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Sample records for anisotropic gle model

  1. Anisotropic multiple bounce models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalhau, Anna Paula; Peter, Patrick; Vitenti, Sandro D. P.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the Galileon ghost condensate implementation of a bouncing cosmological model in the presence of a non-negligible anisotropic stress. We exhibit its structure, which we find to be far richer than previously thought. In particular, even restricting attention to a single set of underlying microscopic parameters, we obtain, numerically, many qualitatively different regimes: depending on the initial conditions on the scalar field leading the dynamics of the Universe, the contraction phase can evolve directly towards a singularity, avoid it by bouncing once, or even bounce many times before settling into an ever-expanding phase. We clarify the behavior of the anisotropies in these various situations.

  2. Dbp5, Gle1-IP6 and Nup159: a working model for mRNP export.

    PubMed

    Folkmann, Andrew W; Noble, Kristen N; Cole, Charles N; Wente, Susan R

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is a stepwise process involving distinct cellular processes including transcription, mRNA (mRNA) processing, mRNA export, and translation. As mRNAs are being synthesized, proteins associate with the RNA to form messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). Previous studies have demonstrated that the RNA-binding protein composition of these mRNPs is dynamic, changing as the mRNP moves through the different steps of gene expression, and playing a critical role in these events. An important step during this maturation process occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) where the export protein Gle1 bound to inositol hexakisphosphate (IP 6) spatially activates the ATP-hydrolysis and mRNP-remodeling activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5. Recent work from our laboratory and others has provided important insights into the function and regulation of Dbp5. These include a more detailed explanation of the mechanism of Dbp5 RNP remodeling, the role of Gle1-IP6 in stimulating Dbp5 ATPase activity, and the identification of a novel paradigm for regulation of Dbp5 by Nup159. Based on in vitro biochemical assays, X-ray crystallography, and corresponding in vivo phenotypes, we propose here an updated model of the Dbp5 cycle during mRNP export through the NPC. This takes into account all available data and provides a platform for future studies.

  3. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  4. On the prediction of GLE events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Marlon; Reyes, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    A model for predicting the occurrence of GLE events is presented. This model uses the UMASEP scheme based on the lag-correlation between the time derivatives of soft X-ray flux (SXR) and near-earth proton fluxes (Núñez, 2011, 2015). We extended this approach with the correlation between SXR and ground-level neutron measurements. This model was calibrated with X-ray, proton and neutron data obtained during the period 1989-2015 from the GOES/HEPAD instrument, and neutron data from the Neutron Monitor Data Base (NMDB). During this period, 32 GLE events were detected by neutron monitor stations. We consider that a GLE prediction is successful when it is triggered before the first GLE alert is issued by any neutron station of the NMDB network. For the most recent 16 years (2015-2000), the model was able to issue successful predictions for the 53.8% (7 of 13 GLE events), obtaining a false alarm ratio (FAR) of 36.4% (4/11), and an average warning time of 10 min. For the first years of the evaluation period (1989-1999), the model was able to issue successful predictions for the 31.6% (6 of 19 GLE events), obtaining a FAR of 33.3% (3/9), and an AWT of 17 min. A preliminary conclusion is that the model is not able to predict the promptest events but the more gradual ones. The final goal of this project, which is now halfway through its planned two-year duration, is the prediction of >500 MeV events. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under agreement No 637324.

  5. Anisotropic lattice models of electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, Vladimir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2002-11-01

    Systems of charged particles on anisotropic three-dimensional lattices are investigated theoretically using Debye-Huckel theory. It is found that the thermodynamics of these systems strongly depends on the degree of anisotropy. For weakly anisotropic simple cubic lattices, the results indicate the existence of order-disorder phase transitions and a tricritical point, while the possibility of low-density gas-liquid coexistence is suppressed. For strongly anisotropic lattices this picture changes dramatically: The low-density gas-liquid phase separation reappears and the phase diagram exhibits critical, tricritical, and triple points. For body-centered lattices, the low-density gas-liquid phase coexistence is suppressed for all degrees of anisotropy. These results show that the effect of anisotropy in lattice models of electrolytes amounts to reduction of spatial dimensionality.

  6. A GLE multi-block model for the evaluation of seismic displacements of slopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, V.; Cascone, E.; Biondi, G.

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes a multi-block displacement model for the evaluation of seismic permanent displacements of natural slopes with slip surface of general shape. A rigorous limit equilibrium method of stability analysis is considered and an application to an ideal clay slope is presented including the effect of excess pore pressure build-up on the displacement response.

  7. Modeling of Anisotropic Inelastic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J.; Nath, D.S.; Brown, A.A.; Casey, J.

    2000-02-25

    An experimental capability, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is being used to study the yield behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The objective of our research is to develop better constitutive equations for polycrystalline metals. We are experimentally determining the multidimensional yield surface of the material, both in its initial state and as it evolves during large inelastic deformations. These experiments provide a more complete picture of material behavior than can be obtained from traditional uniaxial tests. Experimental results show that actual material response can differ significantly from that predicted by simple idealized models. These results are being used to develop improved constitutive models of anisotropic plasticity for use in continuum computer codes.

  8. Anisotropic invariance in minisuperspace models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Sabido, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce invariance under anisotropic transformations to cosmology. This invariance is one of the key ingredients of the theory of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point put forward by Hořava. We find that this new symmetry in the minisuperspace introduces characteristics to the model that can be relevant in the ultraviolet regime. For example, by canonical quantization we find a Schrödinger-type equation which avoids the problem of frozen time in quantum cosmology. For simple cases we obtain solutions to this quantum equation in a Kantowski-Sachs (KS) minisuperspace. At the classical level, we study KS and Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies, obtaining modifications to the solutions of general relativity that can be relevant in the early Universe.

  9. GLE-Wannabe's: Searching for Extreme SEP Events with STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C.; Luhmann, J. G.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mays, M. L.; Bain, H. M.; Li, Y.; Lee, C. O.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2016-12-01

    Ground Level Events (GLEs) are a particular class of solar energetic particle (SEP) events in which the particle spectrum is hard enough to produce effects on the surface. Historically a GLE had to be observed by two separate ground-based monitors to be added to the informal `GLE list' (http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu/ pyle/GLE_List.txt). As these events are among the most energetic of SEP events, they are a clear space weather concern and understanding the conditions under which they occur and the processes that create them is critical for improving our predictive capabilities. By their very definition, GLEs cannot be identified with only space-based instrumentation. With STEREO, it is possible to observe SEP events which are extreme at locations far from Earth (e.g., the 23 July 2012 event); however such events cannot be classified as GLEs unless the intensities are sufficiently large at Earth as well. Using the 60-100 MeV proton intensities observed during the 13 Dec 2006 GLE by the STEREO spacecraft (when they were still close to Earth) as a guide, we have identified several SEP events observed by STEREO which we dub `GLE-Wannabe' (GLE-W) events. None of these events were strong enough locally to register as a GLE at Earth, but had Earth been in the STEREO location, they might have been. We present SEP analysis of these events at STEREO and compare the spectra and composition to that of previously analyzed GLEs, particularly those with comparable observations upstream of Earth. Additionally we analyze the magnetic connection between the spacecraft and the expanding coronal mass ejection driven shock as a function of time using the WSA-ENLIL model. We discuss the SEP results in light of these simulations and their implications for the generation of these GLE-W events.

  10. Real-time prediction of the occurrence of GLE events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Marlon; Reyes-Santiago, Pedro J.; Malandraki, Olga E.

    2017-07-01

    A tool for predicting the occurrence of Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) events using the UMASEP scheme is presented. This real-time tool, called HESPERIA UMASEP-500, is based on the detection of the magnetic connection, along which protons arrive in the near-Earth environment, by estimating the lag correlation between the time derivatives of 1 min soft X-ray flux (SXR) and 1 min near-Earth proton fluxes observed by the GOES satellites. Unlike current GLE warning systems, this tool can predict GLE events before the detection by any neutron monitor (NM) station. The prediction performance measured for the period from 1986 to 2016 is presented for two consecutive periods, because of their notable difference in performance. For the 2000-2016 period, this prediction tool obtained a probability of detection (POD) of 53.8% (7 of 13 GLE events), a false alarm ratio (FAR) of 30.0%, and average warning times (AWT) of 8 min with respect to the first NM station's alert and 15 min to the GLE Alert Plus's warning. We have tested the model by replacing the GOES proton data with SOHO/EPHIN proton data, and the results are similar in terms of POD, FAR, and AWT for the same period. The paper also presents a comparison with a GLE warning system.

  11. Anisotropic Failure Modeling for HY-100 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harstad, E. N.; Maudlin, P. J.; McKirgan, J. B.

    2004-07-01

    HY-100 steel is a material that behaves isotropically in the elastic and plastic region and acts anisotropically in failure. Since HY-100 is a ductile metal, a more gradual failure process is observed as opposed to the nearly instantaneous failure in brittle materials. We extend our elasto-plastic-damage constitutive model by including of a decohesion model to describe material behavior between the onset of failure and fracture. We also develop an anisotropic failure surface to account for directionality in material failure. Both the anisotropic failure and decohesion models have been implemented into a finite element code, where the effects of these models are studied in a uniaxial stress simulations, a plate impact simulations, and a quasistatic notched round bar tensile test simulations.

  12. Isotropic versus anisotropic modeling of photorefractive solitons.

    PubMed

    Belić, M R; Vujić, D; Stepken, A; Kaiser, F; Calvo, G F; Agulló-López, F; Carrascosa, M

    2002-06-01

    The question of the isotropic versus anisotropic modeling of incoherent spatial screening solitons in photorefractive crystals is addressed by a careful theoretical and numerical analysis. Isotropic, or local, models allow for an extended spiraling of two interacting scalar solitons, and for a prolonged propagation of vortex vector solitons, whereas anisotropic, nonlocal, models prevent such phenomena. In the context of Kukhtarev's material equations, the difference in behavior is traced to the continuity equation for the current density. We further show that neither an indefinite spiraling of two solitons nor stable propagation of vortex vector solitons is generally possible in both isotropic and anisotropic models. Such systems do not conserve angular momentum, even in the case of an isotropic change in the index of refraction.

  13. GLE and the NON-GLE Solar Events Observed by AMS-02 in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindi, V.; Consolandi, C.; Corti, C.; Whitman, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a high energy particle detector installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 2011 to study origin and nature of cosmic rays in the energy range from hundreds of MeV to a few TeV. In the first 3 years of operation, AMS-02 measured the highest part of the Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) spectra produced during M-and X-class flares and fast Coronal Mass Ejection. AMS-02 is able to perform precise measurements in a short period of time which is typical of these transient phenomena and to collected enough statistics to fully measure fine structures and time evolution of the spectrum. So far in Solar Cycle 24, one official Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) was observed on May 17, 2012 by Neutron Monitors (NM) while another possible GLE on January 6, 2014 was detected by South Pole NM. Observations by GOES-13, in the high energy proton channels, suggest that there were only 5 SEP events with energies above 500 MeV in this Cycle 24. AMS-02 observations, instead, indicate that since May 2011 there were more than 5 solar events with energies above 500 MeV at Earth. AMS-02 observations, with unprecedented resolution, large acceptance and high statistics, can therefore help the heliophysics community to better understand the true behavior of SEPs at high energies and to constrain models of SEP production. The SEP fluxes of GLE and NON-GLE events observed by AMS-02 will be presented.

  14. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-01

    A new spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence is proposed. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  15. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2017-06-01

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numericalmore » simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.« less

  16. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2016-07-19

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  17. An Anisotropic Multiphysics Model for Intervertebral Disk

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gu, Weiyong

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disk (IVD) is the largest avascular structure in human body, consisting of three types of charged hydrated soft tissues. Its mechanical behavior is nonlinear and anisotropic, due mainly to nonlinear interactions among different constituents within tissues. In this study, a more realistic anisotropic multiphysics model was developed based on the continuum mixture theory and employed to characterize the couplings of multiple physical fields in the IVD. Numerical simulations demonstrate that this model is capable of systematically predicting the mechanical and electrochemical signals within the disk under various loading conditions, which is essential in understanding the mechanobiology of IVD. PMID:27099402

  18. Evolution of multidimensional flat anisotropic cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, A. ); Demianski, M. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics , Universita di Roma I, La Sapienza, Rome ); Ivanov, P.; Polnarev, A.G. )

    1993-07-15

    We study the dynamics of a flat multidimensional anisotropic cosmological model filled with an anisotropic fluidlike medium. By an appropriate choice of variables, the dynamical equations reduce to a two-dimensional dynamical system. We present a detailed analysis of the time evolution of this system and the conditions of the existence of spacetime singularities. We investigate the conditions under which violent, exponential, and power-law inflation is possible. We show that dimensional reduction cannot proceed by anti-inflation (rapid contraction of internal space). Our model indicates that it is very difficult to achieve dimensional reduction by classical means.

  19. Modeling Geodynamic Mobility of Anisotropic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry-Houts, J.; Karlstrom, L.

    2016-12-01

    The lithosphere is often idealized as a linear, or plastic layer overlying a Newtonian half-space. This approach has led to many insights into lithospheric foundering that include Rayligh-Taylor drips, slab-style delaminations, and small scale convection in the asthenosphere. More recent work has begun to quantify the effect of anisotropic lithosphere viscosity on these same phenomena. Anisotropic viscosity may come about due to stratigraphic deposition in the upper crust, dike/sill emplacement in the mid crust, or volcanic underplating at the Moho related to arcs or plumes. Anisotropic viscosity is also observed in the mantle, due to preferential orientation of olivine grains during flow. Here we extend the work of Lev & Hager (2008) on modeling anisotropic lithospheric foundering to investigate the effects of anisotropic regions which vary in size, magnitude, and orientation. We have extended Aspect, a modern geodynamic finite element code with a large developer and user base, to model exotic constitutive laws with an arbitrary fourth order tensor in place of the viscosity term. We further implement a material model to represent a transverse isotropic medium, such as is expected in a layered, or fractured lithosphere. We have validated our implementation against previous results, and analytic solutions, reproducing the result that horizontally oriented anisotropy tends to inhibit drips, and produce longer-wavelength instabilities. We expect that increased lateral extent of anisotropic regions will exaggerate this effect, to a limit at which the effect will plateau. Varying lithosphere thickness, and mantle anisotropy anisotropy may produce similar behavior. The implications of this effect are significant to lithospheric foundering beneath arcs and hotspots, possibly influencing the recycling of eclogite, production of silicic magmas, and dynamic topography.

  20. Anisotropic MHD model and some solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Dzhalilov, N. S.

    2010-09-15

    MHD waves and instabilities in a collisionless anisotropic-pressure plasma are analyzed in an anisotropic MHD model based on the 16-moment approximation, and the results are found to agree well with those obtained in the low-frequency limit of the kinetic model. It is shown that accounting for heat fluxes leads to an asymmetry in the phase velocities of the wave modes with respect to the heat flux direction and also to a strong interaction between the modes, especially between the backward ones (those that propagate in a direction opposite to that of the heat flux). A correct description of the mirror instability is given. The resonant interaction of three backward modes-fast acoustic, fast magnetosonic, and slow acoustic-under the conditions for the onset of the classical firehose instability triggers a new type of instability the growth rate of which is faster than the maximum growth rate of the conventional firehose instability. The results prove that, in contrast to the familiar Chew-Goldberger-Low approximate model, the anisotropic MHD approach provides a correct description of the large-scale dynamics of collisionless anisotropic plasmas (such as solar corona, solar wind, and ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas).

  1. The Impact of Anisotropic Error Correlation Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, R.; Riishojgaard, L. P.; Menard, R.

    1999-01-01

    Most data assimilation systems assume isotropic forecast error correlations, but results from two dimensional Kalman Filter experiments indicate that the correlations can be far from isotropic. In this paper we use a simple two-dimensional data assimilation system, which analyses trace chemical species such as ozone, to assess different approaches to modelling the error correlations. We compare assimilation results using isotropic correlations with results obtained using different approaches to modelling anisotropic correlations: first, using correlations based on the concentrations of the trace chemicals, and secondly using an advective correlation model. We show that these relatively cheap ways of modelling anisotropic correlations give objectively better results than using isotropic correlations. We discuss the possible extension of these approaches to a full 3-D meteorological data assimilation system.

  2. Observational signatures of anisotropic inflationary models

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Junko; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Soda, Jiro E-mail: jiro@phys.sci.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2013-12-01

    We study observational signatures of two classes of anisotropic inflationary models in which an inflaton field couples to (i) a vector kinetic term F{sub μν}F{sup μν} and (ii) a two-form kinetic term H{sub μνλ}H{sup μνλ}. We compute the corrections from the anisotropic sources to the power spectrum of gravitational waves as well as the two-point cross correlation between scalar and tensor perturbations. The signs of the anisotropic parameter g{sub *} are different depending on the vector and the two-form models, but the statistical anisotropies generally lead to a suppressed tensor-to-scalar ratio r and a smaller scalar spectral index n{sub s} in both models. In the light of the recent Planck bounds of n{sub s} and r, we place observational constraints on several different inflaton potentials such as those in chaotic and natural inflation in the presence of anisotropic interactions. In the two-form model we also find that there is no cross correlation between scalar and tensor perturbations, while in the vector model the cross correlation does not vanish. The non-linear estimator f{sub NL} of scalar non-Gaussianities in the two-form model is generally smaller than that in the vector model for the same orders of |g{sub *}|, so that the former is easier to be compatible with observational bounds of non-Gaussianities than the latter.

  3. Anisotropic halo model: implementation and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgró, Mario A.; Paz, Dante J.; Merchán, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    In the present work, we extend the classic halo model for the large-scale matter distribution including a triaxial model for the halo profiles and their alignments. In particular, we derive general expressions for the halo-matter cross-correlation function. In addition, by numerical integration, we obtain instances of the cross-correlation function depending on the directions given by halo shape axes. These functions are called anisotropic cross-correlations. With the aim of comparing our theoretical results with the simulations, we compute averaged anisotropic correlations in cones with their symmetry axis along each shape direction of the centre halo. From these comparisons we characterize and quantify the alignment of dark matter haloes on the Λcold dark matter context by means of the presented anisotropic halo model. Since our model requires multidimensional integral computation we implement a Monte Carlo method on GPU hardware which allows us to increase the precision of the results and it improves the performance of the computation.

  4. Anisotropic singularities in modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiró, Michele Ferraz; Saa, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    We show that the common singularities present in generic modified gravity models governed by actions of the type S=∫d4x-gf(R,ϕ,X), with X=-(1)/(2)gab∂aϕ∂bϕ, are essentially the same anisotropic instabilities associated to the hypersurface F(ϕ)=0 in the case of a nonminimal coupling of the type F(ϕ)R, enlightening the physical origin of such singularities that typically arise in rather complex and cumbersome inhomogeneous perturbation analyses. We show, moreover, that such anisotropic instabilities typically give rise to dynamically unavoidable singularities, precluding completely the possibility of having physically viable models for which the hypersurface (∂f)/(∂R)=0 is attained. Some examples are explicitly discussed.

  5. Isotropic and anisotropic pointing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, András; Vida, Krisztián; Mészáros, László; Mező, György

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes an alternative approach for generating pointing models for telescopes equipped with serial kinematics, esp. equatorial or alt-az mounts. Our model construction does not exploit any assumption for the underlying physical constraints of the mount, however, one can assign various effects to the respective components of the equations. In order to recover the pointing model parameters, classical linear least squares fitting procedures can be applied. This parameterization also lacks any kind of parametric singularity. We demonstrate the efficiency of this type of model on real measurements with meter-class telescopes where the results provide a root mean square accuracy of 1.5-2 arcseconds.

  6. Multidimensional Gravitational Model with Anisotropic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, O. A.; Sharov, G. S.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the gravitational model with additional spatial dimensions and anisotropic pressure which is nonzero only in these dimensions. Cosmological solutions of the Einstein equations in this model include accelerated expansion of the universe at late stage of its evolution and dynamical compactification of extra dimensions. This model describes observational data for Type Ia supernovae on the level or better than the ΛCDM model. We analyze two equations of state resulting in different predictions for further evolution, but in both variants the acceleration epoch is finite.

  7. Anisotropic stellar models admitting conformal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ayan; Banerjee, Sumita; Hansraj, Sudan; Ovgun, Ali

    2017-04-01

    We address the problem of finding static and spherically symmetric anisotropic compact stars in general relativity that admit conformal motions. The study is framed in the language of f( R) gravity theory in order to expose opportunity for further study in the more general theory. Exact solutions of compact stars are found under the assumption that spherically symmetric spacetimes admit conformal motion with anisotropic matter distribution in nature. In this work, two cases have been studied for the existence of such solutions: first, we consider the model given by f(R)=R and then f(R)=aR+b . Finally, specific characteristics and physical properties have been explored analytically along with graphical representations for conformally symmetric compact stars in f( R) gravity.

  8. Modeling anisotropic magnetoresistance in layered antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, D. L. R.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Velev, J.; Chshiev, M.; Castro, J. d.'Albuquerque e.; Lacroix, C.

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the electronic transport and the anisotropic magnetoresistance in systems consisting of pairs of antiferromagnetically aligned layers separated by a non-magnetic layer, across which an antiferromagnetic coupling between the double layers is established. Calculations have been performed within the framework of the tight-binding model, taking into account the exchange coupling within the ferromagnetic layers and the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Conductivities have been evaluated in the ballistic regime, based on Kubo formula. We have systematically studied the dependence of the conductivity and of the anisotropic magnetoresistance on several material and structural parameters, such as the orientation of the magnetic moments relative to the crystalline axis, band filling, out-of-plane hopping and spin-orbit parameter.

  9. Generalised model for anisotropic compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Ray, Saibal; Deb, Debabrata

    2016-12-01

    In the present investigation an exact generalised model for anisotropic compact stars of embedding class 1 is sought with a general relativistic background. The generic solutions are verified by exploring different physical aspects, viz. energy conditions, mass-radius relation, stability of the models, in connection to their validity. It is observed that the model presented here for compact stars is compatible with all these physical tests and thus physically acceptable as far as the compact star candidates RXJ 1856-37, SAX J 1808.4-3658 ( SS1) and SAX J 1808.4-3658 ( SS2) are concerned.

  10. Chromo-natural model in anisotropic background

    SciTech Connect

    Maleknejad, Azadeh; Erfani, Encieh E-mail: eerfani@ipm.ir

    2014-03-01

    In this work we study the chromo-natural inflation model in the anisotropic setup. Initiating inflation from Bianchi type-I cosmology, we analyze the system thoroughly during the slow-roll inflation, from both analytical and numerical points of view. We show that the isotropic FRW inflation is an attractor of the system. In other words, anisotropies are damped within few e-folds and the chromo-natural model respects the cosmic no-hair conjecture. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the slow-roll limit, the anisotropies in both chromo-natural and gauge-flation models share the same dynamics.

  11. A Maverick GLE: The Relativistic Solar Particle Event of December 13, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, John W.; Clem, John; Evenson, Paul; Pyle, Roger; Ruffolo, David; Sáiz, Alejandro; Wechakama, Maneenate

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLE) are more likely to occur when the Sun is very active. The most recent GLE was a maverick. It occurred near solar minimum, but it was a large event by historical standards, with a peak increase exceeding 100% at some stations. This talk reports initial observations and modeling of the GLE of December 13, 2006 based on data returned by the “Spaceship Earth” neutron monitor network. Supported by NSF grant ATM- 0527878, the Thailand Research Fund, and a Post-doctoral Fellowship from Mahidol University.

  12. Dynamic Smagorinsky model on anisotropic grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, A.; Meneveau, C.; Fatica, M.

    1996-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of complex-geometry flows often involves highly anisotropic meshes. To examine the performance of the dynamic Smagorinsky model in a controlled fashion on such grids, simulations of forced isotropic turbulence are performed using highly anisotropic discretizations. The resulting model coefficients are compared with a theoretical prediction (Scotti et al., 1993). Two extreme cases are considered: pancake-like grids, for which two directions are poorly resolved compared to the third, and pencil-like grids, where one direction is poorly resolved when compared to the other two. For pancake-like grids the dynamic model yields the results expected from the theory (increasing coefficient with increasing aspect ratio), whereas for pencil-like grids the dynamic model does not agree with the theoretical prediction (with detrimental effects only on smallest resolved scales). A possible explanation of the departure is attempted, and it is shown that the problem may be circumvented by using an isotropic test-filter at larger scales. Overall, all models considered give good large-scale results, confirming the general robustness of the dynamic and eddy-viscosity models. But in all cases, the predictions were poor for scales smaller than that of the worst resolved direction.

  13. On the Possible Mechanisms of GLE Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoz, K. M.; Gan, W.; Moon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have carried out this work to interpret possible mechanisms of two important high energy particle events (GLE69# 2005 Jan 20 & GLE70# 2006 Dec 13). To realize whether the GLE might be occurred by the energy released from particle acceleration in solar flare or in CME-driven shock, we identify particle injection time in terms of the softest phase of spectral indices deduced from proton fluxes. To understand the extreme emission of the flares, we studied the most prominent phase of concurrent solar radio type III burst which is identified by the softest phase of the spectral indices deduced from electron fluxes. For better understanding of the flare, we also studied magnetic topology and found that the magnetic reconnection of GLE69-associated flare took place at lower altitude of the corona so the strength of the emissions escaped through open field lines was very much high. In contrast, the magnetic reconnection of GLE70-associated flare took place at higher altitude of the corona that caused disturbance in the filament consequently strong ejection of coronal mass (CME). While understanding these characteristics, it is then necessary to look into possible relativistic energy computed in terms of possible travel time determined by employing observational time-lag between GLE and concurrent solar flare. Accordingly, we have found that the GLE69 is procured with sufficient possible relativistic energy (~1.619 GeV) while GLE70 is procured with fractional amount of energy (~0.226 - ~0.694 GeV). So, we can argue that GLE69 might have been produced by flare but we cannot argue that GLE70 might have been caused by solar flare. For better understanding, it is required to justify the results by means of particle injection criteria that we set up: 1. If the intensive phases of flare components, characterized by the prominent phase of the solar radio type III burst, exist within injection time then the energy released from the particle acceleration in flares is believed to

  14. The new international GLE database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duldig, M. L.; Watts, D. J.

    2001-08-01

    The Australian Antarctic Division has agreed to host the international GLE database. Access to the database is via a world-wide-web interface and initially covers all GLEs since the start of the 22nd solar cycle. Access restriction for recent events is controlled by password protection and these data are available only to those groups contributing data to the database. The restrictions to data will be automatically removed for events older than 2 years, in accordance with the data exchange provisions of the Antarctic Treaty. Use of the data requires acknowledgment of the database as the source of the data and acknowledgment of the specific groups that provided the data used. Furthermore, some groups that provide data to the database have specific acknowledgment requirements or wording. A new submission format has been developed that will allow easier exchange of data, although the old format will be acceptable for some time. Data download options include direct web based download and email. Data may also be viewed as listings or plots with web browsers. Search options have also been incorporated. Development of the database will be ongoing with extension to viewing and delivery options, addition of earlier data and the development of mirror sites. It is expected that two mirror sites, one in North America and one in Europe, will be developed to enable fast access for the whole cosmic ray community.

  15. Influence of anisotropic white matter modeling on EEG source localization.

    PubMed

    Cuartas-Morales, E; Cardenas-Pena, D; Castellanos-Dominguez, G

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of the anisotropic white matter within the ElectroEncephaloGraphy source localization problem. To this end, we consider three cases of the anisotropic white matter modeled in two concrete cases: by fixed or variable ratio. We extract information about highly anisotropic areas of the white matter from real Diffusion Weighted Imaging data. To validate the compared anisotropic models, we introduce the localization dipole and orientation errors. Obtained results show that the white matter model with a fixed anisotropic ratio leads to values of dipole localization error close to 1cm and may be enough in those cases avoiding localized analysis of neural brain activity. In contrast, modeling based on the anisotropic variable rate assumption becomes important in tasks regarding analysis and localization of deep sources neighboring the white matter tissue.

  16. An Anisotropic Hardening Model for Springback Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Danielle; Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-08-05

    As more Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) are heavily used for automotive body structures and closures panels, accurate springback prediction for these components becomes more challenging because of their rapid hardening characteristics and ability to sustain even higher stresses. In this paper, a modified Mroz hardening model is proposed to capture realistic Bauschinger effect at reverse loading, such as when material passes through die radii or drawbead during sheet metal forming process. This model accounts for material anisotropic yield surface and nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening behavior. Material tension/compression test data are used to accurately represent Bauschinger effect. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by comparison of numerical and experimental springback results for a DP600 straight U-channel test.

  17. Constitutive modeling of inelastic anisotropic material response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A constitutive equation was developed to predict the inelastic thermomechanical response of single crystal turbine blades. These equations are essential for developing accurate finite element models of hot section components and contribute significantly to the understanding and prediction of crack initiation and propagation. The method used was limited to unified state variable constitutive equations. Two approaches to developing an anisotropic constitutive equation were reviewed. One approach was to apply the Stouffer-Bodner representation for deformation induced anisotropy to materials with an initial anisotropy such as single crystals. The second approach was to determine the global inelastic strain rate from the contribution of the slip in each of the possible crystallographic slip systems. A three dimensional finite element is being developed with a variable constitutive equation link that can be used for constitutive equation development and to predict the response of an experiment using the actual specimen geometry and loading conditions.

  18. GVF-based anisotropic diffusion models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongchuan; Chua, Chin-Seng

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, the gradient vector flow fields are introduced in image restoration. Within the context of flow fields, the shock filter, mean curvature flow, and Perona-Malik equation are reformulated. Many advantages over the original models can be obtained; these include numerical stability, large capture range, and high-order derivative estimation. In addition, a fairing process is introduced in the anisotropic diffusion, which contains a fourth-order derivative and is reformulated as the intrinsic Laplacian of curvature under the level set framework. By applying this fairing process, the shape boundaries will become more apparent. In order to overcome numerical errors, the intrinsic Laplacian of curvature is computed from the gradient vector flow fields instead of the observed images.

  19. MOSSFRAC: An anisotropic 3D fracture model

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W C; Levatin, J L

    2006-08-14

    Despite the intense effort for nearly half a century to construct detailed numerical models of plastic flow and plastic damage accumulation, models for describing fracture, an equally important damage mechanism still cannot describe basic fracture phenomena. Typical fracture models set the stress tensor to zero for tensile fracture and set the deviatoric stress tensor to zero for compressive fracture. One consequence is that the simple case of the tensile fracture of a cylinder under combined compressive radial and tensile axial loads is not modeled correctly. The experimental result is a cylinder that can support compressive radial loads, but no axial load, whereas, the typical numerical result is a cylinder with all stresses equal to zero. This incorrect modeling of fracture locally also has a global effect, because material that is fracturing produces stress release waves, which propagate from the fracture and influence the surrounding material. Consequently, it would be useful to have a model that can describe the stress relief and the resulting anisotropy due to fracture. MOSSFRAC is a material model that simulates three-dimensional tensile and shear fracture in initially isotropic elastic-plastic materials, although its framework is also amenable to initially anisotropic materials. It differs from other models by accounting for the effects of cracks on the constitutive response of the material, so that the previously described experiment, as well as complicated fracture scenarios are simulated more accurately. The model is implemented currently in the LLNL hydrocodes DYNA3D, PARADYN, and ALE3D. The purpose of this technical note is to present a complete qualitative description of the model and quantitative descriptions of salient features.

  20. Anisotropic multicluster model in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gijón, A.; Gálvez, F. J.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Buendía, E.

    2016-06-01

    Multicluster models consider that the nucleons can be moving around different centers in the nuclei. These models have been widely used to describe light nuclei but always considering that the mean field is composed of isotropic harmonic oscillators with different centers. In this work, we propose an extension of these models by using anisotropic harmonic oscillators. The strengths of these oscillators, the distance among the different centers and the disposition of the nucleons inside every cluster are free parameters which have been fixed using the variational criterion. All the one-body and two-body matrix elements have been analytically calculated. Only a numerical integration on the Euler angles is needed to carry out the projection on the values of the total spin of the state and its third component. We have studied the ground state and the first excited states of 8Be, 12C and 10Be getting good results for the energies. The disposition of the nucleons in the different clusters have also been analyzed by using projection on the different Cartesian planes getting much more information than when the radial one-body density is used.

  1. Anisotropic stress and stability in modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Kunz, Martin

    2011-03-15

    The existence of anisotropic stress of a purely geometrical origin seems to be a characteristic of higher order gravity models, and has been suggested as a probe to test these models observationally, for example, in weak lensing experiments. In this paper, we seek to find a class of higher order gravity models of f(R,G) type that would give us a zero anisotropic stress and study the consequences for the viability of the actual model. For the special case of a de Sitter background, we identify a subclass of models with the desired property. We also find a direct link between anisotropic stress and the stability of the model as well as the presence of extra degrees of freedom, which seems to be a general feature of higher order gravity models. Particularly, setting the anisotropic stress equal to zero for a de Sitter background leads to a singularity that makes it impossible to reach the de Sitter evolution.

  2. Entanglement in the Anisotropic Kondo Necklace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    We study the entanglement in the one-dimensional Kondo necklace model with exact diagonalization, calculating the concurrence as a function of the Kondo coupling J and an anisotropy η in the interaction between conduction spins, and we review some results previously obtained in the limiting cases η = 0 and 1. We observe that as J increases, localized and conduction spins get more entangled, while neighboring conduction spins diminish their concurrence; localized spins require a minimum concurrence between conduction spins to be entangled. The anisotropy η diminishes the entanglement for neighboring spins when it increases, driving the system to the Ising limit η = 1 where conduction spins are not entangled. We observe that the concurrence does not give information about the quantum phase transition in the anisotropic Kondo necklace model (between a Kondo singlet and an antiferromagnetic state), but calculating the von Neumann block entropy with the density matrix renormalization group in a chain of 100 sites for the Ising limit indicates that this quantity is useful for locating the quantum critical point.

  3. Anisotropic exchange-interaction model: From the Potts model to the exchange-interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. C.; Chen, H. H.

    1995-04-01

    A spin model called the anisotropic exchange-interaction model is proposed. The Potts model, the exchange-interaction model, and the spin-1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg model are special cases of the proposed model. Thermodynamic properties of the model on the bcc and the fcc lattices are determined by the constant-coupling approximation.

  4. Modelling of anisotropic compact stars of embedding class one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali; Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Manna, Tuhina

    2016-10-01

    In the present article, we have constructed static anisotropic compact star models of Einstein field equations for the spherical symmetric metric of embedding class one. By assuming the particular form of the metric function ν, we have solved the Einstein field equations for anisotropic matter distribution. The anisotropic models represent the realistic compact objects such as SAX J 1808.4-3658 (SS1), Her X-1, Vela X-12, PSR J1614-2230 and Cen X-3. We have reported our results in details for the compact star Her X-1 on the ground of physical properties such as pressure, density, velocity of sound, energy conditions, TOV equation and red-shift etc. Along with these, we have also discussed about the stability of the compact star models. Finally we made a comparison between our anisotropic stars with the realistic objects on the key aspects as central density, central pressure, compactness and surface red-shift.

  5. Deformation modeling and constitutive modeling for anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    A study of deformation mechanisms in the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 was conducted. Monotonic and cyclic tests were conducted from 20 to 1093 C. Both (001) and near-(123) crystals were tested, at strain rates of 0.5 and 50 percent/minute. The deformation behavior could be grouped into two temperature regimes: low temperatures, below 760 C; and high temperatures, above 820 to 950 C depending on the strain rate. At low temperatures, the mechanical behavior was very anisotropic. An orientation dependent CRSS, a tension-compression asymmetry, and anisotropic strain hardening were all observed. The material was deformed by planar octahedral slip. The anisotropic properties were correlated with the ease of cube cross-slip, as well as the number of active slip systems. At high temperatures, the material was isotropic, and deformed by homogeneous gamma by-pass. It was found that the temperature dependence of the formation of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults was responsible for the local minimum in the CRSS of this alloy at 400 C. It was proposed that the cube cross-slip process must be reversible. This was used to explain the reversible tension-compression asymmetry, and was used to study models of cross-slip. As a result, the cross-slip model proposed by Paidar, Pope and Vitek was found to be consistent with the proposed slip reversibility. The results were related to anisotropic viscoplastic constitutive models. The model proposed by Walter and Jordan was found to be capable of modeling all aspects of the material anisotropy. Temperature and strain rate boundaries for the model were proposed, and guidelines for numerical experiments were proposed.

  6. Anisotropic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert models of dissipation in qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Philip J. D.; Green, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    We derive a microscopic model for dissipative dynamics in a system of mutually interacting qubits coupled to a thermal bath that generalizes the dissipative model of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert to the case of anisotropic bath couplings. We show that the dissipation acts to bias the quantum trajectories towards a reduced phase space. This model applies to a system of superconducting flux qubits whose coupling to the environment is necessarily anisotropic. We study the model in the context of the D-Wave computing device and show that the form of environmental coupling in this case produces dynamics that are closely related to several models proposed on phenomenological grounds.

  7. Anisotropic subvoxel-smooth conduction model for bioelectromagnetism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The bioelectric conduction model plays a key role in bioelectromagnetism analysis, such as solving electromagnetic forward and inverse problems. This paper is aimed to develop an anisotropic subvoxel-smooth conduction model (ASCM) to characterize the electrical conductivity tensor jump across the tissue interface, which is derived based on the interfacial continuity condition with asymptotic analysis method. This conduction model is furthermore combined with finite volume method to improve the numerical accuracy for solving electromagnetic forward problem. The performance of ASCM for electrical potential analysis is verified by comparison with analytic solution. The method is also applied to investigate the effect of anisotropic conduction on EEG analysis in a realistic human head model.

  8. Modeling anisotropic Maxwell-Jüttner distributions: derivation and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we develop a model for the anisotropic Maxwell-Jüttner distribution and examine its properties. First, we provide the characteristic conditions that the modeling of consistent and well-defined anisotropic Maxwell-Jüttner distributions needs to fulfill. Then, we examine several models, showing their possible advantages and/or failures in accordance to these conditions. We derive a consistent model, and examine its properties and its connection with thermodynamics. We show that the temperature equals the average of the directional temperature-like components, as it holds for the classical, anisotropic Maxwell distribution. We also derive the internal energy and Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy, where we show that both are maximized for zero anisotropy, that is, the isotropic Maxwell-Jüttner distribution.

  9. Modeling of charged anisotropic compact stars in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanandan, Baiju; Maurya, S. K.; T, Smitha T.

    2017-06-01

    A charged compact star model has been determined for anisotropic fluid distribution. We have solved the Einstein-Maxwell field equations to construct the charged compact star model by using the radial pressure, the metric function e^{λ} and the electric charge function. The generic charged anisotropic solution is verified by exploring different physical conditions like causality condition, mass-radius relation and stability of the solution (via the adiabatic index, TOV equations and the Herrera cracking concept). It is observed that the present charged anisotropic compact star model is compatible with the star PSR 1937+21. Moreover, we also presented the EOS ρ = f(p) for the present charged compact star model.

  10. Well behaved anisotropic compact star models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasim, M. K.; Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Dayanandan, B.

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropic compact star models have been constructed by assuming a particular form of a metric function e^{λ}. We solved the Einstein field equations for determining the metric function e^{ν}. For this purpose we have assumed a physically valid expression of radial pressure (pr). The obtained anisotropic compact star model is representing the realistic compact objects such as PSR 1937 +21. We have done an extensive study about physical parameters for anisotropic models and found that these parameters are well behaved throughout inside the star. Along with these we have also determined the equation of state for compact star which gives the radial pressure is purely the function of density i.e. pr=f(ρ).

  11. Shear-free anisotropic cosmological models in {f (R)} gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, Amare; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-04-01

    We study a class of shear-free, homogeneous but anisotropic cosmological models with imperfect matter sources in the context of f( R) gravity. We show that the anisotropic stresses are related to the electric part of the Weyl tensor in such a way that they balance each other. We also show that within the class of orthogonal f( R) models, small perturbations of shear are damped, and that the electric part of the Weyl tensor and the anisotropic stress tensor decay with the expansion as well as the heat flux of the curvature fluid. Specializing in locally rotationally symmetric spacetimes in orthonormal frames, we examine the late-time behaviour of the de Sitter universe in f( R) gravity. For the Starobinsky model of f( R), we study the evolutionary behavior of the Universe by numerically integrating the Friedmann equation, where the initial conditions for the expansion, acceleration and jerk parameters are taken from observational data.

  12. Dbp5, Gle1-IP6 and Nup159

    PubMed Central

    Folkmann, Andrew W.; Noble, Kristen N.; Cole, Charles N.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is a stepwise process involving distinct cellular processes including transcription, mRNA (mRNA) processing, mRNA export, and translation. As mRNAs are being synthesized, proteins associate with the RNA to form messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). Previous studies have demonstrated that the RNA-binding protein composition of these mRNPs is dynamic, changing as the mRNP moves through the different steps of gene expression, and playing a critical role in these events. An important step during this maturation process occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) where the export protein Gle1 bound to inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) spatially activates the ATP-hydrolysis and mRNP-remodeling activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5. Recent work from our laboratory and others has provided important insights into the function and regulation of Dbp5. These include a more detailed explanation of the mechanism of Dbp5 RNP remodeling, the role of Gle1-IP6 in stimulating Dbp5 ATPase activity, and the identification of a novel paradigm for regulation of Dbp5 by Nup159. Based on in vitro biochemical assays, X-ray crystallography, and corresponding in vivo phenotypes, we propose here an updated model of the Dbp5 cycle during mRNP export through the NPC. This takes into account all available data and provides a platform for future studies. PMID:22064466

  13. Cluster variation studies of the anisotropic exchange interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. C.; Chen, H. H.

    The cluster variation method is applied to study critical properties of the Potts-like ferromagnetic anisotropic exchange interaction model. Phase transition temperatures, order parameter discontinuities and latent heats of the model on the triangular and the fcc lattices are determined by the triangle approximation; and those on the square and the sc lattices are determined by the square approximation.

  14. Model for the anisotropic reentry of albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    The trajectory-tracing technique was used to obtain the angles of incidence, and hence 'intensities,' of negatively charged 0.88-GV particles reentrant at Palestine, Texas. Splash albedo trajectories were traced from the conjugate point, and also from Palestine itself, for those trajectories that were unable to complete a full gyration before reentry into the shadow cone at Palestine. Both isotropic and anisotropic ejection configurations were used at these two locations. These simulations predict a north-south anisotropy (hence also a zenithal anisotropy) for reentrant albedo, with a dearth of trajectories incident from the south. The anisotropy is large enough to explain experimentally determined north-south anisotropies for lower-energy particles, as observed by other groups in the Northern Hemisphere. The results are in agreement with measurements and simulations previously obtained in the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. Time-independent Anisotropic Plastic Behavior by Mechanical Subelement Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes a procedure for modelling the anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior of metals in plane stress state by the mechanical sub-layer model. In this model the stress-strain curves along the longitudinal and transverse directions are represented by short smooth segments which are considered as piecewise linear for simplicity. The model is incorporated in a finite element analysis program which is based on the assumed stress hybrid element and the iscoplasticity-theory.

  16. New exact models for anisotropic matter with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunzu, Jefta M.; Danford, Petro

    2017-09-01

    We generate two new exact models for the Einstein-Maxwell field equations. In our models, we consider the stellar object that is anisotropic and charged with linear equation of state consistent with quark stars. We have a new choice of measure of anisotropy that is physically reasonable. It is interesting that in our models we regain previous isotropic results as special cases. Isotropic exact solutions regained include models by Komathiraj and Maharaj; Mak and Harko; and Misner and Zapolsky. We can also obtain particular anisotropic models obtained by Maharaj, Sunzu, and Ray. The exact solutions corresponding to our models are found explicitly in terms of elementary functions. The graphical plots generated for the matter variables and the electric field are well behaved. We also generate relativistic stellar masses consistent with observations.

  17. What are the causes for the spread of GLE parameters deduced from NM data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bütikofer, R.; Flückiger, E.

    2015-08-01

    Investigations have shown that the analysis results of ground level enhancements (GLEs) based on neutron monitor (NM) data for a selected event can differ considerably depending the procedure used. This may have significant consequences e.g. for the assessment of radiation doses at flight altitudes. The reasons for the spread of the GLE parameters deduced from NM data can be manifold and are at present unclear. They include differences in specific properties of the various analysis procedures (e.g. NM response functions, different ways in taking into account the dynamics of the Earth's magnetospheric field), different characterisations of the solar particle flux near Earth as well as the specific selection of NM stations used for the analysis. In the present paper we quantitatively investigate this problem for a time interval during the maximum phase of the GLE on 13 December 2006. We present and discuss the changes in the resulting GLE parameters when using different NM response functions, different model representations of the Earth's magnetospheric field as well as different assumptions for the solar particle spectrum and pitch angle distribution near Earth. The results of the study are expected to yield a basis for the reduction in the spread of the GLE parameters deduced from NM data.

  18. Anisotropic interactions in a first-order aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, Joep H. M.; Fetecau, Razvan C.; Ryzhik, Lenya

    2015-08-01

    We extend a well studied ODE model for collective behaviour by considering anisotropic interactions among individuals. Anisotropy is modelled by limited sensorial perception of individuals, that depends on their current direction of motion. Consequently, the first-order model becomes implicit, and new analytical issues, such as non-uniqueness and jump discontinuities in velocities, are raised. We study the well-posedness of the anisotropic model and discuss its modes of breakdown. To extend solutions beyond breakdown we propose a relaxation system containing a small parameter ε, which can be interpreted as a small amount of inertia or response time. We show that the limit ε → 0 can be used as a jump criterion to select the physically correct velocities. In smooth regimes, the convergence of the relaxation system as ε → 0 is guaranteed by a theorem due to Tikhonov. We illustrate the results with numerical simulations in two dimensions.

  19. Application of the anisotropic phase-field crystal model to investigate the lattice systems of different anisotropic parameters and orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, Julia; Ajmal Choudhary, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we present the recent advances in the development of the anisotropic phase-field crystal (APFC) model. These advances are important in basic researches for multiferroic and thermoelectric materials with anisotropic crystal lattices and in thin-film applications. We start by providing a general description of the model derived in our previous studies based on the crystal symmetry and the microscopic dynamical density functional theory for anisotropic interactions and show that there exist only two possible degrees of freedom for the anisotropic lattices which are described by two independent parameters. New findings concerning the applications of the APFC model for the estimation of the elastic modules of anisotropic systems including sheared and stretched lattices as well as for the investigation of the heterogeneous thin film growth are described. The simulation results demonstrate the strong dependency of the misfit dislocation formation during the film growth on the anisotropy and reveal the asymmetric behavior in the cases of positive and negative misfits. We also present the development of the amplitude representation for the full APFC model of two orientation variants and show the relationship between the wave vectors and the base angles of the anisotropic lattices.

  20. Separation of variables in anisotropic models: anisotropic Rabi and elliptic Gaudin model in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2017-08-01

    We study the problem of separation of variables for classical integrable Hamiltonian systems governed by non-skew-symmetric non-dynamical so(3)\\otimes so(3) -valued elliptic r-matrices with spectral parameters. We consider several examples of such models, and perform separation of variables for classical anisotropic one- and two-spin Gaudin-type models in an external magnetic field, and for Jaynes-Cummings-Dicke-type models without the rotating wave approximation.

  1. An anisotropic subgrid stress model for high aspect ratio grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Robert; Haering, Sigfried

    2016-11-01

    Standard algebraic eddy viscosity subgrid stress models are formulated based on scalar measures of the local grid, and implicitly assume that the resolution is isotropic. However, complex simulation domains and computational costs associated with problems of engineering interest often necessitate grids with high aspect ratio cells. We present an anisotropic extension of Metias and Lesieur's structure function subgrid stress model. Unlike existing algebraic SGS models, this model is constructed directly through the composition of resolution and resolved turbulence anisotropy. Comparisons with filtered DNS of forced isotropic homogeneous turbulence show the model to significantly outperform general isotropic SGS models with increasing resolution anisotropy.

  2. Anisotropic Turbulence Modeling for Accurate Rod Bundle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baglietto, Emilio

    2006-07-01

    An improved anisotropic eddy viscosity model has been developed for accurate predictions of the thermal hydraulic performances of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies. The proposed model adopts a non-linear formulation of the stress-strain relationship in order to include the reproduction of the anisotropic phenomena, and in combination with an optimized low-Reynolds-number formulation based on Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) to produce correct damping of the turbulent viscosity in the near wall region. This work underlines the importance of accurate anisotropic modeling to faithfully reproduce the scale of the turbulence driven secondary flows inside the bundle subchannels, by comparison with various isothermal and heated experimental cases. The very low scale secondary motion is responsible for the increased turbulence transport which produces a noticeable homogenization of the velocity distribution and consequently of the circumferential cladding temperature distribution, which is of main interest in bundle design. Various fully developed bare bundles test cases are shown for different geometrical and flow conditions, where the proposed model shows clearly improved predictions, in close agreement with experimental findings, for regular as well as distorted geometries. Finally the applicability of the model for practical bundle calculations is evaluated through its application in the high-Reynolds form on coarse grids, with excellent results. (author)

  3. Anisotropic Elastic Resonance Scattering model for the Neutron Transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed Ouisloumen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Shadi Z. Ghrayeb

    2014-11-24

    The resonance scattering transfer cross-section has been reformulated to account for anisotropic scattering in the center-of-mass of the neutron-nucleus system. The main innovation over previous implementations is the relaxation of the ubiquitous assumption of isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass and the actual effective use of scattering angle distributions from evaluated nuclear data files in the computation of the angular moments of the resonant scattering kernels. The formulas for the high order anisotropic moments in the laboratory system are also derived. A multi-group numerical formulation is derived and implemented into a module incorporated within the NJOY nuclear data processing code. An ultra-fine energy mesh cross section library was generated using these new theoretical models and then was used for fuel assembly calculations with the PARAGON lattice physics code. The results obtained indicate a strong effect of this new model on reactivity, multi-group fluxes and isotopic inventory during depletion.

  4. Anisotropic mesh adaptivity for multi-scale ocean modelling.

    PubMed

    Piggott, M D; Farrell, P E; Wilson, C R; Gorman, G J; Pain, C C

    2009-11-28

    Research into the use of unstructured mesh methods in oceanography has been growing steadily over the past decade. The advantages of this approach for domain representation and non-uniform resolution are clear. However, a number of issues remain, in particular those related to the computational cost of models produced using unstructured mesh methods compared with their structured mesh counterparts. Mesh adaptivity represents an important means to improve the competitiveness of unstructured mesh models, where high resolution is only used when and where necessary. In this paper, an optimization-based approach to mesh adaptivity is described where emphasis is placed on capturing anisotropic solution characteristics. Comparisons are made between the results obtained with uniform isotropic resolution, isotropic adaptive resolution and fully anisotropic adaptive resolution.

  5. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  6. Anisotropic Mesoscale Eddy Transport in Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Dennis, J.; Danabasoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    Modern climate models are limited to coarse-resolution representations of large-scale ocean circulation that rely on parameterizations for mesoscale eddies. The effects of eddies are typically introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically in general circulation models. Thus, only a single parameter, namely the eddy diffusivity, is used at each spatial and temporal location to impart the influence of mesoscale eddies on the resolved flow. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion, potential vorticity barriers, oceanic turbulence, and instabilities, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters to three: a major diffusivity, a minor diffusivity, and the principal axis of alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the newly introduced parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces global temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved even further by parameterizing the anisotropic transport mechanisms in the ocean.

  7. Anisotropic 2-dimensional Robin Hood model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey; Cwilich, Gabriel; Zypman, Fredy

    2009-03-01

    We have considered the Robin Hood model introduced by Zaitsev[1] to discuss flux creep and depinning of interfaces in a two dimensional system. Although the model has been studied extensively analytically in 1-d [2], its scaling laws have been verified numerically only in that case. Recent work suggest that its properties might be important to understand surface friction[3], where its 2-dimensional properties are important. We show that in the 2-dimensional case scaling laws can be found provided one considers carefully the anisotropy of the model, and different ways of introducing that anisotropy lead to different exponents and scaling laws, in analogy with directed percolation, with which this model is closely related[4]. We show that breaking the rotational symmetry between the x and y axes does not change the scaling properties of the model, but the introduction of a preferential direction of accretion (``robbing'' in the language of the model) leads to new scaling exponents. [1] S.I.Zaitsev, Physica A189, 411 (1992) [2] M. Pacuzki, S. Maslov and P.Bak, Phys Rev. E53, 414 (1996) [3] S. Buldyrev, J. Ferrante and F. Zypman Phys. Rev E64, 066110 (2006) [4] G. Odor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 76, 663 (2004) .

  8. Nonergodicity in the Anisotropic Dicke Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijsman, Wouter; Gritsev, Vladimir; Sprik, Rudolf

    2017-02-01

    We study the ergodic-nonergodic transition in a generalized Dicke model with independent corotating and counterrotating light-matter coupling terms. By studying level statistics, the average ratio of consecutive level spacings, and the quantum butterfly effect (out-of-time correlation) as a dynamical probe, we show that the ergodic-nonergodic transition in the Dicke model is a consequence of the proximity to the integrable limit of the model when one of the couplings is set to zero. This can be interpreted as a hint for the existence of a quantum analogue of the classical Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser theorem. In addition, we show that there is no intrinsic relation between the ergodic-nonergodic transition and the precursors of the normal-superradiant quantum phase transition.

  9. Anisotropic models of the upper mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, J.; Anderson, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Long period Rayleigh wave and Love wave dispersion data, particularly for oceanic areas, were not simultaneously satisfied by an isotropic structure. Available phase and group velocity data are inverted by a procedure which includes the effects of transverse anisotropy, an elastic dispersion, sphericity, and gravity. The resulting models, for the average Earth, average ocean and oceanic regions divided according to the age of the ocean floor, are quite different from previous results which ignore the above effects. The models show a low velocity zone with age dependent anisotropy and velocities higher than derived in previous surface wave studies. The correspondence between the anisotropy variation with age and a physical model based on flow aligned olivine is suggested.

  10. Life prediction and constitutive models for anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The intent of this program is to develop a basic understanding of cyclic creep-fatigue deformation mechanisms and damage accumulation, a capability for reliable life prediction, and the ability to model the constitutive behavior of anisotropic single crystal (SC) and directionally solidified or recrystallized (DSR) comprise the program, and the work breakdown for each option reflects a distinct concern for two classes of anisotropic materials, SC and DSR materials, at temperatures encountered in the primary gas path (airfoil temperatures), and at temperatures typical of the blade root attachment and shank area. Work directed toward the higher temperature area of concern in the primary gas path includes effects of coatings on the behavior and properties of the materials of interest. The blade root attachment work areas will address the effects of stress concentrations associated with attachment features.

  11. Anisotropic mesoscale eddy transport in ocean general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; Danabasoglu, Gokhan

    2014-11-01

    In modern climate models, the effects of oceanic mesoscale eddies are introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion and potential vorticity barriers, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters from one to three: major diffusivity, minor diffusivity, and alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved by parameterizing the oceanic anisotropic transport mechanisms.

  12. Anisotropic bead models for molecular hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Richard W.; Zwanzig, Robert

    1989-05-01

    Some qualitative effects of slip hydrodynamic boundary conditions can be incorporated into bead models by replacing the scalar friction constant of a bead with a friction tensor. Translational and rotational diffusion coefficients are calculated analytically and exactly for polygons, analytically but approximately for spherical shells, and numerically by the method of Bloomfield and de la Torre. The calculated diffusion constants of benzene agree with experiment; such agreement is not possible using scalar friction constants. Some comments are made about the transition from overall slip to stick hydrodynamic behavior when tensor friction constants are used.

  13. AmeriFlux US-GLE GLEES

    DOE Data Explorer

    Massman, Bill [USDA Forest Service

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-GLE GLEES. Site Description - The Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site (GLEES) site is located on land owned by the U.S. government and managed by US Forest Service as part of the Medicine Bow National Forest. Many of the trees in the immediate vicinity of the site are older than 400 years, inter-dispersed among trees much younger in age. This widespread age distribution is most likely a derivation of one of two scenarios: 1) A widespread stand replacement about 400 years ago followed by a slow replacement; 2) Intermittent random disturbances over the past 400 years (Bradford et al. 2008). A decade long spruce beetle outbreak that peaked in 2008 resulted in the mortality of 85% of the forested basal area. There are a few private land holdings in the area, with scattered uncorked mining claims. Following the establishment of the National Forest, mining was banned and grazing was closed in the early 1990's in the upper portion of the GLEES site. Recreation in the winter, when snow can remain in patches into the summer months, snow mobiling and cross country skiing are popular. During the limited summer, hiking, camping and fishing are common activities. The site is accessible by vehicle only during the summer on Forest Road FDR 317, and in the winter, the tower is only reachable via snowmobile.

  14. Numerical modeling of anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Sonya S; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    Prediction of flow patterns through oxygenator fiber bundles can allow shape optimization so that efficient gas exchange occurs with minimal thrombus formation and hemolysis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can be used to predict three-dimensional flow velocities and flow distribution from spatially dependent variables and they allow estimations of erythrocyte residence time within the fiber bundle. This study builds upon previous work to develop an accurate numerical model for oxygenators, which would allow for accelerated iterations in oxygenator shape and diffuser plate design optimization. Hollow fiber flow channels were developed to permit experimental calculation of fluid permeability in two directions: main flow along the hollow fiber and perpendicular to the hollow fibers. Commercial software was used to develop three-dimensional CFD models of the experimental flow channels and an anisotropic porous media model for oxygenators from these experimental results. The oxygenator model was used to predict pressure loss throughout the device, visualize blood distribution within the fiber bundle, and estimate erythrocyte residence time within the bundle. Experimental flow channels measurements produced a streamwise permeability of 1.143e(-8) m(2) and transverse permeability of 2.385e(-9) m(2) . These permeabilities, coupled with previous work with volume porosity, were used to develop the numerical model of anisotropic behavior through porous fiber bundles, which indicated a more uniform flow field throughout the oxygenator. Incorporation of known anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in previous numerical models more accurately represents fluid behavior through an oxygenator fiber bundle. CFD coupled with experimental validation can produce a powerful tool for oxygenator design and development.

  15. A Continuum Approach For Neural Network Modelling Of Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Hou; Furukawa, Tomonari

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents an approach for constitutive modelling of anisotropic materials using neural networks on a continuum basis. The proposed approach develops the models by using an error function formulated from the minimum total potential energy principle. The variation of the strain energy of a deformed geometry is approximated by using the full field strain measurement with the neural network constitutive model (NNCM) and the coordinate frame transformation. It is subsequently compared with the variation of the applied external work, such that the discrepancy is fed back to update the model properties. The proposed approach is, therefore, able to develop the NNCM without the presence of stress data. This not only facilitates the use of multi-axial load tests and non-standard specimens to produce more realistic experimental results, but also reduces the number of different specimen configurations used for the model development. A numerical example is presented in this paper to validate the performance and applicability of the proposed approach by modelling a carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) lamina. Artificial experimental results of tensile tests with two different specimens are used to facilitate the validation. The results emphasise the flexibility and applicability of the proposed approach for constitutive modelling of anisotropic materials.

  16. Evaluation of a Rapid Anisotropic Model for ECG Simulation.

    PubMed

    Pezzuto, Simone; Kal'avský, Peter; Potse, Mark; Prinzen, Frits W; Auricchio, Angelo; Krause, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art cardiac electrophysiology models that are able to deliver physiologically motivated activation maps and electrocardiograms (ECGs) can only be solved on high-performance computing architectures. This makes it nearly impossible to adopt such models in clinical practice. ECG imaging tools typically rely on simplified models, but these neglect the anisotropic electric conductivity of the tissue in the forward problem. Moreover, their results are often confined to the heart-torso interface. We propose a forward model that fully accounts for the anisotropic tissue conductivity and produces the standard 12-lead ECG in a few seconds. The activation sequence is approximated with an eikonal model in the 3d myocardium, while the ECG is computed with the lead-field approach. Both solvers were implemented on graphics processing units and massively parallelized. We studied the numerical convergence and scalability of the approach. We also compared the method to the bidomain model in terms of ECGs and activation maps, using a simplified but physiologically motivated geometry and 6 patient-specific anatomies. The proposed methods provided a good approximation of activation maps and ECGs computed with a bidomain model, in only a few seconds. Both solvers scaled very well to high-end hardware. These methods are suitable for use in ECG imaging methods, and may soon become fast enough for use in interactive simulation tools.

  17. Evaluation of a Rapid Anisotropic Model for ECG Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Pezzuto, Simone; Kal'avský, Peter; Potse, Mark; Prinzen, Frits W.; Auricchio, Angelo; Krause, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art cardiac electrophysiology models that are able to deliver physiologically motivated activation maps and electrocardiograms (ECGs) can only be solved on high-performance computing architectures. This makes it nearly impossible to adopt such models in clinical practice. ECG imaging tools typically rely on simplified models, but these neglect the anisotropic electric conductivity of the tissue in the forward problem. Moreover, their results are often confined to the heart-torso interface. We propose a forward model that fully accounts for the anisotropic tissue conductivity and produces the standard 12-lead ECG in a few seconds. The activation sequence is approximated with an eikonal model in the 3d myocardium, while the ECG is computed with the lead-field approach. Both solvers were implemented on graphics processing units and massively parallelized. We studied the numerical convergence and scalability of the approach. We also compared the method to the bidomain model in terms of ECGs and activation maps, using a simplified but physiologically motivated geometry and 6 patient-specific anatomies. The proposed methods provided a good approximation of activation maps and ECGs computed with a bidomain model, in only a few seconds. Both solvers scaled very well to high-end hardware. These methods are suitable for use in ECG imaging methods, and may soon become fast enough for use in interactive simulation tools. PMID:28512434

  18. A robust anisotropic hyperelastic formulation for the modelling of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D R; Gower, A L; Destrade, M; Ogden, R W; McGarry, J P

    2014-11-01

    The Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) model for anisotropic hyperelastic behaviour of collagen fibre reinforced materials was initially developed to describe the elastic properties of arterial tissue, but is now used extensively for modelling a variety of soft biological tissues. Such materials can be regarded as incompressible, and when the incompressibility condition is adopted the strain energy Ψ of the HGO model is a function of one isotropic and two anisotropic deformation invariants. A compressible form (HGO-C model) is widely used in finite element simulations whereby the isotropic part of Ψ is decoupled into volumetric and isochoric parts and the anisotropic part of Ψ is expressed in terms of isochoric invariants. Here, by using three simple deformations (pure dilatation, pure shear and uniaxial stretch), we demonstrate that the compressible HGO-C formulation does not correctly model compressible anisotropic material behaviour, because the anisotropic component of the model is insensitive to volumetric deformation due to the use of isochoric anisotropic invariants. In order to correctly model compressible anisotropic behaviour we present a modified anisotropic (MA) model, whereby the full anisotropic invariants are used, so that a volumetric anisotropic contribution is represented. The MA model correctly predicts an anisotropic response to hydrostatic tensile loading, whereby a sphere deforms into an ellipsoid. It also computes the correct anisotropic stress state for pure shear and uniaxial deformations. To look at more practical applications, we developed a finite element user-defined material subroutine for the simulation of stent deployment in a slightly compressible artery. Significantly higher stress triaxiality and arterial compliance are computed when the full anisotropic invariants are used (MA model) instead of the isochoric form (HGO-C model).

  19. Truncated Connectivities in a Highly Supercritical Anisotropic Percolation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Rodrigo G.; de Lima, Bernardo N. B.; Sanchis, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    We consider an anisotropic bond percolation model on , with p=( p h , p v )∈[0,1]2, p v > p h , and declare each horizontal (respectively vertical) edge of to be open with probability p h (respectively p v ), and otherwise closed, independently of all other edges. Let with 0< x 1< x 2, and . It is natural to ask how the two point connectivity function behaves, and whether anisotropy in percolation probabilities implies the strict inequality . In this note we give an affirmative answer in the highly supercritical regime.

  20. Hyperelastic anisotropic microplane constitutive model for annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Caner, Ferhun C; Guo, Zaoyang; Moran, Brian; Bazant, Zdenek P; Carol, Ignacio

    2007-10-01

    In a recent paper, Peng et al. (2006, "An Anisotropic Hyperelastic Constitutive Model With Fiber-Matrix Interaction for the Human Annulus Fibrosis," ASME J. Appl. Mech., 73(5), pp. 815-824) developed an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model for the human annulus fibrosus in which fiber-matrix interaction plays a crucial role in simulating experimental observations reported in the literature. Later, Guo et al. (2006, "A Composites-Based Hyperelastic Constitutive Model for Soft Tissue With Application to the Human Fibrosis," J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 54(9), pp. 1952-1971) used fiber reinforced continuum mechanics theory to formulate a model in which the fiber-matrix interaction was simulated using only composite effect. It was shown in these studies that the classical anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive models for soft tissue, which do not account for this shear interaction, cannot accurately simulate the test data on human annulus fibrosus. In this study, we show that the microplane model for soft tissue developed by Caner and Carol (2006, "Microplane Constitutive Model and Computational Framework for Blood Vessel Tissue," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 128(3), pp. 419-427) can be adjusted for human annulus fibrosus and the resulting model can accurately simulate the experimental observations without explicit fiber-matrix interaction because, in microplane model, the shear interaction between the individual fibers distributed in the tissue provides the required additional rigidity to explain these experimental facts. The intensity of the shear interaction between the fibers can be adjusted by adjusting the spread in the distribution while keeping the total amount of the fiber constant. A comparison of results obtained from (i) a fiber-matrix parallel coupling model, which does not account for the fiber-matrix interaction, (ii) the same model but enriched with fiber-matrix interaction, and (iii) microplane model for soft tissue adapted to annulus fibrosus with two

  1. Ultrasonic Modeling of Bounded Beam Reflection from Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Malehmir, R.; Kazemi, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this contribution, we try to physically model and understand the physics behind directional dependency of reflectivity from an anisotropic medium as a test of existing theory. One aspect of this is to motivate researchers to look beyond the simplifying assumptions that have been widely employed in the analysis of azimuthally varying seismic reflectivity. To do this, we are making laboratory measurements of the acoustic reflectivity from an orthorhombic medium cut at a variety of orientations in order to expose surfaces with differing anisotropy. The laboratory experiments employ a large aperture transmitter and a small, near-point-source, receiver placed within a goniometer that allows for rotation of the transducers and of the sample, this system was developed in earlier studies of reflectivity from porous media. This enables us to measure reflectivity from any azimuth and over a large range of incidence angles. We used Aluminum with known elastic properties for calibration and comparing the reflectivity results with Zoepprtiz solution. The successful correlation with reflectivity data enables us to go one step ahead and replace the sample with any anisotropic sample. The samples are machined from a `phenolic' material created with fibre cloth layers embedded within an epoxy resin, this material is known to be weakly orthorhombic. Blocks fo this material are cut such that the reflecting surfaces lie at a variety of angles with respect to the layering. These results suggest that some care should be employed in azimuthal seismic studies as it may be difficult to detect the differences in the reflectivity before the P-wave critical angle. However, this critical angle displays substantial change with azimuth and may provide important information for seismic investigations.The reflectivity variations are being modelled using a code called ARTc (Anisotropic Reflection and Transmission code) that provides the plane-wave reflectivity and transmissivity for the general

  2. A hydrostatic stress-dependent anisotropic model of viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Tao, Q.; Verrilli, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrostatic stress-dependent, anisotropic model of viscoplasticity is formulated as an extension of Bodner's model. This represents a further extension of the isotropic Bodner model over that made to anisotropy by Robinson and MitiKavuma. Account is made of the inelastic deformation that can occur in metallic composites under hydrostatic stress. A procedure for determining the material parameters is identified that is virtually identical to the established characterization procedure for the original Bodner model. Characterization can be achieved using longitudinal/transverse tensile and shear tests and hydrostatic stress tests; alternatively, four off-axis tensile tests can be used. Conditions for a yield stress minimum under off-axis tension are discussed. The model is applied to a W/Cu composite; characterization is made using off-axis tensile data generated at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  3. Two-point Spectral Modeling of Anisotropic Rapid Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Timothy; Kurien, Susan; Rubinstein, Robert; Zemach, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We perform simulations of a two-point spectral model for the evolution of the energy tensor as function of wave-vector, for arbitrarily anisotropic turbulence in the limit of rapid distortion. The resulting Reynolds stress tensor for such flow is analysed for the effects of anisotropy during evolution. According to the SO(3) rotation group decomposition of the energy tensor, the leading order isotropic contribution is labelled by rotational mode index j = 0 , while higher order anisotropic contributions in statistically homogeneous flows contain a potentially very large array of rotational modes j = 2 , 3 , 4 , ... . We compare our results to those of the classical Launder, Reece and Rodi class of models in the rapid distortion limit. These models only retain anisotropy in a nominal manner up to j = 2 , due to an a priori angle-averaging procedure on the energy tensor, reducing it to a function of wave-number alone. Although the Reynolds stress itself has maximum j = 2 in the SO(3) representation, the terms that contribute to its evolution generate higher order rotational modes. The contributions from the higher order modes are shown to be responsible for the deviation of the LRR solution from the true solution over time.

  4. Spin noise in the anisotropic central spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, Johannes; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2014-01-01

    Spin-noise measurements can serve as a direct probe for the microscopic decoherence mechanism of an electronic spin in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). We have calculated the spin-noise spectrum in the anisotropic central spin model using a Chebyshev expansion technique which exactly accounts for the dynamics up to an arbitrary long but fixed time in a finite-size system. In the isotropic case, describing QD charge with a single electron, the short-time dynamics is in good agreement with quasistatic approximations for the thermodynamic limit. The spin-noise spectrum, however, shows strong deviations at low frequencies with a power-law behavior of ω-3/4 corresponding to a t-1/4 decay at intermediate and long times. In the Ising limit, applicable to QDs with heavy-hole spins, the spin-noise spectrum exhibits a threshold behavior of (ω-ωL)-1/2 above the Larmor frequency ωL=gμBB. In the generic anisotropic central spin model we have found a crossover from a Gaussian type of spin-noise spectrum to a more Ising-type spectrum with increasing anisotropy in a finite magnetic field. In order to make contact with experiments, we present ensemble averaged spin-noise spectra for QD ensembles charged with single electrons or holes. The Gaussian-type noise spectrum evolves to a more Lorentzian shape spectrum with increasing spread of characteristic time scales and g factors of the individual QDs.

  5. Relativistic modeling of compact stars for anisotropic matter distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we have solved Einstein's field equations of spherically symmetric spacetime for anisotropic matter distribution by assuming physically valid expressions of the metric function e^{λ} and radial pressure (pr). Next we have discussed the physical properties of the model in details by taking the radial pressure pr equal to zero at the boundary of the star. The physical analysis of the star indicates that its model parameters such as density, redshift, radial pressure, transverse pressure and anisotropy are well behaved. Also we have obtained the mass and radius of our compact star which are 2.29M_{⊙} and 11.02 km, respectively. It is observed that the model obtained here for compact stars is compatible with the mass and radius of the strange star PSR 1937 +21.

  6. Nonlinear inversion for arbitrarily-oriented anisotropic models: Synthetic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present an implementation of new 3-D finite-frequency kernels, based on the Born approximation, for inversion of a synthetic surface wave dataset. The kernels are formulated based on a hexagonal symmetry with an arbitrary orientation. Numerical tests are performed to achieve a robust inversion scheme. Nonlinear inversion schemes are examined for adequate recovery of three input models to include: isotropic, anisotropic, and both anisotropic and isotropic input models. Output models from inversions of calculated synthetic data are compared against these input models to test for accurate reproduction of input model features, and the resolution of those features. The focus of this study is on inverting for structure beneath western North America. The synthetic dataset consists of collected seismic waveforms of 128 earthquake mechanisms, of magnitude 6-7 from Dec 2006 to Feb 2009, from the IRIS database. Events were selected to correlate with USArray deployments, and to have as complete an azimuthal coverage as possible. The events occurred within a circular region of radius 150° centered about 44° lat, -110° lon (an arbitrary location within USArray coverage). The seismograms have been calculated within a simplified version of PREM in which the crust and 220 km discontinuity have been removed, dubbed PREM LIGHT, utilizing a spectral element code (SEM) coupled to a normal mode solution. The mesh consists of a 3-D heterogeneous outer shell, representing the upper mantle above 400 km depth, coupled to a spherically symmetric inner sphere. The SEM solves the weak formulation of the seismic wave equation in the outer shell, and uses normal mode summation methods for the inner sphere. To validate the results of the SEM, seismograms are benchmarked against seismograms calculated with a 1-D normal mode summation. From the synthetic dataset, multi-taper fundamental mode surface wave phase delay measurements are taken. The orthogonal 2.5π spheroidal wave function

  7. Anisotropic Partial Volume CSF Modeling for EEG Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Damon E.; Duffy, Frank H.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic source localization (ESL) provides non-invasive evaluation of brain electrical activity for neurology research and clinical evaluation of neurological disorders such as epilepsy. Accurate ESL results are dependent upon the use of patient-specific models of bioelectric conductivity. While the effects of anisotropic conductivities in the skull and white matter have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the accurate modeling of the highly conductive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) region. This study examines the effect that partial volume errors in CSF segmentations have upon the ESL bioelectric model. These errors arise when segmenting sulcal channels whose widths are similar to the resolution of the magnetic resonance (MR) images used for segmentation, as some voxels containing both CSF and grey matter cannot be definitively assigned a single label. These problems, particularly prevalent in pediatric populations, make voxelwise segmentation of CSF compartments a difficult problem. Given the high conductivity of CSF, errors in modeling this region my result in large errors in the bioelectric model. We introduce here a new approach for using estimates of partial volume fractions in the construction of patient specific bioelectric models. In regions where partial volume errors are expected, we use a layered gray matter-CSF model to construct equivalent anisotropic conductivity tensors. This allows us to account for the inhomogeneity of the tissue within each voxel. Using this approach, we are able to reduce the error in the resulting bioelectric models, as evaluated against a known high resolution model. Additionally, this model permits us to evaluate the effects of sulci modeling errors and quantify the mean error as a function of the change in sulci width. Our results suggest that both under and over-estimation of the CSF region leads to significant errors in the bioelectric model. While a model with fixed partial volume fraction is

  8. Evolution of a simple inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmological model with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shogin, Dmitry; Hervik, Sigbjørn E-mail: sigbjorn.hervik@uis.no

    2013-10-01

    We investigate a simple inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology (plane symmetric G{sub 2} model) filled with a tilted perfect fluid undergoing velocity diffusion on a scalar field. Considered are two types of fluid: dust and radiation. We solve the system of Einstein field equations and diffusion equations numerically and demonstrate how the universe evolves towards its future asymptotic state. Also, typical time scales of characteristic processes are determined. The obtained results for dust- and radiation-filled cosmologies are compared to each other and to those in the diffusionless case, giving a hint on which effects can be the result of including diffusion in more complicated models. For example, diffusion causes the accelerated expansion stage to arrive at later times.

  9. Anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation modeling using parabolic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, R. I.; Siegmann, W. L.; Jacobson, M. J.; Jacyna, G. M.

    1990-12-01

    A new method for the investigation of anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation in the atmosphere is developed using parabolic approximations. Model equations for the electric field components are formulated which include the effects of both the inhomogeneous atmosphere and the static magnetic field of the earth. Application of parabolic-type approximations produces different systems of coupled parabolic equations. Each is valid for different relative magnitudes of components of the electric field. All admissible cases are then synthesized into one system which can be numerically examined, yielding solutions without a priori knowledge of electric field ratios. A specific example is presented and examined to understand static magnetic field effects on electromagnetic wave propagation. The influences of the earth's magnetic field are discussed and displayed in terms of electric components and the Poynting vector. Results demonstrate that the geomagnetic field can significantly influence HF atmospheric propagation.

  10. Anisotropic Generalized Ghost Pilgrim Dark Energy Model in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhi, M. Vijaya; Rao, V. U. M.; Aditya, Y.

    2017-02-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type- I Universe filled with matter and generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) has been studied in general theory of relativity. To obtain determinate solution of the field equations we have used scalar expansion proportional to the shear scalar which leads to a relation between the metric potentials. Some well-known cosmological parameters (equation of state (EoS) parameter ( ω Λ), deceleration parameter ( q) and squared speed of sound {vs2}) and planes (ω _{Λ }-dot {ω }_{Λ } and statefinder) are constructed for obtained model. The discussion and significance of these parameters is totally done through pilgrim dark energy parameter ( β) and cosmic time ( t).

  11. Propagation of partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams in dispersive and absorbing media.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Lin, Qiang; Ge, Di

    2002-10-01

    By adopting a new tensor method, we derived an analytical propagation formula for the cross-spectral density of partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams through dispersive and absorbing media. Using the derived formula, we studied the evolution properties and spectrum properties of twisted anisotropic GSM beams in dispersive and absorbing media. The results show that the dispersive and absorbing media have strong influences on the propagation properties of twisted anisotropic GSM beams and their spectrum evolution. Our method provides a simple and convenient way to study the propagation of twisted anisotropic GSM beams in media with complex refractive index.

  12. Two models of anisotropic propagation of a cardiac excitation wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, I. S.; Agladze, K. I.

    2014-11-01

    Propagation of the action potential in the real heart is direction-dependent (anisotropic). We propose two general physical models explaining this anisotropy on the cellular level. The first, "delay" model takes into account the frequency of the cell-cell transitions in different directions of propagation, assuming each transition requires some small time interval. The second model relies on the assumption that the action potential transmits to the next cell only from the area at the pole of the previous cell. We estimated parameters of both models by doing optical mapping and fluorescent staining of cardiac cell samples grown on polymer fiber substrate. Both models gave reasonable estimations, but predicted different behaviors of the anisotropy ratio (ratio of the highest and lowest wave velocities) after addition of the suppressor of sodium channels such as lidocaine. The results of the experiment on lidocaine effect on anisotropy ratio were in favor of the first, "delay" model. Estimated average cell-cell transition delay was 240 ± 80 μs, which is close to the characteristic values of synaptic delay.

  13. Minimally coupled scalar field cosmology in anisotropic cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, C. P.; Srivastava, Milan

    2017-02-01

    We study a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic cosmological model in the Einstein gravitational theory with a minimally coupled scalar field. We consider a non-interacting combination of scalar field and perfect fluid as the source of matter components which are separately conserved. The dynamics of cosmic scalar fields with a zero rest mass and an exponential potential are studied, respectively. We find that both assumptions of potential along with the average scale factor as an exponential function of scalar field lead to the logarithmic form of scalar field in each case which further gives power-law form of the average scale factor. Using these forms of the average scale factor, exact solutions of the field equations are obtained to the metric functions which represent a power-law and a hybrid expansion, respectively. We find that the zero-rest-mass model expands with decelerated rate and behaves like a stiff matter. In the case of exponential potential function, the model decelerates, accelerates or shows the transition depending on the parameters. The isotropization is observed at late-time evolution of the Universe in the exponential potential model.

  14. Anisotropic effects on constitutive model parameters of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter S.; Joshi, Vasant S.

    2012-03-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. Model constants are determined from tension, compression or torsion stress-strain at low and high strain rates at different temperatures. These model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloy. Johnson- Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulation go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results show drastically different behavior it becomes important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests were performed on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal "L", transverse "T", and thickness "TH" directions of 1' thick Al7075 Plate. While flow stress at a strain rate of ~1/s as well as ~1100/s in the thickness and transverse directions are lower than the longitudinal direction. The flow stress in the bar was comparable to flow stress in the longitudinal direction of the plate. Fracture strain data from notched tensile specimens fabricated in the L, T, and Thickness directions of 1' thick plate are used to derive fracture constants.

  15. FDTD modeling of anisotropic nonlinear optical phenomena in silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Chethiya M; Premaratne, Malin; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-09-27

    A deep insight into the inherent anisotropic optical properties of silicon is required to improve the performance of silicon-waveguide-based photonic devices. It may also lead to novel device concepts and substantially extend the capabilities of silicon photonics in the future. In this paper, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we present a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for modeling optical phenomena in silicon waveguides, which takes into account fully the anisotropy of the third-order electronic and Raman susceptibilities. We show that, under certain realistic conditions that prevent generation of the longitudinal optical field inside the waveguide, this model is considerably simplified and can be represented by a computationally efficient algorithm, suitable for numerical analysis of complex polarization effects. To demonstrate the versatility of our model, we study polarization dependence for several nonlinear effects, including self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation, and stimulated Raman scattering. Our FDTD model provides a basis for a full-blown numerical simulator that is restricted neither by the single-mode assumption nor by the slowly varying envelope approximation.

  16. Anisotropic Effects on Constitutive Model Parameters of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter; Joshi, Vasant

    2011-06-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. The model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloys. Johnson-Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulations go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results are drastically different it is important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy we performed quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal, transverse, and thickness directions of 1' thick Al7075-T651 plate. Flow stresses at a strain rate of ~1100/s in the longitudinal and transverse direction are similar around 670MPa and decreases to 620 MPa in the thickness direction. These data are lower than the flow stress of 760 MPa measured in Al7075-T651 bar stock.

  17. Elasto-viscoplastic phase field modelling of anisotropic cleavage fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthraj, P.; Svendsen, B.; Sharma, L.; Roters, F.; Raabe, D.

    2017-02-01

    A finite-strain anisotropic phase field method is developed to model the localisation of damage on a defined family of crystallographic planes, characteristic of cleavage fracture in metals. The approach is based on the introduction of an undamaged configuration, and the inelastic deformation gradient mapping this configuration to a damaged configuration is microstructurally represented by the opening of a set of cleavage planes in the three fracture modes. Crack opening is modelled as a dissipative process, and its evolution is thermodynamically derived. To couple this approach with a physically-based phase field method for brittle fracture, a scalar measure of the overall local damage is introduced, whose evolution is determined by the crack opening rates, and weakly coupled with the non-local phase field energy representing the crack opening resistance in the classical sense of Griffith. A finite-element implementation of the proposed model is employed to simulate the crack propagation path in a laminate and a polycrystalline microstructure. As shown in this work, it is able to predict the localisation of damage on the set of pre-defined cleavage planes, as well as the kinking and branching of the crack resulting from the crystallographic misorientation across the laminate boundary and the grain boundaries respectively.

  18. Chiral spin liquid in a frustrated anisotropic kagome Heisenberg model.

    PubMed

    He, Yin-Chen; Sheng, D N; Chen, Yan

    2014-04-04

    Kalmeyer-Laughlin (KL) chiral spin liquid (CSL) is a type of quantum spin liquid without time-reversal symmetry, and it is considered as the parent state of an exotic type of superconductor--anyon superconductor. Such an exotic state has been sought for more than twenty years; however, it remains unclear whether it can exist in a realistic system where time-reversal symmetry is breaking (T breaking) spontaneously. By using the density matrix renormalization group, we show that KL CSL exists in a frustrated anisotropic kagome Heisenberg model, which has spontaneous T breaking. We find that our model has two topological degenerate ground states, which exhibit nonvanishing scalar chirality order and are protected by finite excitation gap. Furthermore, we identify this state as KL CSL by the characteristic edge conformal field theory from the entanglement spectrum and the quasiparticles braiding statistics extracted from the modular matrix. We also study how this CSL phase evolves as the system approaches the nearest-neighbor kagome Heisenberg model.

  19. Logarithmic violation of scaling in anisotropic kinematic dynamo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form ∝δ (t -t')/k⊥d-1 +ξ , where k⊥ = |k⊥| and k⊥ is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction. The stochastic advection-diffusion equation for the transverse (divergence-free) vector field includes, as special cases, the kinematic dynamo model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the linearized Navier-Stokes equation. In contrast to the well known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale L has a logarithmic behavior: instead of power-like corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of L.

  20. Modeling failure of soft anisotropic materials with application to arteries.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2011-11-01

    The arterial wall is a composite where the preferred orientation of collagen fibers induces anisotropy. Though the hyperelastic theories of fiber-reinforced composites reached a high level of sophistication and showed a reasonable correspondence with the available experimental data they are short of the failure description. Following the tradition of strength of materials the failure criteria are usually separated from stress analysis. In the present work we incorporate a failure description in the hyperelastic models of soft anisotropic materials by introducing energy limiters in the strain energy functions. The limiters provide the saturation value for the strain energy which indicates the maximum energy that can be stored and dissipated by an infinitesimal material volume. By using some popular constitutive models enhanced with the energy limiters we analyze rupture of a sheet of arterial material under the plane stress state varying from the uniaxial to equal biaxial tension. We calculate the local failure criteria including the maximum principal stress, the maximum principal stretch, the von Mises stress, and the strain energy at the moment of the sheet rupture. We find that the local failure criterion in the form of the critical strain energy is the most robust among the considered ones. We also find that the tensile strength-the maximum principal stress-that is usually obtained in uniaxial tension tests might not be appropriate as a failure indicator in the cases of the developed biaxiality of the stress-strain state. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Spherocylindrical microplane constitutive model for shale and other anisotropic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cunbao; Caner, Ferhun C.; Chau, Viet T.; Bažant, Zdeněk P.

    2017-06-01

    Constitutive equations for inelastic behavior of anisotropic materials have been a challenge for decades. Presented is a new spherocylindrical microplane constitutive model that meets this challenge for the inelastic fracturing behavior of orthotropic materials, and particularly the shale, which is transversely isotropic and is important for hydraulic fracturing (aka fracking) as well as many geotechnical structures. The basic idea is to couple a cylindrical microplane system to the classical spherical microplane system. Each system is subjected to the same strain tensor while their stress tensors are superposed. The spherical phase is similar to the previous microplane models for concrete and isotropic rock. The integration of stresses over spherical microplanes of all spatial orientations relies on the previously developed optimal Gaussian integration over a spherical surface. The cylindrical phase, which is what creates the transverse isotropy, involves only microplanes that are normal to plane of isotropy, or the bedding layers, and enhance the stiffness and strength in that plane. Unlike all the microplane models except the spectral one, the present one can reproduce all the five independent elastic constants of transversely isotropic shales. Vice versa, from these constants, one can easily calculate all the microplane elastic moduli, which are all positive if the elastic in-to-out-of plane moduli ratio is not too big (usually less than 3.75, which applies to all shales). Oriented micro-crack openings, frictional micro-slips and bedding plane behavior can be modeled more intuitively than with the spectral approach. Data fitting shows that the microplane resistance depends on the angle with the bedding layers non-monotonically, and compressive resistance reaches a minimum at 60°. A robust algorithm for explicit step-by-step structural analysis is formulated. Like all microplane models, there are many material parameters, but they can be identified sequentially

  2. Anisotropic spectral modeling for unstably stratified homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Antoine; Iyer, Manasa; Gomez, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a spectral model is derived to investigate numerically unstably stratified homogeneous turbulence (USHT) at large Reynolds numbers. The modeling relies on an earlier work for passive scalar dynamics [Briard et al., J. Fluid Mech. 799, 159 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.362] and can handle both shear and mean scalar gradients. The extension of this model to the case of active scalar dynamics is the main theoretical contribution of this paper. This spectral modeling is then applied at large Reynolds numbers to analyze the scaling of the kinetic energy, scalar variance, and scalar flux spectra and to study as well the temporal evolution of the mixing parameter, the Froude number, and some anisotropy indicators in USHT. A theoretical prediction for the exponential growth rate of the kinetic energy, associated with our model equations, is derived and assessed numerically. Throughout the validation part, results are compared with an analogous approach, restricted to axisymmetric turbulence, which is more accurate in term of anisotropy description, but also much more costly in terms of computational resources [Burlot et al., J. Fluid Mech. 765, 17 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2014.726]. It is notably shown that our model can qualitatively recover all the features of the USHT dynamics, with good quantitative agreement on some specific aspects. In addition, some remarks are proposed to point out the similarities and differences between the physics of USHT, shear flows, and passive scalar dynamics with a mean gradient, the two latter configurations having been addressed previously with the same closure. Moreover, it is shown that the anisotropic part of the pressure spectrum in USHT scales in k-11 /3 in the inertial range, similarly to the one in shear flows. Finally, at large Schmidt numbers, a different spectral range is found for the scalar flux: It first scales in k-3 around the Kolmogorov scale and then further in k-1 in the viscous-convective range.

  3. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-08-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  4. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  5. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  6. Atmospheric Cosmic-Ray Variation and Ambient Dose Equivalent Assessments Considering Ground Level Enhancement Thanks to Coupled Anisotropic Solar Cosmic Ray and Extensive Air Shower Modeling.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Guillaume; Aubry, Sébastien

    2017-08-25

    This work investigates the impact of Forbush decrease (FD) and ground-level enhancement (GLE) in the atmosphere, based on solar and galactic cosmic-ray models and the extensive air shower simulations. This approach gives the possibility to investigate both the dynamic behavior of neutron monitors (NM) (using response function) and the flight dose. The ambient dose equivalent during quiet solar activity and solar events (i.e., FDs and GLEs) were investigated for realistic flight plans issued from the Eurocontrol Demand Data Repository. The calculated ambient dose equivalents were compared with flight measurements in quiet solar conditions; comparisons are relevant and demonstrate the ability to estimate the dose level. The GLE model was validated for the GLEs 5 and 69 using the cosmic-ray variation recorded by NMs. The GLE model was applied to flight dose calculations. All of these results show that dose values vary drastically with the route path (latitude, longitude and altitude) and with the delay between the flight departure and the solar event occurrence. Doses induced by extreme GLE events were investigated specifically for London to New York flights, and resulting additional doses are a few hundred or 1,000 μSv, impacting significantly the annual effective dose. This highlights the importance of monitoring extreme solar events and using realistic semi-empirical and particle transport methods for reliable calculation of dose levels.

  7. Synthetic waveform modelling of SS precursors from anisotropic upper-mantle discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Catherine A.; Harmon, Nicholas; Schmerr, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    SS precursors are a powerful tool for interrogating upper-mantle discontinuity structure. Some of these discontinuities may be defined fully or partially by a variation in anisotropy with depth. Therefore, a careful evaluation of SS precursor waveform predictions from anisotropic discontinuities is required. Here, we perform synthetic waveform modelling to evaluate the potential for using SS precursors to constrain anisotropic discontinuities. We investigate SS precursor amplitudes from models with azimuthally anisotropic discontinuities with assumed hexagonal symmetry. We demonstrate that SS precursor polarity variations are robust across a wide range of earthquake source polarizations for our anisotropic models. While polarity variations are not unique among all potential two-layer models with anisotropic discontinuities, other observables, such as the relative arrival time of the precursor and tectonic settings, may be used to constrain anisotropic structure. We discuss implications for previous imaging of upper-mantle discontinuities that may be anisotropic, such as the Lehmann discontinuity, and discontinuities in depth range of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the Pacific.

  8. A robust absorbing layer method for anisotropic seismic wave modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Labbé, S.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-15

    When applied to wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media, Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) exhibit instabilities. Incoming waves are amplified instead of being absorbed. Overcoming this difficulty is crucial as in many seismic imaging applications, accounting accurately for the subsurface anisotropy is mandatory. In this study, we present the SMART layer method as an alternative to PML approach. This method is based on the decomposition of the wavefield into components propagating inward and outward the domain of interest. Only outgoing components are damped. We show that for elastic and acoustic wave propagation in Transverse Isotropic media, the SMART layer is unconditionally dissipative: no amplification of the wavefield is possible. The SMART layers are not perfectly matched, therefore less accurate than conventional PML. However, a reasonable increase of the layer size yields an accuracy similar to PML. Finally, we illustrate that the selective damping strategy on which is based the SMART method can prevent the generation of spurious S-waves by embedding the source in a small zone where only S-waves are damped.

  9. An Anisotropic Fluid-Solid Model of the Mouse Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; del Pin, Facundo; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    A critical challenge in biomechanical simulations is the spatial discretization of complex fluid-solid geometries created from imaging. This is especially important when dealing with Lagrangian interfaces, as there must be at a minimum both geometric and topological compatibility between fluid and solid phases, with exact matching of the interfacial nodes being highly desirable. We have developed a solution to this problem and applied the approach to the creation of a 3D fluidsolid mesh of the mouse heart. First, a 50 micron isotropic MRI dataset of a perfusion-fixed mouse heart was segmented into blood, tissue, and background using a customized multimaterial connected fuzzy thresholding algorithm. Then, a multimaterial marching cubes algorithm was applied to produce two compatible isosurfaces, one for the blood-tissue boundary and one for the tissue-background boundary. A multimaterial smoothing algorithm that rigorously conserves volume for each phase simultaneously smoothed the isosurfaces. Next we applied novel automated meshing algorithms to generate anisotropic hybrid meshes with the number of layers and the desired element anisotropy for each material as the only input parameters. As the meshes are scale-invariant within a material and include boundary layer prisms, fluid-structure interaction computations would have a relative error equilibrated over the entire mesh. The resulting model is highly detailed mesh representation of the mouse heart, including features such as chordae and coronary vasculature, that is also maximally efficient to produce the best simulation results for the computational resources available

  10. Experimental Characterization and Micromechanical Modelling of Anisotropic Slates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Wei, Kai; Liu, Wu; Hu, Shao-Hua; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory tests were performed in this study to examine the anisotropic physical and mechanical properties of the well-foliated Jiujiang slate. The P-wave velocity and the apparent Young's modulus were found to increase remarkably with the foliation angle θ, and the compressive strength at any confining pressure varies in a typical U-shaped trend, with the maximum strength consistently attained at θ = 90° and the minimum strength at θ = 45°. The slate samples failed in three typical patterns relevant to the foliation angle, i.e. shear failure across foliation planes for θ ≤ 15°, sliding along foliation planes for 30° ≤ θ ≤ 60° and axial splitting along foliation planes for θ = 90°. The stress-strain curves at any given foliation angle and confining pressure display an initial nonlinear phase, a linear elastic phase, a crack initiation and growth phase, as well as a rapid stress drop phase and a residual stress phase. Based on the experimental evidences, a micromechanical damage-friction model was proposed for the foliated slate by simply modelling the foliation planes as a family of elastic interfaces and by characterizing the interaction between the foliation planes and the rock matrix with a nonlinear damage evolution law associated with the inclination angle. The proposed model was applied to predict the deformational and strength behaviours of the foliated slate under triaxial compressive conditions using the material parameters calibrated with the uniaxial and/or triaxial test data, with good agreement between the model predictions and the laboratory measurements.

  11. Modeling the anisotropic shock response of single-crystal RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscher, Darby

    Explosives initiate under impacts whose energy, if distributed homogeneously throughout the material, translates to temperature increases that are insufficient to drive the rapid chemistry observed. Heterogeneous thermomechanical interactions at the meso-scale (i.e. between single-crystal and macroscale) leads to the formation of localized hot spots. Direct numerical simulations of mesoscale response can contribute to our understanding of hot spots if they include the relevant deformation mechanisms that are essential to the nonlinear thermomechanical response of explosive molecular crystals. We have developed a single-crystal model for the finite deformation thermomechanical response of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Because of the low symmetry of RDX, a complete description of nonlinear thermoelasticity requires a careful decomposition of free energy into components that represent the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) response and the coupling between isochoric deformation and both deviatoric and hydrostatic stresses. An equation-of-state (EOS) based on Debye theory that defines the PVT response was constructed using experimental data and density functional theory calculations. This EOS replicates the equilibrium states of phase transformation from alpha to gamma polymorphs observed in static high-pressure experiments. Lattice thermoelastic parameters defining the coupled isochoric free energy were obtained from molecular dynamics calculations and previous experimental data. Anisotropic crystal plasticity is modeled using Orowan's expression relating slip rate to dislocation density and velocity. Details of the theory will be presented followed by discussion of simulations of flyer plate impact experiments, including recent experiments diagnosed with in situ X-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. Impact conditions explored within the experimental effort have spanned shock pressures ranging from 1-10 GPa for several crystallographic orientations

  12. Two Spin Liquid phases in the anisotropic triangular Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorella, Sandro

    2005-03-01

    Recently there have been rather clean experimental realizations of the quantum spin 1/2 Heisenberg Hamiltonian on a 2D triangular lattice geometry in systems like Cs2Cu Cl4 and organic compounds like k-(ET)2Cu2(CN)3. These materials are nearly two dimensional and are characterized by an anisotropic antiferromagnetic superexchange. The strength of the spatial anisotropy can increase quantum fluctuations and can destabilize the magnetically ordered state leading to non conventional spin liquid phases. In order to understand these interesting phenomena we have studied, by Quantum Monte Carlo methods, the triangular lattice Heisenberg model as a function of the strength of this anisotropy, represented by the ratio r between the intra-chain nearest neighbor coupling J' and the inter-chain one J. We have found evidence of two spin liquid regions, well represented by projected BCS wave functions[1,2] of the type proposed by P. W. Anderson at the early stages of High temperature superconductivity [3]. The first spin liquid phase is stable for small values of the coupling r 0.6 and appears gapless and fractionalized, whereas the second one is a more conventional spin liquid, very similar to the one realized in the quantum dimer model in the triangular lattice[4]. It is characterized by a spin gap and a finite correlation length, and appears energetically favored in the region 0.6 r 0.9. The various phases are in good agreement with the experimental findings and supports the existence of spin liquid phases in 2D quantum spin-half systems. %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% 1cm *[1] L. Capriotti F. Becca A. Parola and S. Sorella , Phys. Rev. Letters 87, 097201 (2001). *[2] S. Yunoki and S. Sorella Phys. Rev. Letters 92, 15003 (2004). *[3] P. W. Anderson, Science 235, 1186 (1987). *[4] P. Fendley, R. Moessner, and S. L. Sondhi Phys. Rev. B 66, 214513 (2002).

  13. Tensor ABCD law for partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian-Schell model beams.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Cai, Yangjian

    2002-02-15

    A 4 x 4 complex curvature tensor M>(-1) is introduced to describe partially coherent anisotropic Gaussian-Schell model (GSM) beams. An analytical propagation formula for the cross-spectral density of partially coherent anisotropic GSM beams is derived. The propagation law of M(-1) that is also derived may be called partially coherent tensor ABCD law. The analytical formulas presented here are useful in treating the propagation and transformation of partially coherent anisotropic GSM beams, which include previous results for completely coherent Gaussian beams as special cases.

  14. An anisotropic damage model for concrete structures under cyclic loading-uniaxial modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yuchuan; He, Yuming

    2017-05-01

    An anisotropic damage model is developed based on conventional rotating crack approach. It uses nonlinear unloading/linear reloading branches to model the hysteretic behavior of concrete. Two damage variables, determined by the ratio of accumulated dissipating energy to fracture energy, are introduced to represent the stiffness degradation in tension and compression. Three cyclic tests are simulated by this model and sensitivity analyses are conducted as well. The numerical responses calculated by the damage model are consistent with those obtained from the experiments. The numerical results reflect the nonlinear behavior observed in those tests, such as the damage-induced stiffness degradation, accumulation of residual deformation, energy dissipation caused by hysteretic behavior and stiffness recovery effect due to crack closure. Sensitivity analyses show that the damage exponents have significant influence on the computational accuracy. It is concluded that the anisotropic damage model is applicable to the nonlinear analyses of concrete structures subjected to cyclic loading.

  15. BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF AN ANISOTROPIC UNIVERSE MODEL: SYSTEMATICS AND POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneboom, Nicolaas E.; Eriksen, Hans Kristian; Ackerman, Lotty; Wehus, Ingunn Kathrine E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.n E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.n

    2010-10-10

    We revisit the anisotropic universe model previously developed by Ackerman, Carroll, and Wise (ACW), and generalize both the theoretical and computational framework to include polarization and various forms of systematic effects. We apply our new tools to simulated Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data in order to understand the potential impact of asymmetric beams, noise misestimation, and potential zodiacal light emission. We find that neither has any significant impact on the results. We next show that the previously reported ACW signal is also present in the one-year WMAP temperature sky map presented by Liu and Li, where data cuts are more aggressive. Finally, we re-analyze the five-year WMAP data taking into account a previously neglected (-i){sup l-l'}-term in the signal covariance matrix. We still find a strong detection of a preferred direction in the temperature map. Including multipoles up to l = 400, the anisotropy amplitude for the W band is found to be g = 0.29 {+-} 0.031, nonzero at 9{sigma}. However, the corresponding preferred direction is also shifted very close to the ecliptic poles at (l, b) = (96, 30), in agreement with the analysis of Hanson and Lewis, indicating that the signal is aligned along the plane of the solar system. This strongly suggests that the signal is not of cosmological origin, but most likely is a product of an unknown systematic effect. Determining the nature of the systematic effect is of vital importance, as it might affect other cosmological conclusions from the WMAP experiment. Finally, we provide a forecast for the Planck experiment including polarization.

  16. Anisotropic adaptive finite element method for modelling blood flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Sahni, O; Li, X; Jansen, K E; Shephard, M S; Taylor, C A

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we present an adaptive anisotropic finite element method (FEM) and demonstrate how computational efficiency can be increased when applying the method to the simulation of blood flow in the cardiovascular system. We use the SUPG formulation for the transient 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations which are discretised by linear finite elements for both the pressure and the velocity field. Given the pulsatile nature of the flow in blood vessels we have pursued adaptivity based on the average flow over a cardiac cycle. Error indicators are derived to define an anisotropic mesh metric field. Mesh modification algorithms are used to anisotropically adapt the mesh according to the desired size field. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method by first applying it to pulsatile flow in a straight cylindrical vessel and then to a porcine aorta with a stenosis bypassed by a graft. We demonstrate that the use of an anisotropic adaptive FEM can result in an order of magnitude reduction in computing time with no loss of accuracy compared to analyses obtained with uniform meshes.

  17. Asymptotic modelling of a thermopiezoelastic anisotropic smart plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yufei

    Motivated by the requirement of modelling for space flexible reflectors as well as other applications of plate structures in engineering, a general anisotropic laminated thin plate model and a monoclinic Reissner-Mindlin plate model with thermal deformation, two-way coupled piezoelectric effect and pyroelectric effect is constructed using the variational asymptotic method, without any ad hoc assumptions. Total potential energy contains strain energy, electric potential energy and energy caused by temperature change. Three-dimensional strain field is built based on the concept of warping function and decomposition of the rotation tensor. The feature of small thickness and large in-plane dimension of plate structure helped to asymptotically simplify the three-dimensional analysis to a two-dimensional analysis on the reference surface and a one-dimensional analysis through the thickness. For the zeroth-order approximation, the asymptotically correct expression of energy is derived into the form of energetic equation in classical laminated plate theory, which will be enough to predict the behavior of plate structures as thin as a space flexible reflector. A through-the-thickness strain field can be expressed in terms of material constants and two-dimensional membrane and bending strains, while the transverse normal and shear stresses are not predictable yet. In the first-order approximation, the warping functions are further disturbed into a high order and an asymptotically correct energy expression with derivatives of the two-dimensional strains is acquired. For the convenience of practical use, the expression is transformed into a Reissner-Mindlin form with optimization implemented to minimize the error. Transverse stresses and strains are recovered using the in-plane strain variables. Several numerical examples of different laminations and shapes are studied with the help of analytical solutions or shell elements in finite element codes. The constitutive relation is

  18. Heat Flow Pattern and Thermal Resistance Modeling of Anisotropic Heat Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falakzaadeh, F.; Mehryar, R.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure safe operating temperatures of the ever smaller heat generating electronic devices, drastic measures should be taken. Heat spreaders are used to increase surface area, by spreading the heat without necessarily transferring it to the ambient in the first place. The heat flow pattern is investigated in heat spreaders and the fundamental differences regarding how heat conducts in different materials is addressed. Isotropic materials are compared with anisotropic ones having a specifically higher in-plane thermal conductivity than through plane direction. Thermal resistance models are proposed for anisotropic and isotropic heat spreaders in compliance with the order of magnitude of dimensions used in electronics packaging. After establishing thermal resistance models for both the isotropic and anisotropic cases, numerical results are used to find a correlation for predicting thermal resistance in anisotropic heat spreaders with high anisotropy ratios.

  19. An anisotropic constitutive model with biaxial-tension coupling for woven composite reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Huang, Xiaoshuang; Peng, Xiongqi; Gong, Youkun

    2016-10-01

    Based on fiber reinforced continuum mechanics theory, an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model with biaxial tension coupling for woven composite reinforcements is developed. Experimental data from literature are used to identify material parameters in the constitutive model for a specific balanced plain woven fabric. The developed model is validated by comparing numerical results with experimental biaxial tension data under different stretch ratios and picture-frame shear data, demonstrating that the developed constitutive model is highly suitable to characterize the highly non-linear and strongly anisotropic mechanical behaviors of woven composite reinforcements under large deformation.

  20. Differences in published characteristics of GLE60 and their consequences on computed radiation dose rates along selected flight paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bütikofer, R.; Flückiger, E. O.

    2013-02-01

    The radiation dose rates at flight altitudes can increase by orders of magnitude for a short time during energetic solar cosmic ray events, so called ground level enhancements (GLEs). Especially at high latitudes and flight altitudes, solar energetic particles superposed on galactic cosmic rays may cause radiation that exceeds the maximum allowed dosage limit for the general public. Therefore the determination of the radiation dose rate during GLEs should be as reliable as possible. Radiation dose rates along flight paths are typically determined by computer models that are based on cosmic ray flux and anisotropy parameters derived from neutron monitor and/or satellite measurements. The characteristics of the GLE on 15 April 2001 (GLE60) were determined and published by various authors. In this work we compare these results and investigate the consequences on the computed radiation dose rates along selected flight paths. In addition, we compare the computed radiation dose rates with measurements that were made during GLE60 on board two transatlantic flights.

  1. Modeling anisotropic flow and heat transport by using mimetic finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele; Willbrand, Karen; Büsing, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Modeling anisotropic flow in porous or fractured rock often assumes that the permeability tensor is diagonal, which means that its principle directions are always aligned with the coordinate axes. However, the permeability of a heterogeneous anisotropic medium usually is a full tensor. For overcoming this shortcoming, we use the mimetic finite difference method (mFD) for discretizing the flow equation in a hydrothermal reservoir simulation code, SHEMAT-Suite, which couples this equation with the heat transport equation. We verify SHEMAT-Suite-mFD against analytical solutions of pumping tests, using both diagonal and full permeability tensors. We compare results from three benchmarks for testing the capability of SHEMAT-Suite-mFD to handle anisotropic flow in porous and fractured media. The benchmarks include coupled flow and heat transport problems, three-dimensional problems and flow through a fractured porous medium with full equivalent permeability tensor. It shows firstly that the mimetic finite difference method can model anisotropic flow both in porous and in fractured media accurately and its results are better than those obtained by the multi-point flux approximation method in highly anisotropic models, secondly that the asymmetric permeability tensor can be included and leads to improved results compared the symmetric permeability tensor in the equivalent fracture models, and thirdly that the method can be easily implemented in existing finite volume or finite difference codes, which has been demonstrated successfully for SHEMAT-Suite.

  2. Modeling of the financial market using the two-dimensional anisotropic Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2017-09-01

    We have used the two-dimensional classical anisotropic Ising model in an external field and with an ion single anisotropy term as a mathematical model for the price dynamics of the financial market. The model presented allows us to test within the same framework the comparative explanatory power of rational agents versus irrational agents with respect to the facts of financial markets. We have obtained the mean price in terms of the strong of the site anisotropy term Δ which reinforces the sensitivity of the agent's sentiment to external news.

  3. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  4. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-01

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  5. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-15

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  6. Modeling Cometary Coma with a Three Dimensional, Anisotropic Multiple Scattering Distributed Processing Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchini, Chris B.

    1997-01-01

    Development of camera and instrument simulations for space exploration requires the development of scientifically accurate models of the objects to be studied. Several planned cometary missions have prompted the development of a three dimensional, multi-spectral, anisotropic multiple scattering model of cometary coma.

  7. Modeling Cometary Coma with a Three Dimensional, Anisotropic Multiple Scattering Distributed Processing Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchini, Chris B.

    1997-01-01

    Development of camera and instrument simulations for space exploration requires the development of scientifically accurate models of the objects to be studied. Several planned cometary missions have prompted the development of a three dimensional, multi-spectral, anisotropic multiple scattering model of cometary coma.

  8. Relativistic compact anisotropic charged stellar models with Chaplygin equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a new model of static spherically symmetric relativistic charged stellar objects with locally anisotropic matter distribution together with the Chaplygin equation of state. The interior spacetime has been matched continuously to the exterior Reissner-Nordström geometry. Different physical properties of the stellar model have been investigated, analyzed, and presented graphically.

  9. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional crystal growth with anisotropic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meca, Esteban; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Lowengrub, John

    2013-11-01

    In the present article, we introduce a phase-field model for thin-film growth with anisotropic step energy, attachment kinetics, and diffusion, with second-order (thin-interface) corrections. We are mainly interested in the limit in which kinetic anisotropy dominates, and hence we study how the expected shape of a crystallite, which in the long-time limit is the kinetic Wulff shape, is modified by anisotropic diffusion. We present results that prove that anisotropic diffusion plays an important, counterintuitive role in the evolving crystal shape, and we add second-order corrections to the model that provide a significant increase in accuracy for small supersaturations. We also study the effect of different crystal symmetries and discuss the influence of the deposition rate.

  10. Anisotropic Finite Element Modeling Based on a Harmonic Field for Patient-Specific Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wanqiu; Zou, Beiji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This study examined the influence of anisotropic material for human sclera. Method. First, the individual geometry of patient-specific sclera was reproduced from a laser scan. Then, high quality finite element modeling of individual sclera was performed using a convenient automatic hexahedral mesh generator based on harmonic field and integrated with anisotropic material assignment function. Finally, comparison experiments were designed to investigate the effects of anisotropy on finite element modeling of sclera biomechanics. Results. The experimental results show that the presented approach can generate high quality anisotropic hexahedral mesh for patient-specific sclera. Conclusion. The anisotropy shows significant differences for stresses and strain distribution and careful consideration should be given to its use in biomechanical FE studies. PMID:28271067

  11. Analytic models of anisotropic strange stars in f(T) gravity with off-diagonal tetrad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, M.; Abbas, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the analytic models of anisotropic compact stars in f(T) gravity (where T is torsion scalar), with non-diagonal tetrad. By taking the anisotropic source inside the spherically symmetric star, the equations of motions have been derived in the context of f(T) gravity. Krori and Barua metric which satisfies the physical requirement of a realistic star, has been applied to describe the compact objects like strange stars. We use the power law form of f(T) model to determine explicit relations of matter variables. Further, we have found the anisotropic behavior, energy conditions, stability and surface redshift of stars. Using the masses and radii of 4U1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658, we have determined the constants involved in metric components. Finally we discuss the graphical behavior of the analytic description of strange star candidates.

  12. Forward modeling of marine DC resistivity method for a layered anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Ping; Cai, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Since the ocean bottom is a sedimentary environment wherein stratification is well developed, the use of an anisotropic model is best for studying its geology. Beginning with Maxwell's equations for an anisotropic model, we introduce scalar potentials based on the divergence-free characteristic of the electric and magnetic (EM) fields. We then continue the EM fields down into the deep earth and upward into the seawater and couple them at the ocean bottom to the transmitting source. By studying both the DC apparent resistivity curves and their polar plots, we can resolve the anisotropy of the ocean bottom. Forward modeling of a high-resistivity thin layer in an anisotropic half-space demonstrates that the marine DC resistivity method in shallow water is very sensitive to the resistive reservoir but is not influenced by airwaves. As such, it is very suitable for oil and gas exploration in shallowwater areas but, to date, most modeling algorithms for studying marine DC resistivity are based on isotropic models. In this paper, we investigate one-dimensional anisotropic forward modeling for marine DC resistivity method, prove the algorithm to have high accuracy, and thus provide a theoretical basis for 2D and 3D forward modeling.

  13. Stress distribution in a premolar 3D model with anisotropic and isotropic enamel.

    PubMed

    Munari, Laís S; Cornacchia, Tulimar P M; Moreira, Allyson N; Gonçalves, Jason B; De Las Casas, Estevam B; Magalhães, Cláudia S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the areas of stress concentration in a three-dimensional (3D) premolar tooth model with anisotropic or isotropic enamel using the finite element method. A computed tomography was imported to an image processing program to create the tooth model which was exported to a 3D modeling program. The mechanical properties and loading conditions were prescribed in Abaqus. In order to evaluate stresses, axial and oblique loads were applied simulating realistic conditions. Compression stress was observed on the side of load application, and tensile stress was observed on the opposite side. Tensile stress was concentrated mainly in the cervical region and in the alveolar insertion bone. Although stress concentration analyses of the isotropic 3D models produced similar stress distribution results when compared to the anisotropic models, tensile stress values shown by anisotropic models were smaller than the isotropic models. Oblique loads resulted in higher values of tensile stresses, which concentrate mainly in the cervical area of the tooth and in the alveolar bone insertion. Anisotropic properties must be utilized in enamel stress evaluation in non-carious cervical lesions.

  14. Mott Quantum Criticality in the Anisotropic 2D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Benjamin; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Pruschke, Thomas; Assaad, Fakher F.; Raczkowski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    We present evidence for Mott quantum criticality in an anisotropic two-dimensional system of coupled Hubbard chains at half-filling. In this scenario emerging from variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical mean-field theory, the interchain hopping t⊥ acts as a control parameter driving the second-order critical end point Tc of the metal-insulator transition down to zero at t⊥c/t ≃0.2 . Below t⊥c, the volume of the hole and electron Fermi pockets of a compensated metal vanishes continuously at the Mott transition. Above t⊥c, the volume reduction of the pockets is cut off by a first-order transition. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a putative quantum critical point in layered organic conductors, whose location remains elusive so far.

  15. Anisotropic Elastic-Waveform Modeling for Fracture Characterization in EGS Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Kai; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-01-28

    Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) contain newly created fractures in addition to possible existing fractures. Accurate characterization and monitoring of EGS reservoirs are crucial for optimal placement of new wells and effective extraction of geothermal heat. The fractured reservoirs behave as anisotropic media where seismic waves propagate with different velocities along different directions. In addition, the anisotropic properties of fluid-filled fracture zones could be different from those of dry fracture zones. We develop an optimized rotated staggered-grid elastic-wave finite-difference method for simulating seismic-wave propagation in heterogeneous, anisotropic media. Our new method uses a few extra grid points and optimized finite-difference coefficients based on the space-time dispersion relation, and reduce numerical dispersion of the conventional rotated staggered-grid finite-difference scheme. We validate our new method using synthetic vertical-seismic-profiling (VSP) data for an anisotropic geophysical model built with geologic features found at the Raft River EGS reservoir. This improved and optimized rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method provides an essential tool for analyzing VSP data, reverse-time migration, and elastic-waveform inversion in anisotropic, fractured reservoirs.

  16. Fluid-structure interaction simulations of cerebral arteries modeled by isotropic and anisotropic constitutive laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricerri, Paolo; Dedè, Luca; Deparis, Simone; Quarteroni, Alfio; Robertson, Anne M.; Sequeira, Adélia

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers numerical simulations of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems in hemodynamics for idealized geometries of healthy cerebral arteries modeled by both nonlinear isotropic and anisotropic material constitutive laws. In particular, it focuses on an anisotropic model initially proposed for cerebral arteries to characterize the activation of collagen fibers at finite strains. In the current work, this constitutive model is implemented for the first time in the context of an FSI formulation. In this framework, we investigate the influence of the material model on the numerical results and, in the case of the anisotropic laws, the importance of the collagen fibers on the overall mechanical behavior of the tissue. With this aim, we compare our numerical results by analyzing fluid dynamic indicators, vessel wall displacement, Von Mises stress, and deformations of the collagen fibers. Specifically, for an anisotropic model with collagen fiber recruitment at finite strains, we highlight the progressive activation and deactivation processes of the fibrous component of the tissue throughout the wall thickness during the cardiac cycle. The inclusion of collagen recruitment is found to have a substantial impact on the intramural stress, which will in turn impact the biological response of the intramural cells. Hence, the methodology presented here will be particularly useful for studies of mechanobiological processes in the healthy and diseased vascular wall.

  17. Anisotropic seismic-waveform inversion: Application to a seismic velocity model from Eleven-Mile Canyon in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Gao, Kai; Huang, Lianjie; Sabin, Andrew

    2016-03-31

    Accurate imaging and characterization of fracture zones is crucial for geothermal energy exploration. Aligned fractures within fracture zones behave as anisotropic media for seismic-wave propagation. The anisotropic properties in fracture zones introduce extra difficulties for seismic imaging and waveform inversion. We have recently developed a new anisotropic elastic-waveform inversion method using a modified total-variation regularization scheme and a wave-energy-base preconditioning technique. Our new inversion method uses the parameterization of elasticity constants to describe anisotropic media, and hence it can properly handle arbitrary anisotropy. We apply our new inversion method to a seismic velocity model along a 2D-line seismic data acquired at Eleven-Mile Canyon located at the Southern Dixie Valley in Nevada for geothermal energy exploration. Our inversion results show that anisotropic elastic-waveform inversion has potential to reconstruct subsurface anisotropic elastic parameters for imaging and characterization of fracture zones.

  18. Effects of the January 2005 GLE/SEP events on minor atmospheric components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storini, M.; Damiani, A.

    It is known from long ago that solar energetic charged particles, driven by the geomagnetic field, are able to produce ionization at different altitudes of the terrestrial atmosphere. Moreover, they can initiate catalytic cycles for the ozone depletion, involving NOx (N+NO+NO2) and HOx (H, OH, HO2) components. Nevertheless, only in recent years it was possible to compare chemical models involving atmospheric minor components with satellite data. In this work we looked for effects of the GLE/SEP events occurred during January 2005 on the OH and HNO3 species of the atmosphere. Results show that there is a response on the minor atmospheric components, which is different in the winter and summer terrestrial hemispheres. *: This topic is faced for COST 724 Action and supported by the Italian Antarctic Research Program in the frame of Solar-Terrestrial Relations and partly performed for a PhD thesis under development at Siena University/Dept. of Earth Science.

  19. The ground-level enhancement of 2012 May 17: Derivation of solar proton event properties through the application of the NMBANGLE PPOLA model

    SciTech Connect

    Plainaki, Christina; Laurenza, Monica; Storini, Marisa; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Gerontidou, Maria; Kanellakopoulos, Anastasios

    2014-04-20

    In this work, we apply an updated version of the Neutron Monitor (NM) Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model, in order to derive the characteristics of the ground-level enhancement (GLE) on 2012 May 17 (GLE71), the spectral properties of the related solar energetic particle (SEP) event, the spatial distributions of the high-energy solar cosmic ray fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, and the time evolution of the location of the GLE source. Our modeling, based uniquely on the use of ground-level NM data, leads to the following main results. The SEP spectrum related to GLE71 was rather soft during the whole duration of the event, manifesting some weak acceleration episodes only during the initial phase (at ∼01:55-02:00 UT) and at ∼02:30-02:35 UT and ∼02:55-03:00 UT. The spectral index of the modeled SEP spectrum supports the coronal mass ejection-shock driven particle acceleration scenario, in agreement with past results based on the analysis of satellite measurements. During the initial phase of GLE71, the solar proton source at the top of the atmosphere was located above the northern hemisphere, implying that the asymptotic directions of viewing of the northern hemisphere NMs were more favorably located for registering the event than the southern ones. The spatial distribution of the solar proton fluxes at the top of the atmosphere during the main phase manifested a large variation along longitude and latitude. At the rigidity of 1 GV, the maximum primary solar proton flux resulted on the order of ∼3 × 10{sup 4} part. m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} GV{sup –1}.

  20. Modeling Anisotropic Plasticity: 3D Eulerian Hydrocode Simulations of High Strain Rate Deformation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, Michael; Clancy, Sean; Maudlin, Paul; Holian, Kathleen

    2001-06-01

    : Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength has been implemented in the three-dimensional CONEJO hydrodynamics code. CONEJO is an explicit, Eulerian continuum mechanics code that is utilized to predict formation processes associated with material deformation at elevated strain-rates and is a code development project under the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program. Some special features of CONEJO include a high-order advection algorithm, a material interface tracking scheme, and van Leer monotonic advection-limiting. The anisotropic constitutive modeling is posed in an unrotated material frame using the theorem of polar decomposition to describe rigid body rotation. An Euler-Rodrigues description is used to quantify the rigid body rotations. Continuous quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure were utilized. Associative flow formulations incorporating these yield functions were solved using a geometric normal return method. Simple rectangular shear problems, "R-value" problems, and Taylor cylinder impact test data were utilized to verify and validate the implementation of the anisotropic model. A "stretching rod" problem (involving large strain and strain-rate deformation) was selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy for this deformation process. The rod necking rate and topology was compared for CONEJO simulations using several isotropic and anisotropic descriptions that utilized the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model.

  1. Two-dimensional model of a plate made of an anisotropic inhomogeneous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovstik, P. E.; Tovstik, T. P.

    2017-03-01

    We present an asymptotic derivation of the two-dimensional equations of equilibrium of a thin elastic inhomogeneous plate manufactured of an anisotropic material of general form with 21 moduli of elasticity. We also consider simplified models obtained under special assumptions on the moduli. We use test examples to illustrate the error estimate of the proposed model and discuss its scope. The model is compared with the classical Kirchhoff-Love and Timoshenko-Reissner models.

  2. A mitotic nuclear envelope tether for Gle1 also affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Chemudupati, Mahesh; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    During Aspergillus nidulans mitosis, peripheral nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (Nups) disperse from the core NPC structure. Unexpectedly, one predicted peripheral Nup, Gle1, remains at the mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) via an unknown mechanism. Gle1 affinity purification identified mitotic tether for Gle1 (MtgA), which tethers Gle1 to the NE during mitosis but not during interphase when Gle1 is at NPCs. MtgA is the orthologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomere-anchoring inner nuclear membrane protein Bqt4. Like Bqt4, MtgA has meiotic roles, but it is functionally distinct from Bqt4 because MtgA is not required for tethering telomeres to the NE. Domain analyses showed that MtgA targeting to the NE requires its C-terminal transmembrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. Of importance, MtgA functions beyond Gle1 mitotic targeting and meiosis and affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture when deleted or overexpressed. Deleting MtgA generates small, round nuclei, whereas overexpressing MtgA generates larger nuclei with altered nuclear compartmentalization resulting from NE expansion around the nucleolus. The accumulation of MtgA around the nucleolus promotes a similar accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein Erg24, reducing its levels in the ER. This study extends the functions of Bqt4-like proteins to include mitotic Gle1 targeting and modulation of nuclear and nucleolar architecture. PMID:27630260

  3. Mott Quantum Criticality in the Anisotropic 2D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Benjamin; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Pruschke, Thomas; Assaad, Fakher F.; Raczkowski, Marcin

    We present evidence for Mott quantum criticality in an anisotropic two-dimensional system of coupled Hubbard chains at half-filling. In this scenario emerging from variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical mean-field theory, the interchain hopping t⊥ acts as control parameter driving the second-order critical endpoint Tc of the metal-insulator transition down to zero at t⊥c / t ~= 0 . 2 . Below t⊥c the volume of hole and electron Fermi pockets of a compensated metal vanishes continuously at the Mott transition. Above t⊥c the volume reduction of the pockets is cut off by a first-order transition. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a putative quantum critical point in layered organic conductors whose location remains elusive so far. We acknowledge support by DFG research units FOR1807 and FOR1346, ERC Starting Grant No. 306897 and NSF Grant No. PHY11-25915, and computer support by the GWDG and Jülich Supercomputing Centre.

  4. A Model with Ellipsoidal Scatterers for Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Anisotropic Layered Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a model with ellipsoidal scatterers for applications to polarimetric remote sensing of anisotropic layered media at microwave frequencies. The physical configuration includes an isotropic layer covering an anisotropic layer above a homogeneous half space. The isotropic layer consists of randomly oriented spheroids. The anisotropic layer contains ellipsoidal scatterers with a preferential vertical alignment and random azimuthal orientations. Effective permittivities of the scattering media are calculated with the strong fluctuation theory extended to account for the nonspherical shapes and the scatterer orientation distributions. On the basis of the analytic wave theory, dyadic Green's functions for layered media are used to derive polarimetric backscattering coefficients under the distorted Born approximation. The ellipsoidal shape of the scatterers gives rise to nonzero cross-polarized returns from the untilted anisotropic medium in the first-order approximation. Effects of rough interfaces are estimated by an incoherent addition method. Theoretical results and experimental data are matched at 9 GHz for thick first-year sea ice with a bare surface and with a snow cover at Point Barrow, Alaska. The model is then used to study the sensitivity of polarimetric backscattering coefficients with respect to correlation lengths representing the geometry of brine inclusions. Polarimetric signatures of bare and snow-covered sea ice are also simulated based on the model to investigate effects of different scattering mechanisms.

  5. Ultrasonic field modeling in anisotropic materials by distributed point source method.

    PubMed

    Fooladi, Samaneh; Kundu, Tribikram

    2017-03-16

    DPSM (distributed point source method) is a modeling technique which is based on the concept of Green's function. First, a collection of source and target points are distributed over the solution domain based on the problem description and solution requirements. Then, the effects from all source points are superimposed at the location of every individual target point. Therefore, a successful implementation of DPSM entails an effective evaluation of Green's function between many pairs of source and target points. For homogeneous and isotropic media, the Green's function is available as a closed-form analytical expression. But for anisotropic solids, the evaluation of Green's function is more complicated and needs to be done numerically. Nevertheless, important applications such as defect detection in composite materials require anisotropic analysis. In this paper, the DPSM is used for ultrasonic field modeling in anisotropic materials. Considering the prohibitive computational cost of evaluating Green's function numerically for a large number of points, a technique called "windowing" is suggested which employs the repetitive pattern of points in DPSM in order to considerably reduce the number of evaluations of Green's function. In addition, different resolutions of numerical integration are used for computing Green's function corresponding to different distances in order to achieve a good balance between time and accuracy. The developed anisotropic DPSM model equipped with windowing technique and multi-resolution numerical integration is then applied to the problem of ultrasonic wave modeling in a plate immersed in a fluid. The transducers are placed in the fluid on both sides of the plate. First an isotropic plate is considered for the sake of verification and rough calibration of numerical integration. Then a composite plate is considered to demonstrate applicability and effectiveness of the developed model for simulating ultrasonic wave propagation in anisotropic

  6. Calculations of Diffuser Flows with an Anisotropic K-Epsilon Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T.-H.

    1995-01-01

    A newly developed anisotropic K-epsilon model is applied to calculate three axisymmetric diffuser flows with or without separation. The new model uses a quadratic stress-strain relation and satisfies the realizability conditions, i.e., it ensures both the positivity of the turbulent normal stresses and the Schwarz' inequality between any fluctuating velocities. Calculations are carried out with a finite-element method. A second-order accurate, bounded convection scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure numerical credibility of the solutions. The standard K-epsilon model is also used in order to highlight the performance of the new model. Comparison with the experimental data shows that the anisotropic K-epsilon model performs consistently better than does the standard K-epsilon model in all of the three test cases.

  7. Electrons and protons acceleration during the first GLE event of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Firoz, Kazi, A.; Sun, Lingpeng; Miroshnichenko, Leonty, I.

    2013-04-01

    High-energy particles were recorded by the near-Earth spacecraft particle detectors and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In present study, we try to identify the acceleration source of solar energetic particles (SEPs) by combining in-situ particle measurements from WIND/3DP, ACE/EPAM, GOES, and solar cosmic rays (SCRs) registered by several NMs, as well as the remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the path length (1.25 ± 0.05 AU) of SEPs in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar particle release (SPR) time (01:29 ± 1 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account the contamination effects. It is found that the electrons impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change of spectral index, is consistent with the flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. The potential field source surface (PFSS) modeled open-field lines rooted in the active region (AR) provide escaping channels for flare accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released ~10 min later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combing multi-wavelength imaging data on the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain some evidence of that GLE protons, with estimated kinetic energy of ~1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to ~3.07 solar radii.

  8. Anisotropic Tensile Failure Model of Rapid Prototyping Parts - Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Hoon; Baek, Changil; Lee, Sunyoung; Ahn, In Shup

    Stratasys' Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is a typical Rapid Prototyping (RP) process that can fabricate prototypes out of plastic materials, and the parts made from FDM were often used as load-carrying elements. Because FDM deposits materials in about 300 μm thin filament with designated orientation, parts made from FDM show anisotropic material behaviors. This paper proposes an analytic model to predict the tensile strength of FDM parts. Applying the Classical Lamination Theory and Tsai-Wu failure criterion, which were developed for laminated composite materials, a computer code was implemented to predict the failure of the FDM parts. The tensile strengths predicted by the analytic model were compared with those of the experimental data. The data and predicted values agreed reasonably well to prove the validity of the model.

  9. Accelerating anisotropic cosmological model in f(R,T) theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhi Kumar, R.; Satyannarayana, B.

    2017-10-01

    Field equations in a modified theory of gravitation proposed by Harko et al. (Phys Rev D 84:024020, 8) are obtained with the aid of a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic LRS Bianchi type-I metric. Cosmological models corresponding to false vacuum and dust universe are obtained. Some physical and kinematical properties of each of the models are discussed. These models may be physically significant for discussion at an early stage of evolution of the universe.

  10. Microscopic model of the Knight shift in anisotropic and correlated metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Bianca E.; Klemm, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a microscopic model of nuclear magnetic resonance in metals. The spin-1/2 local nucleus and its surrounding orbital electrons interact with the arbitrary constant \\boldsymbol{B}{0} and perpendicular time-oscillatory magnetic inductions \\boldsymbol{B}{1}(t) and with each other via an anisotropic hyperfine interaction. An Anderson-like Hamiltonian describes the excitations of the relevant occupied local orbital electrons into the conduction bands, each band described by an anisotropic effective mass with corresponding Landau orbits and an anisotropic spin \\boldsymbol{g} tensor. Local orbital electron correlation effects are included using the mean-field decoupling procedure of Lacroix. The Knight resonance frequency and corresponding linewidth shifts are evaluated to leading orders in the hyperfine and Anderson excitation interactions. While respectively proportional to {{≤ft({{B}1}/{{B}0}\\right)}2} and a constant for weak {{B}0}\\gg {{B}1} , both highly anisotropic shifts depend strongly upon \\boldsymbol{B}{0} when a Landau level is near the Fermi energy. Electron correlations affect the anisotropy of the linewidth shift. The model is easily generalizable to arbitrary nuclear spin I.

  11. In vivo anisotropic mechanical properties of dystrophic skeletal muscles measured by anisotropic MR elastographic imaging: the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Eric C; Jugé, Lauriane; Lambert, Simon A; Paradis, Valérie; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the utility of mechanical anisotropy (shear storage modulus parallel to fiber/shear storage modulus perpendicular to fiber) measured by combined magnetic resonance (MR) elastography and diffusion-tensor imaging ( DTI diffusion-tensor imaging ) technique (anisotropic MR elastography) to distinguish between healthy and necrotic muscle with different degrees of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. The experimental protocol was approved by the regional animal ethics committee. Twenty-one mdx and 21 wild-type ( WT wild type ) mice were used in our study. Animals were divided into exercised and sedentary groups. Anisotropic MR elastography was used to obtain mechanical anisotropic shear moduli for the lateral gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles in a 7-T MR imager, from which the mechanical anisotropic ratio was calculated. The animals were imaged before and after 10 weeks of a horizontal treadmill running protocol. Spearman rank correlations were used to compare MR elastographic data with muscle necrotic area percentage from histologic analysis. Mechanical anisotropy in WT wild type and mdx mice muscle were compared by using t test and one-way analysis of variance, and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed by using statistical software. Anisotropic MR elastography was able to be used to distinguish between the muscles of mdx and WT wild type mice, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.8. Strong negative correlation (rs = -0.701; P < .001) between the mechanical anisotropic ratio and the percentage of muscle necrotic area was found. By comparing mice with no or mild (0%-5% mean necrotic area) and severe (>5% mean necrotic area) muscle necrosis, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.964 was achieved. Diffusion parameters alone were unable to distinguish between the WT wild type and mdx mice at any time point. The mechanical anisotropic ratio of the shear storage

  12. Hypersurface-homogeneous cosmological models with anisotropic dark energy in Saez-Ballester theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M. K.; Chandel, S.; Ram, Shri

    2017-01-01

    The present study deals with hypersurface-homogeneous cosmological models with anisotropic dark energy in Saez-Ballester theory of gravitation. Exact solutions of field equations are obtained by applying a special law of variation of Hubble's parameter that yields a constant negative value of the deceleration parameter. Three physically viable cosmological models of the Universe are presented for the values of parameter K occurring in the metric of the space-time. The model for K = 0 corresponds to an accelerating Universe with isotropic dark energy. The other two models for K = 1 and -1 represent accelerating Universe with anisotropic dark energy, which isotropize for large time. The physical and geometric behaviours of the models are also discussed.

  13. Evaluation of Springback for DP980 S Rail Using Anisotropic Hardening Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jisik; Lee, Jinwoo; Bae, Gihyun; Barlat, Frederic; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    The effect of anisotropic hardening models on springback of an S-rail part was investigated. Two advanced constitutive models based on distortional and kinematic hardening, which captured the Bauschinger effect, transient hardening, and permanent softening during strain path change, were implemented in a finite element (FE) code. In-plane compression-tension tests were performed to identify the model parameters. The springback of the S-rail after forming a 980 MPa dual-phase steel sheet sample was measured and analyzed using different hardening models. The comparison between experimental and FE results demonstrated that the advanced anisotropic hardening models, which are particularly suitable for non-proportional loading, significantly improved the springback prediction capability of an advanced high strength steel.

  14. Forward modeling the perovskite-postperovskite transition in seismically anisotropic models beneath a slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, S.; Li, M.; Miyagi, L. M.; McNamara, A. K.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Wenk, H.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic observations of the lowermost mantle in subduction regions show strong seismic anisotropy as well as a seismic discontinuity. Both observations appear consistent with a perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. The single crystal velocities of the post-perovksite phase are both faster and more anisotropic. How the seismic discontinuity appears in reflection studies will depend on the retainment of texturing across the phase transitions. In this study we test the texturing across the phase transition and its seismic detectability by forward modeling through a combination of geodynamics and mineral physics tools. Tracers in a 3D geodynamical model with a subducting slab (constrained at the surface) track the velocity gradient tensor along the slab. This information is fed into a viscoplastic polycrystal plasticity model along with major mineral components and different assumptions for their active slip systems and elastic properties. We include a perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. We assume different models converting from perovskite to post-perovskite textured material, of which the simplest is a total randomization. Away from the discontinuity, the strong texturing towards the CMB will overprint the signature of any of these assumptions. Here we present radially anisotropic models expressed in terms of seismic SH and SV velocities, illustrating the seismic sensitivity to the texture conversion within the transition. Our geodynamical model has a large number of tracers that track different areas in the subducting slab and represent lateral variations in deformation. These variations result in a family of modeled seismic discontinuities, representing the spread in depth and sharpness of the discontinuity measured by seismic ScS precursor studies.

  15. Anisotropic Coarse-Grained Model for Proteins Based On Gay–Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gay–Berne anisotropic potential has been widely used to evaluate the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained particles being described as elliptical rigid bodies. In this paper, we are presenting a coarse-grained model for twenty kinds of amino acids and proteins, based on the anisotropic Gay–Berne and point electric multipole (EMP) potentials. We demonstrate that the anisotropic coarse-grained model, namely GBEMP model, is able to reproduce many key features observed from experimental protein structures (Dunbrack Library), as well as from atomistic force field simulations (using AMOEBA, AMBER, and CHARMM force fields), while saving the computational cost by a factor of about 10–200 depending on specific cases and atomistic models. More importantly, unlike other coarse-grained approaches, our framework is based on the fundamental intermolecular forces with explicit treatment of electrostatic and repulsion-dispersion forces. As a result, the coarse-grained protein model presented an accurate description of nonbonded interactions (particularly electrostatic component) between hetero/homodimers (such as peptide–peptide, peptide–water). In addition, the encouraging performance of the model was reflected by the excellent correlation between GBEMP and AMOEBA models in the calculations of the dipole moment of peptides. In brief, the GBEMP model given here is general and transferable, suitable for simulating complex biomolecular systems. PMID:24659927

  16. Wolff algorithm and anisotropic continuous-spin models: An application to the spin-van der Waals model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'onorio de Meo, Marco; Oh, Suhk Kun

    1992-07-01

    The problem of applying Wolff's cluster algorithm to anisotropic classical spin models is resolved by modifying a part of the Wolff algorithm. To test the effectiveness of our modified algorithm, the spin-van der Waals model is investigated in detail. Our estimate of the dynamical exponent of the model is z=0.19+/-0.04.

  17. An anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete at transient elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baker, Graham; de Borst, René

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of concrete at elevated temperatures is important for an assessment of integrity (strength and durability) of structures exposed to a high-temperature environment, in applications such as fire exposure, smelting plants and nuclear installations. In modelling terms, a coupled thermomechanical analysis represents a generalization of the computational mechanics of fracture and damage. Here, we develop a fully coupled anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete under high stress and transient temperature, with emphasis on the adherence of the model to the laws of thermodynamics. Specific analytical results are given, deduced from thermodynamics, of a novel interpretation on specific heat, evolution of entropy and the identification of the complete anisotropic, thermomechanical damage surface. The model is also shown to be stable in a computational sense, and to satisfy the laws of thermodynamics.

  18. Separation of variables in anisotropic models and non-skew-symmetric elliptic r-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, Taras

    2017-05-01

    We solve a problem of separation of variables for the classical integrable hamiltonian systems possessing Lax matrices satisfying linear Poisson brackets with the non-skew-symmetric, non-dynamical elliptic so(3)⊗ so(3)-valued classical r-matrix. Using the corresponding Lax matrices, we present a general form of the "separating functions" B( u) and A( u) that generate the coordinates and the momenta of separation for the associated models. We consider several examples and perform the separation of variables for the classical anisotropic Euler's top, Steklov-Lyapunov model of the motion of anisotropic rigid body in the liquid, two-spin generalized Gaudin model and "spin" generalization of Steklov-Lyapunov model.

  19. Separation of variables in anisotropic models and non-skew-symmetric elliptic r-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, Taras

    2016-11-01

    We solve a problem of separation of variables for the classical integrable hamiltonian systems possessing Lax matrices satisfying linear Poisson brackets with the non-skew-symmetric, non-dynamical elliptic so(3)⊗ so(3) -valued classical r-matrix. Using the corresponding Lax matrices, we present a general form of the "separating functions" B(u) and A(u) that generate the coordinates and the momenta of separation for the associated models. We consider several examples and perform the separation of variables for the classical anisotropic Euler's top, Steklov-Lyapunov model of the motion of anisotropic rigid body in the liquid, two-spin generalized Gaudin model and "spin" generalization of Steklov-Lyapunov model.

  20. Failure Analysis of Warm Stamping of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Based on an Anisotropic Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. J.; Chen, Z. H.; Dong, C. F.

    2014-11-01

    Based on the frame work of continuum damage mechanics, a research work of anisotropic damage evolution in warm stamping process of magnesium alloy sheets has been carried out by means of a combined experimental-numerical method. The aim was to predict formability of warm stamping of AZ31 Mg alloy sheets by taking the thermal and damage effects into account. In the presented work, a temperature-dependent anisotropic yield function suitable for cold rolling sheet metals together with an anisotropic damage model was implemented into the a VUMAT subroutine for ABAQUS/EXPLICIT. The evolution of internal damage in the form of void growth and coalescence in AZ31 Mg alloy sheet was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, a coupled thermo-mechanical simulation of the stamping process was performed using the implemented code at different temperatures. The parameters employed in the simulation were determined by the standard tensile tests and algebraic manipulation. The overall anisotropic damage process from crack initiation to final propagation in local area of blank was simulated. Numerical results show that the prediction of the site of crack initiation and the orientation of crack propagation are consistent with the data observed in warm stamping experiments.

  1. Green function method study of the anisotropic ferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ai-Yuan; Chen, Yuan

    2008-06-01

    We study the phase diagram of the anisotropic ferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a square lattice. We use the double-time Green’s function method within the Callen decoupling approximation. The dependence of the Curie temperature Tc on the spin S and on the anisotropy parameter Δ ( Δ=0 and 1 correspond to the isotropic Heisenberg and Ising model, respectively) is obtained explicitly. Our results are in agreement with results obtained from other theoretical approaches.

  2. A Weighted Difference of Anisotropic and Isotropic Total Variation Model for Image Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    model or a reconstructed result. A classical regularization is the total variation (TV) proposed by Rudin -Osher-Fatemi [33]. It is widely used in image...S. J. Osher and S. Esedoglu, Decomposition of images by the anisotropic rudin -osher-fatemi model, Comm. Pure Appl. Math, 57 (2003), pp. 1609–1626...R. B. Potts, Some generalized order-disorder transformations, Math. Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc, (1952), pp. 106–109. [33] L. Rudin , S. Osher, and E

  3. A rock physics model for analysis of anisotropic parameters in a shale reservoir in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Keran; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Shuangquan; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-02-01

    A rock physics model is a very effective tool to describe the anisotropy and mechanical properties of rock from a seismology perspective. Compared to a conventional reservoir, modelling a shale reservoir requires us to face two main challenges in modelling: the existence of organic matter and strong anisotropy. We construct an anisotropic rock physics workflow for a typical shale reservoir in Southwest China, in which the organic matter is treated separately from other minerals by using a combination of anisotropic self-consistent approximation and the differential effective medium method. The standard deviation of the distribution function is used to model the degree of lamination of clay and kerogen. A double scan workflow is introduced to invert the probability of pore aspect ratio and lamination simultaneously, which can give us a better understanding of the shale formation. The anisotropic properties of target formation have been analysed based on the proposed model. Inverted Thomsen parameters, especially the sign of delta, are analysed in terms of the physical properties of rock physics modelling.

  4. Five-layer realistic head model based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of different tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dandan; Zhang, Jianwei; Wu, Weijuan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiangping

    2009-10-01

    This paper is focused on the sophisticated realistic head modeling based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of the head tissues. The finite element method (FEM) was used to model the five-layer head volume conductor models with hexahedral elements from segmentation and mapping of DT-MRI data. Then the inhomogeneous conductivities of the scalp, CSF and gray matter tissue were distributed according a normal distribution based on the mean value of respective tissues. The electric conductivity of the brain tissues dictates different inhomogeneous and anisotropic at some different microscopic levels. Including the inhomogeneous and anisotropy of the tissue would improve the accuracy of the MREIT, EEG and MEG problems in the simulation research.

  5. Diffusion-Limited Aggregation with Anisotropic Sticking Probability: A Tentative Model for River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1986-10-01

    Diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model with anisotropic sticking probability Ps is computer-simulated on two dimensional square lattice. The cluster grows from a seed particle at the origin in the positive y area with the absorption-type boundary along x-axis. The cluster is found to grow anisotropically as R//˜Nν// and R\\bot˜Nν\\bot, where R\\bot and R// are the radii of gyration of the cluster along x- and y-axes, respectively, and N is the particle number constituting the cluster. The two exponents are shown to become assymptotically ν//{=}2/3, ν\\bot{=}1/3 whenever the sticking anisotropy exists. It is also found that the present model is fairly consistent with Hack’s law of river networks, suggesting that it is a good candidate of a prototype model for the evolution of the river network.

  6. Urban flood modeling using shallow water equations with depth-dependent anisotropic porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgen, Ilhan; Zhao, Jiaheng; Liang, Dongfang; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    The shallow water model with anisotropic porosity conceptually takes into account the unresolved subgrid-scale features, e.g. microtopography or buildings. This enables computationally efficient simulations that can be run on coarser grids, whereas reasonable accuracy is maintained via the introduction of porosity. This article presents a novel numerical model for the depth-averaged equations with anisotropic porosity. The porosity is calculated using the probability mass function of the subgrid-scale features in each cell and updated in each time step. The model is tested in a one-dimensional theoretical benchmark before being evaluated against measurements and high-resolution predictions in three case studies: a dam-break over a triangular bottom sill, a dam-break through an idealized city and a rainfall-runoff event in an idealized urban catchment. The physical processes could be approximated relatively well with the anisotropic porosity shallow water model. The computational resolution influences the porosities calculated at the cell edges and therefore has a large influence on the quality of the solution. The computational time decreased significantly, on average three orders of magnitude, in comparison to the classical high-resolution shallow water model simulation.

  7. Evaluation of three-dimensional anisotropic head model for mapping realistic electromagnetic fields of brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Wi, Hun; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields provide fundamental data for the imaging of electrical tissue properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, in recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based tissue property mapping. The induced voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density caused by externally injected current are critical factors for determining the image quality of electrical tissue conductivity. As a useful tool to identify bio-electromagnetic phenomena, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subject to an injected currents. In this study, we provide the numerical simulation results of electromagnetic field mapping of brain tissues using a MR-based conductivity imaging method. First, we implemented a realistic three-dimensional human anisotropic head model using high-resolution anatomical and diffusion tensor MR images. The voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density of brain tissues were imaged by injecting 1 mA of current through pairs of electrodes on the surface of our head model. The current density map of anisotropic brain tissues was calculated from the measured magnetic flux density based on the linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. Comparing the current density to the previous isotropic model, the anisotropic model clearly showed the differences between the brain tissues. This originates from the enhanced signals by the inherent conductivity contrast as well as the actual tissue condition resulting from the injected currents.

  8. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasmas using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2014-12-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic tokamak plasmas is theoretically analyzed by using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation. The bi-Maxwellian distribution function for guiding-center ions is assumed to obtain a self-consistent form, yielding pressures satisfying the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) anisotropic equilibrium condition. The double adiabatic model gives the dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which agrees well with the one derived from gyro-kinetic equation. The GAM frequency increases with the ratio of pressures, p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, and the Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}. MHD result shows a low-frequency zonal flow existing for all p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, while according to the kinetic dispersion relation, no low-frequency branch exists for p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}≳ 2.

  9. Anisotropic Effects on Constitutive Model Parameters of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    strength 7075-T651aluminum alloy . Johnson - Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration...structural components made of high strength 7075-T651aluminum alloy . Johnson - Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material...rate sensitivity, Johnson - Cook , constitutive model. PACS: 62.20 .Dc, 62.20..Fe, S 62.50. +p, 83.60.La INTRODUCTION Aluminum 7075 alloys are

  10. Implementation of an anisotropic mechanical model for shale in Geodyn

    SciTech Connect

    Attaia, A.; Vorobiev, O.; Walsh, S.

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to present the implementation of a shale model in the Geodyn code, based on published rock material models and properties that can help a petroleum engineer in his design of various strategies for oil/gas recovery from shale rock formation.

  11. Large scale behavior of a two-dimensional model of anisotropic branched polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Milan; Knežević, Dragica

    2013-10-01

    We study critical properties of anisotropic branched polymers modeled by semi-directed lattice animals on a triangular lattice. Using the exact transfer-matrix approach on strips of quite large widths and phenomenological renormalization group analysis, we obtained pretty good estimates of various critical exponents in the whole high-temperature region, including the point of collapse transition. Our numerical results suggest that this collapse transition belongs to the universality class of directed percolation.

  12. Intersecting S-branes and an anisotropic models of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Dmitry G.

    2008-10-10

    We consider an anisotropic S-brane (space-like hyperbrane) solutions in application to cosmological model. The gravity-dilaton-antisymmetric form field initial model is compactified of extra space and we get four dimensional space (space of three dimensional S-brane plus time coordinate). Dynamic of obtained model depends from the dynamic of compactified space. In all cases of extra space in such cosmological models the primordial inflationary phase was obtained. Focus attention to the question of an anisotropy of space and an improving a number of e-folding.

  13. Modeling of Anisotropic Rock Joints Under Cyclic Loading (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    This work describes a constitutive framework for modeling the behavior of rough joints under cyclic loading. Particular attention is paid to the intrinsic links between dilatancy, surface degradation, and mobilized shear strength. The framework also accounts for the important effect of shear-induced anisotropy. Both the governing formulation and an algorithm for implicit numerical integration are presented. While the proposed methods are general, we also postulate a specific model that is compared with experimental data. It employs relatively few free parameters, but shows good agreement with laboratory tests.

  14. Effects of coherence on anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model beams on propagation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Xiangzhao; Zeng, Aijun; Yang, Kun

    2007-08-01

    An analytical formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of the electric field of anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model beams propagating in free space is derived by using a tensor method. The effects of coherence on those beams are studied. It is shown that two anisotropic stochastic electromagnetic beams that propagate from the source plane z=0 into the half-space z>0 may have different beam shapes (i.e., spectral density) and states of polarization in the half-space, even though they have the same beam shape and states of polarization in the source plane. This fact is due to a difference in the coherence properties of the field in the source plane.

  15. Anisotropic generalization of Matese & Whitman solution for compact star models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanandan, Baiju; Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Smitha, T. T.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the stability of anisotropic compact star models by introducing Matese and Whitman (Phys. Rev. D 11:1270, 1980) solution in general relativity. We have particularly looked into the detailed investigation of the measurements of basic physical parameters such as radial pressure, tangential pressure, energy density, red shift, sound velocity, masses and radii are affected by unknown effects such as loss, accretion and diffusion of mass. Those give insight into the characteristics of the compact astrophysical object with anisotropic matter distribution as well as the physical reality. The results obtained for the physical feature of compact stars such as, Her. X-1, RXJ 1856-37, SAX J1808.4-3658(SS2) and SAX J1808.4-3658(SS1) are compared to the recently observed massive compact object.

  16. Spreading and wandering of Gaussian-Schell model laser beams in an anisotropic turbulent ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-09-01

    The effect of anisotropic turbulence on the spreading and wandering of Gaussian-Schell model (GSM) laser beams propagating in an ocean is studied. The long-term spreading of a GSM beam propagating through the paraxial channel of a turbulent ocean is also developed. Expressions of random wander for such laser beams are derived in an anisotropic turbulent ocean based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. We investigate the influence of parameters in a turbulent ocean on the beam wander and spreading. Our results indicate that beam spreading and random beam wandering are smaller without considering the anisotropy of turbulence in the oceanic channel. Salinity fluctuation has a greater contribution to both the beam spreading and beam wander than that of temperature fluctuations in a turbulent ocean. Our results could be helpful for designing a free-space optical wireless communication system in an oceanic environment.

  17. Anisotropic, nonsingular early universe model leading to a realistic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Lasenby, Anthony N.; Hobson, Michael P.

    2009-02-15

    We present a novel cosmological model in which scalar field matter in a biaxial Bianchi IX geometry leads to a nonsingular 'pancaking' solution: the hypersurface volume goes to zero instantaneously at the 'big bang', but all physical quantities, such as curvature invariants and the matter energy density remain finite, and continue smoothly through the big bang. We demonstrate that there exist geodesics extending through the big bang, but that there are also incomplete geodesics that spiral infinitely around a topologically closed spatial dimension at the big bang, rendering it, at worst, a quasiregular singularity. The model is thus reminiscent of the Taub-NUT vacuum solution in that it has biaxial Bianchi IX geometry and its evolution exhibits a dimensionality reduction at a quasiregular singularity; the two models are, however, rather different, as we will show in a future work. Here we concentrate on the cosmological implications of our model and show how the scalar field drives both isotropization and inflation, thus raising the question of whether structure on the largest scales was laid down at a time when the universe was still oblate (as also suggested by [T. S. Pereira, C. Pitrou, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 9 (2007) 6.][C. Pitrou, T. S. Pereira, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 4 (2008) 4.][A. Guemruekcueoglu, C. Contaldi, and M. Peloso, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 11 (2007) 005.]). We also discuss the stability of our model to small perturbations around biaxiality and draw an analogy with cosmological perturbations. We conclude by presenting a separate, bouncing solution, which generalizes the known bouncing solution in closed FRW universes.

  18. Statistical analysis of cell migration in 3D using the anisotropic persistent random walk model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Giri, Anjil; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices (ECMs) is crucial to the normal development of tissues and organs and in disease processes, yet adequate analytical tools to characterize 3D migration are lacking. The motility of eukaryotic cells on 2D substrates in the absence of gradients has long been described using persistent random walks (PRWs). Recent work shows that 3D migration is anisotropic and features an exponential mean cell velocity distribution, rendering the PRW model invalid. Here we present a protocol for the analysis of 3D cell motility using the anisotropic PRW model. The software, which is implemented in MATLAB, enables statistical profiling of experimentally observed 2D and 3D cell trajectories, and it extracts the persistence and speed of cells along primary and nonprimary directions and an anisotropic index of migration. Basic computer skills and experience with MATLAB software are recommended for successful use of the protocol. This protocol is highly automated and fast, taking <30 min to analyze trajectory data per biological condition.

  19. Formation of Bragg band gaps in anisotropic phononic crystals analyzed with the empty lattice model

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yan -Feng; Maznev, Alexei; Laude, Vincent

    2016-05-11

    Bragg band gaps of phononic crystals generally, but not always, open at Brillouin zone boundaries. The commonly accepted explanation stems from the empty lattice model: assuming a small material contrast between the constituents of the unit cell, avoided crossings in the phononic band structure appear at frequencies and wavenumbers corresponding to band intersections; for scalar waves the lowest intersections coincide with boundaries of the first Brillouin zone. However, if a phononic crystal contains elastically anisotropic materials, its overall symmetry is not dictated solely by the lattice symmetry. We construct an empty lattice model for phononic crystals made of isotropic andmore » anisotropic materials, based on their slowness curves. We find that, in the anisotropic case, avoided crossings generally do not appear at the boundaries of traditionally defined Brillouin zones. Furthermore, the Bragg "planes" which give rise to phononic band gaps, are generally not flat planes but curved surfaces. Lastly, the same is found to be the case for avoided crossings between shear (transverse) and longitudinal bands in the isotropic case.« less

  20. Formation of Bragg band gaps in anisotropic phononic crystals analyzed with the empty lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan -Feng; Maznev, Alexei; Laude, Vincent

    2016-05-11

    Bragg band gaps of phononic crystals generally, but not always, open at Brillouin zone boundaries. The commonly accepted explanation stems from the empty lattice model: assuming a small material contrast between the constituents of the unit cell, avoided crossings in the phononic band structure appear at frequencies and wavenumbers corresponding to band intersections; for scalar waves the lowest intersections coincide with boundaries of the first Brillouin zone. However, if a phononic crystal contains elastically anisotropic materials, its overall symmetry is not dictated solely by the lattice symmetry. We construct an empty lattice model for phononic crystals made of isotropic and anisotropic materials, based on their slowness curves. We find that, in the anisotropic case, avoided crossings generally do not appear at the boundaries of traditionally defined Brillouin zones. Furthermore, the Bragg "planes" which give rise to phononic band gaps, are generally not flat planes but curved surfaces. Lastly, the same is found to be the case for avoided crossings between shear (transverse) and longitudinal bands in the isotropic case.

  1. Viscoplastic selfconsistent modelling of the anisotropic behavior of voided polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lebensohn, R. A.; Maudlin, P. J.; Tomé, C. N. ,

    2004-01-01

    In this work we consider the presence of ellipsoidal voids inside polycrystals submitted to large strain deformation. For this purpose, the originally incompressible viscoplastic selfconsistent (VPSC) formulation has been extended to deal with compressible polyaystals. Such an extended model allows us to account for porosity evolution in voided polycrystals, while preserving the anisotropy and crystallographic capabilities of the VPSC formulation. We present several applications of this extended VPSC model, which address the coupling between texture, plastic anisotropy, void shape, triaxiality, and porosity evolution. We also discuss the implementation of a multiscale calculation using the present compressible VPSC as constitutive routine inside dynamic FEM codes, for the simulation of deformation processes in which both anisotropy and cavitation became relevant aspects of microstructural evolution.

  2. Anisotropic Damage Mechanics Modeling in Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-15

    conducted on a titanium aluminide SiC-reinforced metal matrix composite. Center-cracked plates with laminate layups of (0/90) and (±45). were tested...Kattan, P. I., "Finite Strain Plasticity and Damage in Constitutive Modeling of Metals with Spin Tensors," Applied Mechanics Reviews, Vol. 45, No. 3...34Contractors Meeting on Mechanics of Materials," Dayton, Ohio, October 1991. Voyiadjis, G. Z., and Kattan, P. I., "Finite Strain Plasticity and Damage in

  3. Models of Anisotropic Creep in Integral Wing Panel Forming Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinikov, A. I.; Oleinikov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    For a sufficiently wide range of stresses the titanic and aluminummagnesium alloys, as a rule, strained differently in the process of creep under tension and compression along a fixed direction. There are suggested constitutive relations for the description of the steady-state creep of transversely isotropic materials with different tension and compression characteristics. Experimental justification is given to the proposed constitutive equations. Modeling of forming of wing panels of the aircraft are considered.

  4. Electromagnetic characterization of the CFRPs anisotropic conductivity: modeling and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menana, H.; Féliachi, M.

    2011-02-01

    This work deals with the characterization of the conductivity tensor of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) thin plate. We propose a contactless method based on the eddy current non destructive testing technique. The used eddy current sensor consists of a ferrite torus on which a winding is wound. The torus is of a rectangular section and contains a thin air-gap in which the thin CFRP plate is inserted. We developed analytical relations giving the longitudinal and transversal conductivities of the CFRP plate as functions of the impedances variations of the eddy current sensor, corresponding to the orientations of the carbon fibers parallel and transverse to the direction of the torus width which is much greater than its thickness. The analytical relations are developed by inverting interpolation functions of curves giving the variations of the sensor impedances as functions of the longitudinal and transversal conductivities of the CFRP plate. These curves are obtained by a numerical model based on a simplified integro-differential formulation in terms of the electric vector potential in the CFRP plate, coupled to the magnetic circuit equations in the ferrite torus. The modeling results are supported by measurements.

  5. Inter-comparison of isotropic and anisotropic sea ice rheology in a fully coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Cassano, J. J.; Maslowski, W.; Osinski, R.; Seefeldt, M. W.; Hughes, M.; Duvivier, A.; Nijssen, B.; Hamman, J.; Hutchings, J. K.; Hunke, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    We present the sea ice climate of the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), using a suite of new physics available in the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE5). RASM is a high-resolution fully coupled pan-Arctic model that also includes the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. The model domain extends from ~45˚N to the North Pole and is configured to run at ~9km resolution for the ice and ocean components, coupled to 50km resolution atmosphere and land models. The baseline sea ice model configuration includes mushy-layer sea ice thermodynamics and level-ice melt ponds. Using this configuration, we compare the use of isotropic and anisotropic sea ice mechanics, and evaluate model performance using these two variants against observations including Arctic buoy drift and deformation, satellite-derived drift and deformation, and sea ice volume estimates from ICESat. We find that the isotropic rheology better approximates spatial patterns of thickness observed across the Arctic, but that both rheologies closely approximate scaling laws observed in the pack using buoys and RGPS data. A fundamental component of both ice mechanics variants, the so called Elastic-Viscous-Plastic (EVP) and Anisotropic-Elastic-Plastic (EAP), is that they are highly sensitive to the timestep used for elastic sub-cycling in an inertial-resolving coupled framework, and this has a significant affect on surface fluxes in the fully coupled framework.

  6. Three-dimensional elasticity models for buckling of anisotropic and auxetic beams and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Eltigani

    The three-dimensional elasticity model is developed to determine the critical buckling load for isotropic, anisotropic, and auxetic beams and plates. Different beam theories are studied and compared to the elasticity theory. The study was based on the assessment of those beam theories using different beam cross-sections and boundary conditions. The elasticity theory for anisotropic beams obtained well results for large slenderness ratios when it compared with Euler-Bernoulli theory which is considered in this study the main area of comparison study. For small values of slenderness ratio the elasticity theory obtained significant difference than the Euler-Bernoulli theory, which means that Euler-Bernoulli is weaker when it is used for short beams than long beams. The orientation of the anisotropy behavior is also studied and has showed how the buckling load can be changed due to the orientation of the elasticity modulus. The auxetic beams behave differently than the anisotropic behavior, it gives results higher and lower than the Euler-Bernoulli theory according to the slenderness ratio and the Poisson's ratio values. A significant behavior was noticed in using beams with negative Poisson's the ratio which can be useful in structure mechanics field.

  7. Phase diagram of the one-dimensional anisotropic Kondo-necklace model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, S.; Langari, A.

    2008-01-01

    The one-dimensional anisotropic Kondo-necklace model has been studied by several methods. It is shown that a mean field approach fails to gain the correct phase diagram for the Ising-type anisotropy. We then applied the spin wave theory which is justified for the anisotropic case. We have derived the phase diagram between the antiferromagnetic long range order and the Kondo singlet phases. We have found that the exchange interaction (J) between the itinerant spins and local ones enhances the quantum fluctuations around the classical long range antiferromagnetic order and finally destroy the ordered phase at the critical value Jc . Moreover, our results show that the onset of anisotropy in the XY term of the itinerant interactions develops the antiferromagnetic order for Janisotropic XY interaction. We have justified our results by the numerical Lanczos method where the structure factor at the antiferromagnetic wave vector diverges as the size of system goes to infinity.

  8. EEG source analysis of epileptiform activity using a 1mm anisotropic hexahedra finite element head model

    PubMed Central

    Rullmann, M.; Anwander, A.; Dannhauer, M.; Warfield, S.K.; Duffy, F.H.; Wolters, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The major goal of the evaluation in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis for medically intractable patients is the precise reconstruction of the epileptogenic foci, preferably with non-invasive methods. This paper evaluates whether surface electroencephalography (EEG) source analysis based on a 1mm anisotropic finite element (FE) head model can provide additional guidance for presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and whether it is practically feasible in daily routine. A 1mm hexahedra FE volume conductor model of the patient’s head with special focus on accurately modeling the compartments skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the anisotropic conducting brain tissues was constructed using non-linearly co-registered T1-, T2- and diffusion-tensor- magnetic resonance imaging data. The electrodes of intra-cranial EEG (iEEG) measurements were extracted from a co-registered computed tomography image. Goal function scan (GFS), minimum norm least squares (MNLS), standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) and spatio-temporal current dipole modeling inverse methods were then applied to the peak of the averaged ictal discharges EEG data. MNLS and sLORETA pointed to a single center of activity. Moving and rotating single dipole fits resulted in an explained variance of more than 97%. The non-invasive EEG source analysis methods localized at the border of the lesion and at the border of the iEEG electrodes which mainly received ictal discharges. Source orientation was towards the epileptogenic tissue. For the reconstructed superficial source, brain conductivity anisotropy and the lesion conductivity had only a minor influence, whereas a correct modeling of the highly conducting CSF compartment and the anisotropic skull was found to be important. The proposed FE forward modeling approach strongly simplifies meshing and reduces run-time (37 Milliseconds for one forward computation in the model with 3.1 Million unknowns), corroborating the practical feasibility of the

  9. Modeling the Effects of Anisotropic Turbulence and Dispersive Waves on Oceanic Circulation and their Incorporation in Navy Ocean Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    anisotropic turbulence and dispersive waves in different environments , test them, compare them with data and implement them in ocean models. In this project...stratification and/or a solid body rotation. We have also performed computer simulations with an idealized circulation model of quasi-two-dimensional...member of a team on Martian planetary boundary layer at the International Space Science Institute and was responsible for reviewing turbulence models

  10. Expansion of the GLE1-associated arthrogryposis multiplex congenita clinical spectrum.

    PubMed

    Smith, C; Parboosingh, J S; Boycott, K M; Bönnemann, C G; Mah, J K; Lamont, R E; Micheil Innes, A; Bernier, F P

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in GLE1 cause two recessive subtypes of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), a condition characterized by joint contractures at birth, and all previously reported patients died in the perinatal period. GLE1 related AMC has been almost exclusively reported in the Finnish population and is caused by a relatively common pathogenic splicing mutation in that population. Here, we report two non-Finnish brothers with novel compound heterozygous splicing mutations in GLE1, one of whom has survived to 12 years of age. We also demonstrate low levels of residual wild type transcript in fibroblasts from the surviving brother, suggesting that this residual wild-type transcript may contribute to the relatively longer-term survival in this family. We provide a detailed clinical report on the surviving patient, providing the first insight into the natural history of this rare neuromuscular disease. We also suggest that lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 (LCCS1) and lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn disease (LAAHD), the two AMC subtypes related to GLE1, do not have sufficient clinical or molecular differentiation to be considered allelic disorders. Rather, GLE1 mutations cause a variable spectrum of AMC severity including a non-lethal variant described herein. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A statistical model for point-based target registration error with anisotropic fiducial localizer error.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Andrew D; Likholyot, Alexander; Frantz, Donald D; Peters, Terry M

    2008-03-01

    Error models associated with point-based medical image registration problems were first introduced in the late 1990s. The concepts of fiducial localizer error, fiducial registration error, and target registration error are commonly used in the literature. The model for estimating the target registration error at a position r in a coordinate frame defined by a set of fiducial markers rigidly fixed relative to one another is ubiquitous in the medical imaging literature. The model has also been extended to simulate the target registration error at the point of interest in optically tracked tools. However, the model is limited to describing the error in situations where the fiducial localizer error is assumed to have an isotropic normal distribution in R3. In this work, the model is generalized to include a fiducial localizer error that has an anisotropic normal distribution. Similar to the previous models, the root mean square statistic rms tre is provided along with an extension that provides the covariance Sigma tre. The new model is verified using a Monte Carlo simulation and a set of statistical hypothesis tests. Finally, the differences between the two assumptions, isotropic and anisotropic, are discussed within the context of their use in 1) optical tool tracking simulation and 2) image registration.

  12. Anisotropic Heisenberg model on hierarchical lattices with aperiodic interactions: a renormalization-group approach.

    PubMed

    Branco, N S; de Sousa, J Ricardo; Ghosh, Angsula

    2008-03-01

    Using a real-space renormalization-group approximation, we study the anisotropic quantum Heisenberg model on hierarchical lattices, with interactions following aperiodic sequences. Three different sequences are considered, with relevant and irrelevant fluctuations, according to the Luck-Harris criterion. The phase diagram is discussed as a function of the anisotropy parameter Delta (such that Delta=0 and 1 correspond to the isotropic Heisenberg and Ising models, respectively). We find three different types of phase diagrams, with general characteristics: the isotropic Heisenberg plane is always an invariant one (as expected by symmetry arguments) and the critical behavior of the anisotropic Heisenberg model is governed by fixed points on the Ising-model plane. Our results for the isotropic Heisenberg model show that the relevance or irrelevance of aperiodic models, when compared to their uniform counterpart, is as predicted by the Harris-Luck criterion. A low-temperature renormalization-group procedure was applied to the classical isotropic Heisenberg model in two-dimensional hierarchical lattices: the relevance criterion is obtained, again in accordance with the Harris-Luck criterion.

  13. Unitary evolution for anisotropic quantum cosmologies: models with variable spatial curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sachin; Banerjee, Narayan

    2016-11-01

    Contrary to the general belief, there has recently been quite a few examples of unitary evolution of quantum cosmological models. The present work gives more examples, namely Bianchi type VI and type II. These examples are important as they involve varying spatial curvature unlike the most talked about homogeneous but anisotropic cosmological models like Bianchi I, V and IX. We exhibit either an explicit example of the unitary solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, or at least show that a self-adjoint extension is possible.

  14. Anisotropic solid-liquid interface kinetics in silicon: an atomistically informed phase-field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, S.; Albe, K.; Flegel, E.; Barragan-Yani, D. A.; Wagner, B.

    2017-09-01

    We present an atomistically informed parametrization of a phase-field model for describing the anisotropic mobility of liquid-solid interfaces in silicon. The model is derived from a consistent set of atomistic data and thus allows to directly link molecular dynamics and phase field simulations. Expressions for the free energy density, the interfacial energy and the temperature and orientation dependent interface mobility are systematically fitted to data from molecular dynamics simulations based on the Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential. The temperature-dependent interface velocity follows a Vogel-Fulcher type behavior and allows to properly account for the dynamics in the undercooled melt.

  15. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose is to develop life prediction models for coated anisotropic materials used in gas temperature airfoils. Two single crystal alloys and two coatings are now being tested. These include PWA 1480; Alloy 185; overlay coating, PWA 286; and aluminide coating, PWA 273. Constitutive models are also being developed for these materials to predict the plastic and creep strain histories of the materials in the lab tests and for actual design conditions. This nonlinear material behavior is particularily important for high temperature gas turbine applications and is basic to any life prediction system.

  16. Anisotropic Bianchi type-III model in Palatini f (R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Debika Kangsha; Banik, Sebika Kangsha; Bhuyan, Kalyan

    2017-03-01

    We derive exact solutions for anisotropic Bianchi type-III cosmological model in the Palatini formalism of f (R) gravity using Dynamical System Approach. For the f (R) of the form f(R) =R-β /Rn and f(R) =R+α Rm , we have found the fixed points describing the radiation-dominated, matter dominated and de Sitter evolution periods. Fixed points have also been found which have non-vanishing shear playing a very significant role in describing the anisotropy present in the early universe. In addition, we have also found that the spatial curvature affect isotropisation of this cosmological model.

  17. Spin transport in the frustrated anisotropic three-dimensional XY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    We use the SU(3) Schwinger's boson theory to study the spin transport in the frustrated anisotropic three-dimensional XY model at T=0 with single ion anisotropy. We have investigated the behavior of the spin conductivity for this model that presents exchange interactions J1, J2 and J ‧ . We study the spin transport in the Bose-Einstein regime where we have that the tz bosons are condensed i.e. = < tz†> = t . Our results show a metallic spin transport for ω > 0 and a superconductor spin transport in the limit of DC conductivity.

  18. Three-dimensional forward modeling and inversion of marine CSEM data in anisotropic conductivity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) forward and inverse modeling code for marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) surveys in anisotropic media. The forward solution is based on a primary/secondary field approach, in which secondary fields are solved using a staggered finite-volume (FV) method and primary fields are solved for 1D isotropic background models analytically. It is shown that it is rather straightforward to extend the isotopic 3D FV algorithm to a triaxial anisotropic one, while additional coefficients are required to account for full tensor conductivity. To solve the linear system resulting from FV discretization of Maxwell' s equations, both iterative Krylov solvers (e.g. BiCGSTAB) and direct solvers (e.g. MUMPS) have been implemented, makes the code flexible for different computing platforms and different problems. For iterative soloutions, the linear system in terms of electromagnetic potentials (A-Phi) is used to precondition the original linear system, transforming the discretized Curl-Curl equations to discretized Laplace-like equations, thus much more favorable numerical properties can be obtained. Numerical experiments suggest that this A-Phi preconditioner can dramatically improve the convergence rate of an iterative solver and high accuracy can be achieved without divergence correction even for low frequencies. To efficiently calculate the sensitivities, i.e. the derivatives of CSEM data with respect to tensor conductivity, the adjoint method is employed. For inverse modeling, triaxial anisotropy is taken into account. Since the number of model parameters to be resolved of triaxial anisotropic medias is twice or thrice that of isotropic medias, the data-space version of the Gauss-Newton (GN) minimization method is preferred due to its lower computational cost compared with the traditional model-space GN method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the code with synthetic examples.

  19. Nonlinear inversion for arbitrarily-oriented anisotropic models II: Inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present output models from inversion of a synthetic surface wave dataset. We implement new 3-D finite-frequency kernels, based on the Born approximation, to invert for upper mantle structure beneath western North America. The kernels are formulated based on a hexagonal symmetry with an arbitrary orientation. Numerical tests were performed to achieve a robust inversion scheme. Four synthetic input models were created, to include: isotropic, constant strength anisotropic, variable strength anisotropic, and both anisotropic and isotropic together. The reference model was a simplified version of PREM (dubbed PREM LIGHT) in which the crust and 220 km discontinuity have been removed. Output models from inversions of calculated synthetic data are compared against these input models to test for accurate reproduction of input model features, and the resolution of those features. The object of this phase of the study was to determine appropriate nonlinear inversion schemes that adequately recover the input models. The synthetic dataset consists of collected seismic waveforms of 126 earthquake mechanisms, of magnitude 6-7 from Dec 2006 to Feb 2009, from the IRIS database. Events were selected to correlate with USArray deployments, and to have as complete an azimuthal coverage as possible. The events occurred within a circular region of radius 150o centered about 44o lat, -110o lon (an arbitrary location within USArray coverage). Synthetic data were calculated utilizing a spectral element code (SEM) coupled to a normal mode solution. The mesh consists of a 3-D heterogeneous outer shell, representing the upper mantle above 450 km depth, coupled to a spherically symmetric inner sphere. From the synthetic dataset, multi-taper fundamental mode surface wave phase delay measurements are taken. The orthogonal 2.5π -prolate spheroidal wave function eigentapers (Slepian tapers) reduce noise biasing, and can provide error estimates in phase delay measurements. This study is a

  20. A quantum fidelity study of the anisotropic next-nearest-neighbour triangular lattice Heisenberg model.

    PubMed

    Thesberg, Mischa; Sørensen, Erik S

    2014-10-22

    Ground- and excited-state quantum fidelities in combination with generalized quantum fidelity susceptibilites, obtained from exact diagonalizations, are used to explore the phase diagram of the anisotropic next-nearest-neighbour triangular Heisenberg model. Specifically, the J'-J2 plane of this model, which connects the J1-J2 chain and the anisotropic triangular lattice Heisenberg model, is explored using these quantities. Through the use of a quantum fidelity associated with the first excited-state, in addition to the conventional ground-state fidelity, the BKT-type transition and Majumdar-Ghosh point of the J1-J2 chain (J'=0) are found to extend into the J'-J2 plane and connect with points on the J2=0 axis thereby forming bounded regions in the phase diagram. These bounded regions are then explored through the generalized quantum fidelity susceptibilities χρ, χ₁₂₀°, χD and χCAF which are associated with the spin stiffness, 120° spiral order parameter, dimer order parameter and collinear antiferromagnetic order parameter respectively. These quantities are believed to be extremely sensitive to the underlying phase and are thus well suited for finite-size studies. Analysis of the fidelity susceptibilities suggests that the J', J2≪J phase of the anisotropic triangular model is either a collinear antiferromagnet or possibly a gapless disordered phase that is directly connected to the Luttinger phase of the J1-J2 chain. Furthermore, the outer region is dominated by incommensurate spiral physics as well as dimer order.

  1. A new anisotropic compact star model having Matese & Whitman mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali; Ratanpal, B. S.

    2016-07-01

    Present paper proposed a new singularity free model of anisotropic compact star. The Einstein field equations are solved in closed form by utilizing Matese & Whitman mass function. The model parameters ρ, pr and pt all are well behaved inside the stellar interior and our model satisfies all the required conditions to be physically acceptable. The model given in the present work is compatible with observational data of compact objects like SAX J 1808.4-3658 (SS1), SAX J 1808.4-3658 (SS2) and 4U 1820-30. A particular model of 4U 1820-30 is studied in detail and found that it satisfies all the condition needed for physically acceptable model. The present work is the generalization of Sharma and Ratanpal (Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 22:1350074, 2013) model for compact stars admitting quadratic equation of state.

  2. Ein anisotropes homologes Modell für den Core-Kollaps in Sternhaufen.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, P. D.

    1990-07-01

    The author describes a new method for computing the quasi-stationary evolution of spherical star clusters, which is based on moment equations of Boltzmann's equation. The deficiency of high velocity stars and the anisotropic velocity distribution, both of which are distinctive features of real stellar systems, are approximated by single parameters. The effects of gravitational encounters between individual stars are represented by collision terms in the moment equations which are considered up to fourth order in this treatment. Using heuristic algebraic relations between the flux velocities the moment equations are closed at fifth order. The model is applied to the phenomenon of core collapse in one-component star clusters. The ordinary differential equations for self-similar evolution are derived and the eigenvalue problem for pre-collapse is solved. In the isotropic version the author finds a power-law index and a core collapse rate which are in reasonable agreement with existing homological models. The anisotropic model is characterized by a somewhat steeper density profile, a considerably reduced value for the core collapse rate and moderate anisotropy in the outer parts of the halo. The effects of modifying the equations of this approximative model are discussed in detail and the discrepancies between Larson's calculations and other models including anisotropy are resolved.

  3. Quantifying the contributions of structure to annulus fibrosus mechanical function using a nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic model.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Heather Lynch; Elliott, Dawn M

    2007-04-01

    The annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc is comprised of concentric lamella of oriented collagen fibers embedded in a hydrated proteoglycan matrix with smaller amounts of minor collagens, elastin, and small proteoglycans. Its structure and composition enable the disc to withstand complex loads and result in inhomogeneous, anisotropic, and nonlinear mechanical behaviors. The specific contributions of the annulus fibrosus constituent structures to mechanical function remain unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use a structurally motivated, anisotropic, nonlinear strain energy model of annulus fibrosus to determine the relative contributions of its structural components to tissue mechanical behavior. A nonlinear, orthotropic hyperelastic model was developed for the annulus fibrosus. Terms to describe fibers, matrix, and interactions between annulus fibrosus structures (shear and normal to the fiber directions) were explicitly included. The contributions of these structures were analyzed by including or removing terms and determining the effect on the fit to multidimensional experimental data. Correlation between experimental and model-predicted stress, a Bland-Altman analysis of bias and standard deviation of residuals, and the contribution of structural terms to overall tissue stress were calculated. Both shear and normal interaction terms were necessary to accurately model multidimensional behavior. Inclusion of shear interactions more accurately described annulus fibrosus nonlinearity. Fiber stretch and shear interactions dominated contributions to circumferential direction stress, while normal and shear interactions dominated axial stress. The results suggest that interactions between fibers and matrix, perhaps facilitated by crosslinks, elastin, or minor collagens, augment traditional (i.e., fiber-uncrimping) models of nonlinearity.

  4. Phase field modeling of crack propagations in fluid-saturated porous media with anisotropic surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, S.; Sun, W.; Yoon, H.; Choo, J.

    2016-12-01

    Directional mechanical properties of layered geomaterials such as shale are important on evaluating the onset and growth of fracture for engineering applications such as hydraulic fracturing, geologic carbon storage, and geothermal recovery. In this study, a continuum phase field modeling is conducted to demonstrate the initiation and pattern of cracks in fluid-saturated porous media. The discontinuity of sharp cracks is formulated using diffusive crack phase field modeling and the anisotropic surface energy is incorporated to account for the directional fracture toughness. In particular, the orientation of bedding in geomaterials with respect to the loading direction is represented by the directional critical energy release rate. Interactions between solid skeleton and fluid are also included to analyze the mechanical behavior of fluid-saturated geologic materials through the coupled hydro-mechanical model. Based on the linear elastic phase field modeling, we also addressed how the plasticity in crack phase field influences the crack patterns by adopting the elasto-plastic model with Drucker-Prager yield criterion. Numerical examples exhibit the features of anisotropic surface energy, the interactions between solid and fluid and the effects of plasticity on crack propagations.Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Invariant-based anisotropic constitutive models of the healthy and aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Basciano, C A; Kleinstreuer, C

    2009-02-01

    The arterial wall is a complex fiber-reinforced composite. Pathological conditions, such as aneurysms, significantly alter the mechanical response of the arterial wall, resulting in a loss of elasticity, enhanced anisotropy, and increased chances of mechanical failure. Invariant-based models of the healthy and aneurysmal abdominal aorta were constructed based on first principles and published experimental data with implementations for several numerical cases, as well as comparisons to current healthy and aneurysmal tissue data. Inherent limitations of a traditional invariant-based methodology are also discussed and compared to the models' ability to accurately reproduce experimental trends. The models capture the nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical responses of the two arterial sections and make reasonable predictions regarding the effects of alterations in healthy and diseased tissue histology. Additionally, the new models exhibit convex and anisotropic monotonically increasing energy contours (suggesting numerical stability) but have potentially the inherent limitations of a covariant theoretical framework. Although the traditional invariant framework exhibits significant covariance, the invariant terms utilized in the new models exhibited limited covariance and are able to accurately reproduce experimental trends. A streamlined implementation is also possible for future numerical investigations of fluid-structure interactions in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  6. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    PubMed

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles θ∈[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropic modified holographic Ricci dark energy cosmological model with hybrid expansion law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kanika; Sultana, Tazmin

    2015-11-01

    Here in this paper we present a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type-II metric filled with dark matter and anisotropic modified holographic Ricci dark energy. To solve the Einstein's field equations we have taken the hybrid expansion law (HEL) which exhibits a cosmic transition of the universe from decelerating to accelerating phase. We have investigated the physical and geometrical properties of the model. It is observed that the anisotropy of the universe and that of the modified holographic Ricci dark energy tends to zero at later times and the universe becomes homogeneous, isotropic and flat. We have also studied the cosmic jerk parameter.

  8. First-order goniospectrophotometric spectral modeling of isotropic and anisotropic colorant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, Jennifer D T; Berns, Roy S

    2014-02-01

    Color modeling of translucent and opaque media commonly uses two-constant Kubelka-Munk (KM) turbid media theory. KM theory is designed for isotropic color systems that rely on absorption and scatter to produce an overall reflected color. KM theory has previously been considered inadequate to use with interference pigments (IPs) due to their specular reflected, angle-dependent color and anisotropic behavior. If, however, an IP's reflected color is considered to contribute to the background reflectance and not as a colorant in a mixture with a conventional colorant, KM theory can be used. KM theory was successfully implemented to predict the goniospectrophotometric, normalized spectral reflectance of conventional colorants and IP mixtures.

  9. J1x-J1y-J2 square-lattice anisotropic Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2017-08-01

    The spin one Heisenberg model with an easy-plane single-ion anisotropy and spatially anisotropic nearest-neighbor coupling, frustrated by a next-nearest neighbor interaction, is studied at zero temperature using a SU(3) Schwinger boson formalism (sometimes also referred to as flavor wave theory) in a mean field approximation. The local constraint is enforced by introducing a Lagrange multiplier. The enlarged Hilbert space of S = 1 spins lead to a nematic phase that is ubiquitous to S = 1 spins with single ion anisotropy. The phase diagram shows two magnetically ordered phase, separated by a quantum paramagnetic (nematic) phase.

  10. A study of symmetry restoration at finite temperature in the O(4) model using anisotropic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavai, R. V.; Heller, U. M.; Karsch, F.; Plache, B.; Neuhaus, T.

    Results of investigations of the O(4) spin model at finite temperature using anisotropic lattices are presented. In both the large N approximation and the numerical simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm we find that the ratio of the symmetry restoration temperature TSR to the Higgs mass mH is independent of the anisotropy. We obtain a lower bound of 0.59 ± 0.04 for the ratio, T SR/m H, at m H ⋍ 0.5 , which is lowered furhter by about 10% at m Ha ⋍ 1 .

  11. Anisotropic fluid modeling of ionospheric upflow: Effects of low-altitude anisotropy and thermospheric winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, M.; Zettergren, M.

    2017-01-01

    A new anisotropic fluid model is developed to describe ionospheric upflow responses to magnetospheric forcing by electric fields and broadband ELF waves at altitudes of 90-2500 km. This model is based on a bi-Maxwellian ion distribution and solves time-dependent, nonlinear equations of conservation of mass, momentum, parallel energy, and perpendicular energy for six ion species important to E, F, and topside ionospheric regions. It includes chemical and collisional interactions with the neutral atmosphere, photoionization, and electron impact ionization. This model is used to examine differences between isotropic and anisotropic descriptions of ionospheric upflow driven by DC electric fields, possible effects of low-altitude (<500 km) wave heating, and impacts of neutral winds on ion upflow. Results indicate that isotropic models may overestimate field-aligned ion velocity responses by as much as ˜48%. Simulations also show significant ionospheric responses at low altitudes to wave heating for very large power spectral densities, but ion temperature anisotropies below the F region peak are dominated by frictional heating from DC electric fields. Neutral winds are shown to play an important role regulating ion upflow. Thermospheric winds can enhance or suppress upward fluxes driven by DC and BBELF fields by 10-20% for the cases examined. The time history of the neutral winds also affects the amount of ionization transported to higher altitudes by DC electric fields.

  12. Anisotropic reversible piezoresistivity in magnetic-metallic/polymer structured elastomeric composites: modelling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Mietta, José Luis; Tamborenea, Pablo I; Martin Negri, R

    2016-01-14

    Structured elastomeric composites (SECs) with electrically conductive fillers display anisotropic piezoresistivity. The fillers do not form string-of-particle structures but pseudo-chains formed by grouping micro-sized clusters containing nanomagnetic particles surrounded by noble metals (e.g. silver, Ag). The pseudo-chains are formed when curing or preparing the composite in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, thus pseudo-chains are aligned in the direction of the field. The electrical conduction through pseudo-chains is analyzed and a constitutive model for the anisotropic reversible piezoresistivity in SECs is proposed. Several effects and characteristics, such as electron tunnelling, conduction inside the pseudo-chains, and chain-contact resistivity, are included in the model. Experimental results of electrical resistance, R, as a function of the normal stress applied in the direction of the pseudo-chains, P, are very well fitted by the model in the case of Fe3O4[Ag] microparticles magnetically aligned while curing in polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS. The cross sensitivity of different parameters (like the potential barrier and the effective distance for electron tunnelling) is evaluated. The model predicts the presence of several gaps for electron tunnelling inside the pseudo-chains. Estimates of those parameters for the mentioned experimental system under strains up to 20% are presented. Simulations of the expected response for other systems are performed showing the influence of Young's modulus and other parameters on the predicted piezoresistivity.

  13. Characterisation of induced fracture networks within an enhanced geothermal system using anisotropic electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Jake; Thiel, Stephan; Pek, Josef; Peacock, Jared; Heinson, Graham

    2014-11-01

    As opinions regarding the future of energy production shift towards renewable sources, enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are becoming an attractive prospect. The characterisation of fracture permeability at depth is central to the success of EGS. Recent magnetotelluric (MT) studies of the Paralana geothermal system (PGS), an EGS in South Australia, have measured changes in MT responses which were attributed to fracture networks generated during fluid injection experiments. However, extracting permeabilities from these measurements remains problematic as conventional isotropic MT modelling is unable to accommodate for the complexities present within an EGS. To circumvent this problem, we introduce an electrical anisotropy representation to allow better characterisation of volumes at depth. Forward modelling shows that MT measurements are sensitive to subtle variations in anisotropy. Subsequent two-dimensional anisotropic forward modelling shows that electrical anisotropy is able to reproduce the directional response associated with fractures generated by fluid injection experiments at the PGS. As such, we conclude that MT monitoring combined with anisotropic modelling is a promising alternative to the micro-seismic method when characterising fluid reservoirs within geothermal and coal seam gas reservoirs.

  14. Relativistic anisotropic models for compact star with equation of state p = f(ρ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Dayanandan, Baiju; Jasim, M. K.; Al-Jamel, Ahmed

    We present new anisotropic models for Buchdahl [H. A. Buchdahl, Phys. Rev. 116 (1959) 1027.] type perfect fluid solution. For this purpose, we started with metric potential eλ same as Buchdahl [H. A. Buchdahl, Phys. Rev. 116 (1959) 1027.] and eν is monotonically increasing function as suggested by Lake [K. Lake, Phys. Rev. D 67 (2003) 104015]. After that we determine the new pressure anisotropy factor Δ with the help of both the metric potentials eλ and eν and propose new well behaved general solution for anisotropic fluid distribution. The physical quantities like energy density, radial and tangential pressures, velocity of sound and redshift etc. are positive and finite inside the compact star. In this connection, we have studied the stability of the models, which is most vital one and also we determined the equation of state p = f(ρ) for the realistic compact star models. It is noted that the mass and radius of our models can represent the structure of realistic astrophysical objects such as Her X-1 and RXJ 1856-37.

  15. A nonlocal elastic anisotropic shell model for microtubule buckling behaviors in cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanwen; An, Le

    2010-07-01

    The buckling behaviors of microtubules (MTs) in a living cell have been studied based on the nonlocal anisotropic shell theory and Stokes flow theory. The analytical expressions for the buckling load and the growth rate of the buckling are obtained and discussed. In addition, the pressure on MTs, resulting from cytosol motion, is derived on the basis of the Stokes flow theory. The influences of filament network elasticity and the shear modulus of MTs, especially the cytosol viscosity and MT small scale effects on MT buckling behaviors, are investigated. The analytical results show that the MT buckling growth rate increases with the MT small scale parameter, while decreases as the filament network elastic modulus, the MT shear modulus and cytoplasm viscosity increase. Although the cytosol viscosity has a significant influence on the value of the growth rate, it shows little effects on the range of the axial wave number of buckling as well as the critical axial wave number that corresponds to the maximal growth rate. Finally, the MT buckling growth rates have been calculated using the beam model, the isotropic shell model, and the anisotropic shell model. The results indicate that using the anisotropy shell theory to model the buckling behavior of MTs is necessary.

  16. Multiscale Gaussian network model (mGNM) and multiscale anisotropic network model (mANM).

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-28

    Gaussian network model (GNM) and anisotropic network model (ANM) are some of the most popular methods for the study of protein flexibility and related functions. In this work, we propose generalized GNM (gGNM) and ANM methods and show that the GNM Kirchhoff matrix can be built from the ideal low-pass filter, which is a special case of a wide class of correlation functions underpinning the linear scaling flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) method. Based on the mathematical structure of correlation functions, we propose a unified framework to construct generalized Kirchhoff matrices whose matrix inverse leads to gGNMs, whereas, the direct inverse of its diagonal elements gives rise to FRI method. With this connection, we further introduce two multiscale elastic network models, namely, multiscale GNM (mGNM) and multiscale ANM (mANM), which are able to incorporate different scales into the generalized Kirchhoff matrices or generalized Hessian matrices. We validate our new multiscale methods with extensive numerical experiments. We illustrate that gGNMs outperform the original GNM method in the B-factor prediction of a set of 364 proteins. We demonstrate that for a given correlation function, FRI and gGNM methods provide essentially identical B-factor predictions when the scale value in the correlation function is sufficiently large. More importantly, we reveal intrinsic multiscale behavior in protein structures. The proposed mGNM and mANM are able to capture this multiscale behavior and thus give rise to a significant improvement of more than 11% in B-factor predictions over the original GNM and ANM methods. We further demonstrate the benefits of our mGNM through the B-factor predictions of many proteins that fail the original GNM method. We show that the proposed mGNM can also be used to analyze protein domain separations. Finally, we showcase the ability of our mANM for the analysis of protein collective motions.

  17. Multiscale Gaussian network model (mGNM) and multiscale anisotropic network model (mANM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Gaussian network model (GNM) and anisotropic network model (ANM) are some of the most popular methods for the study of protein flexibility and related functions. In this work, we propose generalized GNM (gGNM) and ANM methods and show that the GNM Kirchhoff matrix can be built from the ideal low-pass filter, which is a special case of a wide class of correlation functions underpinning the linear scaling flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) method. Based on the mathematical structure of correlation functions, we propose a unified framework to construct generalized Kirchhoff matrices whose matrix inverse leads to gGNMs, whereas, the direct inverse of its diagonal elements gives rise to FRI method. With this connection, we further introduce two multiscale elastic network models, namely, multiscale GNM (mGNM) and multiscale ANM (mANM), which are able to incorporate different scales into the generalized Kirchhoff matrices or generalized Hessian matrices. We validate our new multiscale methods with extensive numerical experiments. We illustrate that gGNMs outperform the original GNM method in the B-factor prediction of a set of 364 proteins. We demonstrate that for a given correlation function, FRI and gGNM methods provide essentially identical B-factor predictions when the scale value in the correlation function is sufficiently large. More importantly, we reveal intrinsic multiscale behavior in protein structures. The proposed mGNM and mANM are able to capture this multiscale behavior and thus give rise to a significant improvement of more than 11% in B-factor predictions over the original GNM and ANM methods. We further demonstrate the benefits of our mGNM through the B-factor predictions of many proteins that fail the original GNM method. We show that the proposed mGNM can also be used to analyze protein domain separations. Finally, we showcase the ability of our mANM for the analysis of protein collective motions.

  18. Evolution of stress-induced borehole breakout in inherently anisotropic rock: Insights from discrete element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, K.; Kwok, C. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms controlling the initiation, propagation, and ultimate pattern of borehole breakouts in shale formation when drilled parallel with and perpendicular to beddings. A two-dimensional discrete element model is constructed to explicitly represent the microstructure of inherently anisotropic rocks by inserting a series of individual smooth joints into an assembly of bonded rigid discs. Both isotropic and anisotropic hollow square-shaped samples are generated to represent the wellbores drilled perpendicular to and parallel with beddings at reduced scale. The isotropic model is validated by comparing the stress distribution around borehole wall and along X axis direction with analytical solutions. Effects of different factors including the particle size distribution, borehole diameter, far-field stress anisotropy, and rock anisotropy are systematically evaluated on the stress distribution and borehole breakout propagation. Simulation results reveal that wider particle size distribution results in the local stress perturbations which cause localization of cracks. Reduction of borehole diameter significantly alters the crack failure from tensile to shear and raises the critical pressure. Rock anisotropy plays an important role on the stress state around wellbore which lead to the formation of preferred cracks under hydrostatic stress. Far-field stress anisotropy plays a dominant role in the shape of borehole breakout when drilled perpendicular to beddings while a secondary role when drilled parallel with beddings. Results from this study can provide fundamental insights on the underlying particle-scale mechanisms for previous findings in laboratory and field on borehole stability in anisotropic rock.

  19. Critical aspects of three-dimensional anisotropic spin-glass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, Thodoris; Fytas, Nikolaos G.; Malakis, Anastasios; Lelidis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    We study the three-dimensional ± J Ising model with a longitudinal anisotropic bond randomness on the simple cubic lattice. The random exchange interaction is applied only in the z direction, whereas in the other two directions, xy-planes, we consider ferromagnetic exchange. By implementing an effective parallel tempering scheme, we outline the phase diagram of the model and compare it to the corresponding isotropic one. We present a detailed finite-size scaling analysis of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic and spin glass-paramagnetic transition lines, and we also discuss the ferromagnetic-spin glass transition regime. We conclude that the present model shares the same universality classes with the isotropic model, but at the symmetric point has a considerably higher transition temperature from the spin-glass state to the paramagnetic phase. Our data for the ferromagnetic-spin glass transition line support a forward behavior in contrast to the reentrant behavior of the corresponding isotropic model.

  20. Ultrasonic field profile evaluation in acoustically inhomogeneous anisotropic materials using 2D ray tracing model: Numerical and experimental comparison.

    PubMed

    Kolkoori, S R; Rahman, M-U; Chinta, P K; Ktreutzbruck, M; Rethmeier, M; Prager, J

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials is difficult to examine because of the directional dependency of elastic properties. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic non destructive testing techniques for the inspection of anisotropic materials particularly austenitic cladded materials, austenitic welds and dissimilar welds. In this contribution we present an adapted 2D ray tracing model for evaluating ultrasonic wave fields quantitatively in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. Inhomogeneity in the anisotropic material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The presented algorithm evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase relations as well as transmission coefficients. The ray tracing model is able to calculate the ultrasonic wave fields generated by a point source as well as a finite dimension transducer. The ray tracing model results are validated quantitatively with the results obtained from 2D Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT) on several configurations generally occurring in the ultrasonic non destructive testing of anisotropic materials. Finally, the quantitative comparison of ray tracing model results with experiments on 32mm thick austenitic weld material and 62mm thick austenitic cladded material is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Brittleness index and seismic rock physics model for anisotropic tight-oil sandstone reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin-Rui; Huang, Jian-Ping; Li, Zhen-Chun; Yang, Qin-Yong; Sun, Qi-Xing; Cui, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Brittleness analysis becomes important when looking for sweet spots in tight-oil sandstone reservoirs. Hence, appropriate indices are required as accurate brittleness evaluation criteria. We construct a seismic rock physics model for tight-oil sandstone reservoirs with vertical fractures. Because of the complexities in lithology and pore structure and the anisotropic characteristics of tight-oil sandstone reservoirs, the proposed model is based on the solid components, pore connectivity, pore type, and fractures to better describe the sandstone reservoir microstructure. Using the model, we analyze the brittleness sensitivity of the elastic parameters in an anisotropic medium and establish a new brittleness index. We show the applicability of the proposed brittleness index for tight-oil sandstone reservoirs by considering the brittleness sensitivity, the rock physics response characteristics, and cross-plots. Compared with conventional brittleness indexes, the new brittleness index has high brittleness sensitivity and it is the highest in oil-bearing brittle zones with relatively high porosity. The results also suggest that the new brittleness index is much more sensitive to elastic properties variations, and thus can presumably better predict the brittleness characteristics of sweet spots in tight-oil sandstone reservoirs.

  2. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in a quintessence cosmological model: Including anisotropic stress of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. T.; Xu, L. X.; Gui, Y. X.

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the quintessence cold dark matter model with constant equation of state and constant speed of sound in dark energy rest frame, including dark energy perturbation and its anisotropic stress. Comparing with the {Lambda}CDM model, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW)-power spectrums are affected by different background evolutions and dark energy perturbation. As we change the speed of sound from 1 to 0 in the quintessence cold dark matter model with given state parameters, it is found that the inclusion of dark energy anisotropic stress makes the variation of magnitude of the ISW source uncertain due to the anticorrelation between the speed of sound and the ratio of dark energy density perturbation contrast to dark matter density perturbation contrast in the ISW-source term. Thus, the magnitude of the ISW-source term is governed by the competition between the alterant multiple of (1+3/2xc-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}) and that of {delta}{sub de}/{delta}{sub m} with the variation of c-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}.

  3. Dipole estimation errors due to differences in modeling anisotropic conductivities in realistic head models for EEG source analysis.

    PubMed

    Hallez, Hans; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Hese, Peter; Delputte, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2008-04-07

    To improve the EEG source localization in the brain, the conductivities used in the head model play a very important role. In this study, we focus on the modeling of the anisotropic conductivity of the white matter. The anisotropic conductivity profile can be derived from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images (DW-MRI). However, deriving these anisotropic conductivities from diffusion weighted MR images of the white matter is not straightforward. In the literature, two methods can be found for calculating the conductivity from the diffusion weighted images. One method uses a fixed value for the ratio of the conductivity in different directions, while the other method uses a conductivity profile obtained from a linear scaling of the diffusion ellipsoid. We propose a model which can be used to derive the conductivity profile from the diffusion tensor images. This model is based on the variable anisotropic ratio throughout the white matter and is a combination of the linear relationship as stated in the literature, with a constraint on the magnitude of the conductivity tensor (also known as the volume constraint). This approach is stated in the paper as approach A. In our study we want to investigate dipole estimation differences due to using a more simplified model for white matter anisotropy (approach B), while the electrode potentials are derived using a head model with a more realistic approach for the white matter anisotropy (approach A). We used a realistic head model, in which the forward problem was solved using a finite difference method that can incorporate anisotropic conductivities. As error measures we considered the dipole location error and the dipole orientation error. The results show that the dipole location errors are all below 10 mm and have an average of 4 mm in gray matter regions. The dipole orientation errors ranged up to 66.4 degrees, and had a mean of, on average, 11.6 degrees in gray matter regions. In a qualitative manner, the results

  4. Electrical conductivity of a two-dimensional model for a structurally anisotropic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Balagurov, B. Ya.

    2010-02-15

    The electrical conductivity of a two-dimensional structurally anisotropic model for a composite is considered. The model represents an isotropic matrix with a system of nonconducting inclusions in the form of infinitely thin straight line segments (scratches). The scratches make an angle {theta} or -{theta} with a preferred axis (for definiteness, axis y) at the same probability, and their centers are chaotically distributed. An approximate effective medium method is used to obtain a general expression for the effective conductivity tensor of this model that is valid over a wide concentration range. In this approximation, both components of tensor are shown to vanish at the same percolation threshold, which is expressed explicitly. The conductivity of the model in a critical region is considered in terms of the similarity hypothesis.

  5. Locating earthquakes in west Texas oil fields using 3-D anisotropic velocity models

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fa; Doser, D.; Baker, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Earthquakes within the War-Wink gas field, Ward County, Texas, that have been located with a 1-D velocity model occur near the edges and top of a naturally occurring overpressured zone. Because the War-Wink field is a structurally controlled anticline with significant velocity anisotropy associated with the overpressured zone and finely layered evaporites, the authors have attempted to re-locate earthquakes using a 3-D anisotropic velocity model. Preliminary results with this model give the unsatisfactory result that many earthquakes previously located at the top of the overpressured zone (3-3.5 km) moved into the evaporites (1-1.5 km) above the field. They believe that this result could be caused by: (1) aliasing the velocity model; or (2) problems in determining the correct location minima when several minima exist. They are currently attempting to determine which of these causes is more likely for the unsatisfactory result observed.

  6. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Modelling of the frictional behaviour of the snake skin covered by anisotropic surface nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous experimental data clearly revealed anisotropic friction on the ventral scale surface of snakes. However, it is known that frictional properties of the ventral surface of the snake skin range in a very broad range and the degree of anisotropy ranges as well to a quite strong extent. This might be due to the variety of species studied, diversity of approaches used for the friction characterization, and/or due to the variety of substrates used as a counterpart in the experiments. In order to understand the interactions between the nanostructure arrays of the ventral surface of the snake skin, this study was undertaken, which is aimed at numerical modeling of frictional properties of the structurally anisotropic surfaces in contact with various size of asperities. The model shows that frictional anisotropy appears on the snake skin only on the substrates with a characteristic range of roughness, which is less or comparable with dimensions of the skin microstructure. In other words, scale of the skin relief should reflect an adaptation to the particular range of surfaces asperities of the substrate. PMID:27005001

  8. Long-wave model for strongly anisotropic growth of a crystal step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenner, Mikhail

    2013-08-01

    A continuum model for the dynamics of a single step with the strongly anisotropic line energy is formulated and analyzed. The step grows by attachment of adatoms from the lower terrace, onto which atoms adsorb from a vapor phase or from a molecular beam, and the desorption is nonnegligible (the “one-sided” model). Via a multiscale expansion, we derived a long-wave, strongly nonlinear, and strongly anisotropic evolution PDE for the step profile. Written in terms of the step slope, the PDE can be represented in a form similar to a convective Cahn-Hilliard equation. We performed the linear stability analysis and computed the nonlinear dynamics. Linear stability depends on whether the stiffness is minimum or maximum in the direction of the step growth. It also depends nontrivially on the combination of the anisotropy strength parameter and the atomic flux from the terrace to the step. Computations show formation and coarsening of a hill-and-valley structure superimposed onto a long-wavelength profile, which independently coarsens. Coarsening laws for the hill-and-valley structure are computed for two principal orientations of a maximum step stiffness, the increasing anisotropy strength, and the varying atomic flux.

  9. Modelling of the frictional behaviour of the snake skin covered by anisotropic surface nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-03-01

    Previous experimental data clearly revealed anisotropic friction on the ventral scale surface of snakes. However, it is known that frictional properties of the ventral surface of the snake skin range in a very broad range and the degree of anisotropy ranges as well to a quite strong extent. This might be due to the variety of species studied, diversity of approaches used for the friction characterization, and/or due to the variety of substrates used as a counterpart in the experiments. In order to understand the interactions between the nanostructure arrays of the ventral surface of the snake skin, this study was undertaken, which is aimed at numerical modeling of frictional properties of the structurally anisotropic surfaces in contact with various size of asperities. The model shows that frictional anisotropy appears on the snake skin only on the substrates with a characteristic range of roughness, which is less or comparable with dimensions of the skin microstructure. In other words, scale of the skin relief should reflect an adaptation to the particular range of surfaces asperities of the substrate.

  10. Modelling of the frictional behaviour of the snake skin covered by anisotropic surface nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-03-23

    Previous experimental data clearly revealed anisotropic friction on the ventral scale surface of snakes. However, it is known that frictional properties of the ventral surface of the snake skin range in a very broad range and the degree of anisotropy ranges as well to a quite strong extent. This might be due to the variety of species studied, diversity of approaches used for the friction characterization, and/or due to the variety of substrates used as a counterpart in the experiments. In order to understand the interactions between the nanostructure arrays of the ventral surface of the snake skin, this study was undertaken, which is aimed at numerical modeling of frictional properties of the structurally anisotropic surfaces in contact with various size of asperities. The model shows that frictional anisotropy appears on the snake skin only on the substrates with a characteristic range of roughness, which is less or comparable with dimensions of the skin microstructure. In other words, scale of the skin relief should reflect an adaptation to the particular range of surfaces asperities of the substrate.

  11. A Markov chain Monte Carlo with Gibbs sampling approach to anisotropic receiver function forward modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Erin A.; Long, Maureen D.; Moriarty, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Teleseismic receiver functions contain information regarding Earth structure beneath a seismic station. P-to-SV converted phases are often used to characterize crustal and upper-mantle discontinuities and isotropic velocity structures. More recently, P-to-SH converted energy has been used to interrogate the orientation of anisotropy at depth, as well as the geometry of dipping interfaces. Many studies use a trial-and-error forward modeling approach for the interpretation of receiver functions, generating synthetic receiver functions from a user-defined input model of Earth structure and amending this model until it matches major features in the actual data. While often successful, such an approach makes it impossible to explore model space in a systematic and robust manner, which is especially important given that solutions are likely non-unique. Here, we present a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with Gibbs sampling for the interpretation of anisotropic receiver functions. Synthetic examples are used to test the viability of the algorithm, suggesting that it works well for models with a reasonable number of free parameters (<˜20). Additionally, the synthetic tests illustrate that certain parameters are well constrained by receiver function data, while others are subject to severe trade-offs-an important implication for studies that attempt to interpret Earth structure based on receiver function data. Finally, we apply our algorithm to receiver function data from station WCI in the central United States. We find evidence for a change in anisotropic structure at mid-lithospheric depths, consistent with previous work that used a grid search approach to model receiver function data at this station. Forward modeling of receiver functions using model space search algorithms, such as the one presented here, provide a meaningful framework for interrogating Earth structure from receiver function data.

  12. A Markov chain Monte Carlo with Gibbs sampling approach to anisotropic receiver function forward modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Erin A.; Long, Maureen D.; Moriarty, John C.

    2016-10-01

    Teleseismic receiver functions contain information regarding Earth structure beneath a seismic station. P-to-SV converted phases are often used to characterize crustal and upper mantle discontinuities and isotropic velocity structures. More recently, P-to-SH converted energy has been used to interrogate the orientation of anisotropy at depth, as well as the geometry of dipping interfaces. Many studies use a trial-and-error forward modeling approach to the interpretation of receiver functions, generating synthetic receiver functions from a user-defined input model of Earth structure and amending this model until it matches major features in the actual data. While often successful, such an approach makes it impossible to explore model space in a systematic and robust manner, which is especially important given that solutions are likely non-unique. Here, we present a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with Gibbs sampling for the interpretation of anisotropic receiver functions. Synthetic examples are used to test the viability of the algorithm, suggesting that it works well for models with a reasonable number of free parameters (< ˜20). Additionally, the synthetic tests illustrate that certain parameters are well constrained by receiver function data, while others are subject to severe tradeoffs - an important implication for studies that attempt to interpret Earth structure based on receiver function data. Finally, we apply our algorithm to receiver function data from station WCI in the central United States. We find evidence for a change in anisotropic structure at mid-lithospheric depths, consistent with previous work that used a grid search approach to model receiver function data at this station. Forward modeling of receiver functions using model space search algorithms, such as the one presented here, provide a meaningful framework for interrogating Earth structure from receiver function data.

  13. Calibration of Gurson-type models for porous sheet metals with anisotropic non-quadratic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gologanu, M.; Kami, A.; Comsa, D. S.; Banabic, D.

    2016-08-01

    The growth and coalescence of voids in sheet metals are not only the main active mechanisms in the final stages of fracture in a necking band, but they also contribute to the forming limits via changes in the normal directions to the yield surface. A widely accepted method to include void effects is the development of a Gurson-type model for the appropriate yield criterion, based on an approximate limit analysis of a unit cell containing a single spherical, spheroidal or ellipsoidal void. We have recently [2] obtained dissipation functions and Gurson-type models for porous sheet metals with ellipsoidal voids and anisotropic non-quadratic plasticity, including yield criteria based on linear transformations (Yld91 and Yld2004-18p) and a pure plane stress yield criteria (BBC2005). These Gurson-type models contain several parameters that depend on the void and cell geometries and on the selected yield criterion. Best results are obtained when these key parameters are calibrated via numerical simulations using the same unit cell and a few representative loading conditions. The single most important such loading condition corresponds to a pure hydrostatic macroscopic stress (pure pressure) and the corresponding velocity field found during the solution of the limit analysis problem describes the expansion of the cavity. However, for the case of sheet metals, the condition of plane stress precludes macroscopic stresses with large triaxiality or ratio of mean stress to equivalent stress, including the pure hydrostatic case. Also, pure plane stress yield criteria like BBC2005 must first be extended to 3D stresses before attempting to develop a Gurson-type model and such extensions are purely phenomenological with no due account for the out- of-plane anisotropic properties of the sheet. Therefore, we propose a new calibration method for Gurson- type models that uses only boundary conditions compatible with the plane stress requirement. For each such boundary condition we use

  14. Anisotropic micro-sphere-based finite elasticity applied to blood vessel modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastrué, V.; Martínez, M. A.; Doblaré, M.; Menzel, A.

    2009-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional anisotropic elastic model for vascular tissue modelling is presented here. The underlying strain energy density function is assumed to additively decouple into volumetric and deviatoric contributions. A straightforward isotropic neo-Hooke-type law is used to model the deviatoric response of the ground substance, whereas a micro-structurally or rather micro-sphere-based approach will be employed to model the contribution and distribution of fibres within the biological tissue of interest. Anisotropy was introduced by means of the use of von Mises orientation distribution functions. Two different micro-mechanical approaches—a, say phenomenological, exponential ansatz, and a worm-like-chain-based formulation—are applied to the micro-fibres and illustratively compared. The passage from micro-structural contributions to the macroscopic response is obtained by a computational homogenisation scheme, namely numerical integration over the surface of the individual micro-spheres. The algorithmic treatment of this integration is discussed in detail for the anisotropic problem at hand, so that several cubatures of the micro-sphere are tested in order to optimise the accuracy at reasonable computational cost. Moreover, the introduced material parameters are identified from simple tension tests on human coronary arterial tissue for the two micro-mechanical models investigated. Both approaches are able to recapture the experimental data. Based on the identified sets of parameters, we first discuss a homogeneous deformation in simple shear to evaluate the models' response at the micro-structural level. Later on, an artery-like two-layered tube subjected to internal pressure is simulated by making use of a non-linear finite element setting. This enables to obtain the micro- and macroscopic responses in an inhomogeneous deformation problem, namely a blood vessel representative boundary value problem. The effect of residual stresses is additionally

  15. An anisotropic, elastic-decohesive constitutive relation for modeling Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulsky, D.; Tran, H.; Schreyer, H.

    2016-12-01

    As high-resolution simulations become increasingly possible and popular, questions are being raised about isotropic constitutive models for sea ice that are based on averaging material behavior over 100 km scales. At finer resolutions, it may not be appropriate to average over concentrated deformations which occur in leads and ridges since small regions do not contain sufficient numbers of these features at arbitrary orientations to support the assumption of isotropy. An elastic-decohesive constitutive model for pack ice has been developed that explicitly accounts for leads. The constitutive model is based on elasticity combined with a cohesive crack law that predicts the initiation, orientation and opening of leads. This talk presents extensions of the original model that tie it more closely to the thermodynamics and thickness distribution. Before failure, sea ice itself is assumed to be described by isotropic elasticity. However, an element of ice composed of different thicknesses, including refrozen leads and/or ridges, is modeled as an equivalent anisotropic elastic material of uniform thickness. The classical rule-of-mixtures is applied for the ice `composite' having an oriented distribution of thickness to derive the moduli and the strengths of the equivalent material. At failure, a decohesive constitutive relation based on the traction on a potential crack plane is employed in the anisotropic material. Sample paths in stress and strain space are examined to illustrate the aspects of the model when simulating the failure of sea ice. Simulations with the improved model show how failure is influenced by the oriented thickness distribution, for example, by failure occurring preferentially in thin ice.

  16. Mitral valve closure prediction with 3-D personalized anatomical models and anisotropic hyperelastic tissue assumptions.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, C; Mukherjee, R; Burlina, P

    2013-11-01

    This study is concerned with the development of patient-specific simulations of the mitral valve that use personalized anatomical models derived from 3-D transesophageal echocardiography (3-D TEE). The proposed method predicts the closed configuration of the mitral valve by solving for an equilibrium solution that balances various forces including blood pressure, tissue collision, valve tethering, and tissue elasticity. The model also incorporates realistic hyperelastic and anisotropic properties for the valve leaflets. This study compares hyperelastic tissue laws with a quasi-elastic law under various physiological parameters, and provides insights into error sensitivity to chordal placement, allowing for a preliminary comparison of the influence of the two factors (chords and models) on error. Predictive errors show the promise of the method, yielding aggregate median errors of the order of 1 mm, and computed strains and stresses show good correspondence with those reported in prior studies.

  17. An Anisotropic Model for Magnetostriction and Magnetization Computing for Noise Generation in Electric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Mbengue, Serigne Saliou; Buiron, Nicolas; Lanfranchi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process and use of ferromagnetic sheets, operations such as rolling, cutting, and tightening induce anisotropy that changes the material’s behavior. Consequently for more accuracy in magnetization and magnetostriction calculations in electric devices such as transformers, anisotropic effects should be considered. In the following sections, we give an overview of a macroscopic model which takes into account the magnetic and magnetoelastic anisotropy of the material for both magnetization and magnetostriction computing. Firstly, a comparison between the model results and measurements from a Single Sheet Tester (SST) and values will be shown. Secondly, the model is integrated in a finite elements code to predict magnetostrictive deformation of an in-house test bench which is a stack of 40 sheets glued together by the Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation (VPI) method. Measurements on the test bench and Finite Elements results are presented. PMID:27092513

  18. Yang Baxter and anisotropic sigma and lambda models, cyclic RG and exact S-matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appadu, Calan; Hollowood, Timothy J.; Price, Dafydd; Thompson, Daniel C.

    2017-09-01

    Integrable deformation of SU(2) sigma and lambda models are considered at the classical and quantum levels. These are the Yang-Baxter and XXZ-type anisotropic deformations. The XXZ type deformations are UV safe in one regime, while in another regime, like the Yang-Baxter deformations, they exhibit cyclic RG behaviour. The associ-ated affine quantum group symmetry, realized classically at the Poisson bracket level, has q a complex phase in the UV safe regime and q real in the cyclic RG regime, where q is an RG invariant. Based on the symmetries and RG flow we propose exact factorizable S-matrices to describe the scattering of states in the lambda models, from which the sigma models follow by taking a limit and non-abelian T-duality. In the cyclic RG regimes, the S-matrices are periodic functions of rapidity, at large rapidity, and in the Yang-Baxter case violate parity.

  19. The anisotropic cosmological models in f( R, T) gravity with Λ(T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaubey, R.; Shukla, A. K.

    2017-04-01

    The general class of anisotropic Bianchi cosmological models in f( R, T) modified theories of gravity with Λ( T) has been considered. This paper deals with f( R, T) modified theories of gravity, where the gravitational Lagrangian is given by an arbitrary function of Ricci scalar R and the trace of the stress-energy tensor T has been investigated for a specific choice of f( R, T) = f 1( R) + f 2( T). The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. We have discussed three types of solutions of the average scale factor for the general class of Bianchi cosmological models by using a special law for deceleration parameter which is linear in time with a negative slope. The solutions to the Einstein field equations are obtained for three different physical viable cosmologies. All physical parameters are calculated and discussed in each model.

  20. Plate impact simulations of polymeric composites using an anisotropic material model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, A. M.; Grove, D. J.

    1997-07-01

    Recently, an elastic-plastic anisotropic model based on the Tsai-Hill failure surface has been implemented in the 1995 version of the EPIC code. In the model, a strain rate dependent behavior has been assumed in the thickness direction. We simulated several plate impact experiments and analyzed the shock wave propagation in S-2 glass fiber/polyester matrix composite targets under one dimensional strain loading conditions. The modified Mie-Gruneisen equation of state includes the deviatoric part of the normal strain components. Since the deviatoric strains are calculated using a strain rate dependent strength model, this indirectly introduces a weak strain rate dependency in the bulk behavior of the composite. We also investigated the effect of strain rate dependency on the attenuation of the shock wave under one dimensional strain.

  1. Aeroelastic instability of aircraft wings modelled as anisotropic composite thin-walled beams in incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Z.; Librescu, L.

    2003-08-01

    An encompassing aeroelastic model developed toward investigating the influence of directionality property of advanced composite materials and non-classical effects such as transverse shear and warping restraint on the aeroelastic instability of composite aircraft wings is presented. Within the model developed herein, both divergence and flutter instabilities are simultaneously addressed. The aircraft wing is modelled as an anisotropic composite thin-walled beam featuring circumferentially asymmetric stiffness lay-up that generates, for the problem at hand, elastic coupling among plunging, pitching and transverse shear motions. The unsteady incompressible aerodynamics used here is based on the concept of indicial functions. Issues related to aeroelastic instability are discussed, the influence of warping restraint and transverse shear on the critical speed are evaluated, and pertinent conclusions are outlined.

  2. Multicanonical Monte Carlo simulations of anisotropic SU(3) and SU(4) Heisenberg models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Kenji; Kawashima, Naoki; Troyer, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    We present the results of multicanonical Monte Carlo simulations on two-dimensional anisotropic SU(3) and SU(4) Heisenberg models. In our previous study [K. Harada, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 76, 013703 (2007)], we found evidence for a direct quantum phase transition from the valence-bond-solid(VBS) phase to the SU(3) symmetry breaking phase on the SU(3) model and we proposed the possibility of deconfined critical phenomena (DCP) [T. Senthil, et al., Science 303, 1490 (2004); T. Grover and T. Senthil, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 247202 (2007)]. Here we will present new results with an improved algorithm, using a multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm. Using a flow method-like technique [A.B. Kuklov, et al., Annals of Physics 321, 1602 (2006)], we discuss the possibility of DCP in both models.

  3. An Anisotropic Model for Magnetostriction and Magnetization Computing for Noise Generation in Electric Devices.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Serigne Saliou; Buiron, Nicolas; Lanfranchi, Vincent

    2016-04-16

    During the manufacturing process and use of ferromagnetic sheets, operations such as rolling, cutting, and tightening induce anisotropy that changes the material's behavior. Consequently for more accuracy in magnetization and magnetostriction calculations in electric devices such as transformers, anisotropic effects should be considered. In the following sections, we give an overview of a macroscopic model which takes into account the magnetic and magnetoelastic anisotropy of the material for both magnetization and magnetostriction computing. Firstly, a comparison between the model results and measurements from a Single Sheet Tester (SST) and values will be shown. Secondly, the model is integrated in a finite elements code to predict magnetostrictive deformation of an in-house test bench which is a stack of 40 sheets glued together by the Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation (VPI) method. Measurements on the test bench and Finite Elements results are presented.

  4. An anisotropic micromechanics model for predicting the rafting direction in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang-Yu; Wu, Wen-Ping; Chen, Ming-Xiang

    2016-02-01

    An anisotropic micromechanics model based on the equivalent inclusion method is developed to investigate the rafting direction of Ni-based single crystal superalloys. The micromechanical model considers actual cubic structure and orthogonal anisotropy properties. The von Mises stress, elastic strain energy density, and hydrostatic pressure in different inclusions of micromechanical model are calculated when applying a tensile or compressive loading along the [001] direction. The calculated results can successfully predict the rafting direction for alloys exhibiting a positive or a negative mismatch, which are in agreement with pervious experimental and theoretical studies. Moreover, the elastic constant differences and mismatch degree of the matrix and precipitate phases and their influences on the rafting direction are carefully discussed.

  5. Noether symmetries and anisotropic universe models in f(R, T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Nawazish, Iqra

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the existence of Noether symmetries of some anisotropic homogeneous universe models in non-minimally coupled f(R, T) gravity (R and T represent Ricci scalar and trace of the energy-momentum tensor). We evaluate symmetry generators and the corresponding conserved quantities for two models of this theory admitting direct and indirect non-minimal curvature-matter coupling. We also discuss exact solutions for dust as well as non-dust matter distribution and study the physical behavior of some cosmological parameters through these solutions. For dust distribution, the exact solution corresponds to power-law expansion and Einstein universe while exponential expansion appears for non-dust matter. The graphical analysis of these solutions and cosmological parameters provide consistent results with recent observations about accelerated cosmic expansion. We conclude that Noether symmetry generators and conserved quantities exist for both models.

  6. Numerical modeling of fluid-structure interaction in arteries with anisotropic polyconvex hyperelastic and anisotropic viscoelastic material models at finite strains.

    PubMed

    Balzani, Daniel; Deparis, Simone; Fausten, Simon; Forti, Davide; Heinlein, Alexander; Klawonn, Axel; Quarteroni, Alfio; Rheinbach, Oliver; Schröder, Joerg

    2016-10-01

    The accurate prediction of transmural stresses in arterial walls requires on the one hand robust and efficient numerical schemes for the solution of boundary value problems including fluid-structure interactions and on the other hand the use of a material model for the vessel wall that is able to capture the relevant features of the material behavior. One of the main contributions of this paper is the application of a highly nonlinear, polyconvex anisotropic structural model for the solid in the context of fluid-structure interaction, together with a suitable discretization. Additionally, the influence of viscoelasticity is investigated. The fluid-structure interaction problem is solved using a monolithic approach; that is, the nonlinear system is solved (after time and space discretizations) as a whole without splitting among its components. The linearized block systems are solved iteratively using parallel domain decomposition preconditioners. A simple - but nonsymmetric - curved geometry is proposed that is demonstrated to be suitable as a benchmark testbed for fluid-structure interaction simulations in biomechanics where nonlinear structural models are used. Based on the curved benchmark geometry, the influence of different material models, spatial discretizations, and meshes of varying refinement is investigated. It turns out that often-used standard displacement elements with linear shape functions are not sufficient to provide good approximations of the arterial wall stresses, whereas for standard displacement elements or F-bar formulations with quadratic shape functions, suitable results are obtained. For the time discretization, a second-order backward differentiation formula scheme is used. It is shown that the curved geometry enables the analysis of non-rotationally symmetric distributions of the mechanical fields. For instance, the maximal shear stresses in the fluid-structure interface are found to be higher in the inner curve that corresponds to

  7. Anisotropic Resistivity Forward Modelling Using Automatic Generated Higher-order Finite Element Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Forward modelling is the general way to obtain responses of geoelectrical structures. Field investigators might find it useful for planning surveys and choosing optimal electrode configurations with respect to their targets. During the past few decades much effort has been put into the development of numerical forward codes, such as integral equation method, finite difference method and finite element method. Nowadays, most researchers prefer the finite element method (FEM) for its flexible meshing scheme, which can handle models with complex geometry. Resistivity Modelling with commercial sofewares such as ANSYS and COMSOL is convenient, but like working with a black box. Modifying the existed codes or developing new codes is somehow a long period. We present a new way to obtain resistivity forward modelling codes quickly, which is based on the commercial sofeware FEPG (Finite element Program Generator). Just with several demanding scripts, FEPG could generate FORTRAN program framework which can easily be altered to adjust our targets. By supposing the electric potential is quadratic in each element of a two-layer model, we obtain quite accurate results with errors less than 1%, while more than 5% errors could appear by linear FE codes. The anisotropic half-space model is supposed to concern vertical distributed fractures. The measured apparent resistivities along the fractures are bigger than results from its orthogonal direction, which are opposite of the true resistivities. Interpretation could be misunderstood if this anisotropic paradox is ignored. The technique we used can obtain scientific codes in a short time. The generated powerful FORTRAN codes could reach accurate results by higher-order assumption and can handle anisotropy to make better interpretations. The method we used could be expand easily to other domain where FE codes are needed.

  8. Identification and analysis of LNO1-like and AtGLE1-like nucleoporins in plants.

    PubMed

    Braud, Christopher; Zheng, Wenguang; Xiao, Wenyan

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoporins (Nups) are building blocks of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) that mediate cargo trafficking between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Although the physical structure of the NPC is well studied in yeast and vertebrates, little is known about the structure of NPCs or the function of most Nups in plants. Recently we demonstrated two Nups in Arabidopsis: LONO1 (LNO1), homolog of human NUP214 and yeast Nup159, and AtGLE1, homolog of yeast Gle1, are required for early embryogenesis and seed development. To identify LNO1 and AtGLE1 homologs in other plant species, we searched the protein databases and identified 30 LNO1-like and 35 AtGLE1-like proteins from lower plant species to higher plants. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the evolutionary trees of these proteins follow expected plant phylogenies. High sequence homology and conserved domain structure of these nucleoporins suggest important functions of these proteins in nucleocytoplasmic transport, growth and development in plants.

  9. Identification and analysis of LNO1-Like and AtGLE1-Like Nucleoporins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Braud, Christopher; Zheng, Wenguang; Xiao, Wenyan

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoporins (Nups) are building blocks of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) that mediate cargo trafficking between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Although the physical structure of the NPC is well studied in yeast and vertebrates, little is known about the structure of NPCs or the function of most Nups in plants. Recently we demonstrated two Nups in Arabidopsis: LONO1 (LNO1), homolog of human NUP214 and yeast Nup159, and AtGLE1, homolog of yeast Gle1, are required for early embryogenesis and seed development. To identify LNO1 and AtGLE1 homologs in other plant species, we searched the protein databases and identified 30 LNO1-like and 35 AtGLE1-like proteins from lower plant species to higher plants. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the evolutionary trees of these proteins follow expected plant phylogenies. High sequence homology and conserved domain structure of these nucleoporins suggest important functions of these proteins in nucleocytoplasmic transport, growth and development in plants. PMID:24384931

  10. Analytical modeling of equilibrium of strongly anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2013-08-15

    Theoretical analysis of equilibrium of anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators is presented. The anisotropy is assumed strong, which includes the cases with essentially nonuniform distributions of plasma pressure on magnetic surfaces. Such distributions can arise at neutral beam injection or at ion cyclotron resonance heating. Then the known generalizations of the standard theory of plasma equilibrium that treat p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} (parallel and perpendicular plasma pressures) as almost constant on magnetic surfaces are not applicable anymore. Explicit analytical prescriptions of the profiles of p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} are proposed that allow modeling of the anisotropic plasma equilibrium even with large ratios of p{sub ‖}/p{sub ⊥} or p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ‖}. A method for deriving the equation for the Shafranov shift is proposed that does not require introduction of the flux coordinates and calculation of the metric tensor. It is shown that for p{sub ⊥} with nonuniformity described by a single poloidal harmonic, the equation for the Shafranov shift coincides with a known one derived earlier for almost constant p{sub ⊥} on a magnetic surface. This does not happen in the other more complex case.

  11. Absorbing boundary conditions for scalar waves in anisotropic media. Part 2: Time-dependent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savadatti, Siddharth; Guddati, Murthy N.

    2010-09-01

    With the ultimate goal of devising effective absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) for general anisotropic media, we investigate the well-posedness and accuracy aspects of local ABCs designed for the transient modeling of the scalar anisotropic wave equation. The ABC analyzed in this paper is the perfectly matched discrete layers (PMDL), a simple variant of perfectly matched layers (PML) that is also equivalent to rational approximation based ABCs. Specifically, we derive the necessary and sufficient condition for the well-posedness of the initial boundary value problem (IBVP) obtained by coupling an interior and a PMDL ABC. The derivation of the reflection coefficient presented in a companion paper (S. Savadatti, M.N. Guddati, J. Comput. Phys., 2010, doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2010.05.018) has shown that PMDL can correctly identify and accurately absorb outgoing waves with opposing signs of group and phase velocities provided the PMDL layer lengths satisfy a certain bound. Utilizing the well-posedness theory developed by Kreiss for general hyperbolic IBVPs, and the well-posedness conditions for ABCs derived by Trefethen and Halpern for isotropic acoustics, we show that this bound on layer lengths also ensures well-posedness. The time discretized form of PMDL is also shown to be theoretically stable and some instability related to finite precision arithmetic is discussed.

  12. Anisotropic holographic dark energy model in Bianchi type-VI0 universe in a scalar-tensor theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Anitha, S.; Umadevi, S.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate Bianchi type VI0 universe filled with two minimally interacting fields, matter and anisotropic holographic dark energy components in the scalar-tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Saez and Ballester (Phys. Lett. A 113: 467, 1986). Solving the field equations of the theory using a relation between metric potentials and special law of variation for Hubble's parameter proposed by Bermann (Nuovo Cimento B 74:182, 1983) we have presented an anisotropic holographic dark energy model in this theory. The physical aspects of the model are also discussed.

  13. Interaction of H2 with simple metal surfaces - A model based on the anisotropic effective medium theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, M.; Ila, D.; Dalins, I.; Vidali, G.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the interaction of H2 with surfaces of Cu, Ag, Au and Al. The repulsive part of the potential is evaluated using the results of anisotropic effective medium theory (AEMT) while the attractive part is calculated from anisotropic damped dipole-dipole and damped dipole-quadrupole interactions. The model does not have any fitting parameters and its predictions are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The anisotropy of H2 is included in the model but our results show that this effect is very small.

  14. Interaction of H 2 with simple metal surfaces: a model based on the anisotropic effective medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, M.; Ila, D.; Dalins, I.; Vidali, G.

    1990-12-01

    Calculations are presented for the interaction of H 2 with surfaces of Cu, Ag, Au and Al. The repulsive part of the potential is evaluated using the results of anisotropic effective medium theory (AEMT) while the attractive part is calculated from anisotropic damped dipole-dipole and damped dipole-quadrupole interactions. The model does not have any fitting parameters and its predictions are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The anisotropy of H 2 is included in the model but our results show that this effect is very small.

  15. Mean-intercept anisotropy analysis of porous media. I. Analytic formulae for anisotropic Boolean models.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Mecke, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Structure-property relations, which relate the shape of the microstructure to physical properties such as transport or mechanical properties, need sensitive measures of structure. What are suitable fabric tensors that quantify the shape of anisotropic heterogeneous materials? The mean intercept length is among the most commonly used characteristics of anisotropy in porous media, for example, of trabecular bone in medical physics. We analyze the orientation-biased Boolean model, a versatile stochastic model that represents microstructures as overlapping grains with an orientation bias towards a preferred direction. This model is an extension of the isotropic Boolean model, which has been shown to truthfully reproduce multi-functional properties of isotropic porous media. We explain the close relationship between the concept of intersections with test lines to the elaborate mathematical theory of queues, and how explicit results from the latter can be directly applied to characterize microstructures. In this series of two papers, we provide analytic formulas for the anisotropic Boolean model and demonstrate often overlooked conceptual shortcomings of this approach. Queuing theory is used to derive simple and illustrative formulas for the mean intercept length. It separates into an intensity-dependent and an orientation-dependent factor. The global average of the mean intercept length can be expressed by local characteristics of a single grain alone. We thus identify which shape information about the random process the mean intercept length contains. The connection between global and local quantities helps to interpret observations and provides insights into the possibilities and limitations of the analysis. In the second paper of this series, we discuss, based on the findings in this paper, short-comings of the mean intercept analysis for (bone-)microstructure characterization. We will suggest alternative and better defined sensitive anisotropy measures from integral

  16. Anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure of the Earth's mantle: A global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustowski, B.; EkströM, G.; DziewońSki, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    We combine a new, large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body wave travel times to construct a three-dimensional model of the anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modeling approach is improved and more comprehensive compared to our earlier studies and involves the development and implementation of a new spherically symmetric reference model, simultaneous inversion for velocity and anisotropy, as well as discontinuity topographies, and implementation of nonlinear crustal corrections for waveforms. A comparison of our new three-dimensional model, S362ANI, with two other models derived from comparable data sets but using different techniques reveals persistent features: (1) strong, ˜200-km-thick, high-velocity anomalies beneath cratons, likely representing the continental lithosphere, underlain by weaker, fast anomalies extending below 250 km, which may represent continental roots, (2) weak velocity heterogeneity between 250 and 400 km depths, (3) fast anomalies extending horizontally up to 2000-3000 km in the mantle transition zone beneath subduction zones, (4) lack of strong long-wavelength heterogeneity below 650 km suggesting inhibiting character of the upper mantle-lower mantle boundary, and (5) slow-velocity superplumes beneath the Pacific and Africa. The shear wave radial anisotropy is strongest at 120 km depth, in particular beneath the central Pacific. Lateral anisotropic variations appreciably improve the fit to data that are predominantly sensitive to the uppermost and lowermost mantle but not to the waveforms that control the transition zone and midmantle depths. Tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy are negligible in the uppermost mantle but noticeable at the bottom of the mantle.

  17. Quantum phase transition and quench dynamics in the anisotropic Rabi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li-Tuo; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Wu, Huai-Zhi; Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the quantum phase transition (QPT) and quench dynamics in the anisotropic Rabi model when the ratio of the qubit transition frequency to the oscillator frequency approaches infinity. Based on the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, we find an anti-Hermitian operator that maps the original Hamiltonian into a one-dimensional oscillator Hamiltonian within the spin-down subspace. We analytically derive the eigenenergy and eigenstate of the normal and superradiant phases and demonstrate that the system undergoes a second-order quantum phase transition at a critical border. The critical border is a straight line in a two-dimensional parameter space which essentially extends the dimensionality of QPT in the Rabi model. By combining the Kibble-Zurek mechanism and the adiabatic dynamics method, we find that the residual energy vanishes as the quench time tends to zero, which is a sharp contrast to the universal scaling where the residual energy diverges in the same limit.

  18. Perona Malik anisotropic diffusion model using Peaceman Rachford scheme on digital radiographic image

    SciTech Connect

    Halim, Suhaila Abd; Razak, Rohayu Abd; Ibrahim, Arsmah; Manurung, Yupiter HP

    2014-06-19

    In image processing, it is important to remove noise without affecting the image structure as well as preserving all the edges. Perona Malik Anisotropic Diffusion (PMAD) is a PDE-based model which is suitable for image denoising and edge detection problems. In this paper, the Peaceman Rachford scheme is applied on PMAD to remove unwanted noise as the scheme is efficient and unconditionally stable. The capability of the scheme to remove noise is evaluated on several digital radiography weld defect images computed using MATLAB R2009a. Experimental results obtained show that the Peaceman Rachford scheme improves the image quality substantially well based on the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). The Peaceman Rachford scheme used in solving the PMAD model successfully removes unwanted noise in digital radiographic image.

  19. Perona Malik anisotropic diffusion model using Peaceman Rachford scheme on digital radiographic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Suhaila Abd; Razak, Rohayu Abd; Ibrahim, Arsmah; Manurung, Yupiter HP

    2014-06-01

    In image processing, it is important to remove noise without affecting the image structure as well as preserving all the edges. Perona Malik Anisotropic Diffusion (PMAD) is a PDE-based model which is suitable for image denoising and edge detection problems. In this paper, the Peaceman Rachford scheme is applied on PMAD to remove unwanted noise as the scheme is efficient and unconditionally stable. The capability of the scheme to remove noise is evaluated on several digital radiography weld defect images computed using MATLAB R2009a. Experimental results obtained show that the Peaceman Rachford scheme improves the image quality substantially well based on the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). The Peaceman Rachford scheme used in solving the PMAD model successfully removes unwanted noise in digital radiographic image.

  20. Bicritical universality of the anisotropic Heisenberg model in a crystal field.

    PubMed

    Freire, R T S; Plascak, J A

    2015-03-01

    The bicritical properties of the three-dimensional classical anisotropic Heisenberg model in a crystal field are investigated through extensive Monte Carlo simulations on a simple cubic lattice, using Metropolis and Wolff algorithms. Field-mixing and multidimensional histogram techniques were employed in order to compute the probability distribution function of the extensive conjugate variables of interest and, using finite-size scaling analysis, the first-order transition line of the model was precisely located. The fourth-order cumulant of the order parameter was then calculated along this line and the bicritical point located with good precision from the cumulant crossings. The bicritical properties of this point were further investigated through the measurement of the universal probability distribution function of the order parameter. The results lead us to conclude that the studied bicritical point belongs in fact to the three-dimensional Heisenberg universality class.

  1. Simulation of flow of mixtures through anisotropic porous media using a lattice Boltzmann model.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Wittel, F K; Herrmann, H J

    2010-08-01

    We propose a description for transient penetration simulations of miscible and immiscible fluid mixtures into anisotropic porous media, using the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method. Our model incorporates hydrodynamic flow, advection-diffusion, surface tension, and the possibility for global and local viscosity variations to consider various types of hardening fluids. The miscible mixture consists of two fluids, one governed by the hydrodynamic equations and one by advection-diffusion equations. We validate our model on standard problems like Poiseuille flow, the collision of a drop with an impermeable, solid interface and the deformation of the fluid due to surface tension forces. To demonstrate the applicability to complex geometries, we simulate the invasion process of mixtures into wood spruce samples.

  2. Anisotropic Bianchi Type I Cosmological Models with Generalized Chaplygin Gas and Dynamical Gravitational and Cosmological Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotambkar, S.; Singh, G. P.; Kelkar, R.; Bishi, Binaya K.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with study of generalized Chaplygin gas model with dynamical gravitational and cosmological constants. In this paper a new set of exact solutions of Einstein field equations for spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type I space-time have been obtained. The solutions of the Einstein’s field equations are obtained by considering (i) the power law relation between Hubble parameter H and scale factor R and (ii) scale factor of the form R = ‑1/t + t 2, t > 1. The assumptions lead to constant and variable deceleration parameter respectively. The physical and dynamical behaviors of the models have been discussed with the help of graphical representations. Also we have discussed the stability and physical acceptability of solutions for solution type-I and solution type-II.

  3. The anisotropic network model web server at 2015 (ANM 2.0).

    PubMed

    Eyal, Eran; Lum, Gengkon; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-05-01

    The anisotropic network model (ANM) is one of the simplest yet powerful tools for exploring protein dynamics. Its main utility is to predict and visualize the collective motions of large complexes and assemblies near their equilibrium structures. The ANM server, introduced by us in 2006 helped making this tool more accessible to non-sophisticated users. We now provide a new version (ANM 2.0), which allows inclusion of nucleic acids and ligands in the network model and thus enables the investigation of the collective motions of protein-DNA/RNA and -ligand systems. The new version offers the flexibility of defining the system nodes and the interaction types and cutoffs. It also includes extensive improvements in hardware, software and graphical interfaces. ANM 2.0 is available at http://anm.csb.pitt.edu eran.eyal@sheba.health.gov.il, eyal.eran@gmail.com. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Constitutive material model for the prediction of stresses in irradiated anisotropic graphite components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Derek K. L.; Marsden, Barry J.

    2008-10-01

    As well as acting as a moderator and reflector, graphite is used as a structural component in many gas-cooled fission nuclear reactors. Therefore the ability to predict the structural integrity of the many graphite components which make up a graphite reactor core is important in safety case assessments and reactor core life prediction. This involves the prediction of the service life stresses in the individual graphite components. In this paper a material model for the prediction of stresses in anisotropic graphite is presented. The time-integrated non-linear irradiated graphite material model can be used for stress analysis of graphite components subject to both fast neutron irradiation and radiolytic oxidation. As an example a simple stress analysis of a typical reactor graphite component is presented along with a series of sensitivity studies aimed at investigating the importance of the various material property changes involved in graphite component stress prediction.

  5. Cytoplasmic inositol hexakisphosphate production is sufficient for mediating the Gle1-mRNA export pathway.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aimee L; Suntharalingam, Mythili; Johnson, Sylvia L; Audhya, Anjon; Emr, Scott D; Wente, Susan R

    2004-12-03

    Production of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) by Ipk1, the inositol-1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase, is required for Gle1-mediated mRNA export in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. To examine the network of interactions that require IP6 production, an analysis of fitness defects was conducted in mutants harboring both an ipk1 null allele and a mutant allele in genes encoding nucleoporins or transport factors. Enhanced lethality was observed with a specific subset of mutants, including nup42, nup116, nup159, dbp5, and gle2, all of which had been previously connected to Gle1 function. Complementation of the nup116Deltaipk1Delta and nup42Deltaipk1Delta double mutants did not require the Phe-Gly repeat domains in the respective nucleoporins, suggesting that IP6 was acting subsequent to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein targeting to the nuclear pore complex. With Nup42 and Nup159 localized exclusively to the nuclear pore complex cytoplasmic side, we speculated that IP6 may regulate a cytoplasmic step in mRNA export. To test this prediction, the spatial requirements for the production of IP6 were investigated. Restriction of Ipk1 to the cytoplasm did not block IP6 production. Moreover, coincident sequestering of both Ipk1 and Mss4 (an enzyme required for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate production) to the cytoplasm also did not block IP6 production. Given that the kinase required for inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate production (Ipk2) is localized in the nucleus, these results indicated that soluble inositides were diffusing between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Additionally, the cytoplasmic production of IP6 by plasma membrane-anchored Ipk1 rescued a gle1-2 ipk1-4 synthetic lethal mutant. Thus, cytoplasmic IP6 production is sufficient for mediating the Gle1-mRNA export pathway.

  6. A Numerical Model of Anisotropic Mass Transport Through Grain Boundary Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yibo

    Tin (Sn) thin films are commonly used in electronic circuit applications as coatings on contacts and solders for joining components. It is widely observed, for some such system, that whiskers---long, thin crystalline structures---emerge and grow from the film. The Sn whisker phenomenon has become a highly active research area since Sn whiskers have caused a large amount of damage and loss in manufacturing, military, medical and power industries. Though lead (Pb) addition to Sn has been used to solve this problem for over five decades, the adverse environmental and health effects of Pb have motivated legislation to severely constrain Pb use in society. People are researching and seeking the reasons which cause whiskers and corresponding methods to solve the problem. The contributing factors to cause a Sn whisker are potentially many and much still remains unknown. Better understanding of fundamental driving forces should point toward strategies to improve (a) the accuracy with which we can predict whisker formation, and (b) our ability to mitigate the phenomenon. This thesis summarizes recent important research achievements in understanding Sn whisker formation and growth, both experimentally and theoretically. Focus is then placed on examining the role that anisotropy in grain boundary diffusivity plays in determining whisker characteristics (specifically, whether they form and, if so, where on a surface). To study this aspect of the problem and to enable future studies on stress driven grain boundary diffusion, this thesis presents a numerical anisotropic mass transport model. In addition to presenting details of the model and implementation, model predictions for a set of increasingly complex grain boundary networks are discussed. Preliminary results from the model provide evidence that anisotropic grain boundary diffusion may be a primary driving mechanism in whisker formation.

  7. Extraction of anisotropic parameters of turbid media using hybrid model comprising differential- and decomposition-based Mueller matrices.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Chi; Lo, Yu-Lung

    2013-07-15

    A hybrid model comprising the differential Mueller matrix formalism and the Mueller matrix decomposition method is proposed for extracting the linear birefringence (LB), linear dichroism (LD), circular birefringence (CB), circular dichroism (CD), and depolarization properties (Dep) of turbid optical samples. In contrast to the differential-based Mueller matrix method, the proposed hybrid model provides full-range measurements of all the anisotropic properties of the optical sample. Furthermore, compared to the decomposition-based Mueller matrix method, the proposed model is insensitive to the multiplication order of the constituent basis matrices. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by extracting the anisotropic properties of a compound chitosan-glucose-microsphere sample with LB/CB/Dep properties and two ferrofluidic samples with CB/CD/Dep and LB/LD/Dep properties, respectively. It is shown that the proposed hybrid model not only yields full-range measurements of all the anisotropic parameters, but is also more accurate and more stable than the decomposition method. Moreover, compared to the decomposition method, the proposed model more accurately reflects the dependency of the phase retardation angle and linear dichroism angle on the direction of the external magnetic field for ferrofluidic samples. Overall, the results presented in this study confirm that the proposed model has significant potential for extracting the optical parameters of real-world samples characterized by either single or multiple anisotropic properties.

  8. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Nucleic Acids Using Anisotropic Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohui; Shen, Hujun; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Yan; Wang, Honglei

    2016-02-09

    In this work, we attempt to apply a coarse-grained (CG) model, which is based on anisotropic Gay-Berne and electric multipole (EMP) potentials, to the modeling of nucleic acids. First, a comparison has been made between the CG and atomistic models (AMBER point-charge model) in the modeling of DNA and RNA hairpin structures. The CG results have demonstrated a good quality in maintaining the nucleic acid hairpin structures, in reproducing the dynamics of backbone atoms of nucleic acids, and in describing the hydrogen-bonding interactions between nucleic acid base pairs. Second, the CG and atomistic AMBER models yield comparable results in modeling double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules. It is encouraging that our CG model is capable of reproducing many elastic features of nucleic acid base pairs in terms of the distributions of the interbase pair step parameters (such as shift, slide, tilt, and twist) and the intrabase pair parameters (such as buckle, propeller, shear, and stretch). Finally, The GBEMP model has shown a promising ability to predict the melting temperatures of DNA duplexes with different lengths.

  9. Application of a Reduced Texture Methodology to Model the Plasticity of Anisotropic Extruded Aluminum Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meng; Rousselier, Gilles; Mohr, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    A recently developed Reduced Texture Methodology (RTM) featuring (i) a significantly reduced number of crystallographic orientations, (ii) a special experiment-based parameter calibration procedure, and (iii) reasonable computational time for industrial applications is adopted to model the anisotropic plastic behavior of a 2 mm-thick extruded aluminum 6260-T6 sheet. Firstly, the full-thickness sheet is modeled with twelve crystallographic orientations, and the model parameters are identified through an optimization procedure based on uniaxial tensile tests with seven different material orientations. The calibrated model describes well the stress-strain curves and Lankford ratios for all directions, while the optimized grain orientations are in good agreement with EBSD measurements. However, the EBSD results also reveal that the present sheet exhibits a strong heterogeneity through the thickness as far as crystallographic orientations and grain sizes are concerned. To account for this heterogeneity, eight grain orientations are selected out of the total twelve for the full-thickness sheet to model the 0.7 mm-thick central layer of the sheet based on the EBSD measurements. It is found that the reduced eight-grain model provides good predictions of the macroscopic responses in uniaxial tensile tests on reduced-thickness specimens, even without further calibration. A combined calibration is also performed to determine the final set of parameters which provide excellent modeling for both the full-thickness sheet (twelve-grain model) and its central layer (eight-grain model).

  10. Effect on GLE Occurrence Distribution: Possible Action on Active Region by Earth and Jupiter Magnetospheres through Cosmic Ray Deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pozo Garcia, Eduardo

    Eduardo del Pozo Garcia Geophysics and Astronomy Institute Havana, Cuba pozo@iga.cu Following Perez- Peraza and collaborators works on GLE prediction on basis to Cosmic Ray periodicities and cycles, in particular with 1,2 year cycle, effect prognosis of GLE occurrence was determine, I present here a possible interpretation of their results. Here I present the time distribution of the observed GLE in respect to each GLE nearly Sun-Earth-Jupiter alignment time. At the histogram the X axis cero is the alignment time. These alignments take place cyclically every 1,1 year. The histogram shows a modulation-like GLE distribution. The occurrence increments are near the alignment time and, about 125 days before and after the alignment time. Besides, a work hypothesis is proposed: “The Jupiter and Earth magnetospheres must deflect cosmic rays and, at some Jupiter and Earth positions according the current interplanetary magnetic field, may be favorable to increase the energetic particle flux over current Sun active regions, giving place to a modulation-like GLE distribution. Also, by the cosmic rays action some particle flux increase over active regions may come from radiation belts” This effect means that, during solar activity this is a factor that contributes to: - An accumulative activity increase of sunspot groups and their magnetic configuration complexity - Eventually, over complex active region some increase of high energy particle flux help to trigger GLE, or intensify solar proton events in progress, and become a GLE. This effect is taken into account for GLE prediction.

  11. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.; Linask, I.; Nissley, D. M.; Norris, P. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Walker, K. P.

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a program designed to develop life prediction and constitutive models for two coated single crystal alloys used in gas turbine airfoils. The two alloys are PWA 1480 and Alloy 185. The two oxidation resistant coatings are PWA 273, an aluminide coating, and PWA 286, an overlay NiCoCrAlY coating. To obtain constitutive and fatigue data, tests were conducted on uncoated and coated specimens loaded in the CH76 100 CH110 , CH76 110 CH110 , CH76 111 CH110 and CH76 123 CH110 crystallographic directions. Two constitutive models are being developed and evaluated for the single crystal materials: a micromechanic model based on crystallographic slip systems, and a macroscopic model which employs anisotropic tensors to model inelastic deformation anisotropy. Based on tests conducted on the overlay coating material, constitutive models for coatings also appear feasible and two initial models were selected. A life prediction approach was proposed for coated single crystal materials, including crack initiation either in the coating or in the substrate. The coating initiated failures dominated in the tests at load levels typical of gas turbine operation. Coating life was related to coating stress/strain history which was determined from specimen data using the constitutive models.

  12. Anisotropic viscoelastic-viscoplastic continuum model for high-density cellulose-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahjanto, D. D.; Girlanda, O.; Östlund, S.

    2015-11-01

    A continuum material model is developed for simulating the mechanical response of high-density cellulose-based materials subjected to stationary and transient loading. The model is formulated in an infinitesimal strain framework, where the total strain is decomposed into elastic and plastic parts. The model adopts a standard linear viscoelastic solid model expressed in terms of Boltzmann hereditary integral form, which is coupled to a rate-dependent viscoplastic formulation to describe the irreversible plastic part of the overall strain. An anisotropic hardening law with a kinematic effect is particularly adopted in order to capture the complex stress-strain hysteresis typically observed in polymeric materials. In addition, the present model accounts for the effects of material densification associated with through-thickness compression, which are captured using an exponential law typically applied in the continuum description of elasticity in porous media. Material parameters used in the present model are calibrated to the experimental data for high-density (press)boards. The experimental characterization procedures as well as the calibration of the parameters are highlighted. The results of the model simulations are systematically analyzed and validated against the corresponding experimental data. The comparisons show that the predictions of the present model are in very good agreement with the experimental observations for both stationary and transient load cases.

  13. A nonempirical anisotropic atom-atom model potential for chlorobenzene crystals.

    PubMed

    Day, Graeme M; Price, Sarah L

    2003-12-31

    A nearly nonempirical, transferable model potential is developed for the chlorobenzene molecules (C6ClnH6-n, n = 1 to 6) with anisotropy in the atom-atom form of both electrostatic and repulsion interactions. The potential is largely derived from the charge densities of the molecules, using a distributed multipole electrostatic model and a transferable dispersion model derived from the molecular polarizabilities. A nonempirical transferable repulsion model is obtained by analyzing the overlap of the charge densities in dimers as a function of orientation and separation and then calibrating this anisotropic atom-atom model against a limited number of intermolecular perturbation theory calculations of the short-range energies. The resulting model potential is a significant improvement over empirical model potentials in reproducing the twelve chlorobenzene crystal structures. Further validation calculations of the lattice energies and rigid-body k = 0 phonon frequencies provide satisfactory agreement with experiment, with the discrepancies being primarily due to approximations in the theoretical methods rather than the model intermolecular potential. The potential is able to give a good account of the three polymorphs of p-dichlorobenzene in a detailed crystal structure prediction study. Thus, by introducing repulsion anisotropy into a transferable potential scheme, it is possible to produce a set of potentials for the chlorobenzenes that can account for their crystal properties in an unprecedentedly realistic fashion.

  14. Instability of Interacting Ghost Dark Energy Model in an Anisotropic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, N.; Barati, F.

    2016-07-01

    A new dark energy model called "ghost dark energy" was recently suggested to explain the observed accelerating expansion of the universe. This model originates from the Veneziano ghost of QCD. The dark energy density is proportional to Hubble parameter, ρ Λ = α H, where α is a constant of order {Λ }3_{QCD} and Λ Q C D ˜ 100 M e V is QCD mass scale. In this paper, we investigate about the stability of generalized QCD ghost dark energy model against perturbations in the anisotropic background. At first, the ghost dark energy model of the universe with spatial BI model with/without the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is discussed. In particular, the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of this dark energy model are obtained. Then, we use the squared sound speed {vs2} the sign of which determines the stability of the model. We explore the stability of this model in the presence/absence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter in both flat and non-isotropic geometry. In conclusion, we find evidence that the ghost dark energy might can not lead to a stable universe favored by observations at the present time in BI universe.

  15. Estimation of effective geostress parameters driven by anisotropic stress and rock-physics models with orthorhombic symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xinpeng; Zhang, Guangzhi; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-10-01

    Estimation of effective geostress parameters is fundamental to the trajectory design and hydraulic fracturing in shale-gas reservoirs. Considering the shale characteristics of excellent stratification, well-developed cracks or fractures and small-scale pores, an effective or suitable shale anisotropic rock-physics model contributes to achieving the accurate prediction of effective geostress parameters in shale-gas reservoirs. In this paper, we first built a shale anisotropic rock-physics model with orthorhombic symmetry, which helps to calculate the anisotropic and geomechanical parameters under the orthorhombic assumption. Then, we introduced an anisotropic stress model with orthorhombic symmetry compared with an isotropic stress model and a transversely isotropic stress model. Combining the effective estimation of the pore pressure and the vertical stress parameters, we finally obtained the effective geostress parameters including the minimum and maximum horizontal stress parameters, providing a useful guide for the exploration and development in shale-gas reservoirs. Of course, ultimately the optimal choice of the hydraulic-fracturing area may also take into consideration other multi-factors such as the rock brittleness, cracks or fractures, and hydrocarbon distribution.

  16. A discrete thermodynamic approach for modeling anisotropic coupled plasticity-damage behavior in geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-zhi; Shao, Jian-fu; Kondo, Djimedo

    2008-04-01

    In the present Note, we present a discrete thermodynamic approach for modeling coupled anisotropic plastic flow and damage evolution in geomaterials. The basic idea is to extend the widely-used isotropic coupled elastoplastic damage formulation to the case with induced anisotropy using a discrete approach. The total plastic strain is considered as the consequence of frictional sliding in weak sliding planes randomly distributed in the elastic solid matrix. The effective elastic tensor of damaged material is determined using damage variable associated with each family of weak sliding planes. An example of application is shown for a typical semi-brittle rock. To cite this article: Q.-Z. Zhu et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  17. Axially symmetric anisotropic string cosmological models in Saez-Ballester theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakavalli, T.; Rao, G. Ananda; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2017-02-01

    Field equations of a scalar-tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Saez and Ballester (Phys. Lett. A 113:467, 1986) are derived with the help of a spatially homogeneous axially symmetric anisotropic Bianchi type metric in the presence of cosmic string source. To obtain determinate solutions of the field equations we have used the fact that the scalar expansion is proportional to shear scalar and the equations of state which correspond to geometric, Takabayasi and massive strings. It is found that geometric and massive strings do not coexist with the Saez-Ballester Scalar field. However, Takabayasi string which survives has been determined. Also, physical discussion of the dynamical parameters of the model is presented.

  18. Z-scan experiment with anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongxin; Pu, Jixiong; Qi, Hongqun

    2009-09-01

    We analyze the z-scan experiment with anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (AGSM) beams. The expression for the cross-spectral density of the AGSM beam passing through the lens and onto the nonlinear thin sample is derived. Based on the expression, we simulate the results of the z-scan experiment theoretically and analyze the effects of the e factor (e=w(0x)/w(0y)) and the spatial degree of coherence in the x and y orientations on the on-axis z-scan transmittance. It is found that DeltaTp(-v) becomes larger with an increment of the e factor and the spatial degree of coherence. So we can improve the sensitivity of the z-scan experiment by increasing the e factor and the spatial degree of coherence. The results are helpful for improving the sensitivity of the z-scan experiment.

  19. A class of LQC-inspired models for homogeneous, anisotropic cosmology in higher dimensional early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, S. Kalyana

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of a (3 + 1) dimensional homogeneous anisotropic universe is modified by loop quantum cosmology and, consequently, it has generically a big bounce in the past instead of a big-bang singularity. This modified dynamics can be well described by effective equations of motion. We generalise these effective equations of motion empirically to (d + 1) dimensions. The generalised equations involve two functions and may be considered as a class of LQC-inspired models for (d + 1) dimensional early universe cosmology. As a special case, one can now obtain a universe which has neither a big bang singularity nor a big bounce but approaches asymptotically a `Hagedorn like' phase in the past where its density and volume remain constant. In a few special cases, we also obtain explicit solutions.

  20. Crystal plasticity-based modeling for predicting anisotropic behaviour and formability of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Son; Jeong, Youngung; Creuziger, Adam; Iadicola, Mark; Foecke, Tim; Rollett, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    Metallic materials often exhibit anisotropic behaviour under complex load paths because of changes in microstructure, e.g., dislocations and crystallographic texture. In this study, we present the development of constitutive model based on dislocations, point defects and texture in order to predict anisotropic response under complex load paths. In detail, dislocation/solute atom interactions were considered to account for strain aging and static recovery. A hardening matrix based on the interaction of dislocations was built to represent the cross-hardening of different slip systems. Clear differentiation between forward and backward slip directions of dislocations was made to describe back stresses during path changes. In addition, we included dynamic recovery in order to better account for large plastic deformation. The model is validated against experimental data for AA5754-O with path changes, e.g., Figure 1 [1] Another effort is to include microstructure in forming predictions with a minimal increase in computational time. This effort enables comprehensive investigations of the influence of texture-induced anisotropy on formability [2]. Application of these improvements to predict forming limits of various BCC textures, such as γ, ρ, α, η and ɛ fibers and a random (R) texture. These simulations demonstrate that the crystallographic texture has significant (both positive and negative) effects on the forming limit diagrams (Figure 2). For example, the y fiber texture, that is often sought through thermo-mechanical processing due to high r-value, had the highest forming limit in the balanced biaxial strain path but the lowest forming limit under the plane strain path among textures under consideration.

  1. The anisotropic oscillator on curved spaces: A new exactly solvable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Ángel; Herranz, Francisco J.; Kuru, Şengül; Negro, Javier

    2016-10-01

    We present a new exactly solvable (classical and quantum) model that can be interpreted as the generalization to the two-dimensional sphere and to the hyperbolic space of the two-dimensional anisotropic oscillator with any pair of frequencies ωx and ωy. The new curved Hamiltonian Hκ depends on the curvature κ of the underlying space as a deformation/contraction parameter, and the Liouville integrability of Hκ relies on its separability in terms of geodesic parallel coordinates, which generalize the Cartesian coordinates of the plane. Moreover, the system is shown to be superintegrable for commensurate frequencies ωx :ωy, thus mimicking the behaviour of the flat Euclidean case, which is always recovered in the κ → 0 limit. The additional constant of motion in the commensurate case is, as expected, of higher-order in the momenta and can be explicitly deduced by performing the classical factorization of the Hamiltonian. The known 1 : 1 and 2 : 1 anisotropic curved oscillators are recovered as particular cases of Hκ, meanwhile all the remaining ωx :ωy curved oscillators define new superintegrable systems. Furthermore, the quantum Hamiltonian Hˆκ is fully constructed and studied by following a quantum factorization approach. In the case of commensurate frequencies, the Hamiltonian Hˆκ turns out to be quantum superintegrable and leads to a new exactly solvable quantum model. Its corresponding spectrum, that exhibits a maximal degeneracy, is explicitly given as an analytical deformation of the Euclidean eigenvalues in terms of both the curvature κ and the Planck constant ħ. In fact, such spectrum is obtained as a composition of two one-dimensional (either trigonometric or hyperbolic) Pösch-Teller set of eigenvalues.

  2. Comparison of structural anisotropic soft tissue models for simulating Achilles tendon tensile behaviour.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Longo, Giacomo; Gustafsson, Anna; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of tendon injury (tendinopathy) has increased over the past decades due to greater participation in sports and recreational activities. But little is known about the aetiology of tendon injuries because of our limited knowledge in the complex structure-function relationship in tendons. Computer models can capture the biomechanical behaviour of tendons and its structural components, which is essential for understanding the underlying mechanisms of tendon injuries. This study compares three structural constitutive material models for the Achilles tendon and discusses their application on different biomechanical simulations. The models have been previously used to describe cardiovascular tissue and articular cartilage, and one model is novel to this study. All three constitutive models captured the tensile behaviour of rat Achilles tendon (root mean square errors between models and experimental data are 0.50-0.64). They further showed that collagen fibres are the main load-bearing component and that the non-collagenous matrix plays a minor role in tension. By introducing anisotropic behaviour also in the non-fibrillar matrix, the new biphasic structural model was also able to capture fluid exudation during tension and high values of Poisson׳s ratio that is reported in tendon experiments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling the effect of anisotropic pressure on tokamak plasmas normal modes and continuum using fluid approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z. S.; Hole, M. J.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2015-09-01

    Extending the ideal MHD stability code MISHKA, a new code, MISHKA-A, is developed to study the impact of pressure anisotropy on plasma stability. Based on full anisotropic equilibrium and geometry, the code can provide normal mode analysis with three fluid closure models: the single adiabatic model (SA), the double adiabatic model (CGL) and the incompressible model. A study on the plasma continuous spectrum shows that in low beta, large aspect ratio plasma, the main impact of anisotropy lies in the modification of the BAE gap and the sound frequency, if the q profile is conserved. The SA model preserves the BAE gap structure as ideal MHD, while in CGL the lowest frequency branch does not touch zero frequency at the resonant flux surface where m   +   nq   =   0, inducing a gap at very low frequency. Also, the BAE gap frequency with bi-Maxwellian distribution in both model becomes higher if {{p}\\bot} \\gt {{p}\\parallel} with a q profile dependency. As a benchmark of the code, we study the m/n   =   1/1 internal kink mode. Numerical calculation of the marginal stability boundary with bi-Maxwellian distribution shows a good agreement with the generalized incompressible Bussac criterion (Mikhailovskii 1983 Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 9 190): the mode is stabilized(destabilized) if {{p}\\parallel}\\lt {{p}\\bot} ({{p}\\parallel}\\gt{{p}\\bot} ).

  4. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  5. Numerical modelling of mass transport in an arterial wall with anisotropic transport properties.

    PubMed

    Denny, William J; Walsh, Michael T

    2014-01-03

    Coronary artery disease results in blockages or narrowing of the artery lumen. Drug eluting stents (DES) were developed to replace bare metal stents in an effort to combat re-blocking of the diseased artery following treatment. The numerical models developed within this study focus on representing the changing trends of drug delivery from an idealised DES in an arterial wall with an anisotropic ultra-structure. To reduce the computational burden of solving coupled physics problems, a model reduction strategy was adopted. Particular focus has been placed upon adequately modelling the influence of strut compression as there is a paucity of numerical studies that account for changes in transport properties in compressed regions of the arterial wall due to stent deployment. This study developed an idealised numerical modelling framework to account for the changes in the directionally dependent porosity and tortuosities of the arterial wall as a result of radial strut compression. The results show that depending on the degree of strut compression, trends in therapeutic drug delivery within the arterial wall can be either increased or decreased. The study highlights the importance of incorporating compression into numerical models to better represent transport within the arterial wall and suggests an appropriate numerical modelling framework that could be utilised in more realistic patient specific arterial geometries. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Modeling Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Isotropic Objects: from Hairy Nanoparticles to Methylcellulose Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Valeriy

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking and formation of anisotropic structures from apparently isotropic building blocks is an exciting and not fully understood topic. I will discuss two examples of such self-assembly. The first example is related to the assembly of ``hairy'' nanoparticles in homopolymer matrices. The particles can assemble into long strings (they can also form other morphologies, as well) even though the shape of each particle and the distribution of ligands on the particle surface is spherically symmetric. Using the approach developed by Thompson, Ginzburg, Matsen, and Balazs, we show that presence of other particles can re-distribute the ligands and effectively ``polarize'' the particle-particle interaction, giving rise to the formation of 1d particle strings. In the second example, we consider aqueous solutions of methylcellulose (MC) polymers. It has been shown recently that at high temperature, the polymers form high-aspect ratio ``fibrils'' with diameter ~15 nm and length in the hundreds on nanometers. Using coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (CG-MD), we propose that the ``fibrils'' are result of one-dimensional self-assembly of single molecule ``rings''. Each MC polymer chain is forced into a ring because of the balance between internal chain rigidity (favoring more expanded configuration) and unfavorable polymer-water interactions (favoring more collapsed conformation). We also develop a theory predicting rheology and phase behavior of aqueous MC, and validate it against experimental data. Both examples show that anisotropic self-assembly can show up in unexpected places, and various theoretical tools are needed to successfully model it. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company through Grant 223278AF. Collaborators: R. L. Sammler (Dow), W. Huang and R. Larson (U. of Michigan).

  7. Anisotropic material model and wave propagation simulations for shocked pentaerythritol tetranitrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2010-05-01

    An anisotropic continuum material model was developed to describe the thermomechanical response of unreacted pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) single crystals to shock wave loading. Using this model, which incorporates nonlinear elasticity and crystal plasticity in a thermodynamically consistent tensor formulation, wave propagation simulations were performed to compare to experimental wave profiles [J. J. Dick and J. P. Ritchie, J. Appl. Phys. 76, 2726 (1994)] for PETN crystals under plate impact loading to 1.2 GPa. Our simulations show that for shock propagation along the [100] orientation where deformation across shear planes is sterically unhindered, a dislocation-based model provides a good match to the wave profile data. For shock propagation along the [110] direction, where deformation across shear planes is sterically hindered, a dislocation-based model cannot account for the observed strain-softening behavior. Instead, a shear cracking model was developed, providing good agreement with the data for [110] and [001] shock orientations. These results show that inelastic deformation due to hindered and unhindered shear in PETN occurs through mechanisms that are physically different. In addition, results for shock propagation normal to the (101) crystal plane suggest that the primary slip system identified from quasistatic indentation tests is not activated under shock wave loading. Overall, results from our continuum simulations are consistent with a previously proposed molecular mechanism for shock-induced chemical reaction in PETN in which the formation of polar conformers, due to hindered shear, facilitates the development of ionic reaction pathways.

  8. Vertex-element models for anisotropic growth of elongated plant organs

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, John A.; Lucas, Mikaël; King, John R.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2013-01-01

    New tools are required to address the challenge of relating plant hormone levels, hormone responses, wall biochemistry and wall mechanical properties to organ-scale growth. Current vertex-based models (applied in other contexts) can be unsuitable for simulating the growth of elongated organs such as roots because of the large aspect ratio of the cells, and these models fail to capture the mechanical properties of cell walls in sufficient detail. We describe a vertex-element model which resolves individual cells and includes anisotropic non-linear viscoelastic mechanical properties of cell walls and cell division whilst still being computationally efficient. We show that detailed consideration of the cell walls in the plane of a 2D simulation is necessary when cells have large aspect ratio, such as those in the root elongation zone of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to avoid anomalous transverse swelling. We explore how differences in the mechanical properties of cells across an organ can result in bending and how cellulose microfibril orientation affects macroscale growth. We also demonstrate that the model can be used to simulate growth on realistic geometries, for example that of the primary root apex, using moderate computational resources. The model shows how macroscopic root shape can be sensitive to fine-scale cellular geometries. PMID:23847638

  9. Ground states of the Ising model on an anisotropic triangular lattice: stripes and zigzags.

    PubMed

    Dublenych, Yu I

    2013-10-09

    A complete solution of the ground-state problem for the Ising model on an anisotropic triangular lattice with the nearest-neighbor interactions in a magnetic field is presented. It is shown that this problem can be reduced to the ground-state problem for an infinite chain with the interactions up to the second neighbors. In addition to the known ground-state structures (which correspond to full-dimensional regions in the parameter space of the model), new structures are found (at the boundaries of these regions), in particular, zigzagging stripes similar to those observed experimentally in colloidal monolayers. Though the number of parameters is relatively large (four), all the ground-state structures of the model are constructed and analyzed and therefore the paper can be considered as an example of a complete solution of a ground-state problem for classical spin or lattice-gas models. The paper can also help to verify the correctness of some results obtained previously by other authors and concerning the ground states of the model under consideration.

  10. A Generalized Anisotropic Hardening Rule Based on the Mroz Multi-Yield-Surface Model for Pressure Insensitive and Sensitive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Pan, Jwo

    2009-07-27

    In this paper, a generalized anisotropic hardening rule based on the Mroz multi-yield-surface model is derived. The evolution equation for the active yield surface is obtained by considering the continuous expansion of the active yield surface during the unloading/reloading process. The incremental constitutive relation based on the associated flow rule is then derived for a general yield function. As a special case, detailed incremental constitutive relations are derived for the Mises yield function. The closed-form solutions for one-dimensional stress-plastic strain curves are also derived and plotted for the Mises materials under cyclic loading conditions. The stress-plastic strain curves show closed hysteresis loops under uniaxial cyclic loading conditions and the Masing hypothesis is applicable. A user material subroutine based on the Mises yield function, the anisotropic hardening rule and the constitutive relations was then written and implemented into ABAQUS. Computations were conducted for a simple plane strain finite element model under uniaxial monotonic and cyclic loading conditions based on the anisotropic hardening rule and the isotropic and nonlinear kinematic hardening rules of ABAQUS. The results indicate that the plastic response of the material follows the intended input stress-strain data for the anisotropic hardening rule whereas the plastic response depends upon the input strain ranges of the stress-strain data for the nonlinear kinematic hardening rule.

  11. Spatial turning bands simulation of anisotropic non-linear models of coregionalization with symmetric cross-covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, D.

    2016-04-01

    The turning bands method (TBM) is a commonly used method of simulation for large Gaussian fields, its O(N) complexity being unsurpassed (N denotes the number of points to simulate). TBM can be implemented either in the spatial or the spectral domains. In the multivariate anisotropic case, spatial versions of TBM are currently available only for the linear model of coregionalization (LMC). For anisotropic non-LMC with symmetrical covariances only the spectral version is currently available. The spectral domain approach can be slow in the case of non-differentiable covariances due to the numerous frequencies to sample. Here a derivation of the equations is provided for simulating the anisotropic non-LMC directly in the spatial domain and the method is illustrated with two synthetic examples. The approach allows the specification of many different direct and cross-covariance components, each with possibly different geometric anisotropies and different model types. The complexity of the new multivariate approach remains O(N). Hence, a case of two variables defining an anisotropic non-LMC is simulated over one billion points in less than one hour on a desktop computer. These results help enlarge the scope of application of the TBM. The method can be easily implemented in any existing TBM program.

  12. A class of spherical, truncated, anisotropic models for application to globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vita, Ruggero; Bertin, Giuseppe; Zocchi, Alice

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a class of non-truncated, radially anisotropic models (the so-called f(ν)-models), originally constructed in the context of violent relaxation and modelling of elliptical galaxies, has been found to possess interesting qualities in relation to observed and simulated globular clusters. In view of new applications to globular clusters, we improve this class of models along two directions. To make them more suitable for the description of small stellar systems hosted by galaxies, we introduce a "tidal" truncation by means of a procedure that guarantees full continuity of the distribution function. The new fT(ν)-models are shown to provide a better fit to the observed photometric and spectroscopic profiles for a sample of 13 globular clusters studied earlier by means of non-truncated models; interestingly, the best-fit models also perform better with respect to the radial-orbit instability. Then, we design a flexible but simple two-component family of truncated models to study the separate issues of mass segregation and multiple populations. We do not aim at a fully realistic description of globular clusters to compete with the description currently obtained by means of dedicated simulations. The goal here is to try to identify the simplest models, that is, those with the smallest number of free parameters, but still have the capacity to provide a reasonable description for clusters that are evidently beyond the reach of one-component models. With this tool, we aim at identifying the key factors that characterize mass segregation or the presence of multiple populations. To reduce the relevant parameter space, we formulate a few physical arguments based on recent observations and simulations. A first application to two well-studied globular clusters is briefly described and discussed.

  13. A novel finite element model of the ovine lumbar intervertebral disc with anisotropic hyperelastic material properties

    PubMed Central

    Galbusera, Fabio; Jonas, René; Schlager, Benedikt; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Villa, Tomaso

    2017-01-01

    The Ovine spine is an accepted model to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of the human lumbar one. Indeed, the use of animal models for in vitro studies is necessary to investigate the mechanical behaviour of biological tissue, but needs to be reduced for ethical and social reasons. The aim of this study was to create a finite element model of the lumbar intervertebral disc of the sheep that may help to refine the understanding of parallel in vitro experiments and that can be used to predict when mechanical failure occurs. Anisotropic hyperelastic material properties were assigned to the annulus fibrosus and factorial optimization analyses were performed to find out the optimal parameters of the ground substance and of the collagen fibers. For the ground substance of the annulus fibrosus the investigation was based on experimental data taken from the literature, while for the collagen fibers tensile tests on annulus specimens were conducted. Flexibility analysis in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation were conducted. Different material properties for the anterior, lateral and posterior regions of the annulus were found. The posterior part resulted the stiffest region in compression whereas the anterior one the stiffest region in tension. Since the flexibility outcomes were in a good agreement with the literature data, we considered this model suitable to be used in conjunction with in vitro and in vivo tests to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the ovine lumbar disc. PMID:28472100

  14. Evaluating London Dispersion Interactions in DFT: A Nonlocal Anisotropic Buckingham-Hirshfeld Model.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, A; Geldof, D; Vanommeslaeghe, K; Alsenoy, C Van; Geerlings, P

    2012-01-10

    In this work, we present a novel model, referred to as BH-DFT-D, for the evaluation of London dispersion, with the purpose to correct the performance of local DFT exchange-correlation functionals for the description of van der Waals interactions. The new BH-DFT-D model combines the equations originally derived by Buckingham [Buckingham, A. D. Adv. Chem. Phys1967, 12, 107] with the definition of distributed multipole polarizability tensors within the Hirshfeld method [Hirshfeld, F.L. Theor. Chim. Acta1977, 44, 129], resulting in nonlocal, fully anisotropic expressions. Since no damping function has been introduced yet into the model, it is suitable in its present form for the evaluation of dispersion interactions in van der Waals dimers with no or negligible overlap. The new method is tested for an extended collection of van der Waals dimers against high-level data, where it is found to reproduce interaction energies at the BH-B3LYP-D/aug-cc-pVTZ level with a mean average error (MAE) of 0.20 kcal/mol. Next, development steps of the model will consist of adding a damping function, analytical gradients, and generalization to a supramolecular system.

  15. An anisotropic visco-hyperelastic model for PET behavior under ISBM process conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun-Mei; Chevalier, Luc; Monteiro, Eric

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) under the severe loading conditions of the injection stretch blow molding (ISBM) process is strongly dependent on strain rate, strain and temperature. In this process, the PET near the glass transition temperature (Tg) shows a strongly non linear elastic and viscous behavior. In author's previous works, a non linear visco-hyperelastic model has been identified from equi-biaxial tensile experimental results. Despite the good agreement with biaxial test results, the model fails to reproduce the sequential biaxial test (with constant width first step) and the shape evolution during the free blowing of preforms. In this work, an anisotropic version of this visco-hyperelastic model is proposed and identified form both equi and constant width results. The new version of our non linear visco-hyperelastic model is then implemented into the Abaqus environment and used to simulate the free blowing process. The comparison with the experimental results managed in Queen's University Belfast validates the approach.

  16. Anisotropic Sheet Forming Simulations Based on the ALAMEL Model: Application on Cup Deep Drawing and Ironing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyckens, P.; Gawad, J.; Xie, Q.; Van Bael, A.; Roose, D.; Samaey, G.; Moerman, J.; Vegter, H.; Van Houtte, P.

    2011-08-01

    The grain interaction ALAMEL model [1] allows predicting the evolution of the crystallographic texture and the accompanying evolution in plastic anisotropy. A FE constitutive law, based on this multilevel model, is presented and assessed for a cup deep drawing process followed by an ironing process. A Numisheet2011 benchmark (BM-1) is used for the application. The FE material model makes use of the Facet plastic potential [2] for a relatively fast evaluation of the yield locus. A multi-scale approach [3] has been recently developed in order to adaptively update the constitutive law by accommodating it to the evolution of the crystallographic texture. The identification procedure of the Facet coefficients, which describe instantaneous plastic anisotropy, is accomplished through virtual testing by means of the ALAMEL model, as described in more detail in the accompanying conference paper [4]. Texture evolution during deformation is included explicitly by re-identification of Facet coefficients in the course of the FE simulation. The focus of this paper lies on the texture-induced anisotropy and the resulting earing profile during both stages of the forming process. For the considered AKDQ steel material, it is seen that texture evolution during deep drawing is such that the anisotropic plastic flow evolves towards a more isotropic flow in the course of deformation. Texture evolution only slightly influences the obtained cup height for this material. The ironing step enlarges the earing height.

  17. Algebraic and group structure for bipartite anisotropic Ising model on a non-local basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Entanglement is considered a basic physical resource for modern quantum applications as Quantum Information and Quantum Computation. Interactions based on specific physical systems able to generate and sustain entanglement are subject to deep research to get understanding and control on it. Atoms, ions or quantum dots are considered key pieces in quantum applications because they are elements in the development toward a scalable spin-based quantum computer through universal and basic quantum operations. Ising model is a type of interaction generating entanglement in quantum systems based on matter. In this work, a general bipartite anisotropic Ising model including an inhomogeneous magnetic field is analyzed in a non-local basis. This model summarizes several particular models presented in literature. When evolution is expressed in the Bell basis, it shows a regular block structure suggesting a SU(2) decomposition. Then, their algebraic properties are analyzed in terms of a set of physical parameters which define their group structure. In particular, finite products of pulses in this interaction are analyzed in terms of SU(4) covering. Thus, evolution denotes remarkable properties, in particular those related potentially with entanglement and control, which give a fruitful arena for further quantum developments and generalization.

  18. Isotropic and anisotropic shear velocity model of the NA upper mantle using EarthScope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, J.; Clouzet, P.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope TA deployment has provided dense array coverage across the continental US and with it, the opportunity for high resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere in the continent. Building upon our previous work, we present a new 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear wave model of the North American (NA) lithospheric mantle, using full waveform tomography and shorter-period (40 s) waveform data. Our isotropic velocity model exhibits pronounced spatial correlation between major tectonic localities of the eastern NA continent, as evidenced in the geology, and seismic anomalies, suggesting recurring episodes of tectonic events not only are well exposed at the surface, but also leave persistent scars in the continental lithosphere mantle, marked by isotropic and radially anisotropic velocity anomalies that reach as deep as 100-150 km. In eastern North America, our Vs images distinguish the fast velocity cratonic NA from the deep rooted large volume high velocity blocks which are east of the continent rift margin and extend 200-300 km offshore into Atlantic. In between is a prominent narrow band of low velocities that roughly follows the south and eastern Laurentia rift margin and extends into New England. The lithosphere associated with this low velocity band is thinned likely due to combined effects of repeated rifting processes along the rift margin and northward extension of the Bermuda low-velocity channel across the New England region. Deep rooted high velocity blocks east of the Laurentia margin are proposed to represent the Proterozoic Gondwanian terranes of pan-African affinity, which were captured during the Rodinia formation but left behind during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The anisotropy model takes advantage of the up-to-date SKS compilation in the continent and new splitting results from Greenland. The new joint waveform and SKS splitting data inversion is carried out with a 2

  19. The effect of cosmic rays on biological systems - an investigation during GLE events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belisheva, N. K.; Lammer, H.; Biernat, H. K.; Vashenuyk, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, first direct and circumstantial evidences of the effects of cosmic rays (CR) on biological systems are presented. A direct evidence of biological effects of CR is demonstrated in experiments with three cellular lines growing in culture during three events of Ground Level Enhancement (GLEs) in the neutron count rate detected by ground-based neutron monitor in October 1989. Various phenomena associated with DNA lesion on the cellular level demonstrate coherent dynamics of radiation effects in all cellular lines coincident with the time of arrival of high-energy solar particles to the near-Earth space and with the main peak in GLE. These results were obtained in the course of six separate experiments, with partial overlapping of the time of previous and subsequent experiments, which started and finished in the quiet period of solar activity (SA). A significant difference between the values of multinuclear cells in all cellular lines in the quiet period and during GLE events indicates that the cause of radiation effects in the cell cultures is an exposure of cells to the secondary solar CR near the Earth's surface. The circumstantial evidence was obtained by statistical analysis of cases of congenital malformations (CM) at two sites in the Murmansk region. The number of cases of all classes of CM reveals a significant correlation with the number of GLE events. The number of cases of CM with pronounced chromosomal abnormalities clearly correlates with the GLE events that occurred a year before the birth of a child. We have found a significant correlation between modulations of the water properties and daily background variations of CR intensity. We believe that the effects of CR on biological systems can be also mediated by fluctuations in water properties, considered as one of possible mechanisms controlling the effects of CRs on biological systems.

  20. Modeling hysteresis curves of anisotropic SmCoFeCuZr magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio da Silva, Fernanda A.; Castro, Nicolau A.; de Campos, Marcos F.

    2013-02-01

    The hysteresis curves at room temperature and at 630 K of an anisotropic magnet were successfully modeled with the Stoner-Wohlfarth Callen-Liu-Cullen (SW-CLC) model. This implies that coherent rotation of domains is the reversal mechanism in this magnet. The chemical composition of the evaluated magnet is Sm(CobalFe0.06Cu0.108Zr0.03)7.2. The anisotropy field HA was estimated with the model, resulting μ0HA=7.1 T at the room temperature, and 2.9 T at 630 K. For this sample, the CLC interaction parameter (1/d) is very low (near zero) and, thus, the nanocrystalline 2:17 grains are well "magnetically decoupled". The texture analysis using Schulz Pole figure data indicated Mr/Ms ratio=0.96, and this means that the magnet is very well aligned. The excellent alignment of the grains is one of the reasons for the high coercivity of this sample (˜4 T at room temperature).

  1. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for anisotropic inhomogeneous head tissue conductivity in human head modelling.

    PubMed

    Bashar, M R; Li, Y; Wen, P

    2010-06-01

    The accuracy of an electroencephalography (EEG) forward problem partially depends on the head tissue conductivities. These conductivities are anisotropic and inhomogeneous in nature. This paper investigates the effects of conductivity uncertainty and analyses its sensitivity on an EEG forward problem for a spherical and a realistic head models. We estimate the uncertain conductivities using an efficient constraint based on an optimization method and perturb it by means of the volume and directional constraints. Assigning the uncertain conductivities, we construct spherical and realistic head models by means of a stochastic finite element method for fixed dipolar sources. We also compute EEG based on the constructed head models. We use a probabilistic sensitivity analysis method to determine the sensitivity indexes. These indexes characterize the conductivities with the most or the least effects on the computed outputs. These results demonstrate that conductivity uncertainty has significant effects on EEG. These results also show that the uncertain conductivities of the scalp, the radial direction of the skull and transversal direction in the white matter are more sensible.

  2. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    The nuclear moderator for high temperature nuclear reactors are fabricated from graphite. During reactor operations graphite components are subjected to complex stress states arising from structural loads, thermal gradients, neutron irradiation damage, and seismic events. Graphite is a quasi-brittle material. Two aspects of nuclear grade graphite, i.e., material anisotropy and different behavior in tension and compression, are explicitly accounted for in this effort. Fracture mechanic methods are useful for metal alloys, but they are problematic for anisotropic materials with a microstructure that makes it difficult to identify a "critical" flaw. In fact cracking in a graphite core component does not necessarily result in the loss of integrity of a nuclear graphite core assembly. A phenomenological failure criterion that does not rely on flaw detection has been derived that accounts for the material behaviors mentioned. The probability of failure of components fabricated from graphite is governed by the scatter in strength. The design protocols being proposed by international code agencies recognize that design and analysis of reactor core components must be based upon probabilistic principles. The reliability models proposed herein for isotropic graphite and graphite that can be characterized as being transversely isotropic are another set of design tools for the next generation very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as well as molten salt reactors. The work begins with a review of phenomenologically based deterministic failure criteria. A number of this genre of failure models are compared with recent multiaxial nuclear grade failure data. Aspects in each are shown to be lacking. The basic behavior of different failure strengths in tension and compression is exhibited by failure models derived for concrete, but attempts to extend these concrete models to anisotropy were unsuccessful. The phenomenological models are directly dependent on stress invariants. A set of

  3. A role for Gle1, a regulator of DEAD-box RNA helicases, at centrosomes and basal bodies

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Li-En; Akef, Abdalla; Wente, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    Control of organellar assembly and function is critical to eukaryotic homeostasis and survival. Gle1 is a highly conserved regulator of RNA-dependent DEAD-box ATPase proteins, with critical roles in both mRNA export and translation. In addition to its well-defined interaction with nuclear pore complexes, here we find that Gle1 is enriched at the centrosome and basal body. Gle1 assembles into the toroid-shaped pericentriolar material around the mother centriole. Reduced Gle1 levels are correlated with decreased pericentrin localization at the centrosome and microtubule organization defects. Of importance, these alterations in centrosome integrity do not result from loss of mRNA export. Examination of the Kupffer’s vesicle in Gle1-depleted zebrafish revealed compromised ciliary beating and developmental defects. We propose that Gle1 assembly into the pericentriolar material positions the DEAD-box protein regulator to function in localized mRNA metabolism required for proper centrosome function. PMID:28035044

  4. An anisotropic damage mechanics model for concrete with applications for fatigue loading and freeze-thaw effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reberg, Andrew Steven

    It is well known that the formation and propagation of microcracks within concrete is anisotropic in nature, and has a degrading effect on its mechanical performance. In this thesis an anisotropic damage mechanics model is formulated for concrete which can predict the behavior of the material subjected to monotonic loading, fatigue loading, and freeze-thaw cycles. The constitutive model is formulated using the general framework of the internal variable theory of thermodynamics. Kinetic relations are used to describe the directionality of damage accumulation and the associated softening of mechanical properties. The rate independent model is then extended to cover fatigue loading cycles and freeze-thaw cycles. Two simple softening functions are used to predict the mechanical properties of concrete as the number of cyclic loads as well as freeze-thaw cycles increases. The model is compared with experimental data for fatigue and freeze-thaw performance of plain concrete.

  5. Lapse time dependence of coda Q: Anisotropic multiple-scattering models and application to the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerin, Ludovic; Calvet, Marie

    2013-04-01

    The attenuation properties of the crust have been widely explored from measurements of the quality factor of coda waves (Qc) throughout the world. A number of studies have reported an increase of Qc with the lapse time in the coda of shear waves excited by local earthquakes. Based on a single-scattering interpretation, this observation is generally ascribed to depth-dependent attenuation properties in the crust. In recent years a number of observations -in particular seismic wave equipartition- have put forward the importance of multiple scattering in the coda. The main purpose of this study is therefore to clarify the role of multiple scattering in the lapse time dependence of Qc using numerical simulations and observations from the Pyrenees. Thanks to the European project Interreg SISPYR, we collected all available waveform data from various institutions that operate seismological networks along the range. We selected around 5000 waveforms from 159 local earthquakes (with a magnitude larger than 3) which occured between 2001 and 2010. The coda quality factor of short-period S-waves has been measured as a function of the length of the coda window (Lw) for different choices of the onset time of the coda. In the 2-16 Hz frequency band, we observe a transient regime characterized by an increase of Qc with Lw, followed by a stabilization around a plateau whose value depends on the central frequency of the signal and on the location along the range. Using Monte Carlo simulations of wave transport in a variety of random media (exponential, Von-Karman or gaussian heterogeneity power spectra), we demonstrate that the lapse-time dependence of Qc in the Pyrenees may be modeled by anisotropic multiple scattering of seismic waves, without invoking any depth dependence of the attenuation properties in the crust. In our model, anisotropic scattering is quantified by the ratio between the transport and scattering mean path (l*-l). At 6 Hz, we show that pyrenean data require an

  6. Lapse time dependence of coda Q: Anisotropic multiple-scattering models and application to the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, M.; Margerin, L.

    2012-12-01

    The attenuation properties of the crust have been widely explored from measurements of the quality factor of coda waves (Qc) throughout the world. A number of studies have reported an increase of Qc with the lapse time in the coda of shear waves excited by local earthquakes. Based on a single scattering interpretation, this observation is generally ascribed to depth-dependent attenuation properties in the crust. In recent years a number of observations -in particular seismic wave equipartition- have put forward the importance of multiple scattering in the coda. The main purpose of this study is therefore to clarify the role of multiple scattering in the lapse time dependence of Qc using numerical simulations and observations from the Pyrenees. Thanks to the European project Interreg SISPYR, we collected all available waveform data from various institutions that operate seismological networks along the range. We selected around 5000 waveforms from 159 local earthquakes (with a magnitude larger than 3) which occured between 2001 and 2010. The coda quality factor of short-period S-waves has been measured as a function of the length of the coda window (Lw) for different choices of the onset time of the coda. In the 2-16 Hz frequency band, we observe a transient regime characterized by an increase of Qc with Lw, followed by a stabilization around a plateau whose value depends on the central frequency of the signal and on the location along the range. Using Monte Carlo simulations of wave transport in a variety of random media (exponential, Von-Karman or gaussian heterogeneity power spectra), we demonstrate that the lapse-time dependence of Qc in the Pyrenees may be modeled by anisotropic multiple scattering of seismic waves, without invoking any depth dependence of the attenuation properties in the crust. In our model, anisotropic scattering is quantified by the ratio between the transport and scattering mean path (l*/l). At 6 Hz, we show that pyrenean data require an

  7. Sequence determination and analysis of three plasmids of Pseudomonas sp. GLE121, a psychrophile isolated from surface ice of Ecology Glacier (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Grzesiak, Jakub; Ciok, Anna; Nieckarz, Marta; Zdanowski, Marek K; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas sp. GLE121 (a psychrophilic Antarctic strain) carries three plasmids: pGLE121P1 (6899 bp), pGLE121P2 (8330 bp) and pGLE121P3 (39,583 bp). Plasmids pGLE121P1 and pGLE121P2 show significant sequence similarity to members of the IncP-9 and IncP-7 incompatibility groups, respectively, while the largest replicon, pGLE121P3, is highly related to plasmid pNCPPB880-40 of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato NCPPB880. All three plasmids have a narrow host range, limited to members of the genus Pseudomonas. Plasmid pGLE121P3 encodes a conjugal transfer system, while pGLE121P1 carries only a putative MOB module, conserved in many mobilizable plasmids. Plasmid pGLE121P3 contains an additional load of genetic information, including a pair of genes with homology to the rulAB operon, responsible for ultraviolet radiation (UVR) tolerance. Given the increasing UV exposure in Antarctic regions, the expression of these genes is likely to be an important adaptive response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nup42 and IP6 coordinate Gle1 stimulation of Dbp5/DDX19B for mRNA export in yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rebecca L; Mason, Aaron C; Glass, Laura; Aditi; Wente, Susan R

    2017-09-04

    The mRNA lifecycle is driven through spatiotemporal changes in the protein composition of mRNA particles (mRNPs) that are triggered by RNA-dependent DEAD-box protein (Dbp) ATPases. As mRNPs exit the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this remodeling occurs through activation of Dbp5 by inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6 )-bound Gle1. At the NPC, Gle1 also binds Nup42, but Nup42's molecular function is unclear. Here we employ the power of structure-function analysis in S. cerevisiae and human (h) cells, and find that the high-affinity Nup42-Gle1 interaction is integral to Dbp5 (hDDX19B) activation and efficient mRNA export. The Nup42 carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) binds Gle1/hGle1B at an interface distinct from the Gle1-Dbp5/hDDX19B interaction site. A nup42-CTD/gle1-CTD/Dbp5 trimeric complex forms in the presence of IP6 . Deletion of NUP42 abrogates Gle1-Dbp5 interaction, and disruption of the Nup42 or IP6 binding interfaces on Gle1/hGle1B leads to defective mRNA export in S. cerevisiae and human cells. In vitro, Nup42-CTD and IP6 stimulate Gle1/hGle1B activation of Dbp5 and DDX19B recombinant proteins in similar, non-additive manners, demonstrating complete functional conservation between humans and S. cerevisiae. Together, a highly conserved mechanism governs spatial coordination of mRNP remodeling during export. This has implications for understanding human disease mutations that perturb the Nup42-hGle1B interaction. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Twofold and Fourfold Symmetric Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect in a Model with Crystal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically study the twofold and fourfold symmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effects of ferromagnets. We here use the two-current model for a system consisting of a conduction state and localized d states. The localized d states are obtained from a Hamiltonian with a spin-orbit interaction, an exchange field, and a crystal field. From the model, we first derive general expressions for the coefficient of the twofold symmetric term (C2) and that of the fourfold symmetric term (C4) in the AMR ratio. In the case of a strong ferromagnet, the dominant term in C2 is proportional to the difference in the partial densities of states (PDOSs) at the Fermi energy (EF) between the dɛ and dγ states, and that in C4 is proportional to the difference in the PDOSs at EF among the dɛ states. Using the dominant terms, we next analyze the experimental results for Fe4N, in which |C2| and |C4| increase with decreasing temperature. The experimental results can be reproduced by assuming that the tetragonal distortion increases with decreasing temperature.

  10. Anisotropic spherical head model and its application to imaging electric activity of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yury

    2012-07-01

    This study reports on a solution to Poisson's equation describing an electric potential and field generated by a dipolar current source positioned inside a set of concentric spherical shells characterized by a homogeneous anisotropic conductivity inside each shell. Formulas giving a unique continuation of potentials and fields between the shells are derived. The formulas are applied to a spherical model of the human head to show that (i) real human skulls comprising isotropic compact and cancellous bone layers can be closely approximated by a single shell with radial-tangential conductivity anisotropy ˜1:2 and radial conductivity equal to 1/30 of the brain/scalp conductivity; (ii) errors due to the spherical approximation of the head shape are of the same magnitude as errors due to poorly known electrical properties of the modeled head tissues; (iii) commonly used electroencephalography (EEG) average reference contributes 15% of the signal (on the average) and, therefore, makes EEG measurements significantly nonlocal; and (iv) the surface Laplacian of EEG measurements closely approximates electric currents at the skull-scalp interface, providing a parameter-free (up to a constant factor) deblurring and dereferencing of EEG data. These results can be useful for localization of sources underlying electric activity of the brain.

  11. Bayesian Analysis of Sparse Anisotropic Universe Models and Application to the Five-Year WMAP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneboom, Nicolaas E.; Eriksen, Hans Kristian

    2009-01-01

    We extend the previously described cosmic microwave background Gibbs sampling framework to allow for exact Bayesian analysis of anisotropic universe models, and apply this method to the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature observations. This involves adding support for nondiagonal signal covariance matrices, and implementing a general spectral parameter Monte Carlo Markov chain sampler. As a working example, we apply these techniques to the model recently introduced by Ackerman et al., describing, for instance, violations of rotational invariance during the inflationary epoch. After verifying the code with simulated data, we analyze the foreground-reduced five-year WMAP temperature sky maps. For ell <= 400 and the W-band data, we find tentative evidence for a preferred direction pointing toward (l, b) = (110°, 10°) with an anisotropy amplitude of g * = 0.15 ± 0.039. Similar results are obtained from the V-band data (g * = 0.11 ± 0.039; (l, b) = (130°, 20°)). Further, the preferred direction is stable with respect to multipole range, seen independently in both ell = [2, 100] and [100, 400], although at lower statistical significance. We have not yet been able to establish a fully satisfactory explanation for the observations in terms of known systematics, such as noncosmological foregrounds, correlated noise, or asymmetric beams, but stress that further study of all these issues is warranted before a cosmological interpretation can be supported.

  12. Forward modelling of multi-component induction logging tools in layered anisotropic dipping formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Xu, Chenhao; Xiao, Jiaqi

    2013-10-01

    Multi-component induction logging provides great assistance in the exploration of thinly laminated reservoirs. The 1D parametric inversion following an adaptive borehole correction is the key step in the data processing of multi-component induction logging responses. To make the inversion process reasonably fast, an efficient forward modelling method is necessary. In this paper, a modelling method has been developed to simulate the multi-component induction tools in deviated wells drilled in layered anisotropic formations. With the introduction of generalized reflection coefficients, the analytic expressions of magnetic field in the form of a Sommerfeld integral were derived. The fast numerical computation of the integral has been completed by using the fast Fourier-Hankel transform and fast Hankel transform methods. The latter is so time efficient that it is competent enough for real-time multi-parameter inversion. In this paper, some simulated results have been presented and they are in excellent agreement with the finite difference method code's solution.

  13. Quantum spin-1 anisotropic ferromagnetic Heisenberg model in a crystal field: a variational approach.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D C; Plascak, J A; Castro, L M

    2013-09-01

    A variational approach based on Bogoliubov inequality for the free energy is employed in order to treat the quantum spin-1 anisotropic ferromagnetic Heisenberg model in the presence of a crystal field. Within the Bogoliubov scheme an improved pair approximation has been used. The temperature-dependent thermodynamic functions have been obtained and provide much better results than the previous simple mean-field scheme. In one dimension, which is still nonintegrable for quantum spin-1, we get the exact results in the classical limit, or near-exact results in the quantum case, for the free energy, magnetization, and quadrupole moment, as well for the transition temperature. In two and three dimensions the corresponding global phase diagrams have been obtained as a function of the parameters of the Hamiltonian. First-order transition lines, second-order transition lines, tricritical and tetracritical points, and critical endpoints have been located through the analysis of the minimum of the Helmholtz free energy and a Landau-like expansion in the approximated free energy. Only first-order quantum transitions have been found at zero temperature. Limiting cases, such as isotropic Heisenberg, Blume-Capel, and Ising models, have been analyzed and compared to previous results obtained from other analytical approaches as well as from Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Quantum Phase Transition and Local Entanglement in Extended Hubbard Model on Anisotropic Triangular Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ji-Ming; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Zheng-Mei; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-11-01

    Using a mean-field theory based upon Hartree—Fock approximation, we theoretically investigate the competition between the metallic conductivity, spin order and charge order phases in a two-dimensional half-filled extended Hubbard model on anisotropic triangular lattice. Bond order, double occupancy, spin and charge structure factor are calculated, and the phase diagram of the extended Hubbard model is presented. It is found that the interplay of strong interaction and geometric frustration leads to exotic phases, the charge fluctuation is enhanced and three kinds of charge orders appear with the introduction of the nearest-neighbor interaction. Moreover, for different frustrations, it is also found that the antiferromagnetic insulating phase and nonmagnetic insulating phase are rapidly suppressed, and eventually disappeared as the ratio between the nearest-neighbor interaction and on-site interaction increases. This indicates that spin order is also sensitive to the nearest-neighbor interaction. Finally, the single-site entanglement is calculated and it is found that a clear discontinuous of the single-site entanglement appears at the critical points of the phase transition. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos.11274255, 11475027 and 11305132, Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20136203110001, and Technology of Northwest Normal University, China under Grants No. NWNU-LKQN-11-26

  15. Anisotropic cosmological models in f(R,T) gravity with variable deceleration parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Pradyumn Kumar; Sahoo, Parbati; Bishi, Binaya Kumar

    The objective of this work enclosed with the study of spatially homogeneous anisotropic Bianchi type-I universe in f(R,T) gravity (where R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of stress energy momentum tensor) in two different cases viz. f(R,T) = R + 2f(T) and f(R,T) = f1(R) + f2(T) with bulk viscosity matter content. In this study, we consider a time varying deceleration parameter (DP), which generates an accelerating universe to obtain the exact solution of the field equations. The physical and kinematical properties of both the models are discussed in detail for the future evolution of the universe. We have explored the nature of WEC, DEC, SEC and energy density for both the cases. We have found that both the models, with bulk viscosity matter component, show an acceleration of the universe. We have also shown that the cosmic jerk parameter is compatible with the three kinematical data sets.

  16. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  17. A robust macroscopic model for normal-shear coupling, asymmetric and anisotropic behaviors of polycrystalline SMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghi, M.; Damanpack, A. R.; Liao, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this article is to develop a robust macroscopic bi-axial model to capture self-accommodation, martensitic transformation/orientation/reorientation, normal-shear deformation coupling and asymmetric/anisotropic strain generation in polycrystalline shape memory alloys. By considering the volume fraction of martensite and its preferred direction as scalar and directional internal variables, constitutive relations are derived to describe basic mechanisms of accommodation, transformation and orientation/reorientation of martensite variants. A new definition is introduced for maximum recoverable strain, which allows the model to capture the effects of tension-compression asymmetry and transformation anisotropy. Furthermore, the coupling effects between normal and shear deformation modes are considered by merging inelastic strain components together. By introducing a calibration approach, material and kinetic parameters of the model are recast in terms of common quantities that characterize a uniaxial phase kinetic diagram. The solution algorithm of the model is presented based on an elastic-predictor inelastic-corrector return mapping process. In order to explore and demonstrate capabilities of the proposed model, theoretical predictions are first compared with existing experimental results on uniaxial tension, compression, torsion and combined tension-torsion tests. Afterwards, experimental results of uniaxial tension, compression, pure bending and buckling tests on {{NiTi}} rods and tubes are replicated by implementing a finite element method along with the Newton-Raphson and Riks techniques to trace non-linear equilibrium path. A good qualitative and quantitative correlation is observed between numerical and experimental results, which verifies the accuracy of the model and the solution procedure.

  18. Anisotropic cosmologies with ghost dark energy models in f (R, T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayaz, V.; Hossienkhani, H.; Zarei, Z.; Azimi, N.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the generalized Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) ghost model of dark energy in the framework of Einstein gravity is investigated. For this purpose, we use the squared sound speed vs2 whose sign determines the stability of the model. At first, the non-interacting ghost dark energy in a Bianchi type-I (BI) background is discussed. Then the equation-of-state parameter, ω_D=pD/ρD, the deceleration parameter, and the evolution equation of the generalized ghost dark energy are obtained. It is shown that the equation-of-state parameter of the ghost dark energy can cross the phantom line ( ω=-1 in some range of the parameter spaces. Then, this investigation was extended to the general scheme for modified f(R,T) gravity reconstruction from a realistic case in an anisotropic Bianchi type-I cosmology, using the dark matter and ghost dark energy. Special attention is taken into account for the case in which the function f is given by f(R,T)=f1(R) +f2(T). We consider a specific model which permits the standard continuity equation in this modified theory. Besides Ω_{Λ} and Ω in standard Einstein cosmology, another density parameter, Ω_{σ}, is expected by the anisotropy. This theory implies that if Ω_{σ} is zero then it yields the FRW universe model. Interestingly enough, we find that the corresponding f ( R, T) gravity of the ghost DE model can behave like phantom or quintessence of the selected models which describe the accelerated expansion of the universe.

  19. Anisotropic Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarfoth, Ryan Gordon

    Anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces are a group of planar materials that can be modeled by the tensor impedance boundary condition. This boundary condition relates the electric and magnetic field components on a surface using a 2x2 tensor. The advantage of using the tensor impedance boundary condition, and by extension anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces, is that the method allows large and complex structures to be modeled quickly and accurately using a planar boundary condition. This thesis presents the theory of anisotropic impedance surfaces and multiple applications. Anisotropic impedance surfaces are a generalization of scalar impedance surfaces. Unlike the scalar version, anisotropic impedance surfaces have material properties that are dependent on the polarization and wave vector of electromagnetic radiation that interacts with the surface. This allows anisotropic impedance surfaces to be used for applications that scalar surfaces cannot achieve. Three of these applications are presented in this thesis. The first is an anisotropic surface wave waveguide which allows propagation in one direction, but passes radiation in the orthogonal direction without reflection. The second application is a surface wave beam shifter which splits a surface wave beam in two directions and reduces the scattering from an object placed on the surface. The third application is a patterned surface which can alter the scattered radiation pattern of a rectangular shape. For each application, anisotropic impedance surfaces are constructed using periodic unit cells. These unit cells are designed to give the desired surface impedance characteristics by modifying a patterned metallic patch on a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple unit cell geometries are analyzed in order to find the setup with the best performance in terms of impedance characteristics and frequency bandwidth.

  20. Generalized huygens-fresnel diffraction integral for misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems and decentered anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guilin; Lü, Baida

    2002-03-01

    The generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral for misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems is derived by using the canonical operator method, which enables us to study propagation properties of anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (AGSM) beams through misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems. It is shown that under the action of misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems AGSM beams do not preserve the closed property. Therefore generalized partially coherent anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams called decentered anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (DAGSM) beams are introduced, and AGSM beams can be regarded as a special case of DAGSM beams.

  1. Mixed models and reduction method for dynamic analysis of anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Peters, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A time-domain computational procedure is presented for predicting the dynamic response of laminated anisotropic shells. The two key elements of the procedure are: (1) use of mixed finite element models having independent interpolation (shape) functions for stress resultants and generalized displacements for the spatial discretization of the shell, with the stress resultants allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries; and (2) use of a dynamic reduction method, with the global approximation vectors consisting of the static solution and an orthogonal set of Lanczos vectors. The dynamic reduction is accomplished by means of successive application of the finite element method and the classical Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The finite element method is first used to generate the global approximation vectors. Then the Rayleigh-Ritz technique is used to generate a reduced system of ordinary differential equations in the amplitudes of these modes. The temporal integration of the reduced differential equations is performed by using an explicit half-station central difference scheme (Leap-frog method). The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is demonstrated by means of a numerical example and its advantages over reduction methods used with the displacement formulation are discussed.

  2. Mixed models and reduction method for dynamic analysis of anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Peters, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A time-domain computational procedure is presented for predicting the dynamic response of laminated anisotropic shells. The two key elements of the procedure are: (1) use of mixed finite element models having independent interpolation (shape) functions for stress resultants and generalized displacements for the spatial discretization of the shell, with the stress resultants allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries; and (2) use of a dynamic reduction method, with the global approximation vectors consisting of the static solution and an orthogonal set of Lanczos vectors. The dynamic reduction is accomplished by means of successive application of the finite element method and the classical Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The finite element method is first used to generate the global approximation vectors. Then the Rayleigh-Ritz technique is used to generate a reduced system of ordinary differential equations in the amplitudes of these modes. The temporal integration of the reduced differential equations is performed by using an explicit half-station central difference scheme (Leap-frog method). The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is demonstrated by means of a numerical example and its advantages over reduction methods used with the displacement formulation are discussed.

  3. Pairing symmetries in a Hubbard model on an anisotropic triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Yokoyama, Hisatoshi; Tanaka, Yukio; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2007-10-01

    To consider the paring symmetry formed in organic compounds κ-(BEDT-TTF)2X, we study the half-filled-band Hubbard model on an anisotropic triangular lattice (t in two bond directions and t‧ in the other), using an optimization VMC method. As trial states, we adopt a coexisting state of an antiferromagnetic (AF) order and the dx2-y2 -wave RVB gap, in addition to the d + id- and d + d-wave gap states. In these states, we take account of the effect of band (or Fermi surface) renormalization. Magnetic Mott transitions occur, and a regime of robust superconductivity could not be found, in contrast with our previous study. In the insulating regime, the coexisting state in which an AF order prevails is always the lowest-energy state up to remarkably large t‧/t (≲1.3), whereas a dxy-wave RVB state becomes predominant when t‧/t exceeds this value. In the insulating regime, the effective Fermi surface, determined by the renormalized value t˜‧ / t , is markedly renormalized into different directions according to t‧/t; for t‧/t ≲ 1.3, it approaches that of the square lattice (t˜‧ / t = 0) , whereas for t‧/t ≳ 1.3, it becomes almost one-dimensional (t˜‧ / t≫ 1) .

  4. Investigation of protein fluctuations via Anisotropic Network Model and Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okan, Osman B.; Turgut, Deniz; Rammohan, Aravind; Garcia, Angel E.; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2014-03-01

    We use Anisotropic Network Model (ANM) and compare its protein fluctuation predictions against molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental findings for 210 globular proteins. The ANM results are analyzed using bond orientational order (BOO) parameters. We show that BOO parameters could be reformulated as a sum of contact density and geometrical (distribution of contacts in space) components. This reformulation of BOO makes it possible to investigate the role of each individual component separately, and identify cut-off ranges where each component dominates protein fluctuations. Our results indicate that the widely accepted correlation between mean squared displacements (MSDs) and inverse contact density is valid for ANM within the cut-off range of 10-15 Å. We show that the two components of the BOO dominate protein fluctuations at different length scales: contact density at small length scales and geometric distribution of residues at length scales comparable to the protein size. It is also shown that the relationship between MSD and contact density is firmly rooted in BOO, and is rendered possible with a unique distribution of residues that nullifies the average geometric component's contribution to the BOO within the 10 -15 Å cut-off.__ The material is partially based upon work supported by NSF under Grant Nos. 1200270 and 1003574, and 1050966.

  5. Slow shock and rotational discontinuity in MHD and Hall MHD models with anisotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, L.-N.; Wang, B.-J.

    2016-07-01

    Pressure anisotropy may modify the characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, in particular, the slow mode wave and the corresponding shocks and discontinuities. In this study the formation of slow shocks (SSs) in anisotropic plasmas is examined by solving the gyrotropic MHD and Hall MHD equations numerically for one-dimensional Riemann problem. The MHD shocks and discontinuities are generated by imposing a finite normal magnetic field on the Harris type current sheet with a guide magnetic By component. It is shown that anomalous SSs moving faster than the intermediate wave or with positive density-magnetic field correlation may be generated in gyrotropic MHD and Hall MHD models. Moreover, for some parameter values SSs may exhibit upstream wave trains with right-handed polarization in contrast with the earlier prediction that SSs shall possess downstream left-hand polarized wave trains based on the isotropic Hall MHD theory. For the cases of By ≠ 0, SSs with increased density and decreased magnetic field followed by noncoplanar intermediate mode or rotational discontinuity (RD)-like structures similar to the compound SS-RD structures observed in space plasma environments may possibly form in symmetric and asymmetric current layers. The Walén relation of these anomalous RDs without the correction of pressure anisotropy may significantly be violated.

  6. Asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian approach for modeling anisotropic transport in magnetized plasmas for arbitrary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory

    2012-10-01

    Modeling electron transport in magnetized plasmas is extremely challenging due to the extreme anisotropy between parallel (to the magnetic field) and perpendicular directions (χ/χ˜10^10 in fusion plasmas). Recently, a Lagrangian Green's function approach, developed for the purely parallel transport case,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011)^,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, 19, 056112 (2012) has been extended to the anisotropic transport case in the tokamak-ordering limit with constant density.footnotetextL. Chac'on, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, C. Hauck, JCP, submitted (2012) An operator-split algorithm is proposed that allows one to treat Eulerian and Lagrangian components separately. The approach is shown to feature bounded numerical errors for arbitrary χ/χ ratios, which renders it asymptotic-preserving. In this poster, we will present the generalization of the Lagrangian approach to arbitrary magnetic fields. We will demonstrate the potential of the approach with various challenging configurations, including the case of transport across a magnetic island in cylindrical geometry.

  7. Anisotropic and vector hysteresis model for magnetic materials application to a cubic textured NiFe sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernescu-Spornic, Cristina; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Spornic, Sorin Aurel; Ossart, Florence

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, several research teams are involved in vector and anisotropic hysteresis modelling of soft magnetic materials. In this paper a new model is presented. It is based on the Preisach model, but uses a four-state vector operator. The model is applied to a cubic textured NiFe sheet and verified for unixial and rotating exciting field. At high induction level the behaviour of the material is well described. However, discrepancy with experiment is observed at low induction. This phenomena is currently under analysis in order to adapt the model for such working conditions.

  8. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model of brain white matter in biaxial tension and structural-mechanical relationships.

    PubMed

    Labus, Kevin M; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2016-09-01

    Computational models of the brain require accurate and robust constitutive models to characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The anisotropy of white matter has been previously demonstrated; however, there is a lack of data describing the effects of multi-axial loading, even though brain tissue experiences multi-axial stress states. Therefore, a biaxial tensile experiment was designed to more fully characterize the anisotropic behavior of white matter in a quasi-static loading state, and the mechanical data were modeled with an anisotropic hyperelastic continuum model. A probabilistic analysis was used to quantify the uncertainty in model predictions because the mechanical data of brain tissue can show a high degree of variability, and computational studies can benefit from reporting the probability distribution of model responses. The axonal structure in white matter can be heterogeneous and regionally dependent, which can affect computational model predictions. Therefore, corona radiata and corpus callosum regions were tested, and histology and transmission electron microscopy were performed on tested specimens to relate the distribution of axon orientations and the axon volume fraction to the mechanical behavior. These measured properties were implemented into a structural constitutive model. Results demonstrated a significant, but relatively low anisotropic behavior, yet there were no conclusive mechanical differences between the two regions tested. The inclusion of both biaxial and uniaxial tests in model fits improved the accuracy of model predictions. The mechanical anisotropy of individual specimens positively correlated with the measured axon volume fraction, and, accordingly, the structural model exhibited slightly decreased uncertainty in model predictions compared to the model without structural properties.

  9. Bianchi Type-I Anisotropic Dark Energy Model with Constant Deceleration Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Amirhashchi, H.; Saha, Bijan

    2011-09-01

    A new dark energy model in anisotropic Bianchi type-I (B-I) space-time with time dependent equation of state (EoS) parameter and constant deceleration parameter has been investigated in the present paper. The Einstein's field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter (Berman in Il Nuovo Cimento B 74:182, 1983) which generates two types of solutions, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. The existing range of the dark energy EoS parameter ω for derived model is found to be in good agreement with the three recent observations (i) SNe Ia data (Knop et al. in Astrophys. J. 598:102, 2003), (ii) SNe Ia data collaborated with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al. in Astrophys. J. 606:702, 2004) and (iii) a combination of cosmological datasets coming from CMB anisotropies, luminosity distances of high redshift type Ia supernovae and galaxy clustering (Hinshaw et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 180:225, 2009 and Komatsu et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 180:330, 2009). The cosmological constant Λ is found to be a decreasing function of time and it approaches a small positive value at the present epoch which is corroborated by results from recent supernovae Ia observations. It has also been suggested that the dark energy that explains the observed accelerating universe may arise due to the contribution to the vacuum energy of the EoS in a time dependent background. Geometric and kinematic properties of the model and the behaviour of the anisotropy of the dark energy have been carried out.

  10. Control of mRNA Export and Translation Termination by Inositol Hexakisphosphate Requires Specific Interaction with Gle1*

    PubMed Central

    Alcázar-Román, Abel R.; Bolger, Timothy A.; Wente, Susan R.

    2010-01-01

    The unidirectional translocation of messenger RNA (mRNA) through the aqueous channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by interactions between soluble mRNA export factors and distinct binding sites on the NPC. At the cytoplasmic side of the NPC, the conserved mRNA export factors Gle1 and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) play an essential role in mRNA export by activating the ATPase activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5, promoting localized messenger ribonucleoprotein complex remodeling, and ensuring the directionality of the export process. In addition, Dbp5, Gle1, and IP6 are also required for proper translation termination. However, the specificity of the IP6-Gle1 interaction in vivo is unknown. Here, we characterize the biochemical interaction between Gle1 and IP6 and the relationship to Dbp5 binding and stimulation. We identify Gle1 residues required for IP6 binding and show that these residues are needed for IP6-dependent Dbp5 stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Gle1 is the primary target of IP6 for both mRNA export and translation termination in vivo. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, the IP6-binding mutants recapitulate all of the mRNA export and translation termination defects found in mutants depleted of IP6. We conclude that Gle1 specifically binds IP6 and that this interaction is required for the full potentiation of Dbp5 ATPase activity during both mRNA export and translation termination. PMID:20371601

  11. Using COMSOL Multiphysics Software to Model Anisotropic Dielectric and Metamaterial Effects in Folded-Waveguide Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starinshak, David P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic effects of conventional dielectrics, anisotropic dielectrics, and metamaterials were modeled in a terahertz-frequency folded-waveguide slow-wave circuit. Results of attempts to utilize these materials to increase efficiency are presented.

  12. Anisotropic matter in cosmology: locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi I and VII o models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, David

    2016-05-01

    We examine the behaviour of homogeneous, anisotropic space-times, specifically the locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi types I and VII o in the presence of anisotropic matter. By finding an appropriate constant of the motion, and transforming the equations of motion we are able to provide exact solutions in the presence of perfect fluids with anisotropic pressures. The solution space covers matter consisting of a single perfect fluid which satisfies the weak energy condition and is rich enough to contain solutions which exhibit behaviour which is qualitatively distinct from the isotropic sector. Thus we find that there is more ‘matter that matters’ close to a homogeneous singularity than the usual stiff fluid. Example metrics are given for cosmologies whose matter sources are magnetic fields, relativistic particles, cosmic strings and domain walls.

  13. Finite-size effects for anisotropic 2D Ising model with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the exact partition function of the anisotropic Ising model on finite M × N rectangular lattices under four different boundary conditions (periodic-periodic (pp), periodic-antiperiodic (pa), antiperiodic-periodic (ap) and antiperiodic-antiperiodic (aa)) obtained by Kaufman (1949 Phys. Rev. 76 1232), Wu and Hu (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5189) and Kastening (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 057103)). We express the partition functions in terms of the partition functions Zα, β(J, k) with (α, β) = (0, 0), (1/2, 0), (0, 1/2) and (1/2, 1/2), J is an interaction coupling and k is an anisotropy parameter. Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich et al (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5543) to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. Our result is f = fbulk + ∑∞p = 0fp(ρ, k)S-p - 1, where f is the free energy of the system, fbulk is the free energy of the bulk, S = MN is the area of the lattice and ρ = M/N is the aspect ratio. All coefficients in this expansion are expressed through analytical functions. We have introduced the effective aspect ratio ρeff = ρ/sinh 2Jc and show that for pp and aa boundary conditions all finite size correction terms are invariant under the transformation ρeff → 1/ρeff. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  14. Sharp interface model for solid-state dewetting problems with weakly anisotropic surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Wei; Bao, Weizhu; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Based on an energy variational approach, we propose a sharp interface model for simulating solid-state dewetting of thin films with (weakly) anisotropic surface energies. The morphology evolution of thin films is governed by surface diffusion and contact line migration. For the contact line migration, we introduce a relaxation kinetics with a finite contact line mobility by energy gradient flow method. We implement the mathematical model in an explicit finite-difference scheme with cubic spline interpolation for evolving marker points. Following validation of the mathematical and numerical approaches, we simulate the evolution of thin-film islands, semi-infinite films, and films with holes as a function of film dimensions, isotropic Young angle θi, anisotropy strength and crystal symmetry, and film crystal orientation relative to the substrate normal. We find that in addition to classical wetting (where holes in a film heal) and dewetting (where holes in a film grow), we observe cases where a hole through the film heals but leaves a finite-size hole/bubble between the continuous film and substrate or where the hole heals leaving a continuous film that is not bonded to the substrate. Surface energy anisotropy (i) increases the instability that leads to island breakup into multiple islands, (ii) enhances hole healing, and (iii) leads to finite island size even under some conditions where the isotropic Young angle θi suggests that the film wets the substrate. The numerical results presented in the paper capture many of the complexities associated with solid-state dewetting experiments.

  15. 3D MRI-based anisotropic FSI models with cyclic bending for human coronary atherosclerotic plaque mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K; Teng, Zhongzhao; Billiar, Kristen; Bach, Richard; Ku, David N

    2009-06-01

    Heart attack and stroke are often caused by atherosclerotic plaque rupture, which happens without warning most of the time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based atherosclerotic plaque models with fluid-structure interactions (FSIs) have been introduced to perform flow and stress/strain analysis and identify possible mechanical and morphological indices for accurate plaque vulnerability assessment. For coronary arteries, cyclic bending associated with heart motion and anisotropy of the vessel walls may have significant influence on flow and stress/strain distributions in the plaque. FSI models with cyclic bending and anisotropic vessel properties for coronary plaques are lacking in the current literature. In this paper, cyclic bending and anisotropic vessel properties were added to 3D FSI coronary plaque models so that the models would be more realistic for more accurate computational flow and stress/strain predictions. Six computational models using one ex vivo MRI human coronary plaque specimen data were constructed to assess the effects of cyclic bending, anisotropic vessel properties, pulsating pressure, plaque structure, and axial stretch on plaque stress/strain distributions. Our results indicate that cyclic bending and anisotropic properties may cause 50-800% increase in maximum principal stress (Stress-P1) values at selected locations. The stress increase varies with location and is higher when bending is coupled with axial stretch, nonsmooth plaque structure, and resonant pressure conditions (zero phase angle shift). Effects of cyclic bending on flow behaviors are more modest (9.8% decrease in maximum velocity, 2.5% decrease in flow rate, 15% increase in maximum flow shear stress). Inclusion of cyclic bending, anisotropic vessel material properties, accurate plaque structure, and axial stretch in computational FSI models should lead to a considerable improvement of accuracy of computational stress/strain predictions for coronary plaque vulnerability

  16. A family of anisotropic super-dense star models using a space-time describing charged perfect fluid distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.

    2012-08-01

    A family of anisotropic fluid distributions is constructed using a space-time describing a family of charged perfect fluid distributions. The anisotropy parameter is taken to be twice the square of electric intensity used in the charged fluid distributions. As the anisotropy parameter (or the electric intensity) is zero at the centre and is monotonically increasing towards the pressure-free interface, we have utilized the anisotropic fluid distributions to create Boson-type neutron stars models which join smoothly to the Schwarzschild exterior metric. All the physical entities such as energy density, radial pressure, tangential pressure and velocity of sound are monotonically decreasing towards the surface. Different members of the above family are characterized by a positive integral number n. It is observed that the maximum mass (which is 5.8051 solar mass for n = 4) starts decreasing for n > 4. But this reaches a non-zero terminal value (2.8010 solar mass) as n tends to infinity.

  17. Unit-Sphere Anisotropic Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Probability Density Distribution for the Orientation of Critical Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of monolithic glass and ceramic components under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" failure models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This report develops a formulation to describe the probability density distribution of the orientation of critical strength-controlling flaws that results from an applied load. This distribution is a function of the multiaxial stress state, the shear sensitivity of the flaws, the Weibull modulus, and the strength anisotropy. Examples are provided showing the predicted response on the unit sphere for various stress states for isotropic and transversely isotropic (anisotropic) materials--including the most probable orientation of critical flaws for offset uniaxial loads with strength anisotropy. The author anticipates that this information could be used to determine anisotropic stiffness degradation or anisotropic damage evolution for individual brittle (or quasi-brittle) composite material constituents within finite element or micromechanics-based software

  18. An Anisotropic Ocean Surface Emissivity Model Based on WindSat Polarimetric Brightness Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. F.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sandeep, S.; Weber, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this research has been to develop a standardized fast full-Stokes ocean surface emissivity model with Jacobian for a wind-driven ocean surface applicable at arbitrary microwave frequencies, polarizations, and incidence angles. The model is based on the Ohio State University (OSU) two-scale code for surface emission developed by Johnson (2006, IEEE TGRS, 44, 560) but modified as follows: (1) the Meissner-Wentz dielectric permittivity (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) replaces the original permittivity, (2) the Elfouhaily sea surface spectrum (1997, JGR, 102, C7,15781) replaces the Durden-Vesecky spectrum (1985, IEEE TGRS, OE-10, 445), but the Durden-Vesecky angular spreading function is retained, (3) the high-frequency portion of the Elfouhaily spectrum is multiplied by the Pierson-Moskowitz shape spectrum to correct an error in the original paper, (4) the generalized Phillips-Kitaigorodskii equilibrium range parameter for short waves is modeled as a continuous function of the friction velocity at the water surface to eliminate a discontinuous jump in the original paper. A total of five physical tuning parameters were identified, including the spectral strength and the hydrodynamic modulation factor. The short wave part of the spectrum is also allowed to have an arbitrary ratio relative to the long wave part. The foam fraction is multiplied by a variable correction factor, and also modulated to allow an anisotropic foam fraction with more foam on the leeward side of a wave. The model is being tuned against multi-year sequences of WindSat and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) data as analyzed by Meissner and Wentz (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) for up to four Stokes brightnesses and in all angular harmonics up to two in twenty five wind bins from 0.5-25.5 m/s and of 1 m/s width. As a result there are 40 brightnesses per wind bin, for a total of 1000 brightnesses used to constrain the modified model. A chi-squared tuning criterion based on error standard

  19. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic injuries and gradual wear-and-tear of articular cartilage (AC) that can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) have been hypothesized to result from tissue damage to AC. In this study, a previous equilibrium constitutive model of AC was extended to a constitutive damage articular cartilage (CDAC) model. In particular, anisotropic collagen (COL) fibril damage and isotropic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) damage were considered in a 3D formulation. In the CDAC model, time-dependent effects, such as viscoelasticity and poroelasticity, were neglected, and thus all results represent the equilibrium response after all time-dependent effects have dissipated. The resulting CDAC model was implemented in two different finite-element models. The first simulated uniaxial tensile loading to failure, while the second simulated spherical indentation with a rigid indenter displaced into a bilayer AC sample. Uniaxial tension to failure simulations were performed for three COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain (i.e., the maximum elastic COL fibril strain) values of 15%, 30%, and 45%, while spherical indentation simulations were performed with a COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain of 15%. GAG damage parameters were held constant for all simulations. Our results indicated that the equilibrium postyield tensile response of AC and the macroscopic tissue failure strain are highly dependent on COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain. The uniaxial tensile response consisted of an initial nonlinear ramp region due to the recruitment of intact fibrils followed by a rapid decrease in tissue stress at initial COL fibril failure, as a result of COL fibril damage which continued until ultimate tissue failure. In the spherical indentation simulation, damage to both the COL fibril and GAG constituents was located only in the superficial zone (SZ) and near the articular surface with tissue thickening following unloading. Spherical indentation simulation results are in agreement with published experimental

  20. Deleterious mutations in the essential mRNA metabolism factor, hGle1, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaneb, Hannah M.; Folkmann, Andrew W.; Belzil, Véronique V.; Jao, Li-En; Leblond, Claire S.; Girard, Simon L.; Daoud, Hussein; Noreau, Anne; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Szuto, Anna; Levert, Annie; Vidal, Sabrina; André-Guimont, Catherine; Camu, William; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A.; Wente, Susan R.; Dion, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective death of motor neurons. Causative mutations in the global RNA-processing proteins TDP-43 and FUS among others, as well as their aggregation in ALS patients, have identified defects in RNA metabolism as an important feature in this disease. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 and lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease are autosomal recessive fetal motor neuron diseases that are caused by mutations in another global RNA-processing protein, hGle1. In this study, we carried out the first screening of GLE1 in ALS patients (173 familial and 760 sporadic) and identified 2 deleterious mutations (1 splice site and 1 nonsense mutation) and 1 missense mutation. Functional analysis of the deleterious mutants revealed them to be unable to rescue motor neuron pathology in zebrafish morphants lacking Gle1. Furthermore, in HeLa cells, both mutations caused a depletion of hGle1 at the nuclear pore where it carries out an essential role in nuclear export of mRNA. These results suggest a haploinsufficiency mechanism and point to a causative role for GLE1 mutations in ALS patients. This further supports the involvement of global defects in RNA metabolism in ALS. PMID:25343993

  1. AN INTERPRETATION OF GLE71 CONCURRENT CME-DRIVEN SHOCK WAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Firoz, Kazi A.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.; Zhang, Q. M.; Gan, W. Q.; Li, Y. P.; Moon, Y.-J.; Kudela, K.; Park, Y.-D.; Dorman, Lev I. E-mail: firoz.kazi@uah.es

    2014-08-01

    Particle accelerations in solar flares and CME-driven shocks can sometimes result in very high-energy particle events (≥1 GeV) that are known as ground level enhancements (GLEs). Recent studies on the first GLE event (GLE71 2012 May 17 01:50 UT) of solar cycle 24 suggested that CME-driven shock played a leading role in causing the event. To verify this claim, we have made an effort to interpret the GLE71 concurrent shock wave. For this, we have deduced the possible speed and height of the shock wave in terms of the frequency (MHz) of the solar radio type II burst and its drift rate (MHz min{sup –1}), and studied the temporal evolution of the particle intensity profiles at different heights of the solar corona. For a better perception of the particle acceleration in the shock, we have studied the solar radio type II burst with concurrent solar radio and electron fluxes. When the particle intensity profiles are necessarily shifted in time at ∼1 AU, it is found that the growth phases of the electron and cosmic ray intensity fluxes are strongly correlated (>0.91; ≥0.87) with the frequency drift rate of the type II burst, which is also consistent with the intensive particle accelerations at upper coronal heights (∼≥0.80 R {sub S} < 1.10 R {sub S}). Thus, we conclude that the CME-driven shock was possibly capable of producing the high-energy particle event. However, since the peaks of some flare components are found to be strongly associated with the fundamental phase of the type II burst, the preceding flare is supposed to contribute to the shock acceleration process.

  2. Peripapillary and posterior scleral mechanics--part I: development of an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model.

    PubMed

    Girard, Michaël J A; Downs, J Crawford; Burgoyne, Claude F; Suh, J-K Francis

    2009-05-01

    The sclera is the white outer shell and principal load-bearing tissue of the eye as it sustains the intraocular pressure. We have hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the posterior sclera play a significant role in and are altered by the development of glaucoma-an ocular disease manifested by structural damage to the optic nerve head. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of the posterior sclera under acute elevations of intraocular pressure. The constitutive model is derived from fiber-reinforced composite theory, and incorporates stretch-induced stiffening of the reinforcing collagen fibers. Collagen fiber alignment was assumed to be multidirectional at local material points, confined within the plane tangent to the scleral surface, and described by the semicircular von Mises distribution. The introduction of a model parameter, namely, the fiber concentration factor, was used to control collagen fiber alignment along a preferred fiber orientation. To investigate the effects of scleral collagen fiber alignment on the overall behaviors of the posterior sclera and optic nerve head, finite element simulations of an idealized eye were performed. The four output quantities analyzed were the scleral canal expansion, the scleral canal twist, the posterior scleral canal deformation, and the posterior laminar deformation. A circumferential fiber organization in the sclera restrained scleral canal expansion but created posterior laminar deformation, whereas the opposite was observed with a meridional fiber organization. Additionally, the fiber concentration factor acted as an amplifying parameter on the considered outputs. The present model simulation suggests that the posterior sclera has a large impact on the overall behavior of the optic nerve head. It is therefore primordial to provide accurate mechanical properties for this tissue. In a companion paper (Girard, Downs, Bottlang, Burgoyne, and Suh, 2009

  3. Anisotropic ray trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  4. The 1997 GLE as seen by the Antarctic Laboratory for Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massetti, Stefano

    The first relativistic solar cosmic-ray event of the on-going solar activity cycle (n. 23) occurred on November 6, 1997. Data, obtained with the standard neutron monitor (6-NM-64) of LARC (Antarctic Laboratory for Cosmic Rays - South Shetlands - King George Island - Ardley Cove: 62°12'09" S, 58°57'42" W; geomagnetic rigidity cut-off about 3 GV), are reported to show the ground level enhancement (GLE) registered by the Chile/Italy collaboration in the frame of the International Decade for Scientific Cooperation in Antarctica (1991-2000).

  5. Finite-element modeling of layered, anisotropic composite plates and shells: A review of recent research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Finite element papers published in the open literature on the static bending and free vibration of layered, anisotropic, and composite plates and shells are reviewed. A literature review of large-deflection bending and large-amplitude free oscillations of layered composite plates and shells is also presented. Non-finite element literature is cited for continuity of the discussion.

  6. Finite-element modeling of layered, anisotropic composite plates and shells: A review of recent research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Finite element papers published in the open literature on the static bending and free vibration of layered, anisotropic, and composite plates and shells are reviewed. A literature review of large-deflection bending and large-amplitude free oscillations of layered composite plates and shells is also presented. Non-finite element literature is cited for continuity of the discussion.

  7. Anisotropic power-law inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Watanabe, Masa-aki E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-12-01

    We study an inflationary scenario in supergravity model with a gauge kinetic function. We find exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solutions when both the potential function for an inflaton and the gauge kinetic function are exponential type. The dynamical system analysis tells us that the anisotropic power-law inflation is an attractor for a large parameter region.

  8. SGLOBE-rani: a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A.; Chang, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic S velocity structure (SGLOBE-rani) based on ~43,000,000 surface-wave and ~420,000 bodywave travel time measurements, which is expanded in spherical harmonic basis functions up to degree 35. We incorporate crustal thickness perturbations as model parameters in the inversions to properly consider crustal effects and suppress the leakage of crustal structure into mantle structure. This is possible since we utilize short-period group velocity data with a period range down to 16 s, which are strongly sensitive to the crust. The isotropic S-velocity model shares common features with previous global S-velocity models and shows excellent consistency with several high-resolution upper mantle models. Our anisotropic model also agrees well with previous regional studies. Nevertheless, our new model of 3-D radial anisotropy shows some features not seen in previous whole-mantle models, such as faster SV velocity anomalies along subduction zones at transition zone depths and faster SH velocity beneath slabs in the lower mantle. The derived crustal thickness perturbations also bring potentially important information about the crustal thickness beneath oceanic crusts, which has been difficult to constrain due to poor access compared with continental crusts. We interpret our results in terms of mineralogy and geodynamical processes in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle.

  9. Surface tensions of linear and branched alkanes from Monte Carlo simulations using the anisotropic united atom model.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Goujon, F; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2008-11-06

    The anisotropic united atoms (AUA4) model has been used for linear and branched alkanes to predict the surface tension as a function of temperature by Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations are carried out for n-alkanes ( n-C5, n-C6, n-C7, and n-C10) and for two branched C7 isomers (2,3-dimethylpentane and 2,4-dimethylpentane). Different operational expressions of the surface tension using both the thermodynamic and the mechanical definitions have been applied. The simulated surface tensions with the AUA4 model are found to be consistent within both definitions and in good agreement with experiments.

  10. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental United-State (US) has reached its eastern part, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave (Vs) model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. We here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of Vs for NA based entirely on SEM-based numerical waveforms from an augmented dataset of 155 regional events and 70 teleseismic events. The forward wavefield computations are performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic Vs model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). To model teleseismic wavefields within our regional computational domain, we developed a new modeling technique which allows us to replace a distant source by virtual sources at the boundary of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). Computing virtual sources requires one global simulation per teleseismic events.We then compare two models obtained: one using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and another using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels

  11. The GLE-associated flare of 21 August, 1979. [ground level event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Kahler, S. W.; Cane, h. V.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Howard, R. A.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of ground-based and satellite measurements is to identify the source of the ground level event (GLE) beginning near 06:30 UT on 21 August, 1979 as the 2B flare with maximum at about 06:15 UT in McMath region 16218. This flare differed from previous GLE-associated flares in that it lacked a prominent impulsive phase, having a peak about 9 GHz burst flux density of only 27 sfu and a greater than 10 keV peak hard X-ray flux of less than about 3 x 10 to the -6th ergs/sq cm/s. Also, McMath 16218 was magnetically less complex than the active regions in which previous cosmic-ray flares have occurred, containing essentially only a single sunspot with a rudimentary penumbra. The flare was associated with a high speed mass ejection observed by the NRL white light coronagraph aboard P78-1 and a shock accelerated (SA) event observed by the low frequency radio astronomy experiment on ISEE-3.

  12. COMPOUND TWIN CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2012 MAY 17 GLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, C.; Wang, Yuming; Li, G.; Kong, X.; Hu, J.; Sun, X. D.; Ding, L.; Chen, Y.; Xia, L.

    2013-02-15

    We report a multiple spacecraft observation of the 2012 May 17 GLE event. Using the coronagraph observations by SOHO/LASCO, STEREO-A/COR1, and STEREO-B/COR1, we identify two eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred in the same active region and close in time ({approx}2 minutes) in the 2012 May 17 GLE event. Both CMEs were fast. Complicated radio emissions, with multiple type II episodes, were observed from ground-based stations: Learmonth and BIRS, as well as the WAVES instrument on board the Wind spacecraft. High time-resolution SDO/AIA imaging data and SDO/HMI vector magnetic field data were also examined. A complicated pre-eruption magnetic field configuration, consisting of twisted flux-tube structure, is reconstructed. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) up to several hundred MeV nucleon{sup -1} were detected in this event. Although the eruption source region was near the west limb, the event led to ground-level enhancement. The existence of two fast CMEs and the observation of high-energy particles with ground-level enhancement agrees well with a recently proposed 'twin CME' scenario.

  13. Relativistic Electrons in Ground-Level Enhanced (GLE) Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. F.; Tylka, A. J.; Novikova, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-level enhanced (GLE) solar particle events are one of the most spectacular manifestations of solar activity, with protons accelerated to multi-GeV energies in minutes. Although GLEs have been observed for more than sixty years, the processes by which the particle acceleration takes place remain controversial. Relativistic electrons provide another means of investigating the nature of the particle accelerator, since some processes that can efficiently accelerate protons and ions are less attractive candidates for electron acceleration. We report on observations of relativistic electrons, at ~0.5 - 5 MeV, during GLEs of 1976-2005, using data from the University of Chicago’s Cosmic Ray Nuclei Experiment (CRNE) on IMP-8, whose electron response has recently been calibrated using GEANT-4 simulations (Novikova et al. 2010). In particular, we examine onset times, temporal structure, fluences, and spectra of electrons in GLEs and compare them with comparable quantities for relativistic protons derived from neutron monitors. We discuss the implications of these comparisons for the nature of the particle acceleration process. We also compare relativistic electrons in GLEs to those in other, non-GLE SEP events with very large proton fluences above 30 MeV. Supported by ONR and by NASA LWS/TRT under DPR NNH09AL11I.

  14. Analysis of Ground Level Enhancements (GLE): Extreme solar energetic particle events have hard spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvestari, E.; Willamo, T.; Gil, A.; Usoskin, I. G.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mayorov, A.

    2017-08-01

    Nearly 70 Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic rays have been recorded by the worldwide neutron monitor network since the 1950s depicting a big variety of energy spectra of solar energetic particles (SEP). Here we studied a statistical relation between the event-integrated intensity of GLEs (calculated as count-rate relative excess, averaged over all available polar neutron monitors, and expressed in percent-hours) and the hardness of the solar particle energy spectra. For each event the integral omnidirectional event-integrated fluences of particles with energy above 30 MeV (F30) and above 200 MeV (F200) were computed using the reconstructed spectra, and the ratio between the two fluences was considered as a simple index of the event's hardness. We also provided a justification of the spectrum estimate in the form of the Band-function, using direct PAMELA data for GLE 71 (17-May-2012). We found that, while there is no clear relation between the intensity and the hardness for weak events, all strong events with the intensity greater 100 %∗h are characterized by a very hard spectrum. This implies that a hard spectrum can be securely assumed for all extreme GLE events, e.g., those studied using cosmogenic isotope data in the past.

  15. The GLE-associated flare of 21 August, 1979. [ground level event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Kahler, S. W.; Cane, h. V.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Howard, R. A.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of ground-based and satellite measurements is to identify the source of the ground level event (GLE) beginning near 06:30 UT on 21 August, 1979 as the 2B flare with maximum at about 06:15 UT in McMath region 16218. This flare differed from previous GLE-associated flares in that it lacked a prominent impulsive phase, having a peak about 9 GHz burst flux density of only 27 sfu and a greater than 10 keV peak hard X-ray flux of less than about 3 x 10 to the -6th ergs/sq cm/s. Also, McMath 16218 was magnetically less complex than the active regions in which previous cosmic-ray flares have occurred, containing essentially only a single sunspot with a rudimentary penumbra. The flare was associated with a high speed mass ejection observed by the NRL white light coronagraph aboard P78-1 and a shock accelerated (SA) event observed by the low frequency radio astronomy experiment on ISEE-3.

  16. Solid-State Constitutive Modelling of Glassy Polymers: Coupling the Rolie-Poly Equations for Melts with Anisotropic Viscoplastic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Focatiis, Davide S. A.; Embery, John; Buckley, C. Paul

    2008-07-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of a well-characterised monodisperse grade of entangled atactic polystyrene across a very wide temperature and strain rate range through linear and non-linear melt rheology and solid-state deformation. In an effort to construct a constitutive model for large deformations able to describe rheological response right across this wide timescale, two well-established rheological models are combined: the well known RoliePoly (RP) conformational melt model and the Oxford glass-rubber constitutive model for glassy polymers. Comparisons between experimental data and simulations from a numerical implementation of the model illustrate that the model can cope well with the range of deformations in which orientation is limited to length-scales longer than an entanglement length. One approach in which the model can be expanded to incorporate the effects of orientation on shorter length scales using anisotropic viscoplastic flow is briefly discussed.

  17. Solid-State Constitutive Modelling of Glassy Polymers: Coupling the Rolie-Poly Equations for Melts with Anisotropic Viscoplastic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    De Focatiis, Davide S. A.; Buckley, C. Paul; Embery, John

    2008-07-07

    This paper investigates the behaviour of a well-characterised monodisperse grade of entangled atactic polystyrene across a very wide temperature and strain rate range through linear and non-linear melt rheology and solid-state deformation. In an effort to construct a constitutive model for large deformations able to describe rheological response right across this wide timescale, two well-established rheological models are combined: the well known RoliePoly (RP) conformational melt model and the Oxford glass-rubber constitutive model for glassy polymers. Comparisons between experimental data and simulations from a numerical implementation of the model illustrate that the model can cope well with the range of deformations in which orientation is limited to length-scales longer than an entanglement length. One approach in which the model can be expanded to incorporate the effects of orientation on shorter length scales using anisotropic viscoplastic flow is briefly discussed.

  18. Anisotropic resistivity tomography: A model study for characterization of fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka

    1994-12-31

    Since fractured rocks often exhibit anisotropy with respect to hydraulic conductivity, it is expected that anisotropy may play an important factor in describing their electrical properties. Based upon this observation, numerical experiments have been carried out to determine whether anisotropic resistivity tomography can be used for characterization of fractured rocks. In fractured rock masses, the conventional 2-D inversion in which anisotropy is ignored produces peculiar distortions of the resistivity distribution. In contrast, the inversion accounting for anisotropy reconstructs anisotropic background media, as well as conductive anomalies associated with the zones of concentrated fracturing. It is also found that the fracture planes inclined with respect to the strike direction may have no significant effects on 2-D inversion if the angle is within about 20{degree}.

  19. Anisotropic plasticity of MgSiO3 post-perovskite from atomic scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryaeva, Alexandra; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to the lower mantle, the D″ layer exhibits significant seismic anisotropy both at the global and local scale [1]. Located right above the CMB, the D'' represents a very complex region and the causes of its pronounced anisotropy are still debated (CPO, oriented inclusions, layering, thermo-chemical heterogeneities etc). Among them, contribution of the post-perovskite rheology is commonly considered to be substantial. However, for this high-pressure phase, information about mechanical properties, probable slip systems, dislocations and their behavior under stress are still extremely challenging to obtain directly from experiments [3, 4]. Thus, we propose employing full atomistic modeling (based on the pairwise potential previously derived by [2]) to access the ability of MgSiO3 post-perovskite to deform by dislocation glide at 120 GPa. Lattice friction opposed to the dislocation glide in MgSiO3 post-perovskite is shown to be highly anisotropic. Thus, remarkably low values of Peierls stress (1 GPa) are found for the glide of [100] screw dislocations in (010), while glide in (001) requires almost 18 times larger stress values. In general, (010) plane is characterized by the lowest lattice friction which suggests (010) deformation textures. Comparison of our results with previous study of MgSiO3 perovskite (bridgmanite) [5], based on similar simulation approach, clearly shows that monotonous increase in Peierls stress of bridgmanite will be followed by a dramatic drop after the phase transition to the post-perovskite phase, which consequently suggests the D'' located at the CMB to be weaker than the overlying mantle. In addition to that, the observed evolution of CRSS with temperature clearly demonstrates that post-perovskite deforms in the athermal regime which backs up it to be a very weak phase and indicates its deformation by dislocation glide in contrast to high-lattice friction perovskite (bridgmanite) phase deformed by climb only. References [1

  20. Models of collapsing and expanding anisotropic gravitating source in f( R, T) theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, G.; Ahmed, Riaz

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we have formulated the exact solutions of the non-static anisotropic gravitating source in f( R, T) gravity which may lead to expansion and collapse. By assuming there to be no thermal conduction in gravitating source, we have determined parametric solutions in f( R, T) gravity with a non-static spherical geometry filled using an anisotropic fluid. We have examined the ranges of the parameters for which the expansion scalar becomes negative and positive, leading to collapse and expansion, respectively. Further, using the definition of the mass function, the conditions for the trapped surface have been explored, and it has been investigated that there exists a single horizon in this case. The impact of the coupling parameter λ has been discussed in detail in both cases. For the various values of the coupling parameter λ , we have plotted the energy density, anisotropic pressure and anisotropy parameter in the cases of collapse and expansion. The physical significance of the graphs has been explained in detail.

  1. The tight binding model study of the role of anisotropic AFM spin ordering in the charge ordered CMR manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, J. K.; Panda, Saswati; Rout, G. C.

    2017-05-01

    We propose here a tight binding model study of the interplay between charge and spin orderings in the CMR manganites taking anisotropic effect due to electron hoppings and spin exchanges. The Hamiltonian consists of the kinetic energies of eg and t2g electrons of manganese ion. It further includes double exchange and Heisenberg interactions. The charge density wave interaction (CDW) describes an extra mechanism for the insulating character of the system. The CDW gap and spin parameters are calculated using Zubarev's Green's function technique and computed self-consistently. The results are reported in this communication.

  2. Propagation of partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams through an apertured astigmatic optical system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Hu, Li

    2006-03-15

    By expanding the hard-aperture function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions, we derived an approximate analytical formula for a partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (AGSM) beam propagating through an apertured paraxial general astigmatic (GA) optical system by use of a tensor method. The results obtained by using the approximate analytical formula are in good agreement with those obtained by using the numerical integral calculation. Our formulas avoid time-consuming numerical integration and provide a convenient and effective way for studying the propagation and transformation of a partially coherent twisted AGSM beam through an apertured paraxial GA optical system.

  3. The Spaghetti Model of the Turbulent Solar Wind: Implications for the Scaling of Anisotropic Magnetic Fluctuations and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Smith, C.; Vasquez, B.

    2010-11-01

    There has been a steady accumulation of observational evidence that the solar wind may be thought of as spaghetti: a network of individual magnetic flux tubes each with its own magnetic and plasma characteristics. As early as 1963, Parker referred to these tubes as magnetic and plasma ``filaments,'' and the picture has undergone several refinements since then [Bartley et al. 1966, Marliani et al. 1973, Tu and Marsch 1990, Bruno et al. 2001], culminating in the recent work of Borovsky [2008] who has suggested that these are fossil structures that originate at the solar surface. We use the weakly compressible MHD turbulence model [Bhattacharjee et al., 1998], which incorporates the effect of background spatial inhomogeneities, to describe such structures. We revisit the model equations, showing their relation to recent work by Hunana and Zank [2010]. For a model of interchange-instability driven turbulence, we then use the 1998 model equations to make predictions for the beta scaling of the anisotropic magnetic fluctuation spectra (the so-called variance anisotropy) observed by ACE, and show that the predictions bracket the observations well. We also predict the scaling of the anisotropic transport coefficients for particles and thermal energy.

  4. Modelling Orthorhombic Anisotropic Effects for Reservoir Fracture Characterization of a Naturally Fractured Tight Carbonate Reservoir, Onshore Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinowo, Olawale Olakunle; Chapman, Mark; Bell, Rebecca; Lynn, Heloise B.

    2017-09-01

    In this study we present a step-by-step theoretical modelling approach, using established seismic wave propagation theories in anisotropic media, to generate unique anisotropic reflection patterns observed from three-dimensional pure-mode pressure (3D-PP), full-azimuth and full-offset seismic reflection data acquired over a naturally fractured tight carbonate field, onshore Texas, USA. Our aim is to gain an insight into the internal structures of the carbonate reservoir responsible for the observed anisotropic reflection patterns. From the generated model we were able to establish that the observed field seismic reflection patterns indicate azimuthal anisotropy in the form of crack induced shear-wave splitting and variation in P-wave velocity with offset and azimuth. Amplitude variation with azimuth (AVAZ) analysis also confirmed multi-crack sets induced anisotropy which is characteristic of orthorhombic symmetry, evident as multiple bright and dim-amplitude azimuth directions as well as complete reversal of bright-amplitude to dim-amplitude azimuth direction as the angle of incidence increases from near (≤15°) to mid (≥30°) offsets. Finally, we fitted the generated P-wave velocity into an ellipse to determine the intensity and orientation (N26E) of the open crack set as well as the direction of the minimum in situ stress axis (N116E) within the reservoir. The derived information served as an aid for the design of horizontal well paths that would intercept open fractures and ensure production optimization of the carbonate reservoir, which was on production decline despite reservoir studies that indicate un-depleted reserves.

  5. An anisotropic phase-field model for solid-state dewetting and its sharp-interface limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziwnik, Marion; Münch, Andreas; Wagner, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    We propose a two-dimensional phase field model for solid state dewetting where the surface energy is weakly anisotropic. The evolution is described by the Cahn–Hilliard equation with a bi-quadratic degenerate mobility together with a bulk free energy based on a double-well potential and a free boundary condition at the film-substrate contact line. We derive the corresponding sharp interface limit via matched asymptotic analysis involving multiple inner layers. We show that in contrast to the frequently used quadratic degenerate mobility, the resulting sharp interface model for the bi-quatratic mobility is consistent with the pure surface diffusion model. In addition, we show that natural boundary conditions at the substrate obtained from the first variation of the total free energy including contributions at the substrate imply a contact angle condition in the sharp-interface limit which recovers the Young–Herring equation in the anisotropic and Young’s equation in the isotropic case, as well as a balance of fluxes at the contact line (or contact point).

  6. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  7. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  8. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  9. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  10. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  11. Anisotropic elasticity of silicon and its application to the modelling of X-ray optics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Barrett, Raymond; Cloetens, Peter; Detlefs, Carsten; Sanchez del Rio, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The crystal lattice of single-crystal silicon gives rise to anisotropic elasticity. The stiffness and compliance coefficient matrix depend on crystal orientation and, consequently, Young’s modulus, the shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio as well. Computer codes (in Matlab and Python) have been developed to calculate these anisotropic elasticity parameters for a silicon crystal in any orientation. These codes facilitate the evaluation of these anisotropy effects in silicon for applications such as microelectronics, microelectromechanical systems and X-ray optics. For mechanically bent X-ray optics, it is shown that the silicon crystal orientation is an important factor which may significantly influence the optics design and manufacturing phase. Choosing the appropriate crystal orientation can both lead to improved performance whilst lowering mechanical bending stresses. The thermal deformation of the crystal depends on Poisson’s ratio. For an isotropic constant Poisson’s ratio, ν, the thermal deformation (RMS slope) is proportional to (1 + ν). For a cubic anisotropic material, the thermal deformation of the X-ray optics can be approximately simulated by using the average of ν12 and ν13 as an effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio, where the direction 1 is normal to the optic surface, and the directions 2 and 3 are two normal orthogonal directions parallel to the optical surface. This average is independent of the direction in the optical surface (the crystal plane) for Si(100), Si(110) and Si(111). Using the effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio for these orientations leads to an error in thermal deformation smaller than 5.5%. PMID:24763640

  12. Anisotropic elasticity of silicon and its application to the modelling of X-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Barrett, Raymond; Cloetens, Peter; Detlefs, Carsten; Sanchez Del Rio, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The crystal lattice of single-crystal silicon gives rise to anisotropic elasticity. The stiffness and compliance coefficient matrix depend on crystal orientation and, consequently, Young's modulus, the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio as well. Computer codes (in Matlab and Python) have been developed to calculate these anisotropic elasticity parameters for a silicon crystal in any orientation. These codes facilitate the evaluation of these anisotropy effects in silicon for applications such as microelectronics, microelectromechanical systems and X-ray optics. For mechanically bent X-ray optics, it is shown that the silicon crystal orientation is an important factor which may significantly influence the optics design and manufacturing phase. Choosing the appropriate crystal orientation can both lead to improved performance whilst lowering mechanical bending stresses. The thermal deformation of the crystal depends on Poisson's ratio. For an isotropic constant Poisson's ratio, ν, the thermal deformation (RMS slope) is proportional to (1 + ν). For a cubic anisotropic material, the thermal deformation of the X-ray optics can be approximately simulated by using the average of ν12 and ν13 as an effective isotropic Poisson's ratio, where the direction 1 is normal to the optic surface, and the directions 2 and 3 are two normal orthogonal directions parallel to the optical surface. This average is independent of the direction in the optical surface (the crystal plane) for Si(100), Si(110) and Si(111). Using the effective isotropic Poisson's ratio for these orientations leads to an error in thermal deformation smaller than 5.5%.

  13. A general and predictive model of anisotropic grain boundary energy and morphology for polycrystal-level simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnels, Brandon; Beyerlein, Irene; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    In this work, a new model for anisotropic GB energy and morphology is formulated that is fast, general, dependent on only three material parameters, and is verified by comparison with more than 40 MD and experimental datasets for (a)symmetric, tilt/twist, FCC/BCC materials, as well as experimental measurements. A relaxation algorithm is presented that is able to efficiently compute the optimal facet pattern and corresponding relaxed energy. Finally, the GB model is implemented as an interface model in a polycrystal simulation to observe the effects of GB in conjunction with elastic and plastic deformation. The simulations are compared with those using an isotropic GB model, and the effect of the GB isotropy on the bulk properties and microstructure is determined. The results have applications towards, e.g., improved polycrystal simulations, understanding void nucleation, and GB engineering.

  14. Experimental Investigation of the Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of a Columnar Jointed Rock Mass: Observations from Laboratory-Based Physical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Zhang, J. C.; Xu, W. Y.; Wang, R. B.; Wang, H. L.; Yan, L.; Lin, Z. N.

    2017-07-01

    Because of the complex geological structure, determination of the field mechanical parameters of the columnar jointed rock mass (CJRM) was a challenging task in the design and construction of the Baihetan hydropower plant. To model the mechanical behaviour of the CJRM, uniaxial compression tests were conducted on artificial CJRM specimens with geological structure similar to that found in the actual CJRM. Based on the test results, the anisotropic deformation and strength were mainly analysed. The empirical correlations of evaluating the field mechanical parameters were derived based on the joint factor approach and the modulus reduction factor method. The findings of the physical model tests were then used to estimate the field moduli and unconfined compressive strengths of the Baihetan CJRM. The results predicted by physical model tests were compared with those obtained from the field tests and the RMR classification system. It is concluded that physical model tests were capable of providing valuable estimations on the field mechanical parameters of the CJRM.

  15. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of directionally solidified and single crystal alloys is perhaps the most important recent advancement in hot section materials technology. The objective is to develop knowledge that enables the designer to improve anisotropic gas turbine parts to their full potential. Two single crystal alloys selected were PWA 1480 and Alloy 185. The coatings selected were an overlay coating, PWA 286, and an aluminide diffusion coating, PWA 273. The constitutive specimens were solid and cylindrical; the fatigue specimens were hollow and cylindrical. Two thicknesses of substrate are utilized. Specimens of both thickness (0.4 and 1.5 mm) will be coated and then tested for tensile, creep, and fatigue properties.

  16. Investigation of the ultrasonic attenuation in anisotropic weld materials with finite element modeling and grain-scale material description.

    PubMed

    Lhuillier, P E; Chassignole, B; Oudaa, M; Kerhervé, S O; Rupin, F; Fouquet, T

    2017-03-08

    A finite element modeling approach of ultrasonic propagation combined with a description of the microstructure at the scale of the grains has been implemented. The simulations seek to determine the contribution of scattering to the ultrasonic attenuation in polycrystalline materials. The approach is applied to anisotropic microstructures exhibiting both elongated grains and transversely isotropic crystallographic texture which can be found in multipass welds. The ultrasonic propagation is computed with the 2D finite element code ATHENA 2D. The description of the propagation media accounts for the geometric, elastic and crystallographic properties of anisotropic welds. The study is focused on two types of welds made of austenitic 316L stainless steel and Ni-based alloy (182). The attenuation was computed from the decay of multiple backwall echoes. The contribution of the microstructure scattering was isolated by a correction of the attenuation data with the attenuation obtained in an equivalent homogenized material. The simulation investigates the attenuation as a function of several parameters: grain orientation and size, ultrasonic frequency, or anisotropy level. The attenuation level of elastic pressure waves was specifically examined as a function of the angle between the propagation direction and the grain orientation. The evolution of the attenuation is consistent with the theoretical models. Moreover the simulation results were compared to experimental data available from the literature in 316L stainless steel welds. The simulated and experimental values are in very good agreement.

  17. Modeling and design of two-dimensional membrane-type active acoustic metamaterials with tunable anisotropic density.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ahmed; Elsabbagh, Adel; Akl, Wael

    2016-11-01

    A two-dimensional active acoustic metamaterial with controllable anisotropic density is introduced. The material consists of composite lead-lead zirconate titanate plates clamped to an aluminum structure with air as the background fluid. The effective anisotropic density of the material is controlled, independently for two orthogonal directions, by means of an external static electric voltage signal. The material is used in the construction of a reconfigurable waveguide capable of controlling the direction of the acoustic waves propagating through it. An analytic model based on the acoustic two-port theory, the theory of piezoelectricity, the laminated pre-stressed plate theory, and the S-parameters retrieval method is developed to predict the behavior of the material. The results are verified using the finite element method. Excellent agreement is found between both models for the studied frequency and voltage ranges. The results show that, below 1600 Hz, the density is controllable within orders of magnitude relative to the uncontrolled case. The results also suggest that simple controllers could be used to program the material density toward full control of the directivity and dispersion characteristics of acoustic waves.

  18. Numerically modelling the Cygnus Loop as a remnant evolved in an anisotropic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun; Yu, Huan; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of the middle-aged supernova remnant, Cygnus Loop, seen in X-rays, is peculiar, with a blowout in the south region and other irregular features, such as a bump in the west, a limb with a planar morphology in the east and asymmetry between the east and the west shock profiles of the blowout. The detailed process of the formation of the peculiar profile of the shock is still unclear. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations for the remnant to revisit its evolution. In the simulations, the progenitor ejects an anisotropic, latitude-dependent wind, and travels in a direction that is not aligned with the symmetry axis of the wind. As a result, a cavity with a fringed structure is produced. The remnant has evolved in the cavity for about 104 yr. In the north-east, the shock has first encountered the bow shock, and this part corresponds to the bright north-eastern region. The south blowout is formed due to the shock travelling into the undisturbed wind, and the interaction of the shock with the cavity leads to the other peculiar features of the shock structure. The resulting profile of the remnant is consistent with that indicated in X-rays. It can be concluded that the supernova explosion occurred in the cavity produced by an anisotropic stellar wind experiencing two main phases with different wind velocities.

  19. Anisotropic string cosmological model in Brans–Dicke theory of gravitation with time-dependent deceleration parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Maurya, D. Ch. Zia, R. Pradhan, A.

    2016-10-15

    We discuss a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic string cosmological models in the Brans–Dicke theory of gravitation. For a spatially homogeneous metric, it is assumed that the expansion scalar θ is proportional to the shear scalar σ. This condition leads to A = kB{sup m}, where k and m are constants. With these assumptions and also assuming a variable scale factor a = a(t), we find solutions of the Brans–Dicke field equations. Various phenomena like the Big Bang, expanding universe, and shift from anisotropy to isotropy are observed in the model. It can also be seen that in early stage of the evolution of the universe, strings dominate over particles, whereas the universe is dominated by massive strings at the late time. Some physical and geometrical behaviors of the models are also discussed and observed to be in good agreement with the recent observations of SNe la supernovae.

  20. Anisotropic string cosmological model in Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation with time-dependent deceleration parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, D. Ch.; Zia, R.; Pradhan, A.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic string cosmological models in the Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation. For a spatially homogeneous metric, it is assumed that the expansion scalar θ is proportional to the shear scalar σ. This condition leads to A = kB m , where k and m are constants. With these assumptions and also assuming a variable scale factor a = a( t), we find solutions of the Brans-Dicke field equations. Various phenomena like the Big Bang, expanding universe, and shift from anisotropy to isotropy are observed in the model. It can also be seen that in early stage of the evolution of the universe, strings dominate over particles, whereas the universe is dominated by massive strings at the late time. Some physical and geometrical behaviors of the models are also discussed and observed to be in good agreement with the recent observations of SNe la supernovae.

  1. Cracking on anisotropic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, A. M.; Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of cracking of a local anisotropic neutron star (NS) due to small density fluctuations. It is assumed that the neutron star core consists of leptons, nucleons and hyperons. The relativistic mean field model is used to describe the core of equation of state (EOS). For the crust, we use the EOS introduced by Miyatsu et al. [1]. Furthermore, two models are used to describe pressure anisotropic in neutron star matter. One is proposed by Doneva-Yazadjiev (DY) [2] and the other is proposed by Herrera-Barreto (HB) [3]. The anisotropic parameter of DY and HB models are adjusted in order the predicted maximum mass compatible to the mass of PSR J1614-2230 [4] and PSR J0348+0432 [5]. We have found that cracking can potentially present in the region close to the neutron star surface. The instability due cracking is quite sensitive to the NS mass and anisotropic parameter used.

  2. Resolution of anisotropic and shielded highly conductive layers using 2-D electromagnetic modelling in the Rhine Graben and Black Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezkan, Bülent; Červ, Václav; Pek, Josef

    1992-12-01

    Anisotropy in magnetotelluric (MT) data has been found very often and has been explained as the result of local structures of different conductivities. In this paper, an observed anisotropy in MT data is not interpreted qualitatively in terms of local structures but is modelled quantitatively by a quasi-anisotropic layer. Besides the MT transfer functions, measurements of the vertical magnetic component are required. The second goal of this paper is to describe a method which permits the resolution of mid-crustal conductive layers in the presence of an additional high-conductivity layer at the surface. This method is possible in a two-dimensional (2-D) situation that limits the spatial extension of the surface structure. Again, vertical magnetic field recordings are necessary, but the phase of the E-polarization with respect to the 2-D structure is the most sensitive parameter. Using two field sites in Southern Germany, it has been possible to give a quantitative explanation of anisotropy and an improved depth resolution, and to derive an integrated conductivity of the highly conductive mid-crustal layers using MT and geomagnetic depth sounding data. The anisotropic highly conductive layer is located 12 km beneath the poorly conductive Black Forest crystalline rocks, whereas it is at a depth of 6 km beneath the highly conductive Rhine Graben sediments.

  3. Measurements of ultrasound velocity and attenuation in numerical anisotropic porous media compared to Biot's and multiple scattering models.

    PubMed

    Mézière, Fabien; Muller, Marie; Bossy, Emmanuel; Derode, Arnaud

    2014-07-01

    This article quantitatively investigates ultrasound propagation in numerical anisotropic porous media with finite-difference simulations in 3D. The propagation media consist of clusters of ellipsoidal scatterers randomly distributed in water, mimicking the anisotropic structure of cancellous bone. Velocities and attenuation coefficients of the ensemble-averaged transmitted wave (also known as the coherent wave) are measured in various configurations. As in real cancellous bone, one or two longitudinal modes emerge, depending on the micro-structure. The results are confronted with two standard theoretical approaches: Biot's theory, usually invoked in porous media, and the Independent Scattering Approximation (ISA), a classical first-order approach of multiple scattering theory. On the one hand, when only one longitudinal wave is observed, it is found that at porosities higher than 90% the ISA successfully predicts the attenuation coefficient (unlike Biot's theory), as well as the existence of negative dispersion. On the other hand, the ISA is not well suited to study two-wave propagation, unlike Biot's model, at least as far as wave speeds are concerned. No free fitting parameters were used for the application of Biot's theory. Finally we investigate the phase-shift between waves in the fluid and the solid structure, and compare them to Biot's predictions of in-phase and out-of-phase motions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of anisotropic turbulence on average polarizability of Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams through ocean link.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Minyu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the spatial power spectrum of the refractive index of anisotropic turbulence, the average polarizability of the Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams and lateral coherence length of the spherical wave propagating through the ocean water channel are derived. Numerical results show that, in strong temperature fluctuation, the depolarization effects of anisotropic turbulence are inferior to isotropic turbulence, as the other parameters of two links are the same. The depolarization effects of salinity fluctuation are less than the effects of the temperature fluctuation; the average polarizability of beams increases when increasing the inner scale of turbulence and the source's transverse size; and the larger rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid enhances the average polarizability of beams. The region of the receiving radius is smaller than the characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is smaller than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. However, the receiving radius region is larger than a characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is larger than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence.

  5. Modeling the Infrared Reverberation Response of the Circumnuclear Dusty Torus in AGNs: The Effects of Cloud Orientation and Anisotropic Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeyda, Triana; Robinson, Andrew; Richmond, Michael; Vazquez, Billy; Nikutta, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The obscuring circumnuclear torus of dusty molecular gas is one of the major components of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The torus can be studied by analyzing the time response of its infrared (IR) dust emission to variations in the AGN continuum luminosity, a technique known as reverberation mapping. The IR response is the convolution of the AGN ultraviolet/optical light curve with a transfer function that contains information about the size, geometry, and structure of the torus. Here, we describe a new computer model that simulates the reverberation response of a clumpy torus. Given an input optical light curve, the code computes the emission of a 3D ensemble of dust clouds as a function of time at selected IR wavelengths, taking into account light travel delays. We present simulated dust emission responses at 3.6, 4.5, and 30 μm that explore the effects of various geometrical and structural properties, dust cloud orientation, and anisotropy of the illuminating radiation field. We also briefly explore the effects of cloud shadowing (clouds are shielded from the AGN continuum source). Example synthetic light curves have also been generated, using the observed optical light curve of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 6418 as input. The torus response is strongly wavelength-dependent, due to the gradient in cloud surface temperature within the torus, and because the cloud emission is strongly anisotropic at shorter wavelengths. Anisotropic illumination of the torus also significantly modifies the torus response, reducing the lag between the IR and optical variations.

  6. Anisotropic viscoelastic shell modeling technique of copper patterns/photoimageable solder resist composite for warpage simulation of multi-layer printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Joo, Sung-Jun; Kwak, Dong-Ok; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the warpage simulation of a multi-layer printed circuit board (PCB) was performed as a function of various copper (Cu) patterns/photoimageable solder resist (PSR) composite patterns and their anisotropic viscoelastic properties. The thermo-mechanical properties of Cu/PSR patterns were obtained from finite element analysis (virtual test) and homogenized with anisotropic composite shell models that considered the viscoelastic properties. The multi-layer PCB model was simplified based on the unit Cu/PSR patterns and the warpage simulation during the reflow process was performed by using ABAQUS combined with a user-defined subroutine. From these results, it was demonstrated that the proposed anisotropic viscoelastic composite shell simulation technique can be successfully used to predict warpage of multi-layer PCBs during the reflow process.

  7. EM modelling of arbitrary shaped anisotropic dielectric objects using an efficient 3D leapfrog scheme on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, A.; Hachemi, M. El; Belouettar, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.

    2016-09-01

    The standard Yee algorithm is widely used in computational electromagnetics because of its simplicity and divergence free nature. A generalization of the classical Yee scheme to 3D unstructured meshes is adopted, based on the use of a Delaunay primal mesh and its high quality Voronoi dual. This allows the problem of accuracy losses, which are normally associated with the use of the standard Yee scheme and a staircased representation of curved material interfaces, to be circumvented. The 3D dual mesh leapfrog-scheme which is presented has the ability to model both electric and magnetic anisotropic lossy materials. This approach enables the modelling of problems, of current practical interest, involving structured composites and metamaterials.

  8. Effect of Shale Distribution on Hydrocarbon Sands Integrated with Anisotropic Rock Physics for AVA Modelling: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aamir; Zubair; Hussain, Matloob; Rehman, Khaista; Toqeer, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    Shales can be distributed in sand through four different ways; laminated, structural, dispersed and any combination of these aforementioned styles. A careful analysis of well log data is required for the determination of shale distribution in sand affecting its reservoir quality. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of shale distribution on reservoir quality of sands using well log data. The correlation of well data in terms of lithology has revealed four sand and three shale layers in Lower Goru Formation acting as a major reservoir in the study area. Our results indicate that the laminated type of shale distribution prevails at the Basal sand level, which does not affect its reservoir quality greatly. The remaining layers of variable vertical extent show a variety of shale distribution models affecting their reservoir quality adversely. We also present anisotropic rock physics modelling for AVA analysis at Basal sand level.

  9. Hard Spherocylinders of Two Different Lengths as a Model System of a Nematic Liquid Crystal on an Anisotropic Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Tomonori; Hyodo, Yosuke; Momoi, Yuichi; Kwak, Musun; Kang, Dongwoo; Choi, Youngseok; Nishioka, Akihiro; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we describe the effects of an anisotropic substrate on the alignment of a nematic liquid crystal. We examine how the substrate affects the alignment of a nematic liquid crystal by Monte Carlo simulation. The liquid crystal on a substrate was described by the phase separation of liquid crystal molecules and substrate molecules, both of which were modeled by hard particles. We used hard rods to represent both the liquid crystal and the substrate. The length of the hard rods representing the substrate was adjusted to represent the degree of substrate anisotropy. The results show that the nematic alignment could either be reinforced or weakened, depending on the length of the substrate rods. Mean field theory is used to analyze the simulation results. We confirmed that the distance over which the substrate affects the bulk liquid crystal is about 3 nm for the present hard-rod-based model.

  10. Anisotropic path modeling to assess pedestrian-evacuation potential from Cascadia-related tsunamis in the US Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent disasters highlight the threat that tsunamis pose to coastal communities. When developing tsunami-education efforts and vertical-evacuation strategies, emergency managers need to understand how much time it could take for a coastal population to reach higher ground before tsunami waves arrive. To improve efforts to model pedestrian evacuations from tsunamis, we examine the sensitivity of least-cost-distance models to variations in modeling approaches, data resolutions, and travel-rate assumptions. We base our observations on the assumption that an anisotropic approach that uses path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in slope is the most realistic of an actual evacuation landscape. We focus our efforts on the Long Beach Peninsula in Washington (USA), where a substantial residential and tourist population is threatened by near-field tsunamis related to a potential Cascadia subduction zone earthquake. Results indicate thousands of people are located in areas where evacuations to higher ground will be difficult before arrival of the first tsunami wave. Deviations from anisotropic modeling assumptions substantially influence the amount of time likely needed to reach higher ground. Across the entire study, changes in resolution of elevation data has a greater impact on calculated travel times than changes in land-cover resolution. In particular areas, land-cover resolution had a substantial impact when travel-inhibiting waterways were not reflected in small-scale data. Changes in travel-speed parameters had a substantial impact also, suggesting the importance of public-health campaigns as a tsunami risk-reduction strategy.

  11. Anisotropic solvent model of the lipid bilayer. 2. Energetics of insertion of small molecules, peptides and proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Andrei L.; Pogozheva, Irina; Mosberg, Henry I

    2011-01-01

    A new computational approach to calculating binding energies and spatial positions of small molecules, peptides and proteins in the lipid bilayer has been developed. The method combines an anisotropic solvent representation of the lipid bilayer and universal solvation model, which predicts transfer energies of molecules from water to an arbitrary medium with defined polarity properties. The universal solvation model accounts for hydrophobic, van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, and electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. The lipid bilayer is represented as a fluid anisotropic environment described by profiles of dielectric constant (ε), solvatochromic dipolarity parameter (π*), and hydrogen bonding acidity and basicity parameters (α and β). The polarity profiles were calculated using published distributions of quasi-molecular segments of lipids determined by neutron and X-ray scattering for DOPC bilayer and spin-labeling data that define concentration of water in the lipid acyl chain region. The model also accounts for the preferential solvation of charges and polar groups by water and includes the effect of the hydrophobic mismatch for transmembrane proteins. The method was tested on calculations of binding energies and preferential positions in membranes for small-molecules, peptides and peripheral membrane proteins that have been experimentally studied. The new theoretical approach was implemented in a new version (2.0) of our PPM program and applied for the large-scale calculations of spatial positions in membranes of more than 1000 peripheral and integral proteins. The results of calculations are deposited in the updated OPM database (http://opm.phar.umich.edu). PMID:21438606

  12. Evaluation of Bianchi type VI0 magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter in bimetric theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, M. S.; Ameen, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Bianchi type VI0 magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter have been studied by solving the Rosen's field equations in Bimetric theory of gravitation. The models corresponding to power law expansion and exponential law expansion have been evaluated and studied their nature geometrically and physically. It is seen that there is real visible matter (baryonic matter) suddenly appeared only for small interval of time 0.7 ≤ t < 0.7598 and for the remaining whole range of time t, there is dark energy matter in the universe. Our investigations are supported to the observational fact that the usual matter described by known particle theory is about 4% and the dark energy cause the accelerating expansion of the universe and several high precision observational experiments, especially the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropic Probe (WMAP) satellite experiment (see [C. L. Bennett et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 148 (2003) 1; WMAP Collab. (D. N. Spergel et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 148 (2003) 175; D. N. Spergel et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. 170 (2007) 377; WMAP Collab. (E. Komastu et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180 (2009) 330; WMAP Collab. (G. Hinshaw et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. 208 (2013) 19; Plank Collab. (P. A. R. Ade), arXiv:1303.5076; arXiv:1303.5082]) conclude that the dark energy occupies near about 73% of the energy of the universe and dark matter is about 23%. In exponential law of expansion, our model is fully occupied by real visible matter and there is no chance of dark energy and dark matter.

  13. Anisotropic assembly and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.; Uminsky, David T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of anisotropy in two classes of individual-based models for self-organization, collective behavior and self-assembly. We accomplish this via first-order dynamical systems of pairwise interacting particles that incorporate anisotropic interactions. At a continuum level, these models represent the natural anisotropic variants of the well-known aggregation equation. We leverage this framework to analyze the impact of anisotropic effects upon the self-assembly of co-dimension one equilibrium structures, such as micelles and vesicles. Our analytical results reveal the regularizing effect of anisotropy, and isolate the contexts in which anisotropic effects are necessary to achieve dynamical stability of co-dimension one structures. Our results therefore place theoretical limits on when anisotropic effects can be safely neglected. We also explore whether anisotropic effects suffice to induce pattern formation in such particle systems. We conclude with brief numerical studies that highlight various aspects of the models we introduce, elucidate their phase structure and partially validate the analysis we provide.

  14. Application of continuum percolation theory for modeling single- and two-phase characteristics of anisotropic carbon paper gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Cheng, Ping

    2016-03-01

    Percolation theory is used to model intrinsic and relative permeabilities as well as tortuosity in anisotropic carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDL) and compared with existing results from lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations and experimental measurements. Although single- and two-phase characteristics of the carbon paper GDL are mainly affected by medium geometrical and topological properties, e.g., pore-size distribution, connectivity, and pore geometry, analyzing capillary pressure curves implies that the pore-size distribution of the carbon paper GDL is very narrow. This suggests that its effect on tortuosity and wetting- and nonwetting-phase relative permeabilities is trivial. However, integrated effects of pore geometry, surface area, connectivity, and tortuosity on intrinsic permeability might be substantial. Universal power laws from percolation theory predict the tortuosity-porosity and relative permeability-saturation curves accurately, indicating both characteristics not affected by the pore-size distribution. The permeability-porosity relationship, however, conforms to nonuniversality.

  15. Ground-state phase diagram of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with anisotropic hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönmeier-Kromer, Janik; Pollet, Lode

    2014-02-01

    We compute the ground-state phase diagram of the two-dimensional (2D) Bose-Hubbard model with anisotropic hopping using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, connecting the one-dimensional (1D) to the 2D system. We find that the tip of the lobe lies on a curve controlled by the 1D limit over the full anisotropy range, while the universality class is always the same as in the isotropic 2D system. This behavior can be derived analytically from the lowest renormalization-group equations and has a shape typical for the underlying Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in one dimension. We also compute the phase boundary of the Mott lobe at unit density for strong anisotropy and compare it to the 1D system. Our calculations shed light on recent cold gas experiments monitoring the dynamics of an expanding cloud.

  16. A lower bound on {T SR}/{m H} in the O(4) model on anisotropic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavai, R. V.; Heller, U. M.; Karsch, F.; Neuhaus, T.; Plache, B.

    1992-11-01

    Results of an investigation of the O(4) spin model at finite temperature using anisotropic lattices are presented. In both the large N approximation and numerical simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm we find that the ratio of the symmetry restoration temperature TSR to the Higgs mass mH is independent of the anisotropy ξ. From the numerical simulations we obtain a lower bound of {T SR}/{m H}⋍ 0.58 ± 0.02 at a value for the Higgs mass m Ha s ⋍ 0.5 , which is lowered further by about 10% at m Ha s ⋍ 1 . Requiring certain timelike correlation functions to coincide with their spacelike counterparts, quantum and scaling corrections to the anisotropy are determined and are found to be small i.e., the anisotropy is found to be close to the ratio of spacelike and timelike lattice spacings.

  17. Generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation to the isotropic and anisotropic Rabi model in the ultrastrong-coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Yu

    2016-12-01

    Generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation (GSRWA) is proposed by employing both the displacement and the squeezing transformations. A solvable Hamiltonian is reformulated in the same form as the ordinary RWA ones. For a qubit coupled to oscillators experiment, a well-defined Schrödinger-cat-like entangled state is given by the displaced-squeezed oscillator state instead of the original displaced state. For the isotropic Rabi case, the mean photon number and the ground-state energy are expressed analytically with additional squeezing terms, exhibiting a substantial improvement of the GSRWA. And the ground-state energy in the anisotropic Rabi model confirms the effectiveness of the GSRWA. Due to the squeezing effect, the GSRWA improves the previous methods only with the displacement transformation in a wide range of coupling strengths even for large atom frequency.

  18. 3-D frequency-domain seismic wave modelling in heterogeneous, anisotropic media using a Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a modified version of the spectral element method (SEM), called the Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach, for frequency domain 3D seismic modelling in arbitrary heterogeneous, anisotropic media. The model may incorporate an arbitrary free-surface topography and irregular subsurface interfaces. Unlike the SEM ,it does not require a powerful mesh generator such as the Delauney Triangular or TetGen. Rather, the GQG approach replaces the element mesh with Gaussian quadrature abscissae to directly sample the physical properties of the model parameters and compute the weighted residual or variational integral. This renders the model discretisation simple and easily matched to the model topography, as well as direct control of the model paramterisation for subsequent inversion. In addition, it offers high accuracy in numerical modelling provided that an appropriate density of the Gaussian quadrature abscissae is employed. The second innovation of the GQG is the incorporation of a new implementation of perfectly matched layers to suppress artificial reflections from the domain margins. We employ PML model parameters (specified complex valued density and elastic moduli) rather than explicitly solving the governing wave equation with a complex co-ordinate system as in conventional approaches. Such an implementation is simple, general, effective and easily extendable to any class of anisotropy and other numerical modelling methods. The accuracy of the GQG approach is controlled by the number of Gaussian quadrature points per minimum wavelength, the so-called sampling density. The optimal sampling density should be the one which enables high definition of geological characteristics and high precision of the variational integral evaluation and spatial differentiation. Our experiments show that satisfactory results can be obtained using sampling densities of 5 points per minimum wavelength. Efficiency of the GQG approach mainly depends on the linear

  19. The value and cost of complexity in predictive modelling: role of tissue anisotropic conductivity and fibre tracts in neuromodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Shahid, Syed; Bikson, Marom; Salman, Humaira; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2014-06-01

    Objectives. Computational methods are increasingly used to optimize transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) dose strategies and yet complexities of existing approaches limit their clinical access. Since predictive modelling indicates the relevance of subject/pathology based data and hence the need for subject specific modelling, the incremental clinical value of increasingly complex modelling methods must be balanced against the computational and clinical time and costs. For example, the incorporation of multiple tissue layers and measured diffusion tensor (DTI) based conductivity estimates increase model precision but at the cost of clinical and computational resources. Costs related to such complexities aggregate when considering individual optimization and the myriad of potential montages. Here, rather than considering if additional details change current-flow prediction, we consider when added complexities influence clinical decisions. Approach. Towards developing quantitative and qualitative metrics of value/cost associated with computational model complexity, we considered field distributions generated by two 4 × 1 high-definition montages (m1 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C3 and m2 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C1) and a single conventional (m3 = C3-Fp2) tDCS electrode montage. We evaluated statistical methods, including residual error (RE) and relative difference measure (RDM), to consider the clinical impact and utility of increased complexities, namely the influence of skull, muscle and brain anisotropic conductivities in a volume conductor model. Main results. Anisotropy modulated current-flow in a montage and region dependent manner. However, significant statistical changes, produced within montage by anisotropy, did not change qualitative peak and topographic comparisons across montages. Thus for the examples analysed, clinical decision on which dose to select would not be altered by the omission of anisotropic brain conductivity

  20. Characterizing fiber formation in meat analogs using an anisotropic photon migration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghesagara, J.; Hsieh, F.; Yao, G.

    2006-10-01

    Animal meat products may not be the best choice for many people in the world due to various reasons such as cost, health problems, or religious restrictions. High moisture (40-80%) extrusion technology shows a great promise for texturizing vegetable proteins into fibrous meat alternatives. Soy protein which is healthy, highly nutritious, low in both fat and carbohydrate has been used in high moisture extrusion process to produce meat analogs with well formed fiber that resemble chicken or turkey breast meat. Assessing fiber formation in extruded products is important for controlling extrusion quality in manufacturing process. Although several methods have been studied for quantifying fiber formation in extrudates, their applications for real time quality control in manufacturing process have been challenging. We explored the possibility of applying a nondestructive method based on backscattered reflectance to measure the fiber formation of extruded soy proteins. An image processing method was developed to extract the light reflectance profile at the extrudates' surface. We applied the anisotropic continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory to quantitatively describe the fiber formation in extrudates based on extracted surface reflectance profiles. This method has a potential to be used as a non-destructive, fast, real time quality control tool for products with fibrous structures.

  1. Model atmospheres and radiation of magnetic neutron stars: Anisotropic thermal emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Ventura, J.; Zavlin, V. E.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropy of the thermal radiation emitted by a surface element of a neutron star atmosphere (e.g., by a polar cap of a radio pulsar). Angular dependences of the partial fluxes at various photon energies, and spectra at various angles are obtained for different values of the effective temperature T(sub eff) and magnetic field strength B, and for different directions of the magnetic field. It is shown that the local radiation of the magnetized neutron star atmospheres is highly anisotropic, with the maximum flux emitted in the magnetic field direction. At high B the angular dependences in the soft X-ray range have two maxima, a high narrow peak along B and a lower and broader maximum at intermediate angles. The radiation is strongly polarized, the modulation of the degree of polarization due to the rotation of the neurtron star may be much higher than that for the radiative flux. The results obtained are compared with recent ROSAT observations of the thermal-like radiation from the radio pulsars PSR 1929+10 and PSR J0437-4715.

  2. Model atmospheres and radiation of magnetic neutron stars: Anisotropic thermal emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Ventura, J.; Zavlin, V. E.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropy of the thermal radiation emitted by a surface element of a neutron star atmosphere (e.g., by a polar cap of a radio pulsar). Angular dependences of the partial fluxes at various photon energies, and spectra at various angles are obtained for different values of the effective temperature T(sub eff) and magnetic field strength B, and for different directions of the magnetic field. It is shown that the local radiation of the magnetized neutron star atmospheres is highly anisotropic, with the maximum flux emitted in the magnetic field direction. At high B the angular dependences in the soft X-ray range have two maxima, a high narrow peak along B and a lower and broader maximum at intermediate angles. The radiation is strongly polarized, the modulation of the degree of polarization due to the rotation of the neurtron star may be much higher than that for the radiative flux. The results obtained are compared with recent ROSAT observations of the thermal-like radiation from the radio pulsars PSR 1929+10 and PSR J0437-4715.

  3. Methods for high-resolution anisotropic finite element modeling of the human head: automatic MR white matter anisotropy-adaptive mesh generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an advanced finite element (FE) head modeling technique through which high-resolution FE meshes adaptive to the degree of tissue anisotropy can be generated. Our adaptive meshing scheme (called wMesh) uses MRI structural information and fractional anisotropy maps derived from diffusion tensors in the FE mesh generation process, optimally reflecting electrical properties of the human brain. We examined the characteristics of the wMeshes through various qualitative and quantitative comparisons to the conventional FE regular-sized meshes that are non-adaptive to the degree of white matter anisotropy. We investigated numerical differences in the FE forward solutions that include the electrical potential and current density generated by current sources in the brain. The quantitative difference was calculated by two statistical measures of relative difference measure (RDM) and magnification factor (MAG). The results show that the wMeshes are adaptive to the anisotropic density of the WM anisotropy, and they better reflect the density and directionality of tissue conductivity anisotropy. Our comparison results between various anisotropic regular mesh and wMesh models show that there are substantial differences in the EEG forward solutions in the brain (up to RDM=0.48 and MAG=0.63 in the electrical potential, and RDM=0.65 and MAG=0.52 in the current density). Our analysis results indicate that the wMeshes produce different forward solutions that are different from the conventional regular meshes. We present some results that the wMesh head modeling approach enhances the sensitivity and accuracy of the FE solutions at the interfaces or in the regions where the anisotropic conductivities change sharply or their directional changes are complex. The fully automatic wMesh generation technique should be useful for modeling an individual-specific and high-resolution anisotropic FE head model incorporating realistic anisotropic conductivity distributions

  4. Three-dimensional stress-induced magnetic anisotropic constitutive model for ferromagnetic material in low intensity magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Le; Liu, Xin'en; Jia, Dong; Niu, Hongpan

    2016-09-01

    Metal magnetic memory (MMM) technique is a promising tool for inspecting early damage in ferromagnetic components due to its high sensitivity to stress in weak geomagnetic field. However, the quantitative analysis methods for the MMM haven't been sufficiently studied yet for absence of a reasonable constitutive model. A three-dimensional stress-induced magnetic anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in this paper to study magneto-mechanical coupling effect of the MMM. The model is developed in principal stress space and a linear relation between magnetization and magnetic field is employed for low intensity magnetic field. As a result, stress-induced magnetic anisotropy is represented by stress dependence of magnetic permeability in different directions, which is simple and convenient for applications in the MMM technique. Based on the model, the effect of stress on magnetic permeability and surface magnetic field is computed and compared with experimental data for a tensioned ferromagnetic specimen in low intensity magnetic field. The good consistency implies the validity of the proposed model.

  5. A two-dimensional hybrid method for modeling seismic waves propagation in laterally-varying anisotropic media and its application to central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wen, L.

    2009-12-01

    The shear wave splitting measurements provide important information on mantle flow, deformation and mineralogy. They are now routinely made using the method developed by Silver and Chan (1994). More and more dense regional observations also begin to reveal sharp spatial variations of seismic anisotropy which could not be explained by simplified horizontal homogeneous anisotropic structures. To better constrain the mantle anisotropy beneath those regions, we developed a two-dimensional hybrid method for simulating seismic wave propagation in laterally-varying anisotropic media [Zhao et al., 2008]. In this presentation, we apply the method to study anisotropic structures beneath central Tibet by waveform modeling the teleseismic SKS phases recorded in the International Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas project (INDEPTH) III. Using data from two events that were selected such that the stations and sources can be approximated as a two-dimensional profile, we derived an optimal model for the anisotropic structures of the upper mantle beneath the study region: a 50-70 km thick anisotropic layer with a fast direction trending N95°E beneath the Qiangtang block, a 150 km thick and 60 km wide anisotropic segment with an axis trending N95°E beneath the northernmost Lhasa block, and a ~30 km wide transition zone in between within which the fast direction trends N45°E and the depth extent of anisotropy decreases northward sharply. Synthetic waveform modeling further suggests that an anisotropic model with a horizontal symmetry axis can explain the observations better than that with a dipping symmetry, and a low velocity zone possibly underlies or mixes with the anisotropic structures in the northern portion of the region. The optimal model yields synthetic seismograms that are in good agreement with the observations in both amplitudes and relative arrival times of SKS phases. Synthetic tests also indicate that different elastic constants, source parameters and depth

  6. Relativistic Electrons in Ground-Level Enhanced (GLE) Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William; Novikova, Elena I.

    Ground-level enhanced (GLE) solar particle events are one of the most spectacular manifesta-tions of solar activity, with protons accelerated to multi-GeV energies in minutes. Although GLEs have been observed for more than sixty years, the processes by which the particle ac-celeration takes place remain controversial. Relativistic electrons provide another means of investigating the nature of the particle accelerator, since some processes that can efficiently ac-celerate protons and ions are less attractive candidates for electron acceleration. We report on observations of relativistic electrons, at ˜0.5 -5 MeV, during GLEs of 1976-2005, using data from the University of Chicago's Cosmic Ray Nuclei Experiment (CRNE) on IMP-8, whose electron response has recently been calibrated using GEANT-4 simulations (Novikova et al. 2010). In particular, we examine onset times, temporal structure, fluences, and spectra of elec-trons in GLEs and compare them with comparable quantities for relativistic protons derived from neutron monitors. We discuss the implications of these comparisons for the nature of the particle acceleration process.

  7. Parameter estimation of anisotropic Manning's n coefficient for advanced circulation (ADCIRC) modeling of estuarine river currents (lower St. Johns River)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Henok K.; Bacopoulos, Peter

    2017-05-01

    A rich dataset of time- and space-varying velocity measurements for a macrotidal estuary was used in the development of a vector-based formulation of bottom roughness in the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model. The updates to the parallel code of ADCIRC to include directionally based drag coefficient are briefly discussed in the paper, followed by an application of the data assimilation (nudging analysis) to the lower St. Johns River (northeastern Florida) for parameter estimation of anisotropic Manning's n coefficient. The method produced converging estimates of Manning's n values for ebb (0.0290) and flood (0.0219) when initialized with uniform and isotropic setting of 0.0200. Modeled currents, water levels and flows were improved at observation locations where data were assimilated as well as at monitoring locations where data were not assimilated, such that the method increases model skill locally and non-locally with regard to the data locations. The methodology is readily transferrable to other circulation/estuary models, given pre-developed quality mesh/grid and adequate data available for assimilation.

  8. A battery model that enables consideration of realistic anisotropic environment surrounding an active material particle and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xianke; Lu, Wei

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a model that enables consideration of the realistic anisotropic environment surrounding an active material particle by incorporating both diffusion and migration of lithium ions and electrons in the particle. This model makes it possible to quantitatively evaluate effects such as fracture on capacity degradation. In contrast, the conventional model assumes isotropic environment and only considers diffusion in the active particle, which cannot capture the effect of fracture since it would predict results contradictory to experimental observations. With the developed model we have investigated the effects of active material electronic conductivity, particle size, and State of Charge (SOC) swing window when fracture exists. The study shows that the low electronic conductivity of active material has a significant impact on the lithium ion pattern. Fracture increases the resistance for electron transport and therefore reduces lithium intercalation/deintercalation. Particle size plays an important role in lithium ion transport. Smaller particle size is preferable for mitigating capacity loss when fracture happens. The study also shows that operating at high SOC reduces the impact of fracture.

  9. Estimation of gas hydrate saturation using isotropic and anisotropic models at the location selected after measurement of seismic quality factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundhra, A.; Sain, K.; Shankar, U.

    2012-12-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition (NGHP) 01 discovered gas hydrate in unconsolidated sediments at several drilling sites along the continental margins of Krishna-Godavari Basin, India. Presence of gas hydrate reduces the attenuation of travelling seismic waves which can be measured by estimation of seismic quality factor (Dasgupta and Clark, 1998). Here, we use log spectral ratio method (Sain et al, 2009) to compute quality factor at three locations, among which two have strong and one has no bottom simulating reflector (BSR), along seismic cross-line near one of the drilling site. Interval quality factor for three submarine sedimentary layers bounded by seafloor, BSR, one reflector above and another reflector below the BSR has been measured. To compute quality factor, unprocessed pre-stack seismic data has been used to avoid any influence of processing sequence. We have estimated that interval quality factor lies within 200-220 in the interval having BSR while it varies within 90-100 in other intervals. Thereby, high interval quality factor ascertains that observed BSR is due to presence of gas hydrates. We have performed rock physics modelling by using isotropic and anisotropic models, to quantitatively estimate gas hydrate saturation at one of the location where an interval has high quality factor. Abruptly high measured resistivity and high P-wave velocity in the interval, leads to towering hydrate saturation (Archie,1942 and Helegrud et al, 1999) in comparison to lower gas hydrate saturations estimated by pressure core and chlorinity measurements. Overestimation of saturation is attributed to presence of near vertical fractures that are identified from logging-while-drilling resistivity images. We have carried out anisotropic modeling (Kennedy and Herrick, 2004 and Lee,2009) by incorporating fracture volume and fracture porosity to estimate hydrate saturation and have observed that modeled gas hydrate saturations agree with the lower gas

  10. Critical behavior of the three-dimensional Ising model with anisotropic bond randomness at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, T.; Malakis, A.

    2013-01-01

    We study the ±J three-dimensional (3D) Ising model with a spatially uniaxial anisotropic bond randomness on the simple cubic lattice. The ±J random exchange is applied on the xy planes, whereas, in the z direction, only a ferromagnetic exchange is used. After sketching the phase diagram and comparing it with the corresponding isotropic case, the system is studied at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition line using parallel tempering and a convenient concentration of antiferromagnetic bonds (pz=0;pxy=0.176). The numerical data clearly point out a second-order ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition belonging in the same universality class with the 3D random Ising model. The smooth finite-size behavior of the effective exponents, describing the peaks of the logarithmic derivatives of the order parameter, provides an accurate estimate of the critical exponent 1/ν=1.463(3), and a collapse analysis of magnetization data gives an estimate of β/ν=0.516(7). These results are in agreement with previous papers and, in particular, with those of the isotropic ±J three-dimensional Ising model at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition line, indicating the irrelevance of the introduced anisotropy.

  11. On the modelling of complex kinematic hardening and nonquadratic anisotropic yield criteria at finite strains: application to sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilo, Tiago J.; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Valente, Robertt A. F.; Reese, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a finite strain model for complex combined isotropic-kinematic hardening is presented. It accounts for finite elastic and finite plastic strains and is suitable for any anisotropic yield criterion. In order to model complex cyclic hardening phenomena, the kinematic hardening is described by several back stress components. To that end, a new procedure is proposed in which several multiplicative decompositions of the plastic part of the deformation gradient are considered. The formulation incorporates a completely general format of the yield function, which means that any yield function can by employed by following a procedure that ensures the principle of material frame indifference. The constitutive equations are derived in a thermodynamically consistent way and numerically integrated by means of a backward-Euler algorithm based on the exponential map. The performance of the constitutive model is assessed via numerical simulations of industry-relevant sheet metal forming processes (U-channel forming and draw/re-draw of a panel benchmarks), the results of which are compared to experimental data. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the use of multiple back stress components is very advantageous in the description of springback. This holds in particular if one carries out a comparison with the results of using only one component. Moreover, the numerically obtained results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Critical behavior of the three-dimensional Ising model with anisotropic bond randomness at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition line.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, T; Malakis, A

    2013-01-01

    We study the ±J three-dimensional (3D) Ising model with a spatially uniaxial anisotropic bond randomness on the simple cubic lattice. The ±J random exchange is applied on the xy planes, whereas, in the z direction, only a ferromagnetic exchange is used. After sketching the phase diagram and comparing it with the corresponding isotropic case, the system is studied at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition line using parallel tempering and a convenient concentration of antiferromagnetic bonds (p(z)=0;p(xy)=0.176). The numerical data clearly point out a second-order ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition belonging in the same universality class with the 3D random Ising model. The smooth finite-size behavior of the effective exponents, describing the peaks of the logarithmic derivatives of the order parameter, provides an accurate estimate of the critical exponent 1/ν=1.463(3), and a collapse analysis of magnetization data gives an estimate of β/ν=0.516(7). These results are in agreement with previous papers and, in particular, with those of the isotropic ±J three-dimensional Ising model at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition line, indicating the irrelevance of the introduced anisotropy.

  13. Multi-component seismic modeling and robust pre-stack seismic waveform inversion for elastic anisotropic media parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao

    Consideration of azimuthal anisotropy, at least to an orthorhombic symmetry is important in exploring the naturally fractured and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Full waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic data can, in principle, provide more robust estimates of subsurface elastic parameters and density than the inversion of single component (P wave) seismic data. In addition, azimuthally dependent anisotropy can only be resolved by carefully studying the multicomponent seismic displacement data acquired and processed along different azimuths. Such an analysis needs an inversion algorithm capable of simultaneously optimizing multiple objectives, one for each data component along each azimuth. In this dissertation, I propose a novel multiobjective methodology using a parallelized version of NSGA II for waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic data along two azimuths. The proposed methodology is also an improvement of the original NSGA II in overall computational efficiency, preservation of population diversity, and rapid sampling of the model space. Next, the proposed methodology is applied on wide azimuth and multicomponent vertical seismic profile (VSP) data to provide reliable estimation of subsurface anisotropy at and near the well location. Prestack waveform inversion was applied to the wide-azimuth multicomponent VSP data acquired at the Wattenberg Field, located in Denver Basin of northeastern Colorado, USA, to characterize the Niobrara formation for azimuthal anisotropy. By comparing the waveform inversion results with an independent study that used a joint slowness-polarization approach to invert the same data, we conclude that the waveform inversion is a reliable tool for inverting the wide-azimuth multicomponent VSP data for anisotropy estimation. Last but not least, an anisotropic elastic three-dimensional scheme for modeling the elastodynamic wavefield is developed in order to go beyond the 1D layering assumption being used in previous

  14. An anisotropic shear velocity model of the Earth's mantle using normal modes, body waves, surface waves and long-period waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We use normal-mode splitting functions in addition to surface wave phase anomalies, body wave traveltimes and long-period waveforms to construct a 3-D model of anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modelling approach inverts for mantle velocity and anisotropy as well as transition-zone discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the non-linear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+M, is an update to the earlier model S362ANI, which did not include normal-mode splitting functions in its derivation. The new model has stronger isotropic velocity anomalies in the transition zone and slightly smaller anomalies in the lowermost mantle, as compared with S362ANI. The differences in the mid- to lowermost mantle are primarily restricted to features in the Southern Hemisphere. We compare the isotropic part of S362ANI+M with other recent global tomographic models and show that the level of agreement is higher now than in the earlier generation of models, especially in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+M is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle and is similar to S362ANI. When radial anisotropy is allowed throughout the mantle, large-scale anisotropic patterns are observed in the lowermost mantle with vSV > vSH beneath Africa and South Pacific and vSH > vSV beneath several circum-Pacific regions. The transition zone exhibits localized anisotropic anomalies of ˜3 per cent vSH > vSV beneath North America and the Northwest Pacific and ˜2 per cent vSV > vSH beneath South America. However, small improvements in fits to the data on adding anisotropy at depth leave the question open on whether large-scale radial anisotropy is required in the transition zone and in the lower mantle. We demonstrate the potential of mode-splitting data in reducing the trade-offs between isotropic velocity and

  15. A return mapping algorithm for isotropic and anisotropic plasticity models using a line search method

    SciTech Connect

    Scherzinger, William M.

    2016-05-01

    The numerical integration of constitutive models in computational solid mechanics codes allows for the solution of boundary value problems involving complex material behavior. Metal plasticity models, in particular, have been instrumental in the development of these codes. Here, most plasticity models implemented in computational codes use an isotropic von Mises yield surface. The von Mises, of J2, yield surface has a simple predictor-corrector algorithm - the radial return algorithm - to integrate the model.

  16. A return mapping algorithm for isotropic and anisotropic plasticity models using a line search method

    DOE PAGES

    Scherzinger, William M.

    2016-05-01

    The numerical integration of constitutive models in computational solid mechanics codes allows for the solution of boundary value problems involving complex material behavior. Metal plasticity models, in particular, have been instrumental in the development of these codes. Here, most plasticity models implemented in computational codes use an isotropic von Mises yield surface. The von Mises, of J2, yield surface has a simple predictor-corrector algorithm - the radial return algorithm - to integrate the model.

  17. A return mapping algorithm for isotropic and anisotropic plasticity models using a line search method

    SciTech Connect

    Scherzinger, William M.

    2016-05-01

    The numerical integration of constitutive models in computational solid mechanics codes allows for the solution of boundary value problems involving complex material behavior. Metal plasticity models, in particular, have been instrumental in the development of these codes. Here, most plasticity models implemented in computational codes use an isotropic von Mises yield surface. The von Mises, of J2, yield surface has a simple predictor-corrector algorithm - the radial return algorithm - to integrate the model.

  18. Dynamics of ordering in highly degenerate models with anisotropic grain-boundary potential: Effects of temperature and vortex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1989-11-01

    Monte Carlo computer-simulation techniques are used to elucidate the equilibrium phase behavior as well as the late-stage ordering dynamics of some two-dimensional models with ground-state ordering of a high degeneracy Q. The models are Q-state Potts models with anisotropic grain-boundary potential on triangular lattices-essentially clock models, except that the potential is not a cosine, but a sine function of the angle between neighboring grain orientations. For not too small Q, these models display two thermally driven phase transitions, one which takes the system from a low-temperature Potts-ordered phase to an intermediate phase which lacks conventional long-range order, and another transition which takes the system to the high-temperature disordered phase. The linear nature of the sine potential used makes it a marginal case in the sense that it favors neither hard domain boundaries, like the standard Potts models do, nor a wetting of the boundaries, as the standard clock models do. Thermal fluctuations nevertheless cause wetting to occur for not too small temperatures. Specifically, we have studied models with Q=12 and 48. The models are quenched from infinity to zero as well as finite temperatures within the two low-temperature phases. The order parameter is a nonconserved quantity during these quenches. The nonequilibrium ordering process subsequent to the quench is studied as a function of time by calculating the interfacial energy, ΔE, associated with the entire grain-boundary network. The time evolution of this quantity is shown to obey the growth law, ΔE(t)~t-n, over an extended time range at late times. It is found that the zero-temperature dynamics is characterized by a special exponent value which for the Q=48 model is n~=0.25 in accordance with earlier work. However, for quenches to finite temperatures in the Potts-ordered phase there is a distinct crossover to the classical Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn exponent value, n=(1/2, for both values of Q. This

  19. Multimodal Brain-Tumor Segmentation Based on Dirichlet Process Mixture Model with Anisotropic Diffusion and Markov Random Field Prior

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yisu; Jiang, Jun; Chen, Wufan

    2014-01-01

    Brain-tumor segmentation is an important clinical requirement for brain-tumor diagnosis and radiotherapy planning. It is well-known that the number of clusters is one of the most important parameters for automatic segmentation. However, it is difficult to define owing to the high diversity in appearance of tumor tissue among different patients and the ambiguous boundaries of lesions. In this study, a nonparametric mixture of Dirichlet process (MDP) model is applied to segment the tumor images, and the MDP segmentation can be performed without the initialization of the number of clusters. Because the classical MDP segmentation cannot be applied for real-time diagnosis, a new nonparametric segmentation algorithm combined with anisotropic diffusion and a Markov random field (MRF) smooth constraint is proposed in this study. Besides the segmentation of single modal brain-tumor images, we developed the algorithm to segment multimodal brain-tumor images by the magnetic resonance (MR) multimodal features and obtain the active tumor and edema in the same time. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using 32 multimodal MR glioma image sequences, and the segmentation results are compared with other approaches. The accuracy and computation time of our algorithm demonstrates very impressive performance and has a great potential for practical real-time clinical use. PMID:25254064

  20. Anisotropic constitutive modeling for nickel base single crystal superalloy Rene N4 at 982 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, D. C.; Jayaraman, N.; Sheh, M. Y.; Alden, D.

    1987-01-01

    A back stress/drag stress constitutive model based on a crystallographic approach to model single crystal anisotropy is presented. Experimental results demonstrated the need for the back stress variable in the inelastic flow equations. Experimental findings suggested that back stress is orientation dependent and controls both strain hardening and recovery characteristics. Due to the observed stable fatigue loops at 1800 F, drag stress is considered constant for this temperature. The constitutive model operated with constraints determined only from tensile data was extensively tested from simple tensile and fatigue to complicated strain hold tests. The model predicted very well under those conditions.

  1. Three-dimensional deformable model for segmentation and tracking of anisotropic cine cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Alok; O'Donnell, Tom; Singh, Ajit

    1994-05-01

    MR imaging is increasingly being used as a method for analyzing and diagnosing cardiac function. Segmentation of heart chambers facilitates volume computation, as well as ventricular motion analysis. Successful techniques have been developed for segmentation of individual 2D slices. However 2D models limit the description of a 3D phenomenon to two dimensions and use only 2D constraints. The resulting model lacks interslice coherency, making interslice interpolation necessary. In addition, the model is more susceptible to corruption due to noise local to one or more slices. We present work towards an approach to segmenting cine MR images using a 3D deformable model with rigid and nonrigid components. Past approaches have used models without rigid components or used isotropic CT data. Our model adaptively subdivides the mesh in response to the forces extracted from image data. Additionally, the local mesh of the model encodes surface orientation to align the model with the desired edge directions, a crucial constraint for distinguishing close anatomical structures. The modified subdivision algorithm preserves orientation of the elements by vertex ordering. We present results of segmenting two multi-slice cardiac MR image series with interslice resolutions of 8 and 4 mm/slice, and intraslice resolution of 1mm/pixel. We also include work in progress on tracking multislice, multiphase cine cardiac MR sequences with 4mm interslice, and 1mm intraslice resolution.

  2. Implementation of Anisotropic and Nonlinear Thermal Stress Models in ADINA 78.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    Elastic ( Mooney - Rivlin ), 2D elements only Unfortunately, ever since the original version of ADINA, [1 ’ 2 ] Bathe has retained this cumbersome...exception is the Mooney - Rivlin rubber like material model available in ADIN A.) A more tractable approach is the deformation theory plasticity model

  3. A Dynamic/Anisotropic Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Ionizing Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; West, Katie J.; Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.; Abrahms, Briana L.; Luetke, Nathan J.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides the proving ground for future long duration human activities in space. Ionizing radiation measurements in ISS form the ideal tool for the experimental validation of ionizing radiation environmental models, nuclear transport code algorithms, and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the Space Transportation System (STS; Shuttle) have provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code development by requiring dynamic models of the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. Previous studies using Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of the evolving ISS configurations with Thermo Luminescent Detector (TLD) area monitors, demonstrated that computational dosimetry requires environmental models with accurate non-isotropic as well as dynamic behavior, detailed information on rack loading, and an accurate 6 degree of freedom (DOF) description of ISS trajectory and orientation.

  4. Modelling a new class of anisotropic compact stars satisfying the Karmakar's condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali

    2017-06-01

    The present paper provides a new class of interior solutions which satisfies the Karmakar condition (K.R. Karmarkar, Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. A 27, 56 (1948)). The model is generated by assuming a reasonable choice for the metric potential g_{rr} and the model parameters are obtained accordingly since, in the case of embedding class-I, the metric co-efficients are dependent on each other. We match our interior solution to the exterior Schwarzschild line element in the presence of thin shell. The proposed model does not suffer from central singularity. The model is discussed for a neutron star of mass 1.4 M_{⊙} and radius 10km. The potential stability condition of the model is also discussed.

  5. Non-FG mediated transport of the large pre-ribosomal subunit through the nuclear pore complex by the mRNA export factor Gle2

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Laura; Chang, Yiming; Altvater, Martin; Menet, Anna M.; Kemmler, Stefan; Panse, Vikram G.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple export receptors passage bound pre-ribosomes through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) by transiently interacting with the Phe-Gly (FG) meshwork of their transport channels. Here, we reveal how the non-FG interacting yeast mRNA export factor Gly-Leu-FG lethal 2 (Gle2) functions in the export of the large pre-ribosomal subunit (pre-60S). Structure-guided studies uncovered conserved platforms used by Gle2 to export pre-60S: an uncharacterized basic patch required to bind pre-60S, and a second surface that makes non-FG contacts with the nucleoporin Nup116. A basic patch mutant of Gle2 is able to function in mRNA export, but not pre-60S export. Thus, Gle2 provides a distinct interaction platform to transport pre-60S to the cytoplasm. Notably, Gle2’s interaction platforms become crucial for pre-60S export when FG-interacting receptors are either not recruited to pre-60S or are impaired. We propose that large complex cargos rely on non-FG as well as FG-interactions for their efficient translocation through the nuclear pore complex channel. PMID:23907389

  6. Non-FG mediated transport of the large pre-ribosomal subunit through the nuclear pore complex by the mRNA export factor Gle2.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Laura; Chang, Yiming; Altvater, Martin; Menet, Anna M; Kemmler, Stefan; Panse, Vikram G

    2013-09-01

    Multiple export receptors passage bound pre-ribosomes through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) by transiently interacting with the Phe-Gly (FG) meshwork of their transport channels. Here, we reveal how the non-FG interacting yeast mRNA export factor Gly-Leu-FG lethal 2 (Gle2) functions in the export of the large pre-ribosomal subunit (pre-60S). Structure-guided studies uncovered conserved platforms used by Gle2 to export pre-60S: an uncharacterized basic patch required to bind pre-60S, and a second surface that makes non-FG contacts with the nucleoporin Nup116. A basic patch mutant of Gle2 is able to function in mRNA export, but not pre-60S export. Thus, Gle2 provides a distinct interaction platform to transport pre-60S to the cytoplasm. Notably, Gle2's interaction platforms become crucial for pre-60S export when FG-interacting receptors are either not recruited to pre-60S or are impaired. We propose that large complex cargos rely on non-FG as well as FG-interactions for their efficient translocation through the nuclear pore complex channel.

  7. An improved rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method with fourth-order temporal accuracy for elastic-wave modeling in anisotropic media

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Kai; Huang, Lianjie

    2017-08-31

    The rotated staggered-grid (RSG) finite-difference method is a powerful tool for elastic-wave modeling in 2D anisotropic media where the symmetry axes of anisotropy are not aligned with the coordinate axes. We develop an improved RSG scheme with fourth-order temporal accuracy to reduce the numerical dispersion associated with prolonged wave propagation or a large temporal step size. The high-order temporal accuracy is achieved by including high-order temporal derivatives, which can be converted to high-order spatial derivatives to reduce computational cost. Dispersion analysis and numerical tests show that our method exhibits very low temporal dispersion even with a large temporal step sizemore » for elastic-wave modeling in complex anisotropic media. Using the same temporal step size, our method is more accurate than the conventional RSG scheme. In conclusion, our improved RSG scheme is therefore suitable for prolonged modeling of elastic-wave propagation in 2D anisotropic media.« less

  8. Anisotropic composite human skull model and skull fracture validation against temporo-parietal skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    A composite material model for skull, taking into account damage is implemented in the Strasbourg University finite element head model (SUFEHM) in order to enhance the existing skull mechanical constitutive law. The skull behavior is validated in terms of fracture patterns and contact forces by reconstructing 15 experimental cases. The new SUFEHM skull model is capable of reproducing skull fracture precisely. The composite skull model is validated not only for maximum forces, but also for lateral impact against actual force time curves from PMHS for the first time. Skull strain energy is found to be a pertinent parameter to predict the skull fracture and based on statistical (binary logistical regression) analysis it is observed that 50% risk of skull fracture occurred at skull strain energy of 544.0mJ.

  9. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.; Meyer, T. G.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from a 7 year program designed to develop generic constitutive and life prediction approaches and models for nickel-based single crystal gas turbine airfoils. The program was composed of a base program and an optional program. The base program addressed the high temperature coated single crystal regime above the airfoil root platform. The optional program investigated the low temperature uncoated single crystal regime below the airfoil root platform including the notched conditions of the airfoil attachment. Both base and option programs involved experimental and analytical efforts. Results from uniaxial constitutive and fatigue life experiments of coated and uncoated PWA 1480 single crystal material formed the basis for the analytical modeling effort. Four single crystal primary orientations were used in the experiments: group of zone axes (001), group of zone axes (011), group of zone axes (111), and group of zone axes (213). Specific secondary orientations were also selected for the notched experiments in the optional program. Constitutive models for an overlay coating and PWA 1480 single crystal materials were developed based on isothermal hysteresis loop data and verified using thermomechanical (TMF) hysteresis loop data. A fatigue life approach and life models were developed for TMF crack initiation of coated PWA 1480. A life model was developed for smooth and notched fatigue in the option program. Finally, computer software incorporating the overlay coating and PWA 1480 constitutive and life models was developed.

  10. A mesostructurally-based anisotropic continuum model for biological soft tissues--decoupled invariant formulation.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Georges

    2011-11-01

    Characterising and modelling the mechanical behaviour of biological soft tissues is an essential step in the development of predictive computational models to assist research for a wide range of applications in medicine, biology, tissue engineering, pharmaceutics, consumer goods, cosmetics, transport or military. It is therefore critical to develop constitutive models that can capture particular rheological mechanisms operating at specific length scales so that these models are adapted for their intended applications. Here, a novel mesoscopically-based decoupled invariant-based continuum constitutive framework for transversely isotropic and orthotropic biological soft tissues is developed. A notable feature of the formulation is the full decoupling of shear interactions. The constitutive model is based on a combination of the framework proposed by Lu and Zhang [Lu, J., Zhang, L., 2005. Physically motivated invariant formulation for transversely isotropic hyperelasticity. International Journal of Solids and Structures 42, 6015-6031] and the entropic mechanics of tropocollagen molecules and collagen assemblies. One of the key aspects of the formulation is to use physically-based nanoscopic quantities that could be extracted from experiments and/or atomistic/molecular dynamics simulations to inform the macroscopic constitutive behaviour. This effectively couples the material properties at different levels of the multi-scale hierarchical structure of collagenous tissues. The orthotropic hyperelastic model was shown to reproduce very well the experimental multi-axial properties of rabbit skin. A new insight into the shear response of a skin sample subjected to a simulated indentation test was obtained using numerical direct sensitivity analyses.

  11. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.; Meyer, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results from a 35 month period of a program designed to develop generic constitutive and life prediction approaches and models for nickel-based single crystal gas turbine airfoils. The program is composed of a base program and an optional program. The base program addresses the high temperature coated single crystal regime above the airfoil root platform. The optional program investigates the low temperature uncoated single crystal regime below the airfoil root platform including the notched conditions of the airfoil attachment. Both base and option programs involve experimental and analytical efforts. Results from uniaxial constitutive and fatigue life experiments of coated and uncoated PWA 1480 single crystal material form the basis for the analytical modeling effort. Four single crystal primary orientations were used in the experiments: (001), (011), (111), and (213). Specific secondary orientations were also selected for the notched experiments in the optional program. Constitutive models for an overlay coating and PWA 1480 single crystal material were developed based on isothermal hysteresis loop data and verified using thermomechanical (TMF) hysteresis loop data. A fatigue life approach and life models were selected for TMF crack initiation of coated PWA 1480. An initial life model used to correlate smooth and notched fatigue data obtained in the option program shows promise. Computer software incorporating the overlay coating and PWA 1480 constitutive models was developed.

  12. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.; Linask, I.; Nissley, D. M.; Norris, P. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Walker, K. P.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first year of a program designed to develop life prediction and constitutive models for two coated single crystal alloys used in gas turbine airfoils. The two alloys are PWA 1480 and Alloy 185. The two oxidation resistant coatings are PWA 273, an aluminide coating, and PWA 286, an overlay NiCoCrAlY coating. To obtain constitutive and/or fatigue data, tests were conducted on coated and uncoated PWA 1480 specimens tensilely loaded in the 100 , 110 , 111 , and 123 directions. A literature survey of constitutive models was completed for both single crystal alloys and metallic coating materials; candidate models were selected. One constitutive model under consideration for single crystal alloys applies Walker's micromechanical viscoplastic formulation to all slip systems participating in the single crystal deformation. The constitutive models for the overlay coating correlate the viscoplastic data well. For the aluminide coating, a unique test method is under development. LCF and TMF tests are underway. The two coatings caused a significant drop in fatigue life, and each produced a much different failure mechanism.

  13. Spontaneous alignment of frustrated bonds in an anisotropic, three-dimensional Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalabert, Rodolfo A.; Sachdev, Subir

    1991-07-01

    The Ising model on a three-dimensional cubic lattice with all plaquettes in the x-y frustrated plane is studied by use of a Monte Carlo technique; the exchange constants are of equal magnitude, but have varying signs. At zero temperature, the model has a finite entropy and no long-range order. The low-temperature phase is characterized by an order parameter measuring the openZ4 symmetry of lattice rotations which is invariant under Mattis gauge transformation; fluctuations lead to the alignment of frustrated bonds into columns and a fourfold degeneracy. An additional factor-of-2 degeneracy is obtained from a global spin flip. The order vanishes at a critical temperature by a transition that appears to be in the universality class of the D=3, XY model. These results are consistent with the theoretical predictions of Blankschtein et al. This Ising model is related by duality to phenomenological models of two-dimensional frustrated quantum antiferromagnets.

  14. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Petrovich, Cristobal; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (`rotochemical heating'). This effect has previously been studied by Fernández & Reisenegger for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our predictions with the surface temperature of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and upper limits for 21 classical pulsars, we find the millisecond pulsar can be only explained by the models with the effectively largest energy gaps (type B models), the classical pulsars require with the gap models that vanish for some angle (type C) and two different envelope compositions. Thus, no single model for neutron superfluidity can simultaneously account for the thermal emission of all available observations of non-accreting neutron stars, possibly due to our neglect of proton superconductivity.

  15. Block entropy and quantum phase transition in the anisotropic Kondo necklace model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2010-06-01

    We study the von Neumann block entropy in the Kondo necklace model for different anisotropies η in the XY interaction between conduction spins using the density matrix renormalization group method. It was found that the block entropy presents a maximum for each η considered, and, comparing it with the results of the quantum criticality of the model based on the behavior of the energy gap, we observe that the maximum block entropy occurs at the quantum critical point between an antiferromagnetic and a Kondo singlet state, so this measure of entanglement is useful for giving information about where a quantum phase transition occurs in this model. We observe that the block entropy also presents a maximum at the quantum critical points that are obtained when an anisotropy Δ is included in the Kondo exchange between localized and conduction spins; when Δ diminishes for a fixed value of η, the critical point increases, favoring the antiferromagnetic phase.

  16. Effect of anisotropic turbulence on aerodynamic noise. [Lighthill theory mathematical model for axisymmetric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Rosenbaum, B.

    1973-01-01

    A model based on Lighthill's theory for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. It does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. In the course of the analysis, a hierarchy of equations is developed wherein each succeeding equation involves more assumptions than the preceding equation but requires less experimental information for its use. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed. It is shown that for the particular turbulence data considered anisotropy causes the high-frequency self-noise to be beamed downstream.

  17. A memory diffusion model for molecular anisotropic diffusion in siliceous β-zeolite.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiangfei; An, Zhuanzhuan; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    A memory diffusion model of molecules on β-zeolite is proposed. In the model, molecular diffusion in β-zeolites is treated as jumping from one adsorption site to its neighbors and the jumping probability is a compound probability which includes that provided by the transitional state theory as well as that derived from the information about which direction the target molecule comes from. The proposed approach reveals that the diffusivities along two crystal axes on β-zeolite are correlated. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations on diffusion of benzene and other simple molecules in β-zeolites. The results show that the molecules with larger diameters fit the prediction much better and that the "memory effects" are important in all cases.

  18. Anisotropic aggregation in a simple model of isotropically polymer-coated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiken, Jurriaan A.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2013-07-01

    We report a numerical study of a simple, modified Asakura-Oosawa model for nanoparticles that are isotropically grafted with polymer chains. We perform canonical and grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations to establish a qualitative morphology diagram, as well as quantitative phase diagrams. The morphology diagram qualitatively reproduces experimental observations and theoretical approaches employing more complex models. In addition, we establish the transition lines for a microphase separation and show that the phase behavior saturates for larger polymer sizes. An analytical treatment on the level of the second virial coefficient indicates that this saturation effect is caused by less effective shielding of nanoparticles by longer polymers. Our simple model enables large-scale particle-based simulations of self-assembly of polymer-coated particles.

  19. Improved understanding of the dynamic response in anisotropic directional composite materials through the combination of experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Key, C. T.; Schumacher, S. C.

    2014-05-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the dynamic response of composite materials; specifically low density epoxy matrix binders strengthened with continuous reinforcing fibers. This is in part due to the widespread use of carbon fiber composites in military, commercial, industrial, and aerospace applications. The design community requires better understanding of these materials in order to make full use of their unique properties. Planar impact testing was performed resulting in pressures up to 15 GPa on a unidirectional carbon fiber - epoxy composite, engineered to have high uniformity and low porosity. Results illustrate the anisotropic nature of the response under shock loading. Along the fiber direction, a two-wave structure similar to typical elastic-plastic response is observed, however, when shocked transverse to the fibers, only a single bulk shock wave is detected. At higher pressures, the epoxy matrix dissociates resulting in a loss of anisotropy. Greater understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the observed response has been achieved through numerical modeling of the system at the micromechanical level using the CTH hydrocode. From the simulation results it is evident that the observed two-wave structure in the longitudinal fiber direction is the result of a fast moving elastic precursor wave traveling in the carbon fibers ahead of the bulk response in the epoxy resin. Similarly, in the transverse direction, results show a collapse of the resin component consistent with the experimental observation of a single shock wave traveling at speeds associated with bulk carbon. Experimental and simulation results will be discussed and used to show where additional mechanisms, not fully described by the currently used models, are present.

  20. Mechanical-mathematical and experimental modeling of well stability in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, D. M.; Karev, V. I.; Kovalenko, Yu. F.; Ustinov, K. B.

    2013-07-01

    Virtually allmodern gas and oil production technologies are based on directional drilling, and hence well stability issues are of primary importance. It was established that the stability of slanted wells significantly depends on the deformation and strength characteristics of rocks, on the presence and degree of rock anisotropy, and also on the well geometry and the pressure at the well bottom. We suggest a new approach to this problem by modeling the hole making process with the use of a triaxial independent loading test system (TAILTS) based on the mechanical-mathematical model developed here.

  1. A Highly Anisotropic Nonlinear Elasticity Model for Vesicles II: Derivation of the Thin Bilayer Bending Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, Benoît

    2015-08-01

    We study the thin-shell limit of the nonlinear elasticity model for vesicles introduced in part I. We consider vesicles of width with elastic energy of order . In this regime, we show that the limit model is a bending theory for generalized hypersurfaces—namely, co-dimension one oriented varifolds without boundary. Up to a positive factor, the limit functional is the Willmore energy. In the language of -convergence, we establish a compactness result, a lower bound result and the matching upper bound in the smooth case.

  2. Cell-to-cell modeling of the interface between atrial and sinoatrial anisotropic heterogeneous nets.

    PubMed

    López Garza, Gabriel; Castellanos, Norma P; Godínez, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    The transition between sinoatrial cells and atrial cells in the heart is not fully understood. Here we focus on cell-to-cell mathematical models involving typical sinoatrial cells and atrial cells connected with experimentally observed conductance values. We are interested mainly in the geometry of the microstructure of the conduction paths in the sinoatrial node. We show with some models that appropriate source-sink relationships between atrial and sinoatrial cells may occur according to certain geometric arrangements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Low Earth Orbit validation of a dynamic and anisotropic trapped radiation model through ISS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.

    2011-10-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides the proving ground for future long duration human activities in space. Ionizing radiation measurements in ISS form the ideal tool for the experimental validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear transport code algorithms and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the Space Transportation System (STS; Shuttle) have provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code development by requiring dynamic models of the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. Previous studies using Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of the evolving ISS configurations with Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) area monitors, demonstrated that computational dosimetry requires environmental models with accurate non-isotropic as well as dynamic behavior, detailed information on rack loading, and an accurate six degree of freedom (DOF) description of ISS trajectory and orientation. It is imperative that we understand ISS exposures dynamically for crew career planning, and insure that the regulatory requirements of keeping exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) are adequately implemented. This is especially true as ISS nears some form of completion with increasing complexity, resulting in a larger drag coefficient, and requiring operation at higher altitudes with increased exposure rates. In this paper ISS environmental model is configured for 11A (circa mid 2005), and uses non-isotropic and dynamic geomagnetic transmission and trapped proton models. ISS 11A and LEO model validations are important steps in preparation for the design and validation for the next generation manned vehicles. While the described cutoff rigidity, trapped proton and electron formalisms as coded in a package named GEORAD (GEOmagnetic RADiation) and a web interface named OLTARIS (On-line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space) are applicable to the LEO, Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) and

  4. Fully anisotropic 3-D EM modelling on a Lebedev grid with a multigrid pre-conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaysaval, Piyoosh; Shantsev, Daniil V.; de la Kethulle de Ryhove, Sébastien; Bratteland, Tarjei

    2016-12-01

    We present a numerical algorithm for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) simulations in conducting media with general electric anisotropy. The algorithm is based on the finite-difference discretization of frequency-domain Maxwell's equations on a Lebedev grid, in which all components of the electric field are collocated but half a spatial step staggered with respect to the magnetic field components, which also are collocated. This leads to a system of linear equations that is solved using a stabilized biconjugate gradient method with a multigrid preconditioner. We validate the accuracy of the numerical results for layered and 3-D tilted transverse isotropic (TTI) earth models representing typical scenarios used in the marine controlled-source EM method. It is then demonstrated that not taking into account the full anisotropy of the conductivity tensor can lead to misleading inversion results. For synthetic data corresponding to a 3-D model with a TTI anticlinal structure, a standard vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) inversion is not able to image a resistor, while for a 3-D model with a TTI synclinal structure it produces a false resistive anomaly. However, if the VTI forward solver used in the inversion is replaced by the proposed TTI solver with perfect knowledge of the strike and dip of the dipping structures, the resulting resistivity images become consistent with the true models.

  5. Structure of intermediate shocks in collisionless anisotropic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics plasma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.

    2013-10-01

    The existence of discontinuities within the double-adiabatic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model is discussed. These solutions are transitional layers where some of the plasma properties change from one equilibrium state to another. Under the assumption of traveling wave solutions with velocity C and propagation angle θ with respect to the ambient magnetic field, the Hall-MHD model reduces to a dynamical system and the waves are heteroclinic orbits joining two different fixed points. The analysis of the fixed points rules out the existence of rotational discontinuities. Simple considerations about the Hamiltonian nature of the system show that, unlike dissipative models, the intermediate shock waves are organized in branches in parameter space, i.e., they occur if a given relationship between θ and C is satisfied. Electron-polarized (ion-polarized) shock waves exhibit, in addition to a reversal of the magnetic field component tangential to the shock front, a maximum (minimum) of the magnetic field amplitude. The jumps of the magnetic field and the relative specific volume between the downstream and the upstream states as a function of the plasma properties are presented. The organization in parameter space of localized structures including in the model the influence of finite Larmor radius is discussed.

  6. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  7. An exactly solved model of three-dimensional surface growth in the anisotropic KPZ regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prähofer, M.; Spohn, H.

    1996-09-01

    We generalize the surface growth model of Gates and Westcott to arbitrary inclination. The exact steady growth velocity is of saddle type with principal curvatures of opposite sign. According to Wolf, this implies logarithmic height correlations, which we prove by mapping the steady state of the surface to world lines of free fermions with chiral boundary conditions.

  8. An exactly solved model of three-dimensional surface growth in the anisotropic KPZ regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prähofer, M.; Spohn, H.

    1997-09-01

    We generalize the surface growth model of Gates and Westcott to arbitrary inclination. The exact steady growth velocity is of saddle type with principal curvatures of opposite sign. According to Wolf, this implies logarithmic height correlations, which we prove by mapping the steady state of the surface to world lines of free fermions with chiral boundary conditions.

  9. Anisotropic four-state clock model in the presence of random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Octavio D. Rodriguez; Nobre, Fernando D.

    2016-02-01

    A four-state clock ferromagnetic model is studied in the presence of different configurations of anisotropies and random fields. The model is considered in the limit of infinite-range interactions, for which the mean-field approach becomes exact. Both representations of Cartesian spin components and two Ising variables are used, in terms of which the physical properties and phase diagrams are discussed. The random fields follow bimodal probability distributions and the richest criticality is found when the fields, applied in the two Ising systems, are not correlated. The phase diagrams present new interesting topologies, with a wide variety of critical points, which are expected to be useful in describing different complex phenomena.

  10. Continuum Multiscale Modeling of Finite Deformation Plasticity and Anisotropic Damage in Polycrystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    neighboring grains cannot be spa- tially resolved. 3.5. Homogenization of damage Effects from mechanisms modeled individually— elastoplasticity within each...crystal plasticity routines are available, as the damage computations are effectively uncoupled from the constitutive update of the elastoplastic response... elastoplasticity and damage : multiscale kinematics, Int. J. Solids Struct. 40 (2003) 5669–5688. [17] C. Teodosiu, F. Sidoroff, A finite theory of

  11. Unit-Sphere Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Applied to Anisotropic and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel, N.

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of brittle materials under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This methodology has been extended to predict the multiaxial strength response of transversely isotropic brittle materials, including polymer matrix composites (PMCs), by considering (1) flaw-orientation anisotropy, whereby a preexisting microcrack has a higher likelihood of being oriented in one direction over another direction, and (2) critical strength, or K (sub Ic) orientation anisotropy, whereby the level of critical strength or fracture toughness for mode I crack propagation, K (sub Ic), changes with regard to the orientation of the microstructure. In this report, results from finite element analysis of a fiber-reinforced-matrix unit cell were used with the unit-sphere model to predict the biaxial strength response of a unidirectional PMC previously reported from the World-Wide Failure Exercise. Results for nuclear-grade graphite materials under biaxial loading are also shown for comparison. This effort was successful in predicting the multiaxial strength response for the chosen problems. Findings regarding stress-state interactions and failure modes also are provided.

  12. Three-dimensional pseudospectral modelling of cardiac propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Ng, K T; Yan, R

    2003-11-01

    Various investigators have used the monodomain model to study cardiac propagation behaviour. In many cases, the governing non-linear parabolic equation is solved using the finite-difference method. An adequate discretisation of cardiac tissue with realistic dimensions, however, often leads to a large model size that is computationally demanding. Recently, it has been demonstrated, for a two-dimensional homogeneous monodomain, that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method can offer higher computational efficiency than the finite-difference technique. Here, an extension of the pseudospectral approach to a three-dimensional inhomogeneous case with fibre rotation is presented. The unknown transmembrane potential is expanded in terms of Chebyshev polynomial trial functions, and the monodomain equation is enforced at the Gauss-Lobatto node points. The forward Euler technique is used to advance the solution in time. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method offered an even larger improvement in computational performance over the finite-difference method in the three-dimensional case. Specifically, the pseudospectral method allowed the number of nodes to be reduced by approximately 85 times, while the same solution accuracy was maintained. Depending on the model size, simulations were performed with approximately 18-41 times less memory and approximately 99-169 times less CPU time.

  13. Heterogeneous and anisotropic integrative model of pulmonary veins: computational study of arrhythmogenic substrate for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidi, Oleg V.; Colman, Michael A.; Varela, Marta; Zhao, Jichao; Smaill, Bruce H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Boyett, Mark R.; Zhang, Henggui

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the genesis of re-entrant substrate for the most common cardiac arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF), are not well understood. In this study, we develop a multi-scale three-dimensional computational model that integrates cellular electrophysiology of the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) with the respective tissue geometry and fibre orientation. The latter is reconstructed in unique detail from high-resolution (approx. 70 μm) contrast micro-computed tomography data. The model is used to explore the mechanisms of re-entry initiation and sustenance in the PV region, regarded as the primary source of high-frequency electrical activity in AF. Simulations of the three-dimensional model demonstrate that an initial break-down of normal electrical excitation wave-fronts can be caused by the electrical heterogeneity between the PVs and LA. High tissue anisotropy is then responsible for the slow conduction and generation of a re-entrant circuit near the PVs. Evidence of such circuits has been seen clinically in AF patients. Our computational study suggests that primarily the combination of electrical heterogeneity and conduction anisotropy between the PVs and LA tissues leads to the generation of a high-frequency (approx. 10 Hz) re-entrant source near the PV sleeves, thus providing new insights into the arrhythmogenic mechanisms of excitation waves underlying AF. PMID:24427522

  14. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  15. Gap formation and phase transition of the anisotropic Kondo necklace model: Density matrix renormalization group analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the one-dimensional Kondo necklace model, at zero temperature, with an anisotropy parameter η in the interaction of the conduction chain, by means of the density matrix renormalization group. We calculate the energy gap and estimate the quantum critical points that separate a Kondo singlet state from an antiferromagnetic state, assuming a Kosterlitz-Thouless tendency. We also observe the correlation functions and the structure factors that support our critical points. The resulting phase diagram is presented and compared to that reported previously using Lanczos calculations. It is shown that the quantum critical points vary very slowly with η , but when η approaches zero, they drop abruptly.

  16. Local equilibrium solutions in simple anisotropic cosmological models, as described by relativistic fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shogin, Dmitry; Amund Amundsen, Per

    2016-10-01

    We test the physical relevance of the full and the truncated versions of the Israel-Stewart (IS) theory of irreversible thermodynamics in a cosmological setting. Using a dynamical systems method, we determine the asymptotic future of plane symmetric Bianchi type I spacetimes with a viscous mathematical fluid, keeping track of the magnitude of the relative dissipative fluxes, which determines the applicability of the IS theory. We consider the situations where the dissipative mechanisms of shear and bulk viscosity are involved separately and simultaneously. It is demonstrated that the only case in the given model when the fluid asymptotically approaches local thermal equilibrium, and the underlying assumptions of the IS theory are therefore not violated, is that of a dissipative fluid with vanishing bulk viscosity. The truncated IS equations for shear viscosity are found to produce solutions which manifest pathological dynamical features and, in addition, to be strongly sensitive to the choice of initial conditions. Since these features are observed already in the case of an oversimplified mathematical fluid model, we have no reason to assume that the truncation of the IS transport equations will produce relevant results for physically more realistic fluids. The possible role of bulk and shear viscosity in cosmological evolution is also discussed.

  17. Kinetics of aggregation of an anisotropic model of self-assembling molecules.

    PubMed

    Khan, Siddique; Haaga, Jason; Gunton, J D

    2015-07-14

    We study the kinetics of aggregation of a two site model of interacting spherical molecules. A given site on one molecule can interact with one or more sites on other neighboring molecules. The sites represent the result of a simple coarse graining of putative amino acid residues or two specifically designed sites on a colloidal particle. We study the kinetics and equilibrium morphology for a fixed angle between the two sites, for several angles between 30° and 150°. In the model, the sites interact via an attractive Asakura-Oosawa potential and the molecules have the usual hard sphere repulsion interaction. We find a transition from a micelle-like morphology at small angles to a rod-like morphology at intermediate angles and to a gel-like structure at values of the angle greater than about ninety degrees. However, at 150 degrees, after a long induction time during which there is no aggregation, we observe a nucleation and growth process that leads to a final spherical-like aggregate. Our results show that this angle is a control parameter for the kinetics and equilibrium properties of the system.

  18. A scale-bridging modeling approach for anisotropic organic molecules at patterned semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleppmann, Nicola; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2015-02-01

    Hybrid systems consisting of organic molecules at inorganic semiconductor surfaces are gaining increasing importance as thin film devices for optoelectronics. The efficiency of such devices strongly depends on the collective behavior of the adsorbed molecules. In the present paper, we propose a novel, coarse-grained model addressing the condensed phases of a representative hybrid system, that is, para-sexiphenyl (6P) at zinc-oxide (ZnO). Within our model, intermolecular interactions are represented via a Gay-Berne potential (describing steric and van-der-Waals interactions) combined with the electrostatic potential between two linear quadrupoles. Similarly, the molecule-substrate interactions include a coupling between a linear molecular quadrupole to the electric field generated by the line charges characterizing ZnO(10-10). To validate our approach, we perform equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations, where the lateral positions are fixed to a 2D lattice, while the rotational degrees of freedom are continuous. We use these simulations to investigate orientational ordering in the condensed state. We reproduce various experimentally observed features such as the alignment of individual molecules with the line charges on the surface, the formation of a standing uniaxial phase with a herringbone structure, as well as the formation of a lying nematic phase.

  19. A scale-bridging modeling approach for anisotropic organic molecules at patterned semiconductor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleppmann, Nicola; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-02-14

    Hybrid systems consisting of organic molecules at inorganic semiconductor surfaces are gaining increasing importance as thin film devices for optoelectronics. The efficiency of such devices strongly depends on the collective behavior of the adsorbed molecules. In the present paper, we propose a novel, coarse-grained model addressing the condensed phases of a representative hybrid system, that is, para-sexiphenyl (6P) at zinc-oxide (ZnO). Within our model, intermolecular interactions are represented via a Gay-Berne potential (describing steric and van-der-Waals interactions) combined with the electrostatic potential between two linear quadrupoles. Similarly, the molecule-substrate interactions include a coupling between a linear molecular quadrupole to the electric field generated by the line charges characterizing ZnO(10-10). To validate our approach, we perform equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations, where the lateral positions are fixed to a 2D lattice, while the rotational degrees of freedom are continuous. We use these simulations to investigate orientational ordering in the condensed state. We reproduce various experimentally observed features such as the alignment of individual molecules with the line charges on the surface, the formation of a standing uniaxial phase with a herringbone structure, as well as the formation of a lying nematic phase.

  20. Modeling cell elongation during germ band retraction: cell autonomy versus applied anisotropic stress

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Holley E.; Veldhuis, Jim; Brodland, G. Wayne; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-01-01

    The morphogenetic process of germ band retraction in Drosophila embryos involves coordinated movements of two epithelial tissues – germ band and amnioserosa. The germ band shortens along its rostral-caudal or head-to-tail axis, widens along its perpendicular dorsal-ventral axis, and uncurls from an initial ‘U’ shape. The amnioserosa mechanically assists this process by pulling on the crook of the U-shaped germ band. The amnioserosa may also provide biochemical signals that drive germ band cells to change shape in a mechanically autonomous fashion. Here, we use a finite-element model to investigate how these two contributions reshape the germ band. We do so by modeling the response to laser-induced wounds in each of the germ band’s spatially distinct segments (T1-T3, A1-A9) during the middle of retraction when segments T1-A3 form the ventral arm of the ‘U’, A4-A7 form its crook, and A8-A9 complete the dorsal arm. We explore these responses under a range of externally applied stresses and internal anisotropy of cell edge tensions – akin to a planar cell polarity that can drive elongation of cells in a direction parallel to the minimum edge tension – and identify regions of parameter space (edge-tension anisotropy versus stress anisotropy) that best match previous experiments for each germ band segment. All but three germ band segments are best fit when the applied stress anisotropy and the edge-tension anisotropy work against one another – i.e., when the isolated effects would elongate cells in perpendicular directions. Segments in the crook of the germ band (A4-A7) have cells that elongate in the direction of maximum external stress, i.e., external stress anisotropy is dominant. In most other segments, the dominant factor is internal edge-tension anisotropy. These results are consistent with models in which the amnioserosa pulls on the crook of the germ band to mechanically assist retraction. In addition, they suggest a mechanical cue for edge

  1. Dissolution in anisotropic porous media: Modelling convection regimes from onset to shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paoli, Marco; Zonta, Francesco; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we use direct numerical simulations to examine the role of non-isotropic permeability on solutal convection in a fluid-saturated porous medium. The dense solute injected from the top boundary is driven downwards by gravity and follows a complex time-dependent dynamics. The process of solute dissolution, which is initially controlled by diffusion, becomes dominated by convection as soon as fingers appear, grow, and interact. The dense solute finally reaches the bottom boundary where, due to the prescribed impermeable boundary, it starts filling the domain so to enter the shutdown stage. We present the entire transient dynamics for large Rayleigh-Darcy numbers, Ra, and non-isotropic permeability. We also try to provide suitable and reliable models to parametrize it. With the conceptual setup presented here, we aim at mimicking the process of liquid CO2 sequestration into geological reservoirs.

  2. Tunneling conductivity in anisotropic nanofiber composites: a percolation-based model.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Avik P; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2015-04-15

    The critical path approximation ('CPA') is integrated with a lattice-based approach to percolation to provide a model for conductivity in nanofiber-based composites. Our treatment incorporates a recent estimate for the anisotropy in tunneling-based conductance as a function of the relative angle between the axes of elongated nanoparticles. The conductivity is examined as a function of the volume fraction, degree of clustering, and of the mean value and standard deviation of the orientational order parameter. Results from our calculations suggest that the conductivity can depend strongly upon the standard deviation in the orientational order parameter even when all the other variables (including the mean value of the order parameter 〈S〉) are held invariant.

  3. Anisotropic character of atoms in a two-dimensional Frenkel—Kontorova model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cang-Long; Duan, Wen-Shan; Chen, Jian-Min; Shi, Yu-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a certain density of interacting atoms arranged on a two-dimensional square lattice, which is made to slide over a two-dimensional periodic substrate potential with also the quare lattice symmetry, in the presence of dissipation, by an externally applied driving force, is studied. By rotating the misfit angle θ, the dynamical behaviour displays two different tribological regimes: one is smooth, the other becomes intermittent. We comment both on the nature of the atomic dynamics in the locked-to-sliding transition, and on the dynamical states displayed during the atom motion at different values of the driving force. In tribological applications, we also investigate how the main model parameters such as the stiffness strength and the magnitude of the adhesive force affect the static friction of the system. In particular, our simulation indicates that the superlubricity will appear.

  4. Anisotropic Harper-Hofstadter-Mott model: Competition between condensation and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügel, Dario; Strand, Hugo U. R.; Werner, Philipp; Pollet, Lode

    2017-08-01

    We derive the reciprocal cluster mean-field method to study the strongly interacting bosonic Harper-Hofstadter-Mott model. The system exhibits a rich phase diagram featuring band insulating, striped superfluid, and supersolid phases. Furthermore, for finite hopping anisotropy, we observe gapless uncondensed liquid phases at integer fillings, which are analyzed by exact diagonalization. The liquid phases at fillings ν =1 ,3 exhibit the same band fillings as the fermionic integer quantum Hall effect, while the phase at ν =2 is C T -symmetric with zero charge response. We discuss how these phases become gapped on a quasi-one-dimensional cylinder, leading to a quantized Hall response, which we characterize by introducing a suitable measure for nontrivial many-body topological properties. Incompressible metastable states at fractional filling are also observed, indicating competing fractional quantum Hall phases. The combination of reciprocal cluster mean-field and exact diagonalization yields a promising method to analyze the properties of bosonic lattice systems with nontrivial unit cells in the thermodynamic limit.

  5. 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara; Fischer, Karen M.; Abt, David

    2011-03-01

    Using a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, we have developed a 3-D upper-mantle model (SAWum_NA2) of North America that includes isotropic shear velocity, with a lateral resolution of ˜250 km, as well as radial and azimuthal anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of ˜500 km. Combining these results, we infer several key features of lithosphere and asthenosphere structure. A rapid change from thin (˜70-80 km) lithosphere in the western United States (WUS) to thick lithosphere (˜200 km) in the central, cratonic part of the continent closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front (RMF). Changes with depth of the fast axis direction of azimuthal anisotropy reveal the presence of two layers in the cratonic lithosphere, corresponding to the fast-to-slow discontinuity found in receiver functions. Below the lithosphere, azimuthal anisotropy manifests a maximum, stronger in the WUS than under the craton, and the fast axis of anisotropy aligns with the absolute plate motion, as described in the hotspot reference frame (HS3-NUVEL 1A). In the WUS, this zone is confined between 70 and 150 km, decreasing in strength with depth from the top, from the RMF to the San Andreas Fault system and the Juan de Fuca/Gorda ridges. This result suggests that shear associated with lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling dominates mantle deformation down to this depth in the western part of the continent. The depth extent of the zone of increased azimuthal anisotropy below the cratonic lithosphere is not well resolved in our study, although it is peaked around 270 km, a robust result. Radial anisotropy is such that, predominantly, ξ > 1, where ξ= (Vsh/Vsv)2, under the continent and its borders down to ˜200 km, with stronger ξ in the bordering oceanic regions. Across the continent and below 200 km, alternating zones of weaker and stronger radial anisotropy, with predominantly ξ < 1, correlate with zones of small lateral changes in the fast axis direction of

  6. Scaling laws and reduced-order models for mixing and reactive-transport in heterogeneous anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudunuru, M. K.; Karra, S.; Nakshatrala, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental to enhancement and control of the macroscopic spreading, mixing, and dilution of solute plumes in porous media structures is the topology of flow field and underlying heterogeneity and anisotropy contrast of porous media. Traditionally, in literature, the main focus was limited to the shearing effects of flow field (i.e., flow has zero helical density, meaning that flow is always perpendicular to vorticity vector) on scalar mixing [2]. However, the combined effect of anisotropy of the porous media and the helical structure (or chaotic nature) of the flow field on the species reactive-transport and mixing has been rarely studied. Recently, it has been experimentally shown that there is an irrefutable evidence that chaotic advection and helical flows are inherent in porous media flows [1,2]. In this poster presentation, we present a non-intrusive physics-based model-order reduction framework to quantify the effects of species mixing in-terms of reduced-order models (ROMs) and scaling laws. The ROM framework is constructed based on the recent advancements in non-negative formulations for reactive-transport in heterogeneous anisotropic porous media [3] and non-intrusive ROM methods [4]. The objective is to generate computationally efficient and accurate ROMs for species mixing for different values of input data and reactive-transport model parameters. This is achieved by using multiple ROMs, which is a way to determine the robustness of the proposed framework. Sensitivity analysis is performed to identify the important parameters. Representative numerical examples from reactive-transport are presented to illustrate the importance of the proposed ROMs to accurately describe mixing process in porous media. [1] Lester, Metcalfe, and Trefry, "Is chaotic advection inherent to porous media flow?," PRL, 2013. [2] Ye, Chiogna, Cirpka, Grathwohl, and Rolle, "Experimental evidence of helical flow in porous media," PRL, 2015. [3] Mudunuru, and Nakshatrala, "On

  7. Regional electric field induced by electroconvulsive therapy in a realistic finite element head model: Influence of white matter anisotropic conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Hee; Deng, Zhi-De; Kim, Tae-Seong; Laine, Andrew F.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first computational study investigating the electric field (E-field) strength generated by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) electrode configurations in specific brain regions of interest (ROIs) that have putative roles in the therapeutic action and/or adverse side effects of ECT. This study also characterizes the impact of the white matter (WM) conductivity anisotropy on the E-field distribution. A finite element head model incorporating tissue heterogeneity and WM anisotropic conductivity was constructed based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI data. We computed the spatial E-field distributions generated by three standard ECT electrode placements including bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), and right unilateral (RUL) and an investigational electrode configuration for focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST). The key results are that (1) the median E-field strength over the whole brain is 3.9, 1.5, 2.3, and 2.6 V/cm for the BL, BF, RUL, and FEAST electrode configurations, respectively, which coupled with the broad spread of the BL E-field suggests a biophysical basis for observations of superior efficacy of BL ECT compared to BF and RUL ECT; (2) in the hippocampi, BL ECT produces a median E-field of 4.8 V/cm that is 1.5–2.8 times stronger than that for the other electrode configurations, consistent with the more pronounced amnestic effects of BL ECT; and (3) neglecting the WM conductivity anisotropy results in E-field strength error up to 18% overall and up to 39% in specific ROIs, motivating the inclusion of the WM conductivity anisotropy in accurate head models. This computational study demonstrates how the realistic finite element head model incorporating tissue conductivity anisotropy provides quantitative insight into the biophysics of ECT, which may shed light on the differential clinical outcomes seen with various forms of ECT, and may guide the development of novel stimulation

  8. A finite element model for direction-dependent mechanical response to nanoindentation of cortical bone allowing for anisotropic post-yield behavior of the tissue.

    PubMed

    Carnelli, D; Gastaldi, D; Sassi, V; Contro, R; Ortiz, C; Vena, P

    2010-08-01

    A finite element model was developed for numerical simulations of nanoindentation tests on cortical bone. The model allows for anisotropic elastic and post-yield behavior of the tissue. The material model for the post-yield behavior was obtained through a suitable linear transformation of the stress tensor components to define the properties of the real anisotropic material in terms of a fictitious isotropic solid. A tension-compression yield stress mismatch and a direction-dependent yield stress are allowed for. The constitutive parameters are determined on the basis of literature experimental data. Indentation experiments along the axial (the longitudinal direction of long bones) and transverse directions have been simulated with the purpose to calculate the indentation moduli and the tissue hardness in both the indentation directions. The results have shown that the transverse to axial mismatch of indentation moduli was correctly simulated regardless of the constitutive parameters used to describe the post-yield behavior. The axial to transverse hardness mismatch observed in experimental studies (see, for example, Rho et al. [1999, "Elastic Properties of Microstructural Components of Human Bone Tissue as Measured by Nanoindentation," J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 45, pp. 48-54] for results on human tibial cortical bone) can be correctly simulated through an anisotropic yield constitutive model. Furthermore, previous experimental results have shown that cortical bone tissue subject to nanoindentation does not exhibit piling-up. The numerical model presented in this paper shows that the probe tip-tissue friction and the post-yield deformation modes play a relevant role in this respect; in particular, a small dilatation angle, ruling the volumetric inelastic strain, is required to approach the experimental findings.

  9. Improved understanding of the dynamic response in anisotropic directional composite materials through the combination of experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C.

    2013-06-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the dynamic response of composite materials; specifically low density epoxy resin binders strengthened with continuous reinforcing fibers. This is in part due to the widespread use of carbon fiber composites in military, commercial, industrial, and aerospace applications. The design community requires better understanding of these materials in order to make full use of their unique properties. Experimental testing has been performed on a unidirectional carbon fiber - epoxy composite, engineered to have high uniformity and low porosity. Planar impact testing was performed at the Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) facility at Sandia National Labs resulting in pressures up to 15 GPa in the composite material. Results illustrate the anisotropic nature of the response under shock loading. Along the fiber direction, a two-wave structure similar to typical elastic-plastic response is observed, however, when shocked transverse to the fibers, only a single bulk shock wave is detected. The two-wave structure persists when impact occurs at angles up to 45 degrees off the fiber direction. At higher pressures, the epoxy matrix dissociates resulting in a loss of anisotropy. Details of the experimental configurations and results will be presented and discussed. Greater understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the observed response has been achieved through the use of numerical modeling of the system at the micromechanical level using the CTH hydrocode. From the simulation results it is evident that the observed two-wave structure in the longitudinal fiber direction is the result of a fast moving elastic precursor wave traveling in the carbon fibers ahead of the bulk response in the epoxy resin. Similarly, in the transverse direction, results show a collapse of the resin component consistent with the experimental observation of a single shock wave traveling at speeds associated with bulk carbon. These results will be

  10. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  11. Mapping fractures using 1D anisotropic modelling of magnetotelluric data: a case study from the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, A.; Heinson, G.; Holford, S.; Thiel, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 1D anisotropic inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data as a potential tool for mapping structural permeability in sedimentary basins. Using 1D inversions of a 171 site, broadband MT data set from the Koroit region of the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia, we have delineated an electrically anisotropic layer at approximately 2.5 to 3.5 km depth. The anisotropy strike is consistent between stations at approximately 160° east of north. The depth of anisotropy corresponds to the top depth of the Lower Cretaceous Crayfish Group, and the anisotropy factor increases from west to east. We interpret the anisotropy as resulting from north-northwest oriented, fluid-filled fractures resulting in enhanced electrical and hydraulic conductivity. This interpretation is consistent with permeability data from well formation tests. It is also consistent with the orientation of mapped faults in the area, which are optimally oriented for reactivation in the current stress field.

  12. Cracking in charged anisotropic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sadiq, Sobia

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of static charged anisotropic cylindrically symmetric compact object through cracking. The Einstein-Maxwell field equations and conservation equation are formulated. We then apply local density perturbation and study the behavior of force distribution function. Finally, the cracking is explored for two models satisfying specific form of Chaplygin equation of state. It is found that these models exhibit cracking and the instability increases as the value of charge parameter is increased.

  13. Pattern formation in a two-dimensional two-species diffusion model with anisotropic nonlinear diffusivities: a lattice approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu; Laptev, Valeri V.; Burmistrov, Andrei S.; Lebovka, Nikolai I.

    2017-09-01

    Diffusion in a two-species two-dimensional system has been simulated using a lattice approach. Rodlike particles were considered as linear k-mers of two mutually perpendicular orientations (k x - and k y -mers) on a square lattice. These k x - and k y -mers were treated as species of two kinds. A random sequential adsorption model was used to produce an initial homogeneous distribution of k-mers. The concentration of k-mers, p, was varied in the range from 0.1 to the jamming concentration, p j . By means of the Monte Carlo technique, translational diffusion of the k-mers was simulated as a random walk, while rotational diffusion was ignored. We demonstrated that the diffusion coefficients are strongly anisotropic and nonlinearly concentration-dependent. For sufficiently large concentrations (packing densities) and k ≥slant 6 , the system tends toward a well-organized steady state. Boundary conditions predetermine the final state of the system. When periodic boundary conditions are applied along both directions of the square lattice, the system tends to a steady state in the form of diagonal stripes. The formation of stripe domains takes longer time the larger the lattice size, and is observed only for concentrations above a particular critical value. When insulating (zero flux) boundary conditions are applied along both directions of the square lattice, each kind of k-mer tries to completely occupy a half of the lattice divided by a diagonal, e.g. k x -mers locate in the upper left corner, while the k y -mers are situated in the lower right corner (‘yin–yang’ pattern). From time to time, regions built of k x - and k y -mers exchange their locations through irregular patterns. When mixed boundary conditions are used (periodic boundary conditions are applied along one direction whereas insulating boundary conditions are applied along the other one), the system still tends to form the stripes, but they are unstable and change their spatial orientation.

  14. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  15. An explicit filtering framework based on Perona-Malik anisotropic diffusion for shock capturing and subgrid scale modeling of Burgers' turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulik, Romit; San, Omer

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we introduce a relaxation filtering closure approach to account for subgrid scale effects in explicitly filtered large eddy simulations using the concept of anisotropic diffusion. We utilize the Perona-Malik diffusion model and demonstrate its shock capturing ability and spectral performance for solving the Burgers turbulence problem, which is a simplified prototype for more realistic turbulent flows showing the same quadratic nonlinearity. Our numerical assessments present the behavior of various diffusivity functions in conjunction with a detailed sensitivity analysis with respect to the free modeling parameters. In comparison to direct numerical simulation (DNS) and under-resolved DNS results, we find that the proposed closure model is efficient in the prevention of energy accumulation at grid cut-off and is also adept at preventing any possible spurious numerical oscillations due to shock formation under the optimal parameter choices. In contrast to other relaxation filtering approaches, it is also shown that a larger inertial range can be obtained by the proposed anisotropic diffusion model using a compact stencil scheme in an efficient way.

  16. The 26 December 2001 Solar Eruptive Event Responsible for GLE63: III. CME, Shock Waves, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Kiselev, V. I.; Uralov, A. M.; Klein, K.-L.; Kochanov, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    The SOL2001-12-26 moderate solar eruptive event (GOES importance M7.1, microwaves up to 4000 sfu at 9.4 GHz, coronal mass ejection (CME) speed 1446 km s-1) produced strong fluxes of solar energetic particles and ground-level enhancement (GLE) of cosmic-ray intensity (GLE63). To find a possible reason for the atypically high proton outcome of this event, we study multi-wavelength images and dynamic radio spectra and quantitatively reconcile the findings with each other. An additional eruption probably occurred in the same active region about half an hour before the main eruption. The latter produced two blast-wave-like shocks during the impulsive phase. The two shock waves eventually merged around the radial direction into a single shock traced up to 25 R_{⊙} as a halo ahead of the expanding CME body, in agreement with an interplanetary Type II event recorded by the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) experiment on the Wind spacecraft. The shape and kinematics of the halo indicate an intermediate regime of the shock between the blast wave and bow shock at these distances. The results show that i) the shock wave appeared during the flare rise and could accelerate particles earlier than usually assumed; ii) the particle event could be amplified by the preceding eruption, which stretched closed structures above the developing CME, facilitated its lift-off and escape of flare-accelerated particles, enabled a higher CME speed and stronger shock ahead; iii) escape of flare-accelerated particles could be additionally facilitated by reconnection of the flux rope, where they were trapped, with a large coronal hole; and iv) the first eruption supplied a rich seed population accelerated by a trailing shock wave.

  17. Anisotropic finite element models for brain injury prediction: the sensitivity of axonal strain to white matter tract inter-subject variability.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Chiara; Zappalà, Stefano; Kleiven, Svein

    2017-02-23

    Computational models incorporating anisotropic features of brain tissue have become a valuable tool for studying the occurrence of traumatic brain injury. The tissue deformation in the direction of white matter tracts (axonal strain) was repeatedly shown to be an appropriate mechanical parameter to predict injury. However, when assessing the reliability of axonal strain to predict injury in a population, it is important to consider the predictor sensitivity to the biological inter-subject variability of the human brain. The present study investigated the axonal strain response of 485 white matter subject-specific anisotropic finite element models of the head subjected to the same loading conditions. It was observed that the biological variability affected the orientation of the preferential directions (coefficient of variation of 39.41% for the elevation angle-coefficient of variation of 29.31% for the azimuth angle) and the determination of the mechanical fiber alignment parameter in the model (gray matter volume 55.55-70.75%). The magnitude of the maximum axonal strain showed coefficients of variation of 11.91%. On the contrary, the localization of the maximum axonal strain was consistent: the peak of strain was typically located in a 2 cm(3) volume of the brain. For a sport concussive event, the predictor was capable of discerning between non-injurious and concussed populations in several areas of the brain. It was concluded that, despite its sensitivity to biological variability, axonal strain is an appropriate mechanical parameter to predict traumatic brain injury.

  18. Calculation of the surface tension of cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons from Monte Carlo simulations using an anisotropic united atom model (AUA).

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-07

    We report the calculation of the surface tension of cycloalkanes and aromatics by direct two-phase MC simulations using an anisotropic united atom model (AUA). In the case of aromatics, the polar version of the AUA-4 (AUA 9-sites) model is used. A comparison with the nonpolar models is carried out on the surface tension of benzene. The surface tension is calculated from different routes: the mechanical route using the Irving and Kirkwood (IK) and Kirkwood-Buff (KB) expressions; the thermodynamic route by using the test-area (TA) method. The different operational expressions of these definitions are presented with those of their long range corrections. The AUA potential allows to reproduce very well the dependence of the surface tension with respect to the temperature for cyclopentane, cyclohexane, benzene and toluene.

  19. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  20. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    DOE PAGES

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; ...

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticitymore » theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.« less

  1. Yield surfaces for anisotropic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. D.; Thacker, B. H.

    2000-04-01

    Aerospace systems are incorporating composite materials into their structures. The composite materials are often anisotropic in mechanical response due to their geometric layout. For many years, the failure surfaces of anisotropic materials were thought to be characterizable by a quadratic function in the stress, referred to as a Tsai-Wu yield surface, or, in a more restrictive form, a Tsai-Hill yield surface. Such a representation does not work for materials that are strong in two directions and weak in one direction, which is the case of most interest since it represents fiber/epoxy composite plates. This paper demonstrates the impossibility of modeling the failure surface with either the Tsai-Wu or Tsai-Hill failure surfaces. A yield surface is presented based on the lemniscate, which is quartic in the stress. This new yield surface addresses the case of strong in two directions and weak in one.

  2. Anisotropic Ripple Deformation in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-05-07

    Two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  3. Yield Surfaces for Anisotropic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. D.; Thacker, B. H.

    1999-06-01

    Modern aerospace systems are incorporating composite materials into their structures. Often, the composite materials are anisotropic in their mechanical response due to the geometric layout of fibers. For many years, the failure surfaces of anisotropic materials were thought to be characterizable by a quadratic function in the stress, often referred to as a Tsai-Wu yield surface, or, in a more restrictive form, a Tsai-Hill yield surface. Such a representation does not work for materials that are strong in two directions and weak in one direction, which, unfortunately, is the case of most interest since it represents most composite plates. This paper demonstrates the impossibility of modeling the failure surface with both the Tsai-Wu and Tsai-Hill failure surfaces. We then present a yield surface based on the lemniscate, which is quartic in the stress. This new yield surface addresses the case of strong in two directions and weak in one. Calculations with a fragment impacting a composite plate modeled with the new yield surface are presented. Modifications of the yield surface are presented to allow, in a limited way, materials that are both anisotropic and have differing strengths in tension and compression.

  4. Anisotropic Nanoparticles and Anisotropic Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Nathan D; Vartanian, Ariane M; Abadeer, Nardine S; Grzincic, Elissa M; Jacob, Lisa M; Lin, Wayne; Li, Ji; Dennison, Jordan M; Hinman, Joshua G; Murphy, Catherine J

    2016-02-18

    Anisotropic nanoparticles are powerful building blocks for materials engineering. Unusual properties emerge with added anisotropy-often to an extraordinary degree-enabling countless new applications. For bottom-up assembly, anisotropy is crucial for programmability; isotropic particles lack directional interactions and can self-assemble only by basic packing rules. Anisotropic particles have long fascinated scientists, and their properties and assembly behavior have been the subjects of many theoretical studies over the years. However, only recently has experiment caught up with theory. We have begun to witness tremendous diversity in the synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled anisotropy. In this Perspective, we highlight the synthetic achievements that have galvanized the field, presenting a comprehensive discussion of the mechanisms and products of both seed-mediated and alternative growth methods. We also address recent breakthroughs and challenges in regiospecific functionalization, which is the next frontier in exploiting nanoparticle anisotropy.

  5. Large scale anisotropic bias from primordial non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: mh.namjoo@ipm.ir

    2013-08-01

    In this work we study the large scale structure bias in models of anisotropic inflation. We use the Peak Background Splitting method in Excursion Set Theory to find the scale-dependent bias. We show that the amplitude of the bias is modified by a direction-dependent factor. In the specific anisotropic inflation model which we study, the scale-dependent bias vanishes at leading order when the long wavelength mode in squeezed limit is aligned with the anisotropic direction in the sky. We also extend the scale-dependent bias formulation to the general situations with primordial anisotropy. We find some selection rules indicating that some specific parts of a generic anisotropic bispectrum is picked up by the bias parameter. We argue that the anisotropic bias is mainly sourced by the angle between the anisotropic direction and the long wavelength mode in the squeezed limit.

  6. Commissioning of photon beams of a flattening filter-free linear accelerator and the accuracy of beam modeling using an anisotropic analytical algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Klöck, Stephan

    2011-07-15

    To investigate dosimetric characteristics of a new linear accelerator designed to deliver flattened, as well as flattening filter-free (FFF), beams. To evaluate the accuracy of beam modeling under physical conditions using an anisotropic analytical algorithm. Dosimetric data including depth dose curves, profiles, surface dose, penumbra, out-of-field dose, output, total and scatter factors were examined for four beams (X6, X6FFF, X10, and X10FFF) of Varian's TrueBeam machine. Beams modeled by anisotropic analytical algorithm were compared with measured dataset. FFF beams have lower mean energy (tissue-phantom ratio at the depths of 20 and 10 cm (TPR 20/10): X6, 0.667; X6FFF, 0.631; X10, 0.738; X10FFF, 0.692); maximum dose is located closer to the surface; and surface dose increases by 10%. FFF profiles have sharper but faster diverging penumbra. For small fields and shallow depths, dose outside a field is lower for FFF beams; however, the advantage fades with increasing phantom scatter. Output increases 2.26 times for X6FFF and 4.03 times for X10FFF and is less variable with field size; collimator exchange effect is reduced. A good agreement between modeled and measured data is observed. Criteria of 2% depth-dose and 2-mm distance-to-agreement are always met. Reference dosimetric characteristics of TrueBeam photon bundles were obtained, and successful modeling of the beams was achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropic elastic scattering of stripe/line-shaped scatters to two-dimensional electron gas: Model and illustrations in a nonpolar AlGaN/GaN hetero-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Li, Yao; Yan, Ran; Liu, Guipeng; Nie, Yuhu; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In a semiconductor hetero-junction, the stripe/line-shaped scatters located at the hetero-interface lead to the anisotropic transport of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The elastic scattering of infinitely long and uniform stripe/line-shaped scatters to 2DEG is theoretically investigated based on a general theory of anisotropic 2DEG transport [J. Schliemann and D. Loss, Phys. Rev. B 68(16), 165311 (2003)], and the resulting 2DEG mobility along the applied electrical field is modeled to be a function of the angle between the field and the scatters. The anisotropy of the scattering and the mobility originate in essence from that the stripe/line-shaped scatters act upon the injecting two-dimensional wave vector by changing only its component perpendicular to the scatters. Three related scattering mechanisms in a nonpolar AlGaN/GaN hetero-junction are discussed as illustrations, including the striated morphology caused interface roughness scattering, and the polarization induced line charge dipole scattering and the misfit dislocation scattering at the AlGaN/GaN interface. Different anisotropic behaviors of the mobility limited by these scattering mechanisms are demonstrated, but analysis shows that all of them are determined by the combined effects of the anisotropic bare scattering potential and the anisotropic dielectric response of the 2DEG.

  8. Modeling Intravascular Delivery from Drug-Eluting Stents with Biodurable Coating: Investigation of Anisotropic Vascular Drug Diffusivity and Arterial Drug Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxiang; Pack, Daniel W.; Braatz, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    In-stent restenosis occurs in coronary arteries after implantation of drug-eluting stents with non-uniform restenosis thickness distribution in the artery cross-section. Knowledge of the spatiotemporal drug uptake in the arterial wall is useful for investigating restenosis growth but may often be very expensive/difficult to acquire experimentally. In this work, local delivery of a hydrophobic drug from a drug-eluting stent implanted in a coronary artery is mathematically modeled to investigate the drug release and spatiotemporal drug distribution in the arterial wall. The model integrates drug diffusion in the coating and drug diffusion with reversible binding in the arterial wall. The model is solved by the finite volume method for both high and low drug loadings relative to its solubility in the stent coating with varied isotropic/anisotropic vascular drug diffusivities. Drug release profiles in the coating are observed to depend not only on the coating drug diffusivity but also on the properties of the surrounding arterial wall. Time dependencies of the spatially-averaged free- and bound-drug levels in the arterial wall on the coating and vascular drug diffusivities are discussed. Anisotropic vascular drug diffusivities result in slightly different average drug levels in the arterial wall but very different spatial distributions. Higher circumferential vascular diffusivity results in more uniform drug loading in the upper layers and is potentially beneficial in reducing in-stent restenosis. An analytical expression is derived which can be used to determine regions in the arterial with higher free-drug concentration than bound-drug concentration. PMID:22512464

  9. Structure of the C-terminus of the mRNA export factor Dbp5 reveals the interaction surface for the ATPase activator Gle1

    PubMed Central

    Dossani, Zain Y.; Weirich, Christine S.; Erzberger, Jan P.; Berger, James M.; Weis, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    The DExD/H-box RNA-dependent ATPase Dbp5 plays an essential role in the nuclear export of mRNA. Dbp5 localizes to the nuclear pore complex, where its ATPase activity is stimulated by Gle1 and its coactivator inositol hexakisphosphate. Here, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Dbp5, refined to 1.8 Å. The structure reveals a RecA-like fold that contains two defining characteristics not present in other structurally characterized DExD/H-box proteins: a C-terminal α-helix and a loop connecting β5 and α4, both of which are composed of conserved and unique elements in the Dbp5 primary sequence. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we have identified several charged surface residues that, when mutated, weaken the binding of Gle1 and inhibit the ability of Gle1 to stimulate Dbp5's ATPase activity. In vivo analysis of the same mutations reveals that those mutants displaying the weakest ATPase stimulation in vitro are also unable to support yeast growth. Analysis of the correlation between the in vitro and in vivo data indicates that a threshold level of Dbp5 ATPase activity is required for cellular mRNA export that is not met by the unstimulated enzyme, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Dbp5's activity can be modulated to regulate mRNA export. PMID:19805289

  10. The derivation of an anisotropic velocity model from combined surface and borehole seismic experiments at the COSC-1 borehole, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision, where the surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of parts of the Caledonian structure. The project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) investigates the structure and physical conditions of the orogen units and the underlying basement with two approximately 2.5 km deep fully cored boreholes in western Jämtland, central Sweden. In 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was successfully drilled through the Seve Nappe Complex. This unit, mainly consisting of gneisses, belongs to the so-called Middle Allochthons and has been ductilely deformed and transported during collisional orogeny. A major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Combined with core analysis and downhole logging, the survey will allow extrapolation of the structures away from the borehole. The survey consisted of three parts: 1) a high-resolution zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP), 2) a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP in combination with three long offset surface receiver lines, and 3) a limited 3D seismic survey. Data from the multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment and the long offset surface lines were used to derive a detailed velocity model around the borehole from the inversion of first arrival traveltimes. The comparison of velocities from these tomography results with a velocity function calculated from the zero-offset VSP revealed clear differences in velocities for mainly horizontally and vertically traveling waves. Therefore, an anisotropic VTI model was constructed, using the P-wave velocity function from zero-offset VSP and the Thomson parameters ɛ and δ. The latter were partly derived from ultrasonic lab measurements on COSC-1 core samples. Traveltimes were calculated with an anisotropic eikonal solver and serve as the basis

  11. Spectral Analyses and Radiation Exposures from Several Ground-Level Enhancement (GLE) Solar Proton Events: A Comparison of Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan; Dietrich, William; Badavi, Francis; Rojdev, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Several methods for analyzing the particle spectra from extremely large solar proton events, called Ground-Level Enhancements (GLEs), have been developed and utilized by the scientific community to describe the solar proton energy spectra and have been further applied to ascertain the radiation exposures to humans and radio-sensitive systems, namely electronics. In this paper 12 GLEs dating back to 1956 are discussed, and the three methods for describing the solar proton energy spectra are reviewed. The three spectral fitting methodologies are EXP [an exponential in proton rigidity (R)], WEIB [Weibull fit: an exponential in proton energy], and the Band function (BAND) [a double power law in proton rigidity]. The EXP and WEIB methods use low energy (MeV) GLE solar proton data and make extrapolations out to approx.1 GeV. On the other hand, the BAND method utilizes low- and medium-energy satellite solar proton data combined with high-energy solar proton data deduced from high-latitude neutron monitoring stations. Thus, the BAND method completely describes the entire proton energy spectrum based on actual solar proton observations out to 10 GeV. Using the differential spectra produced from each of the 12 selected GLEs for each of the three methods, radiation exposures are presented and discussed in detail. These radiation exposures are then compared with the current 30-day and annual crew exposure limits and the radiation effects to electronics.

  12. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by 3 d transition-metal wires. We show that a gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symmetry filtering properties of the molecules. We further discuss how this molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance (MAMR) can be tuned by the proper choice of materials and their electronic properties.

  13. The family of anisotropically scaled equatorial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RamíRez GutiéRrez, Enver; da Silva Dias, Pedro Leite; Raupp, Carlos; Bonatti, Jose Paulo

    2011-04-01

    In the present work we introduce the family of anisotropic equatorial waves. This family corresponds to equatorial waves at intermediate states between the shallow water and the long wave approximation model. The new family is obtained by using anisotropic time/space scalings on the linearized, unforced and inviscid shallow water model. It is shown that the anisotropic equatorial waves tend to the solutions of the long wave model in one extreme and to the shallow water model solutions in the other extreme of the parameter dependency. Thus, the problem associated with the completeness of the long wave model solutions can be asymptotically addressed. The anisotropic dispersion relation is computed and, in addition to the typical dependency on the equivalent depth, meridional quantum number and zonal wavenumber, it also depends on the anisotropy between both zonal to meridional space and velocity scales as well as the fast to slow time scales ratio. For magnitudes of the scales compatible with those of the tropical region, both mixed Rossby-gravity and inertio-gravity waves are shifted to a moderately higher frequency and, consequently, not filtered out. This draws attention to the fact that, for completeness of the long wave like solutions, it is necessary to include both the anisotropic mixed Rossby-gravity and inertio-gravity waves. Furthermore, the connection of slow and fast manifolds (distinguishing feature of equatorial dynamics) is preserved, though modified for the equatorial anisotropy parameters used δ ∈ < 1]. New possibilities of horizontal and vertical scale nonlinear interactions are allowed. Thus, the anisotropic shallow water model is of fundamental importance for understanding multiscale atmosphere and ocean dynamics in the tropics.

  14. Aligning Experimental and Theoretical Anisotropic B-Factors: Water Models, Normal-Mode Analysis Methods, and Metrics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The strength of X-ray crystallography in providing the information for protein dynamics has been under appreciated. The anisotropic B-factors (ADPs) from high-resolution structures are invaluable in studying the relationship among structure, dynamics, and function. Here, starting from an in-depth evaluation of the metrics used for comparing the overlap between two ellipsoids, we applied normal-mode analysis (NMA) to predict the theoretical ADPs and then align them with experimental results. Adding an extra layer of explicitly treated water on protein surface significantly improved the energy minimization results and better reproduced the anisotropy of experimental ADPs. In comparing experimental and theoretical ADPs, we focused on the overlap in shape, the alignment of dominant directions, and the similarity in magnitude. The choices of water molecules, NMA methods, and the metrics for evaluating the overlap of ADPs determined final results. This study provides useful information for exploring the physical basis and the application potential of experimental ADPs. PMID:24673391

  15. Stress - Strain Response of the Human Spine Intervertebral Disc As an Anisotropic Body. Mathematical Modeling and Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minárová, Mária; Sumec, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the biomechanical investigation on the human lumbar intervertebral disc under the static load. The disc is regarded as a two - phased ambient consisting of a fibrous outer part called annulus fibrosis and a liquid inner part nucleus pulposus. Due to the fibrous structure, the annulus fibrosis can be treated by using a special case of anisotropy - transversal isotropy. In the paper the corresponding tensor of material constants is derived. The tensor consequently incomes to the constitutive equations determining the stress - strain relation in the material. In order to study the mechanical behaviour the disc is observed within the motion segment, the basic unit for motion tracing. The motion segment involves two neighbouring vertebrae and the intervertebral disc between them that connect them both. When constitutive equations are accomplished, they can be incorporated in the finite element analysis. The illustrative example of the intervertebral disc L2/L3, the disc between the second and the third lumbar vertebrae the lumbar part of spine, with its computer implementation is performed. Finally the comparison of the results of using anisotropic and homogenized approach is provided. The comparison illustrates the eligibility of such a kind of approach.

  16. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of anisotropic Si(100) etching: Modeling the chemical origins of characteristic etch morphologies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankush; Aldinger, Brandon S; Faggin, Marc F; Hines, Melissa A

    2010-07-28

    An atomistic, chemically realistic, kinetic Monte Carlo simulator of anisotropic Si(100) etching was developed. Surface silicon atoms were classified on the basis of their local structure, and all atoms of each class were etched with the same rate. A wide variety of morphologies, including rough, striped, and hillocked, was observed. General reactivity trends were correlated with specific morphological features. The production of long rows of unstrained dihydride species, recently observed in NH(4)F (aq) etching of Si(100), could only be explained by the rapid etching of dihydrides that are adjacent to (strained) monohydrides-so-called "alpha-dihydrides." Some etch kinetics promoted the formation of {111}-microfaceted pyramidal hillocks, similar in structure to those observed experimentally during Si(100) etching. Pyramid formation was intrinsic to the etch kinetics. In contrast with previously postulated mechanisms of pyramid formation, no masking agent (e.g., impurity, gas bubble) was required. Pyramid formation was explained in terms of the slow etch rate of the {111} sides, {110} edges, and the dihydride species that terminated the apex of the pyramid. As a result, slow etching of Si(111) surfaces was a necessary, but insufficient, criterion for microfacet formation on Si(100) surfaces.

  17. Mechanics of anisotropic plates and shells - A new look at an old subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1992-07-01

    A number of aspects of the mechanics of anisotropic plates and shells are discussed. The topics covered include computational models of anisotropic plates and shells, consequences of anisotropy on deformation couplings, symmetry types, stress concentrations and edge effects, and importance of transverse shear deformation; recent applications and recent advances in the modeling and analysis of anisotropic plates and shells; and new research directions.

  18. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  19. Constitutive Equation for Anisotropic Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, O.

    2006-12-01

    In many rocks, due to the existence of well-defined fabric elements such as bedding, layering, foliation or lamination planes, or due to the existence of linear structures, anisotropy can be important. The symmetries most frequently encountered are: transverse isotropy and orthotropy. By adopting both theoretical and experimental approaches, many authors have investigated the effect of the presence within the rock of pronounced anisotropic feature on the mechanical behavior in the elastic regime and on strength properties. Fewer attempts however have been made to capture the anisotropy of rocks in the plastic range. In this paper an elastic/viscoplastic non-associated constitutive equation for an initially transversely isotropic material is presented. The model captures the observed dependency of the elastic moduli on the stress state. The limit of the elastic domain is given by an yield function whose expression is a priori unknown and is determined from data. The basic assumption adopted is that the type of anisotropy of the rock does not change during the deformation process. The anisotropy is thus described by a fourth order tensor invariant with respect to any transformation belonging to the symmetry group of the material. This tensor is assumed to be constant: it does not depend on time nor on deformation; A is involved in the expression of the flow rule, of the yield function, and of the failure criterion in the form of a transformed stress tensor. The components of the anisotropic tensor A are determined from the compressive strengths in conjunction with an anisotropic short- term failure The irreversibility is supposed to be due to transient creep, the irreversible stress work per unit volume being considered as hardening parameter. The adequacy of the model is demonstrated by applying it to a stratified sedimentary rock, Tournemire shale.