whereas water molecules outside the first hydration shell remain unaffected. The inferred anisotropy in molecular motion explains why terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, which probes dipolar relaxation, is more sensitive to cation hydration effects while femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy, which is sensitive to reorientation of hydroxyl groups, is more sensitive to anion hydration effects. We also show that dissolution of CsI-a salt for which both cation and anion are weakly hydrated-has little effect on water reorientation dynamics, with hydration water displaying dynamics that are similar to those in bulk water.

  12. Anisotropic Plasticity of BN Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhu, Menon; Srivastava, Deepak; Woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Plastic collapse of compressed BN nanotubes are investigated and compared with carbon nanotubes of similar nature. Using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) method for system containing B, N and C atoms we compute stiffness and plastic collapse of BN and C nanotubes under axial compression. For small compressional strain, BN nanotubes are found to be about 92% as stiff as similar C nanotubes. Due to BN bond buckling effect, however, the elastic limit of BN nanotubes is found to be more than C nanotubes. A route to plasticity is explored in which we find that at elastic limit the accumulated strain is released by a local plastic deformation of the nanotube. The mechanism of strain release and the resulting plastic deformation, however. are anisotropic in nature. The strain is released preferentially towards N as leading edge of a buckled BN bond and the tube, compressed at both ends, plastically collapses preferentially towards one end. Details of the anisotropic plasticity and prospective applications will be discussed in this presentation.

  13. Anisotropic non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Shouvik; Lee, Sung-Sik

    2016-11-01

    We study non-Fermi-liquid states that arise at the quantum critical points associated with the spin density wave (SDW) and charge density wave (CDW) transitions in metals with twofold rotational symmetry. We use the dimensional regularization scheme, where a one-dimensional Fermi surface is embedded in (3 -ɛ ) -dimensional momentum space. In three dimensions, quasilocal marginal Fermi liquids arise both at the SDW and CDW critical points: the speed of the collective mode along the ordering wave vector is logarithmically renormalized to zero compared to that of Fermi velocity. Below three dimensions, however, the SDW and CDW critical points exhibit drastically different behaviors. At the SDW critical point, a stable anisotropic non-Fermi-liquid state is realized for small ɛ , where not only time but also different spatial coordinates develop distinct anomalous dimensions. The non-Fermi liquid exhibits an emergent algebraic nesting as the patches of Fermi surface are deformed into a universal power-law shape near the hot spots. Due to the anisotropic scaling, the energy of incoherent spin fluctuations disperse with different power laws in different momentum directions. At the CDW critical point, on the other hand, the perturbative expansion breaks down immediately below three dimensions as the interaction renormalizes the speed of charge fluctuations to zero within a finite renormalization group scale through a two-loop effect. The difference originates from the fact that the vertex correction antiscreens the coupling at the SDW critical point whereas it screens at the CDW critical point.

  14. Recent progress in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The quark-gluon plasma created in a relativistic heavy-ion collisions possesses a sizable pressure anisotropy in the local rest frame at very early times after the initial nuclear impact and this anisotropy only slowly relaxes as the system evolves. In a kinetic theory picture, this translates into the existence of sizable momentum-space anisotropies in the underlying partonic distribution functions, < pL2> ≪ < pT2>. In such cases, it is better to reorganize the hydrodynamical expansion by taking into account momentum-space anisotropies at leading-order in the expansion instead of as a perturbative correction to an isotropic distribution. The resulting anisotropic hydrodynamics framework has been shown to more accurately describe the dynamics of rapidly expanding systems such as the quark-gluon plasma. In this proceedings contribution, I review the basic ideas of anisotropic hydrodynamics, recent progress, and present a few preliminary phenomenological predictions for identified particle spectra and elliptic flow.

  15. Postbuckling of laminated anisotropic panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffrey, Glenda L.

    1987-01-01

    A two-part study of the buckling and postbuckling of laminated anisotropic plates with bending-extensional coupling is presented. The first part involves the development and application of a modified Rayleigh-Ritz analysis technique. Modifications made to the classical technique can be grouped into three areas. First, known symmetries of anisotropic panels are exploited in the selection of approximation functions. Second, a reduced basis technique based on these same symmetries is applied in the linear range. Finally, geometric boundary conditions are enforced via an exterior penalty function approach, rather than relying on choice of approximation functions to satisfy these boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented for both the linear and nonlinear range, with additional studies made to determine the effect of variation in penalty parameter and number of basis vectors. In the second part, six panels possessing anisotropy and bending-extensional coupling are tested. Detailed comparisons are made between experiment and finite element results in order to gain insight into the postbuckling and failure characteristics of such panels. The panels are constructed using two different lamination sequences, and panels with three different aspect ratios were constructed for each lamination sequence.

  16. Scattering by a two-dimensional cavity filled with an anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bing; Ge, Debiao

    2003-10-01

    Using the Green function of an anisotropic medium in free space and the Green identity, the boundary integral equations for a two-dimensional homogeneous anisotropic medium are deduced. These equations are then applied to analyse the scattering problem of an open cavity filled with an anisotropic medium located in a conducting plane. To the best of our knowledge, this problem has not been dealt with in previous publications. We implement the boundary element method and generalized network formulation to solve the boundary integral equations and present some examples. The computed results are in good agreement with the one obtained by the modal matching method. This illustrates the feasibility of this scheme. Two examples of the radar cross section for an open cavity filled with an anisotropic medium are also presented.

  17. Thermal load leveling during silicon crystal growth from a melt using anisotropic materials

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Frederick M.; Helenbrook, Brian T.

    2016-10-11

    An apparatus for growing a silicon crystal substrate comprising a heat source, an anisotropic thermal load leveling component, a crucible, and a cold plate component is disclosed. The anisotropic thermal load leveling component possesses a high thermal conductivity and may be positioned atop the heat source to be operative to even-out temperature and heat flux variations emanating from the heat source. The crucible may be operative to contain molten silicon in which the top surface of the molten silicon may be defined as a growth interface. The crucible may be substantially surrounded by the anisotropic thermal load leveling component. The cold plate component may be positioned above the crucible to be operative with the anisotropic thermal load leveling component and heat source to maintain a uniform heat flux at the growth surface of the molten silicon.

  18. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  19. Ballistic Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Single-Atom Contacts.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, J; Otte, F; Néel, N; Weismann, A; Mokrousov, Y; Kröger, J; Berndt, R; Heinze, S

    2016-02-10

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance, that is, the sensitivity of the electrical resistance of magnetic materials on the magnetization direction, is expected to be strongly enhanced in ballistic transport through nanoscale junctions. However, unambiguous experimental evidence of this effect is difficult to achieve. We utilize single-atom junctions to measure this ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Single Co and Ir atoms are deposited on domains and domain walls of ferromagnetic Fe layers on W(110) to control their magnetization directions. They are contacted with nonmagnetic tips in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope to measure the junction conductances. Large changes of the magnetoresistance occur from the tunneling to the ballistic regime due to the competition of localized and delocalized d-orbitals, which are differently affected by spin-orbit coupling. This work shows that engineering the AMR at the single atom level is feasible.

  20. Pattern formation in skyrmionic materials with anisotropic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeister, Julian; Vedmedenko, Elena Y.; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic Skyrmions have attracted broad attention during recent years because they are regarded as promising candidates as bits of information in novel data storage devices. A broad range of theoretical and experimental investigations have been conducted with the consideration of axisymmetric Skyrmions in isotropic environments. However, one naturally observes a huge variety of anisotropic behavior in many experimentally relevant materials. In the present work, we investigate the influence of anisotropic environments onto the formation and behavior of the noncollinear spin states of skyrmionic materials by means of Monte Carlo calculations. We find skyrmionic textures which are far from having an axisymmetric shape. Furthermore, we show the possibility to employ periodic modulations of the environment to create skyrmionic tracks.

  1. Anisotropic Andreev reflection and Josephson effect in ballistic phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito

    2017-04-01

    We study Andreev reflection and the Josephson effect in a ballistic monolayer of black phosphorous, known as phosphorene. Due to the anisotropic band structure of this system, the supercurrent changes with an order of magnitude when comparing tunneling along two perpendicular directions in the monolayer. We show that the main reason for this effect is a large difference in the number of transverse modes in Andreev bound states. The oscillatory behavior of the supercurrent as a function of the length and chemical potential of the junction also differs substantially depending on the orientation of the superconducting electrodes deposited on the phosphorene sheet. For Andreev reflection, we show that gate voltaging controls the probability of this process and that the anisotropic behavior found in the supercurrent case is also present for conductance spectra.

  2. Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Garrod, David

    2014-02-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. New data on the role of desmosomes in development and human disease, especially wound healing and pemphigus, are briefly discussed, and the importance of regulation of the adhesiveness of desmosomes in tissue dynamics is considered.

  3. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  4. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  5. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  6. Investigation of Coating Compounds and Adhesives for Self-Supporting Collapsible Fuel Storage Tanks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    Optimum Polyether and Polyester Pol yols 13 B. Work Conducted at Mishawaka , m d , Facility on Adhesives 14 1. Screening of Adhesives for Bonding of Coati...Tables Page + 12 — Original Pulls in lbs/in on Polyether / 48 Polyester Polyurethane Coated Samples 13 - Fabric/Coating Adhesives Retained for 49 Long...Term Aging 14 - Adhesives Evaluation iri Bonding Polyether 50 Polyurethane to Fabrics 15 - Adhesives Evaluation in Bonding Polyether 52 Polyurethane

  7. Anisotropic Charge Distribution and Anisotropic van der Waals Radius Leading to Intriguing Anisotropic Noncovalent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hahn; Van Dung Doan; Cho, Woo Jong; Madhav, Miriyala Vijay; Kim, Kwang S.

    2014-01-01

    Although group (IV–VII) nonmetallic elements do not favor interacting with anionic species, there are counterexamples including the halogen bond. Such binding is known to be related to the charge deficiency because of the adjacent atom's electron withdrawing effect, which creates σ/π-holes at the bond-ends. However, a completely opposite behavior is exhibited by N2 and O2, which have electrostatically positive/negative character around cylindrical-bond-surface/bond-ends. Inspired by this, here we elucidate the unusual features and origin of the anisotropic noncovalent interactions in the ground and excited states of the 2nd and 3rd row elements belonging to groups IV–VII. The anisotropy in charge distributions and van der Waals radii of atoms in such molecular systems are scrutinized. This provides an understanding of their unusual molecular configuration, binding and recognition modes involved in new types of molecular assembling and engineering. This work would lead to the design of intriguing molecular systems exploiting anisotropic noncovalent interactions. PMID:25059645

  8. Deformation modeling and constitutive modeling for anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    A study of deformation mechanisms in the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 was conducted. Monotonic and cyclic tests were conducted from 20 to 1093 C. Both (001) and near-(123) crystals were tested, at strain rates of 0.5 and 50 percent/minute. The deformation behavior could be grouped into two temperature regimes: low temperatures, below 760 C; and high temperatures, above 820 to 950 C depending on the strain rate. At low temperatures, the mechanical behavior was very anisotropic. An orientation dependent CRSS, a tension-compression asymmetry, and anisotropic strain hardening were all observed. The material was deformed by planar octahedral slip. The anisotropic properties were correlated with the ease of cube cross-slip, as well as the number of active slip systems. At high temperatures, the material was isotropic, and deformed by homogeneous gamma by-pass. It was found that the temperature dependence of the formation of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults was responsible for the local minimum in the CRSS of this alloy at 400 C. It was proposed that the cube cross-slip process must be reversible. This was used to explain the reversible tension-compression asymmetry, and was used to study models of cross-slip. As a result, the cross-slip model proposed by Paidar, Pope and Vitek was found to be consistent with the proposed slip reversibility. The results were related to anisotropic viscoplastic constitutive models. The model proposed by Walter and Jordan was found to be capable of modeling all aspects of the material anisotropy. Temperature and strain rate boundaries for the model were proposed, and guidelines for numerical experiments were proposed.

  9. Electrochemical Deposition Of Conductive Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Distefano, Salvador; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show electrically conductive films are deposited on glassy carbon or indium tin oxide substrates by electrochemical polymerization of N-{(3-trimethoxy silyl) propyl} pyrrole or copolymerization with pyrrole. Copolymers of monomer I and pyrrole exhibit desired electrical conductivity as well as desired adhesion and other mechanical properties. When fully developed, new copolymerization process useful in making surface films of selectable conductivity.

  10. Borehole stability analysis in anisotropic rocks using Breakout Analysis for Anisotropic Rocks (BAAR) MATLAB-based code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piłacik, Alicja; Adamuszek, Marta; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    The elastic anisotropy of the rock medium e.g. transversely isotropic shale is an important factor affecting stress distribution around the borehole, and by so influencing the initiation and development of compressive and tensile failure zones affecting the borehole stability. The Breakout Analysis for Anisotropic Rocks (BAAR) code was developed in Matlab for the two-dimensional analysis of stress distribution around the borehole in an anisotropic thermo-poroelastic rock medium subjected to far-field loads. The comprehensive stability analysis, including numerous failure criteria was conducted for boreholes in the Pomeranian part of the Lower Palaeozoic Baltic Basin with emphasis on the transversely isotropic Sasino and Pasłek shale formations.

  11. Anisotropic invariance in minisuperspace models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Sabido, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce invariance under anisotropic transformations to cosmology. This invariance is one of the key ingredients of the theory of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point put forward by Hořava. We find that this new symmetry in the minisuperspace introduces characteristics to the model that can be relevant in the ultraviolet regime. For example, by canonical quantization we find a Schrödinger-type equation which avoids the problem of frozen time in quantum cosmology. For simple cases we obtain solutions to this quantum equation in a Kantowski-Sachs (KS) minisuperspace. At the classical level, we study KS and Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies, obtaining modifications to the solutions of general relativity that can be relevant in the early Universe.

  12. Anisotropic Decomposition of Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Bajar, Sean; Yulga, Brian; Yang, Wenge; Hooks, Daniel

    2008-01-17

    Using a white x-ray synchrotron beam, we have dynamically studied radiation-induced decomposition in single crystalline PETN and TATB. By monitoring the integrated intensity of selected diffraction spots via a CCD x-ray camera as a function of time, we have found that the decomposition rate varies dramatically depending upon the orientation of the crystalline axes relative to polarized x-ray beam and for differing diffracting conditions (spots) within the same crystalline orientation. We suggest that this effect is due to Compton scattering of the polarized x-rays with electron clouds that is dependent upon their relative orientation. This novel effect may yield valuable insight regarding anisotropic detonation sensitivity in energetic materials such as PETN.

  13. Anisotropic decomposition of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Bajar, Sean; Yulga, Brian; Yang Wenge; Hooks, Daniel

    2007-12-12

    Using a white x-ray synchrotron beam, we have dynamically studied radiation-induced decomposition in single crystalline PETN and TATB. By monitoring the integrated intensity of selected diffraction spots via a CCD x-ray camera as a function of time, we have found that the decomposition rate varies dramatically depending upon the orientation of the crystalline axes relative to polarized x-ray beam and for differing diffracting conditions (spots) within the same crystalline orientation. We suggest that this effect is due to Compton scattering of the polarized x-rays with electron clouds that is dependent upon their relative orientation. This novel effect may yield valuable insight regarding anisotropic detonation sensitivity in energetic materials such as PETN.

  14. Anisotropic grid adaptation in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, Siavash; Larsson, Johan

    2016-11-01

    The modeling errors depend directly on the grid (or filter) spacing in turbulence-resolving simulations (LES, DNS, DES, etc), and are typically at least as significant as the numerical errors. This makes adaptive grid-refinement complicated, since it prevents the estimation of the local error sources through numerical analysis. The present work attempts to address this difficulty with a physics-based error-source indicator that accounts for the anisotropy in the smallest resolved scales, which can thus be used to drive an anisotropic grid-adaptation process. The proposed error indicator is assessed on a sequence of problems, including turbulent channel flow and flows in more complex geometries. The formulation is geometrically general and applicable to complex geometries.

  15. Mechanics of anisotropic spring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Schwarz, J. M.; Das, Moumita

    2014-12-01

    We construct and analyze a model for a disordered linear spring network with anisotropy. The modeling is motivated by, for example, granular systems, nematic elastomers, and ultimately cytoskeletal networks exhibiting some underlying anisotropy. The model consists of a triangular lattice with two different bond occupation probabilities, px and py, for the linear springs. We develop an effective medium theory (EMT) to describe the network elasticity as a function of px and py. We find that the onset of rigidity in the EMT agrees with Maxwell constraint counting. We also find beyond linear behavior in the shear and bulk modulus as a function of occupation probability in the rigid phase for small strains, which differs from the isotropic case. We compare our EMT with numerical simulations to find rather good agreement. Finally, we discuss the implications of extending the reach of effective medium theory as well as draw connections with prior work on both anisotropic and isotropic spring networks.

  16. Modeling of Anisotropic Inelastic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J.; Nath, D.S.; Brown, A.A.; Casey, J.

    2000-02-25

    An experimental capability, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is being used to study the yield behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The objective of our research is to develop better constitutive equations for polycrystalline metals. We are experimentally determining the multidimensional yield surface of the material, both in its initial state and as it evolves during large inelastic deformations. These experiments provide a more complete picture of material behavior than can be obtained from traditional uniaxial tests. Experimental results show that actual material response can differ significantly from that predicted by simple idealized models. These results are being used to develop improved constitutive models of anisotropic plasticity for use in continuum computer codes.

  17. Thermodynamics of soft anisotropic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rey, Alejandro D

    2004-01-22

    The Gibbs-Duhem equation for interfaces between nematic liquid crystals and isotropic fluids is formulated and shown to be a generic equation for soft anisotropic surfaces. The one-to-one correspondence between the nematic and crystalline surface Gibbs-Duhem equations is established. Consistency between the surface Gibbs-Duhem equation and the classical equations of interfacial nematostatics is shown. Using a phase space that takes into account thermodynamics, liquid crystalline order, and geometric variables, the generalized nematic surface Gibbs-Duhem equation reveals the presence of couplings between shape, adsorption, temperature, and average molecular orientation. Merging the thermodynamic analysis with nematostatics results in a model for morphactancy, that is, adsorption-induced interfacial shape selection. The specific roles of gradient bulk Frank elasticity, interfacial tension, and anchoring energy are elucidated by analyzing particular paths in the thermodynamic-geometric phase space.

  18. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, W. A.; Grall, R. R.; Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Harmon, J. K.

    1996-07-01

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 Rsolar [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ``background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 Rsolar which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a ``Maltese Cross'' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 Rsolar, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 Rsolar

  19. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  20. Soy protein adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  1. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  2. Anisotropic thermal property of magnetically oriented carbon nanotube polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Dong, Shuai; Wang, Caiping; Wang, Xiaojie; Fang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a method for preparing multi-walled carbon nanotubea/polydimethylsiloxane (MWCNTs/PDMS) composites with enhanced thermal properties by using a high magnetic field (up to 10T). The MWCNT are oriented magnetically inside a silicone by in-situ polymerization method. The anisotropic structure would be expected to produce directional thermal conductivity. This study will provide a new approach to the development of anisotropic thermal-conductive polymer composites. Systematic studies with the preparation of silicone/graphene composites corresponding to their thermal and mechanical properties are carried out under various conditions: intensity of magnetic field, time, temperature, fillings. The effect of MWCNT/graphene content and preparation procedures on thermal conductivity of composites is investigated. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is used to reveal the mechanical properties of the composites in terms of the filling contents and magnetic field strength. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to observe the micro-structure of the MWCNT composites. The alignment of MWCNTs in PDMS matrix is also studied by Raman spectroscopy. The thermal conductivity measurements show that the magnetically aligned CNT-composites feature high anisotropy in thermal conductivity.

  3. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2011-01-01

    The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea) and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones). But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use. PMID:22073094

  4. LARC-13 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Sheppard, C. H.; Johnson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A LARC-13 type adhesive system was developed and property data obtained that demonstrated improved thermomechanical properties superior to base LARC-13 adhesive. An improved adhesive for 589 K (600 F) use was developed by physical or chemical modification of LARC-13. The adhesive was optimized for titanium and composite bonding, and a compatible surface preparation for titanium and composite substrates was identified. The data obtained with the improved adhesive system indicated it would meet the 589 K (600 F) properties desired for application on space shuttle components. Average titanium lap shear data were: (1) 21.1 MPa (3355 psi) at RT, (2) 13.0 MPa (1881 psi) at 600 F, and (3) 16.4 MPa (2335) after aging 125 hours at 600 F and tested at 600 F.

  5. Anisotropic inflation in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Sayantani

    2016-09-19

    We study anisotropic inflation with Gauss-Bonnet correction in presence of a massless vector field. In this scenario, exact anisotropic power-law inflation is realized when the inflaton potential, gauge coupling function and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling are exponential functions. We show that anisotropy becomes proportional to two slow-roll parameters of the theory and hence gets enhanced in presence of quadratic curvature corrections. The stability analysis reveals that anisotropic power-law solutions remain stable over a substantially large parameter region.

  6. Shaped beam scattering by an anisotropic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Huayong; Huang, Zhixiang; Wu, Xianliang

    2017-03-01

    An exact semi-analytical solution to the electromagnetic scattering from an optically anisotropic particle illuminated by an arbitrarily shaped beam is proposed. The scattered fields and fields within the anisotropic particle are expanded in terms of spherical vector wave functions. The unknown expansion coefficients are determined by using the boundary conditions and the method of moments scheme. For incidence of a Gaussian beam, zero-order Bessel beam and Hertzian electric dipole radiation, numerical results of the normalized differential scattering cross section are given to a uniaxial, gyrotropic anisotropic spheroid and circular cylinder of finite length. The scattering properties are analyzed concisely.

  7. Anisotropic superfluidity in a dipolar Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Ticknor, Christopher; Wilson, Ryan M; Bohn, John L

    2011-02-11

    We study the superfluid character of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (DBEC) in a quasi-two dimensional geometry. We consider the dipole polarization to have some nonzero projection into the plane of the condensate so that the effective interaction is anisotropic in this plane, yielding an anisotropic dispersion relation. By performing direct numerical simulations of a probe moving through the DBEC, we observe the sudden onset of drag or creation of vortex-antivortex pairs at critical velocities that depend strongly on the direction of the probe's motion. This anisotropy emerges because of the anisotropic manifestation of a rotonlike mode in the system.

  8. Anisotropic Superfluidity in a Dipolar Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ticknor, Christopher; Wilson, Ryan M.; Bohn, John L.

    2011-02-11

    We study the superfluid character of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (DBEC) in a quasi-two dimensional geometry. We consider the dipole polarization to have some nonzero projection into the plane of the condensate so that the effective interaction is anisotropic in this plane, yielding an anisotropic dispersion relation. By performing direct numerical simulations of a probe moving through the DBEC, we observe the sudden onset of drag or creation of vortex-antivortex pairs at critical velocities that depend strongly on the direction of the probe's motion. This anisotropy emerges because of the anisotropic manifestation of a rotonlike mode in the system.

  9. Self-adhesive resin cements: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Radovic, Ivana; Monticelli, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Vulicevic, Zoran R; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-08-01

    To summarize research conducted on self-adhesive cements and provide information on their properties, based on the results of original scientific full-length papers from peer-reviewed journals listed in PubMed. The search was conducted using the term "self-adhesive cement OR (trade names of currently available products)". Only in vitro studies that investigated two commercially available self-adhesive cements have been published so far. The results were summarized into the following categories: adhesion to tooth substrates (enamel, dentin, root dentin), adhesion to restorative materials (endodontic posts, ceramics, titanium abutments), marginal adaptation, microleakage, mechanical properties, biocompatibility, chemical adhesion and fluoride release, and ratings in clinical use. The majority of available literature data is based on studies that investigated one of the self-adhesive cements that are currently available to clinicians. According to the in vitro results, self-adhesive cement adhesion to dentin and various restorative materials is satisfactory and comparable to other multistep resin cements, while adhesion to enamel appears to be a weak link in their bonding properties. Long-term clinical performance of these materials needs to be assessed prior to making a general recommendation for their use.

  10. Identifying heterogeneous anisotropic properties in cerebral aneurysms: a pointwise approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Lu, Jia

    2011-04-01

    The traditional approaches of estimating heterogeneous properties in a soft tissue structure using optimization-based inverse methods often face difficulties because of the large number of unknowns to be simultaneously determined. This article proposes a new method for identifying the heterogeneous anisotropic nonlinear elastic properties in cerebral aneurysms. In this method, the local properties are determined directly from the pointwise stress-strain data, thus avoiding the need for simultaneously optimizing for the property values at all points/regions in the aneurysm. The stress distributions needed for a pointwise identification are computed using an inverse elastostatic method without invoking the material properties in question. This paradigm is tested numerically through simulated inflation tests on an image-based cerebral aneurysm sac. The wall tissue is modeled as an eight-ply laminate whose constitutive behavior is described by an anisotropic hyperelastic strain energy function containing four parameters. The parameters are assumed to vary continuously in the sac. Deformed configurations generated from forward finite element analysis are taken as input to inversely establish the parameter distributions. The delineated and the assigned distributions are in excellent agreement. A forward verification is conducted by comparing the displacement solutions obtained from the delineated and the assigned material parameters at a different pressure. The deviations in nodal displacements are found to be within 0.2% in most part of the sac. The study highlights some distinct features of the proposed method, and demonstrates the feasibility of organ level identification of the distributive anisotropic nonlinear properties in cerebral aneurysms.

  11. Nanoparticle-Structured Highly Sensitive and Anisotropic Gauge Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Luo, Jin; Shan, Shiyao; Lombardi, Jack P; Xu, Yvonne; Cartwright, Kelly; Lu, Susan; Poliks, Mark; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-09-16

    The ability to tune gauge factors in terms of magnitude and orientation is important for wearable and conformal electronics. Herein, a sensor device is described which is fabricated by assembling and printing molecularly linked thin films of gold nanoparticles on flexible microelectrodes with unusually high and anisotropic gauge factors. A sharp difference in gauge factors up to two to three orders of magnitude between bending perpendicular (B(⊥)) and parallel (B(||)) to the current flow directions is observed. The origin of the unusual high and anisotropic gauge factors is analyzed in terms of nanoparticle size, interparticle spacing, interparticle structure, and other parameters, and by considering the theoretical aspects of electron conduction mechanism and percolation pathway. A critical range of resistivity where a very small change in strain and the strain orientation is identified to impact the percolation pathway in a significant way, leading to the high and anisotropic gauge factors. The gauge anisotropy stems from molecular and nanoscale fine tuning of interparticle properties of molecularly linked nanoparticle assembly on flexible microelectrodes, which has important implication for the design of gauge sensors for highly sensitive detection of deformation in complex sensing environment or on complex curved surfaces such as wearable electronics and skin sensors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Optical anisotropic-dielectric response of mercuric iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, H.; Johs, B.; James, R.B.

    1997-10-01

    Anisotropic optical properties of mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) were studied by variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). Angular-dependent polarized reflectance and transmittance at three special optical-axis configurations, concerning the uniaxial anisotropic nature of the crystal, were derived to facilitate the VASE analysis. Two surface orientations of this tetragonal crystal were selected, i.e., an a-plane and a c-plane sample. Room-temperature multiple-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements from both samples with three different optical configurations along with polarized transmission measurements were jointly analyzed by the VASE analysis through multiple-sample, multiple-model methods. Anisotropic dielectric functions of single-crystal HgI{sub 2}, {var_epsilon}{sub {perpendicular}}({omega}) and {var_epsilon}{sub {parallel}}({omega}), for optical electric-field vector oriented perpendicular and parallel to the c axis, respectively, were obtained in the range 1.24{endash}5.1 eV. Different absorption energy-band edges, at room temperature, were observed from the ordinary and extraordinary dielectric responses at 2.25 and 2.43 eV, respectively. This is consistent with the results related to the optical transitions between the conduction band and the heavy- and light-hole valence band indicated by theoretical studies. A surface model related to the surface roughness and defects of HgI{sub 2} was established and characterized by the VASE analysis. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Coefficient adaptive triangulation for strongly anisotropic problems

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.; Donato, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Second order elliptic partial differential equations arise in many important applications, including flow through porous media, heat conduction, the distribution of electrical or magnetic potential. The prototype is the Laplace problem, which in discrete form produces a coefficient matrix that is relatively easy to solve in a regular domain. However, the presence of anisotropy produces a matrix whose condition number is increased, making the resulting linear system more difficult to solve. In this work, we take the anisotropy into account in the discretization by mapping each anisotropic region into a ``stretched`` coordinate space in which the anisotropy is removed. The region is then uniformly triangulated, and the resulting triangulation mapped back to the original space. The effect is to generate long slender triangles that are oriented in the direction of ``preferred flow.`` Slender triangles are generally regarded as numerically undesirable since they tend to cause poor conditioning; however, our triangulation has the effect of producing effective isotropy, thus improving the condition number of the resulting coefficient matrix.

  14. Cyanoacrylate Adhesives in Eye Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EYE, *WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*ADHESIVES, EYE), (*ACRYLIC RESINS, ADHESIVES), CORNEA , HEALING, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), NECROSIS, SURGICAL SUPPLIES, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), SURGERY, THERAPY

  15. Design guidelines for use of adhesives and organic coatings in hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, S. V.; Licari, J. J.; Perkins, K. L.; Schramm, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the reliability of organic adhesives in hybrid microcircuits. The objectives were twofold: (1) to identify and investigate problem areas that could result from the use of organic adhesives and (2) to develop evaluation tests to quantify the extent to which these problems occur for commercially available adhesives. Efforts were focused on electrically conductive adhesives. Also, a study was made to evaluate selected organic coatings for contamination protection for hybrid microcircuits.

  16. Borehole Deformation and Failure in Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, Oliver; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Lumley, David

    2010-05-01

    Borehole breakouts develop due to compressive shear failure along the borehole wall and subsequent spalling of near wellbore rock. These compressive shear failures can occur during drilling and lead to a borehole enlargement in the direction of the minimum horizontal stress. In order to investigate the initiation of borehole breakouts in anisotropic media a numerical analysis of the borehole deformation has been performed. The numerical model is based on an extensive geophysical and geomechanical dataset, provided by BHP Billiton Petroleum. This dataset was established during the development and production phase of an oil reservoir on the North West Shelf, Western Australia. The aim of this study is to estimate the severity of the influence of anisotropy on the breakout process. It is proposed that there is a hierarchy among the possible influences on the breakout process: 1. The regional stress field has a first order effect on the borehole breakout direction. 2. This is followed by a preferential fracture direction or anisotropic failure criterion of the medium. 3. And finally the elastic anisotropy of the medium affecting the local stress field around the borehole. A clear separation of these influences through methods of observation is not always trivial. Firstly, the preferential fracture direction and the elastic anisotropy, at least to some degree, are functions of the regional stress field. Secondly, most of the knowledge we have about the regional stress field in relatively aseismic regions is inferred from borehole breakout data. Therefore a numerical simulation is chosen as a method of study. Material properties like elastic anisotropy or failure criterion and even their dependency on the stress field can easily be manipulated. This geophysical and geomechanical data is used to populate the numerical model. The regional stress field is implemented as a boundary condition. The commercial Finite Element package ABAQUS is used to obtain the stress / strain

  17. Anisotropic amplification of proton transport in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Fawaz, Mohammed; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Gautam, Manu; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2017-07-01

    Though graphene oxide (GO) membrane shuttles protons under humid conditions, it suffer severe disintegration and anhydrous conditions lead to abysmal ionic conductivity. The trade-off between mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity challenge the amplification of GO's ionic transport under anhydrous conditions. We show anisotropic amplification of GO's ionic transport with a selective amplification of in plane contribution under anhydrous conditions by doping it with a plant extract, phytic acid (PA). The hygroscopic nature of PA stabilized interlayer water molecules and peculiar geometry of sbnd OH functionalities around saturated hydrocarbon ring anisotropically enhanced ionic transport amplifying the fuel cell performance metrics.

  18. Negative refraction in anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, S. T.

    2004-03-01

    Left-handed materials (LHM) are materials in which the direction of wave propagation S is opposite to the wave vector k . S <0 .[1,2,3] LHM exhibit nagative refraction. Experiments have been carried out on a medium consisting of arrays of metallic rings and wrires.[3] An example of a different class of anisotropic left-handed materials are metallic magnetic granular composites. Based on the effective medium approximation, we show that by incorporating metallic magnetic nanoparticles into an appropriate insulating matrix, it may be possible to prepare a composite medium of low eddy current loss which is left-handed for electromagnetic waves propagating in some special direction and polarization in a frequency region near the ferromagnetic resonance frequency.[4,5] This composite may be easier to make on an industrial scale. In addition, its physical properties may be easily tuned by rotating the magnetization locally. The physics involved seems to be different from the original argument.[1,2] In our argument[5], the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the metal is much larger than the real part, opposite to the original argument. In anisotropic materials so that some of the susceptibilities are negative, the criterion for LHM may not be the same as that for negative refraction.[6] Ansiotropic materials exhibit a richer manifold of anomlous behaviour[6,7,8] and offers more flexibility in apllications.[8] More recently it was found that negative refraction can occur in anisotropic materials where all the susceptibilities are positive.[9] We found that the range of applicability of this effect is much larger than originally thought.[10] S. T. Chui was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research, by the Army Research Laboratory through the Center of Composite Materials at the University of Delaware, by DARPA and by the NSF. [1] J.B.Pendry, A.J.Holden, W.J.Stewart, and I.Youngs, Phys. Rev. Lett 76, 4773 (1996). [2] V.G.Veselago, Sov. Phys. Usp. 10, 509

  19. Enhancing Interfacial Bonding between Anisotropically Oriented Grains Using a Glue-Nanofiller for Advanced Li-Ion Battery Cathode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Lee, Sanghan; Cho, Hyeon; Kim, Junhyeok; Lee, Jieun; Park, Suhyeon; Joo, Se Hun; Kim, Su Hwan; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-06-01

    Formation of a glue-nanofiller layer between grains, consisting of a middle-temperature spinel-like Lix CoO2 phase, reinforces the strength of the incoherent interfacial binding between anisotropically oriented grains by enhancing the face-to-face adhesion strength. The cathode treated with the glue-layer exhibits steady cycling performance at both room-temperature and 60 °C. These results represent a step forward in advanced lithium-ion batteries via simple cathode coating.

  20. Anisotropic wettability on imprinted hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengxiang; Low, Hong Yee

    2007-07-03

    A series of two-level hierarchical structures on polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were fabricated using sequential nanoimprinting lithography (NIL). The hierarchical structures consist of micrometer and sub-micrometer scale grating imprinted with varying orientations. Through water contact angle measurements, these surface hierarchical structures showed a wide range of anisotropic wettabilities on PMMA and PS, with PMMA having an anisotropic wettability from 6 degrees to 54 degrees and PS having an anisotropic wettability from 8 degrees to 32 degrees. At the same time, the water contact angle of PMMA and PS can be tuned to nearly 120 degrees without modifying the surface chemistry. A tunable anisotropic wettability is beneficial for applications where controlling the direction of liquid flow is important, such as in microfluidic devices.

  1. Mussel adhesion - essential footwork.

    PubMed

    Waite, J Herbert

    2017-02-15

    Robust adhesion to wet, salt-encrusted, corroded and slimy surfaces has been an essential adaptation in the life histories of sessile marine organisms for hundreds of millions of years, but it remains a major impasse for technology. Mussel adhesion has served as one of many model systems providing a fundamental understanding of what is required for attachment to wet surfaces. Most polymer engineers have focused on the use of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (Dopa), a peculiar but abundant catecholic amino acid in mussel adhesive proteins. The premise of this Review is that although Dopa does have the potential for diverse cohesive and adhesive interactions, these will be difficult to achieve in synthetic homologs without a deeper knowledge of mussel biology; that is, how, at different length and time scales, mussels regulate the reactivity of their adhesive proteins. To deposit adhesive proteins onto target surfaces, the mussel foot creates an insulated reaction chamber with extreme reaction conditions such as low pH, low ionic strength and high reducing poise. These conditions enable adhesive proteins to undergo controlled fluid-fluid phase separation, surface adsorption and spreading, microstructure formation and, finally, solidification. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  3. Inflation in anisotropic scalar-tensor theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pimentel, Luis O.; Stein-Schabes, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    The existence of an inflationary phase in anisotropic Scalar-Tensor Theories is investigated by means of a conformal transformation that allows us to rewrite these theories as gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field with a nontrivial potential. The explicit form of the potential is then used and the No Hair Theorem concludes that there is an inflationary phase in all open or flat anisotropic spacetimes in these theories. Several examples are constructed where the effect becomes manifest.

  4. Anisotropic Interactions between Cold Rydberg Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2015-0002 Anisotropic interactions between cold Rydberg atoms Luis Marcassa INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 09/28...34Anisotropic Interactions Between Cold Rydberg Atoms " 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0434 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...processes in an atomic sample trapped in a CO2 optical dipole trap. The process was investigated as a function of: i) atomic density; ii) dc electric

  5. Phase space analysis in anisotropic optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Chumakov, Sergey M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1995-01-01

    From the minimal action principle follows the Hamilton equations of evolution for geometric optical rays in anisotropic media. As in classical mechanics of velocity-dependent potentials, the velocity and the canonical momentum are not parallel, but differ by an anisotropy vector potential, similar to that of linear electromagnetism. Descartes' well known diagram for refraction is generalized and a factorization theorem holds for interfaces between two anisotropic media.

  6. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  7. Adhesive Bonding for Shelters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    weru uvaluated, the type of etch bath " sweetener " and the type of rinse\\water used. The type of etch bath " sweetener " was found to have a dramatic effect...EA9601NW Adhesives on 50521134 Bare Adherenas 39 13 Stress-Durability Behavior Sun-mary 40 14 Effect of Ltch Bath Sweetening Alloy on Interracial Durability...34"’ -,,• , •’• •"• " ,,,,, 9 Adhesive/Primer/Adherend Alloy/Surface Preparation Combinations Adherend OFPL Sweetening Rinse Adhesive:Primer Alloy Alloy

  8. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  9. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  10. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  11. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  12. SAR Segmentation using Anisotropic Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intajag, Sathit; Tipsuwanporn, Vittaya; Cheevasuwit, Fusak

    Speckle effects are commonly observed in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The human eye is capable of deriving meaningful information from SAR images; however, an automatic or semi-automatic processing algorithm has difficulty in distinguishing objects in the images because of noise effects present in those images. This paper presents a segmentation method for SAR images, which employs an anisotropic diffusion algorithm. In the proposed scheme, a SAR image is transformed into a logarithmic domain where the diffusion process is used to grow homogeneous regions in the noise environment until the regions reach some criteria for homogeneity; consequently, the segmented image in the logarithm domain is converted to the intensity domain by an exponential function. To grow homogeneous regions the adaptive diffusion method is introduced with a tensor technique in which tensor data are varied with the neighboring pixels. The diffusion algorithm will stop itself by a standard deviation divided by the mean, which is provided according to the homogeneity criteria. Results are shown on both synthetic and satellite SAR images. The evaluation of the proposed method employs the theoretical gain of equivalent numbers of looks (ENL).

  13. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Spin precession in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raes, B.; Cummings, A. W.; Bonell, F.; Costache, M. V.; Sierra, J. F.; Roche, S.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2017-02-01

    We generalize the diffusive model for spin injection and detection in nonlocal spin structures to account for spin precession under an applied magnetic field in an anisotropic medium, for which the spin lifetime is not unique and depends on the spin orientation. We demonstrate that the spin precession (Hanle) line shape is strongly dependent on the degree of anisotropy and on the orientation of the magnetic field. In particular, we show that the anisotropy of the spin lifetime can be extracted from the measured spin signal, after dephasing in an oblique magnetic field, by using an analytical formula with a single fitting parameter. Alternatively, after identifying the fingerprints associated with the anisotropy, we propose a simple scaling of the Hanle line shapes at specific magnetic field orientations that results in a universal curve only in the isotropic case. The deviation from the universal curve can be used as a complementary means of quantifying the anisotropy by direct comparison with the solution of our generalized model. Finally, we applied our model to graphene devices and find that the spin relaxation for graphene on silicon oxide is isotropic within our experimental resolution.

  15. SAW imaging in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Sharples, S. D.; Somekh, M. G.

    2000-05-01

    We have developed a non-contact laser ultrasound SAW microscope operating at 82 MHz and harmonics thereof, which is capable of rapid image acquisition. Conventional acoustic microscopy is largely immune to the effects of aberration because of the very short acoustic path length that is imposed by the presence of the couplant. The couplant also limits the sensitivity of contacting acoustic microscopy. In laser ultrasound systems the absence of couplant means that longer path lengths are possible but the anisotropy and grain structure of the material can aberrate the passage of the acoustic wave limiting the performance of the system and producing acoustic speckle. We show that even weakly aberrating materials (e.g. aluminum) can produce significant speckle effects. We present experimental non-contacting imaging results on isotropic and textured anisotropic samples; together with simulated images. The results demonstrate that the speckle statistics of the experimental and simulated results agree well; thus demonstrating the cause of the speckle in the experimental images. We demonstrate how a wavefront sensor and adaptation of the optical excitation profile offers a solution to the problem of texture in non-contacting SAW imaging. Finally, we discuss how some material properties may be inferred from the speckle.

  16. Magnon planar Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance in a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Cornelissen, L. J.; Shan, J.; Kuschel, T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2017-04-01

    Electrical resistivities can be different for charge currents traveling parallel or perpendicular to the magnetization in magnetically ordered conductors or semiconductors, resulting in the well-known planar Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance. Here we study the analogous anisotropic magnetotransport behavior for magnons in a magnetic insulator Y3Fe5O12 . Electrical and thermal magnon injection, and electrical detection methods, are used at room temperature with transverse and longitudinal geometries to measure the magnon planar Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance, respectively. We observe that the relative difference between magnon current conductivities parallel and perpendicular to the magnetization, with respect to the average magnon conductivity, i.e., | (σ∥m-σ⊥m) /σ0m| , is approximately 5% with the majority of the measured devices showing σ⊥m>σ∥m .

  17. Development of Capsular Adhesive Systems and Evaluation of Their Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-26

    Adhesives; Microencapsulation processes, Epoxy resins, Anaerobic systems, Characterization, Microcapsules properties, Stability, Liquid Chromatography...II. TECHNICAL DISCUSSION ................... 5 A. Complementary microencapsulation stu- dies ............................... 5 1...initial phase of this program (1), studies on microencapsulation of adhesive systems were conducted in which the capsule shells are made from the

  18. Fabrication and characterization of thermoplastic elastomer dry adhesives with high strength and low contamination.

    PubMed

    Bin Khaled, Walid; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-05-14

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyurethane elastomers have commonly been used to manufacture mushroom shaped gecko-inspired dry adhesives with high normal adhesion strength. However, the thermosetting nature of these two materials severely limits the commercial viability of their manufacturing due to long curing times and high material costs. In this work, we introduce poly(styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene) (SEBS) thermoplastic elastomers as an alternative for the manufacture of mushroom shaped dry adhesives with both directional and nondirectional performance. These materials are attractive for their potential to be less contaminating via oligomer transfer than thermoset elastomers, as well as being more suited to mass manufacturing. Low material transfer properties are attractive for adhesives that could potentially be used in cleanroom environments for microscale assembly and handling in which device contamination is a serious concern. We characterized a thermoplastic elastomer in terms of oligomer transfer using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found that the SEBS transfers negligible amounts of its own oligomers, during contact with a gold-coated silicon surface, which may be representative of the metallic bond pads found in micro-electro-mechanical systems devices. We also demonstrate the fabrication of mushroom shaped isotropic and anisotropic adhesive fibers with two different SEBS elastomer grades using thermocompression molding and characterize the adhesives in terms of their shear-enhanced normal adhesion strength. The overall adhesion of one of the thermoplastic elastomer adhesives was found to be stronger or comparable to their polyurethane counterparts with identical dimensions.

  19. Addition polyimide adhesives containing ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicon elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin either as physical polyblends, or by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after ageing at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  20. Adhesive fracture mechanics. [stress analysis for bond line interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    In studies of fracture mechanics the adhesive fracture energy is regarded as a fundamental property of the adhesive system. It is pointed out that the value of the adhesive fracture energy depends on surface preparation, curing conditions, and absorbed monolayers. A test method reported makes use of a disk whose peripheral part is bonded to a substrate material. Pressure is injected into the unbonded central part of the disk. At a certain critical pressure value adhesive failure can be observed. A numerical stress analysis involving arbitrary geometries is conducted.

  1. Addition polyimide adhesives containing ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicon elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin either as physical polyblends, or by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after ageing at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  2. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  3. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  4. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  5. Cellulose-Templated Graphene Monoliths with Anisotropic Mechanical, Thermal, and Electrical Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rujing; Chen, Qiao; Zhen, Zhen; Jiang, Xin; Zhong, Minlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2015-09-02

    Assembling particular building blocks into composites with diverse targeted structures has attracted considerable interest for understanding its new properties and expanding the potential applications. Anisotropic organization is considered as a frequently used targeted architecture and possesses many peculiar properties because of its unusual shapes. Here, we show that anisotropic graphene monoliths (AGMs), three-dimensional architectures of well-aligned graphene sheets obtained by a dip-coating method using cellulose acetate fibers as templates show thermal-insulating, fire-retardant, and anisotropic properties. They exhibit a feature of higher mechanical strength and thermal/electrical conductivities in the axial direction than in the radial direction. Elastic polymer resins are then introduced into the pores of the AGMs to form conductive and flexible composites. The composites, as AGMs, retain the unique anisotropic properties, revealing opposite resistance change under compressions in different directions. The outstanding anisotropic properties of AGMs make them possible to be applied in the fields of thermal insulation, integrated circuits, and electromechanical devices.

  6. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  7. Adhesive and Elastic Properties of DOPA-Containing Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Rebecca; Shull, Ken; Messersmith, Phillip; Madhav, Priti

    2001-03-01

    It was recently determined that L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is primarily responsible for both the adhesion and crosslinking that occurs in mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). In wet environments, MAPs form strong adhesive bonds to a large variety of substrates, making DOPA-modified polymers very interesting for adhesion studies. Polymer materials modified from or modeled after DOPA have large potential as biomedical adhesives and as adhesives in aqueous environments. The mechanical and adhesive properties of a DOPA-containing hydrogel were tested using an axisymmetric adhesion test modified from the method of Johnson, Kendall and Roberts. In accordance with this technique, a rigid, hemispherical indenter was brought into contact with hydrogel samples, generating load and displacement data. In addition, images were taken of the contact between the sample and indenter. Using the collected data and images, the adhesive properties of the material were calculated. Separate experiments were conducted in conditions of varying humidity and aqueous environments in order to determine any changes in the adhesive behavior of the hydrogel. Data resulting from experiments in each type of environment will be presented.

  8. Adhesion to porcelain and metal.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Raymond L

    2007-04-01

    Some compelling clinical benefits of porcelain and metal adhesion are presented. Current concepts for metal adhesion are reviewed, including modifications of metal surface and resin chemistry. Porcelain adhesion is reviewed, including little-known methods that use silane but no hydrofluoric acid etching. Clinical protocols for use of metal and porcelain adhesives are presented.

  9. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  10. Many Roles of Wood Adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2014-01-01

    Although wood bonding is one of the oldest applications of adhesives, going back to early recorded history (1), some aspects of wood bonds are still not fully understood. Most books in the general area of adhesives and adhesion do not cover wood bonding. However, a clearer understanding of wood bonding and wood adhesives can lead to improved products. This is important...

  11. Cryogenic/high temperature structural adhesives. [for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Studies were conducted to develop a structural adhesive system possessing useful properties over a 20 to 589 K temperature range. Adhesive systems based on polyimide, polyphenylquinoxaline, polyquinoxaline, polybenzothiazole and polybenzimidazole polymers first were screened for suitability. Detailed evaluation of two polyimide adhesive systems, BR34/FM34 and P4/A5F or P4A/A5FA, and one polyphenylquinoxaline adhesive system, PPQ (IMW), then was performed. Property information was generated over the full temperature range for shear strength, stressed and unstressed thermal aging, thermal shock, and coefficient of thermal expansion. Both polyimide adhesive systems were identified as being capable of providing structural adhesive joints for cryogenic/high temperature service.

  12. Thermophysical and flammability characterization of phosphorylated epoxy adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Giants, T. W.; Bilow, N.; Hsu, M.-T.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the thermophysical and flammability properties of a phosphorylated epoxy adhesive, which has potential applications in aircraft interior panels, are described. The adhesive consists of stoichiometric ratios of bis(3-glycidyloxphenyl)methylphosphine oxide and bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide containing approximately 7.5% phosphorus. Preliminary data are presented from adhesive bonding studies conducted utilizing this adhesive with polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) film and phenolic-glass laminates. Limiting oxygen index and smoke density data are presented and compared with those of the tetraglycidyl methylene dianiline epoxy resin-adhesive system currently used in aircraft interiors. Initial results indicate that the phosphorylated epoxy compound has excellent adhesive properties when used with PVF film and that desirable fire-resistant properties are maintained.

  13. Thermophysical and flammability characterization of phosphorylated epoxy adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Giants, T. W.; Bilow, N.; Hsu, M.-T.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the thermophysical and flammability properties of a phosphorylated epoxy adhesive, which has potential applications in aircraft interior panels, are described. The adhesive consists of stoichiometric ratios of bis(3-glycidyloxphenyl)methylphosphine oxide and bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide containing approximately 7.5% phosphorus. Preliminary data are presented from adhesive bonding studies conducted utilizing this adhesive with polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) film and phenolic-glass laminates. Limiting oxygen index and smoke density data are presented and compared with those of the tetraglycidyl methylene dianiline epoxy resin-adhesive system currently used in aircraft interiors. Initial results indicate that the phosphorylated epoxy compound has excellent adhesive properties when used with PVF film and that desirable fire-resistant properties are maintained.

  14. Investigation of anisotropic thermal transport in polymers using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto Simavilla, David; Venerus, David; Schieber, Jay

    2014-03-01

    During manufacturing, the anisotropic nature of thermal transport in flowing polymers plays an important role in the final properties of materials. In our laboratory, we have investigated anisotropic thermal conductivity in polymers subjected to deformation using an optical technique based on Forced Rayleigh Scattering (FRS). For over a decade, our setup has been the only one capable of testing the linear relationship between anisotropy in thermal conductivity and stress, known as the stress-thermal rule. In order to overcome some of the limitations in the optical properties of materials inherent to FRS, we have recently developed a complementary technique based on infrared thermography (IRT). We validate IRT technique by comparing measurements of anisotropy in thermal conductivity on crosslinked networks against those obtained with FRS. The main advantage of IRT method is that, it allows us to study optically thick materials, including polymers that are prone to strain induced crystallization. Additionally, examination of IRT transient state experiments enables us to study the effect of deformation on other properties such as specific heat capacity.

  15. Metallic adhesion in atomic-size junctions.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Bollinger, G; Joyez, P; Agraït, N

    2004-09-10

    We report high resolution simultaneous measurements of electrical conductance and force gradient between two sharp gold tips as their separation is varied from the tunneling distance to atomic-size contact. The use of atomically sharp tips minimizes van der Waals interaction, making it possible to identify the short-range metallic adhesion contribution to the total force.

  16. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  17. Lamb wave attenuation in a rough plate. I. Analytical and experimental results in an anisotropic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, Catherine; Leduc, Damien; Morvan, Bruno; Depollier, Claude; Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine; Izbicki, Jean-Louis; Pareige, Pascal; Bruneau, Michel

    2008-10-01

    The characterization of bounded roughened surfaces before applying adhesive joint, in order to detect poor cohesive and adhesive properties, remains difficult. Earlier studies based on analysis of surface wave (Rayleigh waves or Scholte waves) are not really adapted to the characterization of such surfaces. Guided acoustic waves, i.e., Lamb waves, turn out to be the best adapted kind of waves to characterize this roughness when plates are bounded together. It is the aim of this paper to provide analytical and experimental approaches to analyze the behavior of Lamb waves propagating inside plates with a rough surface (small perturbations). First, experimental results of the attenuation effects are given on roughened glass plates. Second, the attenuation factor of the Lamb wave in an anisotropic rough solid plate is calculated through a complex analytical model of the dispersion equation which accounts for the effect of the power spectrum density of the rough profile (including the effect of the statistical roughness parameters).

  18. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    PubMed Central

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R.; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S.; Samal, Akshaya K.; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications. PMID:22110867

  19. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions.

    PubMed

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S; Samal, Akshaya K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  20. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Nopoush, Mohammad; Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    We use quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics to study an azimuthally symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. In quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics, a single finite-temperature quasiparticle mass is introduced and fit to the lattice data in order to implement a realistic equation of state (EoS). We compare results obtained by using the quasiparticle method with the standard method of imposing the EoS in anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. Using these three methods, we extract the primordial particle spectra, total number of charged particles, and average transverse momentum for various values of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η /s . We find that the three methods agree well for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η /s , but differ at large η /s , with the standard anisotropic EoS method showing suppressed production at low transverse-momentum compared with the other two methods considered. Finally, we demonstrate explicitly that, when using standard viscous hydrodynamics, the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative at large pT. Such behavior is not seen in either anisotropic hydrodynamics approach, irrespective of the value of η /s .